WorldWideScience

Sample records for combustion related processes

  1. Chemical Processes Related to Combustion in Fluidised Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steenari, Britt-Marie; Lindqvist, Oliver [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry

    2002-12-01

    with evaluation of other biomass ash particles and, as an extension, the speciation of Cu and Zn will be studied as well. Ash fractions from combustion of MSW in a BFB boiler have been investigated regarding composition and leaching properties, i.e. environmental impact risks. The release of salts from the cyclone ash fraction can be minimised by the application of a simple washing process, thus securing that the leaching of soluble substances stays within the regulative limits. The MSW ash - water systems contain some interesting chemical issues, such as the interactions between Cr(VI) and reducing substances like Al-metal. The understanding of such chemical processes is important since it gives a possibility to predict effects of a change in ash composition. An even more detailed understanding of interactions between a solution containing ions and particle surfaces can be gained by theoretical modelling. In this project (and with additional unding from Aangpannefoereningens Forskningsstiftelse) a theoretical description of ion-ion interactions and the solid-liquid-interface has been developed. Some related issues are also included in this report. The publication of a paper on the reactions of ammonia in the presence of a calcining limestone surface is one of them. A review paper on the influence of combustion conditions on the properties of fly ash and its applicability as a cement replacement in concrete is another. The licentiate thesis describing the sampling and measurement of Cd in flue gas is also included since it was finalised during the present period. A co-operation project involving the Geology Dept. at Goeteborg Univ. and our group is briefly discussed. This project concerns the utilisation of granules produced from wood ash and dolomite as nutrient source for forest soil. Finally, the plans for our flue gas simulator facility are discussed.

  2. Lump wood combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  3. New class of combustion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzhanov, A.G.; Borovinskaya, I.P.

    1975-01-01

    A short review is given of the results of work carried out since 1967 on studying the combustion processes caused by the interaction of chemical elements in the condensed phase and leading to the formation of refractory compounds. New phenomena and processes are described which are revealed when investigating the combustion of the systems of this class, viz solid-phase combustion, fast combustion in the condensed phase, filtering combustion, combustion in liquid nitrogen, spinning combustion, self-oscillating combustion, and repeated combustion. A new direction in employment of combustion processes is discussed, viz. a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of refractory nitrides, carbides, borides, silicides and other compounds

  4. Catalytically enhanced combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel having improved combustion efficiency. It comprises a petroleum based liquid hydrocarbon; and a combustion catalyst comprising from about 18 to about 21 weight percent naphthalene, from about 75 to about 80 weight percent toluene, and from about 2.8 to about 3.2 weight percent benzyl alcohol

  5. Combustion behavior of spent solvent in a submerged combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Gunzo; Maeda, Mitsuru; Fujine, Sachio; Amakawa, Masayuki; Uchida, Katsuhide.

    1993-10-01

    An experimental study has been conducted in order to evaluate the applicability of a submerged combustion technique to the treatment of spent solvents contaminated with TRU elements. A bench-scale equipment of submerged combustor having combustion capacity of 1.39 liter of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) per hour was used to obtain process data such as the distribution behavior of radioactive nuclides in the submerged combustion process. This report describes the experimental results on the combustion characteristics of the simulated spent solvents of TBP and/or n-dodecane, and on the distribution behaviors of combustion products such as ruthenium and iodine in the submerged combustion process. (author)

  6. Ozone formation in relation with combustion processes in highly populated urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Avino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The complex chain of photochemical reactions is one of the most important tasks in the air quality evaluation, expecially in urban areas. In fact, in this case there are high emission levels of NOx and no-methane hydrocarbons by combustion processes such as autovehicular traffic, domestic heating and industrial plants. Ozone is not emitted directly into the atmosphere but it is formed from a complex series of reactions between emitted nitrogen oxides (NOx and reactive organic compounds (ROC. The high ozone concentrations, which occur during photochemical episodes, are usually accompanied by elevated concentrations of other photochemical oxidants such as nitric acid (HNO3, peroxyacylnitrates (PANs, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, etc. The complex series of these reactions constitutes the most important issue to the degradation of air quality. Further, the NMHCs play a key role in the formation of photochemical air pollution: they are considered as precursors for ozone production at the ground level when the sunlight and nitrogen oxides are present. From a practically point of view defining a quality standard or a limit is substantially correct but it is no sufficient to solve the problem. So it should become necessary to acquire knowledge on the different formation mechanisms of the photochemical pollution phenomena. In this paper there will be shown the results of a long-term study performed in Rome for evaluating the ozone formation in relationship with the autovehicular traffic density.

  7. Processing of hydroxyapatite obtained by combustion synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canillas, M.; Rivero, R.; García-Carrodeguas, R.; Barba, F.; Rodríguez, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    One of the reasons of implants failure are the stress forces appearing in the material–tissue interface due to the differences between their mechanical properties. For this reason, similar mechanical properties to the surrounding tissue are desirable. The synthesis of hydroxyapatite by solution combustion method and its processing have been studied in order to obtain fully dense ceramic bodies with improved mechanical strength. Combustion synthesis provides nanostructured powders characterized by a high surface area to facilitate the following sintering. Moreover, synthesis was conducted in aqueous and oxidizing media. Oxidizing media improve homogenization and increase the energy released during combustion. It gives rise to particles whose morphology and size suggest lower surface energies compared with aqueous media. The obtained powders were sintered by using a controlled sintering rate schedule. Lower surfaces energies minimize the shrinkage during sintering and relative densities measurements and diametral compression test confirm improved densification and consequently mechanical properties. [es

  8. Processing of hydroxyapatite obtained by combustion synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Canillas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the reasons of implants failure are the stress forces appearing in the material–tissue interface due to the differences between their mechanical properties. For this reason, similar mechanical properties to the surrounding tissue are desirable. The synthesis of hydroxyapatite by solution combustion method and its processing have been studied in order to obtain fully dense ceramic bodies with improved mechanical strength. Combustion synthesis provides nanostructured powders characterized by a high surface area to facilitate the following sintering. Moreover, synthesis was conducted in aqueous and oxidizing media. Oxidizing media improve homogenization and increase the energy released during combustion. It gives rise to particles whose morphology and size suggest lower surface energies compared with aqueous media. The obtained powders were sintered by using a controlled sintering rate schedule. Lower surfaces energies minimize the shrinkage during sintering and relative densities measurements and diametral compression test confirm improved densification and consequently mechanical properties.

  9. Cars diagnostics for combustion and plasma processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckbreth, A.C.; Stufflebeam, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is an analysis approach for nonintrusive temperature and species measurements in hostile environments. Widely utilized in combustion, it may be able to significantly impact materials processing research. CARS is described. Its applications to combustion and plasma process environments are reviewed and contrasted

  10. Problematic issues of air protection during thermal processes related to the energetic uses of sewage sludge and other waste. Case study: Co-combustion in peaking power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroncová, Emília; Ladomerský, Juraj; Musil, Juraj

    2018-03-01

    Currently, it is necessary to deal with issues related to the emissions as there is a constantly increasing interest in combusting sludge from sewage treatment plants in the boilers for wood. An analysis of the energetic importance of the combustion of sewage sludge has already been carried out, but the effects of various treatments of the sludge are not always clear, e.g. composting and subsequent combustion to the air pollution. Investments in other thermal processes of energetic utilisation of sewage sludge and organic waste are not always successfully implemented. The objective of this paper is to point out some problematic cases for acceptance of thermal processes related to energetic use of waste in terms of the air protection. The other aim is to mention the experience with solutions of such issues in Slovakia. There are mentioned first results of the operational validation experiments during the energy generation in circulating fluidized bed boiler in peaking power plant (Power 110MW) with the addition of the so-called alternative fuel based on wood and sewage sludge to the main fuel - black coal (anthracite). And there has already been achieved the highest share of 12.4%w. (dry matter) of sewage sludge in form of compost in blend with black coal, which is technologically viable. Moreover analyzed the problems of the authorization and operation of the co-combustion of sewage sludge and of combustion of products of various kinds of pyrolysis waste - pyrolysis gas and pyrolysis oil are analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Understanding Combustion Processes Through Microgravity Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1998-01-01

    A review of research on the effects of gravity on combustion processes is presented, with an emphasis on a discussion of the ways in which reduced-gravity experiments and modeling has led to new understanding. Comparison of time scales shows that the removal of buoyancy-induced convection leads to manifestations of other transport mechanisms, notably radiative heat transfer and diffusional processes such as Lewis number effects. Examples from premixed-gas combustion, non-premixed gas-jet flames, droplet combustion, flame spread over solid and liquid fuels, and other fields are presented. Promising directions for new research are outlined, the most important of which is suggested to be radiative reabsorption effects in weakly burning flames.

  12. Internal Heterogeneous Processes in Aluminum Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, E. L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the aluminum particle combustion mechanism which has been expanded by inclusion of gas dissolution processes and ensuing internal phase transformations. This mechanism is proposed based on recent normal and microgravity experiments with particles formed and ignited in a pulsed micro-arc. Recent experimental findings on the three stages observed in Al particle combustion in air and shows the burning particle radiation, trajectory (streak), smoke cloud shapes, and quenched particle interiors are summarized. During stage I, the radiation trace is smooth and the particle flame is spherically symmetric. The temperature measured using a three-color pyrometer is close to 3000 K. Because it exceeds the aluminum boiling point (2730 K), this temperature most likely characterizes the vapor phase flame zone rather than the aluminum surface. The dissolved oxygen content within particles quenched during stage I was below the detection sensitivity (about 1 atomic %) for Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy (WDS). After an increase in the radiation intensity (and simultaneous decrease in the measured color temperature from about 3000 to 2800 K) indicative of the transition to stage II combustion, the internal compositions of the quenched particles change. Both oxygen-rich (approx. 10 atomic %) and oxygen-lean (combustion behavior and the evolution of its internal composition, the change from the spherically symmetric to asymmetric flame shape occurring upon the transition from stage I to stage II combustion could not be understood based only on the fact that dissolved oxygen is detected in the particles. The connection between the two phenomena appeared even less significant because in earlier aluminum combustion studies carried in O2/Ar mixtures, flame asymmetry was not observed as opposed to experiments in air or O2/CO mixtures. It has been proposed that the presence of other gases, i.e., hydrogen, or nitrogen causes the change in the combustion regime.

  13. Advanced Fuels and Combustion Processes for Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    production from biomass steam reforming – Conduct a feasibility analysis of the proposed integrated process Energia Technologies - D. Nguyen & K. Parimi...strength foam material development by Ultramet – Combustion experiments performed U. Of Alabama – End-user input provided by Solar Turbines Major

  14. Experimental evaluation of main emissions during coal processing waste combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, Margarita A; Legros, Jean C; Strizhak, Pavel A

    2018-02-01

    The total volume of the coal processing wastes (filter cakes) produced by Russia, China, and India is as high as dozens of millions of tons per year. The concentrations of CO and CO 2 in the emissions from the combustion of filter cakes have been measured directly for the first time. They are the biggest volume of coal processing wastes. There have been many discussions about using these wastes as primary or secondary components of coal-water slurries (CWS) and coal-water slurries containing petrochemicals (CWSP). Boilers have already been operationally tested in Russia for the combustion of CWSP based on filter cakes. In this work, the concentrations of hazardous emissions have been measured at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000°С. The produced CO and CO 2 concentrations are shown to be practically constant at high temperatures (over 900°С) for all the coal processing wastes under study. Experiments have shown the feasibility to lowering the combustion temperatures of coal processing wastes down to 750-850°С. This provides sustainable combustion and reduces the CO and CO 2 emissions 1.2-1.7 times. These relatively low temperatures ensure satisfactory environmental and energy performance of combustion. Using CWS and CWSP instead of conventional solid fuels significantly reduces NO x and SO x emissions but leaves CO and CO 2 emissions practically at the same level as coal powder combustion. Therefore, the environmentally friendly future (in terms of all the main atmospheric emissions: CO, CO 2 , NO x , and SO x ) of both CWS and CWSP technologies relies on low-temperature combustion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermodynamics of Gases: Combustion Processes, Analysed in Slow Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    We present a number of simple demonstration experiments recorded with high-speed cameras in the fields of gas dynamics and thermal physics. The experiments feature relatively slow combustion processes of pure hydrogen as well as fast reactions involving oxy-hydrogen in a stoichiometric mixture. (Contains 4 figures.)

  16. Unsteady Processes in Solid Propellant Combustion,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    0—AflO ~5a INSTITUTO NACIONAL DE TECNICA AEROESPACIAL MADRID (SPAIN) F/S 21/9.2UNSTEADY PROCESSES IN SOLID PROPELLANT COMBUSTION . (U) MAY...PRO C E SS E S IN SOLID P R O P E L L A N T C O M B U S T I O N H A. Crespo and M. Kindelán Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial Madrid , Spain j

  17. Effect of Variant End of Injection Period on Combustion Process of Biodiesel Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Amir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative fuel as a replacement to the standard diesel fuel in combustion diesel engine. The biodiesel fuel has a significantly influences throughout the combustion process and exhaust emission. The purpose of this research is to investigate the combustion process behavior during the End of Injection (EOI period and operates under variant conditions using Rapid Compression Machine (RCM. Experimental of RCM is used to simulate a combustion process and combustion characteristics of diesel engine combustion. Three types of biodiesel blend which are B5, B10 and B15 were tested at several injection pressures of 80 MPa, 90 MPa and 130 MPa under different ambient temperatures, 750 K to 1100 K. The results of this study showed that the ignition delay slightly reduced with increasing the content of biodiesel blends from B5, B10 and B15 and became more shorten as the injection pressure been enhanced. As the injection pressure increased, the behavior of combustion pressure at end of injection is reduced, radically increased the NOX emission. It is noted that the process of combustion at the end of injection increased as the ambient temperature is rising. In fact, higher initial ambient temperature improved the fuel atomization and mixing process. Under the biodiesel combustion with higher ambient temperature condition, the exhaust emission of CO, O2, and HC became less but increased in NOX emission. Besides, increased in blends of biodiesel ratio are found to enhance the combustion process, resulted a decreased in HC emissions.

  18. Hydrothermal processing of transuranic contaminated combustible waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelow, S.J.; Worl, L.; Harradine, D.; Padilla, D.; McInroy, R.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated the usefulness of hydrothermal processing for the disposal of a wide variety of transuranic contaminated combustible wastes. This paper provides an overview of the implementation and performance of hydrothermal treatment for concentrated salt solutions, explosives, propellants, organic solvents, halogenated solvents, and laboratory trash, such as paper and plastics. Reaction conditions vary from near ambient temperatures and pressure to over 1000degC and 100 MPa pressure. Studies involving both radioactive and non-radioactive waste simulants are discussed. (author)

  19. Hydrothermal processing of radioactive combustible waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worl, L.A.; Buelow, S.J.; Harradine, D.; Le, L.; Padilla, D.D.; Roberts, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrothermal processing has been demonstrated for the treatment of radioactive combustible materials for the US Department of Energy. A hydrothermal processing system was designed, built and tested for operation in a plutonium glovebox. Presented here are results from the study of the hydrothermal oxidation of plutonium and americium contaminated organic wastes. Experiments show the destruction of the organic component to CO 2 and H 2 O, with 30 wt.% H 2 O 2 as an oxidant, at 540 C and 46.2 MPa. The majority of the actinide component forms insoluble products that are easily separated by filtration. A titanium liner in the reactor and heat exchanger provide corrosion resistance for the oxidation of chlorinated organics. The treatment of solid material is accomplished by particle size reduction and the addition of a viscosity enhancing agent to generate a homogeneous pumpable mixture

  20. Impacts of Combustion Conditions and Photochemical Processing on the Light Absorption of Biomass Combustion Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsson, J; Eriksson, A C; Nielsen, I Elbæk; Malmborg, V Berg; Ahlberg, E; Andersen, C; Lindgren, R; Nyström, R; Nordin, E Z; Brune, W H; Svenningsson, B; Swietlicki, E; Boman, C; Pagels, J H

    2015-12-15

    The aim was to identify relationships between combustion conditions, particle characteristics, and optical properties of fresh and photochemically processed emissions from biomass combustion. The combustion conditions included nominal and high burn rate operation and individual combustion phases from a conventional wood stove. Low temperature pyrolysis upon fuel addition resulted in "tar-ball" type particles dominated by organic aerosol with an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 2.5-2.7 and estimated Brown Carbon contributions of 50-70% to absorption at the climate relevant aethalometer-wavelength (520 nm). High temperature combustion during the intermediate (flaming) phase was dominated by soot agglomerates with AAE 1.0-1.2 and 85-100% of absorption at 520 nm attributed to Black Carbon. Intense photochemical processing of high burn rate flaming combustion emissions in an oxidation flow reactor led to strong formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol, with no or weak absorption. PM1 mass emission factors (mg/kg) of fresh emissions were about an order of magnitude higher for low temperature pyrolysis compared to high temperature combustion. However, emission factors describing the absorption cross section emitted per kg of fuel consumed (m(2)/kg) were of similar magnitude at 520 nm for the diverse combustion conditions investigated in this study. These results provide a link between biomass combustion conditions, emitted particle types, and their optical properties in fresh and processed plumes which can be of value for source apportionment and balanced mitigation of biomass combustion emissions from a climate and health perspective.

  1. Signal Processing Methods for Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Spontaneous Stability and Rough Combustion Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Casiano, Matthew; Fischbach, Sean; Hulka, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid rocket engine combustion stability assessments are traditionally broken into three categories: dynamic stability, spontaneous stability, and rough combustion. This work focuses on comparing the spontaneous stability and rough combustion assessments for several liquid engine programs. The techniques used are those developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the J-2X Workhorse Gas Generator program. Stability assessment data from the Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD), FASTRAC, and Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) programs are compared against previously processed J-2X Gas Generator data. Prior metrics for spontaneous stability assessments are updated based on the compilation of all data sets.

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of turbulent combustion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. P.

    2002-08-01

    The application of Large Eddy Simulation to Turbulent Combusting flows is described and results are presented for a turbulent hydrogen-air jet flame and for a model can-type gas turbine Combustion chamber. In both cases the results are in good agreement with measurements. For the hydrogen flame and in contrast to the results of other approaches the profiles of all quantities and the rate of spread of the jet were all accurately reproduced by the computations without any modification to the model constants being necessary.

  3. Gas permeation process for post combustion CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, Marc

    2017-01-01

    CO 2 Capture and Storage (CCS) is a promising solution to separate CO 2 from flue gas, to reduce the CO 2 emissions in the atmosphere, and hence to reduce global warming. In CCS, one important constraint is the high additional energy requirement of the different capture processes. That statement is partly explained by the low CO 2 fraction in the inlet flue gas and the high output targets in terms of CO 2 capture and purity (≥90%). Gas permeation across dense membrane can be used in post combustion CO 2 capture. Gas permeation in a dense membrane is ruled by a mass transfer mechanism and separation performance in a dense membrane are characterized by component's effective permeability and selectivity. One of the newest and encouraging type of membrane in terms of separation performance is the facilitated transport membrane. Each particular type of membrane is defined by a specific mass transfer law. The most important difference to the mass transfer behavior in a dense membrane is related to the facilitated transport mechanism and the solution diffusion mechanism and its restrictions and limitations. Permeation flux modelling across a dense membrane is required to perform a post combustion CO 2 capture process simulation. A CO 2 gas permeation separation process is composed of a two-steps membrane process, one drying step and a compression unit. Simulation on the energy requirement and surface area of the different membrane modules in the global system are useful to determine the benefits of using dense membranes in a post combustion CO 2 capture technology. (author)

  4. IMPROVED COMBUSTION PROCESSES IN MEDICAL WASTES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A small rig was designed for conducting tests on the incineration of rural clinical wastes in Botswana. Experimental results showed that if proper combustion conditions are applied to low technology rural clinical waste incinerators, the operating temperatures could increase from around 400 to above 850oC. It was ...

  5. Energy balance of a wood biomass combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggio, P.; Cemin, A.; Grigiante, M.; Ragazzi, M.

    2001-01-01

    This article reports the results of a project developed at the University of Trent dealing with some wood biomass combustion processes. The project has been particularly dedicated to the study of the energetic analysis of the combustion processes that occur on a gasified wood stove of advanced combustion technologies. A considerable number of experimental tests has been carried out making use of different type of wood widely in use in Trentino region. The wood stove is a part of a pilot plant providing an hydraulic circuit equipped with a specific apparatus to measure all the necessary data to determine the energy balance required and specifically the thermal efficiency of the plant [it

  6. Modeling of large-scale oxy-fuel combustion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2012-01-01

    Quite some studies have been conducted in order to implement oxy-fuel combustion with flue gas recycle in conventional utility boilers as an effective effort of carbon capture and storage. However, combustion under oxy-fuel conditions is significantly different from conventional air-fuel firing......, among which radiative heat transfer under oxy-fuel conditions is one of the fundamental issues. This paper demonstrates the nongray-gas effects in modeling of large-scale oxy-fuel combustion processes. Oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas in a 609MW utility boiler is numerically studied, in which...... calculation of the oxy-fuel WSGGM remarkably over-predicts the radiative heat transfer to the furnace walls and under-predicts the gas temperature at the furnace exit plane, which also result in a higher incomplete combustion in the gray calculation. Moreover, the gray and non-gray calculations of the same...

  7. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Brand

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires, and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature, sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio

  8. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Vi H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratton, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wray, Craig P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    In many residential building retrofit programs, air tightening to increase energy efficiency is constrained by concerns about related impacts on the safety of naturally vented combustion appliances. Tighter housing units more readily depressurize when exhaust equipment is operated, making combustion appliances more prone to backdraft or spillage. Several test methods purportedly assess the potential for depressurization-induced backdrafting and spillage, but these tests are not robustly reliable and repeatable predictors of venting performance, in part because they do not fully capture weather effects on venting performance. The purpose of this literature review is to investigate combustion safety diagnostics in existing codes, standards, and guidelines related to combustion appliances. This review summarizes existing combustion safety test methods, evaluations of these test methods, and also discusses research related to wind effects and the simulation of vent system performance. Current codes and standards related to combustion appliance installation provide little information on assessing backdrafting or spillage potential. A substantial amount of research has been conducted to assess combustion appliance backdrafting and spillage test methods, but primarily focuses on comparing short-term (stress) induced tests and monitoring results. Monitoring, typically performed over one week, indicated that combinations of environmental and house operation characteristics most conducive to combustion spillage were rare. Research, to an extent, has assessed existing combustion safety diagnostics for house depressurization, but the objectives of the diagnostics, both stress and monitoring, are not clearly defined. More research is also needed to quantify the frequency of test “failure” occurrence throughout the building stock and assess the statistical effects of weather (especially wind) on house depressurization and in turn on combustion appliance venting

  9. Assessment of combustion and related issues in the DWPF and ITP waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.

    1994-04-01

    This report presents a review of the safety analyses described in the DWPF Safety Analysis Report, the combustion analysis of the ITP Tanks 48 and 49, and presents conclusions drawn from interviews staff on issues related to accident analysis, in particular on issues related to combustion phenomena. The major objectives of this report are to clarify the issues related to the modes of combustion and expected loads on process vessels and structures and, in addition, to offer recommendations which would improve the defense-in-depth posture of the DWPF

  10. Challenges in simulation of chemical processes in combustion furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Kilpinen, P. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The presentation gives an introduction to some of the present issues and problems in treating the complex chemical processes in combustion. The focus is in the coupling of the hydrocarbon combustion process with nitrogen oxide formation and destruction chemistry in practical furnaces or flames. Detailed kinetic modelling based on schemes of elementary reactions are shown to be a useful novel tool for identifying and studying the key reaction paths for nitrogen oxide formation and destruction in various systems. The great importance of the interaction between turbulent mixing and combustion chemistry is demonstrated by the sensitivity of both methane oxidation chemistry and fuel nitrogen conversion chemistry to the reactor and mixing pattern chosen for the kinetic calculations. The fluidized bed combustion (FBC) nitrogen chemistry involves several important heterogeneous reactions. Particularly the char in the bed plays an essential role. Recent research has advanced rapidly and the presentation proposes an overall picture of the fuel nitrogen reaction routes in circulating FBC conditions. (author)

  11. Method of processing combustible nuclear waste material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.R.; Greenhalgh, W.O.; Cowan, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    In treating combustible radio-waste which may contain volatile radio nuclides, e.g. Ru, the waste is heated and agitated with concentrated sulphuric acid, and the resulting residue which comprises elemental carbon which retains the volatile radio-nuclides is separated from the acid. Compounds which form borosilicate glass may be added to the waste, and after removal of sulphate, the resulting residual mixture may be fused into a glass. If the sulphate is not removed from the borosilicate mix, the residual mixture produces a ceramic product on heating. (author)

  12. International evaluation of the programme on engine-related combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcoumanis, D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Greenhalgh, D. [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom); Magnusson, B.F. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Peters, N. [Institut fuer Technische Mechanik, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    The 12 projects in the engine related combustion programme cover the entire range from fundamental and theoretical aspects of combustion to more applied subjects such as engine control. The common denominator in the programme clearly is the internal combustion engine, both the reciprocating as well as the gas turbine engine. Such a large coverage by a relatively small number of projects necessarily leads to an isolation of some of the projects in terms of their subject as well as the methodology that is used. On the other hand, all the research areas of interest in combustion technology are represented by at least one of the projects. These are: mathematical and numerical methods in combustion; modelling of turbulent combustion; laser diagnostics of flows with combustion; studies of engine performance and their control; semi-empirical model development for practical applications. As a conclusion, the evaluation committee believes that the programme is well balanced between fundamental and applied projects. It covers the entire range of modern methodologies that are used on the international level and thereby contributes to the application and further development of these research tools in Sweden

  13. Numerical Studies on Controlling Gaseous Fuel Combustion by Managing the Combustion Process of Diesel Pilot Dose in a Dual-Fuel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulski Maciej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Protection of the environment and counteracting global warming require finding alternative sources of energy. One of the methods of generating energy from environmentally friendly sources is increasing the share of gaseous fuels in the total energy balance. The use of these fuels in compression-ignition (CI engines is difficult due to their relatively high autoignition temperature. One solution for using these fuels in CI engines is operating in a dualfuel mode, where the air and gas mixture is ignited with a liquid fuel dose. In this method, a series of relatively complex chemical processes occur in the engine's combustion chamber, related to the combustion of individual fuel fractions that interact with one another. Analysis of combustion of specific fuels in this type of fuel injection to the engine is difficult due to the fact that combustion of both fuel fractions takes place simultaneously. Simulation experiments can be used to analyse the impact of diesel fuel combustion on gaseous fuel combustion. In this paper, we discuss the results of simulation tests of combustion, based on the proprietary multiphase model of a dual-fuel engine. The results obtained from the simulation allow for analysis of the combustion process of individual fuels separately, which expands the knowledge obtained from experimental tests on the engine.

  14. Steam generation by combustion of processed waste fats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudel, F.; Lengenfeld, P. [OEHMI Forschung und Ingenieurtechnik GmbH, Magdeburg (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    The use of specially processed waste fats as a fuel oil substitute offers, at attractive costs, an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional disposal like refuse incineration or deposition. For that purpose the processed fat is mixed with EL fuel oil and burned in a standard steam generation plant equipped with special accessories. The measured emission values of the combustion processes are very low.

  15. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  16. Processing of combustible α-wastes. A summary of research and development to date with an evaluation of the development potential of the processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieczorek, H.; Hild, W.

    On the basis of currently available literature six processes involving the oxidative treatment of combustible α-bearing wastes are described and discussed. The Wet Combustion in sulfuric/nitric acid at 250 0 C has the highest development potential. This is due to a relatively simple process, a relative low apparative requirement and the possibility of Plutonium recovery

  17. Synthesis of Diopside by Solution Combustion Process Using Glycine Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherikar, Baburao N.; Umarji, A. M.

    Nano ceramic Diopside (CaMgSi2O6) powders are synthesized by Solution Combustion Process(SCS) using Calcium nitrate, Magnesium nitrate as oxidizer and glycine as fuel, fumed silica as silica source. Ammonium nitrate (AN) is used as extra oxidizer. Effect of AN on Diopside phase formation is investigated. The adiabatic flame temperatures are calculated theoretically for varying amount of AN according to thermodynamic concept and correlated with the observed flame temperatures. A “Multi channel thermocouple setup connected to computer interfaced Keithley multi voltmeter 2700” is used to monitor the thermal events during the process. An interpretation based on maximum combustion temperature and the amount of gases produced during reaction for various AN compositions has been proposed for the nature of combustion and its correlation with the characteristics of as synthesized powder. These powders are characterized by XRD, SEM showing that the powders are composed of polycrystalline oxides with crystallite size of 58nm to 74nm.

  18. Chief Inspector's guidance to inspectors: combustion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Note is issued by the Chief Inspector of Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution (HMIP) as one of a series providing guidance for processes prescribed for integrated pollution control in Regulations made under Section 2 of the United Kingdom Environmental Protection Act 1990. It covers the burning of solid fuel manufactured from or comprised of tyres, tyre rubber or similar rubber waste primarily for the purpose of producing energy, in an appliance with a net rated thermal input of 3 megawatts or more. The note includes: a list of prescribed substances most likely to be present in releases to the environment by the processes considered; release limits for release to air, water and land; an outline of techniques for pollution abatement; monitoring requirements. (Author)

  19. Processing of combustible radioactive waste using incineration techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maestas, E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Member countries numerous incineration concepts are being studied as potential methods for conditioning alpha-bearing and other types of combustible radioactive waste. The common objective of these different processes is volume reduction and the transformation of the waste to a more acceptable waste form. Because the combustion processes reduce the mass and volume of waste to a form which is generally more inert than the feed material, the resulting waste can be more uniformly compatible with safe handling, packaging, storage and/or disposal techniques. The number of different types of combustion process designed and operating specifically for alpha-bearing wastes is somewhat small compared with those for non-alpha radioactive wastes; however, research and development is under way in a number of countries to develop and improve alpha incinerators. This paper provides an overview of most alpha-incineration concepts in operation or under development in OECD/NEA Member countries. The special features of each concept are briefly discussed. A table containing characteristic data of incinerators is presented so that a comparison of the major programmes can be made. The table includes the incinerator name and location, process type, capacity throughput, operational status and application. (author)

  20. A review of internal combustion engine combustion chamber process studies at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schock, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of internal combustion stratified-charge engines is highly dependent on the in-cylinder fuel-air mixing processes occurring in these engines. Current research concerning the in-cylinder airflow characteristics of rotary and piston engines is presented. Results showing the output of multidimensional models, laser velocimetry measurements and the application of a holographic optical element are described. Models which simulate the four-stroke cycle and seal dynamics of rotary engines are also discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N84-24999

  1. Reconstruction of an engine combustion process with a neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, P.J.; Gu, F.; Ball, A.D. [School of Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The cylinder pressure waveform in an internal combustion engine is one of the most important parameters in describing the engine combustion process. It is used for a range of diagnostic tasks such as identification of ignition faults or mechanical wear in the cylinders. However, it is very difficult to measure this parameter directly. Never-the-less, the cylinder pressure may be inferred from other more readily obtainable parameters. In this presentation it is shown how a Radial Basis Function network, which may be regarded as a form of neural network, may be used to model the cylinder pressure as a function of the instantaneous crankshaft velocity, recorded with a simple magnetic sensor. The application of the model is demonstrated on a four cylinder DI diesel engine with data from a wide range of speed and load settings. The prediction capabilities of the model once trained are validated against measured data. (orig.) 4 refs.

  2. Influence of Process Parameters on Coal Combustion Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lans, Robert Pieter Van Der

    The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of nitrogen oxide formation and carbon burnout during the combustion of pulverized coal, and to contribute to addressing the potential of chemical engineering models for the prediction of furnace temperatures, NO emissions and the amount...... of carbon in ash. To this purpose, the effect of coal quality on NO and burnout has been investigated experimentally, a radiation heat balance has been developed based on simple chemical engineering methodology, and a mixing study has been conducted in order to describe the near burner macro mixing in terms...... with self-sustaining flames, while extensions are made to full scale boilers and furnace modeling. Since coal combustion and flame aerodynamics are reviewed elsewhere, these phenomena are only treated briefly. The influence of coal type and process conditions on NO formation and carbon burnout has been...

  3. The use of combined classification for analysis of the combustion process state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    In present work comparison combined image classification method of co-firing biomass and pulverized coal are proposed. The images were captured by vision monitoring system with camera and a borescope. Presented research is related with 20% weight fraction of the biomass. Defined two class of combustion: stable and unstable for nine variants with different power, secondary air value parameters and fixed amount biomass. Used combined classification of algorithm (MLP, SVM, k-NN, LDA, QDA) to classify flame image which correspond with the state of the combustion process.

  4. PCDD/PCDF reduction by the co-combustion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vinci K C; Cheung, Wai-Hung; McKay, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    A novel process, termed the co-combustion process, has been developed and designed to utilise the thermal treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) in cement clinker production and reduce PCDD/PCDF emissions. To test the conceptual design; detailed engineering design of the process and equipment was performed and a pilot plant was constructed to treat up to 40 tonnes MSW per day. The novel process features included several units external to the main traditional cement rotary kiln: an external calcinations unit in which the hot gas calcined the limestone thus making significant energy savings for this chemical reaction; the lime generated was used in a second chamber to act as a giant acid gas scrubber to remove SOx and particularly HCl (a source of chloride); an external rotary kiln and secondary combustion unit capable of producing a hot gas at 1200 degrees C; a gas cooler to simulate a boiler turbogenerator set for electricity generation; the incorporation of some of the bottom ash, calcined lime and dust collector solids into the cement clinker. A PCDD/PCDF inventory has been completed for the entire process and measured PCDD/PCDF emissions were 0.001 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3) on average which is 1% of the best practical means [Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department, 2001. A guidance note on the best practicable means for incinerators (municipal waste incineration), BPM12/1] MSW incineration emission limit values.

  5. Ignition and wave processes in combustion of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, Nickolai M; Alymov, Michail I

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the application of classical combustion theory to ignition and flame propagation in solid-solid and gas-solid systems. It presents experimental investigations in the areas of local ignition, filtration combustion, self-propagating high temperature synthesis and nanopowders protection. The authors highlight analytical formulas used in different areas of combustion in solids and propose an approach based on classical combustion theory. The book attempts to analyze the basic approaches to understanding of solid-solid and solid - gas combustion presented in contemporary literature in a unified approach based on classical combustion theory. .

  6. Characterising Combustion in Diesel Engines : Using parameterised finite stage cylinder process models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Characterising combustion of diesel engines is not only necessary when researching the instantaneous combustion phenomena but also when investigating the change of the combustion process under variable engine operating conditions. An effective way to achieve this goal is to parameterize the

  7. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, V. H.; Less, B. D.; Singer, B. C.; Stratton, J. C.; Wray, C. P.

    2015-02-01

    In many residential building retrofit programs, air tightening to increase energy efficiency is often constrained by safety concerns with naturally vented combustion appliances. Tighter residential buildings more readily depressurize when exhaust equipment is operated, making combustion appliances more prone to backdraft or spill combustion exhaust into the living space. Several measures, such as installation guidelines, vent sizing codes, and combustion safety diagnostics, are in place with the intent to prevent backdrafting and combustion spillage, but the diagnostics conflict and the risk mitigation objective is inconsistent. This literature review summarizes the metrics and diagnostics used to assess combustion safety, documents their technical basis, and investigates their risk mitigations. It compiles information from the following: codes for combustion appliance venting and installation; standards and guidelines for combustion safety diagnostics; research evaluating combustion safety diagnostics; research investigating wind effects on building depressurization and venting; and software for simulating vent system performance.

  8. New approaches for description of nitrogen chemistry in combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Kilpinen, P.; Nordstroem, T. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-10-01

    The aim of the project is to assist in development of more efficient in-furnace control methods for nitrogen oxide emission from energy conversion technologies based on combustion and/or gasification. Main emphasis in put on technologies such as fluidized bed combustion (CFBC, BFBC) and combined cycle processes (PFBC, IGCC). The project consists of two parts: (a) detailed kinetic elementary reaction modelling and (b) prediction of NO{sub x} emission from full scale combustors. The following topics have been studied during 1996: (a) Detailed kinetic modelling Effect of HCl on CO burn-out under FBC freeboard conditions. Effect of pressure on the Thermal DeNO{sub x} process under PFBC conditions. Mechanism of NH{sub 3} destruction to N{sub 2} by selective oxidation (SO): -the importance of formation of NO{sub 2} from NO and O{sub 2} at low temperatures. (b) Prediction of NO{sub x} emission from full scale combustors Prediction of NO{sub x} emission from BFBC freeboard: a case study using flow tubes and detailed chemistry. The work has been made partly in collaboration with VTT Energy (projects 213 and 214) and Tampere University of Technology (project 210). (orig.)

  9. Application of pulse combustion technology in spray drying process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Zbicinski

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents development of valved pulse combustor designed for application in drying process and drying tests performed in a specially built installation. Laser technique was applied to investigate the flow field and structure of dispersed phase during pulse combustion spray drying process. PDA technique was used to determine initial atomization parameters as well as particle size distribution, velocity of the particles, mass concentration of liquid phase in the cross section of spray stream, etc., in the drying chamber during drying tests. Water was used to estimate the level of evaporation and 5 and 10% solutions of sodium chloride to carry out drying tests. The Computational Fluid Dynamics technique was used to perform theoretical predictions of time-dependent velocity, temperature distribution and particle trajectories in the drying chamber. Satisfactory agreement between calculations and experimental results was found in certain regions of the drying chamber.

  10. Analysis of selected problems of biomass combustion process in batch boilers - experimental and numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szubel, Mateusz

    2016-03-01

    It is possible to list numerous groups of heating units that are used in households, such as boilers, stoves and units used as supporting heat sources, namely fireplaces. In each case, however, the same operational problems may be evoked [1]. To understand the causes of energy losses in a boiler system, a proper definition of significant elements of the unit's heat balance is necessary. In the group of energy losses, the flue gas loss and the incomplete combustion loss are the most significant factors. The problem with the loss resulting from incomplete combustion, which is related to the presence of combustible substances in the exhaust, is especially significant in case of biomass boilers [2, 3]. The paper presents results of the research and the optimisation of the biomass combustion process in the 180 kW batch boiler. The studies described have been focused on the reduction of the pollutants emission, which was primarily realised by the modifications of the air feeding system. Results of the experiments and the CFD simulations have been compared and discussed. Both in case of the model as well as the experiment, positive influence of the modifications on the emission have been observed.

  11. Analysis of selected problems of biomass combustion process in batch boilers - experimental and numerical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szubel Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is possible to list numerous groups of heating units that are used in households, such as boilers, stoves and units used as supporting heat sources, namely fireplaces. In each case, however, the same operational problems may be evoked [1]. To understand the causes of energy losses in a boiler system, a proper definition of significant elements of the unit’s heat balance is necessary. In the group of energy losses, the flue gas loss and the incomplete combustion loss are the most significant factors. The problem with the loss resulting from incomplete combustion, which is related to the presence of combustible substances in the exhaust, is especially significant in case of biomass boilers [2, 3]. The paper presents results of the research and the optimisation of the biomass combustion process in the 180 kW batch boiler. The studies described have been focused on the reduction of the pollutants emission, which was primarily realised by the modifications of the air feeding system. Results of the experiments and the CFD simulations have been compared and discussed. Both in case of the model as well as the experiment, positive influence of the modifications on the emission have been observed.

  12. In situ high-temperature gas sensors: continuous monitoring of the combustion quality of different wood combustion systems and optimization of combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kohler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The sensing characteristics and long-term stability of different kinds of CO ∕ HC gas sensors (non-Nernstian mixed potential type during in situ operation in flue gas from different types of low-power combustion systems (wood-log- and wood-chip-fuelled were investigated. The sensors showed representative but individual sensing behaviour with respect to characteristically varying flue gas composition over the combustion process. The long-term sensor signal stability evaluated by repeated exposure to CO ∕ H2 ∕ N2 ∕ synthetic air mixtures showed no sensitivity loss after operation in the flue gas. Particularly for one of the sensors (Heraeus GmbH, this high signal stability was observed in a field test experiment even during continuous operation in the flue gas of the wood-chip firing system over 4 months. Furthermore, it was experimentally shown that the signals of these CO ∕ HC sensing elements yield important additional information about the wood combustion process. This was demonstrated by the adaptation of an advanced combustion airstream control algorithm on a wood-log-fed fireplace and by the development of a combustion quality monitoring system for wood-chip-fed central heaters.

  13. Gaussian process regression based optimal design of combustion systems using flame images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Junghui; Chan, Lester Lik Teck; Cheng, Yi-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The digital color images of flames are applied to combustion design. • The combustion with modeling stochastic nature is developed using GP. • GP based uncertainty design is made and evaluated through a real combustion system. - Abstract: With the advanced methods of digital image processing and optical sensing, it is possible to have continuous imaging carried out on-line in combustion processes. In this paper, a method that extracts characteristics from the flame images is presented to immediately predict the outlet content of the flue gas. First, from the large number of flame image data, principal component analysis is used to discover the principal components or combinational variables, which describe the important trends and variations in the operation data. Then stochastic modeling of the combustion process is done by a Gaussian process with the aim to capture the stochastic nature of the flame associated with the oxygen content. The designed oxygen combustion content considers the uncertainty presented in the combustion. A reference image can be designed for the actual combustion process to provide an easy and straightforward maintenance of the combustion process

  14. Signal Processing Methods for Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Stability Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Lee, Erik; Hulka, James R.; Casiano, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The J2X Gas Generator engine design specifications include dynamic, spontaneous, and broadband combustion stability requirements. These requirements are verified empirically based high frequency chamber pressure measurements and analyses. Dynamic stability is determined with the dynamic pressure response due to an artificial perturbation of the combustion chamber pressure (bomb testing), and spontaneous and broadband stability are determined from the dynamic pressure responses during steady operation starting at specified power levels. J2X Workhorse Gas Generator testing included bomb tests with multiple hardware configurations and operating conditions, including a configuration used explicitly for engine verification test series. This work covers signal processing techniques developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to help assess engine design stability requirements. Dynamic stability assessments were performed following both the CPIA 655 guidelines and a MSFC in-house developed statistical-based approach. The statistical approach was developed to better verify when the dynamic pressure amplitudes corresponding to a particular frequency returned back to pre-bomb characteristics. This was accomplished by first determining the statistical characteristics of the pre-bomb dynamic levels. The pre-bomb statistical characterization provided 95% coverage bounds; these bounds were used as a quantitative measure to determine when the post-bomb signal returned to pre-bomb conditions. The time for post-bomb levels to acceptably return to pre-bomb levels was compared to the dominant frequency-dependent time recommended by CPIA 655. Results for multiple test configurations, including stable and unstable configurations, were reviewed. Spontaneous stability was assessed using two processes: 1) characterization of the ratio of the peak response amplitudes to the excited chamber acoustic mode amplitudes and 2) characterization of the variability of the peak response

  15. Combustion and Magnetohydrodynamic Processes in Advanced Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Lord Kahil

    A number of promising alternative rocket propulsion concepts have been developed over the past two decades that take advantage of unsteady combustion waves in order to produce thrust. These concepts include the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE), in which repetitive ignition, propagation, and reflection of detonations and shocks can create a high pressure chamber from which gases may be exhausted in a controlled manner. The Pulse Detonation Rocket Induced Magnetohydrodynamic Ejector (PDRIME) is a modification of the basic PDRE concept, developed by Cambier (1998), which has the potential for performance improvements based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thrust augmentation. The PDRIME has the advantage of both low combustion chamber seeding pressure, per the PDRE concept, and efficient energy distribution in the system, per the rocket-induced MHD ejector (RIME) concept of Cole, et al. (1995). In the initial part of this thesis, we explore flow and performance characteristics of different configurations of the PDRIME, assuming quasi-one-dimensional transient flow and global representations of the effects of MHD phenomena on the gas dynamics. By utilizing high-order accurate solvers, we thus are able to investigate the fundamental physical processes associated with the PDRIME and PDRE concepts and identify potentially promising operating regimes. In the second part of this investigation, the detailed coupling of detonations and electric and magnetic fields are explored. First, a one-dimensional spark-ignited detonation with complex reaction kinetics is fully evaluated and the mechanisms for the different instabilities are analyzed. It is found that complex kinetics in addition to sufficient spatial resolution are required to be able to quantify high frequency as well as low frequency detonation instability modes. Armed with this quantitative understanding, we then examine the interaction of a propagating detonation and the applied MHD, both in one-dimensional and two

  16. Measures for a quality combustion (combustion chamber exit and downstream); Mesures pour une combustion de qualite (sortie de chambre de combustion et en aval)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epinat, G. [APAVE Lyonnaise, 69 (France)

    1996-12-31

    After a review of the different pollutants related to the various types of stationary and mobile combustion processes (stoichiometric, reducing and oxidizing combustion), measures and analyses than may be used to ensure the quality and efficiency of combustion processes are reviewed: opacimeters, UV analyzers, etc. The regulation and control equipment for combustion systems are then listed, according to the generator capacity level

  17. Combustion intensity and distribution relation to noise generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plett, E. G.; Leshner, M. D.; Summerfield, M.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments with several different flame holder geometries were conducted to investigate the degree to which combustion roughness can be altered by altering the flame intensity and flame distribution in a ducted combustion system. The effect of admitting primary air through a plane-slotted or a slotted-swirl vane flame holder was compared and the combustion roughness and noise was contrasted with that obtained with a closed front-end perforated can. The slotted front-end burners produced much smoother burning and less noise than the closed front-end can. No advantage was apparent with swirl vs nonswirl when approximately the same inlet flow distribution was maintained. Preheated inlet air provided somewhat smoother combustion as compared with ambient temperature air. The combustion roughness with methyl alcohol was briefly compared with that of isooctane; indications are that it burns more smoothly, but more detailed studies are needed to substantiate these indications.

  18. Compositional Simulation of In-Situ Combustion EOR: A Study of Process Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Priyanka; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; von Solms, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    In order to facilitate the study of the influence of reservoir process characteristics in In-Situ combustion modeling and advance the work of Kristensen et al. in this domain; a fully compositional In-situ combustion (ISC) model of Virtual Kinetic Cell (VKC; single-cell model) for laboratory scale...... of the combustion front and thus decrease oil recovery, while increase in oxygen feed assists combustion and contributes towards improved oil recovery. The critical properties of the pseudo components are not determined experimentally, thus extending significance to fluid characterization. The composition plays...

  19. Comprehensive investigation of process characteristics for oxy-steam combustion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Bo; Zhao, Haibo; Zou, Chun; Zheng, Chuguang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxy-steam combustion exhibits better performance than oxy-CO 2 combustion. • Cost of electricity in oxy-steam combustion is 6.62% less than oxy-CO 2 combustion. • The increase of oxygen concentration in oxidant can improve its system performance. • The decrease of excess oxygen coefficient can be helpful for its system performance. • Integration with solar technology can enhance its thermodynamic performance. - Abstract: Oxy-steam combustion, as an alternative option of oxy-fuel combustion technology, is considered as a promising CO 2 capture technology for restraining CO 2 emissions from power plants. To attain its comprehensive process characteristics, process simulation, thermodynamic assessment, and sensitivity analysis for oxy-steam combustion pulverized-coal-fired power plants are investigated whilst its corresponding CO 2 /O 2 recycled combustion (oxy-CO 2 combustion) power plant is served as the base case for comparison. Techno-economic evaluation and integration with solar parabolic trough collectors are also discussed to justify its economic feasibility and improve its thermodynamic performance further, respectively. It is found that oxy-steam combustion exhibits better performance than oxy-CO 2 combustion on both thermodynamic and economic aspects, in which the cost of electricity decreases about 6.62% whilst the net efficiency and exergy efficiency increase about 0.90 and 1.01 percentage points, respectively. The increment of oxygen concentration in oxidant (20–45 mol.%) and decrease of excess oxygen coefficient (1.01–1.09) in a certain range are favorable for improving oxy-steam combustion system performance. Moreover, its thermodynamic performance can be improved when considering solar parabolic trough collectors for heating recycled water, even though its cost of electricity increases about 2 $/(MW h)

  20. Effect of Electric Field in the Stabilized Premixed Flame on Combustion Process Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Krickis

    2017-10-01

    The effect of the AC and DC electrical field on combustion processes has been investigated by various researchers. The results of these experiments do not always correlate, due to different experiment conditions and experiment equipment variations. The observed effects of the electrical field impact on the combustion process depends on the applied voltage polarity, flame speed and combustion physics. During the experiment was defined that starting from 1000 V the ionic wind takes the effect on emissions in flue gases, flame shape and combustion instabilities. Simulation combustion process in hermetically sealed chamber with excess oxygen amount 3 % in flue gases showed that the positive effect of electrical field on emissions lies in region from 30 to 400 V. In aforementioned voltage range carbon monoxide emissions were reduced by 6 % and at the same time the nitrogen oxide emissions were increased by 3.5 %.

  1. Digital signal processing of cylinder pressure data for combustion diagnostics of HCCI engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Maurya, Rakesh; Pal, Dev Datt; Kumar Agarwal, Avinash

    2013-03-01

    Diagnosis of combustion is necessary for the estimation of the combustion quality, and control of combustion timing in advanced combustion concepts like HCCI. Combustion diagnostics is often performed using digital processing of pressure signals measured using piezoelectric sensor installed in the combustion chamber of the engine. Four-step pressure signal processing consisting of (i) absolute pressure correction, (ii) phasing w.r.t. crank angle, (iii) cycle averaging and (iv) smoothening is used to get cylinder pressure data from the engine experiments, which is further analyzed to get information about combustion characteristics. This study focuses on various aspect of signal processing (cycle averaging and smoothing) of in-cylinder pressure signal from a HCCI engine acquired using a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Experimental investigations are conducted on a HCCI combustion engine operating at different engine speed/load/air-fuel ratio conditions. The cylinder pressure history of 3000 consecutive engine cycles is acquired for analysis using piezoelectric pressure sensor. This study determines the optimum number of engine cycles to be acquired for reasonably good pressure signals based on standard deviation of in-cylinder pressure, rate of pressure rise and rate of heat release signals. Different signal smoothening methods (using various digital filters) are also analyzed and their results are compared. This study also presents effect of signal processing methods on pressure, pressure rise rate and rate of heat release curves at different engine operating conditions.

  2. Relational Processing Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Glenda; Halford, Graeme S.; Shum, David; Maujean, Annick; Chappell, Mark; Birney, Damian

    2013-01-01

    The research examined relational processing following stroke. Stroke patients (14 with frontal, 30 with non-frontal lesions) and 41 matched controls completed four relational processing tasks: sentence comprehension, Latin square matrix completion, modified Dimensional Change Card Sorting, and n-back. Each task included items at two or three…

  3. Technology for Transient Simulation of Vibration during Combustion Process in Rocket Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubanov, V. M.; Stepanov, D. V.; Shabliy, L. S.

    2018-01-01

    The article describes the technology for simulation of transient combustion processes in the rocket thruster for determination of vibration frequency occurs during combustion. The engine operates on gaseous propellant: oxygen and hydrogen. Combustion simulation was performed using the ANSYS CFX software. Three reaction mechanisms for the stationary mode were considered and described in detail. The way for obtaining quick CFD-results with intermediate combustion components using an EDM model was found. The way to generate the Flamelet library with CFX-RIF was described. A technique for modeling transient combustion processes in the rocket thruster was proposed based on the Flamelet library. A cyclic irregularity of the temperature field like vortex core precession was detected in the chamber. Frequency of flame precession was obtained with the proposed simulation technique.

  4. Fluidized-Bed Combustion-Industrial Application Demonstration Projects. Battelle's multisolid fluidized-bed combustion process, end-of-phase final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    Successful operation of the Subscale Experimental Unit System has been demonstrated; performance was comparable to that of the 6-inch unit (one-tenth scale), indicating that scale-up problems should be minimal. Combustion of as-received wet lump coal (e.g., 1-1/4 in. top size) has been successfully demonstrated. Combustion performance was independent of feed location; accordingly, feeding from above the dense bed is preferred because of relative simplicity of the feeding system. Comparable combustion efficiency and sulfur retention were obtained using either tan silica pebbles or hematite ore as the dense bed material. Tan silica pebbles are preferred from a cost and availability standpoint. Limestone needs to be well distributed in the dense bed to ensure effective sulfur retention. Excellent sulfur removal and limestone utilization can be achieved in the MSFBC system. Effective freeboard height was found to be one of the most important process variables affecting sulfur retention. Sulfur retention decreases with increasing limestone particle size, but is not significantly dependent on coal size, dense bed height, bed type, or excess air. Good combustion efficiency (up to 98 percent) has been demonstrated for both lump and crushed coals. Carbon recycle in the sand circulation stream and/or the flyash reinjection stream is essential to achievement of such a high overall combustion efficiency. The heat transfer coefficient for the steam tubes located in the entrained bed region ranged from 10 to 16 Btu/ft/sup 2/-hr-F (lower-than-expected). Appreciable metal wastage on boiler tubes in the entrained bed zone was observed for the sections not parallel to the flow direction.

  5. Advanced diagnostics in oxy-fuel combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, J.; Clausen, Soennik; Degn Jensen, A. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. CHEC Research Centre, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Boeg Toftegaard, M. (DONG Energy Power, Hvidovre (Denmark))

    2012-07-01

    This report sums up the findings in PSO-project 010069, ''Advanced Diagnostics in Oxy-Fuel Combustion Processes''. Three areas of optic diagnostics are covered in this work: - FTIR measurements in a 30 kW swirl burner. - IR measurements in a 30 kW swirl burner. - IR measurements in a laboratory scale fixed bed reactor. The results obtained in the swirl burner have proved the FTIR method as a valuable technique for gas phase temperature measurements. When its efficacy is evaluated against traditional thermocouple measurements, two cases, with and without probe beam stop, must however be treated separately. When the FTIR probe is operated with the purpose of gas phase concentration measurements the probe needs to operate with a beam stop mounted in front of it. With this beam stop in place it was shown that the measured gas phase temperature was affected by cooling, induced by the cooled beam stop. Hence, for a more accurate determination of gas phase temperatures the probe needed to operate without the beam stop. When this was the case, the FTIR probe showed superior to traditional temperature measurements using a thermocouple as it could measure the fast temperature fluctuations. With the beam stop in place the efficacy of the FTIR probe for gas temperature determination was comparable to the use of a traditional thermocouple. The evaluation of the FTIR technique regarding estimation of gas phase concentrations of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and CO showed that the method is reliable though it cannot be stated as particularly accurate. The accuracy of the method is dependent on the similarity of the reference emission spectra of the gases with those obtained in the experiments, as the transmittance intensity is not a linear function of concentration. The length of the optical path also affects the steadiness of the measurements. The length of the optical path is difficult to adjust on the small scales that are the focus of this work. However

  6. OXYCOAL-AC: Towards development of a zero-CO2-emission coal combustion process for efficient power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toporov, D.; Heil, P.; Foerster, M.; Kneer, R.

    2010-01-01

    The OXYCOAL-AC cooperative research project, presented here, aims at the development of the main components for an integrated zero-CO 2 emission power plant process which comprises combustion of pulverised coal in a mixture of recirculated flue gas (RFG) and oxygen produced from a ceramic ion transport membrane (ITM). This article focuses on the specifics of coal combustion in a CO 2 /O 2 atmosphere including flame stability and related burner design as well as the changes in the heat transfer inside an oxy-firing utility scale furnace. The membrane-based air separation modules and their design for oxycoal conditions are reviewed as well. (authors)

  7. Modeling segregated in- situ combustion processes through a vertical displacement model applied to a Colombian field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra Aristizabal, Jose Julian; Grosso Vargas, Jorge Luis

    2005-01-01

    Recently it has been proposed the incorporation of horizontal well technologies in thermal EOR processes like the in situ combustion process (ISC). This has taken to the conception of new recovery mechanisms named here as segregated in-situ combustion processes, which are conventional in-situ combustion process with a segregated flow component. Top/Down combustion, Combustion Override Split-production Horizontal-well and Toe-to-Heel Air Injection are three of these processes, which incorporate horizontal producers and gravity drainage phenomena. When applied to thick reservoirs a process of this nature could be reasonably modeled under concepts of conventional in-situ combustion and Crestal Gas injection, especially for heavy oils mobile at reservoir conditions. A process of this nature has been studied through an analytic model conceived for the particular conditions of the Castilla field, a homogeneous thick anticline structure containing high mobility heavy oil, which seems to be an excellent candidate for the application of these technologies

  8. Analysis the ECFM-3Z Combustion Model for Simulating the Combustion Process and Emission Characteristics in a HSDI Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf Mobasheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An advanced CFD simulation has been performed to analyze the ECFM-3Z (Extended Coherent Flame Model-3Z combustion model for simulating the combustion process and emission characteristics in a high speed direct injection (HSDI diesel engine. A four cylinders, HSDI diesel engine based on a Ford production engine with a 2nd generation Delphi common rail fuel injection system has been modeled in this research. 3D CFD simulation was carried out from intake valve closing (IVC to exhaust valve opening (EVO. A good agreement of calculated and measured in-cylinder pressure trace as well as pollutant formation trends could be observed for all investigated operating points. Based on the confidence gained from validation, the study is extended to evaluate the effect of fuel injection timing on engine performance and emissions. For this purpose, a comprehensive study of the effect of injection timing with respect to performance and emissions has been considered. Three main injection timing, (1 2.65 BTDC, (2 0.65 BTDC and (3 1.35 ATDC, all with 30 crank angle pilot separations has been used to investigate the effect of the injection timing. The results show that the current methodology can be applied as a beneficial tool for analyzing the parameters of the diesel combustion under HSDI operating condition.

  9. The Relation between Gas Flow and Combustibility using Actual Engine (Basic Experiment of Gas Flow and Combustibility under Low Load Condition)

    OpenAIRE

    田坂, 英紀; 泉, 立哉; 木村, 正寿

    2003-01-01

    Abstract ###Consideration of the global environment problems by exhaust gas is becoming important in recent years. ###Especially about internal combustion engine, social demand has been increasing about low pollution, high ###efficiency and so on. Controlling gas flow in cylinder becomes the key getting good combustion state in ###various driving states. ###The purpose of the research is analysis about the relation between gas flow and combustibility in the cylinder. ###So we measured gas flo...

  10. Application of LES for Analysis of Unsteady Effects on Combustion Processes and Misfires in DISI Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryntsev D.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cycle-to-cycle variations of combustion processes strongly affect the emissions, specific fuel consumption and work output. Internal combustion engines such as Direct Injection Spark-Ignition (DISI are very sensitive to the cyclic fluctuations of the flow, mixing and combustion processes. Multi-cycle Large Eddy Simulation (LES analysis has been used in order to characterize unsteady effects of combustion processes and misfires in realistic DISI engine. A qualitative analysis of the intensity of cyclic variations of in-cylinder pressure, temperature and fuel mass fraction is presented. The effect of ignition probability and analysis of misfires are pointed out. Finally, the fuel history effects along with the effect of residual gas on in-cylinder pressure and temperature as well as misfires are discussed.

  11. Major leaching processes of combustion residues - Characterisation, modelling and experimental investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Jinying

    1998-12-31

    Characterising leaching behaviour provides ample evidence to identify the major leaching processes of combustion residues. Neutralisation and chemical weathering govern the leaching reactions and control the release of elements from combustion residues, and are thus considered to be the major leaching processes. According to experimental investigations and geochemical simulations, the leaching kinetics of buffering materials are key issues for the understanding of the neutralizing processes. The acid neutralizing capacity at different pH levels depends mainly on the mineralogy of the combustion residues. In combustion residues, the dissolution of glass phases is expected to play an important role in a long-term neutralizing process. The neutralizing process in a flow system is significantly different from that in a batch system. The neutralizing ability of a combustion residue may be strongly affected by solute transport and carbonation reactions in a natural leaching environment. The chemical weathering mainly involves the matrix of combustion residues consisting mostly of glass phases. The dissolution kinetics of waste glass and other possible processes involved in the chemical weathering have been investigated and incorporated into a kinetic reactive transport model. Most important processes in the chemical weathering can be simulated simultaneously using this model. The results show that there is a complicated relationship between the factors controlling the long-term chemical weathering. The environmental impact of the glass dissolution cannot be neglected. Although the glass dissolution provides considerable buffering capacity in long-term weathering, the carbonate is usually a dominant buffering mineral in actual weathering processes. The transformation of carbonate should be considered as an important process in the chemical weathering. The formation of secondary minerals may considerably alter the mineralogy of the waste, and thus change the leaching

  12. Analysis of briquetting process of sewage sludge with coal to combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosturkiewicz Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy recovery from sewage sludge can be achieved by several thermal technologies, but before those processes sewage sludge requires special pretreatment. The paper presents the investigation of the sewage sludge with coal briquettes as a fuel for combustion process. Research is conducted at Department of Manufacturing Systems and Department of Thermal Engineering and Environmental Protection, AGH University of Science and Technology to develop a technology of briquette preparation. The obtained results showed possibility of briquetting of municipal sewage sludge with coal in roll presses, equipped with asymmetric thickening gravity feed system. The following properties were determined for the obtained briquettes: density, drop strength and compressive strength. Based on physical and chemical analysis of prepared briquettes it was confirmed that briquettes have good fuel properties to combustion process. Thermal behaviour of studied sewage sludge and prepared mixture was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TG. For the thermo gravimetric analysis (TG the samples were heated in an alumina crucible from an ambient temperature up to 1000 °C at a constant rates: 10 °C/min, 40 °C/min and 100 °C/min in a 40 ml/min flow of air.

  13. Thermodynamic diagnosis of diesel and biodiesel combustion processes during load-increase transient sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armas, Octavio; Ballesteros, Rosario; Cardenas, María Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thermodynamic diagnosis was applied to diesel combustion process during transient operation. ► Comparative analysis of thermodynamic results with different biodiesel fuels has been carried out. ► Biodiesel fuels studied have a slight effect on timing of the combustion process. ► Methodology used can be applied to improve engine control when using different alternative fuels. -- Abstract: The study of the diesel combustion process is a current topic by the need of thermal efficiency improving and the reduction of pollutant emissions. This circumstance has forced researchers and manufacturers to optimize this process not only in steady state operating conditions but also during transient operation. A zero dimensional thermodynamic diagnostic model, with three species (air, fuel evaporated and burned products), has been used to characterize the combustion process during load increase transient sequences at two different engine speed. In both sequences, three variables were studied: the valve position of the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), the elapsed time of the transition process and the type of fuel. Three biodiesel fuels were tested pure: rapeseed, soybean and sunflower which were compared to a commercial diesel fuel used as reference. Results are presented comparing the in-cylinder average maximum pressure and temperature, and the phasing of the combustion process based on the calculation of heat release. This study has allowed the detection of the effect of the tested engine parameters and the biodiesel fuels used on the in-cylinder thermodynamic conditions during the load transient sequences studied.

  14. Combustible gas recombining method and processing facility for gas waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watabe, Atsushi; Murakami, Kazuo

    1998-09-02

    Combustible gases (hydrogen, oxygen) generated by radiation decomposition of reactor water in the vicinity of a reactor core in a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type nuclear power plant pass, together with flow of steams, through a gas/water separator and a steam dryer disposed at the upper portion of a reactor core. A catalyst for allowing hydrogen and oxygen to react efficiently and recombine them into water is plated on the surface of the steam dryer. The catalyst comprises palladium (Pd) or platinum (Pt) or a Pd-Pt alloy. The combustible gases passing through the steam dryer are recombined and formed into steams by the catalyst. A slight amount of hydrogen and oxygen which are not recombined transfers, together with main steams, from a main steam pipe to a main condensator by way of a turbine. Then they are released, together with air from an air extraction device, from an activated carbon-type rare gas hold up tower. (I.N.)

  15. Numerical modelling of biomass combustion: Solid conversion processes in a fixed bed furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul; Naser, Jamal

    2017-06-01

    Increasing demand for energy and rising concerns over global warming has urged the use of renewable energy sources to carry a sustainable development of the world. Bio mass is a renewable energy which has become an important fuel to produce thermal energy or electricity. It is an eco-friendly source of energy as it reduces carbon dioxide emissions. Combustion of solid biomass is a complex phenomenon due to its large varieties and physical structures. Among various systems, fixed bed combustion is the most commonly used technique for thermal conversion of solid biomass. But inadequate knowledge on complex solid conversion processes has limited the development of such combustion system. Numerical modelling of this combustion system has some advantages over experimental analysis. Many important system parameters (e.g. temperature, density, solid fraction) can be estimated inside the entire domain under different working conditions. In this work, a complete numerical model is used for solid conversion processes of biomass combustion in a fixed bed furnace. The combustion system is divided in to solid and gas phase. This model includes several sub models to characterize the solid phase of the combustion with several variables. User defined subroutines are used to introduce solid phase variables in commercial CFD code. Gas phase of combustion is resolved using built-in module of CFD code. Heat transfer model is modified to predict the temperature of solid and gas phases with special radiation heat transfer solution for considering the high absorptivity of the medium. Considering all solid conversion processes the solid phase variables are evaluated. Results obtained are discussed with reference from an experimental burner.

  16. Intelligent Integration between Human Simulated Intelligence and Expert Control Technology for the Combustion Process of Gas Heating Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucheng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to being poor in control quality of the combustion process of gas heating furnace, this paper explored a sort of strong robust control algorithm in order to improve the control quality of the combustion process of gas heating furnace. The paper analyzed the control puzzle in the complex combustion process of gas heating furnace, summarized the cybernetics characteristic of the complex combustion process, researched into control strategy of the uncertainty complex control process, discussed the control model of the complex process, presented a sort of intelligent integration between human-simulated intelligence and expert control technology, and constructed the control algorithm for the combustion process controlling of gas heating furnace. The simulation results showed that the control algorithm proposed in the paper is not only better in dynamic and steady quality of the combustion process, but also obvious in energy saving effect, feasible, and effective in control strategy.

  17. Fundamental limitations of non-thermal plasma processing for internal combustion engine NOx control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the physics and chemistry of non-thermal plasma processing for post-combustion NO x control in internal combustion engines. A comparison of electron beam and electrical discharge processing is made regarding their power consumption, radical production, NO x removal mechanisms, and by product formation. Can non-thermal deNO x operate efficiently without additives or catalysts? How much electrical power does it cost to operate? What are the by-products of the process? This paper addresses these fundamental issues based on an analysis of the electron-molecule processes and chemical kinetics

  18. Do factors related to combustion-based sources explain ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Spatial heterogeneity of effect estimates in associations between PM2.5 and total non-accidental mortality (TNA) in the United States (US), is an issue in epidemiology. This study uses rate ratios generated from the Multi-City/Multi-Pollutant study (1999-2005) for 313 core-based statistical areas (CBSA) and their metropolitan divisions (MD) to examine combustion-based sources of heterogeneity.Methods: For CBSA/MDs, area-specific log rate ratios (betas) were derived from a model adjusting for time, an interaction with age-group, day of week, and natural splines of current temperature, current dew point, and unconstrained temperature at lags 1, 2, and 3. We assessed the heterogeneity in the betas by linear regression with inverse variance weights, using average NO2, SO2, and CO, which may act as a combustion source proxy, and these pollutants’ correlations with PM2.5. Results: We found that weighted mean PM2.5 association (0.96 percent increase in total non-accidental mortality for a 10 µg/m3 increment in PM2.5) increased by 0.26 (95% confidence interval 0.08 , 0.44) for an interquartile change (0.2) in the correlation of SO2 and PM2.5., but betas showed less dependence on the annual averages of SO2 or NO2. Spline analyses suggest departures from linearity, particularly in a model that examined correlations between PM2.5 and CO.Conclusions: We conclude that correlations between SO2 and PM2.5 as an indicator of combustion sources explains some hete

  19. Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Simulation of In-Situ Combustion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margot Gerritsen; Tony Kovscek

    2008-04-30

    This final technical report describes work performed for the project 'Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Numerical Simulator of In-Situ Combustion Processes', DE-FC26-03NT15405. In summary, this work improved our understanding of in-situ combustion (ISC) process physics and oil recovery. This understanding was translated into improved conceptual models and a suite of software algorithms that extended predictive capabilities. We pursued experimental, theoretical, and numerical tasks during the performance period. The specific project objectives were (i) identification, experimentally, of chemical additives/injectants that improve combustion performance and delineation of the physics of improved performance, (ii) establishment of a benchmark one-dimensional, experimental data set for verification of in-situ combustion dynamics computed by simulators, (iii) develop improved numerical methods that can be used to describe in-situ combustion more accurately, and (iv) to lay the underpinnings of a highly efficient, 3D, in-situ combustion simulator using adaptive mesh refinement techniques and parallelization. We believe that project goals were met and exceeded as discussed.

  20. Development of second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Bonk, D. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, and its team members, Westinghouse, Gilbert/Commonwealth, and the Institute of Gas Technology are developing second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion technology capable of achieving net plant efficiency in excess of 45 percent based on the higher heating value of the coal. A three-phase program entails design and costing of a 500 MWe power plant and identification of developments needed to commercialize this technology (Phase 1), testing of individual components (Phase 2), and finally testing these components in an integrated mode (Phase 3). This paper briefly describes the results of the first two phases as well as the progress on the third phase. Since other projects which use the same technology are in construction or in negotiation stages-namely, the Power System Development Facility and the Four Rivers Energy Modernization Projects-brief descriptions of these are also included.

  1. Dynamic simulation in the process of pressurized denitration based on oxy-fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiang; Zhou, Dong

    2018-02-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is considered as one of the most promising technologies for capturing CO2 from coal-fired power plants. It will greatly reduce the cost of gas purification if we remove NOx in the process of compression, which is the characteristic of oxy-combustion. In this paper, simulation of denitration process of oxy-fuel combustion flue gas was realized by the Aspen Plus software, systematically analyzed the effect of temperature, pressure, initial concentration of O2 and NO in the denitration process. Results show that the increasing of pressure, initial concentration of O2, initial concentration of NO and the decrease of temperature are all beneficial to the denitration process.

  2. Effects of Catalysts on Emissions of Pollutants from Combustion Processes of Liquid Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bok Agnieszka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic growth of the use of non-renewable fuels for energy purposes results in demand for catalysts to improve their combustion process. The paper describes catalysts used mainly in the processes of combustion of motor fuels and fuel oils. These catalysts make it possible to raise the efficiency of oxidation processes simultanously reducing the emission of pollutants. The key to success is the selection of catalyst compounds that will reduce harmful emissions of combustion products into the atmosphere. Catalysts are introduced into the combustion zone in form of solutions miscible with fuel or with air supplied to the combustion process. The following compounds soluble in fuel are inclused in the composition of the described catalysts: organometallic complexes, manganese compounds, salts originated from organic acids, ferrocen and its derivatives and sodium chloride and magnesium chloride responsible for burning the soot (chlorides. The priority is to minimize emissions of volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, and carbon monoxide, as well as particulate matter.

  3. Combustion noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  4. Efficient volatile metal removal from low rank coal in gasification, combustion, and processing systems and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, Alan E.; Sellakumar, Kumar Muthusami; Newcomer, Jesse D.

    2017-03-21

    Efficient coal pre-processing systems (69) integrated with gasification, oxy-combustion, and power plant systems include a drying chamber (28), a volatile metal removal chamber (30), recirculated gases, including recycled carbon dioxide (21), nitrogen (6), and gaseous exhaust (60) for increasing the efficiencies and lowering emissions in various coal processing systems.

  5. Process/Engineering Co-Simulation of Oxy-Combustion and Chemical Looping Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, David [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Over the past several years, the DOE has sponsored various funded programs, collectively referred to as Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) programs, which have targeted the development of a steady-state simulator for advanced power plants. The simulator allows the DOE and its contractors to systematically evaluate various power plant concepts, either for preliminary conceptual design or detailed final design.

  6. Modelling of a combustion process for the incineration of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohyiza Ba'an Sivapalan Kathiravale Mohamad Puad Abu Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus

    2005-01-01

    Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) in Malaysia is increasing rapidly with increase in the population and economic growth. Landfill capacity required to accommodate the generated waste is anticipated to exceed 20,000 tons per day by year 2020. The current management system of solely depending on landfill disposal is inadequate and calls for a more environmentally friendly management system, which include the prospects of an eco park. To understand the combustion process, the development of mathematical model based on waste characteristic is required. Hence this paper will present the mathematical model developed to predict the mass and heat balance for MSW combustion process. This results of this mathematical model will be compared against the actual combustion of MSW in Thermal Oxidation Plant, so that the accuracy of the developed model can be determined accordingly. (Author)

  7. Electrical and optical properties of NdAlO3 synthesized by an optimized combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harilal, Midhun; Nair, V. Manikantan; Wariar, P.R.S.; Padmasree, K.P.; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Jose, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Nanocrystals of neodymium aluminate (NdAlO 3 ) are synthesized using an optimized single step auto-ignition citrate complex combustion process. The combustion product was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and Ultraviolet–visible reflection spectroscopy. The combustion product is single phase and composed of aggregates of nanocrystals of sizes in the range 20–40 nm. The NdAlO 3 crystallized in rhombohedral perovskite structure with lattice parameters a = 5.3223 Å and c = 12.9292 Å. The absorption spectrum of the NdAlO 3 nanocrystals shows characteristic absorption bands of the Nd atom. The polycrystalline fluffy combustion product is sintered to high density (∼ 97%) at ∼ 1450 °C for 4 h and the microstructure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of the sintered product were studied using dielectric measurements. The sintered NdAlO 3 has a dielectric constant (ε r ) and a dielectric loss (tan δ) of 21.9 and ∼ 10 −3 at 5 MHz, respectively. - Highlights: • NdAlO 3 nanocrystals were synthesized through a citrate combustion process. • The nanocrystals were sintered to ∼ 97% of theoretical density. • The materials were characterized using a number of analytical techniques. • Nanostructured NdAlO 3 showed crystal field splitting of Nd ions. • Dielectric properties of the sintered NdAlO 3 ceramics were studied

  8. Disposal of coal combustion wastes in the hydraulic backfill process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierzyna, Piotr

    2017-11-01

    This article presents the results of studies regarding the physical properties of selected combustion by-products (CCPs) currently produced in the energy production industry. These properties have been compared with the requirements of the technologies applied in the Polish underground mines. The article gives special consideration to the application of the products in the hydraulic backfill technology. The possibility of using bottom-ashes and slags was considered. The amount of CCPs disposed in Polish hard coal mines is approximately 1.1 million Mg and the tendency is decreasing. In the past two years, approximately 100-150 thousand Mg of CCPs was used in the hydraulic backfill technology. The percentage of the fraction smaller than 0.1 mm is determining for the possibility of using a given type of CCPs in the backfill material. This practically excludes the possibility of using any fly ashes in that technology. In slags from conventional boilers and bottom ashes from fluidized bed boilers the fraction below 0.1 mm constitutes 25% of the total at maximum, which allows for their use in the materials used in hydraulic backfill as a component comprising from 30% to 60%, respectively. Slags (10 01 01) are characterized by the lack of bonding properties, which, in case of open backfill systems that are exposed to atmospheric conditions, constitutes an advantage in comparison to bottom ashes (10 01 24), which in turn definitely exhibit bonding properties. The solution of the problem of using bottom ashes is their supply and application on a current basis.

  9. Characterization of the wood combustion process based on the TG analysis, numerical modelling and measurements performed on the experimental stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szubel Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents selected results of thermogravimetric (TG analyses for softwood (pine and hardwood (beech. The composition of the studied fuels has been defined and described. Both wood types used in the TG tests were studied in order to define their content of basic components such as lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. Types of wood used in the TGA have been combusted on the experimental stand which is equipped with a set of temperature sensors and an exhaust analyser. A comparison of the TG analysis and the combustion in the heating unit has been performed to find relations between the kinetics of devolatilisation for different wood species and to determine the exhaust composition. Numerical modelling using computational fluid dynamics (CFD has been performed for the process of carbon monoxide oxidation to supplement the tests results. The results of the comparisons of the performed analyses can be useful in all areas related to the process of optimisation and improvement of combustion, pyrolysis and devolatilisation process conditions in small scale heating units.

  10. Regulations and standardization relative to the biomass combustion; Reglementation et normalisation relatives a la combustion de la biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autret, E. [Agence de l' Environnement et de la Maitrise de l' Energie, ADEME, 49 - Angers (France)

    2009-03-15

    It does not exist regulations on pollutants emissions on domestic wood burning furnaces, however, these appliances are submitted to the European and french standardization concerning the safety rules, the use rules and the tests methods. Since 2007, these wood burning appliances on the market must have the European Community label. The green flame label was elaborated by the environment and energy control Agency (A.D.E.M.E.), and manufacturers of domestic appliances to promote the use of competitive wood burning appliances. concerning the collective and industrial heating, the installations of more 2 MW are framed by different categories of the installations classified for environment protection (I.C.P.E.) regulation according their fuel and power. The combustion installations of less than 2 MW are a particular case, they are framed by a sanitary department regulation and are controlled by the department directions of sanitary and social affairs. the limit values of emissions are summarized in tables. (N.C.)

  11. A review of standards related to biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeneuve, J.; Savoie, P. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Air quality is evaluated by the concentration of particulate matter (PM) per unit of air volume. PM10 refers to all particles smaller than 10 micrometers in diameter. The European Commission has established acceptable levels of PM10, but the rules are less precise for evaluating the amount of PM that can be emitted from a furnace's chimney. The province of Quebec allows up to 340 mg/m{sup 3} of PM for large furnaces and 600 mg/m{sup 3} for smaller furnaces. Although wood products can be burned in the province, the burning of all other biomass such as straw, stover and grass is forbidden. The City of Vancouver has stricter emissions standards for PM, notably 50 mg/m{sup 3} for large furnaces and 35 mg/m{sup 3} for smaller furnaces. The reason for this difference is that most furnaces in Quebec are used in rural areas whereas the densely populated City of Vancouver must control emissions at the source. It was concluded that although a universal standard on combustion emissions is not feasible because of different socio-economic conditions and population density, furnaces should emit levels of PM which decrease as the surrounding area population concentration increases. Stringent regulations may be met through advances in technology such as chimney height, bag filters, multicyclones, and precipitators.

  12. Combustion-related studies using weakly-bonded complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaudet, R.A. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Binary van der Waals complexes involving species of interest to combustion research are prepared in supersonic free-jet expansions, and their photochemical and photophysical properties are probed by using IR tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy. In the first phase, geometries and other molecular properties are being determined from vibration-rotational spectra. In the second phase, these complexes will be used as precursors to study photoinitiated reactions in precursor geometry limited environments. Two complementary classes of binary complexes are being investigated. The first involves molecular oxygen and hydrogen containing constituents (e.g. O{sub 2}-HCN, O{sub 2}-HF, O{sub 2}-HCl, O{sub 2}-HBr, O{sub 2}-HI and O{sub 2}-hydrocarbons). These species are interesting candidates for study since upon photodissociating the hydride portion, the reaction H and O{sub 2} via the vibrationally excited HO{sub 2} intermediate can conceivably be studied, (e.g. BrH-O{sub 2} + hv(193 nm) {yields} Br-H-O{sub 2} {yields} Br + HO{sub 2} {yields} Br + OH + O). High resolution IR spectroscopy of such complexes have not been obtained previously and the structural information deriving from IR spectra is certainly very useful for better designing and understanding photoinitiated reactions that occur in these complexes.

  13. Modular prototyping engine controller for innovative combustion processes; Flexible Motorprozessregelung fuer neue Brennverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempel, Alexander; Stoelting, Eckhard; Predelli, Oliver; Gratzke, Ralf [IAV GmbH, Gifhorn (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The requirements of the customers and the legislator concerning emission limits, system costs, etc. are well known. This paper presents a rapid prototyping system for engine control, that offers the developer the freedom and the capacity to take this challenge and to achieve the targets. The flexibility of the system and the quick adaptation to a new engine hardware allow a fast realization of new ideas upon an engine test bench or within a vehicle environment. This paper gives an overview about the technical highlights like the Advanced Closedloop Combustion Control (IAVAC3) and the achieved results in the research of innovative combustion processes and their control. (orig.)

  14. Analysis of Combustion Process in Industrial Gas Engine with Prechamber-Based Ignition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Ślefarski

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Application of a pre-combustion chamber (PCC ignition system is one of the methods to improve combustion stability and reduce toxic compounds emission, especially NOx. Using PCC allows the operation of the engine at lean combustion conditions or the utilization of low calorific gaseous fuels such as syngas or biogas. The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the combustion process in two stroke, large bore, stationary gas engine GMVH 12 equipped with two spark plugs (2-SP and a PCC ignition system. The experimental research has been performed during the normal operation of the engine in an industrial compression station. It was observed that application of PCC provides less cycle-to-cycle combustion variation (more than 10% and nitric oxide and carbon monoxide emissions decreased to 60% and 26% respectively. The total hydrocarbon (THC emission rate is 25% higher for the engine equipped with PCC, which results in roughly two percent engine efficiency decrease. Another important criterion of engine retrofitting was the PCC location in the engine head. The experimental results show that improvement of engine operating parameters was recorded only for a configuration with one port offset by 45° from the axis of the main chamber. The study of the ignition delay angle and equivalence ratio in PCC did not demonstrate explicit influence on engine performance.

  15. Digital image processing applications in the ignition and combustion of char/coal particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annamalai, K.; Kharbat, E.; Goplakrishnan, C.

    1992-12-01

    Digital image processing, is employed in this remarch study in order to visually investigate the ignition and combustion characteristics of isolated char/coal particles as well as the effect of interactivecombustion in two-particle char/coal arrays. Preliminary experiments are conducted on miniature isolated candles as well as two-candle arrays.

  16. Fluids and Combustion Facility Acoustic Emissions Controlled by Aggressive Low-Noise Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Beth A.; Young, Judith A.

    2004-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a dual-rack microgravity research facility that is being developed by Northrop Grumman Information Technology (NGIT) for the International Space Station (ISS) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. As an on-orbit test bed, FCF will host a succession of experiments in fluid and combustion physics. The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) must meet ISS acoustic emission requirements (ref. 1), which support speech communication and hearing-loss-prevention goals for ISS crew. To meet these requirements, the NGIT acoustics team implemented an aggressive low-noise design effort that incorporated frequent acoustic emission testing for all internal noise sources, larger-scale systems, and fully integrated racks (ref. 2). Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ref. 3) provided acoustical testing services (see the following photograph) as well as specialized acoustical engineering support as part of the low-noise design process (ref. 4).

  17. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, M.; Werner, R. A.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Brand, W. A.; Geilmann, H.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Kaiser, J.; Jansen, Henk G.

    2011-01-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (C-13 and O-18) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the delta O-18

  18. Artificial intelligence for the modeling and control of combustion processes: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalogirou, S.A. [Higher Technical Inst., Nicosia, Cyprus (Greece). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) systems are widely accepted as a technology offering an alternative way to tackle complex and ill-defined problems. They can learn from examples, are fault tolerant in the sense that they are able to handle noisy and incomplete data, are able to deal with non-linear problems, and once trained can perform prediction and generalization at high speed. They have been used in diverse applications in control, robotics, pattern recognition, forecasting, medicine, power systems, manufacturing, optimization, signal processing, and social/psychological sciences. They are particularly useful in system modeling such as in implementing complex mappings and system identification. Al systems comprise areas like, expert systems, artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic and various hybrid systems, which combine two or more techniques. The major objective of this paper is to illustrate how Al techniques might play an important role in modeling and prediction of the performance and control of combustion process. The paper outlines an understanding of how AI systems operate by way of presenting a number of problems in the different disciplines of combustion engineering. The various applications of AI are presented in a thematic rather than a chronological or any other order. Problems presented include two main areas: combustion systems and internal combustion (IC) engines. Combustion systems include boilers, furnaces and incinerators modeling and emissions prediction, whereas, IC engines include diesel and spark ignition engines and gas engines modeling and control. Results presented in this paper, are testimony to the potential of Al as a design tool in many areas of combustion engineering. (author)

  19. Artificial intelligence for the modeling and control of combustion processes: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soteris A. Kalogirou, [Higher Technical Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) systems are widely accepted as a technology offering an alternative way to tackle complex and ill-defined problems. They can learn from examples, are fault tolerant in the sense that they are able to handle noisy and incomplete data, are able to deal with non-linear problems, and once trained can perform prediction and generalization at high speed. They have been used in diverse applications in control, robotics, pattern recognition, forecasting, medicine, power systems, manufacturing, optimization, signal processing, and social/psychological sciences. They are particularly useful in system modeling such as in implementing complex mappings and system identification. AI systems comprise areas like, expert systems, artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic and various hybrid systems, which combine two or more techniques. The major objective of this paper is to illustrate how AI techniques might play an important role in modeling and prediction of the performance and control of combustion process. The paper outlines an understanding of how AI systems operate by way of presenting a number of problems in the different disciplines of combustion engineering. The various applications of AI are presented in a thematic rather than a chronological or any other order. Problems presented include two main areas: combustion systems and internal combustion (IC) engines. Combustion systems include boilers, furnaces and incinerators modeling and emissions prediction, whereas, IC engines include diesel and spark ignition engines and gas engines modeling and control. Results presented in this paper, are testimony to the potential of AI as a design tool in many areas of combustion engineering. 109 refs., 31 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Integrating multi-objective optimization with computational fluid dynamics to optimize boiler combustion process of a coal fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xingrang; Bansal, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A coal fired power plant boiler combustion process model based on real data. • We propose multi-objective optimization with CFD to optimize boiler combustion. • The proposed method uses software CORBA C++ and ANSYS Fluent 14.5 with AI. • It optimizes heat flux transfers and maintains temperature to avoid ash melt. - Abstract: The dominant role of electricity generation and environment consideration have placed strong requirements on coal fired power plants, requiring them to improve boiler combustion efficiency and decrease carbon emission. Although neural network based optimization strategies are often applied to improve the coal fired power plant boiler efficiency, they are limited by some combustion related problems such as slagging. Slagging can seriously influence heat transfer rate and decrease the boiler efficiency. In addition, it is difficult to measure slag build-up. The lack of measurement for slagging can restrict conventional neural network based coal fired boiler optimization, because no data can be used to train the neural network. This paper proposes a novel method of integrating non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA II) based multi-objective optimization with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to decrease or even avoid slagging inside a coal fired boiler furnace and improve boiler combustion efficiency. Compared with conventional neural network based boiler optimization methods, the method developed in the work can control and optimize the fields of flue gas properties such as temperature field inside a boiler by adjusting the temperature and velocity of primary and secondary air in coal fired power plant boiler control systems. The temperature in the vicinity of water wall tubes of a boiler can be maintained within the ash melting temperature limit. The incoming ash particles cannot melt and bond to surface of heat transfer equipment of a boiler. So the trend of slagging inside furnace is controlled. Furthermore, the

  1. Processes subject to integrated pollution control. Combustion processes: reheat and heat treatment furnaces 50 MW(th) and over

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document, part of a series offering guidance on pollution control regulations issued by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution, focuses on combustion processes involved with reheat and heat treatment furnaces of 50 MW (th) and over. Techniques for controlling releases into air, water and to land are detailed as are the various pollution monitoring strategies. (UK)

  2. Modeling and optimization of processes for clean and efficient pulverized coal combustion in utility boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belošević Srđan V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulverized coal-fired power plants should provide higher efficiency of energy conversion, flexibility in terms of boiler loads and fuel characteristics and emission reduction of pollutants like nitrogen oxides. Modification of combustion process is a cost-effective technology for NOx control. For optimization of complex processes, such as turbulent reactive flow in coal-fired furnaces, mathematical modeling is regularly used. The NOx emission reduction by combustion modifications in the 350 MWe Kostolac B boiler furnace, tangentially fired by pulverized Serbian lignite, is investigated in the paper. Numerical experiments were done by an in-house developed three-dimensional differential comprehensive combustion code, with fuel- and thermal-NO formation/destruction reactions model. The code was developed to be easily used by engineering staff for process analysis in boiler units. A broad range of operating conditions was examined, such as fuel and preheated air distribution over the burners and tiers, operation mode of the burners, grinding fineness and quality of coal, boiler loads, cold air ingress, recirculation of flue gases, water-walls ash deposition and combined effect of different parameters. The predictions show that the NOx emission reduction of up to 30% can be achieved by a proper combustion organization in the case-study furnace, with the flame position control. Impact of combustion modifications on the boiler operation was evaluated by the boiler thermal calculations suggesting that the facility was to be controlled within narrow limits of operation parameters. Such a complex approach to pollutants control enables evaluating alternative solutions to achieve efficient and low emission operation of utility boiler units. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-33018: Increase in energy and ecology efficiency of processes in pulverized coal-fired furnace and optimization of utility steam boiler air preheater by using in

  3. Combustion Characteristics of Chlorine-Free Solid Fuel Produced from Municipal Solid Waste by Hydrothermal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Yoshikawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study on converting municipal solid waste (MSW into chlorine-free solid fuel using a combination of hydrothermal processing and water-washing has been performed. After the product was extracted from the reactor, water-washing experiments were then conducted to obtain chlorine-free products with less than 3000 ppm total chlorine content. A series of combustion experiments were then performed for the products before and after the washing process to determine the chlorine content in the exhaust gas and those left in the ash after the combustion process at a certain temperature. A series of thermogravimetric analyses were also conducted to compare the combustion characteristics of the products before and after the washing process. Due to the loss of ash and some volatile matter after washing process, there were increases in the fixed carbon content and the heating value of the product. Considering the possible chlorine emission, the washing process after the hydrothermal treatment should be necessary only if the furnace temperature is more than 800 °C.

  4. Biomass Gasification for Power Generation Internal Combustion Engines. Process Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesme-Jaén, René; Garcia-Faure, Luis; Oliva-Ruiz, Luis; Pajarín-Rodríguez, Juan; Revilla-Suarez, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy sources worldwide greater prospects for its potential and its lower environmental impact compared to fossil fuels. By different processes and energy conversion technologies is possible to obtain solid, liquid and gaseous fuels from any biomass.In this paper the evaluation of thermal and overall efficiency of the gasification of Integral Forestry Company Santiago de Cuba is presented, designed to electricity generation from waste forest industry. The gasifier is a downdraft reactor, COMBO-80 model of Indian manufacturing and motor (diesel) model Leyland modified to work with producer gas. The evaluation was conducted at different loads (electric power generated) of the motor from experimental measurements of flow and composition of gas supplied to the engine. The results show that the motor operates with a thermal efficiency in the range of 20-32% with an overall efficiency between 12-25 %. (author)

  5. Submerged combustion melting processes for producing glass and similar materials, and systems for carrying out such processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Mark William

    2015-08-04

    Processes of controlling submerged combustion melters, and systems for carrying out the methods. One process includes feeding vitrifiable material into a melter vessel, the melter vessel including a fluid-cooled refractory panel in its floor, ceiling, and/or sidewall, and heating the vitrifiable material with a burner directing combustion products into the melting zone under a level of the molten material in the zone. Burners impart turbulence to the molten material in the melting zone. The fluid-cooled refractory panel is cooled, forming a modified panel having a frozen or highly viscous material layer on a surface of the panel facing the molten material, and a sensor senses temperature of the modified panel using a protected thermocouple positioned in the modified panel shielded from direct contact with turbulent molten material. Processes include controlling the melter using the temperature of the modified panel. Other processes and systems are presented.

  6. The influence factor analyses of non-stable combustion in the ignition process of gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Jian-ping; Zhang, Shi-cheng; Jie, Tao; Cao, Feng; Chen, Xu-si; Li, Hang; Liu, Yong-sun [ShangHai Marine diesel Engine Research Institute, Shanghai (China)

    2013-07-01

    The pulverized coal gasification technology is large-scale carried out in China for more than 10 years, and more and more coal gasification technology, such as SCGP, GSP, GE, indigenous gasifier, have been widely used in China. Ignition process is non-stable combustion process, which is the key process in the operation of gasifier. In ignition process of pulverized coal gasifier, the average temperature and pressure will increase to high level (about 800 C and 1 MPa) from the normal condition. In this paper, the trial furnace experiment have been carried out to study the non-stable flow and combustion characteristics in gasifier. The variety of the temperature and the shape of the flame with the pressure growing have been analyzed. These results show that the average temperature is increasing gradually at atmosphere pressure, while the high temperature region locates 100 mm away from the head of the ignition burner with a spindly shape. As the pressure goes up, the shapes of the flame shorten apparently, while the distance between the high temperature region and the head of the start-up burner decreases. Thereby, it is possible that the head of the start-up-burner will burning-out by the high temperature flame. Therefore, the pressure will tremendously influence the combustion process in gasifier, where the flame will change shortly and unstably.

  7. Intensification of the Process of Flame Combustion of a Pulverized Coal Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    Consideration is given to a method of mechanoactivation intensification of the flame combustion of a pulverized coal fuel through the formation of a stressed state for the microstructure of its particles; the method is based on the use of the regularities of their external (diffusion) and internal (relaxation) kinetics. A study has been made of mechanoactivation nonequilibrium processes that occur in fuel particles during the induced relaxation of their stressed state with a resumed mobility of the microstructure of the particles and intensify diffusion-controlled chemical reactions in them under the assumption that the time of these reactions is much shorter than the times of mechanical action on a particle and of stress relaxation in it. The influence of the diffusion and relaxation factors on the burnup time of a fuel particle and on the flame distance has been analyzed. Ranges of variation in the parameters of flame combustion have been singled out in which the flame distance is determined by the mechanisms of combustion of the fuel and of mixing of combustion products.

  8. Exergetic analysis of cogeneration plants through integration of internal combustion engine and process simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Leonardo de Oliveira [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: leonardo.carvalho@petrobras.com.br; Leiroz, Albino Kalab; Cruz, Manuel Ernani [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica], Emails: leiroz@mecanica.ufrj.br, manuel@mecanica.ufrj.br

    2010-07-01

    Internal combustion engines (ICEs) have been used in industry and power generation much before they were massively employed for transportation. Their high reliability, excellent power-to-weight ratio, and thermal efficiency have made them a competitive choice as main energy converters in small to medium sized power plants. Process simulators can model ICE powered energy plants with limited depth, due to the highly simplified ICE models used. Usually a better understanding of the global effects of different engine parameters is desirable, since the combustion process within the ICE is typically the main cause of exergy destruction in systems which utilize them. Dedicated commercial ICE simulators have reached such a degree of maturity, that they can adequately model a wide spectrum of phenomena that occur in ICEs. However, ICE simulators are unable to incorporate the remaining of power plant equipment and processes in their models. This paper presents and exploits the integration of an internal combustion engine simulator with a process simulator, so as to evaluate the construction of a fully coupled simulation platform to analyze the performance of ICE-based power plants. A simulation model of an actual cogeneration plant is used as a vehicle for application of the proposed computational methodology. The results show that by manipulating the engine mapping parameters, the overall efficiency of the plant can be improved. (author)

  9. Health effects engineering of coal and biomass combustion particulates: influence of zinc, sulfur and process changes on potential lung injury from inhaled ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Art Fernandez; Jost O.L. Wendt; Mark L. Witten [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (US). Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2005-07-01

    This paper is concerned with health effects of the ash aerosol formed from the co-combustion of municipal sewage sludge with pulverized coal. By employing the methods of Health Effects Engineering, one can determine not only which fuel attributes are likely to contribute to lung injury, but also how tendencies of the ash to cause lung injury can be engineered out of the combustion process. Initial results showed that inhalation of ash from the co-combustion of municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and pulverized coal caused much greater lung damage in mice, as measured by lung permeability increase, than that of coal ash, or MSS ash, alone. MSS contains substantial quantities of zinc but little sulfur, while coal contains sulfur but littlezinc. Experiments were conducted to determine the health effects of combustion generated zinc particles and zinc plus sulfur particles. Zinc without sulfur led to normal behavior as far as lung permeability was concerned. Zinc with sulfur added led to the abnormal behavior noted also in the coal+MSS experiments. Therefore, the bad actor was identified to be zinc together with sulfur, and that was why the co-combustion of coal and MSS caused greater lung injury than the combustion of either fuel alone. Injection of a kaolinite sorbent downstream of the flame, but above the Zn dew point, can sequester the Zn, and react it to form a new species which was shown to be relatively benign. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The Siemens pyrolysis-combustion process; Das Siemens Schwel-Brenn-Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, D. [Siemens - KWU, Offenbach (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    The market introduction fo the SIEMENS pyrolysis-combustion process is a technical and ecological milestone in thermal waste processing. It bridges the gap between conventional incineration and recycling and is ideally suited for the modern waste management philosophy. The innovative combination of pyrolysis followed by high-temperature combustion produces energy and reusable materials nearly without emissions. (orig/sr) [Deutsch] Die Markteinfuehrung des Schwel-Brenn-Verfahrens hat im Bereich der thermischen Muellentsorgung eine technologische und oekologische Zeitenwende eingeleitet. Es fuegt sich als Bruecke zwischen herkoemmlicher Muellverbrennung und stofflichem Muell-Recyling ideal in das Konzept einer oekologischen Kreislaufwirtschaft. Die innovative Kombination von Muellverschwelung (Pyrolyse) und anschliessender Hochtemperaturverbrennung wandelt den unvermeidbaren Restmuell nahezu rueckstandsfrei in Wertstoffe und Energie um. (orig/SR)

  11. Thermal effects from the release of selenium from a coal combustion during high-temperature processing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjun; Sun, Qiang; He, Huan

    2018-04-11

    The release of selenium (Se) during coal combustion can have serious impacts on the ecological environment and human health. Therefore, it is very important to study the factors that concern the release of Se from coal combustion. In this paper, the characteristics of the release of Se from coal combustion, pyrolysis, and gasification of different coal species under different conditions are studied. The results show that the amount of released Se increases at higher combustion temperatures. There are obvious increases in the amount of released Se especially in the temperature range of 300 to 800 °C. In addition, more Se is released from the coal gasification than coal combustion process, but more Se is released from coal combustion than pyrolysis. The type of coal, rate of heating, type of mineral ions, and combustion atmosphere have different effects on the released percentage of Se. Therefore, having a good understanding of the factors that surround the release of Se during coal combustion, and then establishing the combustion conditions can reduce the impacts of this toxic element to humans and the environment.

  12. Design of Hybrid Steam-In Situ Combustion Bitumen Recovery Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaomeng; Gates, Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Given enormous capital costs, operating expenses, flue gas emissions, water treatment and handling costs of thermal in situ bitumen recovery processes, improving the overall efficiency by lowering energy requirements, environmental impact, and costs of these production techniques is a priority. Steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is the most widely used in situ recovery technique in Athabasca reservoirs. Steam generation is done on surface and consequently, because of heat losses, the energy efficiency of SAGD can never be ideal with respect to the energy delivered to the sandface. An alternative to surface steam generation is in situ combustion (ISC) where heat is generated within the formation through injection of oxygen at a sufficiently high pressure to initiate combustion of bitumen. In this manner, the heat from the combustion reactions can be used directly to mobilize the bitumen. As an alternative, the heat can be used to generate steam within the formation which then is the agent to move heat in the reservoir. In this research, alternative hybrid techniques with simultaneous and sequential steam-oxygen injection processes are examined to maximize the thermal efficiency of the recovery process. These hybrid processes have the advantage that during ISC, steam is generated within the reservoir from injected and formation water and as a product of oxidation. This implies that ex situ steam generation requirements are reduced and if there is in situ storage of combustion gases, that overall gas emissions are reduced. In this research, detailed reservoir simulations are done to examine the dynamics of hybrid processes to enable design of these processes. The results reveal that hybrid processes can lower emitted carbon dioxide-to-oil ratio by about 46%, decrease the consumed natural gas-to-oil ratio by about 73%, reduce the cumulative energy-to-oil ratio by between 40% and 70% compared to conventional SAGD, and drop water consumption per unit oil produced

  13. Symposium /International/ on Combustion, 18th, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, August 17-22, 1980, Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Problems related to combustion generated pollution are explored, taking into account the mechanism of NO formation from nitrogen compounds in hydrogen flames studied by laser fluorescence, the structure and similarity of nitric oxide production in turbulent diffusion flames, the effect of steam addition on NO formation, and the formation of NO2 by laminar flames. Other topics considered are concerned with propellant combustion, fluidized bed combustion, the combustion of droplets and sprays, premixed flame studies, fire studies, and flame stabilization. Attention is also given to coal flammability, chemical kinetics, turbulent combustion, soot, coal combustion, the modeling of combustion processes, combustion diagnostics, detonations and explosions, ignition, internal combustion engines, combustion studies, and furnaces.

  14. Spray-combustion process characterization in a common rail diesel engine fuelled with butanol-diesel blends by conventional methods and optical diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Silvia Merola

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The target of a sustainable mobility has led to investigate advanced combustion modes and fuels technologies. On the other side, the increasing global energy demand and the decreasing fossil-energy resources are enhancing the interest in the use of renewable alternative fuels for compression ignition engines with the target of near-zero emission levels. Although performance and emissions of alternative-fuel within light-duty diesel engines have been extensively investigated, results of fuel chemical composition impact on combustion by integrated optical methodologies are lacking. In order to meet this challenge, one of the main objectives of the research efforts is to characterize the combustion and species evolution. In this investigation, conventional tests and optical diagnostics were employed to enhance the comprehension of the combustion process and chemical markers in a common rail compression ignition engine powered by butanol-diesel blends. The investigation was focused on the effect of the injection strategy and blend composition on in-cylinder spray combustion and soot formation, through UV-visible digital imaging and natural emission spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in an optically accessible single cylinder high swirl compression ignition engine, equipped with a common rail multi-jets injection system. UV-visible emission spectroscopy was used to follow the evolution of the combustion process chemical markers. Spectral features of OH were identified and followed during the spray combustion process examining different pilot-main dwell timings. Soot spectral evidence in the visible wavelength range was correlated to soot engine out emissions. In this work, conventional and optical data related to diesel fuel blended with 40 % of n-butanol will be presented.

  15. Effects of Injection Rate Profile on Combustion Process and Emissions in a Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiang Bai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When multi-injection is implemented in diesel engine via high pressure common rail injection system, changed interval between injection pulses can induce variation of injection rate profile for sequential injection pulse, though other control parameters are the same. Variations of injection rate shape which influence the air-fuel mixing and combustion process will be important for designing injection strategy. In this research, CFD numerical simulations using KIVA-3V were conducted for examining the effects of injection rate shape on diesel combustion and emissions. After the model was validated by experimental results, five different shapes (including rectangle, slope, triangle, trapezoid, and wedge of injection rate profiles were investigated. Modeling results demonstrate that injection rate shape can have obvious influence on heat release process and heat release traces which cause different combustion process and emissions. It is observed that the baseline, rectangle (flat, shape of injection rate can have better balance between NOx and soot emissions than the other investigated shapes. As wedge shape brings about the lowest NOx emissions due to retarded heat release, it produces the highest soot emissions among the five shapes. Trapezoid shape has the lowest soot emissions, while its NOx is not the highest one. The highest NOx emissions were produced by triangle shape due to higher peak injection rate.

  16. Homogeneous surface oxidation of organosilicates by controlled combustion of adsorbed fuels: a facile method for low-temperature processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Bob E; Deline, Vaughn R; Bass, John; Knoesen, André; Miller, Robert D

    2013-09-25

    We have developed a method for the oxidation of organosilicate materials at temperatures considerably lower than those typically required for uncatalyzed oxidation. The process utilizes a combustible fuel delivered to the surface in an oxidizing environment to locally oxidize materials with carbon-silicon bonds. It also provides a level of control that cannot be achieved through standard high-energy top-to-bottom oxidative procedures such as UV-ozone and O2 plasmas. While the latter processes attack the outer interface, local oxidation can be achieved using our process by manipulating the distribution of the combustible fuel. We use this technique to generate oxidized porous organosilicate films with either a sharp oxidation front or uniform oxidation where the relative carbon content can be controlled through the film thickness depending on processing conditions. Further, we show that this process can also be used to seal bulk interconnected microporosity in films (<1 nm) without substantially changing the refractive index of the material. For both the nominally dense and porous films, the surface oxidation is accompanied by an increase in the Young's modulus and the oxidized films can be readily functionalized using standard silane chemistry to provide a variety of chemical functionalities.

  17. Combustion devices technology team - An overview and status of STME-related activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, P. K.; Croteau-Gillespie, Margie

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for CFD applications in propulsion technology has been formed at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The combustion devices technology team is one of the three teams that constitute the Consortium. While generally aiming to advance combustion devices technology for rocket propulsion, the team's efforts for the last 1 and 1/2 years have been focused on issues relating to the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) nozzle. The nozzle design uses hydrogen-rich turbine exhaust to cool the wall in a film/dump scheme. This method of cooling presents challenges and associated risks for the nozzle designers and the engine/vehicle integrators. Within the nozzle itself, a key concern is the ability to effectively and efficiently film cool the wall. From the National Launch System vehicle base standpoint, there are concerns with dumping combustible gases at the nozzle exit and their potential adverse effects on the base thermal environment. The Combustion Team has developed and is implementing plans to use validated CFD tools to aid in risk mitigation for both areas.

  18. Emission of pollutants from the combustion of composite fuels by metallurgical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Łabaj

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the study on emission characteristics of pollutants resulting from combustion process of composite alternative fuels for use in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper as an alternative fuel to currently used coke breeze. These fuels are mainly based on waste carrier of “C” element, and the composition of the fuel is modelled in order to obtain the appropriate energy and emission parameters as well as strength parameters. These studies confirmed the possibility of using composite fuels as an alternative reducing agent as well as an energy carrier in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper.

  19. Effects of pressure fluctuations on the combustion process in turbulent premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsell, Guillaume; Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    The need for a thorough understanding of turbulence-combustion interactions in compressible flows is driven by recent technological developments in propulsion as well as renewed interest in the development of next generation supersonic and hypersonic vehicles. In such flows, pressure fluctuations displaying a wide range of length and timescales are present. These fluctuations are expected to impact the combustion process to varying degrees, depending amongst other things on the amplitude of the pressure variations and the timescales of the chemical reactions taking place in the flame. In this context, numerical simulations of these flows can provide insight into the impact of pressure fluctuations on the combustion process. In the present work, we analyze data from simulations of statistically-flat premixed n-heptane/air flames at high Karlovitz numbers. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved exactly (DNS) and results obtained with both detailed kinetic modeling and one-step chemistry are considered. The effects of pressure fluctuations on the fuel burning rate are investigated. The findings are compared with results obtained from simulations of one-dimensional premixed flames subjected to various pressure waves.

  20. Seismic monitoring of in situ combustion process in a heavy oil field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadeh, Hossein Mehdi; Srivastava, Ravi P; Vedanti, Nimisha; Landrø, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Three time-lapse 3D seismic surveys are analysed to monitor the effect of in situ combustion, a thermal-enhanced oil recovery process in the Balol heavy oil reservoir in India. The baseline data were acquired prior to the start of the in situ combustion process in four injection wells, while the two monitor surveys were acquired 1 and 2 years after injection start, respectively. We present the results of baseline and second monitor surveys. Fluid substitution studies based on acoustic well logs predict a seismic amplitude decrease at the top reservoir and an increase at the base reservoir. Both the amplitude dimming at the top reservoir and the brightening at the base reservoir are observed in the field data. The extent of the most pronounced 4D anomaly is estimated from the seismic amplitude and time shift analysis. The interesting result of seismic analysis is that the anomalies are laterally shifted towards the northwest, rather than the expected east, from the injector location suggesting a northwest movement of the in situ combustion front. No clear evidence of air leakage into other sand layers, neither above nor below the reservoir sand, is observed. This does not necessarily mean that all the injected air is following the reservoir sand, especially if the thief sand layers are thin. These layers might be difficult to observe on seismic data

  1. Combustion process in a spark ignition engine: dynamics and noise level estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, T; Wendeker, M; Urbanowicz, K; Litak, G

    2004-06-01

    We analyze the experimental time series of internal pressure in a four cylinder spark ignition engine. In our experiment, performed for different spark advance angles, apart from the usual cyclic changes of engine pressure we observed additional oscillations. These oscillations are with longer time scales ranging from one to several hundred engine cycles depending on engine working conditions. Based on the pressure time dependence we have calculated the heat released per combustion cycle. Using the time series of heat release to calculate the correlation coarse-grained entropy we estimated the noise level for internal combustion process. Our results show that for a larger spark advance angle the system is more deterministic. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  2. CFD simulation of the combustion process of the low-emission vortex boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, A. A.; Maryandyshev, P. A.; Pankratov, E. V.; Lubov, V. K.

    2017-11-01

    Domestic heat and power engineering needs means and methods for optimizing the existing boiler plants in order to increase their technical, economic and environmental work. The development of modern computer technology, methods of numerical modeling and specialized software greatly facilitates the solution of many emerging problems. CFD simulation allows to obtaine precise results of thermochemical and aerodynamic processes taking place in the furnace of boilers in order to optimize their operation modes and develop directions for their modernization. The paper presents the results of simulation of the combustion process of a low-emission vortex coal boiler of the model E-220/100 using the software package Ansys Fluent. A hexahedral grid with a number of 2 million cells was constructed for the chosen boiler model. A stationary problem with a two-phase flow was solved. The gaseous components are air, combustion products and volatile substances. The solid phase is coal particles at different burnup stages. The Euler-Lagrange approach was taken as a basis. Calculation of the coal particles trajectories was carried out using the Discrete Phase Model which distribution of the size particle of coal dust was accounted for using the Rosin-Rammler equation. Partially Premixed combustion model was used as the combustion model which take into account elemental composition of the fuel and heat analysis. To take turbulence into account, a two-parameter k-ε model with a standard wall function was chosen. Heat transfer by radiation was calculated using the P1-approximation of the method of spherical harmonics. The system of spatial equations was numerically solved by the control volume method using the SIMPLE algorithm of Patankar and Spaulding. Comparison of data obtained during the industrial-operational tests of low-emission vortex boilers with the results of mathematical modeling showed acceptable convergence of the tasks of this level, which confirms the adequacy of the

  3. Effects of the reacting flowfield on combustion processes in a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Priya

    The performance of dry, low NOx gas turbines, which employ lean premixed (or partially premixed) combustors, is often limited by static and dynamic combustor stability, and they require complicated mixing hardware. To overcome these issues, a novel design, referred to as a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow (SPRF) combustor, has been recently demonstrated. The SPRF combustor has been shown to operate with ultra low NOx emissions in premixed and nonpremixed modes with gaseous and liquid fuels. The objective of this thesis is to elucidate the interactions between the flowfield and combustion processes in this novel combustor for gas- and liquid-fueled operation. This is achieved with experimental measurements employing various optical diagnostic techniques, which include Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), chemiluminescence imaging, Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals and elastic laser scattering from liquid droplets. The velocity measurements obtained during gas-fueled operation show that both nonreacting and reacting flows exhibit a "stagnation" region with low mean velocity and high RMS fluctuations. In nonreacting flow, it has been shown that the decay rate of the jet can be modeled as a combination of a free jet and a jet in a uniform opposed flow. The high shear between the forward and reverse flows causes significant recirculation, resulting in enhanced entrainment and mixing of the returning hot product gases into the incoming reactant jet for the reacting flow cases, which enables stable operation of the combustor at very lean equivalence ratios. Nonpremixed operation produces a flowfield similar to that of the premixed case except in the near-field region. The coaxial injector design results in high turbulence intensities close to the injector exit leading to significant fuel-air premixing before combustion occurs. The operation of the SPRF combustor fueled with liquid Jet-A is also experimentally investigated. The results indicate that while

  4. Relation of Hydrogen and Methane to Carbon Monoxide in Exhaust Gases from Internal-Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Tessmann, Arthur M

    1935-01-01

    The relation of hydrogen and methane to carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases from internal-combustion engines operating on standard-grade aviation gasoline, fighting-grade aviation gasoline, hydrogenated safety fuel, laboratory diesel fuel, and auto diesel fuel was determined by analysis of the exhaust gases. Two liquid-cooled single-cylinder spark-ignition, one 9-cylinder radial air-cooled spark-ignition, and two liquid-cooled single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were used.

  5. Turning process monitoring of internal combustion engine piston’s cylindrical surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twardowski Pawel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the monitoring method of turning process of combustion engine piston’s cylindrical surface is proposed. During this process, the PCD diamond tool cuts the piston’s cylindrical surface with the 3 grooves. The first groove is made in the cast iron insert. In case, when the machining allowances are selected inappropriately, the tool cuts the cast iron insert and consequently generates the reject. The proposed monitoring system based on vibration signals analysis enables the detection of these critical situations and react, in order to maintain the production quality.

  6. Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijmans, Johannes G [Menlo Park, CA; Merkel, Timothy C [Menlo Park, CA; Baker, Richard W [Palo Alto, CA

    2012-05-15

    A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

  7. Coal combustion: Effect of process conditions on char reactivity. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygourakis, K.

    1996-02-01

    Coal utilization involves two major stages: coal pyrolysis and char combustion. Figure 1.1 summarizes the steps of these processes. During the pyrolysis stage, heated particles from plastic coals soften, swell and release their volatiles before resolidifying again. During the combustion or gasification stage, char particles may ignite and fragment as the carbon is consumed leaving behind a solid ash residue. Process conditions such as pyrolysis heating rate, heat treatment temperature, pyrolysis atmosphere, and particle size are shown to chemically and physically affect the coal during pyrolysis and the resulting char. Consequently, these pyrolysis conditions as well as the combustion conditions such as the oxygen concentration and combustion temperature affect the char reactivity and ignition phenomena during the combustion stage. Better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of coal pyrolysis and char combustion is needed to achieve greater and more efficient utilization of coal. Furthermore, this knowledge also contributes to the development of more accurate models that describe the transient processes involved in coal combustion. The project objectives were to investigate the effect of pyrolysis conditions on the macropore structure and subsequent reactivity of chars.

  8. Ash related behaviour in staged and non-staged combustion of biomass fuels and fuel mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becidan, Michaël; Todorovic, Dusan; Skreiberg, Øyvind; Khalil, Roger A.; Backman, Rainer; Goile, Franziska; Skreiberg, Alexandra; Jovovic, Aleksandar; Sørum, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The fate of selected elements (with focus on the important players in corrosion i.e. Na, K, Pb, Zn, Cl and S) are investigated for three biomasses (wood, demolition wood and coffee waste) and six mixtures of these as pellets both with and without air staging in a laboratory reactor. In order to get a complete overview of the combustion products, both online and offline analytical methods are used. Information is collected about: flue gas composition, particle (fly ash) size distribution and composition, bottom ash composition and melting properties. The main findings are: (1) complex interactions are taking place between the mixed fuels during combustion; (2) the mode of occurrence of an element as well as the overall structure of the fuel are important for speciation; (3) the pelletisation process, by bringing chemical elements into intimate contact, may affect partitioning and speciation; (4) staging and mixing might simultaneously have positive and negative effects on operation; (5) staging affects the governing mechanisms of fly ash (aerosols) formation. -- Highlights: ► Complex interactions are taking place between the mixed fuels during combustion. ► The mode of occurrence of an element as well as the overall structure of the fuel are important for speciation. ► The pelletisation process, by bringing chemical elements into intimate contact, may affect partitioning and speciation. ► Staging and mixing might simultaneously have positive and negative effects on operation. ► Staging affects the governing mechanisms of fly ash (aerosols) formation.

  9. Study on the combustion process in a modern diesel engine controlled by pre-injection strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punov, P.; Milkov, N.; Perilhon, C.; Podevin, P.; Evtimov, T.

    2017-10-01

    The paper aims to study the combustion process in a modern diesel engine over the engine operating map. In order to study the rate of heat release (ROHR), an automotive diesel engine was experimentally tested using the injection parameters factory defined. The experimental test was conducted over the engine operating map as the engine speed was limited to 2400 rpm. Then, an engine simulation model was developed in AVL Boost. By means of that model the ROHR was estimated and approximated by means of double Vibe function. In all engine operating points we found two peaks at the ROHR. The first is a result of the pilot injection as the second corresponds to the main injection. There was not found an overlap between both peaks. It was found that the first peak of ROHR occurs closely before top dead center (BTDC) at partial load than full load. The ROHR peak as a result of main injection begins from 4°BTDC to 18°ATDC. It starts earlier with increasing engine speed and load. The combustion duration varies from 30 ºCA to 70 °CA. In order to verify the results pressure curve was estimated by means of defined Vibe function parameters and combustion duration. As a result, we observed small deviation between measured and simulated pressure curves.

  10. Evaluating the emissions from the gasification processing of municipal solid waste followed by combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Evandro José; Queiroz, Neide; Yamamoto, Carlos Itsuo; da Costa Neto, Pedro Ramos

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the emissions of pollutants generated from the combustion of syngas in the gasification of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) in Brazil using a mobile grille gasifier fed with domestic waste without any previous separation or grinding. The basic syngas composition (H 2 , CH 4 and CO) was analyzed by gas chromatography and the Lower Calorific Value was calculated, which ranged from 1.9 to 10.2 MJ/kg. In the monitoring of combustion gases (CO 2 , CO, NO , NO 2 , SO 2 and Total Hydrocarbon Content), values were found for these pollutants that were lower than the values established by the Brazilian legislation, except for SO 2 . Regarding the determination of the emission of metals, values lower than those permissible in the legislation were found for the most toxic metals grouped as class I (Cd, Hg, Tl). Therefore, it was evident that gasification followed by the combustion of syngas from MSW without prior segregation at source has the advantages of having fewer process steps, allowing the low emission of pollutants into the environment and it avoids that the residues are deposited in landfills, which are generators of leachate and greenhouse gas (methane). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Fuel Quantity on Soot Formation Process for Biomass-Based Renewable Diesel Fuel Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Soot formation process was investigated for biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, such as biomass to liquid (BTL), and conventional diesel combustion under varied fuel quantities injected into a constant volume combustion chamber. Soot measurement was implemented by two-color pyrometry under quiescent type diesel engine conditions (1000 K and 21% O2 concentration). Different fuel quantities, which correspond to different injection widths from 0.5 ms to 2 ms under constant injection pressure (1000 bar), were used to simulate different loads in engines. For a given fuel, soot temperature and KL factor show a different trend at initial stage for different fuel quantities, where a higher soot temperature can be found in a small fuel quantity case but a higher KL factor is observed in a large fuel quantity case generally. Another difference occurs at the end of combustion due to the termination of fuel injection. Additionally, BTL flame has a lower soot temperature, especially under a larger fuel quantity (2 ms injection width). Meanwhile, average soot level is lower for BTL flame, especially under a lower fuel quantity (0.5 ms injection width). BTL shows an overall low sooting behavior with low soot temperature compared to diesel, however, trade-off between soot level and soot temperature needs to be carefully selected when different loads are used.

  12. Finial Scientific/Technical Report: Application of a Circulating Fluidized Bed Process for the Chemical Looping Combustion of Solid Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Wei-Ping Pan; Dr. John T. Riley

    2005-10-10

    Chemical Looping Combustion is a novel combustion technology for the inherent separation of the greenhouse gas, CO{sub 2}. In 1983, Richter and Knoche proposed reversible combustion, which utilized both the oxidation and reduction of metal. Metal associated with its oxidized form as an oxygen carrier was circulated between two reactors--oxidizer and reducer. In the reducer, the solid oxygen carrier reacts with the fuel to produce CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and elemental metal only. Pure CO{sub 2} will be obtained in the exit gas stream from the reducer after H{sub 2}O is condensed. The pure CO{sub 2} is ready for subsequent sequestration. In the oxidizer, the elemental metal reacts with air to form metal oxide and separate oxygen from nitrogen. Only nitrogen and some unused oxygen are emitted from the oxidizer. The advantage of CLC compared to normal combustion is that CO{sub 2} is not diluted with nitrogen but obtained in a relatively pure form without any energy needed for separation. In addition to the energy-free purification of CO{sub 2}, the CLC process also provides two other benefits. First, NO{sub x} formation can be largely eliminated. Secondly, the thermal efficiency of a CLC system is very high. Presently, the CLC process has only been used with natural gas. An oxygen carrier based on an energy balance analysis and thermodynamics analysis was selected. Copper (Cu) seems to be the best choice for the CLC system for solid fuels. From this project, the mechanisms of CuO reduction by solid fuels may be as follows: (1) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are available, reduction of CuO could start at about 400 C or less. (2) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are unavailable and the reduction temperature is lower, reduction of CuO could occur at an onset temperature of about 500 C, char gasification reactivity in CO{sub 2} was lower at lower temperatures. (3) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are unavailable and the reduction temperature is higher than 750 C

  13. Kinetics of combustion related processes at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, J.H. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This past year has seen an excursion into perhalomethane dissociation using the laser-schlieren (LS) technique, with work on CCl{sub 4} already published and on CF{sub 3}Cl under analysis. However, the author`s emphasis has again been on the study of relaxation and dissociation of large molecules using the converging/diverging nozzle method to generate very weak (low pressure) shock waves.

  14. Infrared spectroscopy of organic free radicals related to combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisshaar, J.C. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The primary long-term goal of this work is to develop new techniques for measuring vibrational spectra of polyatomic neutral free radicals. The authors explore a variation of resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) in which tunable {omega}{sub IR} excites the radical vibrationally and {omega}{sub UV} selectively ionizes only the vibrationally excited molecules. Development of the IR + UV R2PI experiment is underway. In the meantime, the authors have used optical R2PI and pulsed field ionization (PFI) detection to obtain new vibrational spectra of species such as the benzyl and phenylsilane cations. In benzyl, a great deal was learned about the vibronic coupling mechanism in the mixed q{sup 2}A{sub 2}-2{sup 2}B{sub 2} system near 450 nm by projecting the mixed states onto the manifold of cation vibrational states. In phenylsilane{sup +}, we find that the sixfold barrier to internal rotation of the silyl group is small (V{sub 6} = +19 cm{sup {minus}1}). We are beginning to understand the mechanisms of coupling of torsional states with vibration, overall rotation, and other electronic states. In addition, we are developing a new model of internal rotation in aromatic compounds based on Prof. Frank Weinhold`s natural resonance theory.

  15. Methods of the working processes modelling of an internal combustion engine by an ANSYS IC Engine module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurchatkin, I. V.; Gorshkalev, A. A.; Blagin, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with developed methods of the working processes modelling in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine (ICE). Methods includes description of the preparation of a combustion chamber 3-d model, setting of the finite-element mesh, boundary condition setting and solution customization. Aircraft radial engine M-14 was selected for modelling. The cycle of cold blowdown in the ANSYS IC Engine software was carried out. The obtained data were compared to results of known calculation methods. A method of engine’s induction port improvement was suggested.

  16. Methodology for processing pressure traces used as inputs for combustion analyses in diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rašić, Davor; Vihar, Rok; Žvar Baškovič, Urban; Katrašnik, Tomaž

    2017-05-01

    This study proposes a novel methodology for designing an optimum equiripple finite impulse response (FIR) filter for processing in-cylinder pressure traces of a diesel internal combustion engine, which serve as inputs for high-precision combustion analyses. The proposed automated workflow is based on an innovative approach of determining the transition band frequencies and optimum filter order. The methodology is based on discrete Fourier transform analysis, which is the first step to estimate the location of the pass-band and stop-band frequencies. The second step uses short-time Fourier transform analysis to refine the estimated aforementioned frequencies. These pass-band and stop-band frequencies are further used to determine the most appropriate FIR filter order. The most widely used existing methods for estimating the FIR filter order are not effective in suppressing the oscillations in the rate- of-heat-release (ROHR) trace, thus hindering the accuracy of combustion analyses. To address this problem, an innovative method for determining the order of an FIR filter is proposed in this study. This method is based on the minimization of the integral of normalized signal-to-noise differences between the stop-band frequency and the Nyquist frequency. Developed filters were validated using spectral analysis and calculation of the ROHR. The validation results showed that the filters designed using the proposed innovative method were superior compared with those using the existing methods for all analyzed cases. Highlights • Pressure traces of a diesel engine were processed by finite impulse response (FIR) filters with different orders • Transition band frequencies were determined with an innovative method based on discrete Fourier transform and short-time Fourier transform • Spectral analyses showed deficiencies of existing methods in determining the FIR filter order • A new method of determining the FIR filter order for processing pressure traces was

  17. ACACIA Project – Development of a Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Process. Case of the DMXTM Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez A.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the ACACIA project was to develop processes for post-combustion CO2 capture at a lower cost and with a higher energetic efficiency than first generation processes using amines such as MonoEthanolAmine (MEA which are now considered for the first Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS demonstrators. The partners involved in this project were: Rhodia (Solvay since then, Arkema, Lafarge, GDF SUEZ, Veolia Environnement, IFP Energies nouvelles, IRCE Lyon, LMOPS, LTIM, LSA Armines. To validate the relevance of the breakthrough processes studied in this project, techno-economic evaluations were carried out with comparison to the reference process using a 30 wt% MEA solvent. These evaluation studies involved all the industrial partners of the project, each partner bringing specific cases of CO2 capture on their industrial facilities. From these studies, only the process using demixing solvent, DMXTM, developed by IFPEN appears as an alternative solution to the MEA process.

  18. Relative importance of thermal versus carbon dioxide induced warming from fossil-fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Caldeira, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth is heated both when reduced carbon is oxidized to carbon dioxide and when outgoing longwave radiation is trapped by carbon dioxide in the atmosphere (CO2 greenhouse effect). The purpose of this study is to improve our understanding of time scales and relative magnitudes of climate forcing increase over time from pulse, continuous, and historical CO2 and thermal emissions. To estimate the amount of global warming that would be produced by thermal and CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion, we calculate thermal emissions with thermal contents of fossil fuels and estimate CO2 emissions with emission factors from Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR5. We then use a schematic climate model mimicking Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 to investigate the climate forcing and the time-integrated climate forcing. We show that, considered globally, direct thermal forcing from fossil fuel combustion is about 1.71% the radiative forcing from CO2 that has accumulated in the atmosphere from past fossil fuel combustion. When a new power plant comes on line, the radiative forcing from the accumulation of released CO2 exceeds the thermal emissions from the power plant in less than half a year (and about 3 months for coal plants). Due to the long lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere, CO2 radiative forcing greatly overwhelms direct thermal forcing on longer time scales. Ultimately, the cumulative radiative forcing from the CO2 exceeds the direct thermal forcing by a factor of ~100,000.

  19. Study on the combustion behavior of high impact polystyrene nanocomposites produced by different extrusion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The combustion behavior of a blend made of high impact polystyrene (HIPS with sodium montmorillonite (MMT-Na+ and triphenyl phosphite (TPP, as a halogen-free flame retardant, is analyzed in detail in this work. The blend is processed through various extrusion methods aimed to improve clay dispersion. The UL94 method in vertical position, oxygen index and cone calorimetric measurements assess HIPS blend behavior in combustion. TGA, FTIR, SEM and X-ray measurements, together with mechanical and rheological tests evaluate the thermal degradation, morphology, intercalation and degree of dispersion of particles. The use of a static-mixing die placed at the extreme of a single screw extruder improves clay platelets distribution and reduces the peak heat release rate better than employing a twin screw extrusion process. In addition, mechanical and rheological properties are affected substantially by changing the extrusion process. A correlation between clay dispersion and HIPS fire retardant properties is found, as the peak heat release rate decreases with good clay dispersion in cone calorimetric tests.

  20. Equation for Combustion Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical relationship derived for interactions between turbulent flame and combustion noise. Relationship is rigorous theoretical correlation of combustion noise and combustion process. Establishes foundation for acoustic measurements as tool for investigating structure of turbulent flames. Mathematical relationship is expected to aid researchers in field of noise generated by combustion.

  1. Review of the investigation of mixture formation and combustion process using rapid compression machine and direct visualization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaat, M.; Khalid, Amir; Manshoor, B.; Ramsy, Him

    2013-12-01

    This paper reviews of some applications of optical visualization systems to compute the fuel-air mixing process during early stage of mixture formation in Diesel Combustion Engines. A number of studies have contributed to the understanding of fuel air mixing in DI diesel engine. This review has shown that the mixture formation process affects initial flame development. The review also found that injection pressure has a great effect on the mixture formation then the flame development and combustion characteristics. The method of the simulation of real phenomenon of diesel combustion with optical access rapid compression machine is also reviewed and experimental results are presented. The application of these methods to the investigation of diesel sprays highlights mechanisms which govern propagation and distribution of the formation of a combustible fuel-air mixture. A summary of the implementation of constant volume chamber and optical visualization system are shown in the accompanying tables and figures. The visualization of the formation process of diesel spray and its combustion in the diesel combustion chamber of diesel engine has been recognized as one of the best ways to understand the characteristics of the mixture formation.

  2. Obtaining zeolites from slags and ashes from a waste combustion plant in an autoclave process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grela Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste combustion is associated with the generation of post-processing solid products – waste such as slag and ash. One of the promising technologies in waste management and processing is the synthesis of zeolites and other materials exhibiting sorption properties. The aim of this study was to characterise and assess the physicochemical properties of the waste and the products synthesised from it. This paper presents the possibility of synthesis zeolites from the slag and ash from two waste combustion plants. The investigated waste is classified as hazardous waste and denoted by the EWC code 190111*. The paper presents the results of physicochemical studies of these materials. As a result of synthesis in an autoclave at 140°C with the use of 2 M NaOH, and other compounds, such zeolite forms as chabazite and sodalite were obtained. Textural studies and ion-exchange capacity investigations carried out allowed characterisation of the sorption properties of the materials. It was found that the materials obtained are characterised by the BET specific surface areas of 25.45 m2/g and 16.79 m2/g.

  3. The use of an electric field as a processing parameter in the combustion synthesis of ceramics and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, Z.A.

    1996-01-01

    The imposition of an electric field is shown to activate self-propagating combustion reactions and thus makes possible the synthesis of a variety of ceramic and composite phases. Experimental observations and modeling studies indicated that activation is accomplished by the localized effect of the current. The relationship between wave propagation and the direction of the applied field was investigated. The synthesis of composites by field-activated combustion synthesis (FACS) was demonstrated. It was shown that the imposition of a field during the combustion synthesis of MoSi 2 results in a decrease /in the product particle size. The results suggest that the field can be used as a processing parameter in self-propagating combustion synthesis

  4. Physical and combustion characteristics of biomass particles prepared by different milling processes for suspension firing in utility boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    The physical and combustion properties of roller-milled and hammer-milled wood pellets for suspension-firing are characterized both experimentally and numerically. The particle size and shape distribution is measured based on dynamical digital image processing. The traditional coal roller mills...... produce larger biomass particles than hammer mills do. The true density of the particles, measured by ethanol displacement method, does not remarkably vary with the different mills. Combustion tests of the milled biomass particles are performed in a single particle combustion reactor under conditions...... close to suspension-fired boilers. The ignition, devolatilization and burnout times of the milled particles under different combustion conditions are analysed. A one-dimensional transient model, properly accounting for the particle-ambient flow interaction and appropriately addressing the key sub...

  5. Global Partitioning of NOx Sources Using Satellite Observations: Relative Roles of Fossil Fuel Combustion, Biomass Burning and Soil Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaegle, Lyatt; Steinberger, Linda; Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the following abstract for the paper "Global partitioning of NOx sources using satellite observations: Relative roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and soil emissions." Satellite observations have been used to provide important new information about emissions of nitrogen oxides. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are significant in atmospheric chemistry, having a role in ozone air pollution, acid deposition and climate change. We know that human activities have led to a three- to six-fold increase in NOx emissions since pre-industrial times, and that there are three main surface sources of NOx: fuel combustion, large-scale fires, and microbial soil processes. How each of these sources contributes to the total NOx emissions is subject to some doubt, however. The problem is that current NOx emission inventories rely on bottom-up approaches, compiling large quantities of statistical information from diverse sources such as fuel and land use, agricultural data, and estimates of burned areas. This results in inherently large uncertainties. To overcome this, Lyatt Jaegle and colleagues from the University of Washington, USA, used new satellite observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) instrument. As the spatial and seasonal distribution of each of the sources of NOx can be clearly mapped from space, the team could provide independent topdown constraints on the individual strengths of NOx sources, and thus help resolve discrepancies in existing inventories. Jaegle's analysis of the satellite observations, presented at the recent Faraday Discussion on "Atmospheric Chemistry", shows that fuel combustion dominates emissions at northern mid-latitudes, while fires are a significant source in the Tropics. Additionally, she discovered a larger than expected role for soil emissions, especially over agricultural regions with heavy fertilizer use. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  6. Oxygen-enhanced combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Baukal, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Combustion technology has traditionally been dominated by air/fuel combustion. However, two developments have increased the significance of oxygen-enhanced combustion-new technologies that produce oxygen less expensively and the increased importance of environmental regulations. Advantages of oxygen-enhanced combustion include less pollutant emissions as well as increased energy efficiency and productivity. Oxygen-Enhanced Combustion, Second Edition compiles information about using oxygen to enhance industrial heating and melting processes. It integrates fundamental principles, applications, a

  7. Health effects engineering of coal and biomass combustion particulates: influence of zinc, sulfur and process changes on potential lung injury from inhaled ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Art Fernandez; Jost O.L. Wendt; Mark L. Witten [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2003-07-01

    This paper is concerned with health effects of the ash aerosol formed from the co-combustion of municipal sewage sludge with pulverized coal. To study, and mitigate, possible lung injury caused by inhalation of these ash particles, it is useful to employ 'Health Effects Engineering', which attempts to build connections between mechanisms that form particulates during the combustion process and mechanisms that cause these ill health effects. Initial results showed that inhalation of ash from the co-combustion of municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and pulverized coal caused much greater lung damage in mice, as measured by lung permeability increase, than that of coal ash, or MSS ash, alone. MSS contains substantial quantities of zinc but little sulfur, while coal contains sulfur but little zinc. Therefore, systematic experiments were conducted to determine the health effects of combustion generated zinc particles and zinc plus sulfur particles. Zinc without sulfur led to 'normal' behavior as far as lung permeability was concerned. Zinc with sulfur added led to the 'abnormal' behavior noted also in the coal +MSS experiments. Therefore the bad actor was identified to be zinc together with sulfur, and that was why the co-combustion of coal and MSS caused greater lung injury than the combustion of either fuel alone. Health effects engineering can also be employed to diminish this health risk caused by burning fuels containing both zinc and sulfur. Injection of a kaolinite sorbent downstream of the flame, but above the Zn dew point, can sequester the Zn, and react to form a new species which was shown to be relatively benign. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Study on the Combustion Process and Emissions of a Turbocharged Diesel Engine with EGR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Deqing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high pressure EGR system was adopted to a turbocharged inter-cooled diesel engine, to analyze its combustion and emission characteristics under the condition of different loads and constant speed. Under the same steady operating mode, with the increase of EGR rate, the temperature of compressed gas ascended, the ignition delay was shortened, the pressure and temperature of the burned gas descended, and the combustion process was prolonged. According to the experimental data, it was found that, at the same EGR rate, lower the load of engine was, lower the temperature in cylinder, and higher the increase rate of CO was. However, the increase rate of HC present a falling trend. The decrease rate of the specific emission of NOx linearly varied with EGR rate with a slope of 1.651. The increase rate of smoke opacity behaved a second-order polynomial uprising trend, and the higher the load was, the sharpener the smoke opacity deteriorated, with the increase of EGR rate. From the point of emission view, the engine with EGR system can achieve the lesser exhaust emissions in some operations by adjusting the engine parameters.

  9. Effects of Fuel Temperature on Injection Process and Combustion of Dimethyl Ether Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangxin, Gao; Zhulin, Yuan; Apeng, Zhou; Shenghua, Liu; Yanju, Wei

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the effects of fuel temperature on the injection process in the fuel-injection pipe and the combustion characteristics of compression ignition (CI) engine, tests on a four stroke, direct injection dimethyl ether (DME) engine were conducted. Experimental results show that as the fuel temperature increases from 20 to 40 °C, the sound speed is decreased by 12.2%, the peak line pressure at pump and nozzle sides are decreased by 7.2% and 5.6%, respectively. Meanwhile, the injection timing is retarded by 2.2 °CA and the injection duration is extended by 0.8 °CA. Accordingly, the ignition delay and the combustion duration are extended by 0.7 °CA and 4.0 °CA, respectively. The cylinder peak pressure is decreased by 5.4%. As a result, the effective thermal efficiency is decreased, especially for temperature above 40 °C. Before beginning an experiment, the fuel properties of DME, including the density, the bulk modulus, and the sound speed were calculated by "ThermoData." The calculated result of sound speed is consistent with the experimental results.

  10. Molten salt combustion of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, L.F.; McKenzie, D.E.; Richards, W.L.; Oldenkamp, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    The Atomics International Molten Salt Combustion Process reduces the weight and volume of combustible β-γ contaminated transuranic waste by utilizing air in a molten salt medium to combust organic materials, to trap particulates, and to react chemically with any acidic gases produced during combustion. Typically, incomplete combustion products such as hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide are below detection limits (i.e., 3 ) is directly related to the sodium chloride vapor pressure of the melt; >80% of the particulate is sodium chloride. Essentially all metal oxides (combustion ash) are retained in the melt, e.g., >99.9% of the plutonium, >99.6% of the europium, and >99.9% of the ruthenium are retained in the melt. Both bench-scale radioactive and pilot scale (50 kg/hr) nonradioactive combustion tests have been completed with essentially the same results. Design of three combustors for industrial applications are underway

  11. A numerical study on combustion process in a small compression ignition engine run dual-fuel mode (diesel-biogas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, H.; Widodo, T. I.; Nasution, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    In order to reduce the consumption of fossil fuel of a compression ignition (CI) engines which is usually used in transportation and heavy machineries, it can be operated in dual-fuel mode (diesel-biogas). However, the literature reviews show that the thermal efficiency is lower due to incomplete combustion process. In order to increase the efficiency, the combustion process in the combustion chamber need to be explored. Here, a commercial CFD code is used to explore the combustion process of a small CI engine run on dual fuel mode (diesel-biogas). The turbulent governing equations are solved based on finite volume method. A simulation of compression and expansions strokes at an engine speed and load of 1000 rpm and 2500W, respectively has been carried out. The pressure and temperature distributions and streamlines are plotted. The simulation results show that at engine power of 732.27 Watt the thermal efficiency is 9.05%. The experiment and simulation results show a good agreement. The method developed in this study can be used to investigate the combustion process of CI engine run on dual-fuel mode.

  12. Numerical Investigation of the Impact of the Compressor Operation Mode on Working Process of the Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, M. Yu; Lukachev, S. V.; Anisimov, V. M.

    2018-01-01

    The method of integrated compressor/combustor simulation was used to investigate the impact of flow distortion, appeared due to compressor blades, during the combustion chamber workflow. The method was improved in terms of generating a common grid and of principles of the boundary conditions settings. The geometric model includes four geometric volume bodies: guide vanes of the penultimate stage of high-pressure compressor, the impeller and guide vanes of the last stage and the flow path of combustion chamber. The calculation was carried out for some operation mode of the engine (nominal, 0.7 of nominal and 0.5 of nominal regimes) with and without compressor. The results were compared with the results of combustion chamber simulation without the compressor. Simulations showed that blade wakes extend up to the flame tube head. These wakes influence on the flame tongue, pressure field, temperature and velocity in the recirculation-mixing zone. It can influence on combustion efficiency, ecological performance and on temperature field at the combustor outlet. Thus, the simulations, which take into account combustion chamber and compressor, are more fully represent the characteristics of the working process of the combustion chamber and increase the efficiency of the design of new products.

  13. Models of Non-Stationary Thermodynamic Processes in Rocket Engines Taking into Account a Chemical Equilibrium of Combustion Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Aliev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the two approach-based techniques for calculating the non-stationary intra-chamber processes in solid-propellant rocket engine (SPRE. The first approach assumes that the combustion products are a mechanical mix while the other one supposes it to be the mix, which is in chemical equilibrium. To enhance reliability of solution of the intra ballistic tasks, which assume a chemical equilibrium of combustion products, the computing algorithms to calculate a structure of the combustion products are changed. The algorithm for solving a system of the nonlinear equations of chemical equilibrium, when determining the iterative amendments, uses the orthogonal QR method instead of a method of Gauss. Besides, a possibility to apply genetic algorithms in a task about a structure of combustion products is considered.It is shown that in the tasks concerning the prediction of non-stationary intra ballistic characteristics in a solid propellant rocket engine, application of models of mechanical mix and chemically equilibrium structure of combustion products leads to qualitatively and quantitatively coinciding results. The maximum difference in parameters is 5-10%, at most. In tasks concerning the starting operation of a solid sustainer engine with high-temperature products of combustion difference in results is more essential, and can reach 20% and more.A technique to calculate the intra ballistic parameters, in which flotation of combustion products is considered in the light of a spatial statement, requires using the high-performance computer facilities. For these tasks it is offered to define structure of products of combustion and its thermo-physical characteristics, using the polynoms coefficients of which should be predefined.

  14. Theoretical studies of nonadiabatic and spin-forbidden processes: Investigations of the reactions and spectroscopy of radical species relevant to combustion reactions and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarkony, D.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program focusses on studies of spin-forbidden and electronically nonadiabatic processes involving radical species relevant to combustion reactions and combustion diagnostics. To study the electronic structure aspects of these processes a unique and powerful system of electronic structure programs, developed over the past nine years, the BROOKLYN codes, is employed. These programs enable the authors to address questions basic to the understanding of elementary combustion processes not tractable using more standard quantum chemistry codes.

  15. Methodology for processing pressure traces used as inputs for combustion analyses in diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rašić, Davor; Vihar, Rok; Baškovič, Urban Žvar; Katrašnik, Tomaž

    2017-01-01

    This study proposes a novel methodology for designing an optimum equiripple finite impulse response (FIR) filter for processing in-cylinder pressure traces of a diesel internal combustion engine, which serve as inputs for high-precision combustion analyses. The proposed automated workflow is based on an innovative approach of determining the transition band frequencies and optimum filter order. The methodology is based on discrete Fourier transform analysis, which is the first step to estimate the location of the pass-band and stop-band frequencies. The second step uses short-time Fourier transform analysis to refine the estimated aforementioned frequencies. These pass-band and stop-band frequencies are further used to determine the most appropriate FIR filter order. The most widely used existing methods for estimating the FIR filter order are not effective in suppressing the oscillations in the rate- of-heat-release (ROHR) trace, thus hindering the accuracy of combustion analyses. To address this problem, an innovative method for determining the order of an FIR filter is proposed in this study. This method is based on the minimization of the integral of normalized signal-to-noise differences between the stop-band frequency and the Nyquist frequency. Developed filters were validated using spectral analysis and calculation of the ROHR. The validation results showed that the filters designed using the proposed innovative method were superior compared with those using the existing methods for all analyzed cases. Highlights • Pressure traces of a diesel engine were processed by finite impulse response (FIR) filters with different orders • Transition band frequencies were determined with an innovative method based on discrete Fourier transform and short-time Fourier transform • Spectral analyses showed deficiencies of existing methods in determining the FIR filter order • A new method of determining the FIR filter order for processing pressure traces was

  16. Computer simulation of waste combustion in a moving grate furnace as a tool for process optimization and operator trainings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brem, G.; Kessel, L.B.M. van

    1998-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the waste combustion process in a moving grate furnace. The computer model describes the main processes occurring both in the waste layer on the grate, and in the gas phase in the furnace. The boiler section and the flue gas cleaning equipment are also

  17. Optimization of a Gas Switching Combustion process through advanced heat management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloete, Schalk; Zaabout, Abdelghafour; Romano, Matteo C.; Chiesa, Paolo; Lozza, Giovanni; Gallucci, Fausto; Sint Annaland, Martin van; Amini, Shahriar

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • GSC is a promising new reactor concept for power production with cost effective CO 2 capture. • The standalone fluidized bed reactors employed will allow for easy process scale-up. • The GSC simple configuration achieves higher efficiencies than conventional solutions. • Further increases in efficiency can be achieved via advanced heat management. • The 41.9% maximum efficiency is in line with other CLC–IGCC configurations. - Abstract: Gas Switching Combustion (GSC) is a promising new process concept for energy efficient power production with integrated CO 2 capture. In comparison to conventional Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) carried out in interconnected fluidized beds, the GSC concept will be substantially easier to design and scale up, especially for pressurized conditions. One potential drawback of the GSC concept is the gradual temperature variation over the transient process cycle, which leads to a drop in electric efficiency of the plant. This article investigates heat management strategies to mitigate this issue both through simulations and experiments. Simulation studies of the GSC concept integrated into an IGCC power plant show that heat management using a nitrogen recycle stream can increase plant efficiency by 3 percentage points to 41.6% while maintaining CO 2 capture ratios close to 90%. Reactive multiphase flow simulations of the GSC reactor also showed that heat management can eliminate fuel slip problems. In addition, the GSC concept offers the potential to remove the need for a nitrogen recycle stream by implementing a concentrated air injection that extracts heat while only a small percentage of oxygen reacts. Experiments have shown that, similar to nitrogen recycle, this strategy reduces transient temperature variations across the cycle and therefore merits further investigation.

  18. How in-situ combustion process works in a fractured system : two-dimensional, core and block scale simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadaei, H.; Renard, G. [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Lyon (France); Quintard, M.; Debenest, G. [L' Inst. de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Kamp, A.M. [Centre Huile Lourde Ouvert et Experimental CHLOE, Pau (France)

    2008-10-15

    Core and matrix block scale simulations of in situ combustion (ISC) processes in a fractured reservoir were conducted. ISC propagation conditions and oil recovery mechanisms were studied at core scale, while the 2-D behaviour of ISC was also studied at block-scale in order to determine dominant processes for combustion propagation and the characteristics of different steam fronts. The study examined 2-phase combustion in a porous medium containing a solid fuel as well as 2-D conventional dry combustion methods. The aim of the study was to predict ISC extinction and propagation conditions as well as to understand the mechanisms of oil recovery using ISC processes. The simulations were also used to develop up-scaling guidelines for fractured systems. Computations were performed using different oxygen diffusion and matrix permeability values. The effect of each production mechanism was studied separately. The multi-phase simulations showed that ISC in fractured reservoirs is feasible. The study showed that ISC propagation is dependent on the oxygen diffusion coefficient, while matrix permeability plays an important role in oil production. Oil production was governed by gravity drainage and thermal effects. Heat transfer due to the movement of combustion front velocity in the study was minor when compared to heat transfer by conduction and convection. It was concluded that upscaling methods must also consider the different zones distinguished for oil saturation and temperatures. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 15 figs.

  19. Absolute and relative emissions analysis in practical combustion systems—effect of water vapor condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J. P.; Mollendorf, J. C.; DesJardin, P. E.

    2016-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of the absolute combustion gas composition is necessary in the automotive, aircraft, processing, heating and air conditioning industries where emissions reduction is a major concern. Those industries use a variety of sensor technologies. Many of these sensors are used to analyze the gas by pumping a sample through a system of tubes to reach a remote sensor location. An inherent characteristic with this type of sampling strategy is that the mixture state changes as the sample is drawn towards the sensor. Specifically, temperature and humidity changes can be significant, resulting in a very different gas mixture at the sensor interface compared with the in situ location (water vapor dilution effect). Consequently, the gas concentrations obtained from remotely sampled gas analyzers can be significantly different than in situ values. In this study, inherent errors associated with sampled combustion gas concentration measurements are explored, and a correction methodology is presented to determine the absolute gas composition from remotely measured gas species concentrations. For in situ (wet) measurements a heated zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) oxygen sensor (Bosch LSU 4.9) is used to measure the absolute oxygen concentration. This is used to correct the remotely sampled (dry) measurements taken with an electrochemical sensor within the remote analyzer (Testo 330-2LL). In this study, such a correction is experimentally validated for a specified concentration of carbon monoxide (5020 ppmv).

  20. Aerosol Combustion Synthesis of Nanopowders and Processing to Functional Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Eongyu

    In this dissertation, the advantages of liquid-feed flame spray pyrolysis (LF-FSP) process in producing nanoparticles (NPs) as well as processing the produced NPs to ceramic/polymer nanocomposite films and high density polycrystalline ceramic films are demonstrated. The LF-FSP process aerosolizes alcohol solutions of metalloorganic precursors by oxygen and combusts them at > 1500 °C. The combustion products are rapidly quenched ( 10s of ms) to ceramic/polymer/interface(phase) ternary nanocomposites in which the interphase can be the determining factor of the final net properties. In ceramic processing, NPs show increased sinterability and provide access to small average grain sizes with fine control of microstructures, compared to when micron sized powders are used. Therefore, synthesis, processing, and characterization of NPs, NP derived nanocomposites and ceramic monoliths are of great interest. We first compare the LF-FSP to commercial FSP process by producing fumed silica. Combusting spirocyclic alkoxysilanes or Si(OEt)4 by LF-FSP process produced fumed silica very similar to SiCl4 derived products. Given LF-FSP approach does not require the containment constraints of the SiCl4 process and precursors are synthesized from rice hull ash, the reported approach represents a sustainable, green and potentially lower cost alternative. We then show the versatility of NPs in formulating flexible ceramic/polymer nanocomposites (BaTiO3/epoxy) with superior properties. Volume fractions of the BaTiO3 filler and composite film thicknesses were controlled to adjust the net dielectric constant and the capacitance. Measured net dielectric constants further deviated from theory, with increasing solids loadings, due to NP agglomeration. Wound nanocomposite capacitors showed ten times higher capacitance compared to the commercial counterpart. Following series of studies explore the use of flame made NPs in processing Li+ conducting membranes. Systematic doping studies were

  1. Power process with separation of CO{sub 2} through combustion in two stages - chemical looping combustion. Final report; Kraftprocess med avskiljning av CO{sub 2} genom foerbraenning i ett tvaastegsfoerfarande - chemical looping combustion. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyngfelt, Anders; Cho, Paul; Steenari, Britt-Marie; Langer, Vratislav; Eriksson, Sten; Mattisson, Tobias [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Technology

    2005-06-15

    For combustion with CO{sub 2} capture, chemical-looping combustion (CLC) with inherent separation of CO{sub 2} is a promising technology. Two interconnected fluidized beds are used as reactors. In the fuel reactor, a gaseous fuel is oxidized by an oxygen carrier, e.g. metal oxide particles, producing carbon dioxide and water. The reduced oxygen carrier is then transported to the air reactor, where it is oxidized by air back to its original form before it is returned to the fuel reactor. The feasibility of using both natural iron ore and synthetic oxygen carriers based on oxides of iron, nickel, copper and manganese was determined. Oxygen carrier particles were produced by freeze granulation. To be able to study and compare the different types of oxygen carrier particles, a procedure for testing and evaluation was developed. The reactivity was evaluated in both fixed and fluidized bed laboratory reactors, simulating a CLC system by exposing the sample to alternating reducing and oxidizing conditions. In addition, the particles were characterized with respect to crushing strength, agglomeration, tendency for carbon deposition as well as chemical and physical parameters. The rates of reaction varied and were highly dependent upon the oxygen carrier used. For the natural iron ore it was found that a high yield of CH{sub 4} to CO{sub 2} was possible although the solid reactivity was relatively low. The reactivity of the freeze granulated particles were considerably higher, with the oxygen carriers based on nickel and copper having the highest reactivity in comparison to Fe and Mn based particles. However all of the investigated samples had a reactivity sufficient for use in a CLC of interconnected fluidized beds. The copper oxide particles agglomerated and may not be suitable as an oxygen carrier. Carbon formation and agglomeration was studied in detail, and the results suggest that neither of those should be a problem in this process, except for copper which

  2. Oxidative potential of gas phase combustion emissions - An underestimated and potentially harmful component of air pollution from combustion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, S.; Vaughan, A.; Hedayat, F.; Salimi, F.; Rahman, M. M.; Zare, A.; Brown, R. A.; Brown, R. J.; Wang, H.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, X.; Bottle, S. E.; Yang, I. A.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2017-06-01

    The oxidative potential (OP) of the gas phase is an important and neglected aspect of environmental toxicity. Whilst prolonged exposure to particulate matter (PM) associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to lead to negative health effects, the potential for compounds in gas phase to cause similar effects is yet to be understood. In this study we describe: the significance of the gas phase OP generated through vehicle emissions; discuss the origin and evolution of species contributing to measured OP; and report on the impact of gas phase OP on human lung cells. The model aerosol for this study was exhaust emitted from a Euro III Common-rail diesel engine fuelled with different blends of diesel and biodiesel. The gas phase of these emissions was found to be potentially as hazardous as the particle phase. Fuel oxygen content was found to negatively correlate with the gas phase OP, and positively correlate with particle phase OP. This signifies a complex interaction between reactive species present in gas and particle phase. Furthermore, this interaction has an overarching effect on the OP of both particle and gas phase, and therefore the toxicity of combustion emissions.

  3. Numerical analysis of a one-dimensional multicomponent model of the in-situ combustion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesterov, Igor; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2013-01-01

    parameter, the critical ignition saturation, is introduced, in order to describe the easiness of oil ignition. Its dependence on the different parameters of the oil mixture and injection gas is studied. The conclusions on the processes governing the ignition of oil in the presence of water are made......, the model is based on SARA representation of a petroleum mixture (saturates–aromatics–resins–asphaltenes), which may react differently with oxygen and produce other components (for example, light oils and coke). In total, the model contains 14 components, which may undergo 15 chemical reactions. The set...... of reactions in the original model of M.R. Kristensen has been modified in order to account for secondary combustion of the light oil fraction. The results of the model implementation are applied to the four heavy oil systems and qualitatively compared to the results of previous experimental studies. A new...

  4. Introduction to Physics and Chemistry of Combustion Explosion, Flame, Detonation

    CERN Document Server

    Liberman, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Most of the material covered in this book deals with the fundamentals of chemistry and physics of key processes and fundamental mechanisms for various combustion and combustion related phenomena in gaseous combustible mixture. It provides the reader with basic knowledge of burning processes and mechanisms of reaction wave propagation. The combustion of a gas mixture (flame, explosion, detonation) is necessarily accompanied by motion of the gas. The process of combustion is therefore not only a chemical phenomenon but also one of gas dynamics. The material selection focuses on the gas phase and

  5. The new energy processes and the new approaches of the combustion. The environmental impact decrease; Nouveaux procedes energetiques et nouvelles approches de la combustion. Reduction de l'impact environnemental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabot, G. [CORIA, 76 - Mont Saint Aignan (France); Caillat, S. [Ecole des Mines de Douai, Dept. Energetique, 59 (France); Guillet, R. [Gaz de France, GDF DR, 93 - La Plaine Saint-Denis (France)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    During this day organized by the french society of the science of heat (SFT), seven papers have been presented. They deal with new processes of combustion leading to a better air quality for the environment. The first process concerns the wet combustion, an energy efficient and environmentally friendly technique, its properties and the DHC (hygrometric diagram of combustion) analysis. The flames mechanisms and the swirl process are presented in a second part with the analysis of the radiant heat transfers and the nitrogen oxides emissions. (A.L.B.)

  6. Co-production of electricity and ethanol, process economics of value prior combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treasure, T.; Gonzalez, R.; Venditti, R.; Pu, Y.; Jameel, H.; Kelley, S.; Prestemon, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Economics of producing cellulosic ethanol and bio-power in the same facility using an autohydrolysis process. ► Feedstock considerably affect the economics of the biorefinery facility. ► Lower moisture content improves financial performance of the bio-power business. - Abstract: A process economic analysis of co-producing bioethanol and electricity (value prior to combustion) from mixed southern hardwood and southern yellow pine is presented. Bioethanol is produced by extracting carbohydrates from wood via autohydrolysis, membrane separation of byproducts, enzymatic hydrolysis of extracted oligomers and fermentation to ethanol. The residual solids after autohydrolysis are pressed and burned in a power boiler to generate steam and electricity. A base case scenario of biomass combustion to produce electricity is presented as a reference to understand the basics of bio-power generation economics. For the base case, minimum electricity revenue of $70–$96/MWh must be realized to achieve a 6–12% internal rate of return. In the alternative co-production cases, the ethanol facility is treated as a separate business entity that purchases power and steam from the biomass power plant. Minimum ethanol revenue required to achieve a 12% internal rate of return was estimated to be $0.84–$1.05/l for hardwood and $0.74–$0.85/l for softwood. Based on current market conditions and an assumed future ethanol selling price of $0.65/l, the co-production of cellulosic bioethanol and power does not produce financeable returns. A risk analysis indicates that there is a probability of 26.6% to achieve an internal rate of return equal or higher than 12%. It is suggested that focus be placed on improving yield and reducing CAPEX before this technology can be applied commercially. This modeling approach is a robust method to evaluate economic feasibility of integrated production of bio-power and other products based on extracted hemicellulose.

  7. Multi-Phase Combustion and Transport Processes Under the Influence of Acoustic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    two primary power systems. A brief background of combustion instabilities in gas turbine engines is given first, due to its relevance to the fuel ...biofuel blends, on the other hand, maintain characteristics similar to those of gasoline and can be used in existing internal combustion (IC) engines ... International ) on Combustion , pages 1219–1226, 1996. [67] A.J. Marchese, R.O. Colantino, F.L. Dryer, and V. Nayagam. Microgravity com- bustion of methanol and

  8. Identification of levoglucosan and related steroisomers in fog water as a biomass combustion tracer by ESI-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Pierangela; Cappiello, Achille; De Simonii, Elisa; Mangani, Filippo; Trufelli, Helga; Decesari, Stefano; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Fuzzi, Sandro

    2004-12-01

    A conspicuous fraction of the water soluble organic compounds (WSOC) in fog and fine aerosol samples is composed by monosaccharide anhydrides, such as levoglucosan and its stereoisomers, galactosan and mannosan. Levoglucosan is produced exclusively during wood combustion processes, making it a very useful tracer for plant combustion emissions in the atmosphere. This paper describes a new experimental approach, based on electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS), for the identification of levoglucosan in fog water samples. The analytical method proposed allows to identify the specific sugar anhydrides directly in the liquid phase without the need of any derivatization process.

  9. Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Howard; Zhou, S James; Ding, Yong; Bikson, Ben

    2012-03-31

    This report summarizes progress made during Phase I and Phase II of the project: "Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process," under contract DE-FE-0000646. The objective of this project is to develop a practical and cost effective technology for CO{sub 2} separation and capture for pre-combustion coal-based gasification plants using a membrane contactor/solvent absorption process. The goals of this technology development project are to separate and capture at least 90% of the CO{sub 2} from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants with less than 10% increase in the cost of energy services. Unlike conventional gas separation membranes, the membrane contactor is a novel gas separation process based on the gas/liquid membrane concept. The membrane contactor is an advanced mass transfer device that operates with liquid on one side of the membrane and gas on the other. The membrane contactor can operate with pressures that are almost the same on both sides of the membrane, whereas the gas separation membranes use the differential pressure across the membrane as driving force for separation. The driving force for separation for the membrane contactor process is the chemical potential difference of CO{sub 2} in the gas phase and in the absorption liquid. This process is thus easily tailored to suit the needs for pre-combustion separation and capture of CO{sub 2}. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and PoroGen Corporation (PGC) have developed a novel hollow fiber membrane technology that is based on chemically and thermally resistant commercial engineered polymer poly(ether ether ketone) or PEEK. The PEEK membrane material used in the membrane contactor during this technology development program is a high temperature engineered plastic that is virtually non-destructible under the operating conditions encountered in typical gas absorption applications. It can withstand contact with most of the common treating

  10. Investigation of Spark Ignition and Autoignition in Methane and Air Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Chemical Reaction Kinetics. A numerical Study of Ignition Processes in Internal Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordrik, R.

    1993-12-01

    The processes in the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines have received increased attention in recent years because their efficiencies are important both economically and environmentally. This doctoral thesis studies the ignition phenomena by means of numerical simulation methods. The fundamental physical relations include flow field conservation equations, thermodynamics, chemical reaction kinetics, transport properties and spark modelling. Special attention is given to the inclusion of chemical kinetics in the flow field equations. Using his No Transport of Radicals Concept method, the author reduces the computational efforts by neglecting the transport of selected intermediate species. The method is validated by comparison with flame propagation data. A computational method is described and used to simulate spark ignition in laminar premixed methane-air mixtures and the autoignition process of a methane bubble surrounded by hot air. The spark ignition simulation agrees well with experimental results from the literature. The autoignition simulation identifies the importance of diffusive and chemical processes acting together. The ignition delay times exceed the experimental values found in the literature for premixed ignition delay, presumably because of the mixing process and lack of information on low temperature reactions in the skeletal kinetic mechanism. Transient turbulent methane jet autoignition is simulated by means of the KIVA-II code. Turbulent combustion is modelled by the Eddy Dissipation Concept. 90 refs., 81 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Numerical simulations of industrial processes involving fluid dynamics, combustion and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducrocq, J. [Air Liquide, Centre de Recherche Claude-Delorme, Jouy-en-Josas (France)

    1997-12-31

    Moving out of the scientific community research laboratories, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software packages are now allowing industrials to analyse and optimize industrial processes involving the use of gases, liquids and even some two-phase fluids. Their attractiveness and their impact stems out from the opportunity they offer to bring insight into an existing unit, or even at the design stage, by displaying the spatial distribution of process relevant variables such as temperature, concentration. The filling of the spacing in between a two-layer window is a simple example. This new opportunity of visualisation is at times an unique way, when the process environment is an opaque one, such as liquid metal flowing into a tundish or when measurements of flows may be a long and tedious work, such as flows within water treatment basins. This environment we are to investigate in order to optimize can also be a harsh one, due to its high temperature level for example. Such are burners. But then pure fluid flow analysis, such as cold flow water models, has too many shortcomings. The description of combustion processes and of radiation become a necessary feature in order to describe thermal heat transfer or to locate `hot spots`. Such numerical models showing our oxycombustion expertise in glass melting will be presented. (author)

  12. Greenhouse impact due to the use of combustible fuels: life cycle viewpoint and relative radiative forcing commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkinen, Johanna; Palosuo, Taru; Holmgren, Kristina; Savolainen, Ilkka

    2008-09-01

    Extensive information on the greenhouse impacts of various human actions is important in developing effective climate change mitigation strategies. The greenhouse impacts of combustible fuels consist not only of combustion emissions but also of emissions from the fuel production chain and possible effects on the ecosystem carbon storages. It is important to be able to assess the combined, total effect of these different emissions and to express the results in a comprehensive way. In this study, a new concept called relative radiative forcing commitment (RRFC) is presented and applied to depict the greenhouse impact of some combustible fuels currently used in Finland. RRFC is a ratio that accounts for the energy absorbed in the Earth system due to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations (production and combustion of fuel) compared to the energy released in the combustion of fuel. RRFC can also be expressed as a function of time in order to give a dynamic cumulative picture on the caused effect. Varying time horizons can be studied separately, as is the case when studying the effects of different climate policies on varying time scales. The RRFC for coal for 100 years is about 170, which means that in 100 years 170 times more energy is absorbed in the atmosphere due to the emissions of coal combustion activity than is released in combustion itself. RRFC values of the other studied fuel production chains varied from about 30 (forest residues fuel) to 190 (peat fuel) for the 100-year study period. The length of the studied time horizon had an impact on the RRFC values and, to some extent, on the relative positions of various fuels.

  13. Nongray-gas Effects in Modeling of Large-scale Oxy-fuel Combustion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2012-01-01

    Quite some studies have been conducted in order to implement oxy-fuel combustion with flue gas recycle in conventional utility boilers as an effective effort of carbon capture and storage. However, combustion under oxy-fuel conditions is significantly different from conventional air-fuel firing, ...

  14. Study of the Radical Chain Mechanism of Hydrocarbon Oxidation for In Situ Combustion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ushakova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the abundance of in situ combustion models of oil oxidation, many of the effects are still beyond consideration. For example, until now, initial stages of oxidation were not considered from a position of radical chain process. This is a serious difficulty for the simulation of oil recovery process that involves air injection. To investigate the initial stages of oxidation, the paper considers the sequence of chemical reactions, including intermediate short-living compounds and radicals. We have attempted to correlate the main stages of the reaction with areas of heat release observed in the experiments. The system of differential equations based on the equations of oxidation reactions was solved. Time dependence of peroxides formation and start of heat release is analytically derived for the initial stages. We have considered the inhibition of initial oxidation stages by aromatic oil compounds and have studied the induction time in dependence on temperature. Chain ignition criteria for paraffins and crude oil in presence of core samples were obtained. The calculation results are compared with the stages of oxidation that arise by high-pressure differential scanning calorimetry. According to experimental observations we have determined which reactions are important for the process and which can be omitted or combined into one as insignificant.

  15. Preparation of soft-agglomerated nano-sized ceramic powders by sol-gel combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Q.; Ma, X.H.; Yan, Q.Z.; Ge, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    The soft-agglomerated Gd 2 BaCuO 5 (Gd211) nano-powders were synthesized by sol-gel combustion process with binary ligand and the special pretreatment on gel. The mechanism of the formation of weakly agglomerated structure was studied in detail. The results showed that network structure in gelation process was found to be a decisive factor for preventing agglomeration of colloidal particles. The removal of free water, coordinated water, and most of hydroxyl groups during pretreatment further inhibited the formation of hydrogen bonds between adjacent particles. The soft-agglomeration of the particles was confirmed by isolated particles in calcined Gd211 powders and in green compact, a narrow monomodal pore size distribution of the green compact and the low agglomeration coefficient of the calcined Gd211 powder. Extension this process to synthesis of BaCeO 3 , BaTiO 3 and Ce 0.8 Sm 0.2 O 1.9 powders, also led to weakly agglomerated nano-powders. It suggests that this method represents a powerful and facile method for the creation of doped and multi-component nano-sized ceramic powders.

  16. Study on the combustion and hydrocarbon emission characteristics of direct injection spark-ignition engines during the direct-start process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Lei; Xiao, Maoyu; Deng, Kangyao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Mixture concentration in first-combustion cylinder of direct start is measured. • Factors that affect direct start performances are investigated. • Combustion characteristics of first-combustion cylinder are analyzed. • Hydrocarbon emission is considered to determined control strategies of direct start. - Abstract: This study was conducted to investigate the combustion and emissions characteristics of the first-combustion cylinder in a direct-start process. The explosive energy of the first combustion is important for the success of a direct start, but this combustion was rarely addressed in recent research. For a 2.0 L direct-injection spark-ignition engine, the in-cylinder mixture concentration, cylinder pressure, engine speed and exhaust hydrocarbon concentration were detected to analyze the fuel evaporation, combustion, engine movement and engine emissions, respectively. In the first-combustion cylinder of the direct-start process, the injected fuel was often enriched to ensure that an appropriate mixture concentration was obtained for ignition without misfiring. Approximately one-third of the injected fuel would not participate in the combustion process and would therefore reduce the exhaust hydrocarbon emissions. The start position determined the amount of the total explosive energy in the first-combustion cylinder, and an optimal start position for a direct start was found to be at a 70–80° crank angle before the top dead center to obtain a better combustion performance and lower emissions. A lower coolant temperature increased the maximum explosion energy of the first combustion, but additional hydrocarbon emissions were generated. Because there was almost no problem in the direct-start capability with different coolant temperatures after an idling stop, it was necessary to maintain the coolant temperature when the engine was stopped

  17. The process of combustion synthesis of WC-Co composites under the action of an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Keqin; Xiong, Ji; Sun, Lan; Fan, Hongyuan; Zhou, Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Composites of WC-Co have been synthesized and consolidated simultaneously at the ignition temperature of 794 o C by a field-assisted combustion synthesis method (EFACS), where the electric field was generated by a Gleeble thermal simulation instrument. Then, with the aid of high-temperature XRD results, the combustion synthesis process of an 88 wt% (W + C)-12 wt% Co system was studied according to quenching at different temperatures by turning off the electric field. A four-step model describing the process of combustion synthesis of WC-Co composites under an electric field, which is controlled by solid diffusion among the reactant atoms, is proposed. From the preheating period to the solid diffusion period, the solid diffusion among reactant atoms enhance with the increase of temperature. From the solid diffusion period to the combustion period, the 2W (s) + C (s) = W 2 C (s) reaction may occurs at some interfaces between W and C atoms. During combustion period, 2W (s) + C (s) = W 2 C (s) occurs firstly and follows the reaction of W 2 C (s) + C (s) = 2WC (s) . Co melts and then reacts to W, W 2 C in order to form WC and Co 3 W 3 C, with that Co 3 W 3 C carbonizes to form WC and Co. After the combustion period, the remaining phases of W 2 C and Co 3 W 3 C can be carbonized to form WC with the increase of temperature, and the morphology of tungsten carbide changes from spheroid to polyhedrons as the temperature rises.

  18. Plasma-thermal processing and incineration of wastes in a shaft incinerator with a combustible filtering material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalitko, V. A.; Mossé, A. L.

    2000-09-01

    The authors report the basic technological principles and the special features of a method of combined plasma-thermal processing and incineration of harmful wastes in a shaft incinerator under a layer of the charge of such a well-filtering and well-combustible material as wood sawdust, which absorbs up to 99% of the aerosols of waste gases by fixing and concentrating them in the ash. A calculated-analytical estimate of the filtration properties of wood sawdust is obtained as a function of its dispersity, the thickness of the charge layer, and the filtration rate of the waste gases. Determination is made of the optimum design relations and the parameters of charging of a filtering material under different conditions of processing of wastes, including moistening and impregnation of wood sawdust by an aqueous solution of sorbents to absorb harmful metals. The calculated results are compared and demonstrate consistency with the data on the filtration properties of wood sawdust in other technologies, including thermal processing of radioactive wastes in a similar shaft incinerator.

  19. Mercury and toxic metals in ash from combustion and incineration processes; Mercurio y metales toxicos en cenizas provenientes de procesos de combustion e incineracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugica, V.; Amador, M.A.; Torres, M.; Figueroa, J. de J. [Universidad Autonomo-Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Reynosa (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In Mexico, most of the ashes from combustion and incineration process were not appropriately disposed, they are either left on industrial yards and cliffs or thrown away in open spaces and then carried by the wind to places where they can harm population, affect aquatic environment or soils. For prevention and control, the knowledge on the concentration of trace elements in waste ashes is necessary. In this study, several oxidation methods for digestion of ashes followed by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry were evaluated. Hg, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and V were determined in ashes from coal and fuel oil combustion, as well as in ashes from the incineration of municipal, water treatment sludge, and medical wastes. Results showed important concentrations of different trace elements in the ashes. This suggests that adequate disposal of these wastes should be mandatory. On the other hand, concentration of trace elements in the leachates indicated that these wastes are not toxic and they could be disposed in sanitary landfill. 23 refs.

  20. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  1. Plasma assisted measurements of alkali metal concentrations in pressurised combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R.; Haeyrinen, V. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    In this project the continuous alkali measurement method plasma excited alkali resonance line spectroscopy (PEARLS) was developed, tested and demonstrated in pressurised combustion facilities. The PEARLS method has been developed at Tampere University of Technology (TUT). During 1994-1996 the PEARLS method was developed from the laboratory level to an industrial prototype. The alkali measuring instrument has been tested and used for regular measurements in four different pressurised combustion installations ranging up to industrial pilot scale. The installations are: (1) a pressurised entrained flow reactor (PEFR) at VTT Energy in Jyvaeskylae, Finland (2) a pressurised fluidised bed combustion facility, called FRED, at DMT in Essen, Germany. (3) a 10 MW pressurised circulating fluidised bed combustion pilot plant at Foster Wheeler Energia Oy in Karhula, Finland (4) PFBC Research Facility at ABB Carbon in Finspaang, Sweden

  2. Fabrication and processing of next-generation oxygen carrier materials for chemical looping combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadarajah, Arunan [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Among numerous methods of controlling the global warming effect, Chemical Looping Combustion is known to be the most viable option currently. A key factor to a successful chemical looping process is the presence of highly effective oxygen carriers that enable fuel combustion by going through oxidation and reduction in the presence of air and fuel respectively. In this study, CaMnO3-δ was used as the base material and doped on the A-site (Sr or La) and B-site (Fe, Ti, Zn and Al) by 10 mol % of dopants. Solid state reaction followed by mechanical extrusion (optimized paste formula) was used as the preparation method A series of novel doped perovskite-type oxygen carrier particles (CaxLa (Or Sa)1-x Mn1-yByO3-δ (B-site = Fe, Ti, Al, or Zr)) were synthesized by the proposed extrusion formula. The produced samples were characterized with XRD, SEM, BET and TGA techniques. According to the results obtained from TGA analysis, the oxygen capacity of the samples ranged between 1.2 for CLMZ and 1.75 for CSMF. Reactivity and oxygen uncoupling behaviors of the prepared samples were also evaluated using a fluidized bed chemical looping reactor using methane as the fuel at four different temperatures (800, 850, 900, 950 °C). All of the oxygen carriers showed oxygen uncoupling behavior and they were able to capture and release oxygen. Mass-based conversion of the perovskites was calculated and temperature increase proved to increase the mass-based conversion rate in all of the samples under study. Gas yield was calculated at 950 °C as well, and results showed that CLMZ, CM and CSMF showed 100% gas yields and CLMF and CSMZ showed approximately 85% yield in fluidized bed reactor, which is a high and acceptable quantity. Based on extended reactor tests the modified calcium manganese perovskite structures (CSMF) can be a good candidate for future pilot tests.

  3. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Charles [Environ Holdings, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Wilson, Robert [Environ Holdings, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    This project culminated in the demonstration of a full-scale industrial burner which allows a broad range of “opportunity” gaseous fuels to be cost-effectively and efficiently utilized while generating minimal emissions of criteria air pollutants. The burner is capable of maintaining a stable flame when the fuel composition changes rapidly. This enhanced stability will contribute significantly to improving the safety and reliability of burner operation in manufacturing sites. Process heating in the refining and chemicals sectors is the primary application for this burner. The refining and chemical sectors account for more than 40% of total industrial natural gas use. Prior to the completion of this project, an enabling technology did not exist that would allow these energy-intensive industries to take full advantage of opportunity fuels and thereby reduce their natural gas consumption. Opportunity gaseous fuels include biogas (from animal and agricultural wastes, wastewater plants, and landfills) as well as syngas (from the gasification of biomass, municipal solid wastes, construction wastes, and refinery residuals). The primary challenge to using gaseous opportunity fuels is that their composition and combustion performance differ significantly from those of conventional fuels such as natural gas and refinery fuel gas. An effective fuel-flexible burner must accept fuels that range widely in quality and change in composition over time, often rapidly. In Phase 1 of this project, the team applied computational fluid dynamics analysis to optimize the prototype burner’s aerodynamic, combustion, heat transfer, and emissions performance. In Phase 2, full-scale testing and refinement of two prototype burners were conducted in test furnaces at Zeeco’s offices in Broken Arrow, OK. These tests demonstrated that the full range of conventional and opportunity fuels could be utilized by the project’s burner while achieving robust flame stability and very low levels of

  4. Theoretical Investigation of Kinetic Processes in Small Radicals of Importance in Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Millard [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Dagdigian, Paul J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-12-12

    Our group studies inelastic and reactive collisions of small molecules, focusing on radicals important in combustion environments. The goal is the better understanding of kinetic processes that may be difficult to access experimentally. An essential component is the accurate determination and fitting of potential energy surfaces (PESs). After fitting the ab initio points to obtain global PESs, we treat the dynamics using time-independent (close-coupling) methods. Cross sections and rate constants for collisions of are determined with our Hibridon program suite . We have studied energy transfer (rotationally, vibrationally, and/or electronically inelastic) in small hydrocarbon radicals (CH2 and CH3) and the CN radical. We have made a comparison with experimental measurements of relevant rate constants for collisions of these radicals. Also, we have calculated accurate transport properties using state-of-the-art PESs and to investigate the sensitivity to these parameters in 1-dimensional flame simulations. Of particular interest are collision pairs involving the light H atom.

  5. Multivariable Optimization of the Piperazine CO2 Post-Combustion Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; von Solms, Nicolas; Thomsen, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    .2 to 0.6 lean loading, and for two flue gas sources: natural gas combined cycle power plant (NGCC, 3.9 mol% CO2) and a coal based power plant (ASC, 13.25 mol% CO2). Special attention is given to the boundaries where precipitation may occur. The results are created by the hybrid CAPCO2 rate-based model......8 molal piperazine (PZ) is a promising solvent for developing an energy efficient CO2 post-combustion capture process. However, it has a limited operating range due to precipitation. The operating range can be extended by decreasing the piperazine concentration and/or increasing the CO2 loading...... which accounts for precipitation when estimating the heat and mass transfer rates. The results show that the 7 molal piperazine gives the lowest specific reboiler duty at 0.40 CO2 lean loading: 3.32 GJ/t CO2 and 4.05 GJ/t CO2 for the ASC case and NGCC cases. The analysis also reveals that the capture...

  6. Biomass gasification for electricity generation with internal combustion engines. Process efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesme-Jaén, René; Garcia Faure, Luis; Recio Recio, Angel; Oliva Ruiz, Luis; Pajarín Rodríguez, Juan; Revilla Suarez, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is a renewable source of energy worldwide increased prospects for its potential and its lower environmental impact compared to fossil fuels. By processes and energy conversion technologies it is possible to obtain fuels in solid, liquid and gaseous form from any biomass. The biomass gasification is the thermal conversion thereof into a gas, which can be used for electricity production with the use of internal combustion engines with a certain level of efficiency, which depends on the characteristics of biomass and engines used. In this work the evaluation of thermal and overall efficiency of the gasification in Integrated Forestry Enterprise of Santiago de Cuba, designed to generate electricity from waste from the forest industry is presented. Is a downdraft gasifier reactor, COMBO-80 model and engine manufacturing Hindu (diesel) model Leyland modified to work with producer gas. The evaluation was carried out for different loads (electric power generated) engine from experimental measurements of flow and composition of the gas supplied to the engine. The results show that the motor operates with a thermal efficiency in the range of 20-32% with an overall efficiency between 12-25%. (full text)

  7. Removal of unburned carbon in fly ash produced in coal combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez V, Leonardo F; De La Cruz M, Javier F; Sanchez M, Jhon F

    2007-01-01

    The coal unburned in flying ashes obtained in the processes of coal combustion is the main disadvantage for its use in the industry of the construction. This material normally has a size of particle greater than the mineral material, therefore it is possible to be separated in a considerable percentage, obtaining double benefit: the reusability of unburned like fuel or precursor for the activated charcoal production and the use of the mineral material in the industry of the construction since the organic matter has retired him that disables its use. In this work it is experienced with a sifted technique of separation by for three obtained flying ash samples with different technology (travelling Grill, pneumatic injection and overturning grill), were made grain sized analyses with meshes of a diameter of particle greater to 0,589 mm, the short analyses were made to them next to the retained material in each mesh and the unburned percentage of removal was determined of. The technique was compared with other developing.

  8. Evaluation of a sequential extraction process used for determining mercury binding mechanisms to coal combustion byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, James D; Biswas, Pratim; Giammar, Daniel E

    2007-07-01

    Leaching of mercury from coal combustion byproducts is a concern because of the toxicity of mercury. Leachability of mercury can be assessed by using sequential extraction procedures. Sequential extraction procedures are commonly used to determine the speciation and mobility of trace metals in solid samples and are designed to differentiate among metals bound by different mechanisms and to different solid phases. This study evaluated the selectivity and effectiveness of a sequential extraction process used to determine mercury binding mechanisms to various materials. A six-step sequential extraction process was applied to laboratory-synthesized materials with known mercury concentrations and binding mechanisms. These materials were calcite, hematite, goethite, and titanium dioxide. Fly ash from a full-scale power plant was also investigated. The concentrations of mercury were measured using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry, whereas the major elements were measured by ICP atomic emission spectrometry. The materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sequential extraction procedure provided information about the solid phases with which mercury was associated in the solid sample. The procedure effectively extracted mercury from the target phases. The procedure was generally selective in extracting mercury. However, some steps in the procedure extracted mercury from nontarget phases, and others resulted in mercury redistribution. Iron from hematite and goethite was only leached in the reducible and residual extraction steps. Some mercury associated with goethite was extracted in the ion exchangeable step, whereas mercury associated with hematite was extracted almost entirely in the residual step. Calcium in calcite and mercury associated with calcite were primarily removed in the acid-soluble extraction step. Titanium in titanium dioxide and mercury adsorbed onto

  9. Process and Material Design for Micro-Encapsulated Ionic Liquids in Post-Combustion CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Bo [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Brennecke, Joan F [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); McCready, Mark [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Stadtherr, Mark [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-11-18

    Aprotic Heterocyclic Anion (AHA) Ionic Liquids (ILs) have been identified as promising new solvents for post-combustion carbon capture due to their high CO2 uptake and the high tenability 1,2 of their binding energy with CO2. Some of these compounds change phase (solid to liquid) on absorption of CO2; these Phase Change ILs (PCILs)3 offer the additional advantage that part of the heat needed to desorb the CO2 from the absorbent is provided by the heat of fusion as the PCIL solidifies upon release of CO2. However, the relatively high viscosity of AHA ILs and the occurrence of a phase change in PCILs present challenges for conventional absorption equipment. To overcome these challenges we are pursuing the use of new technology to micro-encapsulate the AHA ILs and PCILs. Our partners at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have successfully demonstrated this technology in the application of post-combustion carbon capture with sodium and potassium carbonate solutions,4 and have recently shown the feasibility of micro-encapsulation of an AHA IL for carbon capture.5 The large effective surface area and high CO2 permeability of the micro-capsules is expected to offset the drawback of the high IL viscosity and to provide for a more efficient and cost-effective mass transfer operation involving AHA ILs and PCILs. These opportunities, however, present us with both process and materials design questions. For example, what is the target CO2 absorption strength (enthalpy of chemical absorption) for the tunable AHA IL? What is the target for micro-capsule diameter in order to obtain a high mass transfer rate and good fluidization performance? What are the appropriate temperatures and pressures for the absorber and stripper? In order to address these and other questions, we have developed a rate-based model of a post-combustion CO2 capture process using micro-encapsulated ILs. As a performance baseline

  10. Specifics of phytomass combustion in small experimental device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenhard Richard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wood pellet combustion carries out with high efficiency and comfort in modern pellet boilers. These facts help to increase the amount of installed pellet boilers in households. The combustion process quality depends besides the combustion conditions also on the fuel quality. The wood pellets, which don`t contain the bark and branches represent the highest quality. Because of growing pellet demand, an herbal biomass (phytomass, which is usually an agricultural by-product becomes economically attractive for pellet production. Although the phytomass has the net calorific value relatively slightly lower than the wood biomass, it is often significantly worse in view of the combustion process and an emission production. The combustion of phytomass pellets causes various difficulties in small heat sources, mainly due to a sintering of fuel residues. We want to avoid the ash sintering by a lowering of temperature in the combustion chamber below the ash sintering temperature of phytomass via the modification of a burner design. For research of the phytomass combustion process in the small boilers is constructed the experimental combustion device. There will investigate the impact of cooling intensity of the combustion chamber on the combustion process and emissions. Arising specific requirements from the measurement will be the basis for the design of the pellet burner and for the setting of operating parameters to the trouble-free phytomass combustion was guaranteed.

  11. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  12. Combustion of lean hydrogen-air mixtures in the connected compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Liu; Yoshio Yoshizawa; Akio Miyori; Kenya Kubota

    1997-01-01

    A study of combustion experiments with premixed lean hydrogen-air mixtures was conducted in a vessel consisting of two compartments connected by a diameter-variable vent. Effects of various parameters (hydrogen concentration, vent diameter and initial pressure) on mechanical loads of the combustion processes including mainly the peak pressures and the rates of pressure rise were investigated. Relation of flow and combustion was approached. Ignition-combustion processes were discussed, and the combustion types were classified into three patterns according to the pressure-time histories and the flow characteristics in main combustion compartment

  13. Effect of High Injection Pressure of Algae and Jatropha Derived Biodiesel on Ignition Delay and Combustion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nurdin; Khalid, Amir; Manshoor, Bukhari; Jaat, Norrizam; Zaman, Izzuddin; Sunar, Norshuhaila

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the investigation of the effect of high injection pressure on the ignition delay period and emission characteristics. Few experiments were conducted in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Four types of fuels were tested inside a RCM which are standard diesel (SD), Algae biodiesel (A2), Palm Oil biodiesel (B5, B10, and B15) and Jatropha biodiesel (J5, J10, J15). The experiments were conducted at high injection pressure of 130 MPa. The ambient temperature of constant volume chamber at the time of fuel injection was set at 850 K. The results indicate that the combined factors of specific of ambient temperature and higher injection pressure produces shorter ignition delay time. B5 has the shortest ignition delay with 1.5 ms. Biodiesel has the shorter ignition delay which is prolonged with increasing biodiesel content in the blends. In terms of emissions, Carbon dioxide (CO2), Carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) and smoke emissions decreased with all biodiesel-diesel blends. However, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission of the biodiesel was relatively higher than those of the diesel under all test conditions. In addition, the increase of blends in terms of biodiesel ratio was found to be significant in enhancing the combustion process.

  14. Regenerable mixed copper-iron-inert support oxygen carriers for solid fuel chemical looping combustion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Tian, Hanjing

    2016-12-20

    The disclosure provides an oxygen carrier for a chemical looping cycle, such as the chemical looping combustion of solid carbonaceous fuels, such as coal, coke, coal and biomass char, and the like. The oxygen carrier is comprised of at least 24 weight % (wt %) CuO, at least 10 wt % Fe2O3, and an inert support, and is typically a calcine. The oxygen carrier exhibits a CuO crystalline structure and an absence of iron oxide crystalline structures under XRD crystallography, and provides an improved and sustained combustion reactivity in the temperature range of 600.degree. C.-1000.degree. C. particularly for solid fuels such as carbon and coal.

  15. Effect of char on the combustion process of multicomponent bio-fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoudi, Amir Houshang; Pozarlik, A.K.; van der Weide, E.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Luding, S.; Brem, G.

    2018-01-01

    Combustion of pyrolysis oil has attracted many attention in recent years as a renewable and environmental friendly fuel. However, pyrolysis oil as an multi-component fuel has some differences compared to conventional fossil fuels. One of the main differences is the formation of solid char in the

  16. Fundamental Combustion Processes of Particle-Laden Shear Flows in Solid Fuel Ramjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-17

    1978. Ozisik, M. N., Radiative Transfer and Interactions with Conduction and Convection, Wiley, New York, New York. 1973. 330j Stufflebeam , J.H., and... Stufflebeam , J.H., and Eckbreth, A.C., "Multi- land Ohio, pp. 1-7, July 1982. pIe Species CARS Measurements of High Pres- 3 Psure Solid Propellant Combustion

  17. Numerical simulation of the combustion process of a pellet-drop-feed boiler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez, M. A.; Porteiro, J.; De la Cuesta de Cal, Daniel; Patiño, D.; Míguez, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a transient model for the simulation of biomass combustion in a fixed bed boiler fed through particle drop. The method combines classical CFD techniques, which are used to simulate the gas phase, with a set of Eulerian variables defined to model the solid phase and Lagrangian

  18. Influence of simulated MSW sizes on the combustion process in a fixed bed: CFD and experimental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; El-Salam, M Abd

    2016-03-01

    This work presents the effect of the simulated sizes of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed experimentally and numerically. The effect of temperature, gas emissions, flame front velocity and process rate are discussed for three different sizes of MSW: 10, 30, and 50 mm. The study found that for the operating conditions of the current model, when the diameter of particles is decreased, the bulk density of the material is increased, resulting in a decrease of convective heat transfer as well as combustion speed. As the diameter size of the material particles increase, the height of the post-combustion zone is increased, while the temperature in a high temperature area is decreased, due to the decrease in the material's bulk density and the excessive increase in porosity. Results also show that the average emission concentration of CO and CO2 decreases gradually with an increase in the particle diameter size. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An atmospheric pressure high-temperature laminar flow reactor for investigation of combustion and related gas phase reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oßwald, Patrick; Köhler, Markus

    2015-10-01

    A new high-temperature flow reactor experiment utilizing the powerful molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) technique for detailed observation of gas phase kinetics in reacting flows is presented. The reactor design provides a consequent extension of the experimental portfolio of validation experiments for combustion reaction kinetics. Temperatures up to 1800 K are applicable by three individually controlled temperature zones with this atmospheric pressure flow reactor. Detailed speciation data are obtained using the sensitive MBMS technique, providing in situ access to almost all chemical species involved in the combustion process, including highly reactive species such as radicals. Strategies for quantifying the experimental data are presented alongside a careful analysis of the characterization of the experimental boundary conditions to enable precise numeric reproduction of the experimental results. The general capabilities of this new analytical tool for the investigation of reacting flows are demonstrated for a selected range of conditions, fuels, and applications. A detailed dataset for the well-known gaseous fuels, methane and ethylene, is provided and used to verify the experimental approach. Furthermore, application for liquid fuels and fuel components important for technical combustors like gas turbines and engines is demonstrated. Besides the detailed investigation of novel fuels and fuel components, the wide range of operation conditions gives access to extended combustion topics, such as super rich conditions at high temperature important for gasification processes, or the peroxy chemistry governing the low temperature oxidation regime. These demonstrations are accompanied by a first kinetic modeling approach, examining the opportunities for model validation purposes.

  20. Prediction method of unburnt carbon for coal fired utility boiler using image processing technique of combustion flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda, M.; Sugano, A.; Kimura, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Ishiyama, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a method predicting unburnt carbon in a coal fired utility boiler developed using an image processing technique. The method consists of an image processing unit and a furnace model unit. temperature distribution of combustion flames can be obtained through the former unit. The later calculates dynamics of the carbon reduction from the burner stages to the furnace outlet using coal feed rate, air flow rate, chemical and ash content of coal. An experimental study shows that the prediction error of the unburnt carbon can be reduced to 10%

  1. Public perception related to a hydrogen hybrid internal combustion engine transit bus demonstration and hydrogen fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickson, Allister; Phillips, Al; Morales, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen has been widely considered as a potentially viable alternative to fossil fuels for use in transportation. In addition to price competitiveness with fossil fuels, a key to its adoption will be public perceptions of hydrogen technologies and hydrogen fuel. This paper examines public perceptions of riders of a hydrogen hybrid internal combustion engine bus and hydrogen as a fuel source

  2. Improved Modeling of Finite-Rate Turbulent Combustion Processes in Research Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanOverbeke, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to further develop and test a stochastic model of turbulent combustion in recirculating flows. There is a requirement to increase the accuracy of multi-dimensional combustion predictions. As turbulence affects reaction rates, this interaction must be more accurately evaluated. In this work a more physically correct way of handling the interaction of turbulence on combustion is further developed and tested. As turbulence involves randomness, stochastic modeling is used. Averaged values such as temperature and species concentration are found by integrating the probability density function (pdf) over the range of the scalar. The model in this work does not assume the pdf type, but solves for the evolution of the pdf using the Monte Carlo solution technique. The model is further developed by including a more robust reaction solver, by using accurate thermodynamics and by more accurate transport elements. The stochastic method is used with Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations. The SIMPLE method is used to solve for velocity, pressure, turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. The pdf solver solves for temperature and species concentration. Thus, the method is partially familiar to combustor engineers. The method is compared to benchmark experimental data and baseline calculations. The baseline method was tested on isothermal flows, evaporating sprays and combusting sprays. Pdf and baseline predictions were performed for three diffusion flames and one premixed flame. The pdf method predicted lower combustion rates than the baseline method in agreement with the data, except for the premixed flame. The baseline and stochastic predictions bounded the experimental data for the premixed flame. The use of a continuous mixing model or relax to mean mixing model had little effect on the prediction of average temperature. Two grids were used in a hydrogen diffusion flame simulation. Grid density did not effect the predictions except

  3. Calcium chromate process related investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillard, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    A pilot plant for production of calcium chromate has been scaled up to a small production facility at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department. In preparation for this scale-up, the process and final product were studied in order to evaluate problems not considered previously. The variables and processes studied included: (1) the determination of optimum drying temperature and time for product analysis; (2) the effect of the grade of lime used as the precipitating agent on the purity of the calcium chromate; (3) product purity when calcium chromate is precipitated by the addition of ammonium chromate to slaked lime; (4) the reagents best suited for cleaning calcium chromate spills; and (5) methods for determining hydroxide ion concentration in calcium chromate. The optimum drying time for the product before analysis is four hours at 600 0 C. Gases evolved at various temperatures during the drying process were carbon dioxide and water vapor. Technical grade lime produced calcium chromate of the highest purity. Both nitric and acetic acids were efficient dissolvers of calcium chromate spills. Direct titration of hydroxide ion with sulfuric acid gave an average recovery of 93% for samples spiked with calcium hydroxide. 1 figure, 17 tables

  4. Environmental Performance of Hypothetical Canadian Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Processes Using Life-Cycle Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakkana Piewkhaow

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of life-cycle assessment was applied in order to evaluate the environmental performance of a hypothetical Saskatchewan lignite-fueled Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC electricity generation, with and without pre-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2 capture from a full life-cycle perspective. The emphasis here is placed on environmental performance associated with air contaminants of the comparison between IGCC systems (with and without CO2 capture and a competing lignite pulverized coal-fired electricity generating station in order to reveal which technology offers the most positive environmental effects. Moreover, ambient air pollutant modeling was also conducted by using American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD air dispersion modeling to determine the ground-level concentration of pollutants emitted from four different electricity generating stations. This study assumes that all stations are located close to Estevan. The results showed a significant reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and acidification potential by applying both post-combustion and pre-combustion CO2 capture processes. The GHG emissions were found to have reduced by 27%–86%, and IGCC systems were found to compare favorably to pulverized coal systems. However, in other environmental impact categories, there are multiple environmental trade-offs depending on the capture technology used. In the case of post-combustion capture, it was observed that the environmental impact category of eutrophication potential, summer smog, and ozone depletion increased due to the application of the CO2 capture process and the surface mining coal operation. IGCC systems, on the other hand, showed the same tendency as the conventional coal-fired electricity generation systems, but to a lesser degree. This is because the IGCC system is a cleaner technology that produces lower pollutant emission levels than the electricity

  5. A thermo fluid dynamic model of wood particle gasification- and combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Boiger

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to qualitatively understand and evaluate the thermo- fluid dynamic situation within a wood gasification reactor, a 1D particle model has been created. The presented tool accounts for the highly in- stationary, kinetic- and thermo chemical effects, leading to partial gasification and combustion of a wood particle embedded within a packed bed collective. It considers the fluid- dynamic situation within the changing porous bulk structure of the packed bed, its impact on species- and heat transition mechanisms, the energy- and mass balances of wood, coal, pyrolysis-gas, wood- gas and off- gas phases, the thermodynamics of locally developing gasification- and combustion reaction equilibria, as well as the presence of the chemical species hydrogen, water, carbon (di- oxide, methane, oxygen, solid carbon and gaseous, longer chain hydrocarbons from pyrolysis. Model results can be shown to yield very good, qualitative agreement with measurements, found in literature.

  6. Effect of Various Ignition Timings on Combustion Process and Performance of Gasoline Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Tunka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the effect of the ignition timing on the output parameters of a spark-ignition engine. The main assessed parameters include the output parameters of the engine (engine power and torque, cylinder pressure variation, heat generation and burn rate. However, the article also discusses the effect of the ignition timing on the temperature of exhaust gases, the indicated mean effective pressure, the combustion duration, combustion stability, etc. All measurements were performed in an engine test room in the Department of Technology and Automobile Transport at Mendel University in Brno, on a four-cylinder AUDI engine with a maximum power of 110 kW, as indicated by the manufacturer. To control and change the ignition timing of the engine, a fully programmable Magneti Marelli control unit was used. The experimental measurements were performed on 8 different ignition timings, from 18 °CA to 32 °CA BTDC at wide throttle open and a constant engine speed (2500 rpm, with a stoichiometric mixture fraction. The measurement results showed that as the ignition timing increases, the engine power and torque also increase. The increase in these parameters is a reflection of higher pressure in the cylinder, the maximum value of which is achieved at a higher ignition timing near top dead centre in thepower stroke. In these conditions we can expect higher engine efficiency. It was also found that the combustion is more stable with a higher value of ignition timing. No significant difference was found in the combustion duration.

  7. Process aspects in combustion and gasification Waste-to-Energy (WtE) units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckner, Bo

    2015-03-01

    The utilisation of energy in waste, Waste to Energy (WtE), has become increasingly important. Waste is a wide concept, and to focus, the feedstock dealt with here is mostly municipal solid waste. It is found that combustion in grate-fired furnaces is by far the most common mode of fuel conversion compared to fluidized beds and rotary furnaces. Combinations of pyrolysis in rotary furnace or gasification in fluidized or fixed bed with high-temperature combustion are applied particularly in Japan in systems whose purpose is to melt ashes and destroy dioxins. Recently, also in Japan more emphasis is put on WtE. In countries with high heat demand, WtE in the form of heat and power can be quite efficient even in simple grate-fired systems, whereas in warm regions only electricity is generated, and for this product the efficiency of boilers (the steam data) is limited by corrosion from the flue gas. However, combination of cleaned gas from gasification with combustion provides a means to enhance the efficiency of electricity production considerably. Finally, the impact of sorting on the properties of the waste to be fed to boilers or gasifiers is discussed. The description intends to be general, but examples are mostly taken from Europe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Suitability of aquatic biomass from Lake Toba (North Sumatra, Indonesia) for energy generation by combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunerová, A.; Roubík, H.; Herák, D.

    2017-09-01

    Several aquatic plant species were identified as aquatic pollution of Lake Toba, North Sumatra (Indonesia); specifically, water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes and aquatic weeds Hydrilla verticillata and Myriophyllum spicatum due to their high biomass yield which causes impenetrable mats at the bottom and surface of the lake. That complicates other vegetation growth and utilization of water areas for fishing or recreation. In attempt to clean the lake and prevent plants expansion, great amount of plants populations are removed from water but subsequent efficient utilization of such aquatic biomass is not ensured. Present research investigated energy potential of aquatic biomass originated from mentioned aquatic plants from Lake Toba and its possible utilization for energy production by direct combustion. Performed chemical analysis contained from determination of moisture, ash and volatile matter contents and calorific values. Evaluation of results proved highest suitability and energy potential of Eichhornia crassipes with gross calorific value (GCV) 16.31 MJ·kg-1, followed by Hydrilla verticillata with GCV 15.24 MJ·kg-1. Samples of Myriophyllum spicatum exhibited unsatisfactory results due to its low GCV (11.27 MJ·kg-1) in combination with high ash content (36.99%) which indicates complications during combustion, thus, low energy production efficiency and overall unsuitability for combustion purposes.

  9. Relational Leading and Dialogic Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Hersted

    The Ph.D. thesis contributes to a relational orientation to leading, emphasizing leadership as a shared, collaborative and co-creative activity. In this paradigm major emphasis is put on dialogue and interaction. Inspired by social constructionist ideas, the thesis considers approaches to learning...... with the thesis, dialogically based practices inspired by action research with the aim to enhance collaborative knowledge building, reflexivity and dialogical skills in groups and teams were carried out, analyzed and documented. Participants included school principals, leaders of kindergartens, teachers...

  10. The ChlorOut concept. A method to reduce alkali-related problems during combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassman, Haakan [ChlorOut AB c/o Vattenfall AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Wollner, Lothar [Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH und Co. KG, Ingelheim am Rhein (Germany); Berg, Magnus [ChlorOut AB c/o Vattenfall AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-06-01

    Combustion of biomass with a high content of alkali and chlorine (Cl) can result in operational problems including deposit formation and superheater corrosion. The strategies applied to reduce such problems include co-combustion and the use of additives. Ammonium sulphate is a part of the ChlorOut concept which is applied in a range of commercial boilers. This concept is based on dosing of sulphate-containing additives to the flue gases and a unique measurement device for on-line measurement of gaseous alkali chlorides called IACM (in-situ alkali chloride monitor). The focus of the present paper is on evaluation of long-term experiences from two full-scale boilers. The operational problems with deposit formation and superheater corrosion decreased in these boilers after installing the ChlorOut concept. (orig.)

  11. Method and device for diagnosing and controlling combustion instabilities in internal combustion engines operating in or transitioning to homogeneous charge combustion ignition mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert M [Knoxville, TN; Daw, Charles S [Knoxville, TN; Green, Johney B [Knoxville, TN; Edwards, Kevin D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-07

    This invention is a method of achieving stable, optimal mixtures of HCCI and SI in practical gasoline internal combustion engines comprising the steps of: characterizing the combustion process based on combustion process measurements, determining the ratio of conventional and HCCI combustion, determining the trajectory (sequence) of states for consecutive combustion processes, and determining subsequent combustion process modifications using said information to steer the engine combustion toward desired behavior.

  12. Real time identification of the internal combustion engine combustion parameters based on the vibration velocity signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiuliang; Cheng, Yong; Wang, Limei; Ji, Shaobo

    2017-03-01

    Accurate combustion parameters are the foundations of effective closed-loop control of engine combustion process. Some combustion parameters, including the start of combustion, the location of peak pressure, the maximum pressure rise rate and its location, can be identified from the engine block vibration signals. These signals often include non-combustion related contributions, which limit the prompt acquisition of the combustion parameters computationally. The main component in these non-combustion related contributions is considered to be caused by the reciprocating inertia force excitation (RIFE) of engine crank train. A mathematical model is established to describe the response of the RIFE. The parameters of the model are recognized with a pattern recognition algorithm, and the response of the RIFE is predicted and then the related contributions are removed from the measured vibration velocity signals. The combustion parameters are extracted from the feature points of the renovated vibration velocity signals. There are angle deviations between the feature points in the vibration velocity signals and those in the cylinder pressure signals. For the start of combustion, a system bias is adopted to correct the deviation and the error bound of the predicted parameters is within 1.1°. To predict the location of the maximum pressure rise rate and the location of the peak pressure, algorithms based on the proportion of high frequency components in the vibration velocity signals are introduced. Tests results show that the two parameters are able to be predicted within 0.7° and 0.8° error bound respectively. The increase from the knee point preceding the peak value point to the peak value in the vibration velocity signals is used to predict the value of the maximum pressure rise rate. Finally, a monitoring frame work is inferred to realize the combustion parameters prediction. Satisfactory prediction for combustion parameters in successive cycles is achieved, which

  13. Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-combustion CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shiguang; Shou, S.; Pyrzynski, Travis; Makkuni, Ajay; Meyer, Howard

    2013-12-31

    This report summarizes scientific/technical progress made for bench-scale membrane contactor technology for post-combustion CO2 capture from DOE Contract No. DE-FE-0004787. Budget Period 1 (BP1) membrane absorber, Budget Period 2 (BP2) membrane desorber and Budget Period 3 (BP3) integrated system and field testing studies have been completed successfully and met or exceeded the technical targets (≥ 90% CO2 removal and CO2 purity of 97% in one membrane stage). Significant breakthroughs are summarized below: BP1 research: The feasibility of utilizing the poly (ether ether ketone), PEEK, based hollow fiber contractor (HFC) in combination with chemical solvents to separate and capture at least 90% of the CO2 from simulated flue gases has been successfully established. Excellent progress has been made as we have achieved the BP1 goal: ≥ 1,000 membrane intrinsic CO2 permeance, ≥ 90% CO2 removal in one stage, ≤ 2 psi gas side pressure drop, and ≥ 1 (sec)-1 mass transfer coefficient. Initial test results also show that the CO2 capture performance, using activated Methyl Diethanol Amine (aMDEA) solvent, was not affected by flue gas contaminants O2 (~3%), NO2 (66 ppmv), and SO2 (145 ppmv). BP2 research: The feasibility of utilizing the PEEK HFC for CO2-loaded solvent regeneration has been successfully established High CO2 stripping flux, one order of magnitude higher than CO2 absorption flux, have been achieved. Refined economic evaluation based on BP1 membrane absorber and BP2 membrane desorber laboratory test data indicate that the CO2 capture costs are 36% lower than DOE’s benchmark amine absorption technology. BP3 research: A bench-scale system utilizing a membrane absorber and desorber was integrated into a continuous CO2 capture process using contactors containing 10 to 20 ft2 of membrane area. The integrated process operation was stable through a 100-hour laboratory test, utilizing a simulated flue gas stream. Greater than 90% CO2 capture combined with 97

  14. Applications of the LIF method for the diagnostics of the combustion process of gas-IC-engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchweger, Wolfram; Haslacher, Rainer; Hallmannsegger, Michael; Gerke, Udo

    2007-08-01

    Within the underlying project, the task was to develop methods for optical measurements in a hydrogen-fuelled engine with direct-injection, with the goal of measuring the jet patterns during injection, the stratification of the charge at ignition point and the propagation of the flame during combustion. Therefore, the method of planar laser-induced-fluorescence (PLIF) was chosen. In order to apply this technique for the named tasks, particular methods the visualisation of fuel distribution and the flame front were developed. The measurements were carried out on a single cylinder research engine installed at the Institute for Internal Combustion Engines at Graz University of Technology. This engine features optical access through a quartz-glass liner and a window in the piston while providing a layout equivalent to modern passenger car engines and the possibility to operate in fired mode. As it is hardly feasible to directly excite molecular hydrogen by means of laser light, it is necessary to add a tracer substance to the fuel that provides high fluorescence intensity while not changing the properties of the fuel. Consequently, Triethylamine was chosen as a tracer to be mixed with hydrogen at 200 ppm, which allows it to be used up to a maximum pressure of 200 bar while still providing a strong LIF signal. Due to the excellent linearity of the signal to the local air/fuel-ratio it was possible to develop a method for the calibration of the images in order to compensate for inhomogeneities of the laser beam and staining of the optical access and to ultimately allow a quantification of the fuel distribution. The results are images scaled on air/fuel-ratio which can be used for a direct optimisation of mixture formation processes and the validation of CFD-models. For the analysis of the combustion process the method was adapted with two different approaches. For homogeneous charges a new method was applied by marking the flame front using the tracer within the fuel, so

  15. An experimental study of factors in the recovery of plutonium from combustible wastes treated by incineration, pyrolysis and other processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamber, D.C.; McDonald, L.A.; Roberts, W.G.; Sutcliffe, P.W.; Wilkins, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The work described in this report is concerned with the incineration and pyrolysis of plutonium-contaminated combustible wastes, the leaching of the ashes and chars and the subsequent treatment of the leach solutions. A range of ashes and chars have been prepared from a range of plutonium-contaminated materials covering a variety of combustible materials (e.g. PVC, neoprene, Hypalon) and plutonium contaminants [e.g. PuO 2 , Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , (U, Pu)O 2 ]. Treatment temperatures in the range of 550-900 0 C have been investigated, the best results being obtained at or below 700 0 C with pyrolysis followed by char oxidation being the favoured process. A number of methods for treatment of the leach solutions have been considered and some have been investigated experimentally. Extraction of plutonium and americium with tributylphosphate (TBP) from a leach solution conditioned to 0.1 M H/+5 M NO 3 - has been studied. The key stage has been found to be the conditioning step where precautions must be taken to ensure that plutonium-containing precipitates and non-extractable plutonium are not formed. Consideration has also been given to treatment of the americium containing raffinates from a high acid TBP extraction and some methods have been investigated. A range of simple washing experiments have been carried out in order to compare the process with incineration/pyrolysis

  16. Burners. The decrease of nitrogen oxides in combustion process: the 2 nd generation GR LONOxFLAM burner; Les bruleurs, la reduction des oxydes d`azote dans la combustion: bruleur GR LONOxFLAM de 2. generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, J.C. [EGCI Pillard, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1997-12-31

    The Pillard company has developed, in cooperation with GDF (the French national gas utility), the GR-LONOxFLAM burner concept for reducing NOx emission levels and solid combustion products. The concept consists, for gaseous fuels, in the combination of an internal recirculation and a gas staging process; for liquid fuels, a separated flame process and air staging are combined. These concepts allow for an important reduction in NOx and non-burned residues, even with standard-size burners

  17. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the combustion process of a leather residuals gasification fuel gas: influence of fuel moisture content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonietti, Anderson Jose; Beskow, Arthur Bortolin; Silva, Cristiano Vitorino da [Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Missoes (URI), Erechim, RS (Brazil)], E-mails: arthur@uricer.edu.br, mlsperb@unisinos.br; Indrusiak, Maria Luiza Sperb [Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos (UNISINOS), Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: cristiano@uricer.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    This work presents a numerical study of the combustion process of leather residuals gasification gas, aiming the improvement of the process efficiency, considering different concentrations of water on the gas. The heating produced in this combustion process can be used to generation of thermal and/or electrical energy, for use at the leather industrial plant. However, the direct burning of this leather-residual-gas into the chambers is not straightforward. The alternative in development consists in processing this leather residuals by gasification or pyrolysis, separating the volatiles and products of incomplete combustion, for after use as fuel in a boiler. At these processes, different quantities of water can be used, resulting at different levels of moisture content in this fuel gas. This humidity can affect significantly the burning of this fuel, producing unburnt gases, as the carbon monoxide, or toxic gases as NOx, which must have their production minimized on the process, with the purpose of reducing the emission of pollutants to the atmosphere. Other environment-harmful-gases, remaining of the chemical treatment employed at leather manufacture, as cyanide, and hydrocarbons as toluene, must burn too, and the moisture content has influence on it. At this way, to increase understanding of the influence of moisture in the combustion process, it was made a numerical investigation study of reacting flow in the furnace, evaluating the temperature field, the chemical species concentration fields, flow mechanics and heat transfer at the process. The commercial CFD code CFX Ansys Inc. was used. Considering different moisture contents in the fuel used on the combustion process, with this study was possible to achieve the most efficient burning operation parameters, with improvement of combustion efficiency, and reduction of environmental harmful gases emissions. It was verified that the different moisture contents in the fuel gas demand different operation conditions

  18. Investigation of a process for the pyrolysis of plutonium contaminated combustible solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longstaff, B.; Cains, P.W.; Elliot, M.N.; Taylor, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    Pyrolysis offers an attractive first-stage alternative to incineration as a means of weight and volume reduction of solide combustible waste P.C.M, if it is required to recover plutonium from the final product. The avoidance of turbulent conditions associated with incineration should lead to less carry-over of particulates, and the lower operating temperature approximately 700 0 C should be most advantageous to the choice of constructional materials and to plant life. The char product from pyrolysis may be oxidised to a final ash at similarly acceptable low temperatures by passing air over a stirred bed of materials. The recently received draft designs for a cyclone after-burner (plus associated scrubbers and filters etc) offer an attractive method of dispensing of the volatile products of pyrolysis

  19. Chemical kinetic pathways for the emission of trace by-products in combustion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Lutz, A.E.; Kee, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    A collorbative research program has been initiated to study the emissions of a wide variety of chemical species from stationary combustion systems. These product species have been included in Clean Air act legislation and their emissions must be rigidly controlled, but there is a need for a much better understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms that produce and consume them. We are using physical and chemical mechanisms that produce and consume them. We are using numerical modeling techniques to study the chemical reactions and fluid mechanical factors that occur in industrial burners. We are examining systems including premixed and diffusion flames, and stirred and plug flow reactors in these modeling studies to establish the major factors leading to emissions of these chemicals

  20. Spectroscopic detection, characterization and dynamics of free radicals relevant to combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Terry [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-06-04

    Combustion chemistry is enormously complex. The chemical mechanisms involve a multitude of elementary reaction steps and a comparable number of reactive intermediates, many of which are free radicals. Computer simulations based upon these mechanisms are limited by the validity of the mechanisms and the parameters characterizing the properties of the intermediates and their reactivity. Spectroscopy can provide data for sensitive and selective diagnostics to follow their reactions. Spectroscopic analysis also provides detailed parameters characterizing the properties of these intermediates. These parameters serve as experimental gold standards to benchmark predictions of these properties from large-scale, electronic structure calculations. This work has demonstrated the unique capabilities of near-infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy (NIR CRDS) to identify, characterize and monitor intermediates of key importance in complex chemical reactions. Our studies have focussed on the large family of organic peroxy radicals which are arguably themost important intermediates in combustion chemistry and many other reactions involving the oxidation of organic compounds. Our spectroscopic studies have shown that the NIR Ã - ˜X electronic spectra of the peroxy radicals allows one to differentiate among chemical species in the organic peroxy family and also determine their isomeric and conformic structure in many cases. We have clearly demonstrated this capability on saturated and unsaturated peroxy radicals and β-hydroxy peroxy radicals. In addition we have developed a unique dual wavelength CRDS apparatus specifically for the purpose of measuring absolute absorption cross section and following the reaction of chemical intermediates. The utility of the apparatus has been demonstrated by measuring the cross-section and self-reaction rate constant for ethyl peroxy.

  1. Development and Experimental Validation of Large Eddy Simulation Techniques for the Prediction of Combustion-Dynamic Process in Syngas Combustion: Characterization of Autoignition, Flashback, and Flame-Liftoff at Gas-Turbine Relevant Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihme, Matthias [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Driscoll, James [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-08-31

    The objective of this closely coordinated experimental and computational research effort is the development of simulation techniques for the prediction of combustion processes, relevant to the oxidation of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels at gas-turbine relevant operating conditions. Specifically, the research goals are (i) the characterization of the sensitivity of syngas ignition processes to hydrodynamic processes and perturbations in temperature and mixture composition in rapid compression machines and ow-reactors and (ii) to conduct comprehensive experimental investigations in a swirl-stabilized gas turbine (GT) combustor under realistic high-pressure operating conditions in order (iii) to obtain fundamental understanding about mechanisms controlling unstable flame regimes in HHC-combustion.

  2. Investigations on Bi25FeO40 powders synthesized by hydrothermal and combustion-like processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köferstein, Roberto; Buttlar, Toni; Ebbinghaus, Stefan G.

    2014-01-01

    The syntheses of phase-pure and stoichiometric iron sillenite (Bi 25 FeO 40 ) powders by a hydrothermal (at ambient pressure) and a combustion-like process are described. Phase-pure samples were obtained in the hydrothermal reaction at 100 °C (1), whereas the combustion-like process leads to pure Bi 25 FeO 40 after calcination at 750 °C for 2 h (2a). The activation energy of the crystallite growth process of hydrothermally synthesized Bi 25 FeO 40 was calculated as 48(9) kJ mol −1 . The peritectic point was determined as 797(1) °C. The optical band gaps of the samples are between 2.70(7) eV and 2.81(6) eV. Temperature and field-depending magnetization measurements (5−300 K) show a paramagnetic behaviour with a Curie constant of 55.66×10 −6 m 3 K mol −1 for sample 1 and C=57.82×10 −6 m 3 K mol −1 for sample 2a resulting in magnetic moments of µ mag =5.95(8) µ B mol −1 and µ mag =6.07(4) µ B mol −1 . The influence of amorphous iron-oxide as a result of non-stoichiometric Bi/Fe ratios in hydrothermal syntheses on the magnetic behaviour was additionally investigated. - Graphical abstract: Bi 25 FeO 40 powders were prepared by a hydrothermal method and a combustion process. The optical band gaps and the peritectic point were determined. The magnetic behaviour was investigated depending on the synthesis and the initial Bi/Fe ratios. The influence of amorphous iron-oxide on the magnetic properties was examined. - Highlights: • Two simple syntheses routes for stoichiometric Bi 25 FeO 40 powders using starch as polymerization agent. • Monitoring the phase evolution and crystallite growth kinetics during the syntheses. • Determination of the optical band gap and melting point. • Investigations of the magnetic behaviour of Bi 25 FeO 40 powders. • Influence of amorphous iron oxide and a non-stoichiometric Bi/Fe ratio on the magnetic behaviour

  3. Development of a modelling process for the Otto-DI combustion process based on thermodynamics; Erarbeitung eines thermodynamisch basierten Modellierungsverfahrens fuer den Otto-DI Verbrennungsprozess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, T.; Schaenzlin, K.; Boulouchos, K.

    2004-07-01

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project carried out at the Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland, to develop a thermodynamics-based modelling process for the Otto-DI (direct injection) combustion process. As part of the development of the 'Codino' twin-zone model, the aim of this project was to provide an experimentally sound and convincing basis for the work. Several measurement techniques used on the institute's single-cylinder research engine are discussed, including ion-flow, endoscopy, the two-colour method, spectrography and the use of an optical fibre probe and emission-measurements in the exhaust gasses. Simulations made in parallel with the experiments are also discussed. The results obtained using this measurement-technology 'pool' are presented, whereby an accent is set on the physical-chemical processes involved from the start of mixture preparation up to the end of the combustion process.

  4. 14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, Eva; Andersson, Patrik L; Bidleman, Terry; Boman, Christoffer; Carlin, Danielle J; Collina, Elena; Cormier, Stephania A; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C; Gullett, Brian K; Johansson, Christer; Lucas, Donald; Lundin, Lisa; Lundstedt, Staffan; Marklund, Stellan; Nording, Malin L; Ortuño, Nuria; Sallam, Asmaa A; Schmidt, Florian M; Jansson, Stina

    2016-04-01

    The 14th International Congress on Combustion By-Products and Their Health Effects was held in Umeå, Sweden from June 14th to 17th, 2015. The Congress, mainly sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, focused on the "Origin, fate and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources". The international delegates included academic and government researchers, engineers, scientists, policymakers and representatives of industrial partners. The Congress provided a unique forum for the discussion of scientific advances in this research area since it addressed in combination the health-related issues and the environmental implications of combustion by-products. The scientific outcomes of the Congress included the consensus opinions that: (a) there is a correlation between human exposure to particulate matter and increased cardiac and respiratory morbidity and mortality; (b) because currently available data does not support the assessment of differences in health outcomes between biomass smoke and other particulates in outdoor air, the potential human health and environmental impacts of emerging air-pollution sources must be addressed. Assessment will require the development of new approaches to characterize combustion emissions through advanced sampling and analytical methods. The Congress also concluded the need for better and more sustainable e-waste management and improved policies, usage and disposal methods for materials containing flame retardants.

  5. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  6. Two-stage Lagrangian modeling of ignition processes in ignition quality tester and constant volume combustion chambers

    KAUST Repository

    Alfazazi, Adamu

    2016-08-10

    The ignition characteristics of isooctane and n-heptane in an ignition quality tester (IQT) were simulated using a two-stage Lagrangian (TSL) model, which is a zero-dimensional (0-D) reactor network method. The TSL model was also used to simulate the ignition delay of n-dodecane and n-heptane in a constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC), which is archived in the engine combustion network (ECN) library (http://www.ca.sandia.gov/ecn). A detailed chemical kinetic model for gasoline surrogates from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was utilized for the simulation of n-heptane and isooctane. Additional simulations were performed using an optimized gasoline surrogate mechanism from RWTH Aachen University. Validations of the simulated data were also performed with experimental results from an IQT at KAUST. For simulation of n-dodecane in the CVCC, two n-dodecane kinetic models from the literature were utilized. The primary aim of this study is to test the ability of TSL to replicate ignition timings in the IQT and the CVCC. The agreement between the model and the experiment is acceptable except for isooctane in the IQT and n-heptane and n-dodecane in the CVCC. The ability of the simulations to replicate observable trends in ignition delay times with regard to changes in ambient temperature and pressure allows the model to provide insights into the reactions contributing towards ignition. Thus, the TSL model was further employed to investigate the physical and chemical processes responsible for controlling the overall ignition under various conditions. The effects of exothermicity, ambient pressure, and ambient oxygen concentration on first stage ignition were also studied. Increasing ambient pressure and oxygen concentration was found to shorten the overall ignition delay time, but does not affect the timing of the first stage ignition. Additionally, the temperature at the end of the first stage ignition was found to increase at higher ambient pressure

  7. Numerical studies of spray combustion processes of palm oil biodiesel and diesel fuels using reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Kuti, Olawole

    2014-04-01

    Spray combustion processes of palm oil biodiesel (PO) and conventional diesel fuels were simulated using the CONVERGE CFD code. Thermochemical and reaction kinetic data (115 species and 460 reactions) by Luo et al. (2012) and Lu et al. (2009) (68 species and 283 reactions) were implemented in the CONVERGE CFD to simulate the spray and combustion processes of the two fuels. Tetradecane (C14H30) and n- heptane (C7H 16) were used as surrogates for diesel. For the palm biodiesel, the mixture of methyl decanoate (C11H20O2), methyl-9-decenoate (C11H19O2) and n-heptane was used as surrogate. The palm biodiesel surrogates were combined in proportions based on the previous GC-MS results for the five major biodiesel components namely methyl palmitate, methyl stearate, methyl oleate, methyl linoleate and methyl linolenate. The Favre-Averaged Navier Stokes based simulation using the renormalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulent model was implemented in the numerical calculations of the spray formation processes while the SAGE chemical kinetic solver is used for the detailed kinetic modeling. The SAGE chemical kinetic solver is directly coupled with the gas phase calculations by renormalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulent model using a well-stirred reactor model. Validations of the spray liquid length, ignition delay and flame lift-off length data were performed against previous experimental results. The simulated liquid length, ignition delay and flame lift-off length were validated at an ambient density of 15kg/m3, and injection pressure conditions of 100, 200 and 300 MPa were utilized. The predicted liquid length, ignition delay and flame lift-off length agree with the trends obtained in the experimental data at all injection conditions. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.

  8. ANALYSIS OF INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE WITH A NEW CONCEPT OF POROUS MEDIUM COMBUSTION FOR THE FUTURE CLEAN ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok A Dhale

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, the emissions of internal combustion engine can only be improved by catalytic treatments of the exhaust gases. Such treatments, however, result in high costs and relatively low conversion efficiency. This suggests that a new combustion technique should be developed to yield improved primary combustion processes inside the engine with drastically reduced exhaust gas emissions. To fulfill all requirements, Dr. Franz Drust has proposed a new combustion concept to perform homogenous combustion in internal combustion engines. This concept used the porous medium combustion technique and is called "PM-engine". It is shown that the PM combustion technique can be applied to internal combustion engines. Theoretical considerations are presented for internal combustion engines, indicating that an overall improvement in thermal efficiency can be achieved for the PM-engine. This is explained and general performance of the new PM-engines is demonstrated for a single cylinder, water cooled, direct injection diesel engine. Verification of experiments at primary stage is described that were carried out as a part of the present study.

  9. Measurements and numerical simulations for optimization of the combustion process in a utility boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikhansky, A.; Bar-Ziv, E. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Dept. of Biotechnology and Environmental Engineering, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Chudnovsky, B.; Talanker, A. [Israel Electric Corp. (IEC),, Mechanical Systems Div., Haifa (Israel); Eddings, E.; Sarofim, A. [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Utah Univ., Dept. of Chemical and Fuel Engineering, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2004-07-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code was used to analyse the performance of 550MW pulverized coal combustion opposite a wall-fired boiler (of IEC) at different operation modes. The main objective of this study was to prove that connecting plant measurements with three-dimensional furnace modelling is a cost-effective method for design, optimization and problem solving in power plant operation. Heat flux results from calculations were compared with measurements in the boiler and showed good agreement. Consequently, the code was used to study hydrodynamic aspects of air-flue gases mixing in the upper part of the boiler. It was demonstrated that effective mixing between flue gases and overfire air is of essential importance for CO reburning. From our complementary experimental-numerical effort, IEC considers a possibility to improve the boiler performance by replacing the existing OFA nozzles by those with higher penetration depth of the air jets, with the aim to ensure proper mixing to achieve better CO reburning. (Author)

  10. Measurements and numerical simulations for optimization of the combustion process in a utility boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Vikhansky; E. Bar-Ziv; B. Chudnovsky; A. Talanker; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel). Department of Biotechnology and Environmental Engineering

    2004-04-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code was used to analyse the performance of 550MW pulverized coal combustion opposite a wall-fired boiler (of the Israel Electric Corporation (IEC)) at different operation modes. The main objective of this study was to prove that connecting plant measurements with three-dimensional furnace modelling is a cost-effective method for design, optimization and problem solving in power plant operation. Heat flux results from calculations were compared with measurements in the boiler and showed good agreement. Consequently, the code was used to study hydrodynamic aspects of air-flue gases mixing in the upper part of the boiler. It was demonstrated that effective mixing between flue gases and overfire air is of essential importance for CO reburning. From the complementary experimental-numerical effort, IEC considers a possibility to improve the boiler performance by replacing the existing OFA nozzles by those with higher penetration depth of the air jets, with the aim to ensure proper mixing to achieve better CO reburning. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. An Experimental Investigation on the Combustion and Heat Release Characteristics of an Opposed-Piston Folded-Cranktrain Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukang Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In opposed-piston folded-cranktrain diesel engines, the relative movement rules of opposed-pistons, combustion chamber components and injector position are different from those of conventional diesel engines. The combustion and heat release characteristics of an opposed-piston folded-cranktrain diesel engine under different operating conditions were investigated. Four phases: ignition delay, premixed combustion, diffusion combustion and after combustion are used to describe the heat release process of the engine. Load changing has a small effect on premixed combustion duration while it influences diffusion combustion duration significantly. The heat release process has more significant isochoric and isobaric combustion which differs from the conventional diesel engine situation, except at high exhaust pressure and temperature, due to its two-stroke and uniflow scavenging characteristics. Meanwhile, a relatively high-quality exhaust heat energy is produced in opposed-piston folded-cranktrain diesel engines.

  12. Numerical and experimental investigation of combustion processes of low-calorific gases in pore burners; Numerische und experimentelle Untersuchung von Verbrennungsvorgaengen niederkalorischer Gase in Porenbrennern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diezinger, S.; Steven, M.; Talukdar, P.; Al-Hamamre, Z.; Issendorff, F. von; Trimis, D. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungsmechanik

    2005-07-01

    Combustion of H2-containing low-calorific mixtures in a pore burner was investigated both numerically and experimentally. The mixtures under investigation are representative of SOFC exhaust and pyrolysis gases. In preliminary experiments, the limits of operation of a pore burner were identified by equilibrium calculations and kinetic calculations. On this basis, 3D simulations of the combustion processes were made, taking into account all relevant heat and mass transfer processes including radiation in porous media. Finally, the limits of operation of both mixtures were identified experimentally, as were the CO and NOx emissions. (orig.)

  13. Data Processing Algorithm for Diagnostics of Combustion Using Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironenko, Vladimir R; Kuritsyn, Yuril A; Liger, Vladimir V; Bolshov, Mikhail A

    2018-02-01

    A new algorithm for the evaluation of the integral line intensity for inferring the correct value for the temperature of a hot zone in the diagnostic of combustion by absorption spectroscopy with diode lasers is proposed. The algorithm is based not on the fitting of the baseline (BL) but on the expansion of the experimental and simulated spectra in a series of orthogonal polynomials, subtracting of the first three components of the expansion from both the experimental and simulated spectra, and fitting the spectra thus modified. The algorithm is tested in the numerical experiment by the simulation of the absorption spectra using a spectroscopic database, the addition of white noise, and the parabolic BL. Such constructed absorption spectra are treated as experimental in further calculations. The theoretical absorption spectra were simulated with the parameters (temperature, total pressure, concentration of water vapor) close to the parameters used for simulation of the experimental data. Then, spectra were expanded in the series of orthogonal polynomials and first components were subtracted from both spectra. The value of the correct integral line intensities and hence the correct temperature evaluation were obtained by fitting of the thus modified experimental and simulated spectra. The dependence of the mean and standard deviation of the evaluation of the integral line intensity on the linewidth and the number of subtracted components (first two or three) were examined. The proposed algorithm provides a correct estimation of temperature with standard deviation better than 60 K (for T = 1000 K) for the line half-width up to 0.6 cm -1 . The proposed algorithm allows for obtaining the parameters of a hot zone without the fitting of usually unknown BL.

  14. Transient Combustion in Granular Propellant Beds. Part I. Theoretical Modeling and Numerical Solution of Transient Combustion Processes in Mobile Granular Propellant Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    To advice the statt-of-che- art in the combustion of granular prope..lents by forwilating a complete theoretical model describ".•j the Important...d~~+W s (-.1 1-3. Where the vector products of W , W/2 , W/ , W/ and W/ vith I arte •iVn as Wl#’. m II -VVW ,÷I&. -Wig I,÷W,4A+. j IS÷ I-P(/. W/r...beginning of the granular propel.ent bed ZL Left boumdary point - •light boundary point Grek S.2 1k (Ip Thermal diffusivity of pellucsp 1 Erosive burning

  15. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  16. Estimating the Energy Content of Wastewater Using Combustion Calorimetry and Different Drying Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korth, Benjamin; Maskow, Thomas; Günther, Susanne; Harnisch, Falk, E-mail: falk.harnisch@ufz.de [Department of Environmental Microbiology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2017-09-19

    The energy content of wastewater is routinely assessed by chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements that only provide an incomplete picture and the data fundament of other energy parameters remains scarce. The volumetric heat of combustion (Δ{sub C}H) of raw wastewater from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was assessed using oven drying method (Δ{sub C}H{sub vol} = −6.8 ± 4.3 kJ L{sup −1}, n = 20) and freeze drying method (Δ{sub C}H{sub vol} = −20.2 ± 9.7 kJ L{sup −1}, n = 6) illustrating the substantial loss during the oven drying approach. Normalizing Δ{sub C}H to COD of raw wastewater yielded −6.2 ± 3.5 kJ gCOD{sup −1} for oven-dried samples (n = 14) and −13.0 ± 1.6 kJ gCOD{sup −1} for freeze-dried samples (n = 3). A subsequent correlation analysis with further chemical wastewater parameters revealed a dependency of Δ{sub C}H{sub vol} on COD, total organic carbon (TOC), C:N ratio, and total sulfur content. To verify these correlations, wastewater of a second WWTP was sampled and analyzed. Only COD and TOC were in accordance with the data set from the first WWTP representing potential predictors for the chemical energy stored in wastewater for comparable WWTPs. Unfortunately, during the most practical method (oven drying), a certain loss of volatile compounds is inevitable so that the derived Δ{sub C}H{sub vol} systematically underestimates the total energetic potential of wastewater. Nevertheless, this work expands the, so far, little data fundament on the energy resource wastewater and implies the requirement for further long-term studies on different sites and different wastewater types with a highly standardized sample treatment protocol.

  17. Integration between a demo size post-combustion CO2 capture and full size power plant: an integral approach on energy penalty for different process options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miguel Mercader, F. de; Magneschi, G.; Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Stienstra, G.J.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2012-01-01

    CO2 capture based on post-combustion capture has the potential to significantly reduce the CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, this capture process reduces considerably the energy efficiency of the power plant. To reduce this energy penalty, this paper studies different

  18. Membrane Separation Processes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture: State of the Art and Critical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belaissaoui Bouchra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Membrane processes have been initially seldom considered within a post-combustion carbon dioxide capture framework. More traditional processes, particularly gas-liquid absorption in chemical solvents, are often considered as the most appropriate solution for the first generation of technologies. In this paper, a critical state of the art of gas separation membranes for CO2 capture is proposed. In a first step, the key performances (selectivity, permeability of different membrane materials such as polymers, inorganic membranes, hybrid matrices and liquid membranes, including recently reported results, are reviewed. In a second step, the process design characteristics of a single stage membrane unit are studied. Purity and energy constraints are analysed as a function of operating conditions and membrane materials performances. The interest of multistage and hybrid systems, two domains which have not sufficiently investigated up to now, are finally discussed. The importance of technico-economical analyses is highlighted in order to better estimate the optimal role of membranes for CCS applications.

  19. Improvement of fire-tube boilers calculation methods by the numerical modeling of combustion processes and heat transfer in the combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, I. I.; Rostova, D. M.; Vegera, A. N.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the results of study on determination of degree and nature of influence of operating conditions of burner units and flare geometric parameters on the heat transfer in a combustion chamber of the fire-tube boilers. Change in values of the outlet gas temperature, the radiant and convective specific heat flow rate with appropriate modification of an expansion angle and a flare length was determined using Ansys CFX software package. Difference between values of total heat flow and bulk temperature of gases at the flue tube outlet calculated using the known methods for thermal calculation and defined during the mathematical simulation was determined. Shortcomings of used calculation methods based on the results of a study conducted were identified and areas for their improvement were outlined.

  20. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Glarborg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Most fossil fuels contain sulphur and also biofuels and household waste have a sulphur content. As a consequence sulphur species will often be present in combustion processes. In this paper the fate and influence of fuel sulphur species in combustion will be treated. First a description...... of the sulphur compounds in fossil fuels and the possibilities to remove them will be given. Then the combustion of sulphur species and their influence on the combustion chemistry and especially on the CO oxidation and the NOx formation will be described. Finally the in-situ removal of sulphur in the combustion...

  1. Processing of hydroxyapatite obtained by combustion synthesis; Procesamiento de hidroxiapatita obtenida mediante síntesis por combustión

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Rivero, R.; García-Carrodeguas, R.; Barba, F.; Rodríguez, M.A.

    2017-11-01

    One of the reasons of implants failure are the stress forces appearing in the material–tissue interface due to the differences between their mechanical properties. For this reason, similar mechanical properties to the surrounding tissue are desirable. The synthesis of hydroxyapatite by solution combustion method and its processing have been studied in order to obtain fully dense ceramic bodies with improved mechanical strength. Combustion synthesis provides nanostructured powders characterized by a high surface area to facilitate the following sintering. Moreover, synthesis was conducted in aqueous and oxidizing media. Oxidizing media improve homogenization and increase the energy released during combustion. It gives rise to particles whose morphology and size suggest lower surface energies compared with aqueous media. The obtained powders were sintered by using a controlled sintering rate schedule. Lower surfaces energies minimize the shrinkage during sintering and relative densities measurements and diametral compression test confirm improved densification and consequently mechanical properties. [Spanish] Una de las razones principales de fracaso de los implantes son las fuerzas de estrés que aparecen en la interface material-tejido debido a las diferencias existentes entre sus propiedades mecánicas. Por esta razón, es necesario que el implante posea propiedades mecánicas similares a las del tejido circundante. La síntesis de hidroxiapatita por el método de combustión y su procesamiento se han estudiado con el objetivo de obtener cuerpos cerámicos completamente densificados y, consecuentemente, con propiedades mecánicas mejoradas. El método de combustión provee de polvos nanoestructurados que se caracterizan por una superficie específica elevada que facilita el siguiente proceso de sinterización. Además, este proceso de síntesis se ha realizado en medio acuoso y oxidante. El medio oxidante homogeniza e incrementa la energía liberada durante la

  2. Image processing in diabetic related causes

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    This book is a collection of all the experimental results and analysis carried out on medical images of diabetic related causes. The experimental investigations have been carried out on images starting from very basic image processing techniques such as image enhancement to sophisticated image segmentation methods. This book is intended to create an awareness on diabetes and its related causes and image processing methods used to detect and forecast in a very simple way. This book is useful to researchers, Engineers, Medical Doctors and Bioinformatics researchers.

  3. Combustion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ragland, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Combustion Engineering The Nature of Combustion Combustion Emissions Global Climate Change Sustainability World Energy Production Structure of the Book   Section I: Basic Concepts Fuels Gaseous Fuels Liquid Fuels Solid Fuels Problems Thermodynamics of Combustion Review of First Law Concepts Properties of Mixtures Combustion StoichiometryChemical EnergyChemical EquilibriumAdiabatic Flame TemperatureChemical Kinetics of CombustionElementary ReactionsChain ReactionsGlobal ReactionsNitric Oxide KineticsReactions at a Solid SurfaceProblemsReferences  Section II: Combustion of Gaseous and Vaporized FuelsFlamesLaminar Premixed FlamesLaminar Flame TheoryTurbulent Premixed FlamesExplosion LimitsDiffusion FlamesGas-Fired Furnaces and BoilersEnergy Balance and EfficiencyFuel SubstitutionResidential Gas BurnersIndustrial Gas BurnersUtility Gas BurnersLow Swirl Gas BurnersPremixed-Charge Engine CombustionIntroduction to the Spark Ignition EngineEngine EfficiencyOne-Zone Model of Combustion in a Piston-...

  4. Bench Scale Development and Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process for Post-Combustion CO₂ Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ravi [Innosepra Limited Liability Company, Middlesex, NJ (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A physical sorption process to produce dry CO₂ at high purity (>98%) and high recovery (>90%) from the flue gas taken before or after the FGD was demonstrated both in the lab and in the field (one ton per day scale). A CO₂ recovery of over 94% and a CO₂ purity of over 99% were obtained in the field tests. The process has a moisture, SOX, and Hg removal stage followed by a CO₂ adsorption stage. Evaluations based on field testing, process simulation and detailed engineering studies indicate that the process has the potential for more than 40% reduction in the capital and more than 40% reduction in parasitic power for CO₂ capture compared to MEA. The process has the potential to provide CO₂ at a cost (<$40/tonne) and quality (<1 ppm H₂O, <1 ppm SOX, <10 ppm O₂) suitable for EOR applications which can make CO₂ capture profitable even in the absence of climate legislation. The process is applicable to power plants without SOX, Hg and NOX removal equipment.

  5. Energy from wood - part 1: fundamentals of wood combustion; Holzenergie, Teil 1: Grundlagen der Holzverbrennung - Energie du bois, Partie 1: fondements de la combustion du bois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T. [Verenum, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2000-07-01

    The present publication describes the fundamentals of wood combustion and the mechanisms of pollutant formation. Furthermore, consequences for the design of wood furnaces are discussed. Based on the chemical reaction of wood combustion, the main influences on the pollutant formation are described. The combustion of wood is a multi-stage process of drying, devolatilization, gas combustion, and char burnout. The excess air ratio is introduced as a useful parameter. Its influence on the combustion is discussed. Important fuel properties for the design and operation of wood furnaces are the fuel humidity, the volatile content, the bulk density, and the ash content. The fuel humidity influences the heating value and the combustion temperature. Typical values for different wood fuels are presented and a formula to calculate the heating value is introduced. Since wood has a high volatile content, the main part of the wood is converted into combustible gases during heat up and devolatilization. As a consequence, the principle of a two stage combustion is described that enables an almost complete burnout with low emissions and high efficiency. For this purpose, primary air is injected for the gasification of the fuel and secondary air is added for the burnout of the combustible gases. It is shown that the mixing between combustion air and combustible gases is crucial for a complete burnout. Furthermore, a hot combustion chamber and an operation at optimum excess air have to be guaranteed. However, wood combustion is related to pollutant formation from two sources: On the one hand, an incomplete combustion can lead to high emissions of unburnt pollutants such as carbon monoxide, soot, and hydrocarbons. These pollutants can be reduced with optimized combustion. On the other hand, pollutants such as nitric oxides and particles are formed as a result of fuel constituents, i.e. nitrogen and ash. The formation of nitric oxides and particles as well as measures for their reduction

  6. Combined process of pyrolyzer/combuster for gas production and power generation; Chugoku ni okeru chukibo hatsuden to toshi gas seizo no tame no fukugo process no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooka, I. [The University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan); Ma, T.

    1997-10-30

    In China, they are using a lot of coal by direct firing for domestic cooking, space heating and industrial use. Therefore air pollution is the big problem in every cities in winter season. And at moment, they do not have enough infrastructure for supplying energy such as gas and electric power. There is a great need for facilities for supplying gas and electric power from coal in big cities with much less pollution. This paper d a combined process of medium size plant of gas production and power generation by using fluidized circulation bed pyrolizer and combuster, to contribute to the energy supply which greatly reduces air and water polution and coal consumption. 1 ref., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Process optimisation in waste combustion and gasification; Prozessoptimierung bei der Verbrennung und Vergasung von Abfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, M. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg, Inst. IEC, Fakultaet 4 (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Optimisation of thermal treatment processes is chiefly geared to the following aims: in terms of process engineering, to the homogenisation of input materials, improvement of process effectivity (increased reaction rates), intensification of mixing and exploitation of residence time (approximation to thermodynamic equilibria); in ecological terms, to the minimisation of material flows and pollutant generation and limitation of emissions; and in economic terms to the simplification of process techniques, maximisation of net energy production, and minimisation of the quantity and pollutant content of arising wastes. The present contribution takes a closer look at some of these ways of optimisation. [Deutsch] Die Optimierung der thermischen Behandlungsprozesse wird vor allem mit folgenden Zielstellung durchgefuehrt: - verfahrenstechnisch durch - Homogenisierung der Input-Materialien, Verbesserung der Effektivitaet der Prozesse (Erhoehung der Reaktionsgeschwindigkeit), Intensivierung der Mischung und Nutzung der Verweilzeit (Annaeherung an thermodynamische Gleichgewichte). - Oekologisch durch - Minimierung der Stoffstroeme, Minimierung der Schadstoffentstehung, Begrenzung der Emissionen. - Oekonomisch durch - Vereinfachung der Verfahrenstechnik, Maximierung der Nettoenergieproduktion, Minimierung der Mengen und Schadstoffgehalte entstehender Abfaelle. In den folgenden Ausfuehrungen sollen einige dieser Optimierungsmoeglichkeiten naeher betrachtet werden. (orig./SR)

  8. Characterization and single-stage denitrification anaerobic digestion of spent stream from the hydrolysis-fermentation-combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramnik

    The demand for ethanol as an oxygenate and octane booster in automobile fuel is growing. A number of processes are being investigated for conversion of biomass to ethanol. The Hydrolysis-Fermentation-Combustion (HFC) process for fuel ethanol production developed at the University of California Forest Products Laboratory, Richmond, California is at the stage of technology transfer following over two decades of research and development. This study addresses the technology to be used in treatment of spent streams to be discharged from this process. The treatment design combines a single stage denitrification and anaerobic digestion (SSDAD) for the biological treatment of a representative stream from this process. A typical spent stream contained a wide range of soluble organic materials including: unfermented sugars, components of the feedstocks solubilized in the hydrolysis, acid degradation products of carbohydrates, cleavage products of lignin, water-soluble extractives and phenolics, terpenes and other unfermented organic material, and nitrate ion from the nitric acid used as a catalyst in the hydrolysis reaction. Three sets of experiments were conducted in laboratory scale anaerobic digesters. Commonly available anaerobic sludge from local sewage treatment plants was used as a starter seed and was successfully acclimated to the high nitrate substrate leading to enrichment of denitrifiers. Necessary nutrients and trace elements were identified and supplied to satisfy the obligatory requirements of different groups of bacterial groups present. A major finding was the unique role of ammonium hydroxide in controlling pH leading to steady-state operation of the digester. At steady state operation the reduction in COD was 65%, the nitrate reduction was 88% and the nitrite reduction was 100%. Nitrate was reduced to safe nitrogen gas without buildup of any intermediate products. Organic material was converted to useful methane gas and carbon dioxide. The SSDAD system was

  9. Relation between process and service logics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Mišovič

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that the process control of a small and medium-sized manufacturing business enterprise is the foundation of high quality care of firm’s business processes. Any business process is seen as an indivisible sequence of activity steps designed to perform complex business activities. In its statutory documents the company should have concise descriptions of at least the main processes, along with their contexts in a given department of the company and the employee position.The main business processes, of course many others, are not immutable, on the contrary, they are very often changing. Many processes occur, others are modified others disappear as antiquated and useless to support strategic business objectives. All this is a consequence of the firms’ effort needed to maintain competitiveness in the harsh and dynamic consumer market.Business processes are not isolated, many of them are part of a relatively large process chains, so-called enterprise services, see (Erl, 2005. The discipline of Software Engineering responded to the possibility of consolidating enterprise functionality with enterprise services with the method SOA (Service Oriented Architecture leading to new applications for enterprise information systems.In contrast to business processes, business services are still not sufficiently recognized in the statutory documents of enterprises. Informaticians, producing software applications for enterprise information systems, must draw on company management knowledge relating to the general context and processes together with management to prepare business services. There are therefore more relevant questions based on the emergence of corporate services and information modeling in the discipline of Information Engineering. Acceptable responses are not included in a lot of publications or in publications of the doyen of SOA Thomas Erl, see (Erl, 2006 and thus the proposed SOA paradigm suffers from the same problem

  10. A Model of Fuel Combustion Process in The Marine Reciprocating Engine Work Space Taking Into Account Load and Wear of Crankshaft-Piston Assembly and The Theory of Semi-Markov Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girtler Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the operation of reciprocal internal combustion engines, with marine engines used as an example. The analysis takes into account types of energy conversion in the work spaces (cylinders of these engines, loads of their crankshaft-piston assemblies, and types of fuel combustion which can take place in these spaces during engine operation. It is highlighted that the analysed time-dependent loads of marine internal combustion engine crankshaft-piston assemblies are random processes. It is also indicated that the wear of elements of those assemblies resulting from their load should also be considered a random process. A hypothesis is formulated which explains random nature of load and the absence of the theoretically expected detonation combustion in engines supplied with such fuels as Diesel Oil, Marine Diesel Oil, and Heavy Fuel Oil. A model is proposed for fuel combustion in an arbitrary work space of a marine Diesel engine, which has the form of a stochastic four-state process, discrete in states and continuous in time. The model is based on the theory of semi-Markov processes.

  11. Thermodynamics of a post combustion hydrate-based carbon dioxide capture process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Attouche Sfaxi, I.

    2011-07-01

    Hydrates selectivity towards carbon dioxide is offering a promising route for carbon dioxide removal from flue gases. Hydrate-based CO 2 capture process could substitute amine facilities widely implemented in gas treatment plants but suffering from oxidative degradation problems and high energy demand. In the framework of this thesis, we focus on phase equilibria that are involved in such process. Experimental dissociation conditions for clathrate hydrates of carbon dioxide and nitrogen, in the presence of some promoting molecules (Tetrahydrofuran, Tetrabutyl ammonium bromide and Tetrabutyl ammonium Fluoride ) are reported in the experimental section of this work. The data generated in this work along with literature data are compared to the model predictions. The developed model is based on the Cubic Plus Association (CPA) equation of state (EoS) for fluid phases combined to the van der Waals and Platteeuw's theory for the hydrate phase. (author)

  12. Plasma assisted measurements of alkali metal concentrations in pressurized combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R.; Haeyrinen, V. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-01

    The plasma assisted method for continuous measurement of alkali concentrations in product gas flows of pressurized energy processes will be tested and applied at the 1.6 MW PFBC/G facility at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. During the reporting period the alkali measuring device has been tested under pressurized conditions at VTT Energy, DMT, Foster-Wheeler Energia and ABB Carbon. Measurements in Delft will be performed during 1996 after installation of the hot gas filter. The original plan for measurements in Delft has been postponed due to schedule delays in Delft. The results are expected to give information about the influence of different process conditions on the generation of alkali vapours, the comparison of different methods for alkali measurement and the specific performance of our system. This will be the first test of the plasma assisted measurement method in a gasification process. The project belongs to the Joule II extension program under contract JOU2-CT93-0431. (author)

  13. The combustion of sound and rotten coarse woody debris: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua C. Hyde; Alistair M.S. Smith; Roger D. Ottmar; Ernesto C. Alvarado; Penelope. Morgan

    2011-01-01

    Coarse woody debris serves many functions in forest ecosystem processes and has important implications for fire management as it affects air quality, soil heating and carbon budgets when it combusts. There is relatively little research evaluating the physical properties relating to the combustion of this coarse woody debris with even less specifically addressing...

  14. Attributional and relational processing in pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis eGarlick

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Six pigeons were trained using a matching-to-sample procedure where sample and rewarded comparisons matched on both attributional (color and relational (horizontal or vertical orientation dimensions. Probes then evaluated the pigeons’ preference to comparisons that varied in these dimensions. A strong preference was found for the attribute of color. The discrimination was not found to transfer to novel colors, however, suggesting that a general color rule had not been learned. Further, when color could not be used to guide responding, some influence of other attributional cues such as shape, but not relational cues, was found. We conclude that pigeons based their performance on attributional properties of but not on relational properties between elements in our matching-to-sample procedure.. Future studies should look at examining other attributes to compare attributional versus relational processing.

  15. A Self-Propagating Foaming Process of Porous Al-Ni Intermetallics Assisted by Combustion Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Kobashi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The self-propagating foaming process of porous Al-Ni intermetallics was investigated. Aluminum and nickel powders were blended, and titanium and boron carbide powders were added as reactive exothermic agents. The blended powder was extruded to make a rod-shape precursor. Only one end of the rod precursor was heated to ignite the reaction. The reaction propagated spontaneously throughout the precursor. Pore formation took place at the same time as the reaction occurred. Adding the exothermic agent was effective to increase the porosity. Preheating the precursor before the ignition was also very effective to produce porous Al-Ni intermetallics with high porosity.

  16. The laboratory test rig with miniature jet engine to research aviation fuels combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawron Bartosz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents laboratory test rig with a miniature turbojet engine (MiniJETRig – Miniature Jet Engine Test Rig, that was built in the Air Force Institute of Technology. The test rig has been developed for research and development works aimed at modelling and investigating processes and phenomena occurring in full scale jet engines. In the article construction of a test rig is described, with a brief discussion on the functionality of each of its main components. Additionally examples of measurement results obtained during the realization of the initial tests have been included, presenting the capabilities of the test rig.

  17. Research and development in oil shale combustion and processing in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainberg, V.; Hetsroni, G.

    1996-01-01

    Israeli companies and universities are carrying out wide-scale research aimed at investigation and commercial use of oil shale. Oil shale reserves have been evaluated, a demonstration plant for power generation has been constructed, first steps in shale processing at experimental units have been made, and a few commercial projects for oil shale utilization are under consideration. In spite of the low quality of local shales, there are good prospects for their use in the profitable production of electric power and chemical products

  18. Online elemental analysis of process gases with ICP-OES: a case study on waste wood combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellinger, Marco; Wochele, Joerg; Biollaz, Serge M A; Ludwig, Christian

    2012-10-01

    A mobile sampling and measurement system for the analysis of gaseous and liquid samples in the field was developed. An inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), which is built into a van, was used as detector. The analytical system was calibrated with liquid and/or gaseous standards. It was shown that identical mass flows of either gaseous or liquid standards resulted in identical ICP-OES signal intensities. In a field measurement campaign trace and minor elements in the raw flue gas of a waste wood combustor were monitored. Sampling was performed with a highly transport efficient liquid quench system, which allowed to observe temporal variations in the elemental process gas composition. After a change in feedstock an immediate change of the element concentrations in the flue gas was detected. A comparison of the average element concentrations during the combustion of the two feedstocks showed a high reproducibility for matrix elements that are expected to be present in similar concentrations. On the other hand elements that showed strong differences in their concentration in the feedstock were also represented by a higher concentration in the flue gas. Following the temporal variations of different elements revealed strong correlations between a number of elements, such as chlorine with sodium, potassium and zinc, as well as arsenic with lead, and calcium with strontium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation into the effect of different fuels on ignition delay of M-type diesel combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibić Dževad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An ignition delay is a very complex process which depends on a great number of parameters. In practice, definition of the ignition delay is based on the use of correlation expressions. However, the correlation expressions have very often limited application field. This paper presents a new correlation which has been developed during the research project on the direct injection M-type diesel engine using both the diesel and biodiesel fuel, as well as different values of a static injection timing. A dynamic start of injection, as well as the ignition delay, is defined in two ways. The first approach is based on measurement of a needle lift, while the second is based on measurement of a fuel pressure before the injector. The latter approach requires calculation of pressure signals delay through the fuel injection system and the variation of a static advance injection angle changing. The start of a combustion and the end of the ignition delay is defined on the basis of measurements of an in-cylinder pressure and its point of separation from a skip-fire pressure trace. The developed correlation gives better prediction of the ignition delay definition for the M-type direct injection diesel engine in the case of diesel and biodiesel fuel use when compared with the classic expression by the other authors available in the literature.

  20. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Aerogasdynamics Processes in A Longwall Panel for Estimation of Spontaneous Combustion Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkov, Sergey; Sidorenko, Andrey

    2017-11-01

    The relevance of a solution of the problem of endogenous fire safety in seams liable to self-ignition is shown. The possibilities of numerical methods of researches of gasdynamic processes are considered. The analysis of methodical approaches with the purpose to create models and carry out numerical researches of aerogasdynamic processes in longwall panels of gas mines is made. Parameters of the gob for longwall mining are considered. The significant influence of geological and mining conditions of conducting mining operations on distribution of air streams on longwall panels and effective management of gas emission is shown. The aerogasdynamic model of longwall panels for further research of influence of parameters of ventilation and properties of gob is presented. The results of numerical researches including distribution of air streams, fields of concentration of methane and oxygen at application of various schemes of airing for conditions of perspective mines of the Pechora basin and Kuzbass are given. Recommendations for increase of efficiency of the coal seams mining liable to selfignition are made. The directions of further researches are defined.

  2. Processes of marginalization in relation to participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagermann, Laila Colding

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses processes of marginalization in relation to the participation of two students, Amir and Saad, in the school in Copenhagen, Denmark, which they attend but also across the school and different communities outside the school. In the paper I discuss the effect of some teachers......’ (mis)interpellations of certain students like the two boys and further the problematic about how boys like Amir and Saad often struggle alone with contrasting ideologies of practice and the conflicts related to these contrasts....

  3. Combustion Noise in Modern Aero-Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Duran, I.; Moreau, S.; Nicoud, F.; T., Livebardon; Bouty, E.; Poinsot, T.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Combustion noise has recently been the subject of attention of both the aeroacoustic and the combustion research communities. Over the last decades, engine manufacturershave made important efforts to significantly reduce fan and jet noise, which increased the relative importance of combustion noise. Two main mechanisms of combustion-noise generation have been identified: direct combustion noise, generated by acoustic waves propagating to the outlet, and indirect combus...

  4. Reduced ash-related operational problems by co-combustion peat and agricultural fuels; Minskade askrelaterade driftsproblem genom inblandning av torv i aakerbraenslen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, Marcus; Bostroem, Dan; Skoglund, Nils; Grimm, Alejandro; Boman, Christoffer; Kofod-Hansen, Marie

    2010-06-15

    controlled combustion experiments in bench scale (grate/fluidized bed). Good agreement between the theoretical and practical results on critical ash-chemical sub-processes was observed. Combustion tests were carried out during approximately 2 days in a 4 MW grate fired boiler, using; - briquetted reed canary grass (RCG) fuel with high ash content (totally 25 ton DS). - a RCG with low ash content, co-briquetted with peat (85/15 % on DS basis, totally 25 tons). - Salix chips (approx. 40 tons). - Salix chips admixed with peat (15% on DS basis, totally approx. 40 tons). The overall conclusions of the model calculations concerning the ash content of a 'good peat' was that high ash content, high Si content, high S content and high Ca/Si ratio were favourable. Therefore the peat that mostly corresponded to these requirements was chosen for the demonstration tests. Combustion tests were also performed in a 20 kW underfed pellets burner attached to a pellets boiler. Pelletized straw (50 kg) and straw co-pelletized with peat (60/40% on DS basis, totally 50 kg), were used as fuel. The results shows that admixing a typical carex based peat into Salix and Reed canary grass with low ash content gives positive effects concerning both bed agglomeration and deposit formation (corrosion) in the convection parts of the boiler, already at low levels (15 weight% on DS basis). A carex based peat with a relative high Ca/Si ratio is recommended for co-firing with Salix in grate fired boilers, to avoid slagging. The same type of peat should also be utilized in co-firing Reed canary grass with low ash content (relative low admixing levels is sufficient) and wheat straw (high levels are required) to reduce the risk of slagging. In the choice of peat, a general recommendation can be made that peat with high ash content (carex based peat), preferably with high S content and a high Ca/Si ratio (a wt-ratio around 1 is desirable). Reed canary grass with high ash content is not expected to cause

  5. Influence of forest biomass grown in fertilised soils on combustion and gasification processes as well as on the environment with integrated bioenergy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaanu, K.; Orjala, M. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Fuel Production

    1997-12-01

    This presentation describes research carried out by VTT Energy and METLA during 1996, as part of the collaborative EU project involving Finland, Portugal and Spain. The main objectives of this project are to carry out experimental studies of both combustion and gasification under atmospheric (Portugal and Spain) and pressurised conditions (Finland) using biomass from different countries, namely Finland, Portugal and Spain. This was to determine the influence of biomass fertilising conditions on the process itself and the impact on the integrated energy production facilities, such as gas turbines. The aim of the research was carried out during 1996: (1) To complete the biomass collection, analyses and selection of the samples for combustion and gasification tests. This task has been carried out in co-operation with VTT and METLA, (2) To start the combustion and gasification tests under pressurised and atmospheric conditions. The combustion research in Finland is being performed in pressurised entrained flow reactor at VTT in Jyvaeskylae and the gasification research is being conducted at VTT in Espoo. The collection of biomass samples has been completed. The analyses of the samples show that for instance potassium and phosphorus content will be increased by about 30-50 % due to fertilisation. In the ash fusion tests, the ash from fertilised bark and branches and needles may start to soften already at 900 deg C under reducing conditions depending on the composition of the ash. In oxidising atmospheres the ash softening seems to occur at higher temperatures. Preliminary results indicate that the fertilisation may have an influence on the combustion process

  6. Chemiluminescence analysis of the effect of butanol-diesel fuel blends on the spray-combustion process in an experimental common rail diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merola Simona Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion process was studied from the injection until the late combustion phase in an high swirl optically accessible combustion bowl connected to a single cylinder 2-stroke high pressure common rail compression ignition engine. Commercial diesel and blends of diesel and n-butanol (20%: BU20 and 40%: BU40 were used for the experiments. A pilot plus main injection strategy was investigated fixing the injection pressure and fuel mass injected per stroke. Two main injection timings and different pilot-main dwell times were explored achieving for any strategy a mixing controlled combustion. Advancing the main injection start, an increase in net engine working cycle (>40% together with a strong smoke number decrease (>80% and NOx concentration increase (@50% were measured for all pilot injection timings. Compared to diesel fuel, butanol induced a decrease in soot emission and an increase in net engine working area when butanol ratio increased in the blend. A noticeable increase in NOx was detected at the exhaust for BU40 with a slight effect of the dwell-time. Spectroscopic investigations confirmed the delayed auto-ignition (~60 ms of the pilot injection for BU40 compared to diesel. The spectral features for the different fuels were comparable at the start of combustion process, but they evolved in different ways. Broadband signal caused by soot emission, was lower for BU40 than diesel. Different balance of the bands at 309 and 282 nm, due to different OH transitions, were detected between the two fuels. The ratio of these intensities was used to follow flame temperature evolution.

  7. How do consumers perceive differences in risk across nicotine products? A review of relative risk perceptions across smokeless tobacco, e-cigarettes, nicotine replacement therapy and combustible cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czoli, Christine D; Fong, Geoffrey T; Mays, Darren; Hammond, David

    2017-03-01

    To systematically review the literature regarding relative risk perceptions (RRPs) across non-combustible nicotine products. MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles published up to October 2014. Of the 5266 records identified, articles not published in English that did not quantitatively assess RRPs across categories of non-combustible nicotine products were excluded, yielding 55 records. One reviewer extracted measures and findings of RRPs for product comparisons of smokeless tobacco (SLT), e-cigarettes (ECs) and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to one another, and to combustible cigarettes (CCs). A total of 157 samples from 54 studies were included in the analyses. The accuracy of RRPs differed based on the products being compared: although the accuracy of RRPs was variable across studies, substantial proportions of respondents reported inaccurate beliefs about the relative harmfulness of SLT versus CCs, as well as of ECs versus NRT. In addition, in most studies, respondents did not know the relative harmfulness of SLT versus NRT. In contrast, respondents in many studies correctly perceived NRT and ECs as less harmful than CCs. Cigarette smokers and users of non-combustible nicotine products tended to correctly perceive the relative harmfulness of products more often than non-users. Measures used to assess RRPs varied across studies, with different approaches characterised by certain strengths and limitations. The highly variable and context-specific nature of non-combustible nicotine product RRPs have direct implications for researchers and present several challenges for policymakers working with modified risk products, including issues of measurement, health risk communication and behaviour change. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Noise induced phenomena in combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongliang

    Quantitative models of combustion usually consist of systems of deterministic differential equations. However, there are reasons to suspect that noise may have a significant influence. In this thesis, our primary objective is to study the effect of noise on measurable quantities in the combustion process. Our first study involves combustion in a homogeneous gas. With a one step reaction model, we analytically estimate the requirements under which noise is important to create significant differences. Our simulation shows that a bi-modality phenomenon appears when appropriate parameters are applied, which agrees with our analytical result. Our second study involves steady planar flames. We use a relatively complete chemical model of the H2/air reaction system, which contains all eight reactive species (H2, O2, H, O, OH, H2O, HO2, H2O2) and N2. Our mathematical model for this system is a reacting flow model. We derive noise terms related to transport processes by a method advocated by Landau & Lifshitz, and we also derive noise terms related to chemical reactions. We develop a code to simulate this system. The numerical implementation relies on a good Riemann solver, suitable initial and boundary conditions, and so on. We also implement a code on a continuation method, which not only can be used to study approximate properties of laminar flames under deterministic governing equations, but also eliminates the difficulty of providing a suitable initial condition for governing equations with noise. With numerical experiments, we find the difference of flame speed exist when the noise is turned on or off although it is small when compared with the influence of other parameters, for example, the equivalence ratio. It will be a starting point for further studies to include noise in combustion.

  9. INTELLIGENT MONITORING SYSTEM WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTED FIBEROPTIC SENSOR FOR POWER PLANT COMBUSTION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Y. Lee; Stuart S. Yin; Andre Boheman

    2003-12-26

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optical sensor system for real-time monitoring of high temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NOx. The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three fold: (1) development of high temperature distributed fiber optical sensor capable of measuring temperatures greater than 2000 C degree with spatial resolution of less than 1 cm; (2) development of distributed parameter system (DPS) models to map the three-dimensional (3D) temperature distribution for the furnace; and (3) development of an intelligent monitoring system for real-time monitoring of the 3D boiler temperature distribution. Under Task 1, the efforts focused on developing an innovative high temperature distributed fiber optic sensor by fabricating in-fiber gratings in single crystal sapphire fibers. So far, our major accomplishments include: Successfully grown alumina cladding layers on single crystal sapphire fibers, successfully fabricated in-fiber gratings in single crystal sapphire fibers, and successfully developed a high temperature distributed fiber optic sensor. Under Task 2, the emphasis has been on putting into place a computational capability for simulation of combustors. A PC workstation was acquired with dual Xeon processors and sufficient memory to support 3-D calculations. An existing license for Fluent software was expanded to include two PC processes, where the existing license was for a Unix workstation. Under Task 3, intelligent state estimation theory is being developed which will map the set of 1D (located judiciously within a 3D environment) measurement data into a 3D temperature profile. This theory presents a semigroup

  10. CO2 emission related to energy combustion in the world in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    After a brief comment of the evolution of CO 2 emissions due to transports, housing and office buildings, industry and agriculture, electrical plants, and other energetic activities in France in 2007 in comparison with previous years, this article comments the global increase of CO 2 emissions related to energy in the world (figures and graphs are given for some countries of all continents, notably for China, the United States, France, the European Union, the United Kingdom and Germany). These emissions are then assessed in terms of ratio between emission intensity and GDPs or population. Emissions per inhabitant display a 1 to 20 ratio between the USA and Africa

  11. Alternate fuels; Combustibles alternos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero Paredes R, Hernando; Ambriz G, Juan Jose [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the definition and description of alternate fuels we must center ourselves in those technological alternatives that allow to obtain compounds that differ from the traditional ones, in their forms to be obtained. In this article it is tried to give an overview of alternate fuels to the conventional derivatives of petroleum and that allow to have a clear idea on the tendencies of modern investigation and the technological developments that can be implemented in the short term. It is not pretended to include all the tendencies and developments of the present world, but those that can hit in a relatively short term, in accordance with agreed with the average life of conventional fuels. Nevertheless, most of the conversion principles are applicable to the spectrum of carbonaceous or cellulosic materials which are in nature, are cultivated or wastes of organic origin. Thus one will approach them in a successive way, the physical, chemical and biological conversions that can take place in a production process of an alternate fuel or the same direct use of the fuel such as burning the sweepings derived from the forests. [Spanish] En la definicion y descripcion de combustibles alternos nos debemos centrar en aquellas alternativas tecnologicas que permitan obtener compuestos que difieren de los tradicionales, al menos en sus formas de ser obtenidos. En este articulo se pretende dar un panorama de los combustibles alternos a los convencionales derivados del petroleo y que permita tener una idea clara sobre las tendencias de la investigacion moderna y los desarrollos tecnologicos que puedan ser implementados en el corto plazo. No se pretende abarcar todas las tendencias y desarrollos del mundo actual, sino aquellas que pueden impactar en un plazo relativamente corto, acordes con la vida media de los combustibles convencionales. Sin embargo, la mayor parte de los principios de conversion son aplicables al espectro de materiales carbonaceos o celulosicos los cuales se

  12. Timing matters: The processing of pitch relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annekathrin eWeise

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The human central auditory system can automatically extract abstract regularities from a variant auditory input. To this end, temporarily separated events need to be related. This study tested whether the timing between events, falling either within or outside the temporal window of integration (~350 ms, impacts the extraction of abstract feature relations. We utilized tone pairs for which tones within but not across pairs revealed a constant pitch relation (e.g. pitch of 2nd tone of a pair higher than pitch of 1st tone, while absolute pitch values varied across pairs. We measured the Mismatch Negativity (MMN; the brain’s error signal to auditory regularity violations to 2nd tones that rarely violated the pitch relation (e.g. pitch of 2nd tone lower. A Short condition in which tone duration (90 ms and stimulus onset asynchrony between the tones of a pair were short (110 ms was compared to two conditions, where this onset asynchrony was long (510 ms. In the Long Gap condition the tone durations were identical to Short (90 ms, but the silent interval was prolonged by 400 ms. In Long Tone the duration of the first tone was prolonged by 400 ms, while the silent interval was comparable to Short (20 ms. Results show a frontocentral MMN of comparable amplitude in all conditions. Thus, abstract pitch relations can be extracted even when the within-pair timing exceeds the integration period. Source analyses indicate MMN generators in the supratemporal cortex. Interestingly, they were located more anterior in Long Gap than in Short and Long Tone. Moreover, frontal generator activity was found for Long Gap and Long Tone. Thus, the way in which the system automatically registers irregular abstract pitch relations depends on the timing of the events to be linked. Pending that the current MMN data mirror established abstract rule representations coding the regular pitch relation, neural processes building these templates vary with timing.

  13. Food related processes in the insular cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eFrank

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The insular cortex is a multimodal brain region with regional cytoarchitectonic differences indicating various functional specializations. As a multisensory neural node, the insular cortex integrates perception, emotion, interoceptive awareness, cognition, and gustation. Regarding the latter, predominantly the anterior part of the insular cortex is regarded as the primary taste cortex.In this review, we will specifically focus on the involvement of the insula in food processing and on multimodal integration of food-related items. Influencing factors of insular activation elicited by various foods range from calorie-content to the internal physiologic state, body mass index or eating behavior. Sensory perception of food-related stimuli including seeing, smelling, and tasting elicits increased activation in the anterior and mid-dorsal part of the insular cortex. Apart from the pure sensory gustatory processing, there is also a strong association with the rewarding/hedonic aspects of food items, which is reflected in higher insular activity and stronger connections to other reward-related areas. Interestingly, the processing of food items has been found to elicit different insular activation in lean compared to obese subjects and in patients suffering from an eating disorder (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa. The knowledge of functional differences in the insular cortex opens up the opportunity for possible noninvasive treatment approaches for obesity and eating disorders. To target brain functions directly, real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback offers a state-of-the-art tool to learn to control the anterior insular cortex activity voluntarily. First evidence indicates that obese adults have an enhanced ability to regulate the anterior insular cortex.

  14. Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO₂ Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2015-09-30

    A novel Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS) post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) process has been developed by Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc., Nexant Inc., and Western Kentucky University in this bench-scale project. The GPS-based process presents a unique approach that uses a gas pressurized technology for CO₂ stripping at an elevated pressure to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over the MEA process. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental work, process simulation, and technical and economic analysis studies were applied. The project conducted individual unit lab-scale tests for major process components, including a first absorption column, a GPS column, a second absorption column, and a flasher. Computer simulations were carried out to study the GPS column behavior under different operating conditions, to optimize the column design and operation, and to optimize the GPS process for an existing and a new power plant. The vapor-liquid equilibrium data under high loading and high temperature for the selected amines were also measured. The thermal and oxidative stability of the selected solvents were also tested experimentally and presented. A bench-scale column-based unit capable of achieving at least 90% CO₂ capture from a nominal 500 SLPM coal-derived flue gas slipstream was designed and built. This integrated, continuous, skid-mounted GPS system was tested using real flue gas from a coal-fired boiler at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The technical challenges of the GPS technology in stability, corrosion, and foaming of selected solvents, and environmental, health and

  15. NOx emissions and thermal efficiencies of small scale biomass-fuelled combustion plant with reference to process industries in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, A.S.; Purvis, M.R.I.

    1996-01-01

    Solid biomass materials are an important industrial fuel in many developing countries and also show good potential for usage in Europe within a future mix of renewable energy resources. The sustainable use of wood fuels for combustion relies on operation of plant with acceptable thermal efficiency. There is a clear link between plant efficiency and environmental impacts due to air pollution and deforestation. To supplement a somewhat sparse literature on thermal efficiencies and nitrogen oxide emissions from biomass-fuelled plants in developing countries, this paper presents results for tests carried out on 14 combustion units obtained during field trials in Sri Lanka. The plants tested comprised steam boilers and process air heaters. Biomass fuels included: rubber-wood, fuelwood from natural forests; coconut shells; rice husks; and sugar can bagasse. Average NO x (NO and NO 2 ) emissions for the plants were found to be 47 gNO 2 GJ -1 with 18% conversion of fuel nitrogen. The former value is the range of NO x emission values quoted for combustion of coal in grate-fired systems; some oil-fired systems and systems operating on natural gas, but is less than the emission levels for the combustion of pulverized fuel and heavy fuel oil. This value is significantly within current European standards for NO x emission from large combustion plants. Average thermal efficiency of the plants was found to be 50%. Observations made on operational practices demonstrated that there is considerable scope for the improvement of this thermal efficiency value by plant supervisor training, drying of fuelwood and the use of simple instruments for monitoring plant performance. (Author)

  16. Co-combustion of waste materials using fluidized bed technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Lopes; I. Gulyurtlu; P. Abelha; T. Crujeira; D. Boavida; I. Cabrita [INETI-DEECA, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2004-07-01

    There is growing interest in using renewable fuels in order to sustain the CO{sub 2} accumulation. Several waste materials can be used as coal substitutes as long as they contain significant combustible matter, as for example MSW and sewage sludge. Besides the outcome of the energetic valorization of such materials, combustion must be regarded as a pre-treatment process, contributing to the safe management of wastes. Landfilling is an expensive management option and requires a previous destruction of the organic matter present in residues, since its degradation generates greenhouse gases and produces acidic organic leachates. Fluidized bed combustion is a promising technology for the use of mixtures of coal and combustible wastes. This paper presents INETI's experience in the co-combustion of coal with this kind of residues performed in a pilot fluidized bed. Both the RDF (from MSW and sewage sludge) and sewage sludge combustion problems were addressed, relating the gaseous emissions, the behaviour of metals and the leachability of ashes and a comparison was made between co-combustion and mono-combustion in order to verify the influence of the utilization of coal. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Superior-subordinate relations as organizational processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmuss, Birte; Aggerholm, Helle Kryger; Oshima, Sae

    Since the emergence of the practice turn in social sciences (Golsorkhi et al. 2010), studies have shown a number of institutionally relevant aspects as achievements across time and by means of various resources (human and non-human) (Taylor & van Every 2000, Cooren et al. 2006). Such a process view...... superior-subordinate relations in a specific institutionalized setting: performance appraisal interviews (PAIs). While one main task of PAIs is to manage and integrate organizational and employee performance (Fletcher, 2001:473), PAIs are also organizational practices where superior-subordinate relations...... the participants’ different orientations to “standardized” and “non-standardized” assessments (Maynard, 2003). In our data, “non-standardized” assessments are frequently oriented to as doing the work of "real" evaluations, whereas “standardized” assessments are oriented to as topic closure implicative. Accordingly...

  18. Combustion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  19. Combustion Mode Design with High Efficiency and Low Emissions Controlled by Mixtures Stratification and Fuel Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on the combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixture stratification that have been conducted in the authors’ group, including the charge reactivity controlled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion, stratification controlled premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI combustion, and dual-fuel combustion concepts controlled by both fuel reactivity and mixture stratification. The review starts with the charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion, and the works on HCCI fuelled with both high cetane number fuels, such as DME and n-heptane, and high octane number fuels, such as methanol, natural gas, gasoline and mixtures of gasoline/alcohols, are reviewed and discussed. Since single fuel cannot meet the reactivity requirements under different loads to control the combustion process, the studies related to concentration stratification and dual-fuel charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion are then presented, which have been shown to have the potential to achieve effective combustion control. The efforts of using both mixture and thermal stratifications to achieve the auto-ignition and combustion control are also discussed. Thereafter, both charge reactivity and mixture stratification are then applied to control the combustion process. The potential and capability of thermal-atmosphere controlled compound combustion mode and dual-fuel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI/highly premixed charge combustion (HPCC mode to achieve clean and high efficiency combustion are then presented and discussed. Based on these results and discussions, combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixtures stratification in the whole operating range is proposed.

  20. Application of Large Eddy Simulation in the process of the Multi-Physics Field Coupling in a Combustion Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Rang-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation is the main method to solve turbulence problems. As one of the three methods which are commonly used in large-eddy simulation model (LES is the most effective and promising research method. The basic idea of large-eddy simulation is that the large scale turbulent motion is directly simulated and we use the sub-grid scale model to simulate small-scale turbulent motion. Continuing alternative load exists in aero-engine combustion chamber during operation. This coupling phenomenon is an important reason to the combustion chamber fatigue failure. In this paper, the large-eddy simulation methods are described and applied in researching aero-engine combustion chamber multi-physics field coupling analysis. By comparing with the experimental results we verify the feasibility of this method and there is great significance of actual project.

  1. High Frequency Combustion Instabilities of LOx/CH4 Spray Flames in Rocket Engine Combustion Chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliphorst, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the early stages of space transportation in the 1940’s, and the related liquid propellant rocket engine development, combustion instability has been a major issue. High frequency combustion instability (HFCI) is the interaction between combustion and the acoustic field in the combustion

  2. Immunization with soot from a non-combustion process provokes formation of antibodies against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matschulat, Diana; Prestel, Harald; Haider, Ferdinand; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar

    2006-03-20

    The emission of soot during combustion processes used in transportation, manufacturing, and power generation is of increasing concern because of its serious adverse health effects. In particular, the ability to modulate the immune system has recently been established. In the present investigation, an artificial soot sample that was prepared by fragmentation of acetylene in a laser-induced plasma was used as an antigen for the immunization of a rabbit. A highly sensitive competition curve in an indirect competitive ELISA using a benzo[a]pyrene-BSA conjugate as a coating antigen could be constructed for benzo[a]pyrene with an IC50 of 2.94 mug/l (11.65 nmol/l). In contrast to the high affinity, the soot antiserum dilution (antibody titer) of 1:750 was rather low. The cross-reactivity was tested with 16 parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 7 nitrated polycyclic aromatics, and 3 methylated, hydroxylated or butyric acid derivatives. The results obtained suggest that the vertebrate immune system can respond to an immunization with soot by the generation of high affinity IgG class antibodies against polycyclic aromatics. It is likely that antibodies are raised against the molecular structures which form the framework of the soot particles and not against adsorbed and extractable polyaromatic compounds. The experiments suggest that if soot is considered a T-independent antigen, the isotype switch, essentially from IgM to IgG, could have been caused by co-inoculation with a T-dependent antigen, i.e., mycobacteria contained in Freunds complete adjuvant. However, at the cellular level the mechanism remains to be uncovered.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the combustion process, emission formation and the flow field in an in-direct injection diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barzegar Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the combustion process and emission formation in the Lister 8.1 I.D.I Diesel engine have been investigated using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code. The utilized model includes detailed spray atomization, mixture formation and distribution model which enable modeling the combustion process in spray/wall and spray/swirl interactions along with flow configurations. The analysis considers both part load and full load states. The global properties are presented separately resolved for the swirl chamber (pre-chamber and the main chamber. The results of model verify the fact that the equal amount of the fuel is burned in the main and pre-chamber at full load state while at part load the majority of the fuel is burned in the main chamber. Also, it is shown that the adherence of fuel spray on the pre-chamber walls is due to formation of a stagnation zone which prevents quick spray evaporation and plays an important role in the increase of soot mass fractions at this zone at full load conditions. The simulation results, such as the mean in-cylinder pressure, heat release rate and exhaust emissions are compared with the experimental data and show good agreement. This work also demonstrates the usefulness of multidimensional modeling for complex chamber geometries, such as in I.D.I Diesel engines, to gain more insight into the flow field, combustion process and emission formation.

  4. Methodolgy for the Diagnostic of the Combustion Process of an Idi Diesel Engine Méthodologie pour le diagnostic du processus de combustion dans un moteur Diesel à injection indirecte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payri F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of pressure in the pre-chamber and in the main chamber of an indirect injection Diesel engine provide useful information for the interpretation of the combustion process. However, this is not easy because pressure signals are affected by a number of simultaneous processes such as compression, heat transfer and heat release, and mass exchange between chambers. Diagnostic models try to separate these effects by providing heat release laws which describe with detail the combustion process timing. The whole diagnostic procedure, which is simple and accurate in the case of DI Diesel engines, becomes more complex in IDI ones, and requires much care in calibration, filtering and adjustment because most of the information depends on differences between pressure in the two chambers, whose absolute values are only slightly higher than the accuracy of the pressure measurements. In this work a methodology for the experimental diagnostic is described. The methodology covers the engine testing in both motored and firing conditions, the pressure signal acquisition and processing, the determination of the engine dynamic characteristics, the adjustment of a diagnostic mathematical model, and the final interpretation of the pressure signals through the diagnostic model. Finally, some examples of application are presented. La mesure de la pression dans la préchambre et la chambre principale d'un moteur Diesel à injection indirecte permet d'obtenir une information très utile pour l'interprétation du processus de combustion. Cependant, cette analyse est rendue difficile par le fait que les signaux de pression contiennent l'effet simultané de divers processus, comme la compression, la transmission de chaleur aux parois, le dégagement de chaleur et l'échange de masse entre les deux chambres. L'objectif des modèles de diagnostic est d'isoler ces effets afin d'obtenir des lois de dégagement de chaleur qui décrivent en détail l

  5. Effects of rotating flows on combustion and jet noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, I. R.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental investigations of combustion in rotating (swirling) flow have shown that the mixing and combustion processes were accelerated, flame length and noise levels significantly decreased, and flame stability increased relative to that obtained without rotation. Unsteady burning accompanied by a pulsating flame, violent fluctuating jet, and intense noise present in straight flow burning were not present in rotating flow burning. Correlations between theory and experiment show good agreement. Such effects due to rotating flows could lead to suppressing jet noise, improving combustion, reducing pollution, and decreasing aircraft engine size. Quantitative analysis of the aero-acoustic relationship and noise source characteristics are needed.-

  6. Process chemistry related to hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Matae; Ogata, Yukio

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes, that is, protium, deuterium and tritium, are all related deeply to energy in engineering region. Deuterium and tritium exist usually as water in extremely thin state. Accordingly, the improvement of the technology for separating these isotopes is a large engineering subject. Further, tritium is radioactive and its half-life period is 12.26 years, therefore, it is desirable to fix it in more stable form besides its confinement in the handling system. As the chemical forms of hydrogen, the molecular hydrogen with highest reactivity, metal hydride, carbon-hydrogen-halogen system compounds, various inorganic hydrides, most stable water and hydroxides are enumerated. The grasping of the behavior from reaction to stable state of these hydrogen compounds and the related materials is the base of process chemistry. The reaction of exchanging isotopes between water and hydrogen on solid catalyzers, the decomposition of ethane halide containing hydrogen, the behavior of water and hydroxides in silicates are reported. The isotope exchange between water and hydrogen is expected to be developed as the process of separating and concentrating hydrogen isotopes. (K.I.) 103 refs

  7. Scramjet Combustion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Propulsion a vitesse elevee : Conception du moteur - integration et gestion thermique ) 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...indicates that a moderate degree of nose bluntness could be used to accommodate nose tip heat transfer effects on scramjet inlets without directly...surface was instrumented to measure pressure and heat transfer , while four skin friction gauges were used to measure skin friction at the indicated

  8. SELECTION OF SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COMBUSTION OF BOSNIAN COALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anes Kazagić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with optimization of coal combustion conditions to support selection a sustainable combustion technology and an optimal furnace and boiler design. A methodology for optimization of coal combustion conditions is proposed and demonstrated on the example of Bosnian coals. The properties of Bosnian coals vary widely from one coal basin to the next, even between coal mines within the same basin. Very high percentage of ash (particularly in Bosnian brown coal makes clear certain differences between Bosnian coal types and other world coal types, providing a strong argument for investigating specific problems related to the combustion of Bosnian coals, as well as ways to improve their combustion behaviour. In this work, options of the referent energy system (boiler with different process temperatures, corresponding to the different combustion technologies; pulverised fuel combustion (slag tap or dry bottom furnace and fluidized bed combustion, are under consideration for the coals tested. Sustainability assessment, based on calculation economic and environment indicators, in combination with common low cost planning method, is used for the optimization. The total costs in the lifetime are presented by General index of total costs, calculated on the base of agglomeration of basic economic indicators and the economic indicators derived from environmental indicators. So, proposed methodology is based on identification of those combustion technologies and combustion conditions for coals tested for which the total costs in lifetime of the system under consideration are lowest, provided that all environmental issues of the energy system is fulfilled during the lifetime. Inputs for calculation of the sustainability indicators are provided by the measurements on an experimental furnace with possibility of infinite variation of process temperature, supported by good praxis from the power plants which use the fuels tested and by thermal

  9. Adaptation of Combustion Principles to Aircraft Propulsion. Volume I; Basic Considerations in the Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels with Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Henry C (Editor); Hibbard, Robert R (Editor)

    1955-01-01

    The report summarizes source material on combustion for flight-propulsion engineers. First, several chapters review fundamental processes such as fuel-air mixture preparation, gas flow and mixing, flammability and ignition, flame propagation in both homogenous and heterogenous media, flame stabilization, combustion oscillations, and smoke and carbon formation. The practical significance and the relation of these processes to theory are presented. A second series of chapters describes the observed performance and design problems of engine combustors of the principal types. An attempt is made to interpret performance in terms of the fundamental processes and theories previously reviewed. Third, the design of high-speed combustion systems is discussed. Combustor design principles that can be established from basic considerations and from experience with actual combustors are described. Finally, future requirements for aircraft engine combustion systems are examined.

  10. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  11. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D [Rochester Hills, MI; Reitz, Rolf D [Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  12. The modes of gaseous combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, Nickolai M

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of contemporary problems in combustion science, namely flame propagation, detonation and heterophaseous combustion based on the works of the author. The current problems in the area of gas combustion, as well as the methods allowing to calculate and estimate limiting conditions of ignition, and flame propagation on the basis of experimental results are considered. The book focuses on the virtually inaccessible works of Russian authors and will be useful for experienced students and qualified scientists in the area of experimental studies of combustion processes.

  13. Combustion from basics to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Maximilian; Winter, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Combustion, the process of burning, is defined as a chemical reaction between a combustible reactant (the fuel) and an oxidizing agent (such as air) in order to produce heat and in most cases light while new chemical species (e.g., flue gas components) are formed. This book covers a gap on the market by providing a concise introduction to combustion. Most of the other books currently available are targeted towards the experienced users and contain too many details and/or contain knowledge at a fairly high level. This book provides a brief and clear overview of the combustion basics, suitable f

  14. Studies in combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koszykowski, M.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding and a quantitative predictive capability in combustion modeling. A large part of the understanding of the chemistry of combustion processes comes from {open_quotes}chemical kinetic modeling.{close_quotes} However, successful modeling is not an isolated activity. It necessarily involves the integration of methods and results from several diverse disciplines and activities including theoretical chemistry, elementary reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics and computational science. Recently the authors have developed and utilized new tools for parallel processing to implement the first numerical model of a turbulent diffusion flame including a {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} chemical mechanism.

  15. CO2 capture by biomimetic adsorption: enzyme mediated co2 absorption for post-combustion carbon sequestration and storage process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, M.E.; Olivieri, G.; Salatino, P.; Marzocchella, A.

    2013-01-01

    The huge emission of greenhouse gases from fossil-fuelled power plants is emphasizing the need for efficient Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies. The biomimetic CO2 absorption in aqueous solutions has been recently investigated as a promising innovative alternative for post-combustion CCS.

  16. Environmental survey - tar sands in situ processing research program (Vernal, Uintah County, Utah). [Reverse-forward combustion; steam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Q.

    1980-03-01

    Research will be done on the reverse-forward combustion and steam injection for the in-situ recovery of oil from tar sands. This environmental survey will serve as a guideline for the consideration of environmental consequences of such research. It covers the construction phase, operational phase, description of the environment, potential impacts and mitigations, coordination, and alternatives. (DLC)

  17. Combustion Simulation and Quick-freeze Observation of a Cupola-furnace Process Using a Bio-coke Fuel Based on Tea Scum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Murata, Hirotoshi; Kuwana, Kazunori; Mizuno, Satoru; Morita, Akihiro; Ida, Tamio

    Global environment problems have become more and more serious in recent years, and reduction of greenhouse gas emission based on Kyoto Protocol adopted at the 3rd conference of the parties of the United nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP3); securement of primary energy source and development of clean and renewable energy sources have been pressingly needed in consideration of the predicted depletion of fossil fuel in the future. In this study, we explore the use of a solidified biomass-derived fuel, having the maximum compressive strength of 100MPa and calorific value of 21MJ/kg, in iron-casting or iron-making processes as an alternative fuel to be mixed with coal coke. This study, carried out for internal observation using a quick-freeze technique, observed an actual working cupola furnace under the 20% alternative coal coke operation condition. After quick freeze of the cupola furnace, the solidified biomass fuel was found to inhabit near the iron-melting zone. Especially, this solidified biomass fuel smoothly changes carbonized fuel through high-density state during the operating process. On the other hand, this study tried to simulate gasification combustion under a high temperature environment instead of actual internal combustion of solidified biomass fuel. These combustion mechanisms were confirmed to be similar to diffusion-flame phenomena in general.

  18. Twenty-fifth symposium (international) on combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of the papers presented at this conference are contained in this volume. The other one-third appear in special issues of ''Combustion and Flame'', Vol. 99, 1994 and Vol. 100, 1995. Papers are divided into the following sections: Supersonic combustion; Detonations and explosions; Internal combustion engines; Practical aspects of combustion; Incineration and wastes; Sprays and droplet combustion; Coal and organic solids combustion; Soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Reaction kinetics; NO x ; Turbulent flames; Turbulent combustion; Laminar flames; Flame spread, fire and halogenated fire suppressants; Global environmental effects; Ignition; Two-phase combustion; Solid propellant combustion; Materials synthesis; Microgravity; and Experimental diagnostics. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  19. Measurement of Soot Volume Fraction and Temperature for Oxygen-Enriched Ethylene Combustion Based on Flame Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Yan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A method for simultaneously visualizing the two-dimensional distributions of temperature and soot volume fraction in an ethylene flame was presented. A single-color charge-coupled device (CCD camera was used to capture the flame image in the visible spectrum considering the broad-response spectrum of the R and G bands of the camera. The directional emissive power of the R and G bands were calibrated and used for measurement. Slightly increased temperatures and reduced soot concentration were predicted in the central flame without self-absorption effects considered, an iterative algorithm was used for eliminating the effect of self-absorption. Nine different cases were presented in the experiment to demonstrate the effects of fuel mass flow rate and oxygen concentration on temperature and soot concentration in three different atmospheres. For ethylene combustion in pure-air atmosphere, as the fuel mass flow rate increased, the maximum temperature slightly decreased, and the maximum soot volume fraction slightly increased. For oxygen fractions of 30%, 40%, and 50% combustion in O2/N2 oxygen-enhanced atmospheres, the maximum flame temperatures were 2276, 2451, and 2678 K, whereas combustion in O2/CO2 atmospheres were 1916, 2322, and 2535 K. The maximum soot volume fractions were 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5 ppm in oxygen-enriched O2/N2 atmosphere and 13.6, 15.3, and 14.8 ppm in oxygen-enriched O2/CO2 atmosphere. Compared with the O2/CO2 atmosphere, combustion in the oxygen-enriched O2/N2 atmosphere produced higher flame temperature and larger soot volume fraction. Preliminary results indicated that this technique is reliable and can be used for combustion diagnosis.

  20. Tools for the efficient use of the gas: Combustion diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amell Andres; Maya Ruben D

    1997-01-01

    In this work the results of an investigation carried out with the purpose of developing a fundamental tool related to the process of optimization of the combustion are presented: The combustion diagrams with the optimization are looked for using the maximum heat generated in the reaction and to avoid the production of pollutants, product of an incomplete combustion. This is carried out controlling the stability of the flame and the composition of the smoke by means of the adjustment of the ratio air/combustible basically and with a homogeneous mixture. A constant pursuit of the dry smoke allows to determine the presence of pollutants and to establish the combustion type. A valuable tool to establish the conditions in which this process is carried out, this is the combustion diagram; this diagram uses the values of the concentration of O2 and CO2 in the dry smoke, starting from the sampling of the products by an analyzer to determine the composition of these smoke, the percentage of air really used, the air in excess and the combustion type

  1. Development of flameless combustion; Desarrollo de la combustion sin flama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Sauceda, M. Leonardo; Cervantes de Gortari, Jaime Gonzalo [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: 8344afc@prodigy.net.mx; jgonzalo@servidor.unam.mx

    2010-11-15

    The paper intends contribute to global warming mitigation joint effort that develops technologies to capture the CO{sub 2} produced by fossil fuels combustion and to reduce emission of other greenhouse gases like the NO{sub x}. After reviewing existing combustion bibliography is pointed out that (a) touches only partial aspects of the collective system composed by Combustion-Heat transfer process-Environment, whose interactions are our primary interest and (b) most specialists think there is not yet a clearly winning technology for CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper the study of combustion is focused as integrated in the aforementioned collective system where application of flameless combustion, using oxidant preheated in heat regenerators and fluent gas recirculation into combustion chamber plus appropriated heat and mass balances, simultaneously results in energy saving and environmental impact reduction. [Spanish] El trabajo pretende contribuir al esfuerzo conjunto de mitigacion del calentamiento global que aporta tecnologias para capturar el CO{sub 2} producido por la combustion de combustibles fosiles y para disminuir la emision de otros gases invernadero como NOx. De revision bibliografica sobre combustion se concluye que (a) trata aspectos parciales del sistema compuesto por combustion-proceso de trasferencia de calor-ambiente, cuyas interacciones son nuestro principal interes (b) la mayoria de especialistas considera no hay todavia una tecnologia claramente superior a las demas para captura y almacenaje de CO{sub 2}. Se estudia la combustion como parte integrante del mencionado sistema conjunto, donde la aplicacion de combustion sin flama, empleando oxidante precalentado mediante regeneradores de calor y recirculacion de gases efluentes ademas de los balances de masa y energia adecuados, permite tener simultaneamente ahorros energeticos e impacto ambiental reducido.

  2. Biofuels Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K.

    2013-04-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  3. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  4. Pulsating combustion - Combustion characteristics and reduction of emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, Annika

    1999-11-01

    In the search for high efficiency combustion systems pulsating combustion has been identified as one of the technologies that potentially can meet the objectives of clean combustion and good fuel economy. Pulsating combustion offers low emissions of pollutants, high heat transfer and efficient combustion. Although it is an old technology, the interest in pulsating combustion has been renewed in recent years, due to its unique features. Various applications of pulsating combustion can be found, mainly as drying and heating devices, of which the latter also have had commercial success. It is, however, in the design process of a pulse combustor, difficult to predict the operating frequency, the heat release etc., due to the lack of a well founded theory of the phenomenon. Research concerning control over the combustion process is essential for developing high efficiency pulse combustors with low emissions. Natural gas fired Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been the experimental objects of this study. In order to investigate the interaction between the fluid dynamics and the chemistry in pulse combustors, laser based measuring techniques as well as other conventional measuring techniques have been used. The experimental results shows the possibilities to control the combustion characteristics of pulsating combustion. It is shown that the time scales in the large vortices created at the inlet to the combustion chamber are very important for the operation of the pulse combustor. By increasing/decreasing the time scale for the large scale mixing the timing of the heat release is changed and the operating characteristics of the pulse combustor changes. Three different means for NO{sub x} reduction in Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been investigated. These include exhaust gas recirculation, alteration of air/fuel ratio and changed inlet geometry in the combustion chamber. All used methods achieved less than 10 ppm NO{sub x} emitted (referred to stoichiometric

  5. Combustion visualization and experimental study on spark induced compression ignition (SICI) in gasoline HCCI engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi; He Xu; Wang Jianxin; Shuai Shijin; Xu Fan; Yang Dongbo

    2010-01-01

    Spark induced compression ignition (SICI) is a relatively new combustion control technology and a promising combustion mode in gasoline engines with high efficiency. SICI can be divided into two categories, SACI and SI-CI. This paper investigated the SICI combustion process using combustion visualization and engine experiment respectively. Ignition process of SICI was captured by high speed photography in an optical engine with different compression ratios. The results show that SICI is a combustion mode combined with partly flame propagation and main auto-ignition. The spark ignites the local mixture near spark electrodes and the flame propagation occurs before the homogeneous mixture is auto-ignited. The heat release from central burned zone due to the flame propagation increases the in-cylinder pressure and temperature, resulting in the unburned mixture auto-ignition. The SICI combustion process can be divided into three stages of the spark induced stage, the flame propagation stage and the compression ignition stage. The SICI combustion mode is different from the spark ignition (SI) knocking in terms of the combustion and emission characteristics. Furthermore, three typical combustion modes including HCCI, SICI, SI, were compared on a gasoline direct injection engine with higher compression ratio and switchable cam-profiles. The results show that SICI has an obvious combustion characteristic with two-stage heat release and lower pressure rise rate. The SICI combustion mode can be controlled by spark timings and EGR rates and utilized as an effective method for high load extension on the gasoline HCCI engine. The maximum IMEP of 0.82 MPa can be achieved with relatively low NO x emission and high thermal efficiency. The SICI combustion mode can be applied in medium-high load region for high efficiency gasoline engines.

  6. Les méthodes thermiques de production des hydrocarbures. Chapitre 5 : Combustion "in situ". Pricipes et études de laboratoire Thermal Methods of Hydrocarbon Production. Chapter 5 : "In Situ" Combustion. Principles and Laboratory Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burger J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available II existe plusieurs variantes de la combustion in situ, suivant le sens de déplacement du front de combustion, à co-courant ou à contre-courant, et suivant la nature des fluides injectés, air seul ou injection combinée d'air et d'eau. Les réactions de pyrolyse, d'oxydation et de combustion mises en jeu par ces techniques sont discutées, en particulier la cinétique des principaux mécanismes réactionnels, l'importance du dépôt de coke et l'exothermicité des réactions d'oxydation et de combustion. Les résultats d'essais de déplacement unidirectionnel du front de combustion dans des cellules de laboratoire sont présentés et discutés. Enfin on indique les conditions pratiques d'application des méthodes de combustion in situ sur champ. Possible variations of in situ combustion technique ore as follows : forward or reverse combustion depending on the relative directions of the air flow and the combustion front, dry combustion if air is the only fluid injected into the oil-bearing formation, or fixe/woter flooding if water is injected along with air. The chemical reactions of pyrolysis, oxidation and combustion involved in these processes are described. The kinetics of these reactions is discussed as well as fuel availability in forward combustion and the exothermicity of the oxidation and combustion reactions. The results obtained in the laboratory when a combustion front propagates in unidirectional adiabatic tells are described and discussed. This type of experimentation provides extensive information on the characteristics of the processes. Screening criteria for the practical application of in situ combustion techniques are presented.

  7. Numerical Studies on Controlling Gaseous Fuel Combustion by Managing the Combustion Process of Diesel Pilot Dose in a Dual-Fuel Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Mikulski Maciej; Wierzbicki Sławomir; Piętak Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Protection of the environment and counteracting global warming require finding alternative sources of energy. One of the methods of generating energy from environmentally friendly sources is increasing the share of gaseous fuels in the total energy balance. The use of these fuels in compression-ignition (CI) engines is difficult due to their relatively high autoignition temperature. One solution for using these fuels in CI engines is operating in a dualfuel mode, where the air and gas mixture...

  8. Diffusion processes and related topics in biology

    CERN Document Server

    Ricciardi, Luigi M

    1977-01-01

    These notes are based on a one-quarter course given at the Department of Biophysics and Theoretical Biology of the University of Chicago in 1916. The course was directed to graduate students in the Division of Biological Sciences with interests in population biology and neurobiology. Only a slight acquaintance with probability and differential equations is required of the reader. Exercises are interwoven with the text to encourage the reader to play a more active role and thus facilitate his digestion of the material. One aim of these notes is to provide a heuristic approach, using as little mathematics as possible, to certain aspects of the theory of stochastic processes that are being increasingly employed in some of the population biol­ ogy and neurobiology literature. While the subject may be classical, the nov­ elty here lies in the approach and point of view, particularly in the applica­ tions such as the approach to the neuronal firing problem and its related dif­ fusion approximations. It is a ple...

  9. Effect of grinding process on the level of leachability of the contaminants from the fly ashes from combustion of biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Pawluk Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    The most commonly used renewable energy source in Polish energy production companies is solid biomass which is used both as a separate fuel or as a component co-incinerated together with (mostly) hard coal. During its incineration the biomass generates by-products with diverse and variable physicochemical properties. The most of the waste from production of electricity and/or heat are fly ashes. The fly ashes from combustion of biomass are a particular kind of waste distinguished by high leve...

  10. Environmental Performance of Hypothetical Canadian Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Processes Using Life-Cycle Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Lakkana Piewkhaow; Anastassia Manuilova; Christine W. Chan; Malcolm Wilson; Paitoon Tontiwachwuthikul

    2016-01-01

    The methodology of life-cycle assessment was applied in order to evaluate the environmental performance of a hypothetical Saskatchewan lignite-fueled Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electricity generation, with and without pre-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from a full life-cycle perspective. The emphasis here is placed on environmental performance associated with air contaminants of the comparison between IGCC systems (with and without CO2 capture) and a competing lign...

  11. Key factors of combustion from kinetics to gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, Nikolai M

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the main advances in the mechanisms of combustion processes. It focuses on the analysis of kinetic mechanisms of gas combustion processes and experimental investigation into the interrelation of kinetics and gas dynamics in gas combustion. The book is complimentary to the one previously published, The Modes of Gaseous Combustion.

  12. Two-stage combustion, a new concept in reducing alkali related operational problem; Tvaastegsfoerbraenning, ett nytt koncept att minska alkalirelaterad driftproblematik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjoernhede, Anders; Hermansson, Sven; Seemann, Martin; Alamia, Alberto; Larsson, Anton; Davidsson, Kent; Niklasson, Fredrik; Atongka Tchoffor, Placid; Jones, Frida

    2012-07-01

    A possible way to reduce alkali related problems during thermal conversion of fuels into heat and power is to thermally split the fuel into a relatively alkali-lean gas stream and a relatively alkali-rich char stream. The alkali-lean gas stream could then be combusted and used for high-temperature purpose, e.g. superheating of steam. The char residue could be combusted for heating of e.g. steam tubes at inferior temperatures. The purpose of this project has been to study and demonstrate such two-stage combustion, with separation of the early devolatilization from alkali-rich fuels for steam superheating. Within the project, it has been investigated if this type of thermal conversion is thermo-economically feasible. Furthermore, it has been investigated in laboratory and pilot scale trials, which kinds of fuels, temperature levels and fuel residence times that are required to achieve a flue gas with significantly lower concentrations of alkaloids, compared to single-stage conversion. The results from the thermo-economical simulations show that it is possible to arrange the heat exchanger surfaces in a power plant for thermal two-stage conversion. Compared to traditional one-stage combustion, the electricity efficiency could be increased from 35 % to more than 38 %. However, the results from combustion, gasification and pyrolysis in lab, together with gasification trials in the Chalmers pilot plant, show that the investigated woody fuels (bark and wood pellets) do not seem to be feasible for two-stage conversion. These fuels emit alkaloids exclusively in conjunction with the devolatilization in opposite to the desired effect. On the other hand, straw is a potential fuel candidate for two-stage conversion, since straw emits alkaloids during both devolatilization and char conversion. Furthermore, the results show that increased temperature generally causes increased alkali release. From the results it is suggested that the propensity of a fuel to release alkali during

  13. Relative Economic Merits of Storage and Combustion Turbines for Meeting Peak Capacity Requirements under Increased Penetration of Solar Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Diakov, Victor [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Batteries with several hours of capacity provide an alternative to combustion turbines for meeting peak capacity requirements. Even when compared to state-of-the-art highly flexible combustion turbines, batteries can provide a greater operational value, which is reflected in a lower system-wide production cost. By shifting load and providing operating reserves, batteries can reduce the cost of operating the power system to a traditional electric utility. This added value means that, depending on battery life, batteries can have a higher cost than a combustion turbine of equal capacity and still produce a system with equal or lower overall life-cycle cost. For a utility considering investing in new capacity, the cost premium for batteries is highly sensitive to a variety of factors, including lifetime, natural gas costs, PV penetration, and grid generation mix. In addition, as PV penetration increases, the net electricity demand profile changes, which may reduce the amount of battery energy capacity needed to reliably meet peak demand.

  14. The Role of Attrition and Solids Recovery in a Chemical Looping Combustion Process; Effet de l'attrition et de la recuperation des particules dans le procede de combustion en boucle chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramp, M.; Thon, A.; Hartge, E.U.; Heinrich, S.; Werther, J. [Institute of Solids Process Engineering and Particle Technology, Hamburg University of Technology, 21071 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    In the present work, the steady-state behavior of a Chemical Looping Combustion process of interconnected fluidized bed reactors is simulated. The simulations have been carried out in two different scales, 50 kWth and 100 MWth. Attrition model derived from small scale laboratory experiments has been employed for the prediction of the process behavior in terms of attrition and Oxygen Carrier loss. Information on Oxygen Carrier characteristics and reaction kinetics were taken from literature. Realistic circulation mass flows of Oxygen Carrier particles are obtained and Oxygen Carrier losses are quantified. The large scale process looses significantly more Oxygen Carrier than the small scale process based on the same amount of thermal energy produced. Incomplete conversion in the air reactor could be identified as a critical point. Another issue is the fuel gas bypassing the Oxygen Carrier particles through bubbles in the large scale process which leads to lowered fuel conversions. The simulations indicate that a similar performance of a pilot scale and a large scale process is not guaranteed due to the scale-up effect on fluid dynamics. Furthermore, the simulations allow an assessment of the influence of the quality of the solids recovery system on the Oxygen Carrier loss. The distribution of the losses between possible origins is investigated and different changes in the solids recovery system are discussed regarding their potential to decrease the Oxygen Carrier loss. For example, the addition of a second-stage cyclone after the air reactor of the large scale process reduces the Oxygen Carrier loss significantly. (authors)

  15. Straw combustion on slow-moving grates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2005-01-01

    Combustion of straw in grate-based boilers is often associated with high emission levels and relatively poor fuel burnout. A numerical grate combustion model was developed to assist in improving the combustion performance of these boilers. The model is based on a one-dimensional ‘‘walking...

  16. LES and RANS modeling of pulverized coal combustion in swirl burner for air and oxy-combustion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warzecha, Piotr; Boguslawski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Combustion of pulverized coal in oxy-combustion technology is one of the effective ways to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The process of transition from conventional combustion in air to the oxy-combustion technology, however, requires a thorough investigations of the phenomena occurring during the combustion process, that can be greatly supported by numerical modeling. The paper presents the results of numerical simulations of pulverized coal combustion process in swirl burner using RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) methods for turbulent flow. Numerical simulations have been performed for the oxyfuel test facility located at the Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer at RWTH Aachen University. Detailed analysis of the flow field inside the combustion chamber for cold flow and for the flow with combustion using different numerical methods for turbulent flows have been done. Comparison of the air and oxy-coal combustion process for pulverized coal shows significant differences in temperature, especially close to the burner exit. Additionally the influence of the combustion model on the results has been shown for oxy-combustion test case. - Highlights: • Oxy-coal combustion has been modeled for test facility operating at low oxygen ratio. • Coal combustion process has been modeled with simplified combustion models. • Comparison of oxy and air combustion process of pulverized coal has been done. • RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) results for pulverized coal combustion process have been compared

  17. [ADHD and attachment processes: are they related?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franc, N; Maury, M; Purper-Ouakil, D

    2009-06-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is defined on the basis of developmentally inappropriate inattention, motor activity and impulsivity that emerges early in development and causes impairment in social and academic functioning. ADHD is described as a multifactorial disease, with a well studied genetic vulnerability, and early environmental factors also playing an important role in the development and course of the disorder. Current aetiological models emphasize interaction between genes and environment. The concept of attachment, as proposed by John Bowlby, reflects quality of early interactions, and should therefore be considered as an early developmental factor. First, clinical findings emphasize similitude between both disorders; emotional dysregulation is an important feature in reactive attachment disorder as well as in ADHD. Emotion regulation is highly related to attachment security in young children and could play a part in the development of early attention processes. Moreover, difficult temperament is associated with higher risk for ADHD on the one hand, and can disturb the process of attachment on the other. Parental caregiving - including maternal sensitivity, positive parenting practices - is a main factor involved in the development of attachment, and has shown to be associated with better outcomes in ADHD children, especially with less oppositional/conduct disorders. Second, the aim of our review is to present clinical studies that have looked for a link between ADHD and attachment: the type of attachment could play a part in the course of the disorder: insecure and disorganised attachment types tend to be associated with a higher risk of externalised behaviors in children. For ADHD, this effect seems to be weaker than for other externalised disorders, and has been shown only in populations of at-risk children. Clinical studies also raise the question of possible links between reactive attachment disorder and ADHD. In children suffering

  18. Sulphur dioxide emission from the fossil fuels combustion processes in the Republic of Macedonia for the period from 1988 to 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushevska, Ljubica; Davkova, Katica

    1994-01-01

    The sulphur dioxide represents the major air pollutant. In the region of Republic of Macedonia, the most important sulphur dioxide quantities are emitted from the fossil fuels combustion processes. In this paper the values for the emitted sulphur dioxide quantities per annum, for the period from 1988 to 1992 are given. The presented values were obtained on the basis of three types of input data: the quantities of consumed coal and oil derivatives per annum, the sulphur content in the fossil fuels and the sulphur emission coefficient for coals. (author)

  19. Are reading and face processing related?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Klargaard, Solja K.; Petersen, Anders

    . In this light, investigating face processing in dyslexia, and reading in prosopagnosia becomes interesting: Do deficits in the two domains dissociate? We present data from 11 people with developmental prosopagnosia, which is a disorder of face processing in people with no known brain injury, and in the context......Traditionally, perceptual processing of faces and words is considered highly specialized, strongly lateralized, and largely independent. This has, however, recently been challenged by studies showing that learning to read may affect the perceptual and neural processes involved in face recognition...... of normal intelligence and other cognitive abilities. The face processing deficits in developmental prosopagnosia appear early in life and seem to be the result of developmental problems that are currently poorly understood. In three experiments, we investigated whether reading performance in this group...

  20. Fuel accountability and control at Combustion Engineering, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersteen, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, Inc. has recently developed and installed an automated data collection, data processing system for the accounting and control of special nuclear material. The system uses a variety of data collection techniques and some relatively new data processing ideas. The next few pages describe the Fuel Accountability and Control System

  1. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2017-03-28

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON = 46). The motored pressure at TDC is maintained at 35 bar and fuelMEP is kept constant at 5.1 bar to account for the difference in fuel properties between naphtha and diesel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is injected at a pressure of 800 bar. Photron FASTCAM SA4 that captures in-cylinder combustion at the rate of 10000 frames per second is employed. The captured high speed video is processed to study the combustion homogeneity based on an algorithm reported in previous studies. Starting from late fuel injection timings, combustion stratification is investigated by advancing the fuel injection timings. For late start of injection (SOI), a direct link between SOI and combustion phasing is noticed. At early SOI, combustion phasing depends on both intake air temperature and SOI. In order to match the combustion phasing (CA50) of diesel, the intake air temperature is increased to 90°C for naphtha. The combustion stratification from CI to PPC is also investigated for various level of dilution by displacing oxygen with nitrogen in the intake. The start of combustion (SOC) was delayed with the increase in dilution and to compensate for this, the intake air temperature is increased. The mixture homogeneity is enhanced for higher dilution due to longer ignition delay. The results show that high speed image is initially blue and then turned yellow, indicating soot formation and oxidation. The luminosity of combustion images decreases with early SOI and increased dilution. The images are processed to generate the level of stratification based on the image intensity. The level of stratification is same for diesel and naphtha at various SOI. When O concentration in the intake is decreased to 17.7% and 14

  2. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2014-10-01

    Alternative transportation fuels, preferably from renewable sources, include alcohols with up to five or even more carbon atoms. They are considered promising because they can be derived from biological matter via established and new processes. In addition, many of their physical-chemical properties are compatible with the requirements of modern engines, which make them attractive either as replacements for fossil fuels or as fuel additives. Indeed, alcohol fuels have been used since the early years of automobile production, particularly in Brazil, where ethanol has a long history of use as an automobile fuel. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the use of non-petroleum-based fuels made from biological sources, including alcohols (predominantly ethanol), as important liquid biofuels. Today, the ethanol fuel that is offered in the market is mainly made from sugar cane or corn. Its production as a first-generation biofuel, especially in North America, has been associated with publicly discussed drawbacks, such as reduction in the food supply, need for fertilization, extensive water usage, and other ecological concerns. More environmentally friendly processes are being considered to produce alcohols from inedible plants or plant parts on wasteland. While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides ethanol, many linear and branched members of the alcohol family, from methanol to hexanols, have been studied, with a particular emphasis on butanols. These fuels and their combustion properties, including their ignition, flame propagation, and extinction characteristics, their pyrolysis and oxidation reactions, and their potential to produce pollutant emissions have been intensively investigated in dedicated experiments on the laboratory and the engine scale

  3. Are reading and face processing related?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Klargaard, Solja; Petersen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    . In this light, investigating face processing in dyslexia, and reading in prosopagnosia becomes interesting: Do deficits in the two domains dissociate? Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) is a disorder of face processing in the absence of brain injury, and in the context of normal intelligence and general cognitive......Traditionally, perceptual processing of faces and words is considered highly specialized, strongly lateralized, and largely independent. This has, however, recently been challenged by studies showing that learning to read may affect the perceptual and neural processes involved in face recognition...... development. In three experiments, we investigated reading performance in a group of 11 participants with DP and matched controls: First, we examined if reading speed was affected by word length. Secondly, we compared RTs for single word and single letter stimuli. Third, we measured the word superiority...

  4. Catalytic combustion for the elimination of methane, BTEX and other VOC : IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, R.E.; Wanke, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    Options for volatile organic compound combustion include homogeneous combustion (flaring) or catalytic combustion involving a flameless combustion process that uses a solid catalyst to promote the combustion reaction. This presentation discussed relative reactivity testing for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over commercial catalysts. Several commercial pad catalysts were tested, as well as other powders. The relative reactivity of methane as well as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) were investigated. The purpose of the project was to evaluate combustion of concentrated methane streams that contained BTEX compounds; evaluate catalytic combustion using a counter diffusive radiant heater; develop mathematical models for the reactor to enhance design and understanding; improve the catalyst for BTEX combustion; and target application-dehydrator units. Topics that were addressed in the presentation included methane and benzene conversion; catalytic radiant heaters; small industrial and commercial units; measured temperature distribution; fuel slippage, methane conversion; the effect of water and hydrocarbons; the effect of water-liquid injection; and water addition as vapour. Several observations were offered, including that high percentages of injected liquid water can reduce reactor operating temperature; combustion of BTEX remained highly efficient, however liquid injection could also cause temperature reductions and ultimately the reactor would extinguish; and pre-heating the feed can eliminate the temperature drop and pad wetness problem. It was concluded that BTEX compounds are reactive, and the technology appears promising. 19 figs

  5. Tubular combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Tubular combustors are cylindrical tubes where flame ignition and propagation occur in a spatially confined, highly controlled environment, in a nearly flat, elongated geometry. This allows for some unique advantages where extremely even heat dispersion is required over a large surface while still maintaining fuel efficiency. Tubular combustors also allow for easy flexibility in type of fuel source, allowing for quick changeover to meet various needs and changing fuel pricing. This new addition to the MP sustainable energy series will provide the most up-to-date research on tubular combustion--some of it only now coming out of private proprietary protection. Plentiful examples of current applications along with a good explanation of background theory will offer readers an invaluable guide on this promising energy technology. Highlights include: * An introduction to the theory of tubular flames * The "how to" of maintaining stability of tubular flames through continuous combustion * Examples of both small-scal...

  6. Disruption of Relational Processing Underlies Poor Memory for Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Tanya R.; MacLeod, Colin M.

    2015-01-01

    McDaniel and Bugg (2008) proposed that relatively uncommon stimuli and encoding tasks encourage elaborative encoding of individual items (item-specific processing), whereas relatively typical or common encoding tasks encourage encoding of associations among list items (relational processing). It is this relational processing that is thought to…

  7. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  8. Thickening compositions, and related materials and processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Michael Joseph; Perry, Robert James; Enick, Robert Michael; Lee, Jason Jiwoo

    2017-10-03

    A silicone polymer is provided, modified with at least one functional group from the class of anthraquinone amide groups; anthraquinone sulfonamide groups; thioxanthone amide groups; or thioxanthone sulfone amide groups. The polymer can be combined with a hydrocarbon solvent or with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2), and is very effective for increasing the viscosity of either medium. A process for the recovery of oil from a subterranean, oil-bearing formation is also described, using supercritical carbon dioxide modified with the functionalized silicone polymer. A process for extracting natural gas or oil from a bedrock-shale formation is also described, again using the modified silicone polymer.

  9. The effects of calcium hydroxide on hydrogen chloride emission characteristics during a simulated densified refuse-derived fuel combustion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kung-Yuh; Jih, Jer-Chyuan; Lin, Kae-Long

    2008-08-30

    This study investigated the effects of different calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)(2)) addition methods on the potential for hydrogen chloride (HCl) formation in a simulated densified refuse-derived fuel (RDF-5) with single metal combustion system. These experiments were conducted at 850 degrees C with the Ca(OH)(2) spiked in the RDF-5 production or injection in the flue gas treatment system. The results indicated that the potential for HCl formation was decreased significantly by Ca(OH)(2) spiked in the RDF-5 production or injection in the flue gas treatment system. However, the Ca(OH)(2) injection method in the flue gas for HCl emission reduction was better than other method. According to the relationship between the HCl emission and amount of Ca(OH)(2) injected or spiked, it is interesting to find that when the Ca(OH)(2) injected or spiked ranged from 0% to 5%, the potential for HCl formation in the single metal combustion system decreases significantly with increasing Ca(OH)(2) injected or spiked ratio. A corresponding increase in the amount of CaCl(2) partitioned to the fly ash was observed. However, with the ratio of Ca(OH)(2) higher than 5%, the amount of HCl formation showed that no further significant variation occurred with increasing Ca(OH)(2) spiked ratio.

  10. PUBLIC RELATIONS AS AN INFORMATION PROCESS PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TKACH L. M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Formulation of the problem. If public relations as a phenomenon of information management are examined, we deal with the question of knowledge content and nature of relationship of PR with environment, ability to manage the perception and attitude of people to events in the environment; ensure priority of information over other resources. Goal. To investigate the concept of "public relations" of foreign and domestic experts; consider the typology of the public and the "laws" of public opinion; define the basic principles according to which relations with public should be built, and to identify PR activities as a kind of social communication. Conclusions. Public relations on the basis of advanced information and communication technologies create fundamentally new opportunities for information control and influence on public consciousness.

  11. SAR Systems and Related Signal Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.; Dekker, R.J.; Otten, M.P.G.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is today a valuable source of remote sensing information. SAR is a side-looking imaging radar and operates from airborne and spacebome platforms. Coverage, resolution and image quality are strongly influenced by the platform. SAR processing can be performed on standard

  12. The effect of rapeseed oil biodiesel fuel on combustion, performance, and the emission formation process within a heavy-duty DI diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lešnik, Luka; Biluš, Ignacijo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Sub-models for parameter determination can be derived using experimental results. • Proposed sub-models can be used for calculation of model parameters. • Biodiesel fuel reduces emissions compared to diesel fuel on full engine load. • Usage of biodiesel fuel slow down the emission formation rate. • Oxygen content in biodiesel fuel decreases the amount of formatted CO emissions. - Abstract: This study presents the influence of biodiesel fuel and blends with mineral diesel fuel on diesel engine performance, the combustion process, and the formation of emissions. The study was conducted numerically and experimentally. The aim of the study was to test the possibility of replacing mineral diesel fuel with biodiesel fuel made from rapeseed oil. Pure biodiesel fuel and three blends of biodiesel fuel with mineral diesel fuel were tested experimentally for that purpose on a heavy-duty bus diesel engine. The engine’s performance, in-cylinder pressure, fuel consumption, and the amount of produced NO x and CO emissions were monitored during experimental measurements, which were repeated numerically using the AVL BOOST simulation program. New empirical sub-models are proposed for determining a combustion model and emission models parameters. The proposed sub-models allow the determination of necessary combustion and emission model parameters regarding the properties of the tested fuel and the engine speed. When increasing the percentage of biodiesel fuel within the fuel blends, the reduction in engine torque and brake mean effective pressures are obtained for most of the test regimes. The reduction is caused due to the lower calorific value of the biodiesel fuel. Higher oxygen content in biodiesel fuel contributes to a better oxidation process within the combustion chamber when running on pure biodiesel or its blends. Better oxidation further results in a reduction of the formatted carbon and nitrogen oxides. The reduction of carbon emission is also

  13. Combustion synthesized indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin film for source/drain electrodes in all solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tue, Phan Trong; Inoue, Satoshi; Takamura, Yuzuru; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    We report combustion solution synthesized (SCS) indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin film, which is a well-known transparent conductive oxide, for source/drain (S/D) electrodes in solution-processed amorphous zirconium-indium-zinc-oxide TFT. A redox-based combustion synthetic approach is applied to ITO thin film using acetylacetone as a fuel and metal nitrate as oxidizer. The structural and electrical properties of SCS-ITO precursor solution and thin films were systematically investigated with changes in tin concentration, indium metal precursors, and annealing conditions such as temperature, time, and ambient. It was found that at optimal conditions the SCS-ITO thin film exhibited high crystalline quality, atomically smooth surface (RMS ∝ 4.1 Aa), and low electrical resistivity (4.2 x 10 -4 Ω cm). The TFT using SCS-ITO film as the S/D electrodes showed excellent electrical properties with negligible hysteresis. The obtained ''on/off'' current ratio, subthreshold swing factor, subthreshold voltage, and field-effect mobility were 5 x 10 7 , 0.43 V/decade, 0.7 V, and 2.1 cm 2 /V s, respectively. The performance and stability of the SCS-ITO TFT are comparable to those of the sputtered-ITO TFT, emphasizing that the SCS-ITO film is a promising candidate for totally solution-processed oxide TFTs. (orig.)

  14. Process related contaminations causing climatic reliability issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Dutta, Mondira; Verdingovas, Vadimas

    2012-01-01

    Some level of solder flux residue is inevitably found on electronics no matter whether the Printed Circuit Board Assembly (PCBA) manufacturing is carried out by hand, wave or reflow soldering process. The current use of no-clean flux systems should in principle only leave benign surface...... to a vial using steam purging to a localized area. Leakage current through the extracted solution is measured using a standard dual copper electrode pattern. Corrosion behavior of Sn and Cu are investigated using polarization experiments using a novel localized cell with solutions of malic, adipic, succinic...... contaminants during the wave and re-flow soldering process; however variation in temperature on the PCBA surface during soldering can result in considerable amounts of active residues being left locally. Typical no-clean flux systems used today consist of weak organic acids (WOA) and active residues left...

  15. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  16. Relative recoilless F-factors in REFeO{sub 3} (RE = rare-earth La, Pr, Nd and Sm) orthoferrites synthesized by self-combustion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, L.A; Sierra-Gallego, G. [Departamento de Materiales y Minerales, Facultad de Minas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Calle 75 # 79A-51, Bloque M17, Medellín (Colombia); Barrero, C.A. [Grupo de Estado Sólido, Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 70 No. 52-21, A.A. 1226, Medellín (Colombia); Arnache, O., E-mail: oscar.arnache@udea.edu.co [Grupo de Estado Sólido, Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 70 No. 52-21, A.A. 1226, Medellín (Colombia)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Rare-earth orthoferrites were successfully synthesized by the self-combustion method. • The relative recoilless F-factors for REFeO{sub 3} with respect to α-Fe were calculated. • Magnetic hyperfine fields, cell volumes and Fe−O−Fe bond angles are correlated. - Abstract: In this work, rare-earth orthoferrites polycrystalline compounds REFeO{sub 3} (REFO) with RE = rare-earth La, Pr, Nd and Sm were synthesized by the self-combustion method. A direct correlation between the magnitude of the magnetic hyperfine field and the Fe−O{sub 1}−Fe bond angles was observed. From transmission Mössbauer spectra recorded at room-temperature, relative recoilless F-factors for these REFO compounds were estimated. The method applied to perform this calculation was based on the determination of two subspectral areas present in a mixture of known amounts of the compound under study and a standard sample (α-Fe). For that purpose spectra were thickness-corrected and fitted using lorentzian lines. The so obtained factors were F-{sub REFeO3} (RE = rare-earth La, Pr, Nd and Sm): 1.30 ± 0.02, 1.08 ± 0.04, 1.15 ± 0.05, 1.18 ± 0.08 respectively. The absolute recoilless factors obtained by this method had an average relative error around 11% in comparison with the values predicted by the Debye model.

  17. Public relations and the radiation processing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, T. Donna

    The world's uneasiness and mistrust regarding anything nuclear has heightened in recent years due to events such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. Opinion polls and attitude surveys document the public's growing concern about issues such as the depletion of the ozone layer, the resulting greenhouse effect and exposure of our planet to cosmic radiation. Ultimately, such research reveals an underlying fear regarding the unseen impacts of modern technology on the environment and on human health. These concerns have obvious implications for the radiation processing industry, whose technology is nuclear based and not easily understood by the public. We have already seen organized nuclear opponents mobilize public anxiety, fear and misunderstanding in order to oppose the installation of radiation processing facilities and applications such as food irradiation. These opponents will no doubt try to strengthen resistance to our technology in the future. Opponents will attempt to convince the public that the risks to public and personal health and safety outweigh the benefits of our technology. We in the industry must head off any tendency for the public to see us as the "enemy". Our challenge is to counter public uneasiness and misunderstanding by effectively communicating the human benefits of our technology. Clearly it is a challenge we cannot afford to ignore.

  18. Public relations and the radiation processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, T.D. (Nordion International Inc., Kanata, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    The world's uneasiness and mistrust regarding anything nuclear has heightened in recent years due to events such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. Opinion polls and attitude surveys document the public's growing concern about issues such as the depletion of the ozone layer, the resulting greenhouse effect and exposure of our planet to cosmic radiation. Ultimately, such research reveals an underlying fear regarding the unseen impacts of modern technology on the environment and on human health. These concerns have obvious implications for the radiation processing industry, whose technology is nuclear based and not easily understood by the public. We have already seen organized nuclear opponents mobilize public anxiety, fear and misunderstanding in order to oppose the installation of radiation processing facilities and applications such as food irradiation. These opponents will no doubt try to strengthen resistance to our technology in the future. Opponents will attempt to convince the public that the risks to public and personal health and safety outweigh the benefits of our technology. We in the industry must head off any tendency for the public to see us as the ''enemy''. Our challenge is to counter public uneasiness and misunderstanding by effectively communicating the human benefits of our technology. (author).

  19. Are reading and face processing related?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Klargaard, Solja K.; Petersen, Anders

    was abnormal. First, we examined if reading speed was affected by word length in any of the subjects. Secondly, we compared performance with single word and single letter stimuli using RT measures. Third, we measured the word superiority effect in accuracy of word and letter report with brief exposure...... test, they show normal RTs, and no abnormal word length effects. As a group, they also show an RT advantage for short words over single letters, as we have previously found in normal subjects.2 In the word superiority experiment, the group of prosopagnosics show the typical word superiority effect......, reflected in better overall accuracy, a lower perceptual threshold, and higher processing speed for words compared to letters. In sum, we find no evidence that reading skills are abnormal in developmental prosopagnosia, a finding that may challenge the recently proposed hypothesis that reading development...

  20. Technical and economic assessment of process of treatment of coated bituminous sludge by combustion/vitrification (report PNGMDR 2013-2015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This note reports the assessment of a processing by combustion/vitrification of about 60.000 parcels of coated bituminous sludge belonging to intermediate-level long-lived and low-level long-lived category, and warehoused on the Marcoule CEA site. This assessment identifies the front-end cost of an exploratory R and D which would be required to undo technological locks, the cost of design, realisation and exploitation of the associated installation, and the negative features dues to the lack of technological maturity and to the management of environmental risks and impacts in comparison with the reference industrial solution (geological storage). As a conclusion, the authors state that the process is still not technically feasible

  1. IAEA final research co-ordination meeting on radiation processing of combustion flue gases. Poland, Zakopane, 24-28 May, 1993. Pts. 1-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The symposium materials contain 19 articles being the actual review on worldwide development in radiation processing of combustion flue gases. The use of electron beams has to be very profitable in SO 2 and NO x removal. The application of electron accelerators in off-gas systems is very advanced now in Japan, Germany and Poland as well as pilot plants have been constructed there. Their technical details, control equipment, working parameters and obtained results have been presented at the symposium. The list of electron accelerators available on the world market, their beams parameters and new constructions designed for flue gas radiation treatment have been presented, too. Technical possibilities of electric discharges application for flue gas processing has been shown as well. Theoretical models of radiation-chemical reactions initiated by electrons, their mechanism and kinetics (also in heterogenous systems) has been proposed and discussed. 9 refs, 21 figs, 1 tab

  2. A spectroscopy study of gasoline partially premixed compression ignition spark assisted combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, J.V.; García-Oliver, J.M.; García, A.; Micó, C.; Durrett, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► PPC combustion combined with spark assistance and gasoline fuel on a CI engine. ► Chemiluminescence of different chemical species describes the progress of combustion reaction. ► Spectra of a novel combustion mode under SACI conditions is described. ► UV–Visible spectrometry, high speed imaging and pressure diagnostic were employed for analysis. - Abstract: Nowadays many research efforts are focused on the study and development of new combustion modes, mainly based on the use of locally lean air–fuel mixtures. This characteristic, combined with exhaust gas recirculation, provides low combustion temperatures that reduces pollutant formation and increases efficiency. However these combustion concepts have some drawbacks, related to combustion phasing control, which must be overcome. In this way, the use of a spark plug has shown to be a good solution to improve phasing control in combination with lean low temperature combustion. Its performance is well reported on bibliography, however phenomena involving the combustion process are not completely described. The aim of the present work is to develop a detailed description of the spark assisted compression ignition mode by means of application of UV–Visible spectrometry, in order to improve insight on the combustion process. Tests have been performed in an optical engine by means of broadband radiation imaging and emission spectrometry. The engine hardware is typical of a compression ignition passenger car application. Gasoline was used as the fuel due to its low reactivity. Combining broadband luminosity images with pressure-derived heat-release rate and UV–Visible spectra, it was possible to identify different stages of the combustion reaction. After the spark discharge, a first flame kernel appears and starts growing as a premixed flame front, characterized by a low and constant heat-release rate in combination with the presence of remarkable OH radical radiation. Heat release increases

  3. Multifaceted processes controlling the distribution of hazardous compounds in the spontaneous combustion of coal and the effect of these compounds on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcos L S; da Boit, Kátia; Pacheco, Fernanda; Teixeira, Elba C; Schneider, Ismael L; Crissien, Tito J; Pinto, Diana C; Oyaga, Rafael M; Silva, Luis F O

    2018-01-01

    Pollution generated by hazardous elements and persistent organic compounds that affect coal fire is a major environmental concern because of its toxic nature, persistence, and potential risk to human health. The coal mining activities are growing in the state of Santa Catarina in Brazil, thus the collateral impacts on the health and economy are yet to be analyzed. In addition, the environment is also enduring the collateral damage as the waste materials directly influence the coal by-products applied in civil constructions. This study was aimed to establish the relationships between the composition, morphology, and structural characteristics of ultrafine particles emitted by coal mine fires. In Brazil, the self-combustions produced by Al-Ca-Fe-Mg-Si coal spheres are rich in chalcophile elements (As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn), lithophile elements (Ce, Hf, In, La, Th, and U), and siderophile elements (Co, Cr, Mo, Fe, Ni, and V). The relationship between nanomineralogy and the production of hazardous elements as analyzed by advanced methods for the geochemical analysis of different materials were also delineated. The information obtained by the mineral substance analysis may provide a better idea for the understanding of coal-fire development and assessing the response of particular coal in different combustion processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gasoline Combustion Fundamentals DOE FY17 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekoto, Isaac W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Advanced automotive gasoline engines that leverage a combination of reduced heat transfer, throttling, and mechanical losses; shorter combustion durations; and higher compression and mixture specific heat ratios are needed to meet aggressive DOE VTP fuel economy and pollutant emission targets. Central challenges include poor combustion stability at low-power conditions when large amounts of charge dilution are introduced and high sensitivity of conventional inductive coil ignition systems to elevated charge motion and density for boosted high-load operation. For conventional spark ignited operation, novel low-temperature plasma (LTP) or pre-chamber based ignition systems can improve dilution tolerances while maintaining good performance characteristics at elevated charge densities. Moreover, these igniters can improve the control of advanced compression ignition (ACI) strategies for gasoline at low to moderate loads. The overarching research objective of the Gasoline Combustion Fundamentals project is to investigate phenomenological aspects related to enhanced ignition. The objective is accomplished through targeted experiments performed in a single-cylinder optically accessible research engine or an in-house developed optically accessible spark calorimeter (OASC). In situ optical diagnostics and ex situ gas sampling measurements are performed to elucidate important details of ignition and combustion processes. Measurements are further used to develop and validate complementary high-fidelity ignition simulations. The primary project audience is automotive manufacturers, Tier 1 suppliers, and technology startups—close cooperation has resulted in the development and execution of project objectives that address crucial mid- to long-range research challenges.

  5. A model for premixed combustion oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-03-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing application of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described; it was developed to explain experimental results and to provide guidance for developing active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a PC. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with bimolecular reaction between fuel and air. Although focus is on the model, it and experimental results are compared to understand effects of inlet air temperature and open loop control schemes. The model shows that both are related to changes in transport time.

  6. Physiological processes related to the bee swarming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Svoboda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the essential genetically subjected behaviours of a bee-colony is swarming. However, in the time of queen breeding and technical approach to colony division, swarming constitutes a problem in the effectiveness of controlled beekeeping and subsequently in decreasing of the attainable economic profits. The intensity of swarming is a polyfactorial phenomenon whose characteristic feature is seasonality (the availability of breed, course of weather so the swarming intensity is different in particular years. This study is connected with the research carried out at the Department of Zoo­lo­gy, Fisheries, Hydrobiology and Apiculture at Mendel University in Brno. The experiment focused on the relationship between the swarming and biological state of bee-colony was realized in three seasons of the period 2003–2005. Experimental bee-colonies were stimulated to the swarming fever by zoo-technical practices, at the same time the biological status of given bee-colony was observed. Within the process of marking of newly emerged workers there was observed their number continuously during the particular season. The samples of 3- and 4-week-old workers were instrumental to the analysis of the development of their hypopharyngeal glands. The study has proved that a bee-colonies building higher number of queen cells are likely expected to be in swarming fever, b 3-week-old workers have hypopharyngeal glands in higher stage of development than 4-week-old workers, c higher stage of swarming fever is closely correlated with higher stage of de­ve­lop­ment of hypopharyngeal glands. These facts can contribute to the comprehension of the reason and relationships of the swarming.

  7. A laminar flame investigation of 2-butanone, and the combustion-related intermediates formed through its oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Hemken, Christian

    2016-06-28

    2-Butanone (methyl ethyl ketone) is a high-octane next-generation biofuel candidate synthesized through microbiological pathways from biomass. The flame structure and species formed in 2-butanone combustion are of interest when further considering this compound for use as a fuel. Thus species profiles within a fuel-rich laminar premixed flat flame of 2-butanone were measured. Two experiments which used different facilities and measurement techniques were combined i.e. the first using electron ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) and the second relied on synchrotron-generated vacuum UV photoionization MBMS. Very good agreement between both measurements was obtained. The experiments identified the formation of a number of toxic oxygenated intermediates such as methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. 2- Butanone showed the lowest overall concentrations for species that could contribute to potentially hazardous volatile emissions underlining its attraction as a fuel also from this perspective.

  8. Fuel-nitrogen conversion in the combustion of small amines using dimethylamine and ethylamine as biomass-related model fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucassen, Arnas; Zhang, Kuiwen; Warkentin, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Laminar premixed flames of the two smallest isomeric amines, dimethylamine and ethylamine, were investigated under one-dimensional low-pressure (40mbar) conditions with the aim to elucidate pathways that may contribute to fuel-nitrogen conversion in the combustion of biomass. For this, identical...... flames of both fuels diluted with 25% Ar were studied for three different stoichiometries (Φ=0.8, 1.0, and 1.3) using in situ molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). Quantitative mole fractions of reactants, products and numerous stable and reactive intermediates were determined by electron ionization...... (EI) MBMS with high mass resolution to separate overlapping features from species with different heavy elements by exact mass. Species assignment was assisted by using single-photon vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization (PI) MBMS. The results indicate formation of a number of nitrogenated...

  9. Combustion synthesis of TiB2-based cermets: modeling and experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Pacheco, M.; Bouma, R.H.B.; Katgerman, L.

    2008-01-01

    TiB 2 -based cermets are prepared by combustion synthesis followed by a pressing stage in a granulate medium. Products obtained by combustion synthesis are characterized by a large remaining porosity (typically 50%). To produce dense cermets, a subsequent densification step is performed after the combustion process and when the reacted material is still hot. To design the process, numerical simulations are carried out and compared to experimental results. In addition, physical and electrical properties of the products related to electrical contact applications are evaluated. (orig.)

  10. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  11. The combustion of solid fuels and wastes

    CERN Document Server

    Tillman, David

    1991-01-01

    Careful organization and empirical correlations help clarify the prodigious technical information presented in this useful reference.Key Features* Written for practicing engineers, this comprehensive book supplies an overall framework of the combustion process; It connects information on specific reactions and reaction sequences with current applications and hardware; Each major group of combustion solids is evaluated; Among the many topics covered are:* Various biomass forms* The coalification process* Grate, kiln, and suspension firing* Fluidized bed combustion

  12. Combustion and regulation; Combustion et reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This conference was organized after the publication of the French by-law no 2010 relative to combustion installations and to the abatement of atmospheric pollution. Five topics were discussed during the conference: the new regulations, their content, innovations and modalities of application; the means of energy suppliers to face the new provisions and their schedule; the manufacturers proposals for existing installations and the new equipments; the administration control; and the impact of the new measures on exploitation and engineering. Twenty papers and 2 journal articles are reported in these proceedings. (J.S.)

  13. Low NOx combustion technologies for high-temperature natural gas combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamme, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Because of the high process temperature which is required for some processes like glass melting and the high temperature to which the combustion air is preheated, NOx emission are extremely high. Even at these high temperatures, NOx emissions could be reduced drastically by using advanced combustion techniques such as staged combustion or flame-less oxidation, as experimental work has shown. In the case of oxy-fuel combustion, the NOx emission are also very high if conventional burners are used. The new combustion techniques achieve similar NOx reductions. (author)

  14. Particulate and gaseous emissions from residential biomass combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, Christoffer

    2005-04-01

    different stoves were determined with variations in fuel, appliance and operational properties. The emissions of PICs as well as PM tot from wood combustion were in general shown to be considerably higher compared to pellets combustion. PAH tot emissions were determined in the range of 1,300-220,000 μg/MJ for wood stoves and 2-300 μg/MJ for pellet stoves with phenantrene, fluoranthene and pyrene generally found as major PAHs. The PM emissions from present residential appliances was found to consist of significant but varying fractions of PICs, with emissions in the range 35-350 mg/MJ for wood stoves compared to 15-45 mg/MJ for pellet stoves. Accordingly, the use of up-graded biomass fuels, combusted under continuous and controlled conditions give advantageous combustion conditions compared to traditional batch wise firing of wood logs. The importance of high temperature in well mixed isothermal conditions was further illustrated during pellets combustion to obtain complete combustion with almost a total depletion of PICs. Fine (100-300 nm) particles dominated in all studied cases the PM with 80-95% as PM 1 . Beside varying fractions of carbonaceous material, the fine PM consisted of inorganic volatilized ash elements, mainly found as KCl, K 3 Na(SO 4 ) 2 and K 2 SO 4 with mass concentrations at 15-20 mg/MJ during complete combustion. The importance of the behavior of alkali elements for the ash transformation and fine particle formation processes was further shown, since the stability, distributions and compositions also directly control the degree of volatilization. In addition to the alkali metals, zinc was found as an important element in fine particles from residential biomass combustion. Finally, the behaviour of volatile trace elements, e.g. Zn and Cd, during pellets production and combustion were studied. A significant enrichment in the pellet fuel during the drying process was determined. The magnitude and importance of the enrichment was, however, relative small

  15. Une installation expérimentale pour l'étude du traitement par combustion des fumées industrielles An Experimental Plant for Processing Industrial Fumes by Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morillon R.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Le rejet à l'atmosphère d'effluents gazeux d'origine industrielle entraîne un accroissement sensible de la pollution atmosphérique ; en outre, il s'accompagne souvent d'une perte d'énergie lorsque l'élément polluant est un hydrocarbure. Dans ce cas, l'utilisation du gaz naturel pour le traitement par combustion des fumées industrielles apporte une solution élégante et souvent peu coûteuse grâce à la récupération d'énergie qu'il est possible de faire. La première partie de l'article rappelle les aspects théoriques de ce traitement ; en particulier, l'influence des divers éléments sur son efficacité y est discutée (composition de l'atmosphère polluée, température, temps de séjour, etc.. II apparaît ainsi que diverses conditions doivent être remplies simultanément pour obtenir une efficacité satisfaisante. Afin de disposer d'éléments d'ingénierie permettant de construire les unités de traitement les plus efficaces et les plus sûres possible, au coût le plus bas possible, la Direction des études et techniques nouvelles du Gaz de France a réalisé une installation expérimentale qui est présentée dans la deuxième partie de l'article. Enfin, quelques examples d'utilisation de cette installation expérimentale, qui constitue un nouvel outil de travail mis à la disposition des utisitateurs et des constructeurs, sont décrits dans la troisième partie de l'article. The discharge into the atmosphere of industrial waste gases causes substantially increased air pollution. Moreover, it is often accompanied by loss of energy when the polluting element is a hydrocarbon. In such cases, the use of natural gas for processing industrial fumes by combustion provides an elegant solution, which moy often prove economical too becouse of the recovery of energy it makes possible. The first part of this article reviews the theoretical aspects of such processing. The way in which its effectiveness is affected by various parameters

  16. Development of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, Craig; Gonzalez, Manual; Russell, Durrett

    2011-06-30

    This report summarizes activities related to the revised STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated June 2010 for the Development of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines (COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-05NT42415) project. In both the spark- (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) development activities covered in this program, the goal was to develop potential production-viable internal combustion engine system technologies that both reduce fuel consumption and simultaneously met exhaust emission targets. To be production-viable, engine technologies were also evaluated to determine if they would meet customer expectations of refinement in terms of noise, vibration, performance, driveability, etc. in addition to having an attractive business case and value. Prior to this activity, only proprietary theoretical / laboratory knowledge existed on the combustion technologies explored The research reported here expands and develops this knowledge to determine series-production viability. Significant SI and CI engine development occurred during this program within General Motors, LLC over more than five years. In the SI program, several engines were designed and developed that used both a relatively simple multi-lift valve train system and a Fully Flexible Valve Actuation (FFVA) system to enable a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion process. Many technical challenges, which were unknown at the start of this program, were identified and systematically resolved through analysis, test and development. This report documents the challenges and solutions for each SOPO deliverable. As a result of the project activities, the production viability of the developed clean combustion technologies has been determined. At this time, HCCI combustion for SI engines is not considered production-viable for several reasons. HCCI combustion is excessively sensitive to control variables

  17. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  18. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  19. Combustion control and sensors: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docquier, N.; Candel, S.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increased interest in the application of control to combustion. The objective is to optimize combustor operation, monitor the process and alleviate instabilities and their severe consequences. One wishes to improve the system performance, for example by reducing the levels of pollutant emissions or by smoothing the pattern factor at the combustor exhaust. In other cases, the aim is to extend the stability domain by reducing the level of oscillation induced by coupling between resonance modes and combustion. As combustion systems have to meet increasingly more demanding air pollution standards, their design and operation becomes more complex. The trend towards reduced NO x levels has led to new developments in different fields. Automotive engines and gas turbine combustors are considered in this article. In the first case, complex exhaust aftertreatment is being applied and dedicated engine control systems are required to ensure and maintain high pollutant conversion efficiency. For gas turbines, premixed combustors, which operate at lower local temperatures than conventional systems have been designed. In both cases, monitoring and control of the operating point of the process have to be achieved with great precision to obtain the full benefits of the NO x reduction scheme. For premixed combustors operating near the lean stability limit, the flame is more susceptible to blowout, oscillation or flashback. Research is now carried out to reduce these dynamical problems with passive and active control methods. In addition to a broad range of fundamental problems raised by Active Combustion Control (ACC) and Operating Point Control (OPC), there are important technological issues. This paper contains a review of some facets of combustion control and focuses on the sensors that take or could take part to combustion control solutions. The current status of ACC and OPC is presented together with the associated control concepts. The state of the art in sensors is

  20. Simultaneous harvesting of straw and chaff for energy purposes : influence on bale density, yield, field drying process and combustion characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, G. [JTI Swedish Inst. of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering, Uppsala (Sweden); Ronnback, M. [SP Technical Research Inst. of Sweden, Boras (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    The potential to increase the productivity of fuel straw harvest and transportation was examined. When harvesting straw for energy purposes, only the long fraction is currently collected. However, technological improvements have now rendered it possible to harvest chaff, thus increasing the amount of harvest residues and bale density. The purpose of this study was to determine how harvest yield, bale density, field-drying behaviour and combustion characteristics are affected by the simultaneous harvest of straw and chaff. Field experiments were conducted in 2009 for long- and short-stalked winter wheat crops. Combine harvesting was carried out with 2 different types of combine harvesters. A high-density baler was used to bale the crop residues. Mixing chaff in with the straw swath by combine harvesting gave a lower initial moisture content compared with straw only. The density and the weight of each bale were not affected by the treatments. However, the added chaff increased the total yield of crop residues by 14 per cent, indicating that about half of the biologically available chaff was harvested. Although mixing in chaff increased the ash content by 1 percentage unit, there was no considerable change in net calorific value or ash melting behaviour.

  1. Compound specific carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses of volatile organic compounds in various emissions of combustion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitzthum von Eckstaedt, Christiane D; Grice, Kliti; Ioppolo-Armanios, Marisa; Kelly, David; Gibberd, Mark

    2012-11-01

    This study presents carbon (δ(13)C) and hydrogen (δD) isotope values of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in various emission sources using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TD-GC-irMS). The investigated VOCs ranged from C6 to C10. Samples were taken from (i) car exhaust emissions as well as from plant combustion experiments of (ii) various C3 and (iii) various C4 plants. We found significant differences in δ values of analysed VOCs between these sources, e.g. δ(13)C of benzene ranged between (i) -21.7 ± 0.2 ‰, (ii) -27.6 ± 1.6 ‰ and (iii) -16.3 ± 2.2 ‰, respectively and δD of benzene ranged between (i) -73 ± 13 ‰, (ii) -111 ± 10 ‰ and (iii) -70 ± 24 ‰, respectively. Results of VOCs present in investigated emission sources were compared to values from the literature (aluminium refinery emission). All source groups could be clearly distinguished using the dual approach of δ(13)C and δD analysis. The results of this study indicate that the correlation of compound specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis provides the potential for future research to trace the fate and to determine the origin of VOCs in the atmosphere using thermal desorption compound specific isotope analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The behavior of heavy metals in the process of desulfurization of Brazilian coal combustion gases by the addition of limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebag M.G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of heavy metals in two kinds of Brazilian coals at 100° C (acid digestion and at 850° C were studied (ashes the obtained in muffle furnace with and without addition of limestone. Data were analyzed by flame atomic absorption, using the air acetylene flame. For Pb, Zn, Ni, Mn and Cu the metal concentration obtained the acid digestion were higher than metal concentration were obtained in tests in the muffle furnace. This behavior observed in the muffle furnace occurs because these metals are fixed in stable sulfated compounds in the ashes, which are difficult to dissociate at flame temperature, and also due to the volatile character of the metals, mainly Pb and Zn. There was a constant concentration in the ashes in of Cr the acid digestion and muffle furnace tests. Results from tests using an XRD apparatus indicated, he formation of sulfated compounds in the ashes for both. coals. The analysis using microprobe electronic showed retention of metals like Ni, Mn, Cu, Fe, Ti and Ca. For both coals, the low mobility of most of the metals studied occured due to the alkaline pH of sulfated ashes. These metals in the ash from coal combustion in fluidized bed reactor were also studied and showed similar results, enabling a scale-up to pilot scale.

  3. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  4. Combustion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Annamalai, Kalyan

    2006-01-01

    Introduction and Review of Thermodynamics Introduction Combustion Terminology Matter and Its Properties Microscopic Overview of Thermodynamics Conservation of Mass and Energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics The Second Law of Thermodynamics Summary Stoichiometry and Thermochemistry of Reacting Systems Introduction Overall Reactions Gas Analyses Global Conservation Equations for Reacting Systems Thermochemistry Summary Appendix Reaction Direction and Equilibrium Introduction Reaction Direction and Chemical Equilibrium Chemical Equilibrium Relations Vant Hoff Equation Adi

  5. Thermal analyses of the lignite combustion in oxygen-enriched atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiangyun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the oxygen-enriched combustion behavior of indigenous lignite was measured by a thermogravimetric analyzer (TG. Combustion tests were carried out in N2/O2 atmosphere with an oxygen content ranging from 21% to 70 vol%.The data show that the calorific value per unit time (CVT of the lignite was improved with increased oxygen concentration. In order to reveal the oxygen-enriched combustion process in detail, a new index of characteristic temperature Tc was defined to indicate the fixed carbon behavior during burning, and the combustibility indexes D’, Rw, and S were calculated to determine the combustion performance. The functional relation between CVT and oxygen concentration was determined by non-linear fitting method. The results indicated that the relationship between CVT and oxygen concentration fit the exponential function exactly.

  6. Comparison methods between methane and hydrogen combustion for useful transfer in furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiea, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of hydrogen use by industrial combustion are critically presented. Greenhouse effect due natural water vapors from atmosphere and these produced by hydrogen industrial combustion is critically analyzed, together with problems of gas fuels containing hydrogen as the relative largest component. A comparison method between methane and hydrogen combustion for pressure loss in burner feeding pipe, is conceived. It is deduced the ratio of radiation useful heat transfer characteristics and convection heat transfer coefficients from combustion gases at industrial furnaces and heat recuperators for hydrogen and methane combustion, establishing specific comparison methods. Using criterial equations special processed for convection heat transfer determination, a calculation generalizing formula is established. The proposed comparison methods are general valid for different gaseous fuels. (author)

  7. Development of a carbonate absorption-based process for post-combustion CO2 capture: The role of biocatalyst to promote CO2 absorption rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Ye, X.; Zhang, Z.; Khodayari, A.; Djukadi, T.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is described. IVCAP employs potassium carbonate (PC) as a solvent, uses waste or low quality steam from the power plant for CO2 stripping, and employs a biocatalyst, carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme, for promoting the CO2 absorption into PC solution. A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the activity of CA enzyme mixed in PC solutions in a stirred tank reactor system under various temperatures, CA dosages, CO2 loadings, CO2 partial pressures, and the presence of major flue gas contaminants. It was demonstrated that CA enzyme is an effective biocatalyst for CO2 absorption under IVCAP conditions. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCar & Vehicle Technologies Program CARB Executive Order Exemption Process for a Hydrogen-fueled Internal Combustion engine Vehicle -- Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-04-01

    The CARB Executive Order Exemption Process for a Hydrogen-fueled Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle was undertaken to define the requirements to achieve a California Air Resource Board Executive Order for a hydrogenfueled vehicle retrofit kit. A 2005 to 2006 General Motors Company Sierra/Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD pickup was assumed to be the build-from vehicle for the retrofit kit. The emissions demonstration was determined not to pose a significant hurdle due to the non-hydrocarbon-based fuel and lean-burn operation. However, significant work was determined to be necessary for Onboard Diagnostics Level II compliance. Therefore, it is recommended that an Experimental Permit be obtained from the California Air Resource Board to license and operate the vehicles for the durability of the demonstration in support of preparing a fully compliant and certifiable package that can be submitted.

  9. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  10. Influence of injector technology on injection and combustion development - Part 2: Combustion analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payri, R.; Salvador, F.J.; Gimeno, J.; Morena, J. de la [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, E-46022 (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    The influence of injection technology on the fuel-air mixing process and the combustion development are analyzed by means of visualization techniques. For this purpose, two injectors (one solenoid and one piezoelectric) are characterized using an optical accessible two stroke engine. Visualization of liquid penetration has allowed the measurement of the stabilized liquid length, which is related with the efficiency of fuel-air mixing process. A theoretical derivation is used in order to relate this liquid length with chamber conditions, as well as to make a temporal analysis of these phenomena. After this, natural flame emission and chemiluminescence techniques are carried out. These results indicate that the piezoelectric system has a more efficient fuel-air mixing and combustion, reducing the characteristic times as well as soot formation. Finally, a correlation for the ignition delay of the two systems is obtained. (author)

  11. Investigating co-combustion characteristics of bamboo and wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang; Wang, Ruijuan; Jiang, Changle; Yang, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Tao; Hu, Wanhe; Mi, Bingbing; Liu, Zhijia

    2017-11-01

    To investigate co-combustion characteristics of bamboo and wood, moso bamboo and masson pine were torrefied and mixed with different blend ratios. The combustion process was examined by thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The results showed the combustion process of samples included volatile emission and oxidation combustion as well as char combustion. The main mass loss of biomass blends occurred at volatile emission and oxidation combustion stage, while that of torrefied biomass occurred at char combustion stage. With the increase of bamboo content, characteristic temperatures decreased. Compared with untreated biomass, torrefied biomass had a higher initial and burnout temperature. With the increase of heating rates, combustion process of samples shifted to higher temperatures. Compared with non-isothermal models, activation energy obtained from isothermal model was lower. The result is helpful to promote development of co-combustion of bamboo and masson pine wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sodium nitrate combustion limit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1976-04-01

    Sodium nitrate is a powerful solid oxidant. Energetically, it is capable of exothermically oxidizing almost any organic material. Rate-controlling variables such as temperature, concentration of oxidant, concentration of fuel, thermal conductivity, moisture content, size, and pressure severely limit the possibility of a self-supported exothermic reaction (combustion). The tests reported in this document were conducted on one-gram samples at atmospheric pressure. Below 380 0 C, NaNO 3 was stable and did not support combustion. At moisture concentrations above 22 wt percent, exothermic reactions did not propagate in even the most energetic and reactive compositions. Fresh resin and paraffin were too volatile to enable a NaNO 2 -supported combustion process to propagate. Concentrations of NaNO 3 above 95 wt percent or below 35 wt percent did not react with enough energy release to support combustion. The influence of sample size and confining pressure, both important factors, was not investigated in this study

  13. Greater efficiency in attentional processing related to mindfulness meditation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurk, P.A.M. van den; Giommi, F.; Gielen, S.C.A.M.; Speckens, A.E.M.; Barendregt, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, attentional processing in relation to mindfulness meditation was investigated. Since recent studies have suggested that mindfulness meditation may induce improvements in attentional processing, we have tested 20 expert mindfulness meditators in the attention network test. Their

  14. Dynamic features of combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic features of combustion are discussed for four important cases: ignition, inflammation, explosion, and detonation. Ignition, the initiation of a self-sustained exothermic process, is considered in the simplest case of a closed thermodynamic system and its stochastic distribution. Inflammation, the initiation and propagation of self-sustained flames, is presented for turbulent flow. Explosion, the dynamic effects caused by the deposition of exothermic energy in a compressible medium, is illustrated by self-similar blast waves with energy deposition at the front and the adiabatic non-self-similar wave. Detonation, the most comprehensive illustration of all the dynamic effects of combustion, is discussed with a phenomenological account of the development and structure of the wave.

  15. Efficiency of catalytic processes for the reduction of CO and VOC emissions from wood combustion in domestic fireplaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozil, Fabien; Tschamber, V.; Trouve, G. [Universite de haute Alsace - Laboratoire Gestion des Risques Environnement, 25 rue de Chemnitz, 68200 Mulhouse (France); Haas, Frederic (FONDIS SA, ZI Vieux Thann, 68801 Thann Cedex France)

    2009-09-15

    Pollutant characterization of domestic fireplaces, according to two paces of functioning (normal and low-charge phase) was performed. Two catalysts supported on cordierite or metal were placed in the exhaust of two domestic fireplaces (old and new generation) in order to reduce gaseous pollutants. Active phase of catalysts is composed of noble metals (Pd, Pt) and cerium. Methane was the dominant compound of the released Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC, 80% b. v.). Products resulting from incomplete combustion (CO and other VOC) did not represent more than 6% of the initial carbon content in wood. Lower concentration of CO in the exhaust was obtained with the new generation fireplace as compared to the older one with mean concentrations of CO normalized for 13% oxygen b.v. equal to 0.12% and 0.3%, respectively. Emission of VOC is also drastically reduced for new generation fireplace. The presence of a catalyst induced a decrease of the CO and VOC emission factors during ignition and low-charge phases by factors ranging from 65% to 70%. The abatement of VOC for the old generation fireplace was better in the presence of metal as compared to cordierite, with efficiency values of 65% and 30%, respectively. The new fireplace was the one on which the addition of the cleanup implements had most impact. Besides the introduction of a catalyst, a heating system of the fume was set up below the catalyst. This heating system allowed a faster activation of the catalyst, particularly during ignition and low-charge phases. Best abatements were obtained with the heated metallic support with values close to 80% and 94% for VOC and CO respectively. (author)

  16. Smoldering Combustion Experiments in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, David C.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment is part of a study of the smolder characteristics of porous combustible materials in a microgravity environment. Smoldering is a non-flaming form of combustion that takes place in the interior of porous materials and takes place in a number of processes ranging from smoldering of porous insulation materials to high temperature synthesis of metals. The objective of the study is to provide a better understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smolder, both in microgravity and normal-gravity. As with many forms of combustion, gravity affects the availability of oxidizer and transport of heat, and therefore the rate of combustion. Microgravity smolder experiments, in both a quiescent oxidizing environment, and in a forced oxidizing flow have been conducted aboard the NASA Space Shuttle (STS-69 and STS-77 missions) to determine the effect of the ambient oxygen concentration and oxidizer forced flow velocity on smolder combustion in microgravity. The experimental apparatus is contained within the NASA Get Away Special Canister (GAS-CAN) Payload. These two sets of experiments investigate the propagation of smolder along the polyurethane foam sample under both diffusion driven and forced flow driven smoldering. The results of the microgravity experiments are compared with identical ones carried out in normal gravity, and are used to verify present theories of smolder combustion. The results of this study will provide new insights into the smoldering combustion process. Thermocouple histories show that the microgravity smolder reaction temperatures (Ts) and propagation velocities (Us) lie between those of identical normal-gravity upward and downward tests. These observations indicate the effect of buoyancy on the transport of oxidizer to the reaction front.

  17. UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS AMY MCGOVERN, TIMOTHY SUPINIE, DAVID JOHN GAGNE II, NATHANIEL TROUTMAN,...

  18. Effect of weathering transformations of coal combustion residuals on trace element mobility in view of the environmental safety and sustainability of their disposal and use. I. Hydrogeochemical processes controlling pH and phase stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Sebastian; Miszczak, Ewa; Szczepańska-Plewa, Jadwiga; Twardowska, Irena

    2015-06-01

    Coal combustion residuals (CCRs) are one of the most abundant high-volume waste materials disposed in impoundments worldwide. Some methods of CCR recycling, e.g. their use as structural fill for low lying areas or as soil amendment, also expose this material to atmospheric conditions. Combustion processes result in concentration of trace elements in CCRs at about an order of magnitude compared to coal. In order to assess an effect of long-term weathering transformations of CCRs on trace element binding/release, a study has been carried out. It is based on the chemical composition of real pore solutions extracted from the most abundant primary alkaline Class F bituminous CCRs, 0 to >40 years old, sampled from the surface layer and vertical profiles at four different impoundments. In this part of the study, results of a hydrogeochemical simulation of the saturation state of real pore solutions with respect to mineral phases of CCRs with use of the PHREEQC program, related to actual pH values reflecting the full cycle of weathering transformations, have been discussed. This study is the first geochemical proof of the general trend towards a progressive acidification up to pH < 4 of primary alkaline CCRs due to release of protons during internal processes of formation of gibbsite and aluminosilicate minerals, buffered by carbonates at the alkaline - near-neutral stages, and followed by parallel dissolution and buffering by aluminosilicates at pH < 7 after carbonate depletion, to the level up to pH∼3.5-4.0. The intrinsic geochemical changes have resulted in the different susceptibility of trace elements to release and associated changes in risk to the environment at consecutive stages of weathering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fifth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacksteder, Kurt (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This conference proceedings document is a compilation of 120 papers presented orally or as poster displays to the Fifth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop held in Cleveland, Ohio on May 18-20, 1999. The purpose of the workshop is to present and exchange research results from theoretical and experimental work in combustion science using the reduced-gravity environment as a research tool. The results are contributed by researchers funded by NASA throughout the United States at universities, industry and government research agencies, and by researchers from at least eight international partner countries that are also participating in the microgravity combustion science research discipline. These research results are intended for use by public and private sector organizations for academic purposes, for the development of technologies needed for the Human Exploration and Development of Space, and to improve Earth-bound combustion and fire-safety related technologies.

  20. Quantum teleportation for continuous variables and related quantum information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Akira; Takei, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Quantum teleportation is one of the most important subjects in quantum information science. This is because quantum teleportation can be regarded as not only quantum information transfer but also a building block for universal quantum information processing. Furthermore, deterministic quantum information processing is very important for efficient processing and it can be realized with continuous-variable quantum information processing. In this review, quantum teleportation for continuous variables and related quantum information processing are reviewed from these points of view

  1. Combustion chemistry and formation of pollutants; Chimie de la combustion et formation des polluants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This book of proceedings reports on 7 papers on combustion chemistry and formation of pollutants presented during the workshop organized by the `Combustion and Flames` section of the French society of thermal engineers. The chemistry of combustion is analyzed in various situations such as: turbojet engines, spark ignition engines, industrial burners, gas turbines etc... Numerical simulation is used to understand the physico-chemical processes involved in combustion, to describe the kinetics of oxidation, combustion and flame propagation, and to predict the formation of pollutants. (J.S.)

  2. Facile synthesis, characterization and magnetic property of CuFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanostructures via a sol–gel auto-combustion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, Fatemeh [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317–51167, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sobhani, Azam, E-mail: sobhaniazam@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Kosar University of Bojnord, Bojnord, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317–51167, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    Copper hexaferrite (CuFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) nanostructures were prepared by a simple route utilizing maltose-assisted sol–gel process. The morphology, phase structure, composition and purity of nanostructures can be controlled by type of surfactant and also adjusting the Cu:surfactant, Cu:Fe and Cu:reductant ratios. The bean-shape structures are formed in the absence of the surfactant when the molar ratio of Cu:Fe and Cu:reductant are 1:12 and 1:26, respectively. The agglomerated spherical nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 7 to 20 nm are obtained in the presence of triplex, when ratio of Cu:reductant is 1:26. In the absence of surfactant and also in the presence of triplex, the samples are found to be CuFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}. When polymer is used, there are still the peaks of CuFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} and also some boad peaks in XRD patterns, because of the small size and encapsulation of nanostructures with polymer. Magnetic measurments show superparamagnetic behavior for the all samples. The M{sub s} for the samples obtained in the presence of polymer shows that the coating of magnetic nanostructures does not always increase M{sub s}. FT-IR frequency bands in the range 463–626, 607 and 542 cm{sup −1} correspond to the formation of metal oxides in ferrites. - Highlights: • Copper hexaferrite nanostructures were synthesized for the first time. • A sol–gel auto-combustion route was used to synthesize copper hexaferrites. • Maltose was used as a new reductant. • The various polymers used to as co-fuel for completing combustion reaction. • Ideal ratios between Cu:Fe and Cu:reductant were 1:12 and 1:26, respectively.

  3. New technologies reducing emissions from combustion of biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oravainen, H.

    1997-01-01

    In reducing CO 2 emissions, bioenergy will be the most important source of renewable energy in the next few decades. In principle, combustion of biomass is friendly to the environment because CO 2 released during combustion is recycled back into natural circulation. Biofuels normally contain little nitrogen and sulphur. However, depending on the combustion technology used, emissions may be quite high. This is true of combustion of biomass fuels in small appliances like wood stoves, fireplaces, small boilers etc. When fuels having high content of volatile matter are burnt in appliances using batch type combustion, the process is rather an unsteady-state combustion. Emissions of carbon monoxide, other combustible gases and particulates are quite difficult to avoid. With continuous combustion processes this is not normally a problem. This conference paper presents some means of reducing emissions from combustion of biofuels. 5 refs., 4 figs

  4. Flexible dynamic operation of solar-integrated power plant with solvent based post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, Abdul; Sharma, Manish; Parvareh, Forough; Khalilpour, Rajab; Abbas, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Flexible operation of power and PCC plant may significantly increase operational revenue. • Higher optimal carbon capture rates observed with solar thermal energy input. • Solar thermal repowering of the power plant provides highest net revenue. • Constant optimal capture rate observed for one of the flexible operation cases. • Up to 42% higher revenue generation observed between two cases with solar input. - Abstract: This paper examines flexible operation of solvent-based post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) for the reduction of power plant carbon emissions while minimizing revenue loss due to the reduced power plant electricity output. The study is conducted using a model superstructure enveloping three plants; a power plant, a PCC plant and a solar thermal field where the power plant and PCC plant are operated flexibly under the influence of hourly electricity market and weather conditions. Reduced (surrogate) models for the reboiler duty and auxiliary power requirement for the carbon capture plant are generated and applied to simulate and compare four cases, (A) power plant with PCC, (B) power plant with solar assisted PCC, (C) power plant with PCC and solar repowering – variable net electricity output and (D) power plant with PCC and solar repowering – fixed net electricity output. Such analyses are conducted under dynamic conditions including power plant part-load operation while varying the capture rate to optimize the revenue of the power plant. Each case was simulated with a lower carbon price of $25/tonne-CO 2 and a higher price of $50/tonne-CO 2 . The comparison of cases B–D found that optimal revenue generation for case C can be up to 42% higher than that of solar-assisted PCC (case B). Case C is found to be the most profitable with the lowest carbon emissions intensity and is found to exhibit a constant capture rate for both carbon prices. The optimal revenue for case D is slightly lower than case C for the lower carbon

  5. Attentional Processes in Children's Overt and Relational Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Darin J.; Foster, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined attention and memory processes assumed by the social information-processing model to be biased in aggressive children. We also explored whether similar biases were associated with overt and relational aggression. A total of 96 fourth through sixth graders saw videos of overtly and relationally aggressive child actors and…

  6. Issues in waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Robertson, Kerstin; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Sundquist, Lena; Wrangensten, Lars [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Blom, Elisabet [AaF-Processdesign AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    The main purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art on research and development issues related to waste combustion with relevance for Swedish conditions. The review focuses on co-combustion in grate and fluidised bed furnaces. It is primarily literature searches in relevant databases of scientific publications with to material published after 1995. As a complement, findings published in different report series, have also been included. Since the area covered by this report is very wide, we do not claim to cover the issues included completely and it has not been possitile to evaluate the referred studies in depth. Basic knowledge about combustion issues is not included since such information can be found elsewhere in the literature. Rather, this review should be viewed as an overview of research and development in the waste-to-energy area and as such we hope that it will inspire scientists and others to further work in relevant areas.

  7. Source identification of combustion-related air pollution during an episode and afterwards in winter-time in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, S Levent

    2016-10-11

    Conventional air pollutants (PM 10 , CO, NO x ) gradually increased from fall to winter during 2015 in Istanbul. Several air pollution episodes were observed during this period. This study was made in order to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels, identify the sources of air pollution, and make toxicity assessment based on Benzo(a)pyrene equivalent concentrations. The sampling took 14 sequential days during winter. High-pressure weather conditions prevailed at the start of the sampling. The conditions were then changed to low-pressure condition towards the end of the sampling. Strong inversion was effective on the onset of the sampling. Strong inversion was effective at the onset of the sampling. A high-volume sampler was used to collect gas and particle phase samples. Total suspended particle concentrations were between 27 and 252 μg m -3 . Sixteen PAH species were investigated. Total (gas + particle) PAH concentrations were between 76.4 and 1280.3 ng m -3 , with an average of 301.4 ng m -3 . Individual PAH concentrations were between not detected (n.d.) and 99.2 ng m -3 in the gaseous phase, and between n.d. and 11.5 ng m -3 in the particle phase. Phenanthrene had the highest share among 16 PAH compounds. Benzo(a)pyrene was not detected in 8 days. On the remaining days, its concentration ranged between 5.5 and 14.8 ng m -3 with an average of 3.7 ng m -3 . Low-molecular-weight PAHs dominated gaseous phase; inversely, high-molecular-weight PAHs dominated particle phase. Possible sources were identified by diagnostic ratios. These ratios suggested that coal combustion and diesel vehicle exhaust emissions had a substantial impact on ambient air quality. Benzo(a)pyrene equivalencies were calculated for each PAH compound in order to make toxicity assessment. Total benzo(a)pyrene equivalencies ranged between 0.4 and 30.0 ng m -3 with an average of 7.2 ng m -3 .

  8. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis of three different engine combustion regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yaopeng; Jia, Ming; Chang, Yachao; Kokjohn, Sage L.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy and exergy distributions of three different combustion regimes are studied. • CDC demonstrates the highest utilization efficiency of heat transfer and exhaust. • HCCI achieves the highest energy and exergy efficiencies over CDC and RCCI. • HCCI and RCCI demonstrate lower exergy destruction than CDC. • Combustion temperature, rate, duration and regime affect exergy destruction. - Abstract: Multi-dimensional models were coupled with a detailed chemical mechanism to investigate the energy and exergy distributions of three different combustion regimes in internal combustion engines. The results indicate that the 50% heat release point (CA50) considerably affects fuel efficiency and ringing intensity (RI), in which RI is used to quantify the knock level. Moreover, the burn duration from the 10% heat release point (CA10) to CA50 dominates RI, and the position of 90% heat release point (CA90) affects fuel efficiency. The heat transfer losses of conventional diesel combustion (CDC) strongly depend on the local temperature gradient, while it is closely related to the heat transfer area for homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI). Among the three combustion regimes, CDC has the largest utilization efficiency for heat transfer and exhaust energy due to its higher temperature in the heat transfer layer and higher exhaust pressure and temperature. The utilization efficiency of heat transfer and exhaust in RCCI is less affected by the variation of CA50 compared to those in CDC and HCCI. Exergy destruction is closely related to the homogeneity of in-cylinder temperature and equivalence ratio during combustion process, the combustion temperature, the chemical reaction rate, and the combustion duration. Under the combined effect, HCCI and RCCI demonstrate lower exergy destruction than CDC at the same load. Overall, the variations of the exergy distribution for the three combustion regimes

  9. Influence of forest biomass grown in fertilized soils on combustion and gasification processes as well as on the environment with integrated bioenergy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaanu, K. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1999-07-01

    Project has started 1995 by determination of fertilized areas in Finland, Portugal and Spain. According to the results obtained from the analysis proper amount of pine and eucalyptus samples were selected for combustion and gasification tests. After that atmospheric and pressurized combustion and gasifications tests, including few series of gas clean up tests, have been performed by INETI and VTT. The 1 MW-scale long term test, were conducted by CIEMAT. The results are indicating that fertilization increases the potassium content in trees up to 50% or more depending upon the climate and conditions in soil. Alkali release seems to be an inverse function of the pressure indicating that the highest alkali release take place under atmospheric conditions corresponding to 111 mg/Nm{sup 3} which is over 25 wt.-% of total potassium in pine and 214 mg/Nm{sup 3} which is 32 wt.-% of total potassium in eucalyptus as received in the 1 MW ABFBC-tests. The potassium release is higher than allowed for the gas turbine process. Therefore the flue gas need to be cleaned up before it enters the gas turbine. For alkali removal at the operation conditions in oxidizing environment, the sorbent technology looks promising. According to the gasification tests the alkali release seems to be somewhat lower. Using for example filter system such as ceramic cancel filter the alkali emissions can be kept below requirements for gas turbine process using temperatures between 460-480 deg C. The research conducted here shows that fertilized biomass accumulate nutrients such potassium more than the non fertilized biomasses. Also the soil conditions has an effect to that. Due to the fact that alkalies in biomass are bonded differently than that of coal, the release is also higher. It could be shown that in combined gas turbine process the release of potassium is too high and need to be removed from the flue gas. It could also be shown that alkalies can be captured between 95-100 % at high temperature

  10. Sandia Combustion Research Program: Annual report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This report presents research results of the past year, divided thematically into some ten categories. Publications and presentations arising from this work are included in the appendix. Our highlighted accomplishment of the year is the announcement of the discovery and demonstration of the RAPRENOx process. This new mechanism for the elimination of nitrogen oxides from essentially all kinds of combustion exhausts shows promise for commercialization, and may eventually make a significant contribution to our nation's ability to control smog and acid rain. The sections of this volume describe the facility's laser and computer system, laser diagnostics of flames, combustion chemistry, reacting flows, liquid and solid propellant combustion, mathematical models of combustion, high-temperature material interfaces, studies of engine/furnace combustion, coal combustion, and the means of encouraging technology transfer. 182 refs., 170 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Prelinguistic Relational Concepts: Investigating Analogical Processing in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Alissa L.; Hespos, Susan J.; Gentner, Dedre

    2015-01-01

    This research asks whether analogical processing ability is present in human infants, using the simplest and most basic relation--the "same-different" relation. Experiment 1 (N = 26) tested whether 7- and 9-month-olds spontaneously detect and generalize these relations from a single example, as previous research has suggested. The…

  12. Reduced NOX combustion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delano, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for combusting fuel and oxidant to achieve reduced formation of nitrogen oxides. It comprises: It comprises: heating a combustion zone to a temperature at least equal to 1500 degrees F.; injecting into the heated combustion zone a stream of oxidant at a velocity within the range of from 200 to 1070 feet per second; injecting into the combustion zone, spaced from the oxidant stream, a fuel stream at a velocity such that the ratio of oxidant stream velocity to fuel stream velocity does not exceed 20; aspirating combustion gases into the oxidant stream and thereafter intermixing the aspirated oxidant stream and fuel stream to form a combustible mixture; combusting the combustible mixture to produce combustion gases for the aspiration; and maintaining the fuel stream substantially free from contact with oxidant prior to the intermixture with aspirated oxidant

  13. Analysis of nonequilibrium chemical processes in the plume of subsonic and supersonic aircraft with hydrogen and hydrocarbon combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starik, A.M.; Lebedev, A.B.; Titova, N.S. [Central Inst. of Aviation Motors, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    On the basic of quasi one dimensional mixing model the numerical analysis of nonequilibrium chemical processes in the plume of subsonic and hypersonic aircraft is presented. It was found that species HNO, HNO{sub 3}, HNO{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ClO{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2} could be formed as a result of nonequilibrium processes in the plume and their concentrations can essentially exceed both background values in free stream of atmosphere and their values at the nozzle exit plane. (author) 10 refs.

  14. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  15. Techniques de combustion Combustin Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perthuis E.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'efficacité d'un processus de chauffage par flamme est étroitement liée à la maîtrise des techniques de combustion. Le brûleur, organe essentiel de l'équipement de chauffe, doit d'une part assurer une combustion complète pour utiliser au mieux l'énergie potentielle du combustible et, d'autre part, provoquer dans le foyer les conditions aérodynamiques les plus propices oux transferts de chaleur. En s'appuyant sur les études expérimentales effectuées à la Fondation de Recherches Internationales sur les Flammes (FRIF, au Groupe d'Étude des Flammes de Gaz Naturel (GEFGN et à l'Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP et sur des réalisations industrielles, on présente les propriétés essentielles des flammes de diffusion aux combustibles liquides et gazeux obtenues avec ou sans mise en rotation des fluides, et leurs répercussions sur les transferts thermiques. La recherche des températures de combustion élevées conduit à envisager la marche à excès d'air réduit, le réchauffage de l'air ou son enrichissement à l'oxygène. Par quelques exemples, on évoque l'influence de ces paramètres d'exploitation sur l'économie possible en combustible. The efficiency of a flame heating process is closely linked ta the mastery of, combustion techniques. The burner, an essential element in any heating equipment, must provide complete combustion sa as to make optimum use of the potential energy in the fuel while, at the same time, creating the most suitable conditions for heat transfers in the combustion chamber. On the basis of experimental research performed by FRIF, GEFGN and IFP and of industrial achievements, this article describesthe essential properties of diffusion flames fed by liquid and gaseous fuels and produced with or without fluid swirling, and the effects of such flames on heat transfers. The search for high combustion temperatures means that consideration must be given to operating with reduced excess air, heating the air or

  16. Oxyfuel combustion for below zero CO{sub 2} emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeg Toftegaard, M.; Hansen, Kim G.; Fisker, D. (DONG Energy Power, Hvidovre (Denmark)); Brix, J.; Brun Hansen, B.; Putluru, S.S.R.; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Glarborg, Peter; Degn Jensen, A. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. CHEC Research Centre, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Montgomery, M. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Mechanical Engineering, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark))

    2011-07-01

    The reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions is of highest concern in relation to limiting the anthropogenic impacts on the environment. Primary focus has gathered on the large point sources of CO{sub 2} emissions constituted by large heat and power stations and other heavy, energy-consuming industry. Solutions are sought which will enable a significant reduction of the anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions during the transformation period from the use of fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has the potential to significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from power stations while allowing for the continuous utilisation of the existing energy producing system in the transformation period. Oxyfuel combustion is one of the possible CCS technologies which show promising perspectives for implementation in industrial scale within a relatively short period of time. Oxyfuel combustion deviates from conventional combustion in air by using a mixture of pure oxygen and recirculated flue gas as the combustion medium thereby creating a flue gas highly concentrated in CO{sub 2} making the capture process economically more feasible compared to technologies with capture from more dilute CO{sub 2} streams. This project has investigated a number of the fundamental and practical issues of the oxyfuel combustion process by experimental, theoretical, and modelling investigations in order to improve the knowledge of the technology. The subjects investigated cover: general combustion characteristics of coal and biomass (straw) and mixtures thereof, formation and emission of pollutants, ash characteristics, flue gas cleaning for SO{sub 2} by wet scrubbing with limestone and for NO{sub x} by selective catalytic reduction (SCR), corrosion of boiler heat transfer surfaces, operation and control of large suspension-fired boilers, and the perspectives for the implementation of oxyfuel combustion s a CO{sub 2} sequestration solution in the Danish power production

  17. Control of a post-combustion CO2 capture plant during process start-up and load variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    capture. The study demonstrates that the implemented control structure keeps the carbon capture process at 90% CO2 removal rate with a deviation up to 8% during load variations. In addition, it reveals that the control structure brings the process to the desired set point in approximately 10 min during...... and control system design are crucial. In this paper, we present a dynamic mathematical model for the absorption and desorption columns in a carbon capture plant. Moreover, we implement a decentralized proportional-integral (PI) based control scheme and we evaluate the performance of the control structure...... for various operational procedures, e.g. start-up, load changes, noise on the flue gas flow rate and composition. Note that the carbon capture plant is based on the solvent storage configuration. To the authors knowledge, this is the first paper addressing the issue of start-up operation and control of carbon...

  18. DIAGNOSIS OF FAILURE OF COMBUSTION IN THE COMBUSTION CHAMBER WITH A THERMOVISION EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Vorobiev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of thermovision technology to diagnose failure of the combustion flame test tube of the main combustion chamber gas turbine engine is deal with in the article. Join the thermal radiation of the jet of combustion products and the internal elements was carried out using short-wave thermovision system AGA-782 with spectral spectral filters in several ranges from 3.2 to 5.6 microns. Thermovision is mounted on the axis of the flame tube. The output signal was recorded and processed on a computer in real time, allowing monitor the combustion process and the thermal state of the object during the experiment.

  19. Dynamic neural processing of linguistic cues related to death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Liu

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies suggest that humans evolve the capacity to cope with anxiety induced by the awareness of death's inevitability. However, the neurocognitive processes that underlie online death-related thoughts remain unclear. Our recent functional MRI study found that the processing of linguistic cues related to death was characterized by decreased neural activity in human insular cortex. The current study further investigated the time course of neural processing of death-related linguistic cues. We recorded event-related potentials (ERP to death-related, life-related, negative-valence, and neutral-valence words in a modified Stroop task that required color naming of words. We found that the amplitude of an early frontal/central negativity at 84-120 ms (N1 decreased to death-related words but increased to life-related words relative to neutral-valence words. The N1 effect associated with death-related and life-related words was correlated respectively with individuals' pessimistic and optimistic attitudes toward life. Death-related words also increased the amplitude of a frontal/central positivity at 124-300 ms (P2 and of a frontal/central positivity at 300-500 ms (P3. However, the P2 and P3 modulations were observed for both death-related and negative-valence words but not for life-related words. The ERP results suggest an early inverse coding of linguistic cues related to life and death, which is followed by negative emotional responses to death-related information.

  20. Combustion contribution to noise in jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plett, E. G.; Abdelhamid, A. N.; Harrje, D. T.; Summerfield, M.

    1976-01-01

    The relative importance of combustion as a source of noise in a flow regime representative of a subsonic jet engine exhaust was investigated. The combustion noise source characteristics were obtained from pressure and temperature fluctuation measurements in the combustor and exhaust nozzle. The similarity between the fluctuations in this source region and the far field noise were compared. In the jet exhaust velocity range between 450 and 660 ft/sec investigated in detail, the frequencies of dominant pressure and temperature fluctuations in the combustor were also the frequencies of the dominant far field noise. The overall noise levels were 14 to 20 dB higher than from a corresponding clean jet in the same velocity range. Thus it seemed clear that the unsteadiness associated with the combustion process was responsible for the dominant noise in the far field. A simple analysis to predict the far field noise due to the internal pressure fluctuations causing exit plane velocity fluctuations produced trends closely resembling the measured results, but under predicted the far field noise over the spectral range examined. The possible reason for the higher far field noise is direct transmission of acoustic waves through the nozzle, which was not accounted for in the prediction scheme.

  1. Emissions of hydrocarbons from combustion of biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Mona; Persson, Eva Marie.

    1991-10-01

    Evaluations and measurements of emissions of hydrocarbons from power plants with a capacity exceeding 1 MW using biofuels (wood fuels and peat) have been studied in order to identify and quantify the emissions of incompletely combusted hydrocarbons. The influence of the type of fuel and the combustion technology applied were also studied, using literature references. The report summarizes monitoring results from a number of plants using biofuels. The reported emissions from the different plants can not be compared as they are relatively few and the test results have been obtained under various conditions using different methods of testing and analysis. The methods used are often poorly documented in the studied reports. Few investigations of emissions of hydrocarbons from plants in the range of 1 to 10 MW have been carried out. The plant and the technology used are important factors determining the amount and type of emissions of hydrocarbons. Larger temporary emissions can occur during start up, operational disturbances or when using fuel of inhomogeneous quality. In order to minimize the emissions the combustion process must be efficiently controlled, and a fuel of a hohogeneous quality must be used. The report also summarizes sampling and analysis methods used for monitoring emissions of hydrocarbons. (29 refs., 17 figs.)

  2. Numerical investigation of biogas flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ehsan; Bagheri, Ghobad; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel consumption decreases from 3.24 g/s in biogas conventional combustion to 1.07 g/s in flameless mode. • The differences between reactants and products temperature intensifies irreversibility in traditional combustion. • The temperature inside the chamber is uniform in biogas flameless mode and exergy loss decreases in this technique. • Low O 2 concentration in the flameless mode confirms a complete and quick combustion process in flameless regime. - Abstract: The purpose of this investigation is to analyze combustion characteristics of biogas flameless mode based on clean technology development strategies. A three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study has been performed to illustrate various priorities of biogas flameless combustion compared to the conventional mode. The effects of preheated temperature and wall temperature, reaction zone and pollutant formation are observed and the impacts of combustion and turbulence models on numerical results are discussed. Although preheated conventional combustion could be effective in terms of fuel consumption reduction, NO x formation increases. It has been found that biogas is not eligible to be applied in furnace heat up due to its low calorific value (LCV) and it is necessary to utilize a high calorific value fuel to preheat the furnace. The required enthalpy for biogas auto-ignition temperature is supplied by enthalpy of preheated oxidizer. In biogas flameless combustion, the mean temperature of the furnace is lower than traditional combustion throughout the chamber. Compared to the biogas flameless combustion with uniform temperature, very high and fluctuated temperatures are recorded in conventional combustion. Since high entropy generation intensifies irreversibility, exergy loss is higher in biogas conventional combustion compared to the biogas flameless regime. Entropy generation minimization in flameless mode is attributed to the uniform temperature inside the chamber

  3. Structural, impedance and Mössbauer studies of magnesium ferrite synthesized via sol–gel auto-combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Khan Durrani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4 spinel oxide powder was synthesized by nitrate–citrate sol–gel auto-combustion process with stoichiometric composition of metal nitrate salts, urea and citric acid. The study was focused on the modification of synthesis conditions and effect of these modified conditions on the structural and electrical properties of synthesized MgFe2O4 ceramic materials. Phase composition, crystallinity, structure and surface morphology were studied by X-ray diffraction, FTIR and SEM. Pure single phase MgFe2O4 spinel ferrite was obtained after calcination at 850 °C. Rietveld refinement of XRD result confirmed the single cubic phase spinel oxide with the lattice constant of a = 8.3931 Å and Fd3m symmetry. UV–visible absorption study of calcined powder revealed an optical band gap of 2.17 eV. SEM images of sintered specimens (1050–1450 °C showed that the grain size increased with the increase in sintering temperature. From the impedance results of the sintered MgFe2O4 specimens, it was found that the resistance of grain, grain boundary and electrode effect decreased with an increase in sintering temperature and associated grain growth. In the intermediate frequency region lowering of impedance and dielectric values was observed due to the decrease in grain boundary areas. Mössbauer studies indicated that magnesium ferrite had a mixed spinel structure in calcined and sintered samples, however, the well refined single phase MgFe2O4 was observed due to well developed high crystalline structure at 1350 °C and 1450 °C. Keywords: Sol–gel auto-combustion, Magnesium ferrite, X-ray diffraction, SEM, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Impedance spectroscopy

  4. Fission product determination in irradiated fuel processing waste (electrophoresis); Dosage des produits de fission dans les effluents de traitement des combustibles irradies (electrophorese)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchapt, J.M.; Tret, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Marcoule, 30 - Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule. Services d' Extraction du Plutonium

    1966-07-01

    This dosage method concerns fission products present in the waste produced from the processing of cooled irradiated fuels. - Sr, Cs, Ce, Y, Ru by quantitative analysis; - Zr, Nb by qualitative analysis. It includes electrophoresis on paper strips one meter long which is then analysed between two window-less Geiger counters. For an activity of 10{sup -2} {mu}Ci of any cation in a 10 {mu}l spot, the standard error {sigma} if 3 to 4 per cent. complete analysis lasts about 5 hours. (authors) [French] Cette methode de dosage concerne les produits de fission presents dans les effluents de traitement des combustibles irradies refroidis: - Sr, Cs, Ce, Y, Ru en analyse quantitative; - Zr, Nb en analyse qualitative. Elle comporte une electrophorese sur bande de papier de un metre de longueur suivie d'un depouillement entre deux compteurs Geiger sans fenetre. Pour une activite de 10{sup -2} {mu}Ci d'un cation quelconque dans une tache de 10 {mu}l l'erreur standard {sigma} est de 3 a 4 pour cent. L'analyse complete demande environ 5 heures. (auteurs)

  5. Towards Ideal NOx and CO2 Emission Control Technology for Bio-Oils Combustion Energy System Using a Plasma-Chemical Hybrid Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, M; Fujishima, H; Yamato, Y; Kuroki, T; Tanaka, A; Otsuka, K

    2013-01-01

    A pilot-scale low-emission boiler system consisting of a bio-fuel boiler and plasma-chemical hybrid NO x removal system is investigated. This system can achieve carbon neutrality because the bio-fuel boiler uses waste vegetable oil as one of the fuels. The plasma-chemical hybrid NO x removal system has two processes: NO oxidation by ozone produced from plasma ozonizers and NO 2 removal using a Na 2 SO 3 chemical scrubber. Test demonstrations of the system are carried out for mixed oils (mixture of A-heavy oil and waste vegetable oil). Stable combustion is achieved for the mixed oil (20 – 50% waste vegetable oil). Properties of flue gas—e.g., O 2 , CO 2 and NO x —when firing mixed oils are nearly the same as those when firing heavy oil for an average flue gas flow rate of 1000 Nm 3 /h. NO x concentrations at the boiler outlet are 90 – 95 ppm. Furthermore, during a 300-min continuous operation when firing 20% mixed oil, NO x removal efficiency of more than 90% (less than 10 ppm NO x emission) is confirmed. In addition, the CO 2 reduction when heavy oil is replaced with waste vegetable oil is estimated. The system comparison is described between the plasma-chemical hybrid NO x removal and the conventional technology.

  6. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  7. Pilot-Scale Evaluation of an Advanced Carbon Sorbent-Based Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbostel, Marc [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The overall objective of this project is to achieve the DOE’s goal to develop advanced CO2 capture and separation technologies that can realize at least 90% CO2 removal from flue gas steams produced at a pulverized coal (PC) power plant at a cost of less than $40/tonne of CO2 captured. The principal objective is to test a CO2 capture process that will reduce the parasitic plant load by using a CO2 capture sorbent that will require a reduced amount of steam. The process is based on advanced carbon sorbents having a low heat of adsorption, high CO2 adsorption capacity, and excellent selectivity. While the intent of this project was to produce design and performance data by testing the sorbent using a slipstream of coal-derived flue gas at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) under realistic conditions and continuous long-term operation, the project was terminated following completion of the detailing pilot plant design/engineering work on June 30, 2016.

  8. Injector tip for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Tsu Pin; Ye, Wen

    2003-05-20

    This invention relates to a the tip structure of a fuel injector as used in a internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines using Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) technology require a tip structure that directs fuel spray in a downward direction. This requirement necessitates a tip design that is capable of withstanding mechanical stresses associated with the design.

  9. The reciprocal relations between morphological processes and reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Richard S; Bergman, Krista

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocal relations between emerging morphological processes and reading skills were examined in a longitudinal study tracking children from Grade 1 through Grade 3. The aim was to examine predictive relationships between productive morphological processing involving composing and decomposing of inflections and derivations, reading ability for pseudoword and word decoding, and word and passage reading comprehension after controlling for initial abilities in reading, morphological processing, phonological awareness, and vocabulary. Reciprocal influences were indicated by predictive relations among initial morphological processes and later reading abilities co-occurring with relationships between initial reading abilities and later morphological processes. Using multilevel modeling, decomposing and composing were found to predict emerging word decoding and word and passage comprehension but not pseudoword decoding. Reading comprehension predicted growth in decomposing. Subsequent regression analyses of model-estimated early linear growth in predictors and later linear growth in outcomes showed that early growth in morphological processes predicted later growth in word decoding and passage comprehension. Although reciprocal relations between emerging morphological processes and reading skills were observed, the different patterns on each side of the reciprocal "coin" indicated that the mechanisms underlying predictive influences are likely different but related to quality of lexical representations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A combustion model of vegetation burning in "Tiger" fire propagation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannino, F.; Ascoli, D.; Sirignano, M.; Mazzoleni, S.; Russo, L.; Rego, F.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a semi-physical model for the burning of vegetation in a wildland fire. The main physical-chemical processes involved in fire spreading are modelled through a set of ordinary differential equations, which describe the combustion process as linearly related to the consumption of fuel. The water evaporation process from leaves and wood is also considered. Mass and energy balance equations are written for fuel (leaves and wood) assuming that combustion process is homogeneous in space. The model is developed with the final aim of simulating large-scale wildland fires which spread on heterogeneous landscape while keeping the computation cost very low.

  11. Study of combustion and emission characteristics of fuel derived from waste plastics by various waste to energy (W-t-E) conversion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrat, M. A.; Rasul, M. G.; Khan, M. M. K.

    2016-07-01

    Reduction of plastic wastes by means of producing energy can be treated as a good investment in the waste management and recycling sectors. In this article, conversion of plastics into liquid fuel by two thermo-chemical processes, pyrolysis and gasification, are reviewed. The study showed that the catalytic pyrolysis of homogenous waste plastics produces better quality and higher quantity of liquefied fuel than that of non-catalytic pyrolysis process at a lower operating temperature. The syngas produced from gasification process, which occurs at higher temperature than the pyrolysis process, can be converted into diesel by the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction process. Conducive bed material like Olivine in the gasification conversion process can remarkably reduce the production of tar. The waste plastics pyrolysis oil showed brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of about 27.75%, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) of 0.292 kg/kWh, unburned hydrocarbon emission (uHC) of 91 ppm and NOx emission of 904 ppm in comparison with the diesel for BTE of 28%, BSFC of 0.276 kg/kWh, uHC of 57 ppm and NOx of 855 ppm. Dissolution of Polystyrene (PS) into biodiesel also showed the potential of producing alternative transport fuel. It has been found from the literature that at higher engine speed, increased EPS (Expanded Polystyrene) quantity based biodiesel blends reduces CO, CO2, NOx and smoke emission. EPS-biodiesel fuel blend increases the brake thermal efficiency by 7.8%, specific fuel consumption (SFC) by 7.2% and reduces brake power (Pb) by 3.2%. More study using PS and EPS with other thermoplastics is needed to produce liquid fuel by dissolving them into biodiesel and to assess their suitability as a transport fuel. Furthermore, investigation to find out most suitable W-t-E process for effective recycling of the waste plastics as fuel for internal combustion engines is necessary to reduce environmental pollution and generate revenue which will be addressed in this article.

  12. 2003 Laser Diagnostic in Combustion Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark G. Allen

    2004-09-10

    The GRC Laser Diagnostics in Combustion aims at bringing together scientists and engineers working in the front edge of research and development to discuss and find new ways to solve problems connected to combustion diagnostics. Laser-based techniques have proven to be very efficient tools for studying combustion processes thanks to features as non-intrusiveness in combination with high spatial and temporal resolution. Major tasks for the community are to develop and apply techniques for quantitative measurements with high precision e.g of species concentrations, temperatures, velocities and particles characteristics (size and concentration). These issues are of global interest, considering that the major part of the World's energy conversion comes from combustion sources and the influence combustion processes have on the environment and society.

  13. Coal combustion: Effect of process conditions on char reactivity. Ninth quarterly technical report, September 1, 1992--December 1, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygourakis, K.

    1993-12-31

    Our efforts during the past quarter focused on the development of an image processing technique for characterizing the macropore structure of chars produced from Illinois No. 6 coal. Pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a microscope-stage reactor in inert and reacting atmospheres and at various pyrolysis heating rates. Particles from several pyrolysis runs were embedded in an epoxy resin block and polished sections . were prepared. Digital images of char particle cross-sections were acquired and analyzed to measure the structural properties of the chars. The macropore analysis procedure is presented here in detail. Future reports will present the data showing the effects of pyrolysis conditions on the macropore structure of Illinois No. 6 chars.

  14. Modelling of flame temperature of solution combustion synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp), an important bio-ceramic was successfully synthesized by combustion in the aqueous system containing calcium nitrate-di-ammonium hydrogen orthophosphate-urea. The combustion flame temperature of solution combustion reaction depends on various process parameters, and it plays a significant ...

  15. Numerical investigation of spray combustion towards HITAC conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Shanglong

    2017-01-01

    The features of High Temperature Air Combustion (HiTAC), i.e. high-efficiency combustion processes creating a uniform temperature distribution with low NOX and CO emissions, lend itself ideally for the combustion of all sorts of "difficult” fuels, ranging from low-calorific gases such as

  16. Knock characteristics of dual-fuel combustion in diesel engines ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper investigates the combustion knock characteristics of diesel engines running on natural gas using pilot injection as means of initiating combustion. The diesel engines knock under normal operating conditions but the knock referred to in this paper is an objectionable one. In the dual-fuel combustion process we ...

  17. Antibacterial property of CuCrO{sub 2} nanopowders prepared by a self-combustion glycine nitrate process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nien, Yung-Tang, E-mail: ytnien@nfu.edu.tw [Deparment of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin, 63201, Taiwan (China); Hu, Mon-Ru [Deparment of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin, 63201, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Te-Wei [Department of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, 10608, Taiwan (China); Chu, Jaw-Shiow [Bioresource Collection and Research Center, Food Industry Research and Development Institute, Hsinchu, 30062, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-15

    Porous CuCrO{sub 2} nanopowders were prepared via glycine nitrate process (GNP) at 175 °C in ambient air. The X-ray diffraction patterns showed a pure delafossite phase of CuCrO{sub 2} with numerous broad peaks, indicating a crystallite size of approximately 20 nm. The surface area of the CuCrO{sub 2} nanopowders was larger than 50 m{sup 2}/g, nearly 100 times greater than that of bulk powders (0.47 m{sup 2}/g). Pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) were chosen as the antibacterial evaluation indicators for both the nanopowders and bulk powders. The results showed that 1750 ppm nanopowders inhibited the growth of E. coli. As a control, the bulk powders showed a normal growth profile. The antibacterial property of the CuCrO{sub 2} nanopowders can be attributed to the extremely large surface area, which induces rapid release of Cu ions and strong adhesion of nanopowders to bacteria. - Highlights: • CuCrO{sub 2} nanopowders was prepared by low-temperature glycine nitrate process. • 1250–1500 ppm of CuCrO{sub 2} nanopowders were found to depress the growth of Escherichia coli. • Bulk powders by the solid state reaction exhibited no antibacterial property. • The antibacterial property of nanopowders was attributed to rapid Cu ion releases. • Heavy adhesion of nanopowders to bacteria also resulted in antibacterial property.

  18. Chaotic combustion in spark ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendeker, Miroslaw; Czarnigowski, Jacek; Litak, Grzegorz; Szabelski, Kazimierz

    2003-01-01

    We analyse the combustion process in a spark ignition engine using the experimental data of an internal pressure during the combustion process and show that the system can be driven to chaotic behaviour. Our conclusion is based on the observation of unperiodicity in the time series, suitable stroboscopic maps and a complex structure of a reconstructed strange attractor. This analysis can explain that in some circumstances the level of noise in spark ignition engines increases considerably due to nonlinear dynamics of a combustion process

  19. Integration of air quality-related planning processes : report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    Several communities in British Columbia have conducted air quality, greenhouse gas, or community energy management plans. This report explored the possibility of integrating 3 community-based air quality-related planning processes into a single process and evaluated the use of these 3 processes by local governments and First Nations in identifying and addressing air quality-related objectives, and determined to what extent they could be integrated to achieve planning objectives for air quality, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy supply and conservation. The lessons learned from 9 case studies in British Columbia were presented. The purpose of the case studies was to examine how communities handled emissions and energy related inventory and planning work, as well as their experiences with, or considerations for, an integrated process. The lessons were grouped under several key themes including organization and stakeholder involvement; messaging and focus; leadership/champions; and resources and capacity. The report also outlined a framework for an integrated planning process and provided recommendations regarding how an integrated or complementary process could be performed. A number of next steps were also offered for the provincial government to move the concept of an integrated process forward with the assistance of other partners. These included identifying the resources required to support communities engaging in an integrated process as well as discussing the series of options for provincial support with key stakeholders. refs., tabs., figs

  20. Combustion heater for oil shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Richard G.; Walton, Otis R.; Lewis, Arthur E.; Braun, Robert L.

    1985-01-01

    A combustion heater for oil shale heats particles of spent oil shale containing unburned char by burning the char. A delayed fall is produced by flowing the shale particles down through a stack of downwardly sloped overlapping baffles alternately extending from opposite sides of a vertical column. The delayed fall and flow reversal occurring in passing from each baffle to the next increase the residence time and increase the contact of the oil shale particles with combustion supporting gas flowed across the column to heat the shale to about 650.degree.-700.degree. C. for use as a process heat source.

  1. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  2. HCCI Combustion: Analysis and Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador M. Aceves; Daniel L. Flowers; Joel Martinez-Frias; J. Ray Smith; Robert Dibble; Michael Au; James Girard

    2001-05-14

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a new combustion technology that may develop as an alternative to diesel engines with high efficiency and low NOx and particulate matter emissions. This paper describes the HCCI research activities being currently pursued at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at the University of California Berkeley. Current activities include analysis as well as experimental work. On analysis, we have developed two powerful tools: a single zone model and a multi-zone model. The single zone model has proven very successful in predicting start of combustion and providing reasonable estimates for peak cylinder pressure, indicated efficiency and NOX emissions. This model is being applied to develop detailed engine performance maps and control strategies, and to analyze the problem of engine startability. The multi-zone model is capable of very accurate predictions of the combustion process, including HC and CO emissions. The multi-zone model h as applicability to the optimization of combustion chamber geometry and operating conditions to achieve controlled combustion at high efficiency and low emissions. On experimental work, we have done a thorough evaluation of operating conditions in a 4-cylinder Volkswagen TDI engine. The engine has been operated over a wide range of conditions by adjusting the intake temperature and the fuel flow rate. Satisfactory operation has been obtained over a wide range of operating conditions. Cylinder-to-cylinder variations play an important role in limiting maximum power, and should be controlled to achieve satisfactory performance.

  3. Fast combustion waves and chemi-ionization processes in a flame initiated by a powerful local plasma source in a closed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artem'ev, K. V.; Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kazantsev, S. Yu.; Kononov, N. G.; Kossyi, I. A.; Popov, N. A.; Tarasova, N. M.; Filimonova, E. A.; Firsov, K. N.

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the initiation of combustion in a stoichiometric methane–oxygen mixture by a freely localized laser spark and by a high-current multispark discharge in a closed chamber. It is shown that, preceding the stage of ‘explosive’ inflammation of a gas mixture, there appear two luminous objects moving away from the initiator along an axis: a relatively fast and uniform wave of ‘incomplete combustion’ under laser spark ignition and a wave with a brightly glowing plasmoid behind under ignition from high-current slipping surface discharge. The gas mixtures in both the ‘preflame’ and developed-flame states are characterized by a high degree of ionization as the result of chemical ionization (plasma density ne≈1012 cm−3) and a high frequency of electron–neutral collisions (νen≈1012 s−1). The role of chemical ionization in constructing an adequate theory for the ignition of a gas mixture is discussed. The feasibility of the microwave heating of both the preflame and developed-flame plasma, supplementary to a chemical energy source, is also discussed. PMID:26170426

  4. Combustion Noise Analysis for Combustion and Fuels Diagnosis of a CI Diesel Engine Operating with Biodiesels

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen, Dong; Shi, Zhanqun; Song, Zhongyue; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the combustion noise of a compression ignition (CI) diesel engine operating with biodiesels has been investigated experimentally. It aims to explore an effective method for combustion process monitoring and fuel quality evaluation through analysing the characteristics of the engine combustion noise. The experiments were conducted on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine fuelled with biodiesels (B50 and B100) and normal pure diesel, and op...

  5. Development of a Premixed Combustion Capability for Scramjet Combustion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; Rice, Brian E.; Chelliah, Harsha; McDaniel, James C.; Edwards, Jack R.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing engines rely on scramjet combustion processes, which involve high speed, compressible, and highly turbulent flows. The combustion environment and the turbulent flames at the heart of these engines are difficult to simulate and study in the laboratory under well controlled conditions. Typically, wind-tunnel testing is performed that more closely approximates engine testing rather than a careful investigation of the underlying physics that drives the combustion process. The experiments described in this paper, along with companion data sets being developed separately, aim to isolate the chemical kinetic effects from the fuel-air mixing process in a dual-mode scramjet combustion environment. A unique fuel injection approach is taken that produces a nearly uniform fuel-air mixture at the entrance to the combustor. This approach relies on the precombustion shock train upstream of the dual-mode scramjet combustor. A stable ethylene flame anchored on a cavity flameholder with a uniformly mixed combustor inflow has been achieved in these experiments allowing numerous companion studies involving coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), particle image velocimetry (PIV), and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be performed.

  6. Combustion chemistry - activities in the CHEK research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dam-Johansen, K.; Johnsson, J.E.; Glarborg, P.; Frandsen, F.; Jensen, A.; Oestberg, M. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The combustion chemistry in the oxidation of fossil fuels and biofuels determines together with mixing and heat transfer the required size of a furnace, the emission of gaseous pollutants, and the formation of ash and deposits on surfaces. This presentation describes technologies for solid fuels combustion and gives a summary of the fuels, the pollutant chemistry and the inorganic chemistry in combustion processes. Emphasis is put on the work carried out in the CHEC (Combustion and Harmful Emission Control) Research Programme. (orig.)

  7. Combustion synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline WO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Walter; Cason, Michael; Aina, Olawunmi; de Tacconi, Norma R; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2008-05-21

    The energy payback time associated with the semiconductor active material is an important parameter in a photovoltaic solar cell device. Thus lowering the energy requirements for the semiconductor synthesis step or making it more energy-efficient is critical toward making the overall device economics more competitive relative to other nonpolluting energy options. In this communication, combustion synthesis is demonstrated to be a versatile and energy-efficient method for preparing inorganic oxide semiconductors such as tungsten trioxide (WO3) for photovoltaic or photocatalytic solar energy conversion. The energy efficiency of combustion synthesis accrues from the fact that high process temperatures are self-sustained by the exothermicity of the combustion process, and the only external thermal energy input needed is for dehydration of the fuel/oxidizer precursor mixture and bringing it to ignition. Importantly, we show that, in this approach, it is also possible to tune the optical characteristics of the oxide semiconductor (i.e., shift its response toward the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum) in situ by doping the host semiconductor during the formative stage itself. As a bonus, the resultant material shows enhanced surface properties such as markedly improved organic dye uptake relative to benchmark samples obtained from commercial sources. Finally, this synthesis approach requires only very simple equipment, a feature that it shares with other "mild" inorganic semiconductor synthesis routes such as sol-gel chemistry, chemical bath deposition, and electrodeposition. The present study constitutes the first use of combustion synthesis for preparing WO3 powder comprising nanosized particles.

  8. Proceedings of the 1999 international joint power generation conference (FACT-vol. 23). Volume 1: Fuels and combustion technologies; Gas turbines; and Nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfield, S.R. Jr.; Moussa, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: Gas turbine combustion; Advanced energy conversion; Low NOx solutions; Burner developments; Alternative fuels combustion; Advanced energy conversion technologies; Numerical modeling of combustion; Fluidized bed combustion; Coal combustion; Combustion research; Gasification systems; Mercury emissions; Highly preheated air combustion; Selective catalytic reduction; Special topics in combustion research; Gas turbines and advanced energy; and How can the nuclear industry become more efficient? Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the database

  9. Analysis of combustion efficiency in a pelletizing furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Simões Vieira de Moura

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this research is to assess how much the improvement in the combustion reaction efficiency can reduce fuel consumption, maintaining the same thermal energy rate provided by the reaction in a pelletizing furnace. The furnace for pelletizing iron ore is a complex thermal machine, in terms of energy balance. It contains recirculation fan gases and constant variations in the process, and the variation of a single process variable can influence numerous changes in operating conditions. This study demonstrated how the main variables related to combustion in the burning zone influence fuel consumption (natural gas from the furnace of the Usina de Pelotização de Fábrica (owned by VALE S/A, without changing process conditions that affect production quality. Variables were analyzed regarding the velocity and pressure of the fuel in the burners, the temperature of the combustion air and reactant gases, the conversion rate and the stoichiometric air/fuel ratio of the reaction. For the analysis, actual data of the furnace in operation was used, and for the simulation of chemical reactions, the software Gaseq® was used. The study showed that the adjustment of combustion reaction stoichiometry provides a reduction of 9.25% in fuel consumption, representing a savings of US$ 2.6 million per year for the company.

  10. Analysis of business process maturity and organisational performance relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinowski T. Bartosz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present results of the study on business process maturity in relation to organisational performance. A two-phase methodology, based on literature review and survey was used. The literature is a source of knowledge about business process maturity and organisational performance, whereas the research on process maturity vs organisational performance in Polish Enterprises provides findings based on 84 surveyed companies. The main areas of the research covered: identification and analysis of maturity related variables and identification of organisational performance perspectives and its relation to process maturity. The study shows that there is a significant positive relation between process maturity and organisational performance. Although there are research on such relation available, they are scarce and have some significant limitations in terms of research sample or the scope of maturity or organisational performance covered. This publication is part of a project funded by the National Science Centre awarded by decision number DEC-2011/01/D/HS4/04070.

  11. Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yongqi

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the methodology and preliminary results of a techno-economic analysis on a hot carbonate absorption process (Hot-CAP) with crystallization-enabled high pressure stripping for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture (PCC). This analysis was based on the Hot-CAP that is fully integrated with a sub-critical steam cycle, pulverized coal-fired power plant adopted in Case 10 of the DOE/NETL’s Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants. The techno-economic analysis addressed several important aspects of the Hot-CAP for PCC application, including process design and simulation, equipment sizing, technical risk and mitigation strategy, performance evaluation, and cost analysis. Results show that the net power produced in the subcritical power plant equipped with Hot-CAP is 611 MWe, greater than that with Econoamine (550 MWe). The total capital cost for the Hot-CAP, including CO{sub 2} compression, is $399 million, less than that for the Econoamine PCC ($493 million). O&M costs for the power plant with Hot-CAP is $175 million annually, less than that with Econoamine ($178 million). The 20-year levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for the power plant with Hot-CAP, including CO2 transportation and storage, is 119.4 mills/kWh, a 59% increase over that for the plant without CO2 capture. The LCOE increase caused by CO{sub 2} capture for the Hot-CAP is 31% lower than that for its Econoamine counterpart.

  12. Application of Pareto-efficient combustion modeling framework to large eddy simulations of turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Ihme, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    The modeling of turbulent combustion requires the consideration of different physico-chemical processes, involving a vast range of time and length scales as well as a large number of scalar quantities. To reduce the computational complexity, various combustion models are developed. Many of them can be abstracted using a lower-dimensional manifold representation. A key issue in using such lower-dimensional combustion models is the assessment as to whether a particular combustion model is adequate in representing a certain flame configuration. The Pareto-efficient combustion (PEC) modeling framework was developed to perform dynamic combustion model adaptation based on various existing manifold models. In this work, the PEC model is applied to a turbulent flame simulation, in which a computationally efficient flamelet-based combustion model is used in together with a high-fidelity finite-rate chemistry model. The combination of these two models achieves high accuracy in predicting pollutant species at a relatively low computational cost. The relevant numerical methods and parallelization techniques are also discussed in this work.

  13. Combustion noise and combustion instabilities in propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culick, F. E. C.; Paparizos, L.; Sterling, J.; Burnley, V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is concerned with some aspects of non-linear behavior of unsteady motions in combustion chambers. The emphasis is on conditions under which organized oscillations having discrete frequencies may exist in the presence of random motions. In order to treat the two types of motions together, and particularly to investigate coupling between noise and combustion instabilities, the unsteady field is represented as a synthesis of acoustic modes having time-varying amplitudes. Each of the amplitudes are written as the sum of two parts, one associated with the random field and the remainder representing the organized oscillations. After spatial averaging, the general problem is reduced to solution of a set of second-order ordinary differential equations whose structure depends on the sorts of nonlinear processes accounted for. This formulation accommodates any physical process; in particular, terms are included to represent noise sources, although only limited modeling is discussed. Our results suggest that random sources of noise have only small effects on combustion instabilities and seem not to be a cause of unstable motions. However, the coupling between the two sorts of unsteady motions may be important as an essential process in a proposed scheme for noise control. It is now a familiar observation that many nonlinear deterministic systems are capable of exhibiting apparently random motions called 'chaos.' This is a particularly interesting possibility for systems which also executed non-deterministic random motions. In combustion chambers, a nonlinear deterministic system (acoustical motions) exists in the presence of noise produced by flow separation, turbulent motions, and energy released by combustion processes. The last part of the paper is directed to the matter of discovering whether or not chaotic motions exist in combustion systems. Analysis has not progressed sufficiently far to answer the question. We report here recent results of processing data

  14. Potential of Porous-Media Combustion Technology as Applied to Internal Combustion Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslaw Weclas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes the knowledge concerning porous media combustion techniques as applied in engines. One of most important reasons of this review is to introduce this still not well known technology to researchers doing with internal combustion engine processes, thermal engines, reactor thermodynamics, combustion, and material science. The paper gives an overview of possible applications of a highly porous open cell structures to in-cylinder processes. This application means utilization of unique features of porous media for supporting engine processes, especially fuel distribution in space, vaporization, mixing with air, heat recuperation, ignition and combustion. There are three ways for applying porous medium technology to engines: support of individual processes, support of homogeneous combustion process (catalytic and non-catalytic with temperature control, and utilization of the porous structure as a heat capacitor only. In the first type of application, the porous structure may be utilized for fuel vaporization and improved fuel distribution in space making the mixture more homogeneous in the combustion chamber. Extension of these processes to mixture formation and ignition inside a combustion reactor allows the realization of a homogeneous and a nearly zero emissions level combustion characterized by a homogeneous temperature field at reduced temperature level.

  15. Ash related bed agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion, further development of the classification method based on CCSEM; CCSEM-luokitusmenetelmaen jatkokehittaeminen tuhkan aiheuttaman agglomeroitumisen tutkimisessa leiju- ja kiertopetipoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, R.; Patrikainen, T.; Heikkinen, R.; Tiainen, M.; Virtanen, M. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Inst. of Chemistry

    1997-10-01

    The scope of this project is to use the information and experience gained from the development of classification method to predict ash related problems like bed agglomeration during fluidised combustion. If boilers have to be shut down due to slagging or agglomeration of the bed material may cause significant economic losses for the entire energy production chain. Mineral classification methods based on the scanning electron microscopy are commonly used for coal ash investigation. In this work different biomass, peat, and peat-wood ash, fluidised-bed materials, and bed agglomerates were analysed with SEM-EDS combined with automatic image analysis software. The properties of ash particles are different depending on the fuel type. If biomass like wood or bark are added to peat the resulting ash has different properties. Due to the low mineral content in the original peat and to the fact that the majority of inorganic material is bound to the organic matrix, the classification has turned out to be less informative than was hoped. However, good results are obtained the by use of quasiternary diagrams. With these diagrams the distribution of particle composition is easily illustrated and thus meaningful prediction can be made of the slagging and agglomerating properties of ash. The content of ten different elements are determined for each particle by SEM-EDS combined with Link AIA software. The composition of the diagram corners can be varied Freely within these ten elements. (orig.)

  16. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    The combustion of wood chips and wood pellets for the production of renewable energy in Denmark increased from 5.7 PJ to 16 PJ during the period 2000-2015, and further increases are expected to occur within the coming years. In 2012, about 22,300 tonnes of wood ashes were generated in Denmark....... Currently, these ashes are mainly landfilled, despite Danish legislation allowing their application onto forest and agricultural soils for fertilising and/or liming purposes. During this PhD work, 16 wood ash samples generated at ten different Danish combustion plants were collected and characterised...... for their composition and leaching properties. Despite the relatively large variations in the contents of nutrients and trace metals, the overall levels were comparable to typical ranges reported in the literature for other wood combustion ashes, as well as with regards to leaching. In general, the composition...

  17. Uncertainties in hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamps, D.W.; Wong, C.C.; Nelson, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three important areas of hydrogen combustion with uncertainties are identified: high-temperature combustion, flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition, and aerosol resuspension during hydrogen combustion. The uncertainties associated with high-temperature combustion may affect at least three different accident scenarios: the in-cavity oxidation of combustible gases produced by core-concrete interactions, the direct containment heating hydrogen problem, and the possibility of local detonations. How these uncertainties may affect the sequence of various accident scenarios is discussed and recommendations are made to reduce these uncertainties. 40 references

  18. Working Memory Regulates Trait Anxiety-Related Threat Processing Biases

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, Rob; Mackintosh, Bundy; Sharma, Dinkar

    2016-01-01

    High trait anxious individuals tend to show biased processing of threat. Correlational evidence suggests that executive control could be used to regulate such threat-processing. On this basis, we hypothesised that trait anxiety-related cognitive biases regarding threat should be exaggerated when executive control is experimentally impaired by loading working memory. In Study 1, 68 undergraduates read ambiguous vignettes under high and low working memory load; later, their interpretations of t...

  19. Engineering aspects of rate-related processes in food manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Many rate-related phenomena occur in food manufacturing processes. This review addresses four of them, all of which are topics that the author has studied in order to design food manufacturing processes that are favorable from the standpoint of food engineering. They include chromatographic separation through continuous separation with a simulated moving adsorber, lipid oxidation kinetics in emulsions and microencapsulated systems, kinetic analysis and extraction in subcritical water, and water migration in pasta.

  20. Reactivity studies of rice husk combustion using TGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, A.F.; Shamsuddin, A.H.; Mahdi, F.M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity of rice husks combustion is systematically studied the thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The kinetic parameters are determined from the Arrhenius plots based on the data of weight loss over temperature at different combustion heating rates. The results of proximate analysis (the moisture, volatile matters, fixed carbon, and ash contents) are also presented in this paper. The effects of process conditions on the self-ignition phenomenon of rice husk combustion are quantified. Finally, these results and compared with results for coal combustion. This research is part of the work to determine the optimal process conditions of rice husk combustion for energy production. (Author)

  1. Combustion and Plasma Synthesis of High-Temperature Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Z. A.; Holt, J. B.

    1997-04-01

    , et al.). Combustion Synthesis in the Ti-C-Ni-Al System (S. Dunmead, et al.). Combustion Synthesis Dynamics Modeling (T. Kottke, et al.). Elementary Processes in SiO2-Al Thermite-Type Reactions Activated or Induced by Mechanochemical Treatment (G. Hida & I. Lin). Combustion Synthesis of Ceramic Preforms for Molten-Metal Infiltration (D. Halverson, et al.). Combustion Characteristics of Solid-Solid Systems: Experiments and Modeling (S. Kumar, et al.). Microstructure of TiB2 Sintered by the Self-Combustion Method (K. Urabe, et al..). A Laser-Ignition Study of Gasless Reactions Using Thermography (C. Chow & J. Mohler). Shock-Induced Reaction Synthesis-Assisted Processing of Ceramics (R. Ward, et al.). Summary Assessment of the Application of SPS and Related Reaction Processing to Produce Dense Ceramics (R. Rice). Shock Consolidation of Combustion-Synthesized Ceramics (A. Niiler, et al.). High-Pressure Burning Rate of Silicon in Nitrogen (M. Costantino & J. Holt). Preparation of a TiC Single Crystal by the Floating-Zone Method from a Self-Combustion Rod (S. Otani, et al.). PLASMA AND GAS-PHASE SYNTHESIS. Thermal Plasma Synthesis of Ceramic Powders and Coatings (T. Yoshida). A Theoretical Comparison of Conventional and Hybrid RF-Plasma Reactors (J. McKelliget & N. El-Kaddah). Homogeneous Nucleation and Particle Growth in Thermal Plasma Synthesis (S. Girshick & C.-P. Chiu). Formation of Refractory Aerosol Particles (R. Flagan, et al.). Ceramic-Powder Synthesis in an Aerosol Reactor (M. Alam, et al.). Silica-Particle Formation Using the Counter-Flow Diffusion Flame Burner (J. Katz, et al.). Synthesis and Properties of Low-Carbon Boron Carbides (C. Adkins, et al.). Synthesis of Si, SiC, and Si3N4 Powders Under High Number Density Conditions (J. Haggerty & J. Flint). Rapid Preparation of Titanium and Other Transition-Metal Nitride- and Carbide Powders by a Carbo-Reduction Method Using Arc-Image Heating (M. Yoshimura, et al.). Microwave Plasma Densification of Aluminum Nitride

  2. [Organ donation process: perception by relatives of cadaverous donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dosSantos, Marcelo José; Massarollo, Maria Cristina Komatsu Braga

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to disclose how relatives of cadaverous donors perceive the organ donation process for transplantation. A phenomenological, qualitative research was carried out on the basis of the "situated-phenomenon structure". The statements revealed that, for the relatives of the donors, the process of donation begins with the patients' hospital admission and only ends when they are buried. Furthermore, it is considered bureaucratic, long, consuming and tiring. This situation results in suffering and stress, but there is no regret about the organ donation since, although the pain caused by the loss does not end, the donation initiative comforts and brings satisfaction.

  3. The Pain-Related Cognitive Processes Questionnaire: Development and Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Melissa A; Ward, L Charles; Thorn, Beverly E; Lang, Cathryne P; Newton-John, Toby R O; Ehde, Dawn M; Jensen, Mark P

    2018-02-01

    Cognitive processes may be characterized as how individuals think, whereas cognitive content constitutes what individuals think. Both cognitive processes and cognitive content are theorized to play important roles in chronic pain adjustment, and treatments have been developed to target both. However, the evaluation of treatments that target cognitive processes is limited because extant measures do not satisfactorily separate cognitive process from cognitive content. The current study aimed to develop a self-report inventory of potentially adaptive and presumed maladaptive attentional processes that may occur when someone is experiencing pain. Scales were derived from a large item pool by successively applying confirmatory factor analysis to item data from two undergraduate samples (N = 393 and 233). Items, which were generated to avoid confounding of cognitive content with cognitive processes, represented nine constructs: Suppression, Distraction, Enhancement, Dissociation, Reappraisal, Absorption, Rumination, Nonjudgment, and Acceptance. The resulting nine scales formed the Pain-Related Cognitive Process Questionnaire (PCPQ), and scale correlations produced four conceptually distinct composite scales: Pain Diversion, Pain Distancing, Pain Focus, and Pain Openness. Internal consistency reliabilities of the nine scales were adequate (α ≥ 0.70) to good, and the four composite scales had α values of 0.79 or higher. Correlations with pain-related criterion variables were generally consistent with putative constructs. The developed PCPQ scales offer a comprehensive assessment of important cognitive processes specific to pain. Overall, the findings suggest that the PCPQ scales may prove useful for evaluating the role of pain-related cognitive processes in studies of chronic pain. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Selecting public relations personnel of hospitals by analytic network process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Sen-Kuei; Chang, Kuei-Lun

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the use of analytic network process (ANP) in the Taiwanese hospital public relations personnel selection process. Starting with interviewing 48 practitioners and executives in north Taiwan, we collected selection criteria. Then, we retained the 12 critical criteria that were mentioned above 40 times by theses respondents, including: interpersonal skill, experience, negotiation, language, ability to follow orders, cognitive ability, adaptation to environment, adaptation to company, emotion, loyalty, attitude, and Response. Finally, we discussed with the 20 executives to take these important criteria into three perspectives to structure the hierarchy for hospital public relations personnel selection. After discussing with practitioners and executives, we find that selecting criteria are interrelated. The ANP, which incorporates interdependence relationships, is a new approach for multi-criteria decision-making. Thus, we apply ANP to select the most optimal public relations personnel of hospitals. An empirical study of public relations personnel selection problems in Taiwan hospitals is conducted to illustrate how the selection procedure works.

  5. Service Encounter Related Process Quality, Patient Satisfaction, and Behavioral Intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandakumar Mekoth

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study identifies some of the critical service encounters thatthe outpatients undergo in a health care facility and investigateswhether the service encounter related process quality as perceivedby the patients leads to patient satisfaction, repeat visit, and recommendationintentions. Personal visits, observations, and enquiriesat the outpatient center have been conducted to identifythe various service encounters that outpatients undergo in thehospital. Exit interviews of the outpatients have been conductedto identify service encounter related process quality variableswhich determine patient satisfaction and behavioral intentions.A preliminary scale to measure service encounter related processquality was developed and its factor structure and internal consistencyreliability were established. The study reveals that boththe physician quality and laboratory quality have been found tobe significantly related to patient satisfaction. However, quite interestingly,courtesy shown by the registration or outpatient staff,perceived length of waiting time, or even the salient aspects of theservicescape, did not influence patient satisfaction.

  6. Event-Related Potentials and Emotion Processing in Child Psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia eChronaki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been increasing interest in the neural mechanisms underlying altered emotional processes in children and adolescents with psychopathology. This review provides a brief overview of the most up-to-date findings in the field of Event-Related Potentials (ERPs to facial and vocal emotional expressions in the most common child psychopathological conditions. In regards to externalising behaviour (i.e. ADHD, CD, ERP studies show enhanced early components to anger, reflecting enhanced sensory processing, followed by reductions in later components to anger, reflecting reduced cognitive-evaluative processing. In regards to internalising behaviour, research supports models of increased processing of threat stimuli especially at later more elaborate and effortful stages. Finally, in autism spectrum disorders abnormalities have been observed at early visual-perceptual stages of processing. An affective neuroscience framework for understanding child psychopathology can be valuable in elucidating underlying mechanisms and inform preventive intervention.

  7. Biomass Fuel and Combustion Conditions Selection in a Fixed Bed Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. Arce

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The biomass market has experienced an increase in development, leading to research and development efforts that are focused on determining optimal biofuel combustion conditions. Biomass combustion is a complex process that involves divergent parameters and thus requires the use of advanced analysis methods. This study proposes combining grey relational analysis (GRA and error propagation theory (EPT to select a biofuel and its optimal combustion conditions. This research will study three biofuels that are currently used in a region of South Europe (Spain, and the most important variables that affect combustion are the ignition front propagation speed and the highest temperature that is reached at the fixed bed combustor. The results demonstrate that a combination of both theories for the analysis of solid-state thermochemical phenomena enables a fast and simple way of choosing the best configuration for each fuel.

  8. Measurement of O2 in the Combustion Chamber of Apulverized Coal Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Břetislav Janeba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Operational measurements of the O2 concentration in the combustion chamber of a pulverized coal boiler are not yet common practice. Operators are generally satisfied with measuring the O2 concentration in the second pass of the boiler, usually behind the economizer, where a flue gas sample is extracted for analysis in a classical analyzer. A disadvantage of this approach is that there is a very weak relation between the measured value and the condition in specific locations in the fireplace, e.g. the function of the individual burners and the combustion process as a whole. A new extractionline was developed for measuring the O2 concentration in the combustion chamber. A planar lambda probe is used in this approach. The extraction line is designed to get outputs that can be used directly for diagnosis or management of the combustion in the boiler.

  9. Opportunities in pulse combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenchley, D. L.; Bomelburg, H. J.

    1985-10-01

    In most pulse combustors, the combustion occurs near the closed end of a tube where inlet valves operate in phase with the pressure amplitude variations. Thus, within the combustion zone, both the temperature and the pressure oscillate around a mean value. However, the development of practical applications of pulse combustion has been hampered because effective design requires the right combination of the combustor's dimensions, valve characteristics, fuel/oxidizer combination, and flow pattern. Pulse combustion has several additional advantages for energy conversion efficiency, including high combustion and thermal efficiency, high combustion intensity, and high convective heat transfer rates. Also, pulse combustion can be self-aspirating, generating a pressure boost without using a blower. This allows the use of a compact heat exchanger that may include a condensing section and may obviate the need for a chimney. In the last decade, these features have revived interest in pulse combustion research and development, which has resulted in the development of a pulse combustion air heater by Lennox, and a pulse combustion hydronic unit by Hydrotherm, Inc. To appraise this potential for energy savings, a systematic study was conducted of the many past and present attempts to use pulse combustion for practical purposes. The authors recommended areas where pulse combustion technology could possibly be applied in the future and identified areas in which additional R and D would be necessary. Many of the results of the study project derived from a special workshop on pulse combustion. This document highlights the main points of the study report, with particular emphasis on pulse combustion application in chemical engineering.

  10. The John Zink Hamworthy combustion handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Baukal, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Despite the length of time it has been around, its importance, and vast amounts of research, combustion is still far from being completely understood. Issues regarding the environment, cost, and fuel consumption add further complexity, particularly in the process and power generation industries. Dedicated to advancing the art and science of industrial combustion, The John Zink Hamworthy Combustion Handbook, Second Edition: Volume 3 - Applications offers comprehensive, up-to-date coverage of equipment used in the process and power generation industries. Under the leadership of Charles E. Baukal

  11. Interactive wood combustion for botanical tree models

    KAUST Repository

    Pirk, Sören

    2017-11-22

    We present a novel method for the combustion of botanical tree models. Tree models are represented as connected particles for the branching structure and a polygonal surface mesh for the combustion. Each particle stores biological and physical attributes that drive the kinetic behavior of a plant and the exothermic reaction of the combustion. Coupled with realistic physics for rods, the particles enable dynamic branch motions. We model material properties, such as moisture and charring behavior, and associate them with individual particles. The combustion is efficiently processed in the surface domain of the tree model on a polygonal mesh. A user can dynamically interact with the model by initiating fires and by inducing stress on branches. The flames realistically propagate through the tree model by consuming the available resources. Our method runs at interactive rates and supports multiple tree instances in parallel. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through numerous examples and evaluate its plausibility against the combustion of real wood samples.

  12. Mechanism of Combustion of Heterogeneous Solid Propellants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, E

    1998-01-01

    ... (and compare results with those of AP oxidizer and Ap/hydrocarbon binder propellants). 4. Develop a realistic qualitative model of the combustion process that would identify the requirements for formulation of realistic analytical models.

  13. Effects of coal combustion and gasification process contaminants on the neuromuscular system. Sub-task on peripheral nervous system effects. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, G.N.

    1979-01-01

    This study is a preliminary investigation of the possible toxic effects of flyash particles from an experimental fluidized-bed combustion process at the Morgantown Energy Research Center. Emphasis has been placed on the action of trace metals present on the surface and in the matrix of the particulates emissions, since these elements may be toxic in low dosages. It is well established that external calcium (Ca/sup 2 +/) is essential for neuromuscular transmission. In the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/ from the external medium, nerve impulses continue to invade the terminal but do not evoke transmitter release. Many of the di- and trivalent metal ions have been tested for their ability to substitute for Ca/sup 2 +/ and have been shown to affect evoked and spontaneous transmitter release. Many of these ions cause a decrease in amplitude of the evoked end-plate potential (e.p.p.), but raise the frequency of spontaneously occurring miniature end-plate potentials (m.e.p.p.s). Several investigators have found that the effective concentration necessary to cause an increase in m.e.p.p. frequency is far greater than that which decreases the e.p.p. amplitude. The neuromuscular junction of the frog was selected to test the effects of flyash particles and pure metal ions, since its general characteristics are well documented and its sensitivity to metal ions is well known. Cadmium (Cd/sup 2 +/) was chosen for our investigation because it had previously been reported to be a highly potent inhibitor of evoked release, yet having no significant effect on spontaneous release even at high concentrations. In this report it was shown that the effective concentrations necessary to increase m.e.p.p. frequency are in the same range as those which decrease e.p.p. amplitude.

  14. Combustion control and model based optimization. Modeling of combustion process and development of supporting control systems for plant operation; Palamisprosessin saeaetoe ja mallipohjainen optimointi; Voimalaitoksen polttoprosessin mallitus ja saeaetoe sekae operoinnin tukiohjelmien kehitys ja testaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortela, U.; Mononen, J.; Leppaekoski, K.; Hiltunen, J.; Jouppila, M.; Karppinen, R. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Systems Engineering Lab.

    1997-10-01

    The aims of the project are to develop the combustion control strategies and to minimize the flue gas emissions. The common goal of the studies has been the reduction of flue gas emissions by using advanced control and optimization methods. The behaviour of different kind of boilers and fuels has been modelled using experimental data from fullscale plants, such as a 42 MW bubbling fluidized bed boiler, 23 MW bubbling fluidized bed boiler and a 300 MW circulating fluidized bed boiler. Many of the individual observations and modelled correlations between control variables and flue gas emissions have lead to operation instructions and/or re-organized control schemes which help to control total emissions. The most part of this knowledge can be formed to the standard IF- THEN - type rules which contain some uncertainty or fuzziness. Rule-based instruction system for the reduction of flue gas emissions is under work. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of poultry processing practices, related public health laws ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background public health regulations related to poultry production and processing as provided within the Meat Law (1968), Food and Drug Act (1974) and Animal Diseases (Control) Act (1988) were also assessed for gaps that could compromise quality and safety of poultry products in Nigeria. The diseases detectable at ...

  16. Evaluation of poultry processing practices, related public health laws ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of poultry processing practices, related public health laws and diseases of chickens at slaughter: A pilot study in Kaduna state. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more ...

  17. Feed Basis for Processing Relatively Low Radioactivity Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the characterization of potential feed for processing relatively low radioactive waste tanks. The feed characterization is based on waste characterization data extracted from the waste characterization system. This data is compared to salt cake sample results from Tanks 37, 38 and 41

  18. Graphic Arts: Book Three. The Press and Related Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajollahi, Karim; And Others

    The third of a three-volume set of instructional materials for a graphic arts course, this manual consists of nine instructional units dealing with presses and related processes. Covered in the units are basic press fundamentals, offset press systems, offset press operating procedures, offset inks and dampening chemistry, preventive maintenance…

  19. Research in adaptive management: working relations and the research process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda C. Graham; Linda E. Kruger

    2002-01-01

    This report analyzes how a small group of Forest Service scientists participating in efforts to implement adaptive management approach working relations, and how they understand and apply the research process. Nine scientists completed a questionnaire to assess their preferred mode of thinking (the Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument), engaged in a facilitated...

  20. Social learning Processes and Nature-Culture relations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores social learning processes and nature-culture relations in a context of transition from traditional to ... presence of diverse vegetation, subtropical climates, high levels of poverty and increased honey demand ... rural poor through sustainable utilisation and management of natural resources, such as.

  1. Fostering new relational experience: clinical process in couple psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarosh, Cheri L

    2014-03-01

    One of the most critical goals for couple psychotherapy is to foster a new relational experience in the session where the couple feels safe enough to reveal more vulnerable emotions and to explore their defensive withdrawal, aggressive attacking, or blaming. The lived intimate experience in the session offers the couple an opportunity to gain integrative insight into their feelings, expectations, and behaviors that ultimately hinder intimacy. The clinical processes that are necessary include empathizing with the couple and facilitating safety within the session, looking for opportunities to explore emotions, ruptures, and unconscious motivations that maintain distance in the relationship, and creating a new relational experience in the session that has the potential to engender integrative insight. These clinical processes will be presented with empirical support. Experts from a session will be used to highlight how these processes influence the couple and promote increased intimacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Microwave-Assisted Ignition for Improved Internal Combustion Engine Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFilippo, Anthony Cesar

    -assisted spark technology will benefit from predictive models which include the plasma processes governing the observed combustion enhancement. This dissertation documents the development of a chemical kinetic mechanism for the plasma-assisted combustion processes relevant to microwave-assisted spark ignition. The mechanism includes an existing mechanism for gas-phase methane oxidation, supplemented with electron impact reactions, cation and anion chemical reactions, and reactions involving vibrationally-excited and electronically-excited species. Calculations using the presently-developed numerical model explain experimentally-observed trends, highlighting the relative importance of pressure, temperature, and mixture composition in determining the effectiveness of microwave-assisted ignition enhancement.

  3. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  4. Sandia combustion research program: Annual report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.E.; Sanders, B.R.; Ivanetich, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    More than a decade ago, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Our strategy was to apply the rapidly increasing capabilities in lasers and computers to combustion science and technology. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''User Facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative--involving US universities, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions of several research projects which have been stimulated by Working Groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship Program has been instrumental in the success of some of the joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents research results of calendar year 1987, separated thematically into nine categories. Refereed journal articles appearing in print during 1987, along with selected other publications, are included at the end of Section 10. In addition to our ''traditional'' research--chemistry, reacting flow, diagnostics, engine combustion, and coal combustion--you will note continued progress in somewhat recent themes: pulse combustion, high temperature materials, and energetic materials, for example. Moreover, we have just started a small, new effort to understand combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  5. Soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel spray combustion in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ji

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents measurements of the soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel combustion in a constant volume chamber using a two-color technique. This technique uses a high-speed camera coupled with two narrowband filters (550. nm and 650. nm, 10. nm FWHM). After calibration, statistical analysis shows that the uncertainty of the two-color temperature is less than 5%, while it is about 50% for the KL factor. This technique is then applied to the spray combustion of biodiesel and diesel fuels under an ambient oxygen concentration of 21% and ambient temperatures of 800, 1000 and 1200. K. The heat release result shows higher energy utilization efficiency for biodiesel compared to diesel under all conditions; meanwhile, diesel shows a higher pressure increase due to its higher heating value. Biodiesel yields a lower temperature inside the flame area, a longer soot lift-off length, and a smaller soot area compared to diesel. Both the KL factor and the total soot with biodiesel are lower than with diesel throughout the entire combustion process, and this difference becomes larger as the ambient temperature decreases. Biodiesel shows approximately 50-100. K lower temperatures than diesel at the quasi-steady stage for 1000 and 1200. K ambient temperature, while diesel shows a lower temperature than biodiesel at 800. K ambient. This result may raise the question of how important the flame temperature is in explaining the higher NO. x emissions often observed during biodiesel combustion. Other factors may also play an important role in controlling NO. x emissions. Both biodiesel and diesel temperature measurements show a monotonic dependence on the ambient temperature. However, the ambient temperature appears to have a more significant effect on the soot formation and oxidation in diesel combustion, while biodiesel combustion soot characteristics shows relative insensitivity to the ambient temperature. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The effect of air preheating on the combustion of solid fuels on a grate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, L.B.M. van; Arendsen, A.R.J.; Boer-Meulman, P.D.M. de; Brem, G.

    2004-01-01

    Combustion of solid fuels on a grate is widely used. Mostly, the combustion behaviour is explained by the classical theory of Rogers. However, that theory cannot explain the combustion process when primary air preheating is applied. Solid fuel grate combustion is studied by experiments in a pot

  7. Analysis of energy cascade utilization in a chemically recuperated scramjet with indirect combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Jiang; Cheng, Kunlin; Zhang, Silong; Zhang, Duo; Bao, Wen; Han, Jiecai

    2016-01-01

    The working process of scramjet with regenerative cooling, which was actually the chemical recuperation process, was analyzed in view of energy cascade utilization. The indirect combustion was realized through pyrolysis reaction of fuel. The relative yields of thermal exergy obtained by indirect combustion have been predicted both assuming an ideal pyrolysis reaction and using the experimental results of thermal pyrolysis of n-decane. The results showed that the influence mechanism of regenerative cooling improved the scramjet engine performance by the energy cascade utilization, and the combustion process was supposed to be designed with the cooling process together to utilize the chemical energy of fuel in a more effective way. A maximum value of 11% of the relative yield was obtained with the ideal pyrolysis reaction while a value less than 3% existed in the thermal pyrolysis experiments because of the domination of chemical kinetics rather than chemical thermodynamics in the real experiments. In spite of the difference between the ideal and the present experimental results, the indirect combustion was prospective to achieve a better energy cascade utilization in a chemically recuperated scramjet if the pyrolysis reaction was further optimized. The results in this paper were beneficial for the performance optimization of a regenerative cooling scramjet. - Highlights: • A new method of energy cascade utilization in a chemically recuperated scramjet. • 11% exergy loss is reduced by ideal pyrolysis reaction with indirect combustion. • Regenerative cooling with chemical recuperation can improve engine performance.

  8. Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yongqi; DeVries, Nicholas; Ruhter, David; Manoranjan, Sahu; Ye, Qing; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Scott; Li, Zhiwei; O' Brien, Kevin

    2014-03-31

    demonstrated. In addition to the experimental studies, the technical challenges pertinent to fouling of slurry-handling equipment and the design of the crystallizer and stripper were addressed through consultation with vendors and engineering analyses. A process flow diagram of the Hot-CAP was then developed and a TEA was performed to compare the energy use and cost performance of a nominal 550-MWe subcritical pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plant without CO{sub 2} capture (DOE/NETL Case 9) with the benchmark MEA-based post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture (PCC; DOE/NETL Case 10) and the Hot-CAP-based PCC. The results revealed that the net power produced in the PC + Hot-CAP is 609 MWe, greater than the PC + MEA (550 MWe). The 20-year levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for the PC + Hot-CAP, including CO{sub 2} transportation and storage, is 120.3 mills/kWh, a 60% increase over the base PC plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The LCOE increase for the Hot-CAP is 29% lower than that for MEA. TEA results demonstrated that the Hot-CAP is energy-efficient and cost-effective compared with the benchmark MEA process.

  9. Working memory regulates trait anxiety-related threat processing biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Robert W; Mackintosh, Bundy; Sharma, Dinkar

    2017-06-01

    High trait anxious individuals tend to show biased processing of threat. Correlational evidence suggests that executive control could be used to regulate such threat-processing. On this basis, we hypothesized that trait anxiety-related cognitive biases regarding threat should be exaggerated when executive control is experimentally impaired by loading working memory. In Study 1, 68 undergraduates read ambiguous vignettes under high and low working memory load; later, their interpretations of these vignettes were assessed via a recognition test. Trait anxiety predicted biased interpretation of social threat vignettes under high working memory load, but not under low working memory load. In Study 2, 53 undergraduates completed a dot probe task with fear-conditioned Japanese characters serving as threat stimuli. Trait anxiety predicted attentional bias to the threat stimuli but, again, this only occurred under high working memory load. Interestingly however, actual eye movements toward the threat stimuli were only associated with state anxiety, and this was not moderated by working memory load, suggesting that executive control regulates biased threat-processing downstream of initial input processes such as orienting. These results suggest that cognitive loads can exacerbate trait anxiety-related cognitive biases, and therefore represent a useful tool for assessing cognitive biases in future research. More importantly, since biased threat-processing has been implicated in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety, poor executive control may be a risk factor for anxiety disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Oil Shale and Its Relation to Petroleum and Other Fuels (Summary Les schistes à l'huile et leurs relation avec le pétrole et les autres combustibles (résumé

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billo S. M.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available World oil reserves in oil shales (1. 2 to 2 trillion barrels are at least 4 times as large as proven crude oil petroleum reserves (310 billion barrels. Petroleum is produced from oil shale by pyrolysis (destructive distillation by hecit. Coal can also be converted ta synthetic petroleum products by direct hydrogenation and by the modified Fischer-Tropsch process. Rising cost of oil exploration and production and increasing efficiency of synthetizing processes indicate that synthetic fuels may increase the supply of natural liquid fuels in the foreseeable future. The term kerogen is often used to comprise all the organic matter contained in sediments and may be of two kinds: 1 coalylike kerogen, and 2 sapropellic kerogen - oil shale type. It is believed that both kerogen and petroleum were formed from hypothetical ancestor - protopetroleum. They are found together in sedimenfs and their C13C12 ratios are similar. The largest producer of oil shale ore China, the USSR and Sweden. The USA is technologically prepared to begin production of synthetized fuels through varying economic condition. Richness and size of deposits, cost of mining, cost of retorting, character of products, and location of deposit in relation to plant and market, determine the economic value of a given deposit. Les réserves mondiales de schistes à huile (1,2 à 2 x 10. 12 barils sont au moins quatre fois supérieures aux réserves prouvées de pétrole brut (310 x 10. 9 barils. On extrait le pétrole des schistes par pyrolyse (distillation destructive thermique. Le charbon peut aussi être transformé en hydrocarbures par hydrogénation et par le procédé Fischer-Tropsch modifié. L'augmentation des coûts de l'exploration et de la production du pétrole et amélioration de l'efficacité des procédés synthétiques montrent que les produits synthétiques vont jouer un rôle croissant dans l'approvisionnement en combustibles liquides au cours des années à venir. Le terme k

  11. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R; Bowen, Gabriel J

    2015-03-17

    Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry.

  12. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P.; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry. PMID:25733906

  13. Internal and surface phenomena in metal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Molodetsky, Irina E.; Law, Chung K.

    1995-01-01

    liquid fuel droplet combustion studies. In addition, the internal compositions of rapidly quenched metal particles will be analyzed using SEM technique. Such compositions are similar to those existing during the combustion and provide new insight on metal combustion processes. The results of this experimental work will be used to model the fundamental mechanisms of metal combustion. Preliminary experimental results on Al and Zr particle combustion at normal gravity are discussed here.

  14. Formation and Control of Sulfur Oxides in Sour Gas Oxy-Combustion: Prediction Using a Reactor Network Model

    KAUST Repository

    Bongartz, Dominik

    2015-11-19

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Sour natural gas currently requires expensive gas cleanup before it can be used in power generation because it contains large amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2) that entail a low heating value and highly corrosive combustion products. A potential alternative is to use the gas directly in a gas turbine process employing oxy-fuel combustion, which could eliminate the need for gas cleanup while also enabling the application of carbon capture and sequestration, possibly combined with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). However, the exact influence of an oxy-fuel environment on the combustion products of sour gas has not been quantified yet. In this work, we used a reactor network model for the combustor and the gas turbine together with our recently assembled and validated detailed chemical reaction mechanism for sour gas combustion to investigate the influence of some basic design parameters on the combustion products of natural gas and sour gas in CO2 or H2O diluted oxy-fuel combustion as well as in conventional air combustion. Our calculations show that oxy-fuel combustion produces up to 2 orders of magnitude less of the highly corrosive product sulfur trioxide (SO3) than air combustion, which clearly demonstrates its potential in handling sulfur containing fuels. Unlike in air combustion, in oxy-fuel combustion, SO3 is mainly formed in the flame zone of the combustor and is then consumed as the combustion products are cooled in the dilution zone of the combustor and the turbine. In oxy-fuel combustion, H2O dilution leads to a higher combustion efficiency than CO2 dilution. However, if the process is to be combined with EOR, CO2 dilution makes it easier to comply with the very low levels of oxygen (O2) required in the EOR stream. Our calculations also show that it might even be beneficial to operate slightly fuel-rich because this simultaneously decreases the O2 and SO3 concentration further. The flame zone

  15. Distributed combustion in a cyclonic burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Giancarlo; Sabia, Pino; de Joannon, Mara; Cavaliere, Antonio; Ragucci, Raffaele

    2017-11-01

    Distributed combustion regime occurs in several combustion technologies were efficient and environmentally cleaner energy conversion are primary tasks. For such technologies (MILD, LTC, etc…), working temperatures are enough low to boost the formation of several classes of pollutants, such as NOx and soot. To access this temperature range, a significant dilution as well as preheating of reactants is required. Such conditions are usually achieved by a strong recirculation of exhaust gases that simultaneously dilute and pre-heat the fresh reactants. However, the intersection of low combustion temperatures and highly diluted mixtures with intense pre-heating alters the evolution of the combustion process with respect to traditional flames, leading to significant features such as uniformity and distributed ignition. The present study numerically characterized the turbulence-chemistry and combustion regimes of propane/oxygen mixtures, highly diluted in nitrogen, at atmospheric pressure, in a cyclonic combustor under MILD Combustion operating conditions. The velocity and mixing fields were obtained using CFD with focus on mean and fluctuating quantities. The flow-field information helped differentiate between the impact of turbulence levels and dilution ones. The integral length scale along with the fluctuating velocity is critical to determine Damköhler and Karlovitz numbers. Together these numbers identify the combustion regime at which the combustor is operating. This information clearly distinguishes between conventional flames and distributed combustion. The results revealed that major controllers of the reaction regime are dilution and mixing levels; both are significantly impacted by lowering oxygen concentration through entrainment of hot reactive species from within the combustor, which is important in distributed combustion. Understanding the controlling factors of distributed regime is critical for the development and deployment of these novel combustion

  16. Reduced Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for JP-8 Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montgomery, Christopher J; Cannon, S. M; Mawid, M. A; Sekar, B

    2002-01-01

    Using CARM (Computer Aided Reduction Method), a computer program that automates the mechanism reduction process, six different reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for JP-8 combustion have been generated...

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced in the combustion of fatty acid alkyl esters from different feedstocks: Quantification, statistical analysis and mechanisms of formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, Alberto; Al-Lal, Ana-María; García-Martínez, María-Jesús; Ortega, Marcelo F; Llamas, Juan F; Lapuerta, Magín; Canoira, Laureano

    2017-05-15

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants of concern due to their carcinogenic and mutagenic activity. Their emissions are mainly related with the combustion or pyrolysis of the organic matter, such as in fossil fuels combustion. It is important to characterize PAHs in the combustions of biofuels due to their increasing importance in the actual energetic setting. There is a lot of research focused in PAHs emission due to the combustion in diesel engines; but only few of them have analyzed the effect of raw material and type of alcohol used in the transesterification process. Different raw materials (i.e. animal fat, palm, rapeseed, linseed, peanut, coconut, and soybean oils) have been used for obtaining FAME and FAEE. A method for measuring PAHs generated during combustion in a bomb calorimeter has been developed. Combustion was made at different oxygen pressures and the samples were taken from the bomb after each combustion. Samples were extracted and the PAHs amounts formed during combustion were analyzed by GC-MS. This research shows the statistical relationships among the 16 PAHs of concern, biodiesel composition and oxygen pressure during combustion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  19. Flameless Combustion Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutmark, Ephraim

    2005-01-01

    .... "Flameless Combustion" is characterized by high stability levels with virtually no thermoacoustic instabilities, very low lean stability limits and therefore extremely low NOx production, efficient...

  20. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  1. Snore related signals processing in a private cloud computing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Guo, Jian; Xu, Huijie; Zhu, Zhaomeng; Zhang, Gongxuan

    2014-09-01

    Snore related signals (SRS) have been demonstrated to carry important information about the obstruction site and degree in the upper airway of Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS) patients in recent years. To make this acoustic signal analysis method more accurate and robust, big SRS data processing is inevitable. As an emerging concept and technology, cloud computing has motivated numerous researchers and engineers to exploit applications both in academic and industry field, which could have an ability to implement a huge blue print in biomedical engineering. Considering the security and transferring requirement of biomedical data, we designed a system based on private cloud computing to process SRS. Then we set the comparable experiments of processing a 5-hour audio recording of an OSAHS patient by a personal computer, a server and a private cloud computing system to demonstrate the efficiency of the infrastructure we proposed.

  2. Advanced technology application for combustion chamber concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tygielski, Kathy S.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Marshall is engaged in the development of an Advanced Main Combustion Chamber under the aegis of the Earth-to-Orbit Propulsion Technology Program. AMCC is to be a robust and highly reliable combustion-chamber prototype costing one-third as much as current designs of comparable performance; it will be associated with a reduction of fabrication time by one-half. Attention is presently given to the three component-manufacturing processes used: single-piece investment casting for the structural jacket and manifolds; vacuum plasma spraying, for the combustion liner, and an alternative, platelet-compounded liner.

  3. Annual Report: Advanced Combustion (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey [NETL; Richards, George

    2012-09-30

    The Advanced Combustion Project addresses fundamental issues of fire-side and steam-side corrosion and materials performance in oxy-fuel combustion environments and provides an integrated approach into understanding the environmental and mechanical behavior such that environmental degradation can be ameliorated and long-term microstructural stability, and thus, mechanical performance can lead to longer lasting components and extended power plant life. The technical tasks of this effort are Oxy-combustion Environment Characterization, Alloy Modeling and Life Prediction, and Alloy Manufacturing and Process Development.

  4. Modeling of combustion noise in helicopter engines

    OpenAIRE

    Livebardon, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The growth of air traffic at the vicinity of areas at high population density imposes to make quieter aircrafts on aeronautical manufacturers.The engine noise is one of the major contributors to the overall sound levels. Furthermore, the combustion is known to be responsible for a broadband noise generation at low-frequency. The combustion noise can be put into two main mechanisms. The first one is the emission of sound pulses by the unsteady heat release of the combustion process and is call...

  5. Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Maja Bøg; Brix, Jacob; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2010-01-01

    temperature. The flue gas produced thus consists primarily of carbon dioxide and water. Much research on the different aspects of an oxy-fuel power plant has been performed during the last decade. Focus has mainly been on retrofits of existing pulverized-coal-fired power plant units. Green-field plants which......Oxy-fuel combustion is suggested as one of the possible, promising technologies for capturing CO2 from power plants. The concept of oxy-fuel combustion is removal of nitrogen from the oxidizer to carry out the combustion process in oxygen and, in most concepts, recycled flue gas to lower the flame...

  6. Bifurcation, pattern formation and chaos in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, A.; Matkowsky, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper problems in gaseous combustion and in gasless condensed phase combustion are studied both analytically and numerically. In gaseous combustion we consider the problem of a flame stabilized on a line source of fuel. The authors find both stationary and pulsating axisymmetric solutions as well as stationary and pulsating cellular solutions. The pulsating cellular solutions take the form of either traveling waves or standing waves. Transitions between these patterns occur as parameters related to the curvature of the flame front and the Lewis number are varied. In gasless condensed phase combustion both planar and nonplanar problems are studied. For planar condensed phase combustion we consider two models: accounts for melting and does not. Both models are shown to exhibit a transition from uniformly to pulsating propagating combustion when a parameter related to the activation energy is increased. Upon further increasing this parameter both models undergo a transition to chaos: by intermittency and by a period doubling sequence. In nonplanar condensed phase combustion the nonlinear development of a branch of standing wave solutions is studied and is shown to lead to relaxation oscillations and subsequently to a transition to quasi-periodicity

  7. Statistics-related and reliability-physics-related failure processes in electronics devices and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhir, E.

    2014-05-01

    The well known and widely used experimental reliability "passport" of a mass manufactured electronic or a photonic product — the bathtub curve — reflects the combined contribution of the statistics-related and reliability-physics (physics-of-failure)-related processes. When time progresses, the first process results in a decreasing failure rate, while the second process associated with the material aging and degradation leads to an increased failure rate. An attempt has been made in this analysis to assess the level of the reliability physics-related aging process from the available bathtub curve (diagram). It is assumed that the products of interest underwent the burn-in testing and therefore the obtained bathtub curve does not contain the infant mortality portion. It has been also assumed that the two random processes in question are statistically independent, and that the failure rate of the physical process can be obtained by deducting the theoretically assessed statistical failure rate from the bathtub curve ordinates. In the carried out numerical example, the Raleigh distribution for the statistical failure rate was used, for the sake of a relatively simple illustration. The developed methodology can be used in reliability physics evaluations, when there is a need to better understand the roles of the statistics-related and reliability-physics-related irreversible random processes in reliability evaluations. The future work should include investigations on how powerful and flexible methods and approaches of the statistical mechanics can be effectively employed, in addition to reliability physics techniques, to model the operational reliability of electronic and photonic products.

  8. Relative speed of processing determines color-word contingency learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrin, Noah D; MacLeod, Colin M

    2017-10-01

    In three experiments, we tested a relative-speed-of-processing account of color-word contingency learning, a phenomenon in which color identification responses to high-contingency stimuli (words that appear most often in particular colors) are faster than those to low-contingency stimuli. Experiment 1 showed equally large contingency-learning effects whether responding was to the colors or to the words, likely due to slow responding to both dimensions because of the unfamiliar mapping required by the key press responses. For Experiment 2, participants switched to vocal responding, in which reading words is considerably faster than naming colors, and we obtained a contingency-learning effect only for color naming, the slower dimension. In Experiment 3, previewing the color information resulted in a reduced contingency-learning effect for color naming, but it enhanced the contingency-learning effect for word reading. These results are all consistent with contingency learning influencing performance only when the nominally irrelevant feature is faster to process than the relevant feature, and therefore are entirely in accord with a relative-speed-of-processing explanation.

  9. Analysis of the Effect of Injection Pressure on Ignition Delay and Combustion Process of Biodiesel from Palm Oil, Algae and Waste Cooking Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irham Anas, Mohd; Khalid, Amir; Hakim Zulkifli, Fathul; Jaat, Norrizam; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Manshoor, Bukhari; Zaman, Izzuddin

    2017-10-01

    Biodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be manufactured from vegetable oils, animal fats, or recycled restaurant grease for use in diesel engines. The objective of this research is investigation the effects of the variant injection pressure on ignition delay and emission for different biodiesel using rapid compression machine. Rapid Compression Machine (RCM) is used to simulate a single compression stroke of an internal combustion engine as a real engine. Four types of biodiesel which are waste cooking oil, crude palm oil, algae and jatropha were tested at injection pressure of 80 MPa, 90 MPa and 130 MPa under constant ambient temperature at 950 K. Increased in injection pressure resulted shorter ignition delay proven by WCO5 which decreased from 1.3 ms at 80 MPa to 0.7 ms at 130 MPa. Meanwhile, emission for CO2 increased due to better fuel atomization for fuel-air mixture formation lead to completed combustion.

  10. Combustion/absorption process for the separation of {sup 14}C and {sup 3}H in radwastes released from nuclear power plants and their analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Young Gun, E-mail: ygko@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Chang-Jong; Cho, Young Hyun; Chung, Kun Ho; Kang, Mun Ja

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and THO were produced by the combustion of radwaste samples. • The radioactivity of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and THO absorbed sorbents were measured by LSC. • The CO{sub 2} absorption in the {sup 14}C sorbent was analyzed using by FT-IR and a rheometer. • The temperature and viscosity of the CO{sub 2} absorbed {sup 14}C sorbent was investigated. - Abstract: Radioactivities of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C in spent radioactive ion exchange resins and spent radioactive lubricant oils released from nuclear power plants, has been determined using a combustion and sorption method (combustion method). The liquid scintillation counting (LSC) spectra showed that the interference of other radionuclides has not significantly affected the determination of radioactivities of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C in the radwaste samples. The chemical structure of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, which originated from the combustion of radwastes, trapped {sup 14}C sorbent has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). FT-IR study showed interesting results that peaks for uncoupled CO{sub 2} and carbonic amide appeared at FT-IR spectra of CO{sub 2} high-absorbed {sup 14}C sorbents, while the peak for carbamate was only observed at the spectra of CO{sub 2} low-absorbed sorbents. During the CO{sub 2} sorption in {sup 14}C sorbent, temperature and viscosity of the sorbent increased owing to decrease of enthalpy and increase of apparent molecular weight of the sorbent caused by the bonding formation between sorbent molecules.

  11. Sludge combustion in fluidized bed reactors at laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirone, R.; Cammarota, A.

    2001-01-01

    The combustion of a dried sewage sludge in laboratory scale fluidized bed has been studied in Naples by the Istituto di ricerche sulla combustione (Irc) in the framework of a National project named Thermal Process with Energy Recovery to be used in laboratory and pre-pilot scale apparatus. The attention has been focused on emissions of unreacted carbon as elutriated fines, on the emissions of pollutant gases and on the assessment of the inventory of fly- and bottom ashes. The combustion behaviour of sewage sludge has been compared with those of a market available Tyre Derived Fuel (TDF) and a biomass from Mediterranean area (Robinia Pseudoacacia) and with that of a South African bituminous coal. Stationary combustion tests were carried out at 850 0 C by feeding particles in the size range 0-1 mm into a bed of silica sand without any sorbent addition. The fluidized bed combustor has been operated, at a superficial gas velocity of 0.4 m/s and different excesses of air ranging between 14 and 98%. Relatively high combustion efficiency, larger than 98.9% has been obtained in experiments carried out with sewage sludge and excess of air larger than 20%. These values, are comparable with those obtained in previously experimental activity carried out under similar operative conditions with a South Africa Bituminous coal (97-98%). It is larger than those obtained by using a Tyre Derived Fuel (89-90%) and the Robinia Pseudoacacia Biomass (93-93%). The relative importance of carbon fines elutriation, CO emissions and volatile bypassing the bed in determining the loss of combustion efficiency has been evaluated for the different fuels tested [it

  12. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  13. Strobes: An Oscillatory Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; van Lingen, J.N.J.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  14. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers

  15. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-06-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers.

  16. Combustion/absorption process for the separation of14C and3H in radwastes released from nuclear power plants and their analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Young Gun; Kim, Chang-Jong; Cho, Young Hyun; Chung, Kun Ho; Kang, Mun Ja

    2017-06-05

    Radioactivities of 3 H and 14 C in spent radioactive ion exchange resins and spent radioactive lubricant oils released from nuclear power plants, has been determined using a combustion and sorption method (combustion method). The liquid scintillation counting (LSC) spectra showed that the interference of other radionuclides has not significantly affected the determination of radioactivities of 3 H and 14 C in the radwaste samples. The chemical structure of 14 CO 2 , which originated from the combustion of radwastes, trapped 14 C sorbent has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). FT-IR study showed interesting results that peaks for uncoupled CO 2 and carbonic amide appeared at FT-IR spectra of CO 2 high-absorbed 14 C sorbents, while the peak for carbamate was only observed at the spectra of CO 2 low-absorbed sorbents. During the CO 2 sorption in 14 C sorbent, temperature and viscosity of the sorbent increased owing to decrease of enthalpy and increase of apparent molecular weight of the sorbent caused by the bonding formation between sorbent molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Combustive management of oil spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Extensive experiments with in situ incineration were performed on a desert site at the University of Arizona with very striking results. The largest incinerator, 6 feet in diameter with a 30 foot chimney, developed combustion temperatures of 3000, F, and attendant soot production approximately 1000 times less than that produced by conventional in situ burning. This soot production, in fact, is approximately 30 times less than current allowable EPA standards for incinerators and internal combustion engines. Furthermore, as a consequence of the high temperature combustion, the bum rate was established at a very high 3400 gallons per hour for this particular 6 foot diameter structure. The rudimentary design studies we have carried out relative to a seagoing 8 foot diameter incinerator have predicted that a continuous burn rate of 7000 gallons per hour is realistic. This structure was taken as a basis for operational design because it is compatible with C130 flyability, and will be inexpensive enough ($120,000 per copy) to be stored at those seaside depots throughout the US coast line in which the requisite ancillary equipments (booms, service tugs, etc.) are already deployed. The LOX experiments verified our expectations with respect to combustion of debris and various highly weathered or emulsified oils. We have concluded, however, that the use of liquid oxygen in actual beach clean up is not promising because the very high temperatures associated with this combustion are almost certain to produce environmentally deleterious effects on the beach surface and its immediately sublying structures. However, the use of liquid oxygen augmentation for shore based and flyable incinerators may still play an important role in handing the problem of accumulated debris

  18. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    .... The PDF approach to turbulent combustion has the advantages of fully representing the turbulent fluctuations of species and temperature, and of allowing realistic combustion chemistry to be implemented...

  19. Environmental optimisation of waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Robert [AaF Energikonsult, Stockholm (Sweden); Berge, Niclas; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    The regulations concerning waste combustion evolve through R and D and a strive to get better and common regulations for the European countries. This study discusses if these rules of today concerning oxygen concentration, minimum temperature and residence time in the furnace and the use of stand-by burners are needed, are possible to monitor, are the optimum from an environmental point of view or could be improved. No evidence from well controlled laboratory experiments validate that 850 deg C in 6 % oxygen content in general is the best lower limit. A lower excess air level increase the temperature, which has a significant effect on the destruction of hydrocarbons, favourably increases the residence time, increases the thermal efficiency and the efficiency of the precipitators. Low oxygen content is also necessary to achieve low NO{sub x}-emissions. The conclusion is that the demands on the accuracy of the measurement devices and methods are too high, if they are to be used inside the furnace to control the combustion process. The big problem is however to find representative locations to measure temperature, oxygen content and residence time in the furnace. Another major problem is that the monitoring of the operation conditions today do not secure a good combustion. It can lead to a false security. The reason is that it is very hard to find boilers without stratifications. These stratifications (stream lines) has each a different history of residence time, mixing time, oxygen and combustible gas levels and temperature, when they reach the convection area. The combustion result is the sum of all these different histories. The hydrocarbons emission is in general not produced at a steady level. Small clouds of unburnt hydrocarbons travels along the stream lines showing up as peaks on a THC measurement device. High amplitude peaks has a tendency to contain higher ratio of heavy hydrocarbons than lower peaks. The good correlation between some easily detected

  20. Immunological processes related to cognitive impairment in MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, T

    2016-09-01

    In this review, the immune-to-brain communication pathways are briefly summarized, with emphasis on the impact of immune cells and their mediators on learning, memory and other cognitive domains. Further, the acute response of the central nervous system to peripherally generated inflammatory stimuli - termed as sickness behaviour - is described, and the central role of microglia in this immune-to-brain crosstalk in physiological and pathological conditions is highlighted. Finally, the role and consequences of immunological processes related to cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis are discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.