WorldWideScience

Sample records for combustible cartridge case

  1. Combustible Cartridge Cases: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    and presents new models of combustible cartridge case burning . Following a summary of experimental data, it concludes with proposals for further...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED SAR NSN 7540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev 2-89) Precribed by ANSI Std Z39-19 IWFENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK...7 3.3 In-Depth Burning Model ........................................ 7 3.3.1 M odel A ................................................ 9 3.3.2

  2. Magazine Influence on Cartridge Case Ejection Patterns with Glock Pistols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhoff, Wim; Alberink, Ivo; Mattijssen, Erwin J A T

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the cartridge case ejection patterns of six different Glock model pistols (one specimen per model) were compared under three conditions: firing with a loaded magazine, an empty magazine, and without magazine. The distances, covered by the ejected cartridge cases given these three conditions, were compared for each of the six models. A significant difference was found between the groups of data for each of the tested specimens. This indicates that it is important that, to reconstruct a shooting scene incident based on the ejection patterns of a pistol, test shots are fired with the same pistol type and under the correct magazine condition. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. Investigation of effective forensic cleaning methods for bullet and cartridge case samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuherk, Cassie Marie

    Bullet and cartridge case evidence may potentially link weapons and crimes through the comparison of toolmark patterns. This analysis relies on the clarity of the toolmarks and the ability of the examiner to identify patterns on the evidence. These patterns may be distorted by debris such as soil, blood, cyanoacrylate, and construction materials. Despite the potential importance of bullet and cartridge case evidence, few investigations of proper cleaning methods have been conducted. The present study was designed to examine the effects of various cleaning solutions and application methods on copper and brass bullets and cartridge cases. Additionally, this research investigated the efficacy of these cleaning protocols on the common evidence contaminants blood and cyanoacrylate. No cleaning method was found to be universally effective on both contaminant types and nondestructive to the metal surface. Ultrasonication was the most efficient application method employed when used in conjunction with an appropriate cleaning solution. Acetone proved to be safe and successful at removing heavy cyanoacrylate deposits from brass cartridge cases without damaging the metal. Although sulfuric acid removed most of the cyanoacrylate from the brass cartridge case, ultrasonication of the fumed cartridge cases in sulfuric acid caused the nickel-plated primer caps to turn black. Additionally, etching occurred when sulfuric acid was allowed to dry on the cartridge case surface. Citric acid, salt-flour-vinegar paste, TergazymeRTM, and water did not effectively remove the cyanoacrylate from the cartridge cases, but the solutions were safe to use on the brass and sometimes resulted in a shinier surface. Regardless of the cleaning method employed, the bloodstained bullets retained most or all of the underlying brown tarnish. Ultrasonication with sulfuric acid was successful at removing some blood-initiated tarnishing; however, the removal of residues was not complete, making it difficult

  4. 25MM Plastic Telescoped Cartridge Case Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Mat’ I____ Projectile: 0wq. No. 30033;7,Rev, A, Platic "Band, 3000 Grain. Primer: Type .SmL. , Lot No.,, , Ne. . Flash Tubet.l3TSpe 1ell Project l...8217 _ ’_"__ Projectile: Dwg. No. 300347, Ray. A, Platic Biand, 3000 Graln. Primer: Type P-SIT.ML , Lot No. . No, Flash Tube:c<# 7’Tr-pecla1, Projectile Rot ntlo...Case: N ,o Rev. ___, Mati:.l, ILt Dwg. No,._____ Rev. M Nt l______Projectile: Dwg, No. 300347, ev • A, Platic ’ t -and, 3000 Grain, Primers Type , Lot

  5. Motion-Based pH Sensing Based on the Cartridge-Case-like Micromotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yajun; Ge, Ya; Liu, Limei; Zhang, Lina; Liu, Mei; Sun, Yunyu; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Bin

    2016-02-17

    In this paper, we report a novel cartridge-case-like micromotor. The micromotor, which is fabricated by the template synthesis method, consists of a gelatin shell with platinum nanoparticles decorating its inner surface. Intriguingly, the resulting cartridge-case-like structure exhibits a pH-dependent "open and close" feature, which originates from the pH responsiveness of the gelatin material. On the basis of the catalytic activity of the platinum nanoparticle inside the gelatin shell, the resulting cartridge-case-like structure is capable of moving autonomously in the aqueous solution containing the hydrogen peroxide fuel. More interestingly, we find out that the micromotor can be utilized as a motion-based pH sensor over the whole pH range. The moving velocity of the micromotor increases monotonically with the increase of pH of the analyte solution. Three different factors are considered to be responsible for the proportional relation between the motion speed and pH of the analyte solution: the peroxidase-like and oxidase-like catalytic behavior of the platinum nanoparticle at low and high pH, the volumetric decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide under the basic condition and the pH-dependent catalytic activity of the platinum nanoparticle caused by the swelling/deswelling behavior of the gelatin material. The current work highlights the impact of the material properties on the motion behavior of a micromotor, thus paving the way toward its application in the motion-based sensing field.

  6. A Modified Electrostatic Adsorption Apparatus for Latent Fingerprint Development on Unfired Cartridge Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyang; Zhang, Ziyuan; Zheng, Xiaochun; Bond, John W

    2017-05-01

    Visualization of latent fingerprints on metallic surfaces by the method of applying electrostatic charging and adsorption is considered as a promising chemical-free method, which has the merit of nondestruction, and is considered to be effective for some difficult situations such as aged fingerprint deposits or those exposed to environmental extremes. In fact, a portable electrostatic generator can be easily accessible in a local forensic technology laboratory, which is already widely used in the visualization of footwear impressions. In this study, a modified version of this electrostatic apparatus is proposed for latent fingerprint development and has shown great potential in visualizing fingerprints on metallic surfaces such as cartridge cases. Results indicate that this experimental arrangement can successfully develop aged latent fingerprints on metal surfaces, and we demonstrate its effectiveness compared with existing conventional fingerprint recovery methods. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Identifying persistent and characteristic features in firearm tool marks on cartridge cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Daniel; Soons, Johannes; Thompson, Robert; Song, John

    2017-12-01

    Recent concerns about subjectivity in forensic firearm identification have motivated the development of algorithms to compare firearm tool marks that are imparted on ammunition and to generate quantitative measures of similarity. In this paper, we describe an algorithm that identifies impressed tool marks on a cartridge case that are both consistent between firings and contribute strongly to a surface similarity metric. The result is a representation of the tool mark topography that emphasizes both significant and persistent features across firings. This characteristic surface map is useful for understanding the variability and persistence of the tool marks created by a firearm and can provide improved discrimination between the comparison scores of samples fired from the same firearm and the scores of samples fired from different firearms. The algorithm also provides a convenient method for visualizing areas of similarity that may be useful in providing quantitative support for visual comparisons by trained examiners.

  8. Determining the effect of cartridge case coatings on GSR using post-fire priming cup residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Molly; Fookes, Barry; Bridge, Candice M

    2017-07-01

    Ammunition is typically composed of a lead-based priming mixture which contributes to the characteristics most commonly used for the identification of gunshot residue (GSR). Due to the health risks often associated with lead, the use of lead-free primers in ammunitions is becoming more popular. Thus, the presence of GSR is becoming more difficult to discern based on the traditional means, i.e. the presence of lead (Pb), barium (Ba), and antimony (Sb). While research has been conducted on the differences between lead-based and lead-free muzzle discharge residue, few have researched other components of ammunition which may lead to other means of characterizing GSR. This research, therefore, covers that gap by focusing on the priming cup present in ammunition and the residue which may originate from it, that can contribute to muzzle discharge residue. In this study, a lead-based and a lead-free ammunition from four different manufacturers were chosen. The cartridges were fired using a Glock 17, 9mm Parabellum, collected post-fire, and subsequently de-primed resulting in the removal of the anvil. The GSR present on the anvils and cups was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX). The data was then processed using unit vector analysis for normalization and analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). This data was then used to determine the components of the cartridge case which contribute to GSR and develop a method of characterization between lead-free and lead-based ammunition. Such a method will improve the detection of GSR by strengthening the criteria of identification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A patterned abrasion caused by the impact of a cartridge case may simulate an atypical muzzle imprint mark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lena; Nadjem, Hadi; Glardon, Matthieu; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Pollak, Stefan; Große Perdekamp, Markus; Pircher, Rebecca

    2016-05-01

    In contact shots, the muzzle imprint is an informative finding associated with the entrance wound. It typically mirrors the constructional components being in line with the muzzle or just behind. Under special conditions, other patterned skin marks located near a gunshot entrance wound may give the impression to be part of the muzzle imprint. A potential mechanism causing a patterned pressure abrasion in close proximity to the bullet entrance site is demonstrated on the basis of a suicidal shot to the temple. The skin lesion in question appeared as a ring-shaped excoriation with a diameter corresponding to that of the cartridge case. Two hypotheses concerning the causative mechanism were investigated by test shots: - After being ejected, the cartridge case ricocheted inside a confined space (car cabin in the particular case) and secondarily hit the skin near the gunshot entrance wound. - The ejection of the cartridge case failed so that the case became stuck in the ejection port and its mouth contacted the skin when the body collapsed after being hit.

  10. Influence Factors Regarding the Effectiveness of Automated Ballistic Comparison on 0.38 Special Caliber Bullets and Cartridge Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Lehi Sudy; Vieira Muterlle, Palloma

    2018-03-01

    Factors influencing effectiveness of automated comparisons, test-fired bullets, and cartridge cases from 0.38 Special revolvers were logged into the Evofinder ® Ballistic ID System. Tests were performed as follows: First test correlated test-fires of the same type, second test compared different types of ammunition components, third test replicated the second test in a larger database, and fourth test replicated the third test with students having no previous firearm identification experience. System effectiveness with projectiles in the first test was 0.89. With cartridge cases, effectiveness was 0.79 with combined results, but analysis of separate results by breech face and firing pin revealed low effectiveness by breech face (0.40). In the second, third, and fourth tests, effectiveness with projectiles were 0.61, 0.51, and 0.44. In addition, these tests had effectiveness with cartridge cases equivalent to 0.55, 0.43, and 0.44. Results are useful to establish routine protocols, system improvements, or comparative assessment of other electronic systems. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Determining Service Life of Respirator Cartridges Using a Simple and Practical Method: Case Study in a Car Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M Rashidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: For ensuring about proper performance of air-purifying respirators in providing protection against workplace contaminants, it is necessary to change the respirator cartridges before the end of their service life. The aim of this study was determination of service life of organic vapor cartridges using a simple and practical method in a spray painting booth of a car manufacturing industry.   Methods: NIOSH MultiVapor software was used for estimating service life of respirator cartridges based on workplace conditions and cartridge specifications. Efficiency of determined service life was investigated using an apparatus for field testing of cartridges in the workplace.   Results: The results showed that existing schedule for changing the respirator cartridges is not effective and no longer provide adequate protection for sprayers against organic contaminants while working in a painting booth. It is necessary to change the cartridges before their estimated service life (every 4 hours.   Conclusion: NIOSH MultiVapor has acceptable efficiency for determining respirator cartridges service life and could be used as a simple and practical method in the workplace. Moreover, Service life estimated by this software was confirmed by cartridge field test apparatus.

  12. A comparison of surface topography characterization technologies for use in comparing spent bullet and cartridge case signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batishko, C.R.; Hickman, B.J.; Cuta, F.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the US Department of Energy to provide technical assistance to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in evaluating and ranking technologies potentially useful in high-speed comparison of unique spent bullet and cartridge case surface signatures. Information sources included vendor input, current relevant literature, vendor phone contacts, other FBI resources, relevant PNL reports, and personal contact with numerous PNL technical staff. A comprehensive list of technologies was reduced to a list of 38 by grouping very similar methodologies, and further reduced to a short list of six by applying a set of five minimum functional requirements. A total of 14 primary criteria, many having secondary criteria, were subsequently used to evaluate each technology. The ranked short list results are reported and supported in this document, and their scores normalized to a hypothetical ideal system are as follows: (1) confocal microscopy 82.13; (2) laser dynamic focusing 72.04; (3)moire interferometry V70.94; (4)fringe field capacitance;(5)laser triangulation 66.18; (6)structured/sectioned light 65.55. Information available within the time/budget constraints which was used for the evaluation and ranking was not sufficiently detailed to evaluate specific implementations of the technologies. Each of the technologies in the short list was judged potentially capable of meeting the minimum requirements. Clever, novel engineering solutions resulting in a more cost-effective system, or a closer fit to the ``ideal system,`` could result in a reordering of the short list when actual technical proposals are evaluated. Therefore, it is recommended that a Request for Proposal not be limited to only the highest ranked technology, but include all six technologies in the short list.

  13. A comparison of surface topography characterization technologies for use in comparing spent bullet and cartridge case signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batishko, C.R.; Hickman, B.J.; Cuta, F.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the US Department of Energy to provide technical assistance to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in evaluating and ranking technologies potentially useful in high-speed comparison of unique spent bullet and cartridge case surface signatures. Information sources included vendor input, current relevant literature, vendor phone contacts, other FBI resources, relevant PNL reports, and personal contact with numerous PNL technical staff. A comprehensive list of technologies was reduced to a list of 38 by grouping very similar methodologies, and further reduced to a short list of six by applying a set of five minimum functional requirements. A total of 14 primary criteria, many having secondary criteria, were subsequently used to evaluate each technology. The ranked short list results are reported and supported in this document, and their scores normalized to a hypothetical ideal system are as follows: (1) confocal microscopy 82.13; (2) laser dynamic focusing 72.04; (3)moire interferometry V70.94; (4)fringe field capacitance;(5)laser triangulation 66.18; (6)structured/sectioned light 65.55. Information available within the time/budget constraints which was used for the evaluation and ranking was not sufficiently detailed to evaluate specific implementations of the technologies. Each of the technologies in the short list was judged potentially capable of meeting the minimum requirements. Clever, novel engineering solutions resulting in a more cost-effective system, or a closer fit to the ideal system,'' could result in a reordering of the short list when actual technical proposals are evaluated. Therefore, it is recommended that a Request for Proposal not be limited to only the highest ranked technology, but include all six technologies in the short list.

  14. IBM 3480 tape cartridge

    CERN Multimedia

    1984-01-01

    The 3480 tape format is a magnetic tape data storage format developed by IBM. The cartridge contains a single reel. IBM’s 3480 cartridge tape system sought to replace the traditional reels of magnetic tape in the computer center. Because of their speed, reliability, durability and low media cost, these tapes and tape drives are still in high demand. A hallmark of the genre is transferability. Tapes recorded with one tape drive are generally readable on another drive, even if the tape drives were built by different manufacturers.

  15. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  16. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    2008-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, a topic generally taught at the upper undergraduate and graduate level in most mechanical engineering programs, and many chemical engineering programs, is the study of rapid energy and mass transfer usually through the common physical phenomena of flame oxidation. It covers the physics and chemistry of this process and the engineering applications-from the generation of power such as the internal combustion automobile engine to the gas turbine engine. Renewed concerns about energy efficiency and fuel costs, along with continued concerns over toxic and particulate emissions have kept the interest in this vital area of engineering high and brought about new developments in both fundamental knowledge of flame and combustion physics as well as new technologies for flame and fuel control. *New chapter on new combustion concepts and technologies, including discussion on nanotechnology as related to combustion, as well as microgravity combustion, microcombustion, and catalytic combustion-all ...

  17. Penetrating chest trauma caused by a blank cartridge actuated rubber ball projectile: case presentation and ballistic investigation of an uncommon weapon type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthias; Peters, Dieter; Klemm, Wolfram; Grossjohann, Rico; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Bockholdt, Britta; Seifert, Julia

    2017-09-01

    Recently, an increasing number of an uncommon weapon type based on a caliber 6-mm Flobert blank cartridge actuated revolver which discharges 10-mm-diameter rubber ball projectiles has been confiscated by police authorities following criminal offenses. A recent trauma case presenting with a penetrating chest injury occasioned an investigation into the basic ballistic parameters of this type of weapon. Kinetic energy E of the test projectiles was calculated between 5.8 and 12.5 J. Energy density ED of the test projectiles was close to or higher than the threshold energy density of human skin. It can be concluded that penetrating skin injuries due to free-flying rubber ball projectiles discharged at close range cannot be ruled out. However, in case of a contact shot, the main injury potential of this weapon type must be attributed to the high energy density of the muzzle gas jet which may, similar to well-known gas or alarm weapons, cause life-threatening or even lethal injuries.

  18. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1997-01-01

    This Third Edition of Glassman's classic text clearly defines the role of chemistry, physics, and fluid mechanics as applied to the complex topic of combustion. Glassman's insightful introductory text emphasizes underlying physical and chemical principles, and encompasses engine technology, fire safety, materials synthesis, detonation phenomena, hydrocarbon fuel oxidation mechanisms, and environmental considerations. Combustion has been rewritten to integrate the text, figures, and appendixes, detailing available combustion codes, making it not only an excellent introductory text but also an important reference source for professionals in the field. Key Features * Explains complex combustion phenomena with physical insight rather than extensive mathematics * Clarifies postulates in the text using extensive computational results in figures * Lists modern combustion programs indicating usage and availability * Relates combustion concepts to practical applications.

  19. The Indicating FTA Elute Cartridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bie, Roosmarie P.; Schmeink, Channa E.; Bakkers, Judith M.J.E.; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Quint, Wim G.V.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Bekkers, Ruud L.M.; Melchers, Willem J.G.

    2011-01-01

    The clinically validated high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) and GP5+/6+-PCR assays were analyzed on an Indicating FTA Elute cartridge (FTA cartridge). The FTA cartridge is a solid dry carrier that allows safe transport of cervical samples. FTA cartridge samples were compared with liquid-based samples for hrHPV and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) detection. One cervical sample was collected in a liquid-based medium, and one was applied to the FTA cartridge. DNA was eluted directly from the FTA cartridge by a simple elution step. HC2 and GP5+/6+-PCR assays were performed on both the liquid-based and the FTA-eluted DNA of 88 women. Overall agreement between FTA and liquid-based samples for the presence of hrHPV was 90.9% with GP5+/6+-PCR and 77.3% with HC2. The sensitivity for high-grade CIN of hrHPV testing on the FTA cartridges was 84.6% with GP5+/6+-PCR and only 53.8% with HC2. By comparison, these sensitivities on liquid-based samples were 92.3% and 100% for GP5+/6+-PCR and HC2, respectively. Therefore, the FTA cartridge shows reasonably good overall agreement for hrHPV detection with liquid-based media when using GP5+/6+-PCR but not HC2 testing. Even with GP5+/6+-PCR, the FTA cartridge is not yet capable of detecting all high-grade CIN lesions. PMID:21704269

  20. Thermal analysis with expendable cartridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susaki, K.; Landgraf, F.J.G.

    1981-01-01

    The pratical method of thermal analysis with expendable cartridge and some aspects of its use are presented. The results of the method applied to the system Nb-Mn are presented together with data from microprobe. (Author) [pt

  1. The Imation 9840 Tape Cartridge

    CERN Multimedia

    It’s a 20 GB uncompressed center-load cartridge used in StorageTek T9840 tape drives. The tape is a Metal Particle (MP) tape suitable for use on all Oracle/Sun/StorageTek 9840 A, B, C and D drives. The 9840 tape has an archival life of 15-30 years.

  2. Quick-change filter cartridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Ortiz, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    A quick-change filter cartridge. In sampling systems for measurement of airborne materials, a filter element is introduced into the sampled airstream such that the aerosol constituents are removed and deposited on the filter. Fragile sampling media often require support in order to prevent rupture during sampling, and careful mounting and sealing to prevent misalignment, tearing, or creasing which would allow the sampled air to bypass the filter. Additionally, handling of filter elements may introduce cross-contamination or exposure of operators to toxic materials. Moreover, it is desirable to enable the preloading of filter media into quick-change cartridges in clean laboratory environments, thereby simplifying and expediting the filter-changing process in the field. The quick-change filter cartridge of the present invention permits the application of a variety of filter media in many types of instruments and may also be used in automated systems. The cartridge includes a base through which a vacuum can be applied to draw air through the filter medium which is located on a porous filter support and held there by means of a cap which forms an airtight seal with the base. The base is also adapted for receiving absorbing media so that both particulates and gas-phase samples may be trapped for investigation, the latter downstream of the aerosol filter.

  3. StorageTek T10000 Data Cartridge

    CERN Multimedia

    This data cartridge works on several StorageTek systems. The goal is to provide cartridge compatibility across several system. It has been designed for space saving and ultra-high capacity tape. It permit to fulfill high-volume backup, archiving, and disaster recovery.

  4. Burns resulting from spontaneous combustion of electronic cigarettes: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Sheckter, Clifford; Chattopadhyay, Arhana; Paro, John; Karanas, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) sales have grown rapidly in recent years, coinciding with a public perception that they are a safer alternative to traditional cigarettes. However, there have been numerous media reports of fires associated with e-cigarette spontaneous combustion. Case Presentation Three severe burns caused by spontaneous combustion of e-cigarettes within a 6-month period were treated at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center Burn Unit. Patients sustained partial a...

  5. Technology Solutions Case Study: Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Brand, D. Cautley, D. Bohac, P. Francisco, L. Shen, and S. Gloss

    2015-12-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives.

  6. [Poisoning by exhaust gas of the imperfect combustion of natural gas: 22 cases study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li-Min; Zhao, Hai; Zhang, Ming-Chang; He, Meng

    2014-10-01

    To analyze the case characteristics of poisoning by exhaust gas of the imperfect combustion of natural gas and provide references for forensic identification and prevention of such accidents. Twenty-two cases of poisoning by exhaust gas of the imperfect combustion of natural gas in Minhang District during 2004 to 2013 were collected. Some aspects such as general conditions of deaths, incidence time, weather, field investigation, and autopsy were retrospectively analyzed. In the 22 cases, there were 15 males and 16 females. The age range was between 2 and 82 years old. The major occurring time was in January or February (8 cases in each) and the cases almost occurred in small area room (21 cases). There was wide crack next to the exhaust port when the gas water heater was been used in all cases. There are more prone to occurrence of exhaust gas poisoning of imperfect combustion of natural gas in small area room with a ventilation window near the exhaust port of gas water heated. It shows that the scene of combustion exhaust gas poisoning should be more concerned in the cold season.

  7. The dynamic interaction between combustible renewables and waste consumption and international tourism: the case of Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Jebli, Mehdi; Ben Youssef, Slim; Apergis, Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    This paper employs the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds methodological approach to investigate the relationship between economic growth, combustible renewables and waste consumption, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, and international tourism for the case of Tunisia spanning the period 1990-2010. The results from the Fisher statistic of both the Wald test and the Johansen test confirm the presence of a long-run relationship among the variables under investigation. The stability of estimated parameters has been tested, while Granger causality tests recommend a short-run unidirectional causality running from economic growth and combustible renewables and waste consumption to CO2 emissions, a bidirectional causality between economic growth and combustible renewables and waste consumption and unidirectional causality running from economic growth and combustible renewables and waste consumption to international tourism. In the long-run, the error correction terms confirm the presence of bidirectional causality relationships between economic growth, CO2 emissions, combustible renewables and waste consumption, and international tourism. Our long-run estimates show that combustible renewables and waste consumption increases international tourism, and both renewables and waste consumption and international tourism increase CO2 emissions and output. We recommend that (i) Tunisia should use more combustible renewables and waste energy as this eliminates wastes from touristic zones and increases the number of tourist arrivals, leading to economic growth, and (ii) a fraction of this economic growth generated by the increase in combustible renewables and waste consumption should be invested in clean renewable energy production (i.e., solar, wind, geothermal) and energy efficiency projects.

  8. StorageTek T10000 Tape Cartridge

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Oracle StorageTek T10000T2 cartridge has total capacity of 5 TB. It is actually manufactured by Fuji Film, uses Barium Ferrite (BaFe) particles technology data store, but is also equipped with RFID chip. There is over 1 km of tape inside of the cartridge with 3584 data tracks and it supports over 25000 load/unload cycles. The archival life is estimated to be around 30 years and uncorrected bit error rate is 10-19. CERN however usually migrates data to newer technologies roughly every 5 years in order to keep the footprint under control.

  9. The reactor Phenix - cartridge rupture detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graftieaux, J.

    1967-01-01

    This report defines the role of cartridge rupture detection in the reactor Phenix. It gives the possible methods, their probable performances, their advantages and disadvantages. The final form of the installation will be determined mainly by the degree of safety required, by the technical possibilities of the reactor design and by the operational flexibility wanted. (author) [fr

  10. CONSTRUCTION AND OPTIMISATION OF A CARTRIDGE FILTER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    1Department of Chemistry, Egerton University, P.O. Box 356, Njoro, Kenya .... the resident time in the filter, thus there is not enough time for F- to interact with the ... associated with creation of too much backpressure in the cartridge as well as ...

  11. The dynamic interaction between combustible renewables and waste consumption and international tourism: The case of Tunisia

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Jebli, Mehdi; Ben Youssef, Slim; Apergis, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    This paper employs the Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) bounds methodological approach to investigate the relationship between economic growth, combustible renewables and waste consumption, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and international tourism for the case of Tunisia spanning the period 1990-2010. The results from the Fisher statistic of both the Wald-test and the Johansen test confirm the presence of a long-run relationship among the variables under investigation. The stability of es...

  12. Indústria de cartucho de toner sob a ótica da remanufatura: estudo de caso de um processo de melhoria Remanufacturing of toner cartridge: a case study of a improvement process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cícero Ferreira Fernandes Costa Filho

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta um estudo de caso de um processo de melhoria aplicado a uma indústria de remanufatura de cartuchos de toner. Inicialmente, é feita uma abordagem do processo de remanufatura procurando salientar as principais características que o diferenciam de um processo de manufatura convencional e a importância do mesmo diante das preocupações ambientais atuais. Através de três indicadores de desempenho propostos no trabalho fez-se um diagnóstico do processo de remanufatura quanto ao aproveitamento de peças recolhidas do campo, atendimento de pedidos dos clientes e quantidade de defeitos. No diagnóstico inicial realizado, os valores obtidos para esses critérios situaram-se abaixo das metas estabelecidas na empresa. Através da metodologia PDCA, identificaram-se oportunidades de melhorias em pontos críticos do processo de fabricação. A implantação dessas melhorias resultou em ganhos nos indicadores de desempenho da ordem de 12%. Algumas ferramentas clássicas foram utilizadas para auxiliar na implementação da metodologia PDCA destacando-se brainstorming, diagrama de Ishikawa e Controle Estatístico de Processo.This paper presents an improvement process applied in one remanufacturing toner cartridge industry. It, initially, presents a mapping of the stages of this process by attempting to highlight the main characteristics, which distinguish it from a conventional manufacturing process and emphasizes its importance as an of eco-efficient process aiming at achieving sustainable development. Through three performance indicators proposed by the work, a diagnosis of the existing process was carried out as to the reuse of parts gasthered in the field, fulfilment of customers'orders and quantity of production faults. At the initial diagnosis carried out, the values obtained for theses criteria were located below the established targets proposed by the company. Through the PDCA tool, improvement opportunities in critical

  13. Criticality safety evaluation report for K Basin filter cartridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.

    1995-01-01

    A criticality safety evaluation of the K Basin filter cartridge assemblies has been completed to support operations without a criticality alarm system. The results show that for normal operation, the filter cartridge assembly is far below the safety limit of k eff = 0.95, which is applied to plutonium systems at the Hanford Site. During normal operating conditions, uranium, plutonium, and fission and corrosion products in solution are continually accumulating in the available void spaces inside the filter cartridge medium. Currently, filter cartridge assemblies are scheduled to be replaced at six month intervals in KE Basin, and at one year intervals in KW Basin. According to available plutonium concentration data for KE Basin and data for the U/Pu ratio, it will take many times the six-month replacement time for sufficient fissionable material accumulation to take place to exceed the safety limit of k eff = 0.95, especially given the conservative assumption that the presence of fission and corrosion products is ignored. Accumulation of sludge with a composition typical of that measured in the sand filter backwash pit will not lead to a k eff = 0.95 value. For off-normal scenarios, it would require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent events to take place before the k eff = 0.95 limit was exceeded. Contingencies considered include failure to replace the filter cartridge assemblies at the scheduled time resulting in additional buildup of fissionable material, the loss of geometry control from the filter cartridge assembly breaking apart and releasing the individual filter cartridges into an optimal configuration, and concentrations of plutonium at U/Pu ratios less than measured data for KE Basin, typically close to 400 according to extensive measurements in the sand filter backwash pit and plutonium production information

  14. Adsorbent cartridge for the exhaust of diazo process machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michlin, N.; Thies, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    A disposable cartridge filled with a chemical composition that acts as an adsorbent for ammonia vapor is adapted to be used in connection with a diazo process printing machine having a vacuum exhausted chamber. Exhaust from the chamber is passed through the cartridge to remove the noxious ammonia vapors and then is vented into the atmosphere. The cartridge is housed in an elongated rectangular cardboard box having three end flaps formed at each of its opposed open ends. Two opposed flaps of each set are formed with central holes and a plastic screen section adhered between these flaps to retain and allow access to the center section of the box which contains the adsorbent chemical. The center end flaps have knock-outs or tear strips that allow holes to be formed in their centers. These center end flaps cover the screens during shipment and when the cartridge is ready for use the center sections of these end flaps are knocked-out to allow the machine exhaust to be vented into and out of the cartridge

  15. Building America Case Study: Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol, Chicago Illinois, and Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-12-01

    "9Combustion safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  16. Burns resulting from spontaneous combustion of electronic cigarettes: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheckter, Clifford; Chattopadhyay, Arhana; Paro, John; Karanas, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) sales have grown rapidly in recent years, coinciding with a public perception that they are a safer alternative to traditional cigarettes. However, there have been numerous media reports of fires associated with e-cigarette spontaneous combustion. Three severe burns caused by spontaneous combustion of e-cigarettes within a 6-month period were treated at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center Burn Unit. Patients sustained partial and full-thickness burns. Two required hospitalization and surgical treatment. E-cigarettes are dangerous devices and have the potential to cause significant burns. Consumers and the general public should be made aware of these life-threatening devices.

  17. 42 CFR 84.194 - Filters used with chemical cartridges; location; replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; replacement. 84.194 Section 84.194 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...; replacement. (a) Particulate matter filters used in conjunction with a chemical cartridge shall be located on... replacement on the cartridge. ...

  18. LES of explosions in venting chamber: A test case for premixed turbulent combustion models

    OpenAIRE

    Vermorel , Olivier; Quillatre , Pierre; Poinsot , Thierry

    2017-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a new experimental and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) database to study upscaling effects in vented gas explosions. The propagation of premixed flames in three setups of increasing size is investigated experimentally and numerically. The baseline model is the well-known laboratory-scale combustion chamber from Sydney (Kent et al., 2005; Masri et al., 2012); two exact replicas at scales 6 and 24.4 were set up by GexCon (Bergen, Norway). The volume ratio...

  19. LCA of domestic and centralized biomass combustion: The case of Lombardy (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caserini, S.; Livio, S.; Giugliano, M.; Grosso, M.; Rigamonti, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes and compares the environmental impacts of biomass combustion in small appliances such as domestic open fireplaces and stoves, and in two types of centralized combined heat and power plants, feeding district heating networks. The analysis is carried out following a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach. The expected savings of GHG (greenhouse gases) emissions due to the substitution of fossil fuels with biomass are quantified, as well as emissions of toxic pollutants and substances responsible for acidification and ozone formation. The LCA results show net savings of GHG emissions when using biomass instead of conventional fuels, varying from 0.08 to 1.08 t of CO 2 eq. per t of dry biomass in the different scenarios. Avoided GHG emissions thanks to biomass combustion in Lombardy are 1.32 Mt year -1 (1.5% of total regional GHG emissions). For the other impact categories, the use of biomass in district heating systems can again cause a consistent reduction of impacts, whereas biomass combustion in residential devices shows higher impacts than fossil fuels with a particular concern for PAH, VOC and particulate matter emissions. For example, in Lombardy, PM10 emissions from domestic devices are about 8100 t year -1 , corresponding to almost one third of the total particulate emissions in 2005. (author)

  20. Two-gun suicide by simultaneous shots to the head: interdisciplinary reconstruction on the basis of scene investigation, autopsy findings, GSR analysis and examination of firearms, bullets and cartridge cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse Perdekamp, Markus; Nadjem, Hadi; Merkel, Joachim; Braunwarth, Roland; Pollak, Stefan; Thierauf, Annette

    2011-07-01

    Suicidal shots fired simultaneously to the head from two handguns are rare. The authors report about a recent case in which a Smith & Wesson cal. 9 mm pistol and a Smith & Wesson cal. .357 Magnum revolver were used. Sitting on a sofa, a 33-year-old man (member of a shooting club) fired two simultaneous shots to the head; the pistol held in the left hand was discharged into the left temple, and the revolver held in the right hand was fired into the mouth. Both weapons remained in the respective hands. An upside-down muzzle imprint in the left temporal region and recoil injuries of a mandibular incisor, and the lower lip indicated that both the pistol and the revolver had been held in an inverted manner at the time of discharge. Blood stains (backspatter) and gunshot residues were present on both firing hands, whereas forward spatter originating from the exit wounds was deposited on the wall behind the suicide's head.

  1. Element budgets of forest biomass combustion and ash fertilisation - a Danish case-study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Morten; Skov, Simon; Sevel, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    Harvest of forest biomass for energy production may lead to a significant export of nutrients from the forest. Ash spreading and recycling of nutrients from wood chip combustion to the forest has come into focus as a means for counteracting the nutrient export. This study was carried out to examine...... the retention of various elements in the different ash fractions and utilise the nutrient recovery to evaluate the fertiliser quality of the examined ash. The mass and element flux of wood chips, bottom ash, cyclone fly ash and condensation sludge at Ebeltoft central heating plant was studied over a four day...

  2. Energy recovery from waste food by combustion or gasification with the potential for regenerative dehydration: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caton, P.A.; Carr, M.A.; Kim, S.S.; Beautyman, M.J. [US Naval Academy, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 590 Holloway Road, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Energy recovery from food waste was studied using the food service at the US Naval Academy as a case study. Post-consumer food waste was captured over a period of ten days to estimate individual waste per meal and total waste per month. The food waste was analyzed for chemical composition and water content using ultimate and proximate analysis, and for energy content, and compared with the same analyses of wood (a more typical biomass fuel). Three different samples of food waste showed relative uniformity of properties despite being sampled on different days, with different menus. Food waste had lower oxygen content, higher nitrogen and ash content, and higher energy content than wood. The food waste in this study had approximately 70% water content. Temperatures and emissions from combustion of wood pellets, dried pelletized food waste, and dried non-pelletized food waste were measured and compared using a modified residential pellet stove. Temperatures were higher for food waste due to the higher energy content. Emissions of NO, HC, and soot were slightly higher for food waste. Despite the large water content, thermodynamic analysis showed that regenerative dehydration, in which waste energy from the combustion system is used to remove water from the incoming wet fuel, is possible. An excess enthalpy ratio is defined to formalize the comparison of waste sensible enthalpy with the energy required for dehydration. Analysis of fuel-lean combustion and fuel-rich gasification shows that little, if any, external energy would necessarily be required to remove the water from the incoming fuel. An equilibrium model was used to simulate waste food gasification by extending the simulation to high water content levels. Probable ranges for successful food waste gasification are identified. Energy recovery of waste food could result in cost savings by offsetting traditional fuel-use (e.g. natural gas for heating) and by reducing disposal costs. (author)

  3. Energy recovery from waste food by combustion or gasification with the potential for regenerative dehydration: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caton, P.A.; Carr, M.A.; Kim, S.S.; Beautyman, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Energy recovery from food waste was studied using the food service at the US Naval Academy as a case study. Post-consumer food waste was captured over a period of ten days to estimate individual waste per meal and total waste per month. The food waste was analyzed for chemical composition and water content using ultimate and proximate analysis, and for energy content, and compared with the same analyses of wood (a more typical biomass fuel). Three different samples of food waste showed relative uniformity of properties despite being sampled on different days, with different menus. Food waste had lower oxygen content, higher nitrogen and ash content, and higher energy content than wood. The food waste in this study had approximately 70% water content. Temperatures and emissions from combustion of wood pellets, dried pelletized food waste, and dried non-pelletized food waste were measured and compared using a modified residential pellet stove. Temperatures were higher for food waste due to the higher energy content. Emissions of NO, HC, and soot were slightly higher for food waste. Despite the large water content, thermodynamic analysis showed that regenerative dehydration, in which waste energy from the combustion system is used to remove water from the incoming wet fuel, is possible. An excess enthalpy ratio is defined to formalize the comparison of waste sensible enthalpy with the energy required for dehydration. Analysis of fuel-lean combustion and fuel-rich gasification shows that little, if any, external energy would necessarily be required to remove the water from the incoming fuel. An equilibrium model was used to simulate waste food gasification by extending the simulation to high water content levels. Probable ranges for successful food waste gasification are identified. Energy recovery of waste food could result in cost savings by offsetting traditional fuel-use (e.g. natural gas for heating) and by reducing disposal costs.

  4. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  5. Sensitivity analysis overlaps of friction elements in cartridge seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žmindák Milan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartridge seals are self-contained units consisting of a shaft sleeve, seals, and gland plate. The applications of mechanical seals are numerous. The most common example of application is in bearing production for automobile industry. This paper deals with the sensitivity analysis of overlaps friction elements in cartridge seal and their influence on the friction torque sealing and compressive force. Furthermore, it describes materials for the manufacture of sealings, approaches usually used to solution of hyperelastic materials by FEM and short introduction into the topic wheel bearings. The practical part contains one of the approach for measurement friction torque, which results were used to specifying the methodology and precision of FEM calculation realized by software ANSYS WORKBENCH. This part also contains the sensitivity analysis of overlaps friction elements.

  6. Unique case of fatal carbon monoxide poisoning in the absence of a combustible fossil fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D R; Poon, P; Titley, J; Jagger, S F; Rutty, G N

    2001-09-01

    A 37-year-old man died as a result of exposure to carbon monoxide within an apartment. An investigation of the apartment showed no gas appliances or gas supply to the apartment and no evidence of any combustion event to any part of the apartment or roof space. Inhalation of dichloromethane was excluded. Heating to the apartment was found to be via an electrical storage heater, the examination of which revealed that the cast-iron core and insulating material showed evidence of heat damage with significant areas devoid of carbon. This electric storage heater is hypothesized to be the source of carbon for the fatal production of carbon monoxide within the apartment.

  7. ACACIA Project - Development of a Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Process. Case of the DMXTM Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, A.; Briot, P.; Raynal, L.; Broutin, P.; Gimenez, M.; Soazic, M.; Cessat, P.; Saysset, S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the ACACIA project was to develop processes for post-combustion CO 2 capture at a lower cost and with a higher energetic efficiency than first generation processes using amines such as Monoethanolamine (MEA) which are now considered for the first Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) demonstrators. The partners involved in this project were: Rhodia (Solvay since then), Arkema, Lafarge, GDF SUEZ, Veolia Environnement, IFP Energies nouvelles, IRCE Lyon, LMOPS, LTIM, LSA Armines. To validate the relevance of the breakthrough processes studied in this project, techno-economic evaluations were carried out with comparison to the reference process using a 30 wt% MEA solvent. These evaluation studies involved all the industrial partners of the project, each partner bringing specific cases of CO 2 capture on their industrial facilities. From these studies, only the process using de-mixing solvent, DMX TM , developed by IFPEN appears as an alternative solution to the MEA process. (authors)

  8. Permanent disposal of radioactive particulate waste in cartridge containing ferromagnetic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troy, M.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a cartridge for permanent disposal of solid radioactive particulate waste, comprising; a liquid impervious casing having an upper end cover, a lower end cover and a side wall extending between the covers, the casing enclosing a waste storage region; ferromagnetic fibrous material defining a waste retaining matrix and filling a major portion of the waste storage region; means defining an inlet conduit extending through the upper end cover and axially of the casing through the waste storage region, and opening into the waste storage region in the vicinity of the lower and end cover; and means defining first and second outlet conduits extending through the upper end cover and opening into the waste storage region in the vicinity of the upper end cover

  9. THE HYDROGEN-FUELLED INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES FOR MARINE APPLICATIONS WITH A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim S. Seddiek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern marine power plants have been designed to improve the overall ship’s efficiency. This pushed the designers of marine machinery to search for unconventional fuels for these plants. During the previous years, diesel oil has been extensively used on-board ships. Due to the high price of light diesel oil and the environmental problems resulting from the use of heavy fuel oil, it has become necessary to search for an alternative to traditional fuels. As a result, natural gas fuel has been used on-board some types of ships, especially short-voyage cruise ships. Unfortunately, there are still some technical and logistic problems related to the use of natural gas as a fuel, especially as it is considered a non-renewable energy source. The use of hydrogen fuel on-board ships, particularly in modern power plants may contribute to overcoming the above problems. The present paper considers the possibility of the use of hydrogen fuel for marine applications and discusses different stages of hydrogen gas cycle beginning with hydrogen generation process from clean energy until using it as fuel for internal combustion engines on-board one RO/RO ship, named Taba, operating in the Mediterranean Sea. Compared to the diesel engine, the hydrogen fuelled engine is found to be lower in thermal efficiency and fuel consumption, however, some adjustments are needed.

  10. Characteristics of a cartridge NEG (St101 Zr-Al)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamatsu, Hiromi; Shimamoto, Masayuki; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Ishimaru, Hajime

    1990-01-01

    The report addresses the application of a non-evaporable getter (NEG) pump to an accelerator (storage ring). Tests are performed to determine major characteristics of the non-evaporable getter pump in an effort to provide a method for its efficient use. Test results show that with an St101 cartridge NEG pump, it is possible to produce an ultrahigh vacuum in a system with a surface area of about 10 4 cm 2 through baking at 410K for two hours. Once activated at 1000K, a NEG pump recovers a pumping performance in a subsequent test run at 723K, though the pumping speed decreases by several tens of percent. The St-101 cartridge type NEG pump is at least 2 Pam 3 in pumping capacity for carbon monoxide. The pumping speed decreases with an increasing amount of occluded carbon monoxide. Upon activation, most of the occluded carbon monoxide diffuses into the pump while only little of it is released into the gas phase. Its diffusion through the surface of the NEG pump can occur even at room temperature, indicating that if a leak takes place, the pump would absorb the gas continuously. Thus, if a leak occurs during activation, the pump would occlude a large amount of gas and therefore, activation should be carried out with careful checking for a leak. (N.K.)

  11. Bubble Jet agent release cartridge for chemical single cell stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangler, N; Welsche, M; Blazek, M; Blessing, M; Vervliet-Scheebaum, M; Reski, R; Müller, C; Reinecke, H; Steigert, J; Roth, G; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2013-02-01

    We present a new method for the distinct specific chemical stimulation of single cells and small cell clusters within their natural environment. By single-drop release of chemical agents with droplets in size of typical cell diameters (d agent release cartridge with integrated fluidic structures and integrated agent reservoirs are shown, tested, and compared in this publication. The single channel setup features a fluidic structure fabricated by anisotropic etching of silicon. To allow for simultaneous release of different agents even though maintaining the same device size, the second type comprises a double channel fluidic structure, fabricated by photolithographic patterning of TMMF. Dispensed droplet volumes are V = 15 pl and V = 10 pl for the silicon and the TMMF based setups, respectively. Utilizing the agent release cartridges, the application in biological assays was demonstrated by hormone-stimulated premature bud formation in Physcomitrella patens and the individual staining of one single L 929 cell within a confluent grown cell culture.

  12. Combustion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ragland, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Combustion Engineering The Nature of Combustion Combustion Emissions Global Climate Change Sustainability World Energy Production Structure of the Book   Section I: Basic Concepts Fuels Gaseous Fuels Liquid Fuels Solid Fuels Problems Thermodynamics of Combustion Review of First Law Concepts Properties of Mixtures Combustion StoichiometryChemical EnergyChemical EquilibriumAdiabatic Flame TemperatureChemical Kinetics of CombustionElementary ReactionsChain ReactionsGlobal ReactionsNitric Oxide KineticsReactions at a Solid SurfaceProblemsReferences  Section II: Combustion of Gaseous and Vaporized FuelsFlamesLaminar Premixed FlamesLaminar Flame TheoryTurbulent Premixed FlamesExplosion LimitsDiffusion FlamesGas-Fired Furnaces and BoilersEnergy Balance and EfficiencyFuel SubstitutionResidential Gas BurnersIndustrial Gas BurnersUtility Gas BurnersLow Swirl Gas BurnersPremixed-Charge Engine CombustionIntroduction to the Spark Ignition EngineEngine EfficiencyOne-Zone Model of Combustion in a Piston-...

  13. Alterations in a Unique Class of Cortical Chandelier Cell Axon Cartridges in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Brad R; DeDionisio, Adam M; Lewis, David A; Fish, Kenneth N

    2017-07-01

    The axons of chandelier cells (ChCs) target the axon initial segment of pyramidal neurons, forming an array of boutons termed a cartridge. In schizophrenia, the density of cartridges detectable by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) membrane transporter 1 immunoreactivity is lower, whereas the density of axon initial segments detectable by immunoreactivity for the α2 subunit of the GABA A receptor is higher in layers 2/superficial 3 of the prefrontal cortex. These findings were interpreted as compensatory responses to lower GABA levels in ChCs. However, we recently found that in schizophrenia, ChC cartridge boutons contain normal levels of the 67 kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) protein, the enzyme responsible for GABA synthesis in these boutons. To understand these findings we quantified the densities of ChC cartridges immunoreactive for vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT+), which is present in all cartridge boutons, and the subset of cartridges that contain calbindin (CB+). Prefrontal cortex tissue sections from 20 matched pairs of schizophrenia and unaffected comparison subjects were immunolabeled for vGAT, GAD67, and CB. The mean density of vGAT+/CB+ cartridges was 2.7-fold higher, exclusively in layer 2 of schizophrenia subjects, whereas the density of vGAT+/CB- cartridges did not differ between subject groups. Neither vGAT, CB, or GAD67 protein levels per ChC bouton nor the number of boutons per cartridge differed between subject groups. Our findings of a greater density of CB+ ChC cartridges in prefrontal cortex layer 2 from schizophrenia subjects suggests that the normal developmental pruning of these cartridges is blunted in the illness. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 42 CFR 84.1155 - Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; location; replacement. 84.1155 Section 84.1155 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1155 Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement. (a) Particulate matter filters used in conjunction with a canister or cartridge...

  15. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 2: Base Case and Sensitivity Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2013-01-17

    Part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103) of this series describes a new rotary reactor for gas-fueled chemical-looping combustion (CLC), in which, a solid wheel with microchannels rotates between the reducing and oxidizing streams. The oxygen carrier (OC) coated on the surfaces of the channels periodically adsorbs oxygen from air and releases it to oxidize the fuel. A one-dimensional model is also developed in part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103). This paper presents the simulation results based on the base-case design parameters. The results indicate that both the fuel conversion efficiency and the carbon separation efficiency are close to unity. Because of the relatively low reduction rate of copper oxide, fuel conversion occurs gradually from the inlet to the exit. A total of 99.9% of the fuel is converted within 75% of the channel, leading to 25% redundant length near the exit, to ensure robustness. In the air sector, the OC is rapidly regenerated while consuming a large amount of oxygen from air. Velocity fluctuations are observed during the transition between sectors because of the complete reactions of OCs. The gas temperature increases monotonically from 823 to 1315 K, which is mainly determined by the solid temperature, whose variations with time are limited within 20 K. The overall energy in the solid phase is balanced between the reaction heat release, conduction, and convective cooling. In the sensitivity analysis, important input parameters are identified and varied around their base-case values. The resulting changes in the model-predicted performance revealed that the most important parameters are the reduction kinetics, the operating pressure, and the feed stream temperatures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. The Diesel Combustion Collaboratory: Combustion Researchers Collaborating over the Internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Pancerella; L. A. Rahn; C. Yang

    2000-02-01

    The Diesel Combustion Collaborator (DCC) is a pilot project to develop and deploy collaborative technologies to combustion researchers distributed throughout the DOE national laboratories, academia, and industry. The result is a problem-solving environment for combustion research. Researchers collaborate over the Internet using DCC tools, which include: a distributed execution management system for running combustion models on widely distributed computers, including supercomputers; web-accessible data archiving capabilities for sharing graphical experimental or modeling data; electronic notebooks and shared workspaces for facilitating collaboration; visualization of combustion data; and video-conferencing and data-conferencing among researchers at remote sites. Security is a key aspect of the collaborative tools. In many cases, the authors have integrated these tools to allow data, including large combustion data sets, to flow seamlessly, for example, from modeling tools to data archives. In this paper the authors describe the work of a larger collaborative effort to design, implement and deploy the DCC.

  17. Problematic issues of air protection during thermal processes related to the energetic uses of sewage sludge and other waste. Case study: Co-combustion in peaking power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroncová, Emília; Ladomerský, Juraj; Musil, Juraj

    2018-03-01

    Currently, it is necessary to deal with issues related to the emissions as there is a constantly increasing interest in combusting sludge from sewage treatment plants in the boilers for wood. An analysis of the energetic importance of the combustion of sewage sludge has already been carried out, but the effects of various treatments of the sludge are not always clear, e.g. composting and subsequent combustion to the air pollution. Investments in other thermal processes of energetic utilisation of sewage sludge and organic waste are not always successfully implemented. The objective of this paper is to point out some problematic cases for acceptance of thermal processes related to energetic use of waste in terms of the air protection. The other aim is to mention the experience with solutions of such issues in Slovakia. There are mentioned first results of the operational validation experiments during the energy generation in circulating fluidized bed boiler in peaking power plant (Power 110MW) with the addition of the so-called alternative fuel based on wood and sewage sludge to the main fuel - black coal (anthracite). And there has already been achieved the highest share of 12.4%w. (dry matter) of sewage sludge in form of compost in blend with black coal, which is technologically viable. Moreover analyzed the problems of the authorization and operation of the co-combustion of sewage sludge and of combustion of products of various kinds of pyrolysis waste - pyrolysis gas and pyrolysis oil are analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CSER 95-014: Criticality storage category for K Basin spent cartridge filters in ECOROK casks at central waste complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    This CSER justifies storing K Basin spent cartridge filters in ECOROK 25-11 casks with liners under the limits in an existing criticality prevention specification, CPS-SW-149-00002, Rev./Mod. B-1, because the worst case fissionable material inventory is less then 1/2 the CPS limit and the cask is larger than allowed containers, the cask and liner have adequate iron content to meet the CPS requirements, and the cask concrete walls are thick enough to isolate the fissionable contents of each cask from neutron interaction with fissionable material external to each cask

  19. Combustion from basics to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Maximilian; Winter, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Combustion, the process of burning, is defined as a chemical reaction between a combustible reactant (the fuel) and an oxidizing agent (such as air) in order to produce heat and in most cases light while new chemical species (e.g., flue gas components) are formed. This book covers a gap on the market by providing a concise introduction to combustion. Most of the other books currently available are targeted towards the experienced users and contain too many details and/or contain knowledge at a fairly high level. This book provides a brief and clear overview of the combustion basics, suitable f

  20. Combustion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  1. Evaluation and comparison of a national made dental cartridge with two foreign made

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Hashemi H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Several factories produce dental cartridge in the world. In Iran, Daroupakhsh company is responsible for this task. The aim of this study was evaluate some properties of daroupakhsh cartridge and compare them with two imported ones: Ecocaine (made in Italy and Septodont (made in France. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 70 healthy patients from maxillofacial clinic of Shariaty hospital were selected. After obtaining informed consent, 0.1 cc of each carpule was injected to the patients' frontal region and the extent of anesthesia was measured at different time intervals. Also the quality of injections was evaluated by 11 surgeons. The dimensions of the three cartridges were also measured and compared together. Data were analyzed by repeated measure ANOVA and Friedman with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: There was no significant difference in extent and duration of anesthesia among the studied cartridges. Surgeons were equally satisfied of all three kinds of cartridges. All of the cartridges were aspirable. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the three studied cartridges had similar properties.

  2. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 2: Base Case and Sensitivity Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong; Chen, Tianjiao; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2013-01-01

    Part 1 (10.1021/ef3014103) of this series describes a new rotary reactor for gas-fueled chemical-looping combustion (CLC), in which, a solid wheel with microchannels rotates between the reducing and oxidizing streams. The oxygen carrier (OC) coated

  3. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  4. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; deMello, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the scale-down platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency.

  5. EPA Region 8, Memo on Desktop Printer Ink Cartridges Policy & Voluntary Printer Turn-in

    Science.gov (United States)

    This memo requests EPA Region 8 users to voluntarily turn-in their desktop printers and notifies users of the Region 8 policy to not provide maintenance or ink and toner cartridges for desktop printers.

  6. Some Factors Affecting Combustion in an Internal-Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, A M; Cohn, Mildred

    1936-01-01

    An investigation of the combustion of gasoline, safety, and diesel fuels was made in the NACA combustion apparatus under conditions of temperature that permitted ignition by spark with direct fuel injection, in spite of the compression ratio of 12.7 employed. The influence of such variables as injection advance angle, jacket temperature, engine speed, and spark position was studied. The most pronounced effect was that an increase in the injection advance angle (beyond a certain minimum value) caused a decrease in the extent and rate of combustion. In almost all cases combustion improved with increased temperature. The results show that at low air temperatures the rates of combustion vary with the volatility of the fuel, but that at high temperatures this relationship does not exist and the rates depend to a greater extent on the chemical nature of the fuel.

  7. The indicating FTA elute cartridge a solid sample carrier to detect high-risk HPV and high-grade cervical lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, R.P. de; Schmeink, C.E.; Bakkers, J.M.J.E.; Snijders, P.J.L.M.; Quint, W.G.V.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    The clinically validated high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) and GP5+/6+-PCR assays were analyzed on an Indicating FTA Elute cartridge (FTA cartridge). The FTA cartridge is a solid dry carrier that allows safe transport of cervical samples. FTA cartridge samples were

  8. Electricity generation from solid biomass via co-combustion with coal. Energy and emission balances from a German case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, D.; Kaltschmitt, M.

    1999-01-01

    The environmental effects of electricity production from different biofuels by means of co-combustion with hard coal in existing coal fired power plants are analysed and compared to electricity production from hard coal alone based on Life Cycle Analysis (LCA). The use of straw and residual wood at a 10% blend with coal in an existing power plant in the southern part of Germany shows that all investigated environmental effects are significantly lower if biomass is used instead of coal. Thus based on the available and proven technology of co-combustion of hard coal and biomass in existing power plants a significant contribution could be made to a more environmentally sound energy system compared to using coal alone. (author)

  9. Combined distiller waste utilisation and combustion gases desulphurisation method. The case study of soda-ash industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasikowski, Tomasz; Buczkowski, Roman; Cichosz, Marcin; Lemanowska, Eliza [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolas Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2007-09-15

    In this paper, a concept of technology that can be helpful for lowering the negative influence of the synthetic (based on the Solvay process) soda ash plant on the natural environment is presented. We describe the desulphurisation of combustion gases from the factory's power plant, which is based on their absorption in the overflow of distiller waste. The excess of lime milk, which is added in the process of ammonia regeneration from filter liquor, results in a strong alkalinity of distiller waste. The high pH of distiller waste favours absorption of acidic combustion gases. The laboratory-scale tests showed about 80% efficiency of the desulphurisation process. The suspension samples we obtained consist mainly of CaCO{sub 3}. We suggest using the obtained solid phase as an adsorbent-insert in Fluidised Bed Combustion technology (FBC). Based on raw material prices, production costs, and average sell prices of the product, economic analysis of innovation was executed. Profits from employing the method presented come mainly from reduction of environmental fees. The sensitivity analysis of cost showed that the application of the desulphurisation process causes cost reduction in soda-ash production accounting for EUR 150 thousand per year (excluding depreciation) in Poland, and EUR 11,700 thousand per year (excluding depreciation) in Sweden. It has been found that the latter value is similar to the positive environmental impact of this innovation expressed in monetary units (EUR 10,350 thousand per year, excluding depreciation). (author)

  10. Partial combustion of a fuel cartridge in reactor G1; Combustion partielle d'une cartouche de combustible dans le reacteur G 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, Rouville; Leduc,; Segot, [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    On the 26 october 1956, after having stopped a few days, the G1 reactor was started up again. The burst slug system gave a first warning at 19 h 07 on loading side, a second one at 19 h 13 on unloading side, and so on others. Ath 15 the Control Engineer ordered a quick decrease of power and then, made it rise again from 2 to 5 MW, to find out, with accuracy, the failing channel. Soon after, in order to avoid any exterior contamination, scanning had to be stopped and a {gamma} ray detecting system outside the burst slug piping system, found out the damaged element in the channel 19-13. The health stations recording showed that the highest experienced measures were still notably lower than the maxima permissible levels. The methodical examination and the unloading of the damaged channel lasted three weeks. On the loading side, bare uranium billets could be seen on a magnesia powder bed. On the unloading side, the can was undamaged, but the element's end was hanging inside the gap of the inlet air. Pushed back, about 30 cm (12 in.), on the loading side, the element got blocked up. After several tests, while argon was still being injected, working staff being kept under strict protection conditions, a countersink tube was operating like the one used for drilling. The channel was cleaned up by sucking up, without, however, avoiding slight contamination in the building of the reactor. On the 7 december 1956, the reactor had a divergence at 2 MW, the first since the fault. A hundred or so channels were still giving a background, therefore making the burst slug system inefficient for those channels. Systematical brushing and sucking up were not able to reduce it beyond a certain level. It forced the reactor to operate during several months with 56 unloaded semi-channels. At last, in june 1957, two handling allowed the reactor to operate in a satisfactory way: removal of 1 mm-thickness of graphite, by re-reaming 54 semi-channels and setting on the burst slug detection-devices, some null regulating tension systems, annealing the background due to continuous pollution. This event has been fruitful. A grid trap has been set right ahead the reactor. Stricter instructions have been given for rising power operations and automatic burst slug sy (already improved as said above) has been duplicated by a human control. At last, the fault has pointed out that the reactors with gap had the disadvantage of facilitating the contamination of channels from one to another. On the other hand, graphite stores the radioactive dusts and hinders an easy decontamination. (author) [French] Le 26 octobre 1956, le reacteur G1 etait remis en marche apres un arret de quelques jours. L'installation de detection de rupture de gaines donna un premier signal de prealerte a 19h07 cote chargement, un second a 19h13 cote dechargement, puis d'autres. Le chef de quart ordonna a 19h15 une baisse rapide de la puissance mais voulant reperer le canal fautif avec precision la fit remonter ensuite a 2 puis a 5 MW. Bientot, par crainte de contamination exterieure, on dut arreter l'exploration et c'est par detection {gamma} a l'exterieur des tuyaux de detection de rupture de gaine qu'on identifia la cartouche endommagee dans le canal 19-13. Les enregistrements des stations de sante montrerent que les pointes observees etaient restees notablement inferieures aux limites maxima admissibles. L'examen methodique et le degagement du canal accidente occuperent trois semaines. On put apercevoir cote chargement les billettes d'uranium nues sur un lit de poudre de magnesie; cote dechargement, la gaine etait intacte mais l'extremite de la cartouche 'pendait' a l'interieur de la fente d'arrivee d'air. Repoussee cote chargement d'environ 30 cm, la cartouche se bloqua. Apres des essais divers, toujours sous injection d'argon, et avec des protections severes du personnel, on mit en oeuvre un tube fraise, analogue a ceux utilises pour les forages. On nettoya le canal par aspiration, sans toutefois eviter de legeres contaminations du hall de la pile. Le 7 decembre 1956 eut lieu une premiere divergence a 2 MW. Une centaine de canaux donnaient encore un bruit de fond rendant inoperante pour ces canaux la detection de ruptures de gaines. Des brossages et aspirations systematiques ne purent le reduire ala d'un palier qui obligea a faire fonctionner le reacteur pendant plusieurs mois avec 56 demi-canaux decharges. Enfin, en juin 1957, deux operations rendirent au reacteur un regime pleinement satisfaisant; enlevement d'une epaisseur de 1 mm de graphite par realesage de 54 demi-canaux et montage sur les appareils de detection de dispositifs d'opposition de tension reglable eliminant dans les mesures la part du bruit de fond due a la pollution permanente. Cet incident a ete riche d'enseignements: une grille piege a ete mise en place juste en amont de la pile; les consignes de montee en puissance ont ete rendues plus prudentes, le controle automatique des detections de ruptures de gaines (deja ameliorees comme il a ete dit) a ete double d'un controle humain. Enfin, l'incident a mis en evidence que les piles a fente avaient le defaut de faciliter la contamination des canaux de proche en proche. Par ailleurs le graphite emmagasine les poussieres radioactives et rend la decontamination difficile. (auteur)

  11. Aliança estratégica no canal de marketing: o caso ALE Combustíveis S.A. Strategic alliance in the marketing channel: the Ale Combustíveis S.A. case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Garcia Cotta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa a estratégia utilizada pela ALE Combustíveis em uma operação desenhada para vender lubrificantes automotivos em sua rede de postos. O estudo avalia as alianças efetuadas com a Elf e posteriormente com a AC Delco, revelando as motivações, escolha dos parceiros, desenho do modelo de relacionamento, gestão das alianças e avaliação do modelo adotado, confrontando a experiência prática com as prescrições da literatura. O modelo adotado, denominado broker, caracteriza-se pela preservação da autonomia das marcas, com a ALE aportando sua estrutura e força de vendas, e o parceiro, a logística de reabastecimento e processamento de pedidos. O método do caso foi adotado como estratégia de pesquisa e o relato revela o acerto na escolha do modelo, porém falhas estratégicas na capacidade operacional e posicionamento do produto, na aliança com a Elf, e na relação de forças no canal, na aliança com a AC Delco, conduziram ao fracasso de ambas as tentativas.This paper analyses the strategy adopted by ALE Combustíveis, a Brazilian Company, in an operation designed to sell automotive lubricants at gas stations. This study reviews the alliances made with Elf and later with AC Delco, exposing ALE's motivations, partner selection, design of relationship model, alliance management and assessment of adopted model, confronting practical experience with prescriptions in the published literature. The model, named broker, is characterized by preservation of the brand's autonomy, with ALE contributing its structure and sales force, and its partner, in turn, the fuelling logistics and order processing. The case method was adopted as a research strategy and this report shows how successful the model selection proved, as well as the strategic blunders related to the operational capacity and product positioning, in the alliance with Elf, and in the forces of management interrelations within the channel, in the AC Delco alliance case

  12. Tubular combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Tubular combustors are cylindrical tubes where flame ignition and propagation occur in a spatially confined, highly controlled environment, in a nearly flat, elongated geometry. This allows for some unique advantages where extremely even heat dispersion is required over a large surface while still maintaining fuel efficiency. Tubular combustors also allow for easy flexibility in type of fuel source, allowing for quick changeover to meet various needs and changing fuel pricing. This new addition to the MP sustainable energy series will provide the most up-to-date research on tubular combustion--some of it only now coming out of private proprietary protection. Plentiful examples of current applications along with a good explanation of background theory will offer readers an invaluable guide on this promising energy technology. Highlights include: * An introduction to the theory of tubular flames * The "how to" of maintaining stability of tubular flames through continuous combustion * Examples of both small-scal...

  13. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  14. On the causal links between health indicator, output, combustible renewables and waste consumption, rail transport, and CO2 emissions: the case of Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Jebli, Mehdi

    2016-08-01

    This study employs the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) approach and Granger causality test to investigate the short- and long-run relationships between health indicator, real GDP, combustible renewables and waste consumption, rail transport, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for the case of Tunisia, spanning the period of 1990-2011. The empirical findings suggest that the Fisher statistic of the Wald test confirm the existence of a long-run relationship between the variables. Moreover, the long-run estimated elasticities of the ARDL model provide that output and combustible renewables and waste consumption have a positive and statistically significant impact on health situation, while CO2 emissions and rail transport both contribute to the decrease of health indicator. Granger causality results affirm that, in the short-run, there is a unidirectional causality running from real GDP to health, a unidirectional causality from health to combustible renewables and waste consumption, and a unidirectional causality from all variables to CO2 emissions. In the long-run, all the computed error correction terms are significant and confirm the existence of long-run association among the variables. Our recommendations for the Tunisian policymakers are as follows: (i) exploiting wastes and renewable fuels can be a good strategy to eliminate pollution caused by emissions and subsequently improve health quality, (ii) the use of renewable energy as a main source for national rail transport is an effective strategy for public health, (iii) renewable energy investment projects are beneficial plans for the country as this contributes to the growth of its own economy and reduce energy dependence, and (iii) more renewable energy consumption leads not only to decrease pollution but also to stimulate health situation because of the increase of doctors and nurses numbers.

  15. Effect of co-combustion on the burnout of lignite/biomass blends: a Turkish case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haykiri-Acma, H; Yaman, S

    2008-11-01

    Co-combustion of Turkish Elbistan lignite and woody shells of hazelnut was performed in a TGA up to 1173 K with a heating rate of 20 K/min. SEM images of each fuel revealed the differences in their physical appearances. Hazelnut shell was blended with lignite in the range of 2-20 wt% to observe the co-combustion properties. Maximum burning rates (Rmax), temperatures of the maximum burning rates (T(R-max)), and the final burnout values of the parent samples and the blends were compared. The results were interpreted considering lignite properties and the major biomass ingredients such as cellulosics, hemicellulosics, and lignin. Deviations between the theoretical and experimental burnout values were evaluated at various temperatures. Burnout characteristics of the blends up to 10 wt% were concluded to have a synergistic effect so the addition of hazelnut shell up to 8 wt% provided higher burnouts than the expected theoretical ones, whereas addition of as much as 10 wt% led to a decrease in the burnout. However, the additive effects were more favorable for the blend having a biomass content of 20 wt%. Apparent activation energy, Rmax, and T(R-max), were found to follow the additive behavior for the blend samples.

  16. Intense atmospheric pollution modifies weather: a case of mixed biomass burning with fossil fuel combustion pollution in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, A. J.; Fu, C. B.; Yang, X. Q.; Sun, J. N.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Herrmann, E.; Zheng, L. F.; Nie, W.; Liu, Q.; Wei, X. L.; Kulmala, M.

    2013-10-01

    The influence of air pollutants, especially aerosols, on regional and global climate has been widely investigated, but only a very limited number of studies report their impacts on everyday weather. In this work, we present for the first time direct (observational) evidence of a clear effect of how a mixed atmospheric pollution changes the weather with a substantial modification in the air temperature and rainfall. By using comprehensive measurements in Nanjing, China, we found that mixed agricultural burning plumes with fossil fuel combustion pollution resulted in a decrease in the solar radiation intensity by more than 70%, a decrease in the sensible heat by more than 85%, a temperature drop by almost 10 K, and a change in rainfall during both daytime and nighttime. Our results show clear air pollution-weather interactions, and quantify how air pollution affects weather via air pollution-boundary layer dynamics and aerosol-radiation-cloud feedbacks. This study highlights cross-disciplinary needs to investigate the environmental, weather and climate impacts of the mixed biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion sources in East China.

  17. Effect of co-combustion on the burnout of lignite/biomass blends: A Turkish case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykirl-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-11-15

    Co-combustion of Turkish Elbistan lignite and woody shells of hazelnut was performed in a TGA tip to 1173 K with a heating rate of 20 K/min. SEM images of each fuel revealed the differences in their physical appearances. Hazelnut shell was blended with lignite in the range of 2-20 wt% to observe the co-combustion properties. Maximum burning rates (R{sub max}), temperatures of the maximum burning rates (TR{sub max}), and the final burnout values of the parent samples and the blends were compared. The results were interpreted considering lignite properties and the major biomass ingredients such as cellulosics, hemicellulosics, and lignin. Deviations between the theoretical and experimental burnout values were evaluated at various temperatures. Burnout characteristics of the blends up to 10 wt% were concluded to have a synergistic effect so the addition of hazelnut shell up to 8 wt% provided higher burnouts than the expected theoretical ones, whereas addition of as much as 10 wt% led to a decrease in the burnout. However, the additive effects were more favorable for the blend having a biomass content of 20 wt%. Apparent activation energy, R{sub max} and TR{sub max}, were found to follow the additive behavior for the blend samples.

  18. Naturally Occurring Radionuclides of Ash Produced by Coal Combustion. The Case of the Kardia Mine in Northern Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotakis, M.; Tsikritzis, L.; Tzimkas, N.; Kolovos, N.; Tsikritzi, R.

    2008-08-01

    West Macedonia Lignite Center (WMLC), located in Northwest Greece, releases into the atmosphere about 21,400 tons/year of fly ash through the stacks of four coal fired plants. The lignite ash contains naturally occurring radionuclides, which are deposited on the WMLC basin. This work investigates the natural radioactivity of twenty six ash samples, laboratory produced from combustion of lignite, which was sampled perpendicularly to the benches of the Kardia mine. The concentrations of radionuclides 40K, 235U, 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra and 232Th, were measured spectroscopically and found round one order of magnitude as high as those of lignite. Subsequently the Radionuclide Partitioning Coefficients of radionuclides were calculated and it was found that they are higher for 232Th, 228Ra and 40K, because the latter have closer affinity with the inorganic matrix of lignite. During combustion up to one third of the naturally occurring radioisotopes escape from the solid phase into the flue gases. With comparison to relative global data, the investigated ash has been found to have relatively high radioactivity, but the emissions of the WMLC radionuclides contribute only 0.03% to the mean annual absorbed dose.

  19. Naturally Occurring Radionuclides of Ash Produced by Coal Combustion. The Case of the Kardia Mine in Northern Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotakis, M.; Tsikritzis, L.; Tzimkas, N.; Kolovos, N.; Tsikritzi, R.

    2008-01-01

    West Macedonia Lignite Center (WMLC), located in Northwest Greece, releases into the atmosphere about 21,400 tons/year of fly ash through the stacks of four coal fired plants. The lignite ash contains naturally occurring radionuclides, which are deposited on the WMLC basin. This work investigates the natural radioactivity of twenty six ash samples, laboratory produced from combustion of lignite, which was sampled perpendicularly to the benches of the Kardia mine. The concentrations of radionuclides 40 K, 235 U, 238 U, 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 232 Th, were measured spectroscopically and found round one order of magnitude as high as those of lignite. Subsequently the Radionuclide Partitioning Coefficients of radionuclides were calculated and it was found that they are higher for 232 Th, 228 Ra and 40 K, because the latter have closer affinity with the inorganic matrix of lignite. During combustion up to one third of the naturally occurring radioisotopes escape from the solid phase into the flue gases. With comparison to relative global data, the investigated ash has been found to have relatively high radioactivity, but the emissions of the WMLC radionuclides contribute only 0.03% to the mean annual absorbed dose

  20. A self-contained fully-enclosed microfluidic cartridge for lab on a chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yobas, Levent; Cheow, Lih Feng; Tang, Kum-Cheong; Yong, Shien-Eit; Ong, Eleana Kye-Zheng; Wong, Lionel; Teo, William Cheng-Yong; Ji, Hongmiao; Rafeah, Siti; Yu, Chen

    2009-12-01

    We describe a self-contained fully-enclosed cartridge for lab-on-a-chip applications where sample and reagents can be applied sequentially as is performed in a heterogeneous immunoassay, or nucleic acid extraction. Both the self-contained and fully-enclosed features of the cartridge are sought to ensure its safe use in the field by unskilled staff. Simplicity in cartridge design and operation is obtained via adopting a valveless concept whereby reagents are stored and used in the form of liquid plugs isolated by air spacers around a fluidic loop. Functional components integrated in the loop include a microfluidic chip specific to the target application, a novel peristaltic pump to displace the liquid plugs, and a pair of removable tubing segments where one is used to introduce biological sample and while the other is to collect eluant. The novel pump is fabricated through soft-lithography technique and works by pinching a planar channel under stainless-steel ball bearings that have been magnetically loaded. The utility of the cartridge is demonstrated for automated extraction and purification of nucleic acids (DNA) from a cell lysate on a battery-operated portable system. The cartridge shown here can be further extended to sample-in-answer-out diagnostic tests.

  1. Microfluidic cartridges for DNA purification and genotyping processed in standard laboratory instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focke, Maximilian; Mark, Daniel; Stumpf, Fabian; Müller, Martina; Roth, Günter; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2011-06-01

    Two microfluidic cartridges intended for upgrading standard laboratory instruments with automated liquid handling capability by use of centrifugal forces are presented. The first microfluidic cartridge enables purification of DNA from human whole blood and is operated in a standard laboratory centrifuge. The second microfluidic catridge enables genotyping of pathogens by geometrically multiplexed real-time PCR. It is operated in a slightly modified off-the-shelf thermal cycler. Both solutions aim at smart and cost-efficient ways to automate work flows in laboratories. The DNA purification cartridge automates all liquid handling steps starting from a lysed blood sample to PCR ready DNA. The cartridge contains two manually crushable glass ampoules with liquid reagents. The DNA yield extracted from a 32 μl blood sample is 192 +/- 30 ng which corresponds to 53 +/- 8% of a reference extraction. The genotyping cartridge is applied to analyse isolates of the multi-resistant Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA) by real-time PCR. The wells contain pre-stored dry reagents such as primers and probes. Evaluation of the system with 44 genotyping assays showed a 100% specificity and agreement with the reference assays in standard tubes. The lower limit of detection was well below 10 copies of DNA per reaction.

  2. Batch fabrication of polymer microfluidic cartridges for QCM sensor packaging by direct bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandström, Niklas; Zandi Shafagh, Reza; Gylfason, Kristinn B.; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2017-12-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensing is an established technique commonly used in laboratory based life-science applications. However, the relatively complex, multi-part design and multi-step fabrication and assembly of state-of-the-art QCM cartridges make them unsuited for disposable applications such as point-of-care (PoC) diagnostics. In this work, we present the uncomplicated manufacturing of QCMs in polymer microfluidic cartridges. Our novel approach comprises two key innovations: the batch reaction injection molding of microfluidic parts; and the integration of the cartridge components by direct, unassisted bonding. We demonstrate molding of batches of 12 off-stoichiometry thiol-ene epoxy polymer (OSTE+) polymer parts in a single molding cycle using an adapted reaction injection molding process; and the direct bonding of the OSTE+  parts to other OSTE+  substrates, to printed circuit boards, and to QCMs. The microfluidic QCM OSTE+  cartridges were successfully evaluated in terms of liquid sealing as well as electrical properties, and the sensor performance characteristics are on par with those of a commercially available QCM biosensor cartridge. The simplified manufacturing of QCM sensors with maintained performance potentializes novel application areas, e.g. as disposable devices in a point of care setting. Moreover, our results can be extended to simplifying the fabrication of other microfluidic devices with multiple heterogeneously integrated components.

  3. Hazard classification test of the cartridge, 120-mm, APFSDS-T, XM829

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooker, C.D.; Hadlock, D.E.; Mishima, J.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-11-01

    Research was conducted to determine the behavior of the ammunition XM829 when subjected to detonation of an adjacent XM829 cartridge, and a sustained hot fire. It was concluded that the functioning of an XM829 cartridge, in one shipping container, will not cause immediate functioning of XM829 cartridges in adjacent containers. However, if a fire results and is sustained, adjacent cartridges may ignite, resulting in some scattering of debris within a maximum radius of 40 feet. Further, the XM829 cartridge can be expected to remain in a kinetic controlled regime with vigorous oxidation occurring early in such a fire but dropping off as the temperature cools toward ambient. Mass balance analyses data indicated a recovery of at least 80% in the 1982 external heat; in the 1983 test, the recovery percentage was improved to approximately 100% of the original depleted uranium weight volume. Therefore, it may be concluded that a significant airborne release of the depleted uranium material did not occur.

  4. The isolation of water-soluble radionuclides from deteriorating spent nuclear fuel in zeolite cartridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.M.; Thompson, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    A method of isolating water-soluble radionuclides leaching from deteriorating spent nuclear fuel by ion-exchange in zeolite cartridges has been studied. Design calculations of two zeolite cartridges to be incorporated in typical spent fuel storage bundle have been provided. Equilibrium exchange data obtained at several temperatures have shown that the maximum exchange capacity of total cesium in sodium titanium aluminosilicate was 114 mg/g zeolite and the capacity at 95% exchange for radioactive isotope Cs-137 was calculated as 55.2 mg/g zeolite. The kinetic data suggest that the rate of exchange of Cs + in sodium titanium aluminosilicate zeolite takes place by a fast initial exchange step followed by slow diffusion of cesium cations. Design calculations based on the equilibrium exchange data show that water-soluble radionuclides leaching from Mk 31 slugs can be isolated using two zeolite cartridges, each 3.7 inches in inside diameter and 2.5 inches in length. The cartridges are designed to isolate 95% of the Cs + leaching from the spent fuel storage bundle. The results from the thermal induced convective flow tests indicate that the system will provide necessary cooling to the spent fuel by convective currents while isolating the Cs + leaching from spent fuel storage bundle in the cartridges

  5. Experimental validation for combustion analysis of GOTHIC code in 2-dimensional combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. W.; Yang, S. Y.; Park, K. C.; Jung, S. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the prediction capability of GOTHIC code for hydrogen combustion phenomena was validated with the results of two-dimensional premixed hydrogen combustion experiment executed by Seoul National University. The experimental chamber has about 24 liter free volume (1x0.024x1 m 3 ) and 2-dimensional rectangular shape. The test were preformed with 10% hydrogen/air gas mixture and conducted with combination of two igniter positions (top center, top corner) and two boundary conditions (bottom full open, bottom right half open). Using the lumped parameter and mechanistic combustion model in GOTHIC code, the SNU experiments were simulated under the same conditions. The GOTHIC code prediction of the hydrogen combustion phenomena did not compare well with the experimental results. In case of lumped parameter simulation, the combustion time was predicted appropriately. But any other local information related combustion phenomena could not be obtained. In case of mechanistic combustion analysis, the physical combustion phenomena of gas mixture were not matched experimental ones. In boundary open cases, the GOTHIC predicted very long combustion time and the flame front propagation could not simulate appropriately. Though GOTHIC showed flame propagation phenomenon in adiabatic calculation, the induction time of combustion was still very long compare with experimental results. Also, it was found that the combustion model of GOTHIC code had some weak points in low concentration of hydrogen combustion simulation

  6. Comparison of a gel column blood typing method and a point-of-care cartridge for dog erythrocyte antigen 1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Shauna L; Richardson, Danielle M; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G

    2013-01-01

    Blood typing for the presence of Dog Erythrocyte Antigen (DEA) 1.1 is recommended in all donor and recipient dogs prior to transfusion of blood products. The objective of this study was to determine if a point-of-care DEA 1.1 blood typing cartridge could be used in place of the gel column typing method. Detection of DEA 1.1 was performed using a laboratory-based gel column method and a point-of-care cartridge. A convenience sample of 30 healthy blood donors, 13 dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) (3 of which had concurrent immune-mediated thrombocytopenia [IMT]), and 44 dogs with other diseases was included in the study. Agreement was observed between the tests for normal dogs and dogs with nonimmune-mediated disease in 74/74 cases. Two dogs in the IMHA group had indeterminate gel column blood typing results; 1 dog in this group had a negative gel column test result but a positive cartridge test result. There was good agreement between the 2 methods for normal dogs and dogs with nonimmune-mediated disease. Blood typing methods in dogs with IMHA should be further investigated. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  7. Validation of a cartridge method for the quality control determination of 99Tcm-HMPAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandos, G.; Penglis, S.; Tsopelas, C.; Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The manufacturer's method for assessing the radiochemical purity (RCP) of ±-HMPAO requires the use of three solvent types on two different stationary phases, and is time-consuming (∼ 15 min) in consideration of the short shelf-life (30 min). An impetus to develop a rapid quality control procedure for this product has led to the use of a single strip Whatman 17 chromatography system using ethyl acetate as the developing solvent. This popular Whatman paper system was previously validates against the manufacturer's method. We have developed a new method to successfully determine the % RCP of ±-HMPAO, which employs a disposable, inexpensive and reusable Amprep C-18 cartridge with normal saline as a non-organic mobile phase. The Whatman paper system separates the primary lipophilic 99 Tc m -HMPAO complex from 99 Tc m O-2, 99 Tc m O 4 and secondary 99 Tc m -HMPAO complex at the origin. By comparison, the lipophilic portion was retained on the cartridge and the hydrophilic impurities were found in saline eluent with the cartridge method. Whatman 17 paper system results showed 95.1 ± I.7% 99 Tc m -HMPAO after 5 min and the cartridge method gave 95.5 ± 1.5% 99 Tc m -HMPAO (n = 8) after 3 min. The % 99 Tc m O 2 levels in 99 Tc m -HMPAO were insignificant. When a failed kit was assessed for RCP at 2.5 h post-reconstitution, the Whatman paper system and the cartridge method correlated well, resulting in 63.1 ± 2.7% and 62.9±2.1% 99 Tc m -HMPAO (n=3) respectively. Although the cartridge method may slightly overestimate the % RCP of 99 Tc m -HMPAO, it was found to be simple, rapid and reliable for the quality control analysis of routine 99 Tc m -HMPAO preparations

  8. Combustion modeling in waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.; Unal, C.; Travis, J.R.; Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    1997-01-01

    This paper has two objectives. The first one is to repeat previous simulations of release and combustion of flammable gases in tank SY-101 at the Hanford reservation with the recently developed code GASFLOW-II. The GASFLOW-II results are compared with the results obtained with the HMS/TRAC code and show good agreement, especially for non-combustion cases. For combustion GASFLOW-II predicts a steeper pressure rise than HMS/TRAC. The second objective is to describe a so-called induction parameter model which was developed and implemented into GASFLOW-II and reassess previous calculations of Bureau of Mines experiments for hydrogen-air combustion. The pressure time history improves compared with the one-step model, and the time rate of pressure change is much closer to the experimental data

  9. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  10. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  11. Low NOx combustion technologies for high-temperature natural gas combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamme, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Because of the high process temperature which is required for some processes like glass melting and the high temperature to which the combustion air is preheated, NOx emission are extremely high. Even at these high temperatures, NOx emissions could be reduced drastically by using advanced combustion techniques such as staged combustion or flame-less oxidation, as experimental work has shown. In the case of oxy-fuel combustion, the NOx emission are also very high if conventional burners are used. The new combustion techniques achieve similar NOx reductions. (author)

  12. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  13. Identification of black-box linear models : the case of thermal periodic contact of exhaust valves in internal combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shojaeefard, M.H.; Fazelpour, M. [Iran Univ. of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Automotive Engineering; Goudarzi, K. [Iran Univ. of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    In internal combustion engines, hot exhaust gases that pass through the exhaust valve lead to high temperatures in the exhaust valve and the valve seat. Heat must be transferred from the exhaust valve to valve seat as they come in contact with each other during the opening and closing cycle in order to avoid damaging the exhaust valve. The heat transfer rate from the valve to valve seat is a function of many factors, including the thermal contact conductance (TCC) between the valve and valve seat. The objective of this study was to experimentally calculate the TCC for six different frequencies in the quasi-steady-state condition and also to obtain a transfer function to estimate the exhaust valve temperature by using black-box models of system identification. Periodic contact was taken into consideration in the study. The paper presented the experimental setup including the loading system, heat and cooling system, temperature measurement system, specimens properties, and data acquisition system. The paper also described the test procedure and experimental results. System identification was also described. It was concluded that the TCC decreased as the frequency of contact increased. The temperature transfer function was calculated by using the system identification method and having the temperatures at both sides of the contact surface. By knowing the temperature of one rod, the temperature of the other rod was estimated with high accuracy. 16 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  14. LES and RANS modeling of pulverized coal combustion in swirl burner for air and oxy-combustion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warzecha, Piotr; Boguslawski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Combustion of pulverized coal in oxy-combustion technology is one of the effective ways to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The process of transition from conventional combustion in air to the oxy-combustion technology, however, requires a thorough investigations of the phenomena occurring during the combustion process, that can be greatly supported by numerical modeling. The paper presents the results of numerical simulations of pulverized coal combustion process in swirl burner using RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) methods for turbulent flow. Numerical simulations have been performed for the oxyfuel test facility located at the Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer at RWTH Aachen University. Detailed analysis of the flow field inside the combustion chamber for cold flow and for the flow with combustion using different numerical methods for turbulent flows have been done. Comparison of the air and oxy-coal combustion process for pulverized coal shows significant differences in temperature, especially close to the burner exit. Additionally the influence of the combustion model on the results has been shown for oxy-combustion test case. - Highlights: • Oxy-coal combustion has been modeled for test facility operating at low oxygen ratio. • Coal combustion process has been modeled with simplified combustion models. • Comparison of oxy and air combustion process of pulverized coal has been done. • RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) results for pulverized coal combustion process have been compared

  15. Microfluidic cartridges for automated, point-of-care blood cell counting

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, Suzanne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Disposable, low-cost microfluidic cartridges for automated blood cell counting applications are presented in this article. The need for point-of-care medical diagnostic tools is evident, particularly in low-resource and rural settings, and a full...

  16. Optimal stapler cartridge selection according to the thickness of the pancreas in distal pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongbeom; Jang, Jin-Young; Son, Donghee; Lee, Seungyeoun; Han, Youngmin; Shin, Yong Chan; Kim, Jae Ri; Kwon, Wooil; Kim, Sun-Whe

    2016-08-01

    Stapling is a popular method for stump closure in distal pancreatectomy (DP). However, research on which cartridges are suitable for different pancreatic thickness is lacking. To identify the optimal stapler cartridge choice in DP according to pancreatic thickness.From November 2011 to April 2015, data were prospectively collected from 217 consecutive patients who underwent DP with 3-layer endoscopic staple closure in Seoul National University Hospital, Korea. Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) was graded according to International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula definitions. Staplers were grouped based on closed length (CL) (Group I: CL ≤ 1.5 mm, II: 1.5 mm 17 mm. With pancreatic thickness <12 mm, the POPF rate was lowest with Group II (I: 50%, II: 27.6%, III: 69.2%, P = 0.035).The optimal stapler cartridges with pancreatic thickness <12 mm were those in Group II (Gold, CL: 1.8 mm). There was no suitable cartridge for thicker pancreases. Further studies are necessary to reduce POPF in thick pancreases.

  17. 3D-Printed Paper Spray Ionization Cartridge with Integrated Desolvation Feature and Ion Optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salentijn, G Ij; Oleschuk, R D; Verpoorte, E

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present the application of 3D-printing for the miniaturization and functionalization of an ion source for (portable) mass spectrometry (MS). Two versions of a 3D-printed cartridge for paper spray ionization (PSI) are demonstrated, assessed, and compared. We first focus on the use of

  18. Rapid monitoring particulate radiocesium with nonwoven fabric cartridge filter and application to field monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hideki; Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Kondo, Yoshihiko; Kawashima, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    A method for rapid monitoring particulate radiocesium using a nonwoven fabric cartridge filter was developed, which needs no further preprocessing before served to a detector. By a performance test, more than 98% of suspended solid (SS) was collected. This method showed the same radioactivity measurement accuracy as filtration by membrane filter and more rapid extraction capability of SS. (author)

  19. Online elemental analysis of process gases with ICP-OES: A case study on waste wood combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellinger, Marco; Wochele, Joerg; Biollaz, Serge M.A.; Ludwig, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Simultaneous measurements of 23 elements in process gases of a waste wood combustor. ► Mobile ICP spectrometer allows measurements of high quality at industrial plants. ► Continuous online measurements with high temporal resolution. ► Linear correlations among element concentrations in the raw flue gas were detected. ► Novel sampling and calibration methods for ICP-OES analysis of process gases. - Abstract: A mobile sampling and measurement system for the analysis of gaseous and liquid samples in the field was developed. An inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), which is built into a van, was used as detector. The analytical system was calibrated with liquid and/or gaseous standards. It was shown that identical mass flows of either gaseous or liquid standards resulted in identical ICP-OES signal intensities. In a field measurement campaign trace and minor elements in the raw flue gas of a waste wood combustor were monitored. Sampling was performed with a highly transport efficient liquid quench system, which allowed to observe temporal variations in the elemental process gas composition. After a change in feedstock an immediate change of the element concentrations in the flue gas was detected. A comparison of the average element concentrations during the combustion of the two feedstocks showed a high reproducibility for matrix elements that are expected to be present in similar concentrations. On the other hand elements that showed strong differences in their concentration in the feedstock were also represented by a higher concentration in the flue gas. Following the temporal variations of different elements revealed strong correlations between a number of elements, such as chlorine with sodium, potassium and zinc, as well as arsenic with lead, and calcium with strontium.

  20. Rotary combustion device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Rotary combustion device (1) with rotary combustion chamber (4). Specific measures are taken to provide ignition of a combustible mixture. It is proposed that a hollow tube be provided coaxially with the axis of rotation (6), so that a small part of the mixture is guided into the combustion chamber.

  1. Comparative Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Oxyfuel and Post-combustion Capture with MEA and AMP/PZ - Case Studies from the EDDiCCUT Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oreggioni, Gabriel D.; Singh, Bhawna; Hung, Christine Roxanne; Van Der Spek, Mijndert W.; Skagestad, Ragnhild; Eldrup, Nils Henrik; Ramirez, Andrea; Strømman, Anders Hammer

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the results of a comparative life cycle assessment study for three CCS technologies applied to a coal-fired power plant: post-combustion capture with MEA, post combustion capture with AMP/PZ and cryogenic oxy-fuel. This study has been performed in the context of the EDDiCCUT

  2. Volatile organic compound analysis in wood combustion and meat cooking emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, B.; McDonald, J.

    1999-01-01

    Residential wood combustion and meat cooking emissions were each analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Emissions were diluted 60--100 times, cooled to ambient temperature, and allowed 80 seconds for condensation prior to collection with the aid of a DRI-constructed dilution stack sampler. Fireplace and wood-stove emissions testing was conducted at the DRI facilities. Wood type, wood moisture, burn rate, and fuel load were varied for different experiments. Meat emissions testing was conducted at the CE-CERT stationary emissions lab, University of California, Riverside. Meat type, fat content, and cooking appliance were changed in different tests. VOCs were collected using stainless-steel 6 L canisters and Tenax cartridges, whereas for carbonyl compound collection 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-impregnated C 18 SepPack cartridges were used. Analysis of VOC collected with canisters and Tenax cartridges was conducted by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) and by GC/FID/ECD (flame ionization detection/electron capture detection). DNPH-impregnated cartridges were analyzed for fourteen C 1 --C 7 carbonyl compounds, using the HPLC method. The results of these measurements are discussed

  3. Simplified quality control of radioactive seeds in sterile cartridge for prostate brachytherapy using an imaging plate and a collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saze, T.; Miyoshi, H.; Maezawa, H.; Kubota, M.; Furutani, S.; Nishitani, H.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Ito, S.; Nishizawa, K.

    2008-01-01

    Image analyzer system and collimator has been successfully applied to calibrate simultaneously multiple 125 I seeds in a sterile cartridge. Seeds within the cartridge were placed on an imaging plate, and the imaging plate irradiated. To remove scatter radiation, and improve spatial resolution of seed images, this study used a specially designed collimator. The irradiated imaging plate was scanned using an image analyzer system, and radioactivity intensities of seed images were given in counts. Counts could be translated to profiles, and each seed within the cartridge was analyzed. It is observed that a good correlation between counts and total radioactivity of the seeds within the cartridge. Thus, using a least-squares line, it was possible to calibrate a seed with unknown apparent activity. By analyzing the profiles, it was possible not only to detect a mis calibrated seed in the cartridge from its relative difference in counts, but also to identify its position in the cartridge. Using an imaging analyzer system, all seeds in a cartridge could be calibrated in a sterile environment. (author)

  4. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  5. Reduced NOX combustion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delano, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for combusting fuel and oxidant to achieve reduced formation of nitrogen oxides. It comprises: It comprises: heating a combustion zone to a temperature at least equal to 1500 degrees F.; injecting into the heated combustion zone a stream of oxidant at a velocity within the range of from 200 to 1070 feet per second; injecting into the combustion zone, spaced from the oxidant stream, a fuel stream at a velocity such that the ratio of oxidant stream velocity to fuel stream velocity does not exceed 20; aspirating combustion gases into the oxidant stream and thereafter intermixing the aspirated oxidant stream and fuel stream to form a combustible mixture; combusting the combustible mixture to produce combustion gases for the aspiration; and maintaining the fuel stream substantially free from contact with oxidant prior to the intermixture with aspirated oxidant

  6. Do insulin cartridges really provide a lower risk of potential diabetes complications than traditional vials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sharayri, Mohammad G; Aljbori, Tariq M; Migdadi, Qusai M; Al-Omoush, Marwa B; Jaarah, Ayman R

    2014-09-01

    Recently, many publicly funded healthcare organizations suffered from an economical crisis. This forced some organizations to utilize less costly alternatives where possible. Insulin cartridges and vials are examples. Many patients are questioning the difference between the two alternatives as they contain the same active ingredient. To find out if insulin cartridges really provide a lower risk of potential diabetes complications than traditional vials. A questionnaire was used to ask two random samples of diabetic patients about the development of some diabetes complications. The first sample (n = 41) consisted of patients using cartridges; the second sample (n = 40) consisted of patients using vials. Patients were randomly selected from the endocrine clinic and the out-patient pharmacy in Al-Hussein Hospital in King Hussein Medical Center in Amman- Jordan. 44% of respondents in the first sample did not suffer from any complication; on the other hand, the percentage was only 15% of respondents in the second sample. All respondents (100%) in the first sample suffered from only 2 complications or less; however, 25% of the respondents in the second sample suffered from 3 or more complications. Nephropathy complications, were slightly higher in the first sample; 22% compared to 15% in the second sample. On the other hand, all complications reported in the second sample were higher; 30% for neuropathy, 65% for retinopathy complications and 42.5% for extremities damage compared to only 9.7%, 7.3% and 26.8% respectively in the first sample. In general, respondents who were using cartridges reported a lesser incidence of diabetes complications. Although many organizations suffered from an economical crisis, the cost-effectiveness aspect should be taken into consideration when purchasing medical alternatives. This will provide higher quality of life for patients and eventually lower hidden and future costs for the organizations.

  7. Safety limits of half-mask cartridge respirators for organic solvent vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Recent studies of the effective service life (safety limits) for typical half-mask cartridge respirators have shown these devices to be unsuitable for certain organic vapors, e.g., methanol, methylamine, vinyl chloride, and dichloromethane, because the effective service life is too short. For these vapors other forms of protection such as air-supplied respirators are recommended. The experimentally determined service life for many vapors is shorter--sometimes significantly shorter--than predicted by adsorption theory

  8. Characterization of cartridge filters from the IEA-R1 Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The management of radioactive waste ensures safety to human health and the environment nowadays and for the future, without overwhelming the upcoming generations. The primary characterization of radioactive waste is one of the main steps in the management of radioactive waste. This step permits to choose the best treatment for the radioactive waste before forwarding it to its final disposal. The aim of the present work is the primary characterization of cartridge filters from the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor utilizing gamma-ray spectrometry, and the method of Monte Carlo for calibration. The IEA-R1 is located in the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN - CNEN) in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Cartridge filters are used for purification of the cooling water that is pumped through the core of the pool type nuclear research reactors. Once worn out, these filters are replaced and then become radioactive waste. Determination of the radioactive inventory is of paramount importance in the management of such radioactive waste, and one of the main methods for doing so is the gamma-ray spectrometry, which can identify and quantify high energy photon emitters. The technique chosen for the characterization of radioactive waste in the present work is the gamma-ray spectrometry with High purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. From the energy identified in the experimental spectrum, three radioisotopes were identified in the cartridge filter: 108m Ag, 110m Ag, 60 Co. For the estimated activity of the filter, the calibration in efficiency was made utilizing the MCNP4C code of the Monte Carlo method. Such method was chosen because there is no standard source available in the same geometry of the cartridge filter, therefore a simulation had to be developed in order to reach a calibration equation, necessary to estimate the activity of the radioactive waste. The results presented an activity value in the order of MBq for all radioisotopes. (authors)

  9. Characterization of cartridge filters from the IEA-R1 Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    The management of radioactive waste ensures safety to human health and the environment nowadays and for the future, without overwhelming the upcoming generations. The primary characterization of radioactive waste is one of the main steps in the management of radioactive waste. This step permits to choose the best treatment for the radioactive waste before forwarding it to its final disposal. The aim of the present work is the primary characterization of cartridge filters from the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor utilizing gamma-ray spectrometry, and the method of Monte Carlo for calibration. The IEA-R1 is located in the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN - CNEN) in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Cartridge filters are used for purification of the cooling water that is pumped through the core of the pool type nuclear research reactors. Once worn out, these filters are replaced and then become radioactive waste. Determination of the radioactive inventory is of paramount importance in the management of such radioactive waste, and one of the main methods for doing so is the gamma-ray spectrometry, which can identify and quantify high energy photon emitters. The technique chosen for the characterization of radioactive waste in the present work is the gamma-ray spectrometry with High purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. From the energy identified in the experimental spectrum, three radioisotopes were identified in the cartridge filter: {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 60}Co. For the estimated activity of the filter, the calibration in efficiency was made utilizing the MCNP4C code of the Monte Carlo method. Such method was chosen because there is no standard source available in the same geometry of the cartridge filter, therefore a simulation had to be developed in order to reach a calibration equation, necessary to estimate the activity of the radioactive waste. The results presented an activity value in the order of MBq for all radioisotopes. (authors)

  10. RPA using a multiplexed cartridge for low cost point of care diagnostics in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereku, Luck Tosan; Mackay, Ruth E; Craw, Pascal; Naveenathayalan, Angel; Stead, Thomas; Branavan, Manorharanehru; Balachandran, Wamadeva

    2018-04-15

    A point of care device utilising Lab-on-a-Chip technologies that is applicable for biological pathogens was designed, fabricated and tested showing sample in to answer out capabilities. The purpose of the design was to develop a cartridge with the capability to perform nucleic acid extraction and purification from a sample using a chitosan membrane at an acidic pH. Waste was stored within the cartridge with the use of sodium polyacrylate to solidify or gelate the sample in a single chamber. Nucleic acid elution was conducted using the RPA amplification reagents (alkaline pH). Passive valves were used to regulate the fluid flow and a multiplexer was designed to distribute the fluid into six microchambers for amplification reactions. Cartridges were produced using soft lithography of silicone from 3D printed moulds, bonded to glass substrates. The isothermal technique, RPA is employed for amplification. This paper shows the results from two separate experiments: the first using the RPA control nucleic acid, the second showing successful amplification from Chlamydia Trachomatis. Endpoint analysis conducted for the RPA analysis was gel electrophoresis that showed 143 base pair DNA was amplified successfully for positive samples whilst negative samples did not show amplification. End point analysis for Chlamydia Trachomatis samples was fluorescence detection that showed successful detection of 1 copy/μL and 10 copies/μL spiked in a MES buffer. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Behavioral response and pain perception to computer controlled local anesthetic delivery system and cartridge syringe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T D Yogesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study evaluated and compared the pain perception, behavioral response, physiological parameters, and the role of topical anesthetic administration during local anesthetic administration with cartridge syringe and computer controlled local anesthetic delivery system (CCLAD. Design: A randomized controlled crossover study was carried out with 120 children aged 7-11 years. They were randomly divided into Group A: Receiving injection with CCLAD during first visit; Group B: Receiving injection with cartridge syringe during first visit. They were further subdivided into three subgroups based on the topical application used: (a 20% benzocaine; (b pressure with cotton applicator; (c no topical application. Pulse rate and blood pressure were recorded before and during injection procedure. Objective evaluation of disruptive behavior and subjective evaluation of pain were done using face legs activity cry consolability scale and modified facial image scale, respectively. The washout period between the two visits was 1-week. Results: Injections with CCLAD produced significantly lesser pain response, disruptive behavior (P < 0.001, and pulse rate (P < 0.05 when compared to cartridge syringe injections. Application of benzocaine produced lesser pain response and disruptive behavior when compared to the other two subgroups, although the result was not significant. Conclusion: Usage of techniques which enhance behavioral response in children like injections with CCLAD can be considered as a possible step toward achieving a pain-free pediatric dental practice.

  12. Change in muzzle velocity due to freezing and water immersion of .22, long rifle, K.F. cartridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhari, M; Chatterjee, S M; Ghosh, P K

    1975-01-01

    A study of change in muzzle velocity due to freezing and water immersion of .22, long rifle, K. F. cartridges has been presented. A statistical criterion has been formulated to ascertain whether or not a cartridge undergoes a change in muzzle velocity due to a particular treatment. The muzzle velocity data of .22, long rifle, K. F. cartridges, obtained by an electronic timer before and after the various treatments, have been analyzed in the light of this criterion. These cartridges have generally been found to suffer considerable loss in muzzle velocity when immersed in water for three weeks and also when immersed in water for three days and simultaneously cooled to 0 degrees C. The forensic significance of this loss in muzzle velocity has been discussed.

  13. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  14. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani; Oß wald, Patrick; Hansen, Nils; Kohse-Hö inghaus, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    . While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides

  15. Injection system used into SI engines for complete combustion and reduction of exhaust emissions in the case of alcohol and petrol alcohol mixtures feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ispas, N.; Cofaru, C.; Aleonte, M.

    2017-10-01

    Internal combustion engines still play a major role in today transportation but increasing the fuel efficiency and decreasing chemical emissions remain a great goal of the researchers. Direct injection and air assisted injection system can improve combustion and can reduce the concentration of the exhaust gas pollutes. Advanced air-to-fuel and combustion air-to-fuel injection system for mixtures, derivatives and alcohol gasoline blends represent a major asset in reducing pollutant emissions and controlling combustion processes in spark-ignition engines. The use of these biofuel and biofuel blending systems for gasoline results in better control of spark ignition engine processes, making combustion as complete as possible, as well as lower levels of concentrations of pollutants in exhaust gases. The main purpose of this paper was to provide most suitable tools for ensure the proven increase in the efficiency of spark ignition engines, making them more environmentally friendly. The conclusions of the paper allow to highlight the paths leading to a better use of alcohols (biofuels) in internal combustion engines of modern transport units.

  16. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golodova, E; Shchepakina, E

    2006-01-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models

  17. Uncertainties in hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamps, D.W.; Wong, C.C.; Nelson, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three important areas of hydrogen combustion with uncertainties are identified: high-temperature combustion, flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition, and aerosol resuspension during hydrogen combustion. The uncertainties associated with high-temperature combustion may affect at least three different accident scenarios: the in-cavity oxidation of combustible gases produced by core-concrete interactions, the direct containment heating hydrogen problem, and the possibility of local detonations. How these uncertainties may affect the sequence of various accident scenarios is discussed and recommendations are made to reduce these uncertainties. 40 references

  18. COMBUSTION SIMULATION IN A SPARK IGNITION ENGINE CYLINDER: EFFECTS OF AIR-FUEL RATIO ON THE COMBUSTION DURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureddin Dinler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion is an important subject of internal combustion engine studies. To reduce the air pollution from internal combustion engines and to increase the engine performance, it is required to increase combustion efficiency. In this study, effects of air/fuel ratio were investigated numerically. An axisymmetrical internal combustion engine was modeled in order to simulate in-cylinder engine flow and combustion. Two dimensional transient continuity, momentum, turbulence, energy, and combustion equations were solved. The k-e turbulence model was employed. The fuel mass fraction transport equation was used for modeling of the combustion. For this purpose a computational fluid dynamics code was developed by using the finite volume method with FORTRAN programming code. The moving mesh was utilized to simulate the piston motion. The developed code simulates four strokes of engine continuously. In the case of laminar flow combustion, Arrhenius type combustion equations were employed. In the case of turbulent flow combustion, eddy break-up model was employed. Results were given for rich, stoichiometric, and lean mixtures in contour graphs. Contour graphs showed that lean mixture (l = 1.1 has longer combustion duration.

  19. New class of combustion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzhanov, A.G.; Borovinskaya, I.P.

    1975-01-01

    A short review is given of the results of work carried out since 1967 on studying the combustion processes caused by the interaction of chemical elements in the condensed phase and leading to the formation of refractory compounds. New phenomena and processes are described which are revealed when investigating the combustion of the systems of this class, viz solid-phase combustion, fast combustion in the condensed phase, filtering combustion, combustion in liquid nitrogen, spinning combustion, self-oscillating combustion, and repeated combustion. A new direction in employment of combustion processes is discussed, viz. a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of refractory nitrides, carbides, borides, silicides and other compounds

  20. Rapid, efficient and selective preconcentration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) by molecularly imprinted composite cartridge and HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Çorman, Mehmet Emin, E-mail: mecorman@sinop.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Sinop University, Department of Bioengineering, Sinop (Turkey); Armutcu, Canan [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Uzun, Lokman, E-mail: lokman@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey)

    2017-01-01

    In this study, cryogel-based molecularly imprinted composite cartridges were designed for the rapid, efficient, and selective preconcentration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) from water samples. First, a BaP-imprinted poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-(L)-phenylalanine) composite cartridge was synthesized under semi-frozen conditions and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and swelling tests. After the optimization of preconcentration parameters, i.e., pH and initial BaP concentration, the selectivity and preconcentration efficiency, and reusability of these cartridges were also evaluated. In selectivity experiments, BaP imprinted composite cartridge exhibited binding capacities 3.09, 9.52, 8.87, and 8.77-fold higher than that of the non-imprinted composite cartridge in the presence of competitors, such as benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF), benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF), indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene (IcdP), and 1-naphthol, respectively. The method detection limit (MDL), relative standard deviation (RSD) and preconcentration efficiency (PE) of the synthesized composite cartridge were calculated as 24.86 μg/L, 1.60%, and 349.6%, respectively. - Highlights: • Cryogel based molecularly imprinted composite cartridges as solid-phase extraction sorbents • Combination unique structural features of cryogels with MIP • An excellent ability to recognize the BaP molecule even if single-run contact • Rapid, efficient, selective and cost-friendly PAH preconcentration • Hydrophobic interactions via N-methacryloyl-(L)-phenylalanine.

  1. Operation of a plant for waste combustion in the dim frames and the national and Europe legislation in the case of the solid waste combustion plant Rugenberger-Dam in Hamburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke, D.; Zwahr, D.

    2000-01-01

    The difficulties in the operation of a waste processing plant are demonstrated on the example of the waste combustion facility Rudenberger-Dam in Hamburg. The installation and processes are described in details. The produced in the process 30% HCL is in compliance with the requirements for a commercial product, but since it is produced as a result from the processing of waste gases, it is treated as a waste product. Similar problems occur in other installations. German and European legislation in the field of waste management are unnecessary complicated. The introduction of technical frame conditions in the laws often presents an obstacle for the application of new technologies. It is pointed out that the time for changes in the environment legislation has come

  2. Boiler using combustible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  3. Lump wood combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  4. Flameless Combustion Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutmark, Ephraim

    2005-01-01

    .... "Flameless Combustion" is characterized by high stability levels with virtually no thermoacoustic instabilities, very low lean stability limits and therefore extremely low NOx production, efficient...

  5. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  6. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  7. On-cartridge derivatisation using matrix solid phase dispersion for the determination of cyclamate in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jianjun; Liu, Yun; Liu, Qianping; Hui, Junfeng; Liu, Yangzi

    2017-01-01

    A novel method for determination of sodium cyclamate in foods was developed. In this method, a syringe was loaded with the homogeneous mixture of the sample, KMnO 4 powder and silica dispersant and used as a matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) reactor. As the reactor was infiltrated with small amounts of concentrated HCl, cyclamate was converted to 2-chlorocyclohexanone quickly and effectively within 5 min and determined by HPLC on a reversed-phase column using UV detection at a wavelength of 310 nm. Comparing with the traditional derivatisation in solution, the better clean-up was provided using on-cartridge derivatisation of MSPD, and much time, labor, and expense were saved. The results showed good linearity (r 2  = 0.9998) over the concentration range of 1–500 mg/L. The limit of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) of the cyclamate were 0.3 mg/L and 1 mg/L respectively. The recoveries ranged from 91.6% to 101.3% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) in the range of 2.5%–4.3%. - Highlights: • A novel method was developed for the determination of cyclamate in foods. • On cartridge derivatisation, using matrix solid phase dispersion, was developed. • A new derivatisation reaction for cyclamate conversion to 2-chlorocyclohexanone was developed. • The method was rapid, simple, inexpensive, effective.

  8. Thermal enhancement cartridge heater modified (TECH Mod) tritium hydride bed development, Part 1 - Design and fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.E.; Estochen, E.G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities have used first generation (Gen1) LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride storage beds for tritium absorption, storage, and desorption. The Gen1 design utilizes hot and cold nitrogen supplies to thermally cycle these beds. Second and third generation (Gen2 and Gen3) storage bed designs include heat conducting foam and divider plates to spatially fix the hydride within the bed. For thermal cycling, the Gen2 and Gen3 beds utilize internal electric heaters and glovebox atmosphere flow over the bed inside the bed external jacket for cooling. The currently installed Gen1 beds require replacement due to tritium aging effects on the LANA0.75 material, and cannot be replaced with Gen2 or Gen3 beds due to different designs of these beds. At the end of service life, Gen1 bed desorption efficiencies are limited by the upper temperature of hot nitrogen supply. To increase end-of-life desorption efficiency, the Gen1 bed design was modified, and a Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) bed was developed. Internal electric cartridge heaters in the new design to improve end-of-life desorption, and also permit in-bed tritium accountability (IBA) calibration measurements to be made without the use of process tritium. Additional enhancements implemented into the TECH Mod design are also discussed. (authors)

  9. On-cartridge derivatisation using matrix solid phase dispersion for the determination of cyclamate in foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianjun, E-mail: bootan12@126.com [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Miniaturized Detection Systems, Xi' an 710069 (China); Liu, Yun [College of Food Engineering and Nutritional Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Liu, Qianping [National Engineering Research Center for Miniaturized Detection Systems, Xi' an 710069 (China); Hui, Junfeng [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Liu, Yangzi [National Engineering Research Center for Miniaturized Detection Systems, Xi' an 710069 (China)

    2017-06-15

    A novel method for determination of sodium cyclamate in foods was developed. In this method, a syringe was loaded with the homogeneous mixture of the sample, KMnO{sub 4} powder and silica dispersant and used as a matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) reactor. As the reactor was infiltrated with small amounts of concentrated HCl, cyclamate was converted to 2-chlorocyclohexanone quickly and effectively within 5 min and determined by HPLC on a reversed-phase column using UV detection at a wavelength of 310 nm. Comparing with the traditional derivatisation in solution, the better clean-up was provided using on-cartridge derivatisation of MSPD, and much time, labor, and expense were saved. The results showed good linearity (r{sup 2} = 0.9998) over the concentration range of 1–500 mg/L. The limit of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) of the cyclamate were 0.3 mg/L and 1 mg/L respectively. The recoveries ranged from 91.6% to 101.3% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) in the range of 2.5%–4.3%. - Highlights: • A novel method was developed for the determination of cyclamate in foods. • On cartridge derivatisation, using matrix solid phase dispersion, was developed. • A new derivatisation reaction for cyclamate conversion to 2-chlorocyclohexanone was developed. • The method was rapid, simple, inexpensive, effective.

  10. Hydrogen Car Cartridges: A New Strategy for Hydrogen Storage, Delivering and Refueling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosini, Pier Paolo

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the project is to introduce a sustainable model in the automotive field, guarantying the Kyoto agreements. The aim of the project is to develop an innovative hydrogen tank able to power an hydrogen fuel cell car with the same performance of liquid fuelled cars. Most of the system performance are expected to satisfy the Department of Energy (DOE) goals for 2015. The hydrogen releasing system is based on solid NaBH4 which is hydrolyzed with water or steam to obtain hydrogen. Sodium borate is obtained as by-product and it has to be recycled. Pure and humidified hydrogen, ready to be utilized in a fuel cell, is obtained by a simple and sure way. Hydrogen is produced only when it is requested and therefore there is never pressurized hydrogen or hydrogen overproduction The system works at atmospheric pressure avoiding the problems related to handling and storing pressurized gas. The car fuelling could be performed in area like the present service stations. The used cartridges can be removed and substituted by new cartridges. Contemporarily a water tank should be refilled. To improve the total energetic yield it was also proposed a NaBH4 regeneration process directly starting from the products of hydrolysis. (auth)

  11. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Yanzhao; Dawood, Alaaeldin; Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Somers, Bart; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON

  12. Automatic welding of fuel elements; Soudure automatique des elements combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briola, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The welding process depends on the type of fuel element, the can material and the number of cartridges to be welded: - inert-gas welding (used for G2 and the 1. set of EL3), - inert atmosphere arc welding (used for welding uranium and zirconium), - electronic welding (used for the 2. set of EL3 and the tank of Proserpine). (author) [French] Suivant le type d'element combustible, le materiau de gaine et l'importance de la serie a fabriquer, le soudeur dispose des differents procedes examines dans cette communication: - soudure classique a l'arc sous gaz inerte (utilisee pour G2 et le premier jeu EL3), - soudure en atmosphere complete d'argon (utilisee pour la soudure d'uranium et de zirconium), - soudure electronique (utilisee pourdeuxieme jeu EL3 et la cuve de Proserpine). (auteur)

  13. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions from residential wood combustion in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Mário; Gomes, Luís; Tarelho, Luís; Pio, Casimiro

    2013-06-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to characterize formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions from residential combustion of common wood species growing in Portugal. Five types of wood were investigated: maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), cork oak (Quercus suber), holm oak (Quercus rotundifolia) and pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica). Laboratory experiments were performed with a typical wood stove used for domestic heating in Portugal and operating under realistic home conditions. Aldehydes were sampled from diluted combustion flue gas using silica cartridges coated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The average formaldehyde to acetaldehyde concentration ratio (molar basis) in the stove flue gas was in the range of 2.1-2.9. Among the tested wood types, pyrenean oak produced the highest emissions for both formaldehyde and acetaldehyde: 1772 ± 649 and 1110 ± 454 mg kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. By contrast, maritime pine produced the lowest emissions: 653 ± 151 and 371 ± 162 mg kg-1 biomass (dry basis) burned, respectively. Aldehydes were sampled separately during distinct periods of the holm oak wood combustion cycles. Significant variations in the flue gas concentrations were found, with higher values measured during the devolatilization stage than in the flaming and smoldering stages.

  14. Statistical Analysis of Firearms/Toolmarks Interpretation of Cartridge Case Evidence Using IBIS and Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-24

    representations of the same surface. 54 At one stage Cambridge Instruments marketed a comparison SEM...versus-test scores (an indication of the reproducibility of marketing within the file. The solid curve represents the best-known non-match (BKNM) curve...34, "FederalAmericanEagle", "Unknown", "Unknown", "FederalAmericanEagle", "Unknown", "Remington") Primer <- c("SSG", " STP ", "SFT", "SFG", " STP ", "SSG

  15. Synthesis of O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine based on a cartridge purification method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Dirk; Klette, Ingo; Kalb, Fabrizia; Baum, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: O-(2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) is widely used as a positron emission tomography tracer for brain tumors. Usually, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification at the end of the two-step synthesis is applied. In this work, we report an automatic radiosynthesis of FET with a purification procedure based on standard cartridges. Methods: O-(2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine was prepared by [ 18 F]fluoroethylation of L-tyrosine by a two-step synthesis using a modified [ 11 C]methionine module (Nuclear Interface). In the first reaction step, we synthesized [ 18 F]fluoroethyltosylate starting from [ 18 F]fluoride. After a purification step, L-tyrosine was [ 18 F]fluoroethylated with [ 18 F]fluoroethyltosylate. The final reaction mixture was purified by means of solid phase extraction. The FET was trapped on an SCX cartridge, eluted with saline solution and trapped again on an HRX cartridge. For a second purification step, the FET was eluted from the HRX cartridge with ammonium acetate buffer and collected on two SCX cartridges followed by a washing step with water. The final product was eluted with saline solution and neutralised with 450 μl NaHCO 3 solution (8.4%). Results: The synthesis was finished after 50 min and delivered the FET in a range of 3-16 GBq. The synthesis typically yielded 41% (21 experiments) of FET (d.c.) without an HPLC purification step. The radiochemical purity ranged between 97% and 100%. Conclusion: We present a radiosynthesis of FET where the usually used HPLC purification procedure has been substituted by a purification step based on standard cartridges. This method is useful for automatic modules without an expensive HPLC purification unit and for the routine production of FET.

  16. Study of experimental validation for combustion analysis of GOTHIC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. Y.; Yang, S. Y.; Park, K. C.; Jeong, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, present lumped and subdivided GOTHIC6 code analyses of the premixed hydrogen combustion experiment at the Seoul National University and comparison with the experiment results. The experimental facility has 16367 cc free volume and rectangular shape. And the test was performed with unit equivalence ratio of the hydrogen and air, and with various location of igniter position. Using the lumped and mechanistic combustion model in GOTHIC6 code, the experiments were simulated with the same conditions. In the comparison between experiment and calculated results, the GOTHIC6 prediction of the combustion response does not compare well with the experiment results. In the point of combustion time, the lumped combustion model of GOTHIC6 code does not simulate the physical phenomena of combustion appropriately. In the case of mechanistic combustion model, the combustion time is predicted well, but the induction time of calculation data is longer than the experiment data remarkably. Also, the laminar combustion model of GOTHIC6 has deficiency to simulate combustion phenomena unless control the user defined value appropriately. And the pressure is not a proper variable that characterize the three dimensional effect of combustion

  17. Environmental impacts and resource losses of incinerating misplaced household special wastes (WEEE, batteries, ink cartridges and cables)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigum, Marianne Kristine Kjærgaard; Damgaard, Anders; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of misplaced special waste (sWEEE, lamps, CRT, batteries, ink cartridges and cables) to environmental impacts from incineration of residual household waste was quantified through life cycle assessment (LCA)-modelling. Misplaced special waste was quantified to constitute less than 1...... and batteries. However as shown by sensitivity analysis, lack of good data on the transfer of rare and hazardous metals to the flue gas in the incineration process should receive further investigation before the environmental impacts from misplaced incinerated special waste can fully be concluded upon. Although...... special waste (sWEEE, lamps, CRT, batteries, ink cartridges, and cables)....

  18. Computer-Aided-Design of the Hydraulic System of Three-Dimensional Cartridge Valve Blocks (Selected Articles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-21

    sectional representation of the spatial figure can be correctly determined. 6 The AutoLisp language system in the AutoCAD software provides the most...softwares are developed on the 32-bit machines and little progress has been reported for the 16-bit machines. Even the AutoCAD is a two-ard-a-half... AutoCAD software as the basis, developed the design package of 3-D cartridge valve blocks on IM PC/AT. To realize the 3-D displaying of cartridge valves

  19. Microscale combustion and power generation

    CERN Document Server

    Cadou, Christopher; Ju, Yiguang

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in microfabrication technologies have enabled the development of entirely new classes of small-scale devices with applications in fields ranging from biomedicine, to wireless communication and computing, to reconnaissance, and to augmentation of human function. In many cases, however, what these devices can actually accomplish is limited by the low energy density of their energy storage and conversion systems. This breakthrough book brings together in one place the information necessary to develop the high energy density combustion-based power sources that will enable many of these devices to realize their full potential. Engineers and scientists working in energy-related fields will find: An overview of the fundamental physics and phenomena of microscale combustion; Presentations of the latest modeling and simulation techniques for gasphase and catalytic micro-reactors; The latest results from experiments in small-scale liquid film, microtube, and porous combustors, micro-thrusters, a...

  20. Steady state HNG combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louwers, J.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L. [TNO Prins Maurits Lab., Rijswijk (Netherlands); Brewster, M.Q. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Son, S.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Parr, T.; Hanson-Parr, D. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Two simplified modeling approaches are used to model the combustion of Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF, N{sub 2}H{sub 5}-C(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}). The condensed phase is treated by high activation energy asymptotics. The gas phase is treated by two limit cases: the classical high activation energy, and the recently introduced low activation energy approach. This results in simplification of the gas phase energy equation, making an (approximate) analytical solution possible. The results of both models are compared with experimental results of HNF combustion. It is shown that the low activation energy approach yields better agreement with experimental observations (e.g. regression rate and temperature sensitivity), than the high activation energy approach.

  1. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  2. Catalytically enhanced combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel having improved combustion efficiency. It comprises a petroleum based liquid hydrocarbon; and a combustion catalyst comprising from about 18 to about 21 weight percent naphthalene, from about 75 to about 80 weight percent toluene, and from about 2.8 to about 3.2 weight percent benzyl alcohol

  3. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers

  4. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  5. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  6. Impact of co-combustion of petroleum coke and coal on fly ash quality: Case study of a Western Kentucky power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hower, James C.; Thomas, Gerald A.; Mardon, Sarah M.; Trimble, Alan S.

    2005-01-01

    Petroleum coke has been used as a supplement or replacement for coal in pulverized-fuel combustion. At a 444-MW western Kentucky power station, the combustion of nearly 60% petroleum coke with moderate- to high-sulfur Illinois Basin coal produces fly ash with nearly 50% uncombusted petroleum coke and large amounts of V and Ni when compared to fly ash from strictly pulverized coal burns. Partitioning of the V and Ni, known from other studies to be concentrated in petroleum coke, was noted. However, the distribution of V and Ni does not directly correspond to the amount of uncombusted petroleum coke in the fly ash. Vanadium and Ni are preferentially associated with the finer, higher surface area fly ash fractions captured at lower flue gas temperatures. The presence of uncombusted petroleum coke in the fly ash doubles the amount of ash to be disposed, makes the fly ash unmarketable because of the high C content, and would lead to higher than typical (compared to other fly ashes in the region) concentrations of V and Ni in the fly ash even if the petroleum coke C could be beneficiated from the fly ash. Further studies of co-combustion ashes are necessary in order to understand their behavior in disposal

  7. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    .... The PDF approach to turbulent combustion has the advantages of fully representing the turbulent fluctuations of species and temperature, and of allowing realistic combustion chemistry to be implemented...

  8. Nitrogen oxides in the combustion products of gas cookers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benes, M.; Zahourek, J.

    1981-07-01

    The combustion of town gas and natural gas in two types of gas ranges manufactured in Czechoslovakia resulted in measurable amounts of NO/sub x/ in both the combustion products and the surrounding air. In all the cases tested, the amounts of NO/sub x/ given off exceeded levels permitted by current Czech standards. These results indicate that before the widespread use of any new gas ranges, their combustion products should be tested for NO/sub x/.

  9. Research on Marine Boiler's Pressurized Combustion and Heat Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pingjian MING; Renqiu JIANG; Yanjun LI; Baozhi SUN

    2005-01-01

    The effect of pressure on combustion and heat transfer is analyzed. The research is based on the basic combustion and heat transfer theorem. A correction for the heat calculation method for pressurized furnace is made on the basis of the normal pressure case. The correction takes the effect of pressurizing into account. The results show that the correction is reasonable and the method is applicable to combustion and heat transfer of the marine supercharged boiler.

  10. Detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus in self-obtained cervicovaginal samples by using the FTA cartridge: new possibilities for cervical cancer screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenselink, C.H.; Bie, R.P. de; Hamont, D. van; Bakkers, J.M.J.E.; Quint, W.G.V.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and genotyping in self-sampled genital smears applied to an indicating FTA elute cartridge (FTA cartridge). The study group consisted of 96 women, divided into two sample sets. All samples were analyzed by the HPV SPF(10)-Line Blot 25. Set 1

  11. Fuel Combustion Laboratory | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion Laboratory Fuel Combustion Laboratory NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the combustion chamber platform for fuel ignition kinetics research, was acquired to expand the lab's

  12. Disposable cartridge extraction of retinol and alpha-tocopherol from fatty samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, C F; Ciba, N

    1988-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for liquid/solid extraction of retinol and alpha-tocopherol from samples, using a disposable kieselguhr cartridge. The substitution of the mixture methanol-ethanol-n-butanol (4 + 3 + 1) for methanol in the alkaline hydrolysis solution makes it now possible to process fatty samples. Methanol is necessary to solubilize the antioxidant ascorbic acid, and a linear chain alcohol such as n-butanol is necessary to reduce the size of soap micelles so that they can penetrate into the kieselguhr pores. In comparisons of the proposed method with conventional methods on mineral premixes and fatty feedstuffs, recovery and accuracy are at least as good by the proposed method. Advantages are increased rate of determinations and the ability to hydrolyze and extract retinol and alpha-tocopherol together from the same sample.

  13. Rapid purification of radioiodinated peptides with Sep-Pak reversed phase cartridges and HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.J.; Schultz, G.S.; Levy, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    A simple, rapid method is described for the purification of radioiodinated peptides for use in radioimmuno- and in radioreceptor assays. Iodinated reaction mixtures are applied directly onto Sep-Pak disposable, reversed phase cartridges equilibrated with phosphate buffer. Unreacted 125-iodide and other non-peptide reaction components are eluted with buffer. The peptide fraction is then eluted with 70% buffer:30% acetonitrile. The peptide fraction is further purified by reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography to separate the native peptide and the mono- and diiodo-derivatives. In this study the method is used to prepare 125-iodide-labeled monoiodo-leucine enkephalin and monoiodo-angiotensin II, which are free of the parent peptides and diiodo-derivatives and are of maximum obtainable specific radioactivity. The usefulness of these labeled peptides in radioimmuno- and radioreceptor assays is demonstrated by their binding to specific antibodies and receptors, respectively. (author)

  14. A new screening method for amphetamine and methamphetamine using dansyl chloride derivatization and cartridge fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, H; Ikeda-Wada, S; Oguri, K

    1998-07-01

    A new screening method for amphetamines was developed. It consists of derivatization with dansyl chloride, extraction of the derivative using a Sep-Pak C18 or a Bond Elut C18, solid phase extraction columns, and visualization of the fluorescence of the cartridge. A control test using drug-free urine showed no fluorescence. Amphetamine, methamphetamine and the methylenedioxy derivatives exhibited strong fluorescence, while related compounds, such as N-ethylamphetamine and fenetylline, were negative or weakly positive. The disadvantage of the present method is that it is a multi-step procedure and 20-30 min is required for screening. However, since it has a different specificity from the widely used immunochemical technique, it is suggested to be a useful screen for amphetamines.

  15. Characterization of filter cartridges from the IEA-R1 reactor by radiochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldo, Bianca; Vicente, Roberto; Ferreira, Robson J.; Goes, Marcos M.; Marumo, Julio T.

    2015-01-01

    The filter cartridges used in water purification system of research nuclear reactor IEA-R1 are considered radioactive wastes after their useful life. The characterization of these wastes is one of the stages of management, which aims to identify and quantify the radionuclides present, including those known as 'difficult to measure' (DTM) radionuclides. Establish a radiochemical analysis methodology for this type of waste is a difficult job, not only by the application of these techniques, but also by the amount of radionuclides that should be analyzed. In the waste produced in a nuclear reactor, the most important radionuclides are fission products, activation products and transuranic elements. Since these radionuclides emit gamma radiation not measurable in its decay process and consequently are difficult to measure, their concentrations can be estimated by indirect methods such as scale factors. This method is used to evaluate the DTM concentration, which is represented by alpha and beta nuclides using the correlation between them and the radionuclide key, a gamma emitter. The objective of this work is to describe a radiochemical analysis methodology for gamma emitter nuclides, present in the filter cartridges, evaluating the activity and concentrations by destructive assays. At the same time, two studies have been performed by non-destructive assays, the first one based on dose rates and the point kernel method to correlate the results and the second one based on calibration efficiency with Monte Carlo method. These studies belong to the radioactive waste characterization program that has been conducted at the Waste Management Laboratory of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP. (author)

  16. Characterization of filter cartridges from the IEA-R1 reactor by radiochemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldo, Bianca; Vicente, Roberto; Ferreira, Robson J.; Goes, Marcos M.; Marumo, Julio T., E-mail: bgeraldo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The filter cartridges used in water purification system of research nuclear reactor IEA-R1 are considered radioactive wastes after their useful life. The characterization of these wastes is one of the stages of management, which aims to identify and quantify the radionuclides present, including those known as 'difficult to measure' (DTM) radionuclides. Establish a radiochemical analysis methodology for this type of waste is a difficult job, not only by the application of these techniques, but also by the amount of radionuclides that should be analyzed. In the waste produced in a nuclear reactor, the most important radionuclides are fission products, activation products and transuranic elements. Since these radionuclides emit gamma radiation not measurable in its decay process and consequently are difficult to measure, their concentrations can be estimated by indirect methods such as scale factors. This method is used to evaluate the DTM concentration, which is represented by alpha and beta nuclides using the correlation between them and the radionuclide key, a gamma emitter. The objective of this work is to describe a radiochemical analysis methodology for gamma emitter nuclides, present in the filter cartridges, evaluating the activity and concentrations by destructive assays. At the same time, two studies have been performed by non-destructive assays, the first one based on dose rates and the point kernel method to correlate the results and the second one based on calibration efficiency with Monte Carlo method. These studies belong to the radioactive waste characterization program that has been conducted at the Waste Management Laboratory of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP. (author)

  17. Effects of combustible stacking in large compartments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentili, Filippo; Giuliani, Luisa; Bontempi, Franco

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the modelling of fire in case of various distributions of combustible materials in a large compartment. Large compartments often represent a challenge for structural fire safety, because of lack of prescriptive rules to follow and difficulties of taking into account the effect...... of non uniform distribution of the combustible materials and fire propagation. These aspects are discussed in this paper with reference to an industrial steel building, taken as case study. Fires triggered by the burning of wooden pallets stored in the premises have been investigated with respect...

  18. Reaction-diffusion pulses: a combustion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Daniel; Llebot, Josep Enric; Fort, Joaquim

    2004-01-01

    We focus on a reaction-diffusion approach proposed recently for experiments on combustion processes, where the heat released by combustion follows first-order reaction kinetics. This case allows us to perform an exhaustive analytical study. Specifically, we obtain the exact expressions for the speed of the thermal pulses, their maximum temperature and the condition of self-sustenance. Finally, we propose two generalizations of the model, namely, the case of several reactants burning together, and that of time-delayed heat conduction. We find an excellent agreement between our analytical results and simulations

  19. Reaction-diffusion pulses: a combustion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Daniel [Grup de FIsica EstadIstica, Dept. de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterrra (Spain); Llebot, Josep Enric [Grup de FIsica EstadIstica, Dept. de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterrra (Spain); Fort, Joaquim [Dept. de FIsica, Univ. de Girona, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2004-07-02

    We focus on a reaction-diffusion approach proposed recently for experiments on combustion processes, where the heat released by combustion follows first-order reaction kinetics. This case allows us to perform an exhaustive analytical study. Specifically, we obtain the exact expressions for the speed of the thermal pulses, their maximum temperature and the condition of self-sustenance. Finally, we propose two generalizations of the model, namely, the case of several reactants burning together, and that of time-delayed heat conduction. We find an excellent agreement between our analytical results and simulations.

  20. Modeling the internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible and computationally economical model of the internal combustion engine was developed for use on large digital computer systems. It is based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The computer program is capable of multicycle calculations, with some parameters varying from cycle to cycle, and has restart capabilities. It can accommodate a broad spectrum of reactants, permits changes in physical properties, and offers a wide selection of alternative modeling functions without any reprogramming. It readily adapts to the amount of information available in a particular case because the model is in fact a hierarchy of five models. The models range from a simple model requiring only thermodynamic properties to a complex model demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. Among its many features the model includes heat transfer, valve timing, supercharging, motoring, finite burning rates, cycle-to-cycle variations in air-fuel ratio, humid air, residual and recirculated exhaust gas, and full combustion kinetics.

  1. Ways of increasing of efficiency of the use of chemical gazogene cartridges at the mining of facing raw material

    OpenAIRE

    Кальчук, Сергій Володимирович; Лукащук, Олександр Вікторович

    2016-01-01

    The analysis and theoretical generalizations of influencing of the known methods of separation to the stone on the array of breeds is executed. Certain backlogs of increase of the OIR use of chemical gazogene cartridges. Offered ways of determination of optimum parameters of most effective their applications on the deposits of facing stone.

  2. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  3. Analysis of the chemical equilibrium of combustion at constant volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius BREBENEL

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Determining the composition of a mixture of combustion gases at a given temperature is based on chemical equilibrium, when the equilibrium constants are calculated on the assumption of constant pressure and temperature. In this paper, an analysis of changes occurring when combustion takes place at constant volume is presented, deriving a specific formula of the equilibrium constant. The simple reaction of carbon combustion in pure oxygen in both cases (constant pressure and constant volume is next considered as example of application, observing the changes occurring in the composition of the combustion gases depending on temperature.

  4. Shale oil combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-dabbas, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    A 'coutant' carbon steel combustion chamber cooled by water jacket was conslructed to burn diesel fuel and mixlure of shale oil and diesel fuels. During experimental work nir fuel ratio was determined, temperaturces were measured using Chromel/ Almel thermocouple, finally the gasous combustion product analysis was carricd out using gas chromatograph technique. The constructed combustion chamber was operating salisfactory for several hours of continous work. According to the measurements it was found that: the flame temperature of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was greater than the flame temperature of diesel fuel. and the sulfer emissious of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was higher than that of diesel fuel. Calculation indicated that the dry gas energy loss was very high and the incomplete combustion energy loss very small. (author). 23 refs., 35 figs

  5. Shale oil combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-dabbas, M A

    1992-05-01

    A `coutant` carbon steel combustion chamber cooled by water jacket was conslructed to burn diesel fuel and mixlure of shale oil and diesel fuels. During experimental work nir fuel ratio was determined, temperaturces were measured using Chromel/ Almel thermocouple, finally the gasous combustion product analysis was carricd out using gas chromatograph technique. The constructed combustion chamber was operating salisfactory for several hours of continous work. According to the measurements it was found that: the flame temperature of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was greater than the flame temperature of diesel fuel. and the sulfer emissious of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was higher than that of diesel fuel. Calculation indicated that the dry gas energy loss was very high and the incomplete combustion energy loss very small. (author). 23 refs., 35 figs.

  6. Indoor combustion and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W

    2008-08-01

    Indoor combustion produces both gases (eg, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide) and particulate matter that may affect the development or exacerbation of asthma. Sources in the home include both heating devices (eg, fireplaces, woodstoves, kerosene heaters, flued [ie, vented] or nonflued gas heaters) and gas stoves for cooking. This article highlights the recent literature examining associations between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma development and severity. Since asthma is a chronic condition affecting both children and adults, both age groups are included in this article. Overall, there is some evidence of an association between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma, particularly asthma symptoms in children. Some sources of combustion such as coal stoves have been more consistently associated with these outcomes than other sources such as woodstoves.

  7. Improvement of a combustion model in MELCOR code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Masao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    NUPEC has been improving a hydrogen combustion model in MELCOR code for severe accident analysis. In the proposed combustion model, the flame velocity in a node was predicted using five different flame front shapes of fireball, prism, bubble, spherical jet, and plane jet. For validation of the proposed model, the results of the Battelle multi-compartment hydrogen combustion test were used. The selected test cases for the study were Hx-6, 13, 14, 20 and Ix-2 which had two, three or four compartments under homogeneous hydrogen concentration of 5 to 10 vol%. The proposed model could predict well the combustion behavior in multi-compartment containment geometry on the whole. MELCOR code, incorporating the present combustion model, can simulate combustion behavior during severe accident with acceptable computing time and some degree of accuracy. The applicability study of the improved MELCOR code to the actual reactor plants will be further continued. (author)

  8. Performance analysis of single stage libr-water absorption machine operated by waste thermal energy of internal combustion engine: Case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Hafiz Zafar; Leman, A. M.; Muthuraman, S.; Salleh, Mohd Najib Mohd; Zakaria, Supaat

    2017-09-01

    Combined heating, cooling, and power is also known as Tri-generation. Tri-generation system can provide power, hot water, space heating and air -conditioning from single source of energy. The objective of this study is to propose a method to evaluate the characteristic and performance of a single stage lithium bromide-water (LiBr-H2O) absorption machine operated with waste thermal energy of internal combustion engine which is integral part of trigeneration system. Correlations for computer sensitivity analysis are developed in data fit software for (P-T-X), (H-T-X), saturated liquid (water), saturated vapor, saturation pressure and crystallization temperature curve of LiBr-H2O Solution. Number of equations were developed with data fit software and exported into excel work sheet for the evaluation of number of parameter concerned with the performance of vapor absorption machine such as co-efficient of performance, concentration of solution, mass flow rate, size of heat exchangers of the unit in relation to the generator, condenser, absorber and evaporator temperatures. Size of vapor absorption machine within its crystallization limits for cooling and heating by waste energy recovered from exhaust gas, and jacket water of internal combustion engine also presented in this study to save the time and cost for the facilities managers who are interested to utilize the waste thermal energy of their buildings or premises for heating and air conditioning applications.

  9. Intense atmospheric pollution modifies weather: a~case of mixed biomass burning with fossil fuel combustion pollution in the eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, A. J.; Fu, C. B.; Yang, X. Q.; Sun, J. N.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y. N.; Herrmann, E.; Zheng, L. F.; Nie, W.; Wei, X. L.; Kulmala, M.

    2013-06-01

    The influence of air pollutants, particularly aerosols, on regional and global climate is widely investigated, but only a very limited number of studies reports their impacts on everyday weather. In this work, we present for the first time direct (observational) evidence of a clear effect how a mixed atmospheric pollution changes the weather with a substantial modification in air temperature and rainfall. By using comprehensive measurements in Nanjing, China, we found that mixed agricultural burning plumes with fossil fuel combustion pollution resulted in a decrease of solar radiation by more than 70%, of sensible heat flux over 85%, a temperature drop by almost 10 K, and a change of rainfall during daytime and nighttime. Our results show clear air pollution - weather interactions, and quantify how air pollution affects weather with the influence of air pollution-boundary layer dynamics and aerosol-radiation-cloudy feedbacks. This study highlights a cross-disciplinary needs to study the environmental, weather and climate impact of the mixed biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion sources in the East China.

  10. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  11. Effect of combustion characteristics on wall radiative heat flux in a 100 MWe oxy-coal combustion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.; Ryu, C. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). School of Mechanical Engineering; Chae, T.Y. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). School of Mechanical Engineering; Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of). Energy System R and D Group; Yang, W. [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of). Energy System R and D Group; Kim, Y.; Lee, S.; Seo, S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Power Generation Lab.

    2013-07-01

    Oxy-coal combustion exhibits different reaction, flow and heat transfer characteristics from air-coal combustion due to different properties of oxidizer and flue gas composition. This study investigated the wall radiative heat flux (WRHF) of air- and oxy-coal combustion in a simple hexahedral furnace and in a 100 MWe single-wall-fired boiler using computational modeling. The hexahedral furnace had similar operation conditions with the boiler, but the coal combustion was ignored by prescribing the gas properties after complete combustion at the inlet. The concentrations of O{sub 2} in the oxidizers ranging between 26 and 30% and different flue gas recirculation (FGR) methods were considered in the furnace. In the hexahedral furnace, the oxy-coal case with 28% of O{sub 2} and wet FGR had a similar value of T{sub af} with the air-coal combustion case, but its WRHF was 12% higher. The mixed FGR case with about 27% O{sub 2} in the oxidizer exhibited the WRHF similar to the air-coal case. During the actual combustion in the 100 MWe boiler using mixed FGR, the reduced volumetric flow rates in the oxy-coal cases lowered the swirl strength of the burners. This stretched the flames and moved the high temperature region farther to the downstream. Due to this reason, the case with 30% O{sub 2} in the oxidizers achieved a WRHF close to that of air-coal combustion, although its adiabatic flame temperature (T{sub af}) and WHRF predicted in the simplified hexahedral furnace was 103 K and 10% higher, respectively. Therefore, the combustion characteristics and temperature distribution significantly influences the WRHF, which should be assessed to determine the ideal operating conditions of oxy- coal combustion. The choice of the weighted sum of gray gases model (WSGGM) was not critical in the large coal-fired boiler.

  12. Emissions of NO and CO from counterflow combustion of CH4 under MILD and oxyfuel conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Kin-Pang; Li, Pengfei; Wang, Feifei; Mi, Jianchun

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the NO and CO emission characteristics of counterflow combustion of methane simulated under MILD or/and oxyfuel conditions. Simulations using CHEMKIN are conducted for various injection conditions of fuel and oxidizer. Note that the terms “oxyfuel”, “MILD-N 2 ” and “MILD-CO 2 ” combustion adopted hereafter represent the conventional oxy-combustion and those MILD combustions diluted by N 2 and CO 2 , respectively. It is observed that the NO emission of MILD-CO 2 combustion is ultra-low for all cases of investigation, even when increasing the combustion temperature up to 2000 K or adding more N 2 (up to 20%) to either the fuel stream (to simulate nitrogen-containing fuels like biomass) or the oxidizer stream (to simulate the air-ingress). A higher temperature allowed under MILD-CO 2 combustion suggests the improvement of energy efficiency for the MILD combustion technology. Moreover, the presence of steam in the oxidant reduces both NO and CO emissions of combustion for all cases. The relative importance analysis reveals that the N 2 O-intermediate mechanism for producing NO prevails in MILD-CO 2 combustion while the prompt and thermal mechanisms predominate MILD-N 2 and oxyfuel combustion, respectively. In addition, the sensitivity analysis identifies those main reactions that play important roles for the NO emission under these combustion conditions. - Highlights: • Assessing the NO and CO emissions from MILD combustion diluted by CO 2 . • Examining the possibility of higher combustion intensity in MILD-CO 2 combustion than in MILD-N 2 combustion. • Differentiating the contributions from each NO mechanism to the total NO emission. • Revealing major NO mechanisms under different combustion conditions. • Better understanding the NO formation mechanisms under MILD combustion.

  13. The indicating FTA elute cartridge a solid sample carrier to detect high-risk HPV and high-grade cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bie, Roosmarie P; Schmeink, Channa E; Bakkers, Judith M J E; Snijders, Peter J F; Quint, Wim G V; Massuger, Leon F A G; Bekkers, Ruud L M; Melchers, Willem J G

    2011-07-01

    The clinically validated high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) and GP5+/6+-PCR assays were analyzed on an Indicating FTA Elute cartridge (FTA cartridge). The FTA cartridge is a solid dry carrier that allows safe transport of cervical samples. FTA cartridge samples were compared with liquid-based samples for hrHPV and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) detection. One cervical sample was collected in a liquid-based medium, and one was applied to the FTA cartridge. DNA was eluted directly from the FTA cartridge by a simple elution step. HC2 and GP5+/6+-PCR assays were performed on both the liquid-based and the FTA-eluted DNA of 88 women. Overall agreement between FTA and liquid-based samples for the presence of hrHPV was 90.9% with GP5+/6+-PCR and 77.3% with HC2. The sensitivity for high-grade CIN of hrHPV testing on the FTA cartridges was 84.6% with GP5+/6+-PCR and only 53.8% with HC2. By comparison, these sensitivities on liquid-based samples were 92.3% and 100% for GP5+/6+-PCR and HC2, respectively. Therefore, the FTA cartridge shows reasonably good overall agreement for hrHPV detection with liquid-based media when using GP5+/6+-PCR but not HC2 testing. Even with GP5+/6+-PCR, the FTA cartridge is not yet capable of detecting all high-grade CIN lesions. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transient flow combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Non-steady combustion problems can result from engine sources such as accelerations, decelerations, nozzle adjustments, augmentor ignition, and air perturbations into and out of the compressor. Also non-steady combustion can be generated internally from combustion instability or self-induced oscillations. A premixed-prevaporized combustor would be particularly sensitive to flow transients because of its susceptability to flashback-autoignition and blowout. An experimental program, the Transient Flow Combustion Study is in progress to study the effects of air and fuel flow transients on a premixed-prevaporized combustor. Preliminary tests performed at an inlet air temperature of 600 K, a reference velocity of 30 m/s, and a pressure of 700 kPa. The airflow was reduced to 1/3 of its original value in a 40 ms ramp before flashback occurred. Ramping the airflow up has shown that blowout is more sensitive than flashback to flow transients. Blowout occurred with a 25 percent increase in airflow (at a constant fuel-air ratio) in a 20 ms ramp. Combustion resonance was found at some conditions and may be important in determining the effects of flow transients.

  15. Diffusion Driven Combustion Waves in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldushin, A. P.; Matkowsky, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Filtration of gas containing oxidizer, to the reaction zone in a porous medium, due, e.g., to a buoyancy force or to an external pressure gradient, leads to the propagation of Filtration combustion (FC) waves. The exothermic reaction occurs between the fuel component of the solid matrix and the oxidizer. In this paper, we analyze the ability of a reaction wave to propagate in a porous medium without the aid of filtration. We find that one possible mechanism of propagation is that the wave is driven by diffusion of oxidizer from the environment. The solution of the combustion problem describing diffusion driven waves is similar to the solution of the Stefan problem describing the propagation of phase transition waves, in that the temperature on the interface between the burned and unburned regions is constant, the combustion wave is described by a similarity solution which is a function of the similarity variable x/square root of(t) and the wave velocity decays as 1/square root of(t). The difference between the two problems is that in the combustion problem the temperature is not prescribed, but rather, is determined as part of the solution. We will show that the length of samples in which such self-sustained combustion waves can occur, must exceed a critical value which strongly depends on the combustion temperature T(sub b). Smaller values of T(sub b) require longer sample lengths for diffusion driven combustion waves to exist. Because of their relatively small velocity, diffusion driven waves are considered to be relevant for the case of low heat losses, which occur for large diameter samples or in microgravity conditions, Another possible mechanism of porous medium combustion describes waves which propagate by consuming the oxidizer initially stored in the pores of the sample. This occurs for abnormally high pressure and gas density. In this case, uniformly propagating planar waves, which are kinetically controlled, can propagate, Diffusion of oxidizer decreases

  16. Combustion and regulation; Combustion et reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This conference was organized after the publication of the French by-law no 2010 relative to combustion installations and to the abatement of atmospheric pollution. Five topics were discussed during the conference: the new regulations, their content, innovations and modalities of application; the means of energy suppliers to face the new provisions and their schedule; the manufacturers proposals for existing installations and the new equipments; the administration control; and the impact of the new measures on exploitation and engineering. Twenty papers and 2 journal articles are reported in these proceedings. (J.S.)

  17. Coagulation measurement from whole blood using vibrating optical fiber in a disposable cartridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaraş, Yusuf Samet; Gündüz, Ali Bars; Sağlam, Gökhan; Ölçer, Selim; Civitçi, Fehmi; Baris, İbrahim; Yaralioğlu, Göksenin; Urey, Hakan

    2017-11-01

    In clinics, blood coagulation time measurements are performed using mechanical measurements with blood plasma. Such measurements are challenging to do in a lab-on-a-chip (LoC) system using a small volume of whole blood. Existing LoC systems use indirect measurement principles employing optical or electrochemical methods. We developed an LoC system using mechanical measurements with a small volume of whole blood without requiring sample preparation. The measurement is performed in a microfluidic channel where two fibers are placed inline with a small gap in between. The first fiber operates near its mechanical resonance using remote magnetic actuation and immersed in the sample. The second fiber is a pick-up fiber acting as an optical sensor. The microfluidic channel is engineered innovatively such that the blood does not block the gap between the vibrating fiber and the pick-up fiber, resulting in high signal-to-noise ratio optical output. The control plasma test results matched well with the plasma manufacturer's datasheet. Activated-partial-thromboplastin-time tests were successfully performed also with human whole blood samples, and the method is proven to be effective. Simplicity of the cartridge design and cost of readily available materials enable a low-cost point-of-care device for blood coagulation measurements. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  18. Unsuitability of using the DNPH-coated solid sorbent cartridge for determination of airborne unsaturated carbonyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Ho, K. F.; Liu, W. D.; Lee, S. C.; Dai, W. T.; Cao, J. J.; Ip, H. S. S.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of aldehydes and ketones are typically conducted by derivatization using sorbent cartridges coated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). The collected samples are eluted with acetonitrile and analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with an ultra-violet detector (HPLC/UV). This paper intends to examine artifacts about its suitability in identification of unsaturated carbonyls. Kinetic tests for acrolein, crotonaldehyde, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) showed formations of carbonyl-DNP-hydrazone during sampling, which could further react with DNPH, resulting in undesired UV absorption products [e.g., carbonyl-DNP-hydrazone-DNPH (dimer) and 2(carbonyl-DNP-hydrazone)-DNPH (trimer)]. The dimerization and trimerization occurred for acrolein and MVK whereas only dimerization for crotonaldehyde and methacrolein. The polymerization products undoubtedly affect the integrity of the chromatogram, leading to misidentification and inaccurate quantification. Whether precautions taken during sampling and/or sample treatment could avoid or minimize this artifact has not been thoughtfully investigated. More often, such artifacts are usually overlooked by scientists when the data are reported.

  19. Microfluidic impact printer with interchangeable cartridges for versatile non-contact multiplexed micropatterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuzhe; Huang, Eric; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2013-05-21

    Biopatterning has been increasingly used for well-defined cellular microenvironment, patterned surface topology, and guided biological cues; however, it meets challenges on biocompatibility, thermal and chemical sensitivity, as well as limited availability of reagents. In this paper, we aim at combining the desired features from non-contact inkjet printing and dot-matrix impact printing to establish a versatile multiplexed micropatterning platform, referred to as Microfluidic Impact Printer (MI-Printer), for emerging biomedical applications. Using this platform, we can achieve the distinct features of no cross-contamination, sub-microliter ink loading with a minimal dead volume, high-throughput printing, biocompatible non-contact processing, sequential patterning with self-alignment, wide adaptability for complex media (e.g., cell suspension or colloidal solutions), interchangeable/disposable cartridge design, and simple assembly and configuration, all highly desirable towards laboratory-based research and development. Specifically, the printing resolution of the MI-printer platform has been experimentally characterized and theoretically analysed. Optimal printing resolution of 80 μm has been repeatedly obtained. Furthermore, two useful functions of the MI-printer, multiplexed printing and combinatorial printing, have been experimentally demonstrated with less than 10 μm misalignment. Moreover, molecular and biological patterning, utilizing the multiplexed and combinatorial printing, has been implemented to illustrate the utility of this versatile printing technique for emerging biomedical applications.

  20. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  1. Optical Tomography in Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evseev, Vadim

    spectral measurements at several line-of-sights with a view to applications for tomographic measurements on full-scale industrial combustion systems. The system was successfully applied on industrial scale for simultaneous fast exhaust gas temperature measurements in the three optical ports of the exhaust......D project, it was also important to investigate the spectral properties of major combustion species such as carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the infrared range at high temperatures to provide the theoretical background for the development of the optical tomography methods. The new software....... JQSRT 113 (2012) 2222, 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.07.015] included in the PhD thesis as an attachment. The knowledge and experience gained in the PhD project is the first important step towards introducing the advanced optical tomography methods of combustion diagnostics developed in the project to future...

  2. Internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Quentin A.; Mecredy, Henry E.; O'Neal, Glenn B.

    1991-01-01

    An improved engine is provided that more efficiently consumes difficult fuels such as coal slurries or powdered coal. The engine includes a precombustion chamber having a portion thereof formed by an ignition plug. The precombustion chamber is arranged so that when the piston is proximate the head, the precombustion chamber is sealed from the main cylinder or the main combustion chamber and when the piston is remote from the head, the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication. The time for burning of fuel in the precombustion chamber can be regulated by the distance required to move the piston from the top dead center position to the position wherein the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication.

  3. Double versus single cartridge of 4% articaine infiltration into the retro-molar area for lower third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawang, Kamonpun; Chaiyasamut, Teeranut; Kiattavornchareon, Sirichai; Pairuchvej, Verasak; Bhattarai, Bishwa Prakash; Wongsirichat, Natthamet

    2017-06-01

    There are no studies regarding 4% articaine infiltration injection into the retro-molar area for an impacted lower third molar (LITM) surgery. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of infiltration using 1.7 ml (single cartridge: SC) of 4% articaine versus 3.4 ml (double cartridges: DC) of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in LITM surgery. This study involved 30 healthy patients with symmetrical LITM. The patients were assigned to receive either a DC or SC of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine as a local anesthetic for each operation. Onset, duration, profoundness, need for additional anesthetic administration, total volume of anesthetic used, vitality of the tooth, and pain score during operation were recorded. The DC of 4 % articaine had a significantly higher success rate (83.3%) than did the SC (53.3%; P molar region can be an alternative anesthetic for LITM surgery.

  4. The security management of spent filter cartridge in Qinshan phase 3 (heavy water reactor) nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Dahai

    2005-01-01

    Qinshan phase 3 nuclear power plant is the first CANDU plant that China fetched in from Canada, and both two units operate under well condition up to now. The radioactive wastes produced during the unit operation mainly include technical waste, spent resin, and spent filter cartridge. The spent filter cartridge is one important part both in the volume and radioactivity of the radioactive waste, and it is the important content of radioactive waste management. Different from PWR, part of high radioactive spent filter in CANDU unit comes from heavy water system such as moderator system. It has to be dried through blowing before replaced from the system. But this working procedure result the filtrate dreg become flexible, and it can bring on the risk of internal or external exposure. It is very important to pay high attention to control the contamination spread during spent filter inside transfer. (authors)

  5. Particle Emissions from Biomass Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpila, Aneta; Bohgard, Mats [Lund Inst. of Technology (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology; Strand, Michael; Lillieblad, Lena; Sanati, Mehri [Vaexjoe Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Bioenergy Technology; Pagels, Joakim; Rissler, Jenny; Swietlicki, Erik; Gharibi, Arash [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Physics

    2003-05-01

    particle number concentration increased slightly with increasing load, at the same time the fine mode particles became smaller. This was probably caused by different degree of particle coagulation as the residence time in the boiler was changed. The mean diameter during combustion of forest residue was around 100 nm compared to 70-80 nm for dry wood and pellets, while the total number was close to constant. This explains the differences in mass concentration found in the impactor measurements. The concentrations of CO and THC was highest for the dry wood fuel, the PAH concentration was highest for pellets combustion in boiler 4, however this boiler was poorly tuned at the time of measurement. The PAH concentration was 5 times higher during combustion of dry wood compared to forest residue. The concentration of CO, THC and PAH varied to a great extend. The high concentrations were measured in boilers running at a low load. The concentration of particle organic carbon was less than 15% of PMI for all fuels. However we used heated primary dilution, which inhibits the condensation of organic components into, the particle phase. A significant fraction of the emitted organic carbon may condense to the particle phase during dilution after the stack or after being oxidized in the atmosphere. We also measured elemental carbon in the particle phase. The contribution to PM1 was as high as 25-30% during pellets combustion at low load and 8% at low load during combustion of dry wood. In all other cases the EC-concentration was less than 3% of PMI. PIXE and lon-chromatography confirmed that alkali-salts were the dominant chemical species. PIXE analysis revealed that emitted amounts of heavy metals such as Zn, Cd and Pb are strongly dependent on the type of the fuel used. Forest residues gave high emissions of Zn, Cd and Pb, while pellets gave very high emissions of Cd and Zn. The fuel with the lowest emissions of heavy metals was dry wood. This again could be related to ash content in

  6. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a clear definition of “fuel and combustion stratifications” is obvious in literature. Hence, it is difficult to compare stratification levels of different PPC strategies or other combustion concepts. T...

  7. Randomized Comparison of Two Vaginal Self-Sampling Methods for Human Papillomavirus Detection: Dry Swab versus FTA Cartridge

    OpenAIRE

    Catarino, Rosa; Vassilakos, Pierre; Bilancioni, Aline; Vanden Eynde, Mathieu; Meyer-Hamme, Ulrike; Menoud, Pierre-Alain; Guerry, Fr?d?ric; Petignat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling (self-HPV) is valuable in cervical cancer screening. HPV testing is usually performed on physician-collected cervical smears stored in liquid-based medium. Dry filters and swabs are an alternative. We evaluated the adequacy of self-HPV using two dry storage and transport devices, the FTA cartridge and swab. Methods A total of 130 women performed two consecutive self-HPV samples. Randomization determined which of the two tests was performed f...

  8. Development and Preliminary Assessment of Hemoperfusion Cartridge with Tannic Acid for Toxic Proteins' Precipitation: An In Vitro Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquíria Miwa Hanai Yoshida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Charcoal hemoperfusion (CHP is one of the extracorporeal removal techniques that are used to remove toxins from the body. CHP generally is considered the preferred method for extracorporeal extraction of several toxins—toxins that are adsorbed by activated charcoal. Assessments of the tannic acid's protective effects on ophidian poisoning are associated with the toxic proteins' precipitation by tannic acid. The challenge in treating a snakebite lies in removing the injected poison with minimal damage to blood constituent proteins. An alternative is CHP, and this investigation proposed to develop a column for hemoperfuser cartridge, combining charcoal granules trapped between layers of polymeric material conjugated to tannic acid, using an in vitro model scaled to the Wistar rat, which can be tested in an animal model. The cartridge was evaluated using the 22 full factorial design, in duplicate, as a method to study the effects of granulated-charcoal size and tannic acid concentration on the hematologic profile (platelet and leukocyte counts and biochemical profile (total serum protein and albumin dosages of sheep blood. The results demonstrate that charcoal in hemoperfuser cartridge: (1 decreases the serum in sheep blood volume, as consequence, (2 increases the serum proteins' concentration, and (iii exerts slight influence on albumin. The inclusion of tannic acid in hemoperfuser column precipitates some of serum proteins and albumin, decreasing their concentrations in the plasma serum. In conclusion, based on these effects we can suggest the use of 0.02 g tannic acid concentration and 8–20 mesh granulated charcoal in hemoperfuser cartridge for precipitating toxic proteins from snake venoms.

  9. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  10. High Gravity (g) Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    UNICORN (Unsteady Ignition and Combustion with Reactions) code10. Flame propagation in a tube that is 50-mm wide and 1000-mm long (similar to that...turbine engine manufacturers, estimating the primary zone space heating rate. Both combustion systems, from Company A and Company B, required a much...MBTU/atm-hr-ft3) Te m pe ra tu re R is e (K ) dP/P = 2% dP/P = 2.5% dP/P = 3% dP/P = 3.5% dP/P = 4% Company A Company B Figure 13: Heat Release Rate

  11. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2014-10-01

    Alternative transportation fuels, preferably from renewable sources, include alcohols with up to five or even more carbon atoms. They are considered promising because they can be derived from biological matter via established and new processes. In addition, many of their physical-chemical properties are compatible with the requirements of modern engines, which make them attractive either as replacements for fossil fuels or as fuel additives. Indeed, alcohol fuels have been used since the early years of automobile production, particularly in Brazil, where ethanol has a long history of use as an automobile fuel. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the use of non-petroleum-based fuels made from biological sources, including alcohols (predominantly ethanol), as important liquid biofuels. Today, the ethanol fuel that is offered in the market is mainly made from sugar cane or corn. Its production as a first-generation biofuel, especially in North America, has been associated with publicly discussed drawbacks, such as reduction in the food supply, need for fertilization, extensive water usage, and other ecological concerns. More environmentally friendly processes are being considered to produce alcohols from inedible plants or plant parts on wasteland. While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides ethanol, many linear and branched members of the alcohol family, from methanol to hexanols, have been studied, with a particular emphasis on butanols. These fuels and their combustion properties, including their ignition, flame propagation, and extinction characteristics, their pyrolysis and oxidation reactions, and their potential to produce pollutant emissions have been intensively investigated in dedicated experiments on the laboratory and the engine scale

  12. Combustibility of tetraphenylborate solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid slurries expected under normal in-tank processing (ITP) operations are not ignitible because of their high water content. However, deposits of dry solids from the slurries are combustible and produce dense, black smoke when burned. The dry solids burn similarly to Styrofoam and more easily than sawdust. It is the opinion of fire hazard experts that a benzene vapor deflagration could ignite the dry solids. A tetraphenylborate solids fire will rapidly plug the waste tank HEPA ventilation filters due to the nature of the smoke produced. To prevent ignition and combustion of these solids, the waste tanks have been equipped with a nitrogen inerting system

  13. Studies in combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koszykowski, M.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding and a quantitative predictive capability in combustion modeling. A large part of the understanding of the chemistry of combustion processes comes from {open_quotes}chemical kinetic modeling.{close_quotes} However, successful modeling is not an isolated activity. It necessarily involves the integration of methods and results from several diverse disciplines and activities including theoretical chemistry, elementary reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics and computational science. Recently the authors have developed and utilized new tools for parallel processing to implement the first numerical model of a turbulent diffusion flame including a {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} chemical mechanism.

  14. Combustion stratification for naphtha from CI combustion to PPC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Y.; Dawood, A.; Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Somers, L.M.T.; Johansson, B.H.

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrated the change in combustion homogeneity from conventional diesel combustion via partially premixed combustion towards HCCI. Experiments are performed in an optical diesel engine at a speed of 1200 rpm with diesel fuel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is

  15. Agreement for HPV genotyping detection between self-collected specimens on a FTA cartridge and clinician-collected specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yaoyao; Gravitt, Patti E; Howard, Roslyn; Eby, Yolanda J; Wang, Shaoming; Li, Belinda; Feng, Changyan; Qiao, You-Lin; Castle, Philip E

    2013-04-01

    The current method of transporting self-collected cervicovaginal specimen for HPV DNA testing relies on liquid based medium, which is challenging and expensive to transport. A novel, dry storage and transportation device, Whatman indicating FTA™ Elute Cartridge, avoids some of the pitfalls of liquid-based medium. This method has been shown to be comparable to liquid-based collection medium, but relative performance of self-collected (SC) and clinician-collected (CC) samples onto FTA cards has not been reported. The objective of this study is to compare the analytic performance of self- and clinician-collected samples onto FTA cartridges for the detection of carcinogenic HPV using Linear Array. There was a 91% agreement, 69% positive agreement, and kappa of 0.75 between the clinician-collected and self-collected specimens for detection of any carcinogenic HPV genotype. When the HPV results were categorized hierarchically according to cervical cancer risk, there was no difference in the distribution of the HPV results for the clinician- and self-collected specimens (p=0.7). This study concludes that FTA elute cartridge is a promising method of specimen transport for cervical cancer screening programs considering using self-collected specimen and HPV testing. Larger studies with clinical endpoints are now needed to assess the clinical performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of the water filters cartridges from the iea-r1 reactor using the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Priscila; Potiens Junior, Ademar J.

    2015-01-01

    Filter cartridges are part of the primary water treatment system of the IEA-R1 Research Reactor and, when saturated, they are replaced and become radioactive waste. The IEA-R1 is located at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN), in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The primary characterization is the main step of the radioactive waste management in which the physical, chemical and radiological properties are determined. It is a very important step because the information obtained in this moment enables the choice of the appropriate management process and the definition of final disposal options. In this paper, it is presented a non-destructive method for primary characterization, using the Monte Carlo method associated with the gamma spectrometry. Gamma spectrometry allows the identification of radionuclides and their activity values. The detection efficiency is an important parameter, which is related to the photon energy, detector geometry and the matrix of the sample to be analyzed. Due to the difficult to obtain a standard source with the same geometry of the filter cartridge, another technique is necessary to calibrate the detector. The technique described in this paper uses the Monte Carlo method for primary characterization of the IEA-R1 filter cartridges. (author)

  17. Agreement for HPV genotyping detection between self-collected specimens on a FTA cartridge and clinician-collected specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, YaoYao; Gravitt, Patti E.; Howard, Roslyn; Eby, Yolanda J.; Wang, Shaoming; Li, Belinda; Feng, Changyan; Qiao, You-Lin; Castle, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    The current method of transporting self-collected cervicovaginal specimen for HPV DNA testing relies on liquid based medium, which is challenging and expensive to transport. A novel, dry storage and transportation device, Whatman indicating FTA™ Elute Cartridge, avoids some of the pitfalls of liquid-based medium. This method has been shown to be comparable to liquid-based collection medium, but relative performance of self-collected (SC) and clinician-collected (CC) samples onto FTA cards has not been reported. The objective of this study is to compare the analytic performance of self- and clinician-collected samples onto FTA cartridges for the detection of carcinogenic HPV using Linear Array. There was a 91% agreement, 69% positive agreement, and kappa of 0.75 between the clinician-collected and self-collected specimens for detection of any carcinogenic HPV genotype. When the HPV results were categorized hierarchically according to cervical cancer risk, there was no difference in the distribution of the HPV results for the clinician- and self-collected specimens (p = 0.7). This study concludes that FTA elute cartridge is a promising method of specimen transport for cervical cancer screening programs considering using self-collected specimen and HPV testing. Larger studies with clinical endpoints are now needed to assess the clinical performance. PMID:23370404

  18. Integration of an Optical Ring Resonator Biosensor into a Self-Contained Microfluidic Cartridge with Active, Single-Shot Micropumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Geidel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available While there have been huge advances in the field of biosensors during the last decade, their integration into a microfluidic environment avoiding external tubing and pumping is still neglected. Herein, we show a new microfluidic design that integrates multiple reservoirs for reagent storage and single-use electrochemical pumps for time-controlled delivery of the liquids. The cartridge has been tested and validated with a silicon nitride-based photonic biosensor incorporating multiple optical ring resonators as sensing elements and an immunoassay as a potential target application. Based on experimental results obtained with a demonstration model, subcomponents were designed and existing protocols were adapted. The newly-designed microfluidic cartridges and photonic sensors were separately characterized on a technical basis and performed well. Afterwards, the sensor was functionalized for a protein detection. The microfluidic cartridge was loaded with the necessary assay reagents. The integrated pumps were programmed to drive the single process steps of an immunoassay. The prototype worked selectively, but only with a low sensitivity. Further work must be carried out to optimize biofunctionalization of the optical ring resonators and to have a more suitable flow velocity progression to enhance the system’s reproducibility.

  19. Domestic Preparedness: Phase 2 Sarin Vapor Challenge and Corn Oil Protection Factor (PF) Testing of Commercial Powered Air Purifying Respirator (PAPR) Systems and Cartridges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Lee E; Lins, Ray; Pappas, Alex G

    2002-01-01

    .... Results indicate that cartridges provide complete penetration resistance against 200 mg/m3 GB challenge concentrations for 60 minutes, but that unacceptably high levels of GB vapor and corn oil...

  20. Combining cationic and anionic mixed-mode sorbents in a single cartridge to extract basic and acidic pharmaceuticals simultaneously from environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Daniela; Borrull, Francesc; Fontanals, Núria; Marcé, Rosa Maria

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to broaden the applications of mixed-mode ion-exchange solid-phase extraction sorbents to extract both basic and acidic compounds simultaneously by combining the sorbents in a single cartridge and developing a simplified extraction procedure. Four different cartridges containing negative and positive charges in the same configuration were evaluated and compared to extract a group of basic, neutral, and acidic pharmaceuticals selected as model compounds. After a thorough optimization of the extraction conditions, the four different cartridges showed to be capable of retaining basic and acidic pharmaceuticals simultaneously through ionic interactions, allowing the introduction of a washing step with 15 mL methanol to eliminate interferences retained by hydrophobic interactions. Using the best combined cartridge, a method was developed, validated, and further applied to environmental waters to demonstrate that the method is promising for the extraction of basic and acidic compounds from very complex samples.

  1. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  2. Case study of an MBT plant producing SRF for cement kiln co-combustion, coupled with a bioreactor landfill for process residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Mario; Dellavedova, Stefano; Rigamonti, Lucia; Scotti, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the performances of the energy recovery pathway from the residual waste based on the production of a Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) to be exploited via co-combustion in a cement kiln. The SRF is produced in a single stream Mechanical-Biological Treatment plant, where bio-drying of the waste is followed by mechanical refining in order to fulfil the quality requirements by the cement kilns. Peculiar of this MBT is the fact that sorting residues are disposed in a nearby landfill, managed according to a bioreactor approach, where landfill gas is collected for electric energy recovery. A detailed mass and energy balance of the system is presented based on one year operational data, followed by its Life Cycle Assessment. Results show that the system is energetically and environmentally effective, with most of the impacts being more than compensated by the savings of materials and energy. Major role in determining such outcome is the displacement of petcoke in the cement kiln, both in terms of its fossil CO2 emissions and of its life cycle impacts, including the trans-oceanic transport. To check the robustness of the results, two sensitivity analyses are performed on the landfill gas collection efficiency and on the avoided electric energy mix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Underground treatment of combustible minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarapuu, E

    1954-10-14

    A process is described for treating oil underground, consisting in introducing several electrodes spaced one from the other in a bed of combustibles underground so that they come in electric contact with this bed of combustibles remaining insulated from the ground, and applying to the electrodes a voltage sufficient to produce an electric current across the bed of combustibles, so as to heat it and create an electric connection between the electrodes on traversing the bed of combustibles.

  4. Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomavirus in Self-Obtained Cervicovaginal Samples by Using the FTA Cartridge: New Possibilities for Cervical Cancer Screening ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenselink, Charlotte H.; de Bie, Roosmarie P.; van Hamont, Dennis; Bakkers, Judith M. J. E.; Quint, Wim G. V.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Bekkers, Ruud L. M.; Melchers, Willem J. G.

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and genotyping in self-sampled genital smears applied to an indicating FTA elute cartridge (FTA cartridge). The study group consisted of 96 women, divided into two sample sets. All samples were analyzed by the HPV SPF10-Line Blot 25. Set 1 consisted of 45 women attending the gynecologist; all obtained a self-sampled cervicovaginal smear, which was applied to an FTA cartridge. HPV results were compared to a cervical smear (liquid based) taken by a trained physician. Set 2 consisted of 51 women who obtained a self-sampled cervicovaginal smear at home, which was applied to an FTA cartridge and to a liquid-based medium. DNA was obtained from the FTA cartridges by simple elution as well as extraction. Of all self-obtained samples of set 1, 62.2% tested HPV positive. The overall agreement between self- and physician-obtained samples was 93.3%, in favor of the self-obtained samples. In sample set 2, 25.5% tested HPV positive. The overall agreement for high-risk HPV presence between the FTA cartridge and liquid-based medium and between DNA elution and extraction was 100%. This study shows that HPV detection and genotyping in self-obtained cervicovaginal samples applied to an FTA cartridge is highly reliable. It shows a high level of overall agreement with HPV detection and genotyping in physician-obtained cervical smears and liquid-based self-samples. DNA can be obtained by simple elution and is therefore easy, cheap, and fast. Furthermore, the FTA cartridge is a convenient medium for collection and safe transport at ambient temperatures. Therefore, this method may contribute to a new way of cervical cancer screening. PMID:19553570

  5. Detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus in self-obtained cervicovaginal samples by using the FTA cartridge: new possibilities for cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenselink, Charlotte H; de Bie, Roosmarie P; van Hamont, Dennis; Bakkers, Judith M J E; Quint, Wim G V; Massuger, Leon F A G; Bekkers, Ruud L M; Melchers, Willem J G

    2009-08-01

    This study assesses human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and genotyping in self-sampled genital smears applied to an indicating FTA elute cartridge (FTA cartridge). The study group consisted of 96 women, divided into two sample sets. All samples were analyzed by the HPV SPF(10)-Line Blot 25. Set 1 consisted of 45 women attending the gynecologist; all obtained a self-sampled cervicovaginal smear, which was applied to an FTA cartridge. HPV results were compared to a cervical smear (liquid based) taken by a trained physician. Set 2 consisted of 51 women who obtained a self-sampled cervicovaginal smear at home, which was applied to an FTA cartridge and to a liquid-based medium. DNA was obtained from the FTA cartridges by simple elution as well as extraction. Of all self-obtained samples of set 1, 62.2% tested HPV positive. The overall agreement between self- and physician-obtained samples was 93.3%, in favor of the self-obtained samples. In sample set 2, 25.5% tested HPV positive. The overall agreement for high-risk HPV presence between the FTA cartridge and liquid-based medium and between DNA elution and extraction was 100%. This study shows that HPV detection and genotyping in self-obtained cervicovaginal samples applied to an FTA cartridge is highly reliable. It shows a high level of overall agreement with HPV detection and genotyping in physician-obtained cervical smears and liquid-based self-samples. DNA can be obtained by simple elution and is therefore easy, cheap, and fast. Furthermore, the FTA cartridge is a convenient medium for collection and safe transport at ambient temperatures. Therefore, this method may contribute to a new way of cervical cancer screening.

  6. Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    was in collaboration with Prof. R. Bowersox (Texas A&M University) and Dr. K. Kobayashi ( Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA). 4.2 Ignition... cinema stereoscopic PIV system for the measurement of micro- and meso-scale turbulent premixed flame dynamics,” Paper B13, 5th US Combustion

  7. Infrared monitoring of combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, S.C.; Morrison, P.W. Jr.; Solomon, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the use of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy for combustion monitoring is described. A combination of emission, transmission, and reflection FT-IR spectroscopy yields data on the temperature and composition of the gases, surfaces and suspended particles in the combustion environment. Detection sensitivity of such trace exhaust gases as CO, CO 2 , SO 2 , NO x , and unburned hydrocarbons is at the ppm level. Tomographic reconstruction converts line-of-sight measurements into spatially resolved temperature and concentration data. Examples from various combustion processes are used to demonstrate the capabilities of the technique. Industrial measurements are described that have been performed directly in the combustion zone and in the exhaust duct of a large chemical recovery boiler. Other measurements of hot slag show how FT-IR spectroscopy can determine the temperature and optical properties of surfaces. In addition, experiments with water droplets show that transmission FT-IR data yield spectra that characterize particle size and number density

  8. Combustible dust tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sugar dust explosion in Georgia on February 7, 2008 killed 14 workers and injured many others (OSHA, 2009). As a consequence of this explosion, OSHA revised its Combustible Dust National Emphasis (NEP) program. The NEP targets 64 industries with more than 1,000 inspections and has found more tha...

  9. Rapid and sensitive determination of phenylurea herbicides in water in the presence of their anilines by extraction with a Carbopack cartridge followed by liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Corcia, A; Marchetti, M

    1991-03-22

    A rapid and sensitive method for determining phenylurea herbicides in environmental aqueous samples in the presence of their anilines is described. The water sample is preconcentrated by passage at a flow-rate of ca. 150 ml/min through a 250-mg graphitized carbon black (Carbopack B) cartridge. After washing with 0.6 ml of methanol, the Carbopack B trap is connected with a cartridge containing a strong cation exchanger. Organics trapped by the Carbopack cartridge are eluted by passage of 6 ml of methylene chloride-methanol (95:5, v/v). Anilines and other basic compounds are quantitatively subtracted from the solvent system while flowing through the cation-exchange cartridge. After evaporation and redissolution, the sample is subjected to reversed-phase gradient elution high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection at 250 nm. Recoveries of phenylureas added to water at levels between 30 and 3000 ng/l were higher than 92%. The limit of detection was about 1 ng/l, for a 2-1 sample. With respect to an octadecyl (C18)-bonded silica cartridge, the Carbopack B cartridge had a far better extraction efficiency for polar phenylureas.

  10. Combustion optimization and HCCI modeling for ultra low emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koten, Hasan; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Zafer Gul, M. [Marmara University Mechanical Engineering Department (Turkey)], E-mail: hasan.koten@marmara.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    With the coming shortage of fossil fuels and the rising concerns over the environment it is important to develop new technologies both to reduce energy consumption and pollution at the same time. In the transportation sector, new combustion processes are under development to provide clean diesel combustion with no particulate or NOx emissions. However, these processes have issues such as limited power output, high levels of unburned hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide emissions. The aim of this paper is to present a methodology for optimizing combustion performance. The methodology consists of the use of a multi-objective genetic algorithm optimization tool; homogeneous charge compression ignition engine cases were studied with the ECFM-3Z combustion model. Results showed that injected fuel mass led to a decrease in power output, a finding which is in keeping with previous research. This paper presented on optimization tool which can be useful in improving the combustion process.

  11. {sup 14}CO{sub 2} processing using an improved and robust molecular sieve cartridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wotte, Anja, E-mail: Anja.Wotte@uni-koeln.de [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Wordell-Dietrich, Patrick [Thünen Institute of Climate-Smart Agriculture, Braunschweig (Germany); Wacker, Lukas [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Don, Axel [Thünen Institute of Climate-Smart Agriculture, Braunschweig (Germany); Rethemeyer, Janet [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2017-06-01

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) analysis on CO{sub 2} can provide valuable information on the carbon cycle as different carbon pools differ in their {sup 14}C signature. While fresh, biogenic carbon shows atmospheric {sup 14}C concentrations, fossil carbon is {sup 14}C free. As shown in previous studies, CO{sub 2} can be collected for {sup 14}C analysis using molecular sieve cartridges (MSC). These devices have previously been made of plastic and glass, which can easily be damaged during transport. We thus constructed a robust MSC suitable for field application under tough conditions or in remote areas, which is entirely made of stainless steel. The new MSC should also be tight over several months to allow long sampling campaigns and transport times, which was proven by a one year storage test. The reliability of the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} results obtained with the MSC was evaluated by detailed tests of different procedures to clean the molecular sieve (zeolite type 13X) and for the adsorption and desorption of CO{sub 2} from the zeolite using a vacuum rig. We show that the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} results are not affected by any contamination of modern or fossil origin, cross contamination from previous samples, and by carbon isotopic fractionation. In addition, we evaluated the direct CO{sub 2} transfer from the MSC into the automatic graphitization equipment AGE with the subsequent {sup 14}C AMS analysis as graphite. This semi-automatic approach can be fully automated in the future, which would allow a high sample throughput. We obtained very promising, low blank values between 0.0018 and 0.0028 F{sup 14}C (equivalent to 50,800 and 47,200 yrs BP), which are within the analytical background and lower than results obtained in previous studies.

  12. "1"4CO_2 processing using an improved and robust molecular sieve cartridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wotte, Anja; Wordell-Dietrich, Patrick; Wacker, Lukas; Don, Axel; Rethemeyer, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Radiocarbon ("1"4C) analysis on CO_2 can provide valuable information on the carbon cycle as different carbon pools differ in their "1"4C signature. While fresh, biogenic carbon shows atmospheric "1"4C concentrations, fossil carbon is "1"4C free. As shown in previous studies, CO_2 can be collected for "1"4C analysis using molecular sieve cartridges (MSC). These devices have previously been made of plastic and glass, which can easily be damaged during transport. We thus constructed a robust MSC suitable for field application under tough conditions or in remote areas, which is entirely made of stainless steel. The new MSC should also be tight over several months to allow long sampling campaigns and transport times, which was proven by a one year storage test. The reliability of the "1"4CO_2 results obtained with the MSC was evaluated by detailed tests of different procedures to clean the molecular sieve (zeolite type 13X) and for the adsorption and desorption of CO_2 from the zeolite using a vacuum rig. We show that the "1"4CO_2 results are not affected by any contamination of modern or fossil origin, cross contamination from previous samples, and by carbon isotopic fractionation. In addition, we evaluated the direct CO_2 transfer from the MSC into the automatic graphitization equipment AGE with the subsequent "1"4C AMS analysis as graphite. This semi-automatic approach can be fully automated in the future, which would allow a high sample throughput. We obtained very promising, low blank values between 0.0018 and 0.0028 F"1"4C (equivalent to 50,800 and 47,200 yrs BP), which are within the analytical background and lower than results obtained in previous studies.

  13. Low emission internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaba, Albert M.

    1979-01-01

    A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

  14. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilik, Gregory K.; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Hedan; Haworth, Daniel C. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Herreros, Jose Martin [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla La-Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine, with a focus on exhaust emissions. Hydrogen was substituted for diesel fuel on an energy basis of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10% and 15% by aspiration of hydrogen into the engine's intake air. Four speed and load conditions were investigated (1800 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output and 3600 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output). A significant retarding of injection timing by the engine's electronic control unit (ECU) was observed during the increased aspiration of hydrogen. The retarding of injection timing resulted in significant NO{sub X} emission reductions, however, the same emission reductions were achieved without aspirated hydrogen by manually retarding the injection timing. Subsequently, hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was examined, with the pilot and main injection timings locked, to study the effects caused directly by hydrogen addition. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion resulted in a modest increase of NO{sub X} emissions and a shift in NO/NO{sub 2} ratio in which NO emissions decreased and NO{sub 2} emissions increased, with NO{sub 2} becoming the dominant NO{sub X} component in some combustion modes. Computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD) of the hydrogen assisted diesel combustion process captured this trend and reproduced the experimentally observed trends of hydrogen's effect on the composition of NO{sub X} for some operating conditions. A model that explicitly accounts for turbulence-chemistry interactions using a transported probability density function (PDF) method was better able to reproduce the experimental trends, compared to a model that ignores the influence of turbulent fluctuations on mean chemical production rates, although the importance of the fluctuations is not as strong as has been reported in some other recent modeling studies. The CFD results confirm

  15. Combustion control and sensors: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docquier, N.; Candel, S.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increased interest in the application of control to combustion. The objective is to optimize combustor operation, monitor the process and alleviate instabilities and their severe consequences. One wishes to improve the system performance, for example by reducing the levels of pollutant emissions or by smoothing the pattern factor at the combustor exhaust. In other cases, the aim is to extend the stability domain by reducing the level of oscillation induced by coupling between resonance modes and combustion. As combustion systems have to meet increasingly more demanding air pollution standards, their design and operation becomes more complex. The trend towards reduced NO x levels has led to new developments in different fields. Automotive engines and gas turbine combustors are considered in this article. In the first case, complex exhaust aftertreatment is being applied and dedicated engine control systems are required to ensure and maintain high pollutant conversion efficiency. For gas turbines, premixed combustors, which operate at lower local temperatures than conventional systems have been designed. In both cases, monitoring and control of the operating point of the process have to be achieved with great precision to obtain the full benefits of the NO x reduction scheme. For premixed combustors operating near the lean stability limit, the flame is more susceptible to blowout, oscillation or flashback. Research is now carried out to reduce these dynamical problems with passive and active control methods. In addition to a broad range of fundamental problems raised by Active Combustion Control (ACC) and Operating Point Control (OPC), there are important technological issues. This paper contains a review of some facets of combustion control and focuses on the sensors that take or could take part to combustion control solutions. The current status of ACC and OPC is presented together with the associated control concepts. The state of the art in sensors is

  16. Combustion strategy : United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, D. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edingburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom). School of Engineering and Physical Sciences

    2009-07-01

    The United Kingdom's combustion strategy was briefly presented. Government funding sources for universities were listed. The United Kingdom Research Councils that were listed included the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC); the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC); the Economic and Social Research Council; the Medical Research Council; the Natural Environment Research Council; and the Science and Technology Facilities Council. The EPSRC supported 65 grants worth 30.5 million pounds. The combustion industry was noted to be dominated by three main players of which one was by far the largest. The 3 key players were Rolls-Royce; Jaguar Land Rover; and Doosan Babcock. Industry and government involvement was also discussed for the BIS Technology Strategy Board, strategy technology areas, and strategy application areas.

  17. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  18. Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-28

    Tracking an individual streamer branch among others in a pulsed induced discharge J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 35 2823--9 [29] van Veldhuizen E M and Rutgers...2005) AIAA–2005–0405. [99] E.M. Van Veldhuizen (ed) Electrical Discharges for Environmental Purposes: Fun- damentals and Applications (New York: Nova...Vandooren J, Van Tiggelen P J 1977 Reaction Mechanism and Rate Constants in Lean Hydrogen–Nitrous Oxide Flames Combust. Flame 28 165 [201] Dean A M, Steiner

  19. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  20. Combustion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Annamalai, Kalyan

    2006-01-01

    Introduction and Review of Thermodynamics Introduction Combustion Terminology Matter and Its Properties Microscopic Overview of Thermodynamics Conservation of Mass and Energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics The Second Law of Thermodynamics Summary Stoichiometry and Thermochemistry of Reacting Systems Introduction Overall Reactions Gas Analyses Global Conservation Equations for Reacting Systems Thermochemistry Summary Appendix Reaction Direction and Equilibrium Introduction Reaction Direction and Chemical Equilibrium Chemical Equilibrium Relations Vant Hoff Equation Adi

  1. Issues in waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Robertson, Kerstin; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Sundquist, Lena; Wrangensten, Lars [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Blom, Elisabet [AaF-Processdesign AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    The main purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art on research and development issues related to waste combustion with relevance for Swedish conditions. The review focuses on co-combustion in grate and fluidised bed furnaces. It is primarily literature searches in relevant databases of scientific publications with to material published after 1995. As a complement, findings published in different report series, have also been included. Since the area covered by this report is very wide, we do not claim to cover the issues included completely and it has not been possitile to evaluate the referred studies in depth. Basic knowledge about combustion issues is not included since such information can be found elsewhere in the literature. Rather, this review should be viewed as an overview of research and development in the waste-to-energy area and as such we hope that it will inspire scientists and others to further work in relevant areas.

  2. Investigation of the submodels for combustion; Polton osamallien kaeytettaevyys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjaeldman, L.; Huttunen, M.; Kyttaelae, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The capability for numerical analysis of flow, combustion and heat transfer in furnaces has been developed by improving the knowledge of the sensitivity of computed results on submodels recently implemented to the computational environment Ardemus owned by VTT Energy and Imatran Voima Oy. The submodels studied include models for combustion of gaseous (pyrolysed) fuel and for nitric oxide. The cases investigated included a gas flame and pulverized coal and peat combustion in single burner furnaces. The effect of grid refinement on the results was investigated for a corner fired power station furnace. (orig.)

  3. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D [Rochester Hills, MI; Reitz, Rolf D [Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  4. Modification of combustion behaviour and NO emissions by coal blending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, Fernando; Arenillas, Ana; Arias, Borja; Pis, Jose J. [Department of Energy and Environment, Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2002-06-20

    Combustion profiles determined by TGA and experiments in a laminar entrained flow reactor (EFR) were used in this work to assess the relative combustion reactivities of different rank coals and their binary coal blends. The combustion behaviour of coal blends in TGA was greatly influenced by coal rank and the proportion of each component in the blend. Higher volatile coals exerted more influence in the low-temperature region and less reactive coals in the char combustion zone. The results in the EFR indicated that coal blends burnout and NO emissions show additivity in the case of similar nature coals. When one of the components was a high-rank coal, the burnout of the blend exhibited, in some cases, positive synergistic effects, while a clear deviation from linearity was found in NO emissions.

  5. Combustion: an oil spill mitigation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-11-01

    The technical feasibility of using combustion as an oil spill mitigation tool was studied. Part I of the two-part report is a practical guide oriented toward the needs of potential users, while Part II is the research or resource document from which the practical guidance was drawn. The study included theoretical evaluations of combustion of petroleum pool fires under the effects of weathering and an oil classification system related to combustion potential. The theoretical analysis of combustion is balanced by practical experience of oil burning and case history information. Decision elements are provided which can be used as a guide for technical evaluations of a particular oil spill situation. The rationale for assessing technical feasibility is given in the context of other alternatives available for response to an oil spill. A series of research and technology development concepts are included for future research. The ethics of using oil burning are discussed as issues, concerns, and tradeoffs. A detailed annotated bibliography is appended along with a capsule review of a decade of oil burning studies and other support information.

  6. Burning characteristics of microcellular combustible objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-tao Yang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcellular combustible objects for application of combustible case, caseless ammunition or combustible detonator-holding tubes are fabricated through one-step foaming process, in which supercritical CO2 is used as foaming agent. The formulations consist of inert polymer binder and ultra fine RDX. For the inner porous structures of microcellular combustible objects, the cell sizes present a unimodal or bimodal distribution by adjusting the foaming conditions. Closed bomb test is to investigate the influence of both porous structure style and RDX content on burning behavior. The sample with bimodal distribution of cell sizes burns faster than that with unimodal distribution, and the concentration of RDX can influence the burning characteristics in a positive manner. In addition, the translation of laminar burning to convective burning is determined by burning rate versus pressure curves of samples at two different loading densities, and the resulting transition pressure is 30 MPa. Moreover, the samples with bigger sample size present higher burning rate, resulting in providing deeper convective depth. Dynamic vivacity of samples is also studied. The results show that the vivacity increases with RDX content and varies with inner structure.

  7. Characterization of filters cartridges from the water polishing system of IEA-R1 reactor: radiometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessaro, Ana Paula G.; Vicente, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The acceptance of radioactive waste in a repository depends primarily on knowledge of the radioisotopic inventory of the material, according to regulations established by regulatory agencies. The primary characterization is also a fundamental action to determine further steps in the management of the radioactive wastes. The aim of this work is to report the development of non-destructive methods for primary characterization of filters cartridges discarded as radioactive waste. The filters cartridges are used in the water polishing system of the IEA-R1 reactor retaining the particles in suspension in the reactor cooling water. The IEA-R1 is a pool type reactor with a thermal power of 5 MW, moderated and cooled with light water. It is located in the Energy and Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN), in São Paulo, Brazil. The cartridge filters become radioactive waste when they are saturated and do not meet the required flow for the proper operation of the water polishing system. The activities of gamma emitters present in the filters are determined using gamma spectrometry, dose rate measurements and the Point Kernel Method to correlate results from both measurements. For the primary characterization, one alternative method is the radiochemical analysis of slices taken from each filter, what presents the disadvantage of higher exposures personnel and contamination risks. Another alternative method is the calibration of the measurement geometry of a gamma spectrometer, which requires the production of a standard filter. Both methods are necessary but can not be used in operational routine of radioactive waste management owing to cost and complexity. The method described can be used to determine routinely the radioactive inventory of these filters and other radioactive wastes, avoiding the necessity of destructive radiochemical analysis, or the necessity of calibrating the geometry of measurement. (author)

  8. A longitudinal evaluation of performance of automated BCR-ABL1 quantitation using cartridge-based detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjeti, Anoop; Granter, Neil; Ashraf, Asma; Fletcher, Linda; Branford, Susan; Rowlings, Philip; Dooley, Susan

    2015-10-01

    An automated cartridge-based detection system (GeneXpert; Cepheid) is being widely adopted in low throughput laboratories for monitoring BCR-ABL1 transcript in chronic myelogenous leukaemia. This Australian study evaluated the longitudinal performance specific characteristics of the automated system.The automated cartridge-based system was compared prospectively with the manual qRT-PCR-based reference method at SA Pathology, Adelaide, over a period of 2.5 years. A conversion factor determination was followed by four re-validations. Peripheral blood samples (n = 129) with international scale (IS) values within detectable range were selected for assessment. The mean bias, proportion of results within specified fold difference (2-, 3- and 5-fold), the concordance rate of major molecular remission (MMR) and concordance across a range of IS values on paired samples were evaluated.The initial conversion factor for the automated system was determined as 0.43. Except for the second re-validation, where a negative bias of 1.9-fold was detected, all other biases fell within desirable limits. A cartridge-specific conversion factor and efficiency value was introduced and the conversion factor was confirmed to be stable in subsequent re-validation cycles. Concordance with the reference method/laboratory at >0.1-≤10 IS was 78.2% and at ≤0.001 was 80%, compared to 86.8% in the >0.01-≤0.1 IS range. The overall and MMR concordance were 85.7% and 94% respectively, for samples that fell within ± 5-fold of the reference laboratory value over the entire period of study.Conversion factor and performance specific characteristics for the automated system were longitudinally stable in the clinically relevant range, following introduction by the manufacturer of lot specific efficiency values.

  9. Investigation of bluff-body micro-flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ehsan; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The temperature uniformity of the micro-flameless combustion increases when a triangular bluff-body is applied. • The velocity and temperature of exhaust gases are higher in micro-flameless combustion compared to the conventional mode. • The rate of fuel–oxidizer consumption in micro-flameless mode is lower than conventional micro-combustion. - Abstract: Characteristics of lean premixed conventional micro-combustion and lean non-premixed flameless regime of methane/air are investigated in this paper by solving three-dimensional governing equations. At moderate equivalence ratio (∅ = 0.5), standard k–ε and the eddy-dissipation concept are employed to simulate temperature distribution and combustion stability of these models. The effect of bluff-body on the temperature distribution of both conventional and flameless mode is developed. The results show that in the premixed conventional micro-combustion the stability of the flame is increased when a triangular bluff-body is applied. Moreover, micro-flameless combustion is more stable when bluff-body is used. Micro-flameless mode with bluff-body and 7% O 2 concentration (when N 2 is used as diluent) illustrated better performance than other cases. The maximum temperature in premixed conventional micro-combustion and micro-flameless combustion was recorded 2200 K and 1520 K respectively. Indeed, the flue gas temperature of conventional mode and flameless combustion was 1300 K and 1500 K respectively. The fluctuation of temperature in the conventional micro-combustor wall has negative effects on the combustor and reduces the lifetime of micro-combustor. However, in the micro-flameless mode, the wall temperature is moderate and uniform. The rate of fuel–oxidizer consumption in micro-flameless mode takes longer time and the period of cylinders recharging is prolonged

  10. Development of flameless combustion; Desarrollo de la combustion sin flama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Sauceda, M. Leonardo; Cervantes de Gortari, Jaime Gonzalo [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: 8344afc@prodigy.net.mx; jgonzalo@servidor.unam.mx

    2010-11-15

    The paper intends contribute to global warming mitigation joint effort that develops technologies to capture the CO{sub 2} produced by fossil fuels combustion and to reduce emission of other greenhouse gases like the NO{sub x}. After reviewing existing combustion bibliography is pointed out that (a) touches only partial aspects of the collective system composed by Combustion-Heat transfer process-Environment, whose interactions are our primary interest and (b) most specialists think there is not yet a clearly winning technology for CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper the study of combustion is focused as integrated in the aforementioned collective system where application of flameless combustion, using oxidant preheated in heat regenerators and fluent gas recirculation into combustion chamber plus appropriated heat and mass balances, simultaneously results in energy saving and environmental impact reduction. [Spanish] El trabajo pretende contribuir al esfuerzo conjunto de mitigacion del calentamiento global que aporta tecnologias para capturar el CO{sub 2} producido por la combustion de combustibles fosiles y para disminuir la emision de otros gases invernadero como NOx. De revision bibliografica sobre combustion se concluye que (a) trata aspectos parciales del sistema compuesto por combustion-proceso de trasferencia de calor-ambiente, cuyas interacciones son nuestro principal interes (b) la mayoria de especialistas considera no hay todavia una tecnologia claramente superior a las demas para captura y almacenaje de CO{sub 2}. Se estudia la combustion como parte integrante del mencionado sistema conjunto, donde la aplicacion de combustion sin flama, empleando oxidante precalentado mediante regeneradores de calor y recirculacion de gases efluentes ademas de los balances de masa y energia adecuados, permite tener simultaneamente ahorros energeticos e impacto ambiental reducido.

  11. Ignition of a combustible half space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    A half space of combustible material is subjected to an arbitrary energy flux at the boundary where convection heat loss is also allowed. An asymptotic analysis of the temperature growth reveals two conditions necessary for ignition to occur. Cases of both large and order unity Lewis number are shown to lead to a nonlinear integral equation governing the thermal runaway. Some global and asymptotic properties of the integral equation are obtained.

  12. Sugar microanalysis by HPLC with benzoylation: improvement via introduction of a C-8 cartridge and a high efficiency ODS column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Michiko; Yokoyama, Hirokazu; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2007-07-01

    An HPLC protocol for sugar microanalysis based on the formation of ultraviolet-absorbing benzoyl chloride derivatives was improved. Here, samples were prepared with a C-8 cartridge and analyzed with a high efficiency ODS column, in which porous spherical silica particles 3 microm in diameter were packed. These devices allowed us to simultaneously quantify multiple sugars and sugar alcohols up to 10 ng/ml and to provide satisfactory separations of some sugars, such as fructose and myo-inositol and sorbitol and mannitol. This protocol, which does not require special apparatuses, should become a powerful tool in sugar research.

  13. A model for steady-state HNF combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louwers, J.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L. [TNO Prins Maurits Lab., Rijswijk (Netherlands); Brewster, M.Q. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Son, S.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    A simple model for the combustion of solid monopropellants is presented. The condensed phase is treated by high activation energy asymptotics. The gas phase is treated by two limit cases: high activation energy, and low activation energy. This results in simplification of the gas phase energy equation, making an (approximate) analytical solution possible. The results of the model are compared with experimental results of Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF) combustion.

  14. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry study of the retention behavior of arsenic species on various solid phase extraction cartridges and its application in arsenic speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Chunhai; Cai Qiantao E-mail: qtcai@cawt.sui.com.sg; Guo Zhongxian; Yang Zhaoguang; Khoo, Soo Beng

    2003-07-18

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to investigate the retention behavior of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), arsenobetaine (AsB), arsenocholine (AsC), trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) and tetramethylarsonium ion (TMAI) on various silica-based solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. A method for arsenic speciation is then developed on the basis of selective SPE separation of arsenic species and highly sensitive ICP-MS detection. Factors affecting the retention and elution of arsenic species were examined. Results showed that the retention of arsenic species depended on the chemical characteristics of arsenic species and the types of sorbent materials. Change of pH in the range of 2.0-9.0 did not show significant effects on the retention of DMA, AsB, AsC, TMAI and TMAO on an ethylbenzene sulfonic acid-based strong cation exchange (SCX-3) cartridge. pH also did not influence the retention of AsB, AsC, TMAI and TMAO on a mixed-mode (M-M) cartridge containing non-polar, strong cation exchange and strong anion exchange (SAX) functional groups. However, the retentions of As(V) and MMA on the SAX and the M-M cartridge changed with pH. As(V) and MMA were completely retained on the SAX cartridge and sequentially selectively eluted with 1.0 mol l{sup -1} acetic acid (for MMA). DMA, AsB, AsC, TMAI and TMAO were completely retained on the SCX-3 cartridge and sequentially selectively eluted with 1.0 mol l{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} (for DMA). As(V), MMA, AsB, AsC, TMAI and TMAO were completely retained on the M-M cartridge. As(III) was not retained on either cartridge and remained in solution. Arsenic species in solution and those eluted from the cartridges were subsequently determined by ICP-MS. A detection limit of 8 ng l{sup -1} arsenic in water sample was obtained. This method was successfully applied to arsenic speciation in various sources of water samples (drinking water, waste water, raw water, etc.) and US

  15. Decrease of noxious emissions in the residual fuel oil combustion; Disminucion de emisiones nocivas en la combustion de aceite combustible residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandoki W, Jorge [Econergia S. de R. L. de C. V. Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    The residual fuel oil combustion emits noxious substances such as carbonaceous particulate, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur trioxide at unacceptable levels. Water emulsified in the fuel substantially reduces such emissions, achieving besides, in most of the cases, a net saving in the fuel consumption. The beneficial effects are shown in burning the residual fuel oil as a water emulsion, as well as the method to produce an adequate emulsion. The emulsified fuel technology offers a low cost option to reduce air pollution. The fuel oil quality has been declining during the last decades due to: 1. Increase in the production of crude heavy oils, generally with higher content of asphaltens and sulfur. 2. Less availability of vacuum distillation residues due to its conversion into greater value products. 3. More intensive conversion processes such as catalytic cracking, visbreaking, etc. that increase the asphaltenes concentration in the bottoms, causing instability problems. 4. The increase in the vanadium and other metals content as the concentration of asphaltenes increases. The use of emulsified fuel oil provides an efficient and economical method to substantially reduce the noxious emissions to the atmosphere. The emulsion contains water particles in a diameter between 2 and 20 microns, uniformly distributed in the fuel oil, generally in a proportion generally of 5 to 10%; besides, it contains a tensioactive agent to assure a stable emulsion capable of withstanding the shearing forces of the pumping and distribution systems. When the atomized oil drops get into the combustion chamber, the emulsified water flashes into high pressure steam, originating a violent secondary atomization. The effect of this secondary atomization is the rupture of the oil drops of various hundred microns, producing drops of 5 to 15 microns in diameter. Since the necessary time for combustion is an exponential function of the drop diameter, a very substantial improvement in the combustion is

  16. Positive detection of exfoliated colon cancer cells on linear stapler cartridges was associated with depth of tumor invasion and preoperative bowel preparation in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kishiko; Endo, Shungo; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Hidaka, Eiji; Ishida, Fumio; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi; Kudo, Shin-Ei

    2016-08-31

    The aim of this study was to investigate exfoliated cancer cells (ECCs) on linear stapler cartridges used for anastomotic sites in colon cancer. We prospectively analyzed ECCs on linear stapler cartridges used for anastomosis in 100 colon cancer patients who underwent colectomy. Having completed the functional end-to-end anastomosis, the linear stapler cartridges were irrigated with saline, which was collected for cytological examination and cytological diagnoses were made by board-certified pathologists based on Papanicolaou staining. The detection rate of ECCs on the linear stapler cartridges was 20 %. Positive detection of ECCs was significantly associated with depth of tumor invasion (p = 0.012) and preoperative bowel preparation (p = 0.003). There were no marked differences between ECC-positive and ECC-negative groups in terms of the operation methods, tumor location, histopathological classification, and surgical margins. Since ECCs were identified on the cartridge of the linear stapler used for anastomosis, preoperative mechanical bowel preparation using polyethylene glycol solution and cleansing at anastomotic sites using tumoricidal agents before anastomosis may be necessary to decrease ECCs in advanced colon cancer.

  17. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Glarborg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    of the sulphur compounds in fossil fuels and the possibilities to remove them will be given. Then the combustion of sulphur species and their influence on the combustion chemistry and especially on the CO oxidation and the NOx formation will be described. Finally the in-situ removal of sulphur in the combustion...... process by reaction between SO2 and calcium containing sorbents and the influence on the NOx chemistry will be treated....

  18. Pulsating combustion - Combustion characteristics and reduction of emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, Annika

    1999-11-01

    In the search for high efficiency combustion systems pulsating combustion has been identified as one of the technologies that potentially can meet the objectives of clean combustion and good fuel economy. Pulsating combustion offers low emissions of pollutants, high heat transfer and efficient combustion. Although it is an old technology, the interest in pulsating combustion has been renewed in recent years, due to its unique features. Various applications of pulsating combustion can be found, mainly as drying and heating devices, of which the latter also have had commercial success. It is, however, in the design process of a pulse combustor, difficult to predict the operating frequency, the heat release etc., due to the lack of a well founded theory of the phenomenon. Research concerning control over the combustion process is essential for developing high efficiency pulse combustors with low emissions. Natural gas fired Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been the experimental objects of this study. In order to investigate the interaction between the fluid dynamics and the chemistry in pulse combustors, laser based measuring techniques as well as other conventional measuring techniques have been used. The experimental results shows the possibilities to control the combustion characteristics of pulsating combustion. It is shown that the time scales in the large vortices created at the inlet to the combustion chamber are very important for the operation of the pulse combustor. By increasing/decreasing the time scale for the large scale mixing the timing of the heat release is changed and the operating characteristics of the pulse combustor changes. Three different means for NO{sub x} reduction in Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been investigated. These include exhaust gas recirculation, alteration of air/fuel ratio and changed inlet geometry in the combustion chamber. All used methods achieved less than 10 ppm NO{sub x} emitted (referred to stoichiometric

  19. Mathematical Modeling in Combustion Science

    CERN Document Server

    Takeno, Tadao

    1988-01-01

    An important new area of current research in combustion science is reviewed in the contributions to this volume. The complicated phenomena of combustion, such as chemical reactions, heat and mass transfer, and gaseous flows, have so far been studied predominantly by experiment and by phenomenological approaches. But asymptotic analysis and other recent developments are rapidly changing this situation. The contributions in this volume are devoted to mathematical modeling in three areas: high Mach number combustion, complex chemistry and physics, and flame modeling in small scale turbulent flow combustion.

  20. Combustion of Waste Wood. Second phase of the collaboration project on waste wood combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Annika; Andersson, Christer; Eriksson, Jan; Hemstroem, Bengt; Jungstedt, Jenny; Kling, Aasa; Bahr, Bo von; Ekvall, Annika; Eskilsson, David; Tullin, Claes; Harnevie, Henrik; Sieurin, Jan; Keihaes, Juha; Mueller, Christian; Berg, Magnus; Wikman, Karin

    2003-08-01

    Combustion of waste wood has during the last decade increased dramatically and this has resulted in a number of Swedish plants using this fuel, e.g. Handeloe P11 (Norrkoeping) and ldbaecken P3 (Nykoeping), and yet other plants that are under construction (e.g. Nynaeshamn). The experience from these plants are that waste wood combustion results in a number of operational problems. To some extent these problems are different compared with the problems related to combustion of other biofuels but the situation is not directly comparable to waste incinerators. The problems are mainly related to slagging and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces and accelerated corrosion at relatively low temperature compared to the situation for ordinary biofuels. In some cases an increase in the emissions of specific substances can also result in difficulties to fulfil the EC-directive on waste combustion. Within previous projects the main problems related to combustion of waste wood have been identified and to some extent the cause of these problems has been clarified. One result of this reported investigation is a deeper understanding of the actual causes of these problems. However, the most important result is a number of recommendations for different measures on how to achieve disturbance-free combustion of waste wood. These recommendations actually summarises the most important possible solutions on how to achieve a disturbance-free operation and a lower maintenance cost for boilers combusting waste wood and can thereby be regarded as a short summery of the whole project: 1) Improving fuel quality by Improved sorting at the source and Sieving of the fuel -> Reducing the amount of metals and chlorine and Separation of fines and thereby reducing the amount of metals. 2) Combustion modifications by Avoiding reducing conditions at the heat exchanger surfaces -> Minimising slagging, fouling and corrosion. 3) Additives or co-combustion by Addition of sulphur with the fuel; Injection of

  1. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  2. The combustion of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    The burning rates of sodium in the form of vapour jets, droplets, sprays and unconfined and confined pools have been reviewed. Attention has been paid to assessing the value of models in the various combustion modes. Additional models have been constructed for the descriptions of laminar and turbulent vapour jets, stationary droplets, forced convection over ambient pool fires together with correlations for peak pressures in confined pool environments. Where appropriate experiments with sodium have not been conducted, the likely behaviour is predicted by comparison with the burning of other fuels, particularly in the field of large free ambient fires. Some areas where further knowledge is required are highlighted. (author)

  3. Alternate fuels; Combustibles alternos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero Paredes R, Hernando; Ambriz G, Juan Jose [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the definition and description of alternate fuels we must center ourselves in those technological alternatives that allow to obtain compounds that differ from the traditional ones, in their forms to be obtained. In this article it is tried to give an overview of alternate fuels to the conventional derivatives of petroleum and that allow to have a clear idea on the tendencies of modern investigation and the technological developments that can be implemented in the short term. It is not pretended to include all the tendencies and developments of the present world, but those that can hit in a relatively short term, in accordance with agreed with the average life of conventional fuels. Nevertheless, most of the conversion principles are applicable to the spectrum of carbonaceous or cellulosic materials which are in nature, are cultivated or wastes of organic origin. Thus one will approach them in a successive way, the physical, chemical and biological conversions that can take place in a production process of an alternate fuel or the same direct use of the fuel such as burning the sweepings derived from the forests. [Spanish] En la definicion y descripcion de combustibles alternos nos debemos centrar en aquellas alternativas tecnologicas que permitan obtener compuestos que difieren de los tradicionales, al menos en sus formas de ser obtenidos. En este articulo se pretende dar un panorama de los combustibles alternos a los convencionales derivados del petroleo y que permita tener una idea clara sobre las tendencias de la investigacion moderna y los desarrollos tecnologicos que puedan ser implementados en el corto plazo. No se pretende abarcar todas las tendencias y desarrollos del mundo actual, sino aquellas que pueden impactar en un plazo relativamente corto, acordes con la vida media de los combustibles convencionales. Sin embargo, la mayor parte de los principios de conversion son aplicables al espectro de materiales carbonaceos o celulosicos los cuales se

  4. Fluidised bed combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion systems that facilitates the maintenance of the depth of the bed are described. A discharge pipe projects upwardly into the bed so that bed material can flow into its upper end and escape downwardly. The end of the pipe is surrounded by an enclosure and air is discharged into the enclosure so that material will enter the pipe from within the enclosure and have been cooled in the enclosure by the air discharged into it. The walls of the enclosure may themselves be cooled

  5. Thermal enhancement cartridge heater modified tritium hydride bed development, Part 2 - Experimental validation of key conceptual design features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, K.J.; Morgan, G.A. [Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) tritium hydride bed is an interim replacement for the first generation (Gen1) process hydride beds currently in service in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facilities. 3 new features are implemented in the TECH Mod hydride bed prototype: internal electric cartridge heaters, porous divider plates, and copper foam discs. These modifications will enhance bed performance and reduce costs by improving bed activation and installation processes, in-bed accountability measurements, end-of-life bed removal, and He-3 recovery. A full-scale hydride bed test station was constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in order to evaluate the performance of the prototype TECH Mod hydride bed. Controlled hydrogen (H{sub 2}) absorption/ desorption experiments were conducted to validate that the conceptual design changes have no adverse effects on the gas transfer kinetics or H{sub 2} storage/release properties compared to those of the Gen1 bed. Inert gas expansions before, during, and after H{sub 2} flow tests were used to monitor changes in gas transfer rates with repeated hydriding/de-hydriding of the hydride material. The gas flow rates significantly decreased after initial hydriding of the material; however, minimal changes were observed after repeated cycling. The data presented herein confirm that the TECH Mod hydride bed would be a suitable replacement for the Gen1 bed with the added enhancements expected from the advanced design features. (authors)

  6. Fast and Easy Drying Method for the Preparation of Activated [{sup 18}F]Fluoride Using Polymer Cartridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jai Woong [Inha University, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byoung Se; Chi, Dae Yoon [FutureChem Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Ju [Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Jun [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    An efficient nucleophilic [{sup 18}F]fluorination has been studied to reduce byproducts and preparation time. Instead of conventional aqueous solution of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 222}, several organic solution containing inert organic salts were used to release [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion and anion bases captured in the polymer cartridge, concluding that methanol solution is the best choice. Comparing to azeotropic drying process, one min was sufficient to remove methanol completely, resulting in about 10% radioactivity saving by reducing drying time. The polymer cartridge, Chromafix (PS-HCO{sub 3}) was pretreated with several anion bases to displace pre-loaded bicarbonate base. Phosphate bases showed better results than carbonate bases in terms of lower basicity. tert-Butanol solvent used as a reaction media played another critical role in nucleophilic [{sup 18}F]fluorination by suppressing eliminated side product. Consequent [{sup 18}F]fluorination under the present condition afforded fast preparation of reaction solution and high radiochemical yields (98% radio-TLC, 84% RCY) with 94% of precursor remained.

  7. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a

  8. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2017-03-28

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON = 46). The motored pressure at TDC is maintained at 35 bar and fuelMEP is kept constant at 5.1 bar to account for the difference in fuel properties between naphtha and diesel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is injected at a pressure of 800 bar. Photron FASTCAM SA4 that captures in-cylinder combustion at the rate of 10000 frames per second is employed. The captured high speed video is processed to study the combustion homogeneity based on an algorithm reported in previous studies. Starting from late fuel injection timings, combustion stratification is investigated by advancing the fuel injection timings. For late start of injection (SOI), a direct link between SOI and combustion phasing is noticed. At early SOI, combustion phasing depends on both intake air temperature and SOI. In order to match the combustion phasing (CA50) of diesel, the intake air temperature is increased to 90°C for naphtha. The combustion stratification from CI to PPC is also investigated for various level of dilution by displacing oxygen with nitrogen in the intake. The start of combustion (SOC) was delayed with the increase in dilution and to compensate for this, the intake air temperature is increased. The mixture homogeneity is enhanced for higher dilution due to longer ignition delay. The results show that high speed image is initially blue and then turned yellow, indicating soot formation and oxidation. The luminosity of combustion images decreases with early SOI and increased dilution. The images are processed to generate the level of stratification based on the image intensity. The level of stratification is same for diesel and naphtha at various SOI. When O concentration in the intake is decreased to 17.7% and 14

  9. Preliminary assessment of combustion modes for internal combustion wave rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalim, M. Razi

    1995-01-01

    Combustion within the channels of a wave rotor is examined as a means of obtaining pressure gain during heat addition in a gas turbine engine. Several modes of combustion are considered and the factors that determine the applicability of three modes are evaluated in detail; premixed autoignition/detonation, premixed deflagration, and non-premixed compression ignition. The last two will require strong turbulence for completion of combustion in a reasonable time in the wave rotor. The compression/autoignition modes will require inlet temperatures in excess of 1500 R for reliable ignition with most hydrocarbon fuels; otherwise, a supplementary ignition method must be provided. Examples of combustion mode selection are presented for two core engine applications that had been previously designed with equivalent 4-port wave rotor topping cycles using external combustion.

  10. Path planning during combustion mode switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Ravi, Nikhil

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods are provided for transitioning between a first combustion mode and a second combustion mode in an internal combustion engine. A current operating point of the engine is identified and a target operating point for the internal combustion engine in the second combustion mode is also determined. A predefined optimized transition operating point is selected from memory. While operating in the first combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion engine to approach the selected optimized transition operating point. When the engine is operating at the selected optimized transition operating point, the combustion mode is switched from the first combustion mode to the second combustion mode. While operating in the second combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion to approach the target operating point.

  11. AIR EMISSIONS FROM SCRAP TIRE COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  12. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  13. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Brand

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires, and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature, sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio

  14. Development of a method for rapid and simultaneous monitoring of particulate and dissolved radiocesium in water with nonwoven fabric cartridge filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideki Tsuji; Tetsuo Yasutaka; Yoshihiko Kondo; Yasukazu Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    A method for the rapid and simultaneous monitoring of particulate and dissolved 137 Cs concentration in water was developed. This method uses pleated polypropylene nonwoven fabric filter to collect particulate radiocesium, and nonwoven fabric impregnated with Prussian blue (PB) to absorb dissolved radiocesium. The fabric was placed into cylindrical plastic cartridges (SS-cartridge and PB-cartridge). Traditional monitoring methods, such as evaporative concentration, often require time for pre-processing. However, this method described requires much less pre-processing time before the detection. Experiments conducted with simulated river water demonstrated that almost all of the suspended solids weight was collected in the SS-cartridge, and that more than 92 % of dissolved 137 Cs was absorbed onto the two PB-cartridges by 2.5 L/min flow rate when the range of the pH was 6-8. This device was applied to monitor Abukuma River water at two locations and the results were compared with those obtained using the filtrating and evaporative concentration method. The suspended solids concentration in river water, calculated by weight gain of the SS-cartridge and by sediment weight after filtration with a 0.45-μm membrane filter, agreed well. The radioactivity of the particulate and dissolved 137 Cs also agreed well in one of the two replications of this method. In addition, the required time for pre-processing was reduced by 60 times that by filtrating and evaporative concentration method. This method can separately collect and concentrate particulate and dissolved radiocesium rapidly and simultaneously in the field. (author)

  15. Ejector device for returning incomplete combustion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szule, T.; Minas, E.; Pietrowski, K.

    1977-12-19

    A device is proposed for separating the fine fraction of incompletely burned clinker and delivering it to the firebox for combustion. The clinker is fed into the two-chambered device from the top through an open gate. The inside chamber of the device consists of a side enclosure with an inspection hole and a hatch, and a gate with a screen on top. An ejector is located in the chamber. The case of the outside chamber, also with an inspection hole and hatch, forms a bypass channel with the enclosure of the inside chamber. Fine clinker is poured through the screen into the inside chamber, and some of it is removed by the ejector for combustion; the coarser fraction builds up on top of the gate, and is periodically passed through it. Large pieces of clinker which do not fit through the screen pass down through the bypass channel.

  16. Manifold methods for methane combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Pope, S.B. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Great progresses have been made in combustion research, especially, the computation of laminar flames and the probability density function (PDF) method in turbulent combustion. For one-dimensional laminar flames, by considering the transport mechanism, the detailed chemical kinetic mechanism and the interactions between these two basic processes, today it is a routine matter to calculate flame velocities, extinction, ignition, temperature, and species distributions from the governing equations. Results are in good agreement with those obtained for experiments. However, for turbulent combustion, because of the complexities of turbulent flow, chemical reactions, and the interaction between them, in the foreseeable future, it is impossible to calculate the combustion flow field by directly integrating the basic governing equations. So averaging and modeling are necessary in turbulent combustion studies. Averaging, on one hand, simplifies turbulent combustion calculations, on the other hand, it introduces the infamous closure problems, especially the closure problem with chemical reaction terms. Since in PDF calculations of turbulent combustion, the averages of the chemical reaction terms can be calculated, PDF methods overcome the closure problem with the reaction terms. It has been shown that the PDF method is a most promising method to calculate turbulent combustion. PDF methods have been successfully employed to calculate laboratory turbulent flames: they can predict phenomena such as super equilibrium radical levels, and local extinction. Because of these advantages, PDF methods are becoming used increasingly in industry combustor codes.

  17. Separation of V(V)-4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinolato complex from a large excess reagent using an ODS cartridge for high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toru; Kaneko, Emiko; Yotsuyanagi, Takao

    2006-12-01

    A selective off-line preconcentration technique for the V(V) complex with 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol has been developed and successfully applied to the determination of V(V) in an air-borne sample. The target complex was separated from excess reagent using an ODS cartridge and water as the eluent. The complex was then concentrated on another ODS cartridge using tetrabutylammonium bromide and eluted with methanol; the eluate was applied to a one-drop concentration/HPLC. A detection limit as low as (6.05 +/- 0.82)x 10(-11) M (5 ppt) was achieved.

  18. Flow blurring atomization for combustion of viscous (bio)fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Bouma, Wilmer; Ratering, Martijn; Brem, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve efficient combustion of liquid fuel a proper atomization of the fuel is needed. In case of many biomass fuels the atomization process is obstructed and hindered by high viscosity of the fuel. Preheating to reduce the viscosity in many cases is not possible because of fuel

  19. Combustion & Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLDRC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Combustion and Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLRDC) supports the experimental and computational study of fundamental combustion phenomena to...

  20. Combustion instability control in the model of combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmadullin, A N; Ahmethanov, E N; Iovleva, O V; Mitrofanov, G A

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study of the influence of external periodic perturbations on the instability of the combustion chamber in a pulsating combustion. As an external periodic disturbances were used sound waves emitted by the electrodynamics. The purpose of the study was to determine the possibility of using the method of external periodic perturbation to control the combustion instability. The study was conducted on a specially created model of the combustion chamber with a swirl burner in the frequency range from 100 to 1400 Hz. The study found that the method of external periodic perturbations may be used to control combustion instability. Depending on the frequency of the external periodic perturbation is observed as an increase and decrease in the amplitude of the oscillations in the combustion chamber. These effects are due to the mechanisms of synchronous and asynchronous action. External periodic disturbance generated in the path feeding the gaseous fuel, showing the high efficiency of the method of management in terms of energy costs. Power required to initiate periodic disturbances (50 W) is significantly smaller than the thermal capacity of the combustion chamber (100 kW)

  1. Space Station Freedom combustion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Extended operations in microgravity, on board spacecraft like Space Station Freedom, provide both unusual opportunities and unusual challenges for combustion science. On the one hand, eliminating the intrusion of buoyancy provides a valuable new perspective for fundamental studies of combustion phenomena. On the other hand, however, the absence of buoyancy creates new hazards of fires and explosions that must be understood to assure safe manned space activities. These considerations - and the relevance of combustion science to problems of pollutants, energy utilization, waste incineration, power and propulsion systems, and fire and explosion hazards, among others - provide strong motivation for microgravity combustion research. The intrusion of buoyancy is a greater impediment to fundamental combustion studies than to most other areas of science. Combustion intrinsically heats gases with the resulting buoyant motion at normal gravity either preventing or vastly complicating measurements. Perversely, this limitation is most evident for fundamental laboratory experiments; few practical combustion phenomena are significantly affected by buoyancy. Thus, we have never observed the most fundamental combustion phenomena - laminar premixed and diffusion flames, heterogeneous flames of particles and surfaces, low-speed turbulent flames, etc. - without substantial buoyant disturbances. This precludes rational merging of theory, where buoyancy is of little interest, and experiments, that always are contaminated by buoyancy, which is the traditional path for developing most areas of science. The current microgravity combustion program seeks to rectify this deficiency using both ground-based and space-based facilities, with experiments involving space-based facilities including: laminar premixed flames, soot processes in laminar jet diffusion flames, structure of laminar and turbulent jet diffusion flames, solid surface combustion, one-dimensional smoldering, ignition and flame

  2. Construction of a mutagenesis cartridge for poliovirus genome-linked viral protein: isolation and characterization of viable and nonviable mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, R.J.; Tada, H.; Ypma-Wong, M.F.; Dunn, J.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1988-01-01

    By following a strategy of genetic analysis of poliovirus, the authors have constructed a synthetic mutagenesis cartridge spanning the genome-linked viral protein coding region and flanking cleavage sites in an infectious cDNA clone of the type I (Mahoney) genome. The insertion of new restriction sites within the infectious clone has allowed them to replace the wild-type sequences with short complementary pairs of synthetic oligonucleotides containing various mutations. A set of mutations have been made that create methionine codons within the genome-linked viral protein region. The resulting viruses have growth characteristics similar to wild type. Experiments that led to an alteration of the tyrosine residue responsible for the linkage to RNA have resulted in nonviable virus. In one mutant, proteolytic processing assayed in vitro appeared unimpaired by the mutation. They suggest that the position of the tyrosine residue is important for genome-linked viral protein function(s)

  3. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  4. Producer for vegetal combustibles for internal-combustion motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-12-28

    A producer is described for internal-combustion motors fed with wood or agricultural byproducts characterized by the fact that its full operation is independent of the degree of wetness of the material used.

  5. [Effectiveness of FTA Elute® indicating cartridge in combination with hybrid capture 2 for cervical cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Shaoming; Hu, Shangying; Chen, Wen; Zhao, Fanghui; He, Wei; Zhang, Yuqing; Qiao, Youlin

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of FTA Elute® Cartridge (GE healthcare, Kent, UK) in combination with hybrid capture 2 (HC2) testing for cervical cancer screening. From May to June 2012, 412 women aged 25 to 65 years in Jiangxi Tonggu were enrolled in the study. We used pathological outcome as the gold standard, and the accuracy of the FTA card in combination with HC2 testing was investigated from both physician- and self-sampling, respectively. Physician sampling using the FTA card in combination with HC2 testing showed a comparable sensitivity (12/13) with the liquid based medium, but a higher specificity 69.5% (266/383) vs (77.8%, 298/383) (P FTA card in combination with HC2 testing with liquid based medium was 10/13 vs 8/13(P = 0.625) and (62.3%, 238/382) vs (75.7%, 289/382) (P FTA and liquid-based sampling medium was 86.1% (340/395) and 79.5% (314/395). For physician-collected samples used for HC2 testing to detect CIN2+, the accuracy of the FTA card was superior to that of the liquid-based medium (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.898, 95%CI:0.838-0.958). FTA Elute® cartridge in combination with HC2 testing is a promising method of specimen transport for cervical cancer screening programs with a good precision.With further optimization, it could become an effective method for cervical cancer screening in various economic levels of areas.

  6. Reducing emissions from diesel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains information dealing with engine design to reduce emissions and improve or maintain fuel economy. Topics include: Observation of High Pressure Fuel Spray with Laser Light Sheet Method; Determination of Engine Cylinder Pressures from Crankshaft Speed Fluctuations; Combustion Similarity for Different Size Diesel Engines: Theoretical Prediction and Experimental Results; Prediction of Diesel Engine Particulate Emission During Transient Cycles; Characteristics and Combustibility of Particulate Matter; Dual-Fuel Diesel Engine Using Butane; Measurement of Flame Temperature Distribution in D.I. Diesel Engine with High Pressure Fuel Injection: and Combustion in a Small DI Diesel Engine at Starting

  7. Computational Study of Stratified Combustion in an Optical Diesel Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Jaasim, Mohammed

    2017-03-28

    Full cycle simulations of KAUST optical diesel engine were conducted in order to provide insights into the details of fuel spray, mixing, and combustion characteristics at different start of injection (SOI) conditions. Although optical diagnostics provide valuable information, the high fidelity simulations with matched parametric conditions improve fundamental understanding of relevant physical and chemical processes by accessing additional observables such as the local mixture distribution, intermediate species concentrations, and detailed chemical reaction rates. Commercial software, CONVERGE™, was used as the main simulation tool, with the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence model and the multi-zone (SAGE) combustion model to compute the chemical reaction terms. SOI is varied from late compression ignition (CI) to early partially premixed combustion (PPC) conditions. The simulation results revealed a stronger correlation between fuel injection timing and combustion phasing for late SOI conditions, whereas the combustion phasing starts to decouple from SOI for early SOI cases. The predictions are consistent with the experimental observations, in terms of the overall trends in combustion and emission characteristics, while the high fidelity simulations provided further insights into the effects of mixture stratifications resulting from different SOI conditions.

  8. The reduction of air pollution by improved combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, S.W. [Pennsylvania Univ., Chemical Engineering Dept., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The contributions of combustion to air pollution and possible remedies are discussed. Control and reduction of air pollution from combustion is more feasible than from other sources because of its discrete localization. The gaseous products of combustion inevitably include H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, NO and/or NO{sub 2} and may include N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3} and unburned and partially burned hydrocarbons. Soot, ash and other dispersed solids may also be present, but are not considered herein. Unburned and partially burned hydrocarbons are prima facie evidence of poor mechanics of combustion and should not be tolerated. On the other hand, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are unavoidable if the fuel contains nitrogen and sulfur. The best remedy in this latter case is to remove these species from the fuel. Otherwise their products of combustion must be removed by absorption, adsorption or reaction. NO{sub x} from the fixation of N{sub 2} in the air and CO may be minimized by advanced techniques of combustion. One such method is described in some detail. If CO{sub 2} must be removed this can be accomplished by absorption, adsorption or reaction, but precooling is necessary and the quantity is an order of magnitude greater than that of any of the other pollutants. (Author)

  9. Combustion in microgravity: The French contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Roger; Legros, Guillaume; Torero, José L.

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity (drop towers, parabolic flights, sounding rockets and space stations) are particularly relevant to combustion problems given that they show high-density gradients and in many cases weak forced convection. For some configurations where buoyancy forces result in complex flow fields, microgravity leads to ideal conditions that correspond closely to canonical problems, e.g., combustion of a spherical droplet in a far-field still atmosphere, Emmons' problem for flame spreading over a solid flat plate, deflagration waves, etc. A comprehensive chronological review on the many combustion studies in microgravity was written first by Law and Faeth (1994) and then by F.A. Williams (1995). Later on, new recommendations for research directions have been delivered. In France, research has been managed and supported by CNES and CNRS since the creation of the microgravity research group in 1992. At this time, microgravity research and future activities contemplated the following: Droplets: the "D2 law" has been well verified and high-pressure behavior of droplet combustion has been assessed. The studies must be extended in two main directions: vaporization in mixtures near the critical line and collective effects in dense sprays. Flame spread: experiments observed blue flames governed by diffusion that are in accordance with Emmons' theory. Convection-dominated flames showed significant departures from the theory. Some theoretical assumptions appeared controversial and it was noted that radiation effects must be considered, especially when regarding the role of soot production in quenching. Heterogeneous flames: two studies are in progress, one in Poitiers and the other in Marseilles, about flame/suspension interactions. Premixed and triple flames: the knowledge still needs to be complemented. Triple flames must continue to be studied and understanding of "flame balls" still needs to be addressed.

  10. Computational Modeling of Turbulent Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is development and validation of predictive models or modeling approaches of liquid fuel combustion (spray combustion) in hot-diluted environments, known as flameless combustion or MILD combustion. The goal is to combine good physical insight,

  11. Measures for a quality combustion (combustion chamber exit and downstream); Mesures pour une combustion de qualite (sortie de chambre de combustion et en aval)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epinat, G. [APAVE Lyonnaise, 69 (France)

    1996-12-31

    After a review of the different pollutants related to the various types of stationary and mobile combustion processes (stoichiometric, reducing and oxidizing combustion), measures and analyses than may be used to ensure the quality and efficiency of combustion processes are reviewed: opacimeters, UV analyzers, etc. The regulation and control equipment for combustion systems are then listed, according to the generator capacity level

  12. Fuels and Combustion | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuels and Combustion Fuels and Combustion This is the March 2015 issue of the Transportation and , combustion strategy, and engine design hold the potential to maximize vehicle energy efficiency and performance of low-carbon fuels in internal combustion engines with a whole-systems approach to fuel chemistry

  13. Development of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, Craig; Gonzalez, Manual; Russell, Durrett

    2011-06-30

    This report summarizes activities related to the revised STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated June 2010 for the Development of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines (COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-05NT42415) project. In both the spark- (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) development activities covered in this program, the goal was to develop potential production-viable internal combustion engine system technologies that both reduce fuel consumption and simultaneously met exhaust emission targets. To be production-viable, engine technologies were also evaluated to determine if they would meet customer expectations of refinement in terms of noise, vibration, performance, driveability, etc. in addition to having an attractive business case and value. Prior to this activity, only proprietary theoretical / laboratory knowledge existed on the combustion technologies explored The research reported here expands and develops this knowledge to determine series-production viability. Significant SI and CI engine development occurred during this program within General Motors, LLC over more than five years. In the SI program, several engines were designed and developed that used both a relatively simple multi-lift valve train system and a Fully Flexible Valve Actuation (FFVA) system to enable a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion process. Many technical challenges, which were unknown at the start of this program, were identified and systematically resolved through analysis, test and development. This report documents the challenges and solutions for each SOPO deliverable. As a result of the project activities, the production viability of the developed clean combustion technologies has been determined. At this time, HCCI combustion for SI engines is not considered production-viable for several reasons. HCCI combustion is excessively sensitive to control variables

  14. Experimental validation of large-eddy simulation for swirling methane-air non-premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, L.Y.; Luo, Y.H.; Xu, C.S. [Shanghai Jiaotong Univ. (China). School of Mechanical Engineering; Zhou, L.X. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics

    2013-07-01

    Large-eddy simulation of swirling methane-air non-premixed combustion was carried out using a Smagorinsky-Lilly subgrid scale stress model and a presumed-PDF fast-chemistry combustion model. The LES statistical results are validated by PIV, temperature and species concentration measurements made by the present authors. The results indicate that in the present case the presumed-PDF fast-chemistry combustion model is a fairish one. The instantaneous vorticity and temperature maps show clearly the development and the interaction between coherent structures and combustion.

  15. Environmental sensing and combustion diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoleri, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of Environmental Sensing and Combustion Diagnostics. Topics covered include: Incineration Systems Applications, Permitting, And Monitoring Overview; Infrared Techniques Applied to Incineration Systems; Continuous Emission Monitors; Analyzers and Sensors for Process Control And Environmental Monitoring

  16. Sodium nitrate combustion limit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1976-04-01

    Sodium nitrate is a powerful solid oxidant. Energetically, it is capable of exothermically oxidizing almost any organic material. Rate-controlling variables such as temperature, concentration of oxidant, concentration of fuel, thermal conductivity, moisture content, size, and pressure severely limit the possibility of a self-supported exothermic reaction (combustion). The tests reported in this document were conducted on one-gram samples at atmospheric pressure. Below 380 0 C, NaNO 3 was stable and did not support combustion. At moisture concentrations above 22 wt percent, exothermic reactions did not propagate in even the most energetic and reactive compositions. Fresh resin and paraffin were too volatile to enable a NaNO 2 -supported combustion process to propagate. Concentrations of NaNO 3 above 95 wt percent or below 35 wt percent did not react with enough energy release to support combustion. The influence of sample size and confining pressure, both important factors, was not investigated in this study

  17. 75 FR 3881 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ..., rubber, drugs, dried blood, dyes, certain textiles, and metals (such as aluminum and magnesium..., furniture manufacturing, metal processing, fabricated metal products and machinery manufacturing, pesticide... standard that will comprehensively address the fire and explosion hazards of combustible dust. The Agency...

  18. Preparation of a New Adsorbent from Activated Carbon and Carbon Nanofiber (AC/CNF for Manufacturing Organic-Vacbpour Respirator Cartridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jahangiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF was prepared to improve the performance of activated carbon (AC for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs and its utilization for respirator cartridges. Activated carbon was impregnated with a nickel nitrate catalyst precursor and carbonnanofibers (CNF were deposited directly on the AC surface using catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Deposited CNFs on catalyst particles in AC micropores, were activated by CO2 to recover the surface area and micropores.Surface and textural characterizations of the prepared composites were investigated using Brunauer, Emmett andTeller’s (BET technique and electron microscopy respectively. Prepared composite adsorbent was tested forbenzene, toluene and xylene (BTX adsorption and then employed in an organic respirator cartridge in granularform. Adsorption studies were conducted by passing air samples through the adsorbents in a glass column at an adjustable flow rate. Finally, any adsorbed species not retained by the adsorbents in the column were trapped in a charcoal sorbent tube and analyzed by gas chromatography. CNFs with a very thin diameter of about 10-20 nmwere formed uniformly on the AC/CNF. The breakthrough time for cartridges prepared with CO2 activated AC/CNF was 117 minutes which are significantly longer than for those cartridges prepared with walnut shell- based activated carbon with the same weight of adsorbents. This study showed that a granular form CO2 activated AC/CNF composite could be a very effective alternate adsorbent for respirator cartridges due to its larger adsorption capacities and lower weight.

  19. Time since discharge of 9mm cartridges by headspace analysis, part 1: Comprehensive optimisation and validation of a headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallidabino, M; Romolo, F S; Weyermann, C

    2017-03-01

    Estimating the time since discharge of spent cartridges can be a valuable tool in the forensic investigation of firearm-related crimes. To reach this aim, it was previously proposed that the decrease of volatile organic compounds released during discharge is monitored over time using non-destructive headspace extraction techniques. While promising results were obtained for large-calibre cartridges (e.g., shotgun shells), handgun calibres yielded unsatisfying results. In addition to the natural complexity of the specimen itself, these can also be attributed to some selective choices in the methods development. Thus, the present series of paper aimed to more systematically evaluate the potential of headspace analysis to estimate the time since discharge of cartridges through the use of more comprehensive analytical and interpretative techniques. Specifically, in this first part, a method based on headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) was comprehensively optimised and validated, as the latter recently proved to be a more efficient alternative than previous approaches. For this purpose, 29 volatile organic compounds were preliminary selected on the basis of previous works. A multivariate statistical approach based on design of experiments (DOE) was used to optimise variables potentially involved in interaction effects. Introduction of deuterated analogues in sampling vials was also investigated as strategy to account for analytical variations. Analysis was carried out by selected ion mode, gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results showed good chromatographic resolution as well as detection limits and peak area repeatability. Application to 9mm spent cartridges confirmed that the use of co-extracted internal standards allowed for improved reproducibility of the measured signals. The validated method will be applied in the second part of this work to estimate the time since discharge of 9mm spent cartridges using multivariate models. Copyright

  20. Dual-Pump CARS Development and Application to Supersonic Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    A dual-pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) instrument has been developed to obtain simultaneous measurements of temperature and absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in supersonic combustion and generate databases for validation and development of CFD codes. Issues that compromised previous attempts, such as beam steering and high irradiance perturbation effects, have been alleviated or avoided. Improvements in instrument precision and accuracy have been achieved. An axis-symmetric supersonic combusting coaxial jet facility has been developed to provide a simple, yet suitable flow to CFD modelers. Approximately one million dual-pump CARS single shots have been collected in the supersonic jet for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Data have been acquired with a H2 co-flow (combustion case) or a N2 co-flow (mixing case). Results are presented and the effects of the compressibility and of the heat release are discussed.

  1. High laboratory cost predicted per tuberculosis case diagnosed with increased case finding without a triage strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, R; Naidoo, P; Beyers, N; Langley, I

    2017-09-01

    Cape Town, South Africa. To model the effects of increased case finding and triage strategies on laboratory costs per tuberculosis (TB) case diagnosed. We used a validated operational model and published laboratory cost data. We modelled the effect of varying the proportion with TB among presumptive cases and Xpert cartridge price reductions on cost per TB case and per additional TB case diagnosed in the Xpert-based vs. smear/culture-based algorithms. In our current scenario (18.3% with TB among presumptive cases), the proportion of cases diagnosed increased by 8.7% (16.7% vs. 15.0%), and the cost per case diagnosed increased by 142% (US$121 vs. US$50). The cost per additional case diagnosed was US$986. This would increase to US$1619 if the proportion with TB among presumptive cases was 10.6%. At 25.9-30.8% of TB prevalence among presumptive cases and a 50% reduction in Xpert cartridge price, the cost per TB case diagnosed would range from US$50 to US$59 (comparable to the US$48.77 found in routine practice with smear/culture). The operational model illustrates the effect of increased case finding on laboratory costs per TB case diagnosed. Unless triage strategies are identified, the approach will not be sustainable, even if Xpert cartridge prices are reduced.

  2. Impact of higher n-butanol addition on combustion and performance of GDI engine in stoichiometric combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zheng; Yang, Feng; Xue, Shuo; Wu, Zhenkuo; Liu, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of 0–50% n-butanol addition on GDI engine are experimentally studied. • Higher n-butanol fractions increase combustion pressure and fasten burning rate. • Higher n-butanol fractions increase BSFC but improve BTE. • Higher n-butanol fractions enhance combustion stability but increase knock intensity. • Higher n-butanol fractions reduce exhaust temperature and NOx emissions. - Abstract: An experimental study was carried out on a turbocharged gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine fueled by n-butanol/gasoline blends. Effects of n-butanol percents (15%, 30%, and 50%) on combustion and performance of the engine operating on stoichiometric combustion condition were discussed and also compared with pure gasoline in this paper. The results indicate that n-butanol/gasoline blends increase combustion pressure and pressure rise rate, fasten burning rate, and shorten ignition delay and combustion duration, as compared to pure gasoline. Moreover, these trends are impacted more evidently with increased n-butanol fraction in the blends. In addition, higher n-butanol percent of gasoline blends increase combustion temperature but decrease the temperature in the later stage of expansion stroke, which contributes to the control of exhaust temperature at high-load. With regards to engine performance, higher n-butanol percent in the blends results in increased brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE). However, higher n-butanol addition helps to improve combustion stability but shows slightly higher knock possibility in high-load. In that case, the knock trend could be weakened by retarding ignition timing. Moreover, higher n-butanol addition significantly decreases NOx emissions, but it increases CO emissions obviously.

  3. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; Ellis, David L.; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. Fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of shrinking budgets. Three technologies have been combined to produce an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Copper alloy NARloy-Z was replaced with a new high performance Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. Functional gradient technology, developed building composite cartridges for space furnaces was incorporated to add oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. NiCrAlY, utilized to produce durable protective coating for the space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (BPFTP) turbine blades, was used as the functional gradient material coating (FGM). The FGM not only serves as a protection from oxidation or blanching, the main cause of engine failure, but also serves as a thermal barrier because of its lower thermal conductivity, reducing the temperature of the combustion liner 200 F, from 1000 F to 800 F producing longer life. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) using the low-cost VPS process. VPS formed combustion chamber test articles have been formed with the FGM hot wall built in and hot fire tested, demonstrating for the first time a coating that will remain intact through the hot firing test, and with

  4. Modeling of microgravity combustion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, John

    1995-01-01

    This program started in February 1991, and is designed to improve our understanding of basic combustion phenomena by the modeling of various configurations undergoing experimental study by others. Results through 1992 were reported in the second workshop. Work since that time has examined the following topics: Flame-balls; Intrinsic and acoustic instabilities in multiphase mixtures; Radiation effects in premixed combustion; Smouldering, both forward and reverse, as well as two dimensional smoulder.

  5. Quantifying emissions from spontaneous combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous combustion can be a significant problem in the coal industry, not only due to the obvious safety hazard and the potential loss of valuable assets, but also with respect to the release of gaseous pollutants, especially CO2, from uncontrolled coal fires. This report reviews methodologies for measuring emissions from spontaneous combustion and discusses methods for quantifying, estimating and accounting for the purpose of preparing emission inventories.

  6. Modelling of EAF off-gas post combustion in dedusting systems using CFD methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, X.; Kirschen, M.; Pfeifer, H. [Inst. for Industrial Furnaces and Heat Engineering in Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany); Abel, M. [VAI-Fuchs GmbH, Willstaett (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    To comply with the increasingly strict environmental regulations, the poisonous off-gas species, e.g. carbon monoxide (CO), produced in the electric arc furnace (EAF) must be treated in the dedusting system. In this work, gas flow patterns of the off-gas post combustion in three different dedusting system units were simulated with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code: (1) post combustion in a horizontal off-gas duct, (2) post combustion in a water cooled post combustion chamber without additional energy supply (no gas or air/oxygen injectors) and (3) post combustion in a post combustion chamber with additional energy input (gas, air injectors and ignition burner, case study of VAI-Fuchs GmbH). All computational results are illustrated with gas velocity, temperature distribution and chemical species concentration fields for the above three cases. In case 1, the effect of different false air volume flow rates at the gap between EAF elbow and exhaust gas duct on the external post combustion of the off-gas was investigated. For case 2, the computed temperature and chemical composition (CO, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}) of the off-gas at the post chamber exit are in good agreement with additional measurements. Various operating conditions for case 3 have been studied, including different EAF off-gas temperatures and compositions, i. e. CO content, in order to optimize oxygen and burner gas flow rates. Residence time distributions in the external post combustion chambers have been calculated for cases 2 and 3. Derived temperature fields of the water cooled walls yield valuable information on thermally stressed parts of post combustion units. The results obtained in this work may also gain insight to future investigation of combustion of volatile organic components (VOC) or formation of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) and permit the optimization of the operation and design of the off-gas dedusting system units. (orig.)

  7. Particulate and gaseous emissions from residential biomass combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, Christoffer

    2005-04-01

    different stoves were determined with variations in fuel, appliance and operational properties. The emissions of PICs as well as PM tot from wood combustion were in general shown to be considerably higher compared to pellets combustion. PAH tot emissions were determined in the range of 1,300-220,000 μg/MJ for wood stoves and 2-300 μg/MJ for pellet stoves with phenantrene, fluoranthene and pyrene generally found as major PAHs. The PM emissions from present residential appliances was found to consist of significant but varying fractions of PICs, with emissions in the range 35-350 mg/MJ for wood stoves compared to 15-45 mg/MJ for pellet stoves. Accordingly, the use of up-graded biomass fuels, combusted under continuous and controlled conditions give advantageous combustion conditions compared to traditional batch wise firing of wood logs. The importance of high temperature in well mixed isothermal conditions was further illustrated during pellets combustion to obtain complete combustion with almost a total depletion of PICs. Fine (100-300 nm) particles dominated in all studied cases the PM with 80-95% as PM 1 . Beside varying fractions of carbonaceous material, the fine PM consisted of inorganic volatilized ash elements, mainly found as KCl, K 3 Na(SO 4 ) 2 and K 2 SO 4 with mass concentrations at 15-20 mg/MJ during complete combustion. The importance of the behavior of alkali elements for the ash transformation and fine particle formation processes was further shown, since the stability, distributions and compositions also directly control the degree of volatilization. In addition to the alkali metals, zinc was found as an important element in fine particles from residential biomass combustion. Finally, the behaviour of volatile trace elements, e.g. Zn and Cd, during pellets production and combustion were studied. A significant enrichment in the pellet fuel during the drying process was determined. The magnitude and importance of the enrichment was, however, relative small

  8. Combustion means for solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, D.

    1987-09-23

    A combustion device for solid fuel, suitable for coal, coke, charcoal, coal-dust briquettes etc., comprising:- a base stand with an opening therein, an imperforate heat resistant holding board locatable to close said opening; a combustion chamber standing on the base stand with the holding board forming the base of the combustion chamber; a wiper arm pivoted for horizontal wiping movement over the upper surface of the holding board; an inlet means at a lower edge of said chamber above the base stand, and/or in a surrounding wall of said chamber, whereby combustion air may enter as exhaust gases leave the combustion chamber; an exhaust pipe for the exhaust gases; generally tubular gas-flow heat-exchange ducting putting the combustion chamber and exhaust pipe into communication; and means capable of moving the holding board into and out of the opening for removal of ash or other residue. The invention can be used for a heating system in a house or in a greenhouse or for a boiler.

  9. Techniques de combustion Combustin Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perthuis E.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'efficacité d'un processus de chauffage par flamme est étroitement liée à la maîtrise des techniques de combustion. Le brûleur, organe essentiel de l'équipement de chauffe, doit d'une part assurer une combustion complète pour utiliser au mieux l'énergie potentielle du combustible et, d'autre part, provoquer dans le foyer les conditions aérodynamiques les plus propices oux transferts de chaleur. En s'appuyant sur les études expérimentales effectuées à la Fondation de Recherches Internationales sur les Flammes (FRIF, au Groupe d'Étude des Flammes de Gaz Naturel (GEFGN et à l'Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP et sur des réalisations industrielles, on présente les propriétés essentielles des flammes de diffusion aux combustibles liquides et gazeux obtenues avec ou sans mise en rotation des fluides, et leurs répercussions sur les transferts thermiques. La recherche des températures de combustion élevées conduit à envisager la marche à excès d'air réduit, le réchauffage de l'air ou son enrichissement à l'oxygène. Par quelques exemples, on évoque l'influence de ces paramètres d'exploitation sur l'économie possible en combustible. The efficiency of a flame heating process is closely linked ta the mastery of, combustion techniques. The burner, an essential element in any heating equipment, must provide complete combustion sa as to make optimum use of the potential energy in the fuel while, at the same time, creating the most suitable conditions for heat transfers in the combustion chamber. On the basis of experimental research performed by FRIF, GEFGN and IFP and of industrial achievements, this article describesthe essential properties of diffusion flames fed by liquid and gaseous fuels and produced with or without fluid swirling, and the effects of such flames on heat transfers. The search for high combustion temperatures means that consideration must be given to operating with reduced excess air, heating the air or

  10. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  11. HERCULES Advanced Combustion Concepts Test Facility: Spray/Combustion Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, K. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Labor fuer Aerothermochemie und Verbrennungssysteme, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This yearly report for 2004 on behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) at the Laboratory for Aero-thermochemistry and Combustion Systems at the Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich, Switzerland, presents a review of work being done within the framework of HERCULES (High Efficiency R and D on Combustion with Ultra Low Emissions for Ships) - the international R and D project concerning new technologies for ships' diesels. The work involves the use and augmentation of simulation models. These are to be validated using experimental data. The report deals with the development of an experimental set-up that will simulate combustion in large two-stroke diesel engines and allow the generation of reference data. The main element of the test apparatus is a spray / combustion chamber with extensive possibilities for optical observation under variable flow conditions. The results of first simulations confirm concepts and shall help in further work on the project. The potential offered by high-speed camera systems was tested using the institute's existing HTDZ combustion chamber. Further work to be done is reviewed.

  12. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Antoni K.; Maxson, James A.; Hensinger, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  13. Co-combustion and gasification of various biomasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutanen, K [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Varkaus (Finland). Ahlstrom Pyropower

    1997-12-31

    During the last twenty years the development of fluidized bed combustion and gasification technology has made it possible to increase significantly utilisation of various biomasses in power and heat generation. The forerunner was the pulp and paper industry that has an adequate biomass fuel supply and energy demand on site. Later on municipalities and even utilities have seen biomass as a potential fuel. The range of available biomasses includes wood-based fuels and wastes like bark, wood chips, and saw dust, agricultural wastes like straw, olive waste and rice husk, sludges from paper mills and de-inking plants, other wastes like municipal sludges, waste paper and RDF. Recently new environmental regulations and taxation of fossil fuels have further increased interest in the use of biomasses in energy generation. However, in many cases available quantities and/or qualities of biomasses are not adequate for only biomass-based energy generation in an economic sense. On the other hand plant owners want to maintain a high level of fuel flexibility and fuel supply security. In some cases disposing by burning is the only feasible way to handle certain wastes. In many cases the only way to fulfil these targets and utilize the energy is to apply co-combustion or gasification of different fuels and wastes. Due to the fact that fluidized bed combustion technology offers a very high fuel flexibility and high combustion efficiency with low emissions it has become the dominating technology in co-combustion applications. This presentation will present Alhstrom`s experiences in co-combustion of biomasses in bubbling beds and Ahlstrom Pyroflow circulating fluidized beds based on about 200 operating references worldwide. CFB gasification will also be discussed 9 refs.

  14. Co-combustion and gasification of various biomasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutanen, K. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Varkaus (Finland). Ahlstrom Pyropower

    1996-12-31

    During the last twenty years the development of fluidized bed combustion and gasification technology has made it possible to increase significantly utilisation of various biomasses in power and heat generation. The forerunner was the pulp and paper industry that has an adequate biomass fuel supply and energy demand on site. Later on municipalities and even utilities have seen biomass as a potential fuel. The range of available biomasses includes wood-based fuels and wastes like bark, wood chips, and saw dust, agricultural wastes like straw, olive waste and rice husk, sludges from paper mills and de-inking plants, other wastes like municipal sludges, waste paper and RDF. Recently new environmental regulations and taxation of fossil fuels have further increased interest in the use of biomasses in energy generation. However, in many cases available quantities and/or qualities of biomasses are not adequate for only biomass-based energy generation in an economic sense. On the other hand plant owners want to maintain a high level of fuel flexibility and fuel supply security. In some cases disposing by burning is the only feasible way to handle certain wastes. In many cases the only way to fulfil these targets and utilize the energy is to apply co-combustion or gasification of different fuels and wastes. Due to the fact that fluidized bed combustion technology offers a very high fuel flexibility and high combustion efficiency with low emissions it has become the dominating technology in co-combustion applications. This presentation will present Alhstrom`s experiences in co-combustion of biomasses in bubbling beds and Ahlstrom Pyroflow circulating fluidized beds based on about 200 operating references worldwide. CFB gasification will also be discussed 9 refs.

  15. Twenty-fifth symposium (international) on combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of the papers presented at this conference are contained in this volume. The other one-third appear in special issues of ''Combustion and Flame'', Vol. 99, 1994 and Vol. 100, 1995. Papers are divided into the following sections: Supersonic combustion; Detonations and explosions; Internal combustion engines; Practical aspects of combustion; Incineration and wastes; Sprays and droplet combustion; Coal and organic solids combustion; Soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Reaction kinetics; NO x ; Turbulent flames; Turbulent combustion; Laminar flames; Flame spread, fire and halogenated fire suppressants; Global environmental effects; Ignition; Two-phase combustion; Solid propellant combustion; Materials synthesis; Microgravity; and Experimental diagnostics. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  16. Randomized Comparison of Two Vaginal Self-Sampling Methods for Human Papillomavirus Detection: Dry Swab versus FTA Cartridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, Rosa; Vassilakos, Pierre; Bilancioni, Aline; Vanden Eynde, Mathieu; Meyer-Hamme, Ulrike; Menoud, Pierre-Alain; Guerry, Frédéric; Petignat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling (self-HPV) is valuable in cervical cancer screening. HPV testing is usually performed on physician-collected cervical smears stored in liquid-based medium. Dry filters and swabs are an alternative. We evaluated the adequacy of self-HPV using two dry storage and transport devices, the FTA cartridge and swab. A total of 130 women performed two consecutive self-HPV samples. Randomization determined which of the two tests was performed first: self-HPV using dry swabs (s-DRY) or vaginal specimen collection using a cytobrush applied to an FTA cartridge (s-FTA). After self-HPV, a physician collected a cervical sample using liquid-based medium (Dr-WET). HPV types were identified by real-time PCR. Agreement between collection methods was measured using the kappa statistic. HPV prevalence for high-risk types was 62.3% (95%CI: 53.7-70.2) detected by s-DRY, 56.2% (95%CI: 47.6-64.4) by Dr-WET, and 54.6% (95%CI: 46.1-62.9) by s-FTA. There was overall agreement of 70.8% between s-FTA and s-DRY samples (kappa = 0.34), and of 82.3% between self-HPV and Dr-WET samples (kappa = 0.56). Detection sensitivities for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse (LSIL+) were: 64.0% (95%CI: 44.5-79.8) for s-FTA, 84.6% (95%CI: 66.5-93.9) for s-DRY, and 76.9% (95%CI: 58.0-89.0) for Dr-WET. The preferred self-collection method among patients was s-DRY (40.8% vs. 15.4%). Regarding costs, FTA card was five times more expensive than the swab (~5 US dollars (USD)/per card vs. ~1 USD/per swab). Self-HPV using dry swabs is sensitive for detecting LSIL+ and less expensive than s-FTA. International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 43310942.

  17. Randomized Comparison of Two Vaginal Self-Sampling Methods for Human Papillomavirus Detection: Dry Swab versus FTA Cartridge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Catarino

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV self-sampling (self-HPV is valuable in cervical cancer screening. HPV testing is usually performed on physician-collected cervical smears stored in liquid-based medium. Dry filters and swabs are an alternative. We evaluated the adequacy of self-HPV using two dry storage and transport devices, the FTA cartridge and swab.A total of 130 women performed two consecutive self-HPV samples. Randomization determined which of the two tests was performed first: self-HPV using dry swabs (s-DRY or vaginal specimen collection using a cytobrush applied to an FTA cartridge (s-FTA. After self-HPV, a physician collected a cervical sample using liquid-based medium (Dr-WET. HPV types were identified by real-time PCR. Agreement between collection methods was measured using the kappa statistic.HPV prevalence for high-risk types was 62.3% (95%CI: 53.7-70.2 detected by s-DRY, 56.2% (95%CI: 47.6-64.4 by Dr-WET, and 54.6% (95%CI: 46.1-62.9 by s-FTA. There was overall agreement of 70.8% between s-FTA and s-DRY samples (kappa = 0.34, and of 82.3% between self-HPV and Dr-WET samples (kappa = 0.56. Detection sensitivities for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse (LSIL+ were: 64.0% (95%CI: 44.5-79.8 for s-FTA, 84.6% (95%CI: 66.5-93.9 for s-DRY, and 76.9% (95%CI: 58.0-89.0 for Dr-WET. The preferred self-collection method among patients was s-DRY (40.8% vs. 15.4%. Regarding costs, FTA card was five times more expensive than the swab (~5 US dollars (USD/per card vs. ~1 USD/per swab.Self-HPV using dry swabs is sensitive for detecting LSIL+ and less expensive than s-FTA.International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN: 43310942.

  18. Improvements of the sensitivity of burst cartridge detection; Amelioration du seuil de detection des ruptures de gaine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasnier, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    I - Special tests for improving the sensitivity of burst cartridge detection equipment in power reactors II - Scintillator purge-flow tests using aged gas in the B.C.D. /E.D.F. 2 Summary. - The first part of this report describes the tests carried out on fission product detectors by a process in which gas is continuously injected in front of the scintillator. Using this system, the background is reduced and perturbations caused by pneumatic switches on the prospecting circuits are eliminated. The quality of the signals thus obtained permits better processing of the data and thus leads to a possible improvement in the sensitivity of burst cartridge detection. The second part gives results of tests carried out with both fresh and aged gases, the economic advantage of the latter being that it permits recycling through the reactor. Reduction of the background is less pronounced but the advantage of the stable signals is conserved. (author) [French] I - Essais speciaux pour ameliorer le seuil de detection des installations de D.R.G. des reacteurs de puissance II- Essais de balayage sous scintillateur avec gaz vieilli a la D.R.G. /E.D.F. 2 Sommaire. - La premiere partie de ce rapport decrit les essais effectues sur les detecteurs de produits de fission par un procede d'injection continue de gaz sous le scintillateur. Grace a ce systeme on obtient une reduction du bruit de fond et l'elimination des perturbations causees par les commutations pneumatiques des circuits de prospection. La qualite des signaux obtenus ainsi permet un meilleur traitement des informations d'ou une amelioration possible du seuil de detection des ruptures de gaines. La seconde partie donne les resultats d'essais effectues avec du gaz propre et vieilli, l'utilisation de ce dernier presentant l'avantage economique d'etre recycle du reacteur. La reduction du bruit de fond est moins importante mais on conserve l'avantage de la stabilisation des signaux. (auteur)

  19. Effects of inlet distortion on gas turbine combustion chamber exit temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Omar Shahzada

    Damage to a nozzle guide vane or blade, caused by non-uniform temperature distributions at the combustion chamber exit, is deleterious to turbine performance and can lead to expensive and time consuming overhaul and repair. A test rig was designed and constructed for the Allison 250-C20B combustion chamber to investigate the effects of inlet air distortion on the combustion chamber's exit temperature fields. The rig made use of the engine's diffuser tubes, combustion case, combustion liner, and first stage nozzle guide vane shield. Rig operating conditions simulated engine cruise conditions, matching the quasi-non-dimensional Mach number, equivalence ratio and Sauter mean diameter. The combustion chamber was tested with an even distribution of inlet air and a 4% difference in airflow at either side. An even distribution of inlet air to the combustion chamber did not create a uniform temperature profile and varying the inlet distribution of air exacerbated the profile's non-uniformity. The design of the combustion liner promoted the formation of an oval-shaped toroidal vortex inside the chamber, creating localized hot and cool sections separated by 90° that appeared in the exhaust. Uneven inlet air distributions skewed the oval vortex, increasing the temperature of the hot section nearest the side with the most mass flow rate and decreasing the temperature of the hot section on the opposite side. Keywords: Allison 250, Combustion, Dual-Entry, Exit Temperature Profile, Gas Turbine, Pattern Factor, Reverse Flow.

  20. Numerical investigation of heat transfer characteristics in utility boilers of oxy-coal combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yukun; Li, Hailong; Yan, Jinyue

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Air-coal and oxy-coal combustion in an industrial scale PF boiler were simulated in ANSYS FLUENT. • The O 2 concentration of 33 vol% in the oxy-coal combustion case matches the air-coal combustion case most closely. • The moisture in the flue gas has little impact on flame temperature, but positive impact on surface incident radiation. - Abstract: Oxy-coal combustion has different flue gas composition from the conventional air-coal combustion. The different composition further results in different properties, such as the absorption coefficient, emissivity, and density, which can directly affect the heat transfer in both radiation and convection zones of utility boilers. This paper numerically studied a utility boiler of oxy-coal combustion and compares with air-coal combustion in terms of flame profile and heat transferred through boiler side walls in order to understand the effects of different operating conditions on oxy-coal boiler retrofitting and design. Based on the results, it was found that around 33 vol% of effective O 2 concentration ([O 2 ] effective ) the highest flame temperature and total heat transferred through boiler side walls in the oxy-coal combustion case match to those in the air-coal combustion case most; therefore, the 33 vol% of [O 2 ] effective could result in the minimal change for the oxy-coal combustion retrofitting of the existing boiler. In addition, the increase of the moisture content in the flue gas has little impact on the flame temperature, but results in a higher surface incident radiation on boiler side walls. The area of heat exchangers in the boiler was also investigated regarding retrofitting. If boiler operates under a higher [O 2 ] effective , to rebalance the load of each heat exchanger in the boiler, the feed water temperature after economizer can be reduced or part of superheating surfaces can be moved into the radiation zone to replace part of the evaporators

  1. Effects of MTBE blended diesel fuel on diesel combustion and emissions; MTBE kongo keiyu ga diesel nensho haiki ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shundo, S; Yokota, H; Kakegawa, T [Hino Motors, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The effects of MTBE (Methyl-t-butyl ether) blended diesel fuel on diesel combustion and emissions were studied. In conventional diesel combustion, the testing mode was carried out in conformity with the Japanese 13 mode. Furthermore, this fuel was applied to a new combustion system (Homogeneous Charge Intelligent Multiple Injection). MTBE blended diesel fuel is more effective in the case of new combustion system and very low NOx, PM capability is suggested. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Comprehensive investigation of process characteristics for oxy-steam combustion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Bo; Zhao, Haibo; Zou, Chun; Zheng, Chuguang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxy-steam combustion exhibits better performance than oxy-CO 2 combustion. • Cost of electricity in oxy-steam combustion is 6.62% less than oxy-CO 2 combustion. • The increase of oxygen concentration in oxidant can improve its system performance. • The decrease of excess oxygen coefficient can be helpful for its system performance. • Integration with solar technology can enhance its thermodynamic performance. - Abstract: Oxy-steam combustion, as an alternative option of oxy-fuel combustion technology, is considered as a promising CO 2 capture technology for restraining CO 2 emissions from power plants. To attain its comprehensive process characteristics, process simulation, thermodynamic assessment, and sensitivity analysis for oxy-steam combustion pulverized-coal-fired power plants are investigated whilst its corresponding CO 2 /O 2 recycled combustion (oxy-CO 2 combustion) power plant is served as the base case for comparison. Techno-economic evaluation and integration with solar parabolic trough collectors are also discussed to justify its economic feasibility and improve its thermodynamic performance further, respectively. It is found that oxy-steam combustion exhibits better performance than oxy-CO 2 combustion on both thermodynamic and economic aspects, in which the cost of electricity decreases about 6.62% whilst the net efficiency and exergy efficiency increase about 0.90 and 1.01 percentage points, respectively. The increment of oxygen concentration in oxidant (20–45 mol.%) and decrease of excess oxygen coefficient (1.01–1.09) in a certain range are favorable for improving oxy-steam combustion system performance. Moreover, its thermodynamic performance can be improved when considering solar parabolic trough collectors for heating recycled water, even though its cost of electricity increases about 2 $/(MW h)

  3. 3rd International Workshop on Turbulent Spray Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Gutheil, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This book reflects the results of the 2nd and 3rd International Workshops on Turbulent Spray Combustion. The focus is on progress in experiments and numerical simulations for two-phase flows, with emphasis on spray combustion. Knowledge of the dominant phenomena and their interactions allows development of predictive models and their use in combustor and gas turbine design. Experts and young researchers present the state-of-the-art results, report on the latest developments and exchange ideas in the areas of experiments, modelling and simulation of reactive multiphase flows. The first chapter reflects on flame structure, auto-ignition and atomization with reference to well-characterized burners, to be implemented by modellers with relative ease. The second chapter presents an overview of first simulation results on target test cases, developed at the occasion of the 1st International Workshop on Turbulent Spray Combustion. In the third chapter, evaporation rate modelling aspects are covered, while the fourth ...

  4. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    The combustion of wood chips and wood pellets for the production of renewable energy in Denmark increased from 5.7 PJ to 16 PJ during the period 2000-2015, and further increases are expected to occur within the coming years. In 2012, about 22,300 tonnes of wood ashes were generated in Denmark....... Currently, these ashes are mainly landfilled, despite Danish legislation allowing their application onto forest and agricultural soils for fertilising and/or liming purposes. During this PhD work, 16 wood ash samples generated at ten different Danish combustion plants were collected and characterised...... for their composition and leaching properties. Despite the relatively large variations in the contents of nutrients and trace metals, the overall levels were comparable to typical ranges reported in the literature for other wood combustion ashes, as well as with regards to leaching. In general, the composition...

  5. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  6. An evaluation of electronic cigarette formulations and aerosols for harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHCs) typically derived from combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karl A; Flora, Jason W; Melvin, Matt S; Avery, Karen C; Ballentine, Regina M; Brown, Anthony P; McKinney, Willie J

    2018-06-01

    U.S. FDA draft guidance recommends reporting quantities of designated harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHCs) in e-cigarette e-liquids and aerosols. The HPHC list comprises potential matrix-related compounds, flavors, nicotine, tobacco-related impurities, leachables, thermal degradation products, and combustion-related compounds. E-cigarettes contain trace levels of many of these constituents due to tobacco-derived nicotine and thermal degradation. However, combustion-related HPHCs are not likely to be found due to the relatively low operating temperatures of most e-cigarettes. The purpose of this work was to use highly sensitive, selective, and validated analytical methods to determine if these combustion-related HPHCs (three aromatic amines, five volatile organic compounds, and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene) are detectable in commercial refill e-liquids, reference e-cigarette e-liquids, and aerosols generated from rechargeable e-cigarettes with disposable cartridges (often referred to as "cig-a-likes"). In addition, the transfer efficiency of these constituents from e-liquid to aerosol was evaluated when these HPHCs were added to the e-liquids prior to aerosol formation. This work demonstrates that combustion-related HPHCs are not present at measurable levels in the commercial and reference e-liquids or e-cigarette aerosols tested. Additionally, when combustion-related HPHCs are added to the e-liquids, they transfer to the aerosol with transfer efficiencies ranging from 49% to 99%. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Combustion performance evaluation of air staging of palm oil blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Jaafar, Mohammad Nazri; Eldrainy, Yehia A; Mat Ali, Muhammad Faiser; Wan Omar, W Z; Mohd Hizam, Mohd Faizi Arif

    2012-02-21

    The problems of global warming and the unstable price of petroleum oils have led to a race to develop environmentally friendly biofuels, such as palm oil or ethanol derived from corn and sugar cane. Biofuels are a potential replacement for fossil fuel, since they are renewable and environmentally friendly. This paper evaluates the combustion performance and emission characteristics of Refined, Bleached, and Deodorized Palm Oil (RBDPO)/diesel blends B5, B10, B15, B20, and B25 by volume, using an industrial oil burner with and without secondary air. Wall temperature profiles along the combustion chamber axis were measured using a series of thermocouples fitted axially on the combustion chamber wall, and emissions released were measured using a gas analyzer. The results show that RBDPO blend B25 produced the maximum emission reduction of 56.9% of CO, 74.7% of NOx, 68.5% of SO(2), and 77.5% of UHC compared to petroleum diesel, while air staging (secondary air) in most cases reduces the emissions further. However, increasing concentrations of RBDPO in the blends also reduced the energy released from the combustion. The maximum wall temperature reduction was 62.7% for B25 at the exit of the combustion chamber.

  8. Biodesulfurization of coals of different rank: Effect on combustion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, F.; Arenillas, A.; Fuente, E.; Pis, J.J. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain). Inst. Nacional del Carbon; Marteinz, O.; Moran, A. [Univ. de Leon (Spain). Escuela de Ingenieria Tecnica Minera

    1999-02-01

    The emission of sulfur oxides during the combustion of coal is one of the causes, among other air pollution problems, of acid rain. The contribution of coal as the mainstay of power production will be determined by whether its environmental performance is equal or superior to other supply options. In this context, desulfurization of coal before combustion by biological methods was studied. Four Spanish high-sulfur content coals of different rank were inoculated with bacteria isolated from mine-drainage waters and with naturally occurring bacteria inherent in the coals to be treated. Higher levels of desulfurization were obtained in the case of the samples treated with their own accompanying bacteria and when aeration was increased. All the samples were amenable to the biodepyritization processes. However, it is of little value to achieve large sulfur reductions if a decrease in coal combustion performance is obtained in the process. For this reason, a comparison was made between the combustibility characteristics of the original coals and those of the biodesulfurized samples. Results indicated that combustibility was not substantially modified by the overall biological treatment. The benefits of reduced sulfur emissions into the atmosphere ought to be taken into account as part of the general evaluation of the processes.

  9. Improved hydrogen combustion model for multi-compartment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Masao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    NUPEC has been improving a hydrogen combustion model in MELCOR code for severe accident analysis. In the proposed combustion model, the flame velocity in a node was predicted using six different flame front shapes of fireball, prism, bubble, spherical jet, plane jet, and parallelepiped. A verification study of the proposed model was carried out using the NUPEC large-scale combustion test results following the previous work in which the GRS/Battelle multi-compartment combustion test results had been used. The selected test cases for the study were the premixed test and the scenario-oriented test which simulated the severe accident sequences of an actual plant. The improved MELCOR code replaced by the proposed model could predict sufficiently both results of the premixed test and the scenario-oriented test of NUPEC large-scale test. The improved MELCOR code was confirmed to simulate the combustion behavior in the multi-compartment containment vessel during a severe accident with acceptable degree of accuracy. Application of the new model to the LWR severe accident analysis will be continued. (author)

  10. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sheppard, E.J. [Tuskeggee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  11. Lyophilization Cycle Design for Dual Chamber Cartridges and a Method for Online Process Control: The "DCC LyoMate" Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpus, Christoph; Friess, Wolfgang

    2017-08-01

    Freeze-drying process design is a challenging task that necessitates a profound understanding of the complex interrelation among critical process parameters (e.g., shelf temperature and chamber pressure), heat transfer characteristics of the involved materials (e.g., product containers and holder devices), and critical quality attributes of the product (e.g., collapse temperatures). The Dual Chamber Cartridge "(DCC) LyoMate" (from lyophilization and automated) is a manometric temperature measurement-based process control strategy that was developed within this study to streamline this complicated task. It was successfully applied using 5% sucrose formulations with 0.5 and 1 mL fill volumes. The system was further challenged using 2, 20, and 100 mg/mL monoclonal antibody formulations. The DCC LyoMate method did not only produce pharmaceutically acceptable cakes but was also able to maintain the desired product temperature irrespective of formulation and protein content. It enabled successful process design even at high protein concentrations and aided the design and online control of the lyophilization process for drying in DCCs within a single development run. Thus, it helps to reduce development cost and the DCC LyoMate can also be easily installed on every freeze-dryer capable of performing a manometric temperature measurement, without the need for hardware modification. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Improvement of fuel combustion technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumanovskii, A.G.; Babii, V.I.; Enyakin, Y.P.; Kotler, V.R.; Ryabov, G.V.; Verbovetskii, E.K.; Nadyrov, I.I. [All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-07-01

    The main problems encountered in the further development of fuel combustion technologies at thermal power stations in Russia are considered. Experience is generalized and results are presented on the efficiency with which nitrogen oxide emissions are reduced by means of technological methods when burning natural gas, fuel oil, and coal. The problems that arise in the introduction of new combustion technologies and in using more promising grades of coal are considered. The results studies are presented that show that low grade Russian coals can be burnt in circulating fluidized bed boilers. 14 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  14. Electrical Aspects of Flames in Microgravity Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Strayer, B.; Weinberg, F.; Carleton, F.

    1999-01-01

    A principal characteristic of combustion in microgravity is the absence of buoyancy driven flows. In some cases, such as for spherically symmetrical droplet burning, the absence of buoyancy is desirable for matching analytical treatments with experiments. In other cases, however, it can be more valuable to arbitrarily control the flame's convective environment independent of the environmental gravitational condition. To accomplish this, we propose the use of ion generated winds driven by electric fields to control local convection of flames. Such control can produce reduced buoyancy (effectively zero buoyancy) conditions in the laboratory in 1-g facilitating a wide range of laser diagnostics that can probe the system without special packaging required for drop tower or flight tests. In addition, the electric field generated ionic winds allow varying gravitational convection equivalents even if the test occurs in reduced gravity environments.

  15. Application of the FIRST Combustion model to Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, B.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2004-01-01

    Liquid fuel is of interest to apply to gas turbines. The large advantage is that liquids are easily storable as compared to gaseous fuels. Disadvantage is that liquid fuel has to be sprayed, vaporized and mixed with air. Combustion occurs at some stage of mixing and ignition. Depending on the

  16. Development of a Premixed Combustion Capability for Scramjet Combustion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; Rice, Brian E.; Chelliah, Harsha; McDaniel, James C.; Edwards, Jack R.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing engines rely on scramjet combustion processes, which involve high speed, compressible, and highly turbulent flows. The combustion environment and the turbulent flames at the heart of these engines are difficult to simulate and study in the laboratory under well controlled conditions. Typically, wind-tunnel testing is performed that more closely approximates engine testing rather than a careful investigation of the underlying physics that drives the combustion process. The experiments described in this paper, along with companion data sets being developed separately, aim to isolate the chemical kinetic effects from the fuel-air mixing process in a dual-mode scramjet combustion environment. A unique fuel injection approach is taken that produces a nearly uniform fuel-air mixture at the entrance to the combustor. This approach relies on the precombustion shock train upstream of the dual-mode scramjet combustor. A stable ethylene flame anchored on a cavity flameholder with a uniformly mixed combustor inflow has been achieved in these experiments allowing numerous companion studies involving coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), particle image velocimetry (PIV), and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be performed.

  17. Comparison between a commercial solid-phase extraction cartridge and a home-made silver containing charcoal column: purification of Mo-99 from I-131 and Te-121

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Carla Roberta; Teodoro, Rodrigo; Osso Junior, Joao

    2011-01-01

    Among the radioisotopes used for medical application in Nuclear Medicine, 99m Tc, readily available from the elution of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generators, is the most used, responsible for more than eighty percent of the total applications. These generators use the 99 Mo radioisotope that is produced in nuclear reactors and IPEN imports all the 99 Mo used in Brazil, mainly from Canada (Nordion). Due to the increasing needs of the Nuclear Medicine in Brazil and the world shortage of 99 Mo observed since 2008, IPEN decided to construct a new research reactor named Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (BMR) as well as to develop the production of 99 Mo through the route of 235 U fission using a CINTICHEM modified separation process. The 99 Mo obtained from this process contains some contaminants and need to be purified. The aim of this work is to compare the preliminary results of the purification step of the solution containing 99 Mo and the contaminants, 131 I and 121 Te in the silver containing charcoal column and a solid-phase extraction cartridge. The purification process of 99 Mo coming from fission LEU foils was performed by adsorption chromatography using a home-made activated charcoal containing silver column (AC-Ag) and a commercial solid-phase extraction cartridge (OnGuard II Ag). High yields of 99 Mo elution and high retention of 131 I were achieved in the AC-Ag column and silver cartridge but 121 Te was more retained in the cartridge than in the AC-Ag column. (author)

  18. Experimental validation for combustion analysis of GOTHIC 6.1b code in 2-dimensional premixed combustion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. Y.; Lee, J. J.; Park, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the prediction capability of GOTHIC code for hydrogen combustion phenomena was validated with the results of two-dimensional premixed hydrogen combustion experiment executed by Seoul National University. In the experimental results, we could confirm the propagation characteristics of hydrogen flame such as buoyancy effect, flame front shape etc.. The combustion time of the tests was about 0.1 sec.. In the GOTHIC analyses results, the GOTHIC code could predict the overall hydrogen flame propagation characteristics but the buoyancy effect and flame shape did not compare well with the experimental results. Especially, in case of the flame propagate to the dead-end, GOTHIC predicted the flame did not affected by the flow and this cause quite different results in flame propagation from experimental results. Moreover the combustion time of the analyses was about 1 sec. which is ten times longer than the experimental result. To obtain more reasonable analysis results, it is necessary that combustion model parameters in GOTHIC code apply appropriately and hydrogen flame characteristics be reflected in solving governing equations

  19. Interactive wood combustion for botanical tree models

    KAUST Repository

    Pirk, Sö ren; Jarząbek, Michał; Hadrich, Torsten; Michels, Dominik L.; Palubicki, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel method for the combustion of botanical tree models. Tree models are represented as connected particles for the branching structure and a polygonal surface mesh for the combustion. Each particle stores biological and physical

  20. Free Energy and Internal Combustion Engine Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, William D.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of one type (Carnot) of Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) cycle is analyzed within the framework of thermodynamic free energies. ICE performance is different from that of an External Combustion Engine (ECE) which is dictated by Carnot's rule.

  1. Method for storing radioactive combustible waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, H.W.; Lovelace, R.C.

    1973-10-01

    A method is described for preventing pressure buildup in sealed containers which contain radioactively contaminated combustible waste material by adding an oxide getter material to the container so as to chemically bind sorbed water and combustion product gases. (Official Gazette)

  2. Scramjet Combustion Stability Behavior Modeling, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in combustion stability analysis (UCDS) offers the potential to predict the combustion stability of a scramjet. This capability is very...

  3. Scramjet Combustion Stability Behavior Modeling, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in combustion stability analysis (UCDS) offers the means to accurately predict the combustion stability of a scramjet. This capability is very...

  4. Publication sites productive uses of combustion ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Publication Sites Productive Uses of Combustion Ash For more information contact: e:mail: Public waste combustion ash in landfills. The new technology brief describes recent studies where ash was used

  5. Combustion Research Facility | A Department of Energy Office of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaborative Research Facility Back to Sandia National Laboratory Homepage Combustion Research Search the CRF Combustion Chemistry Flame Chemistry Research.Combustion_Chemistry.Flame_Chemistry Theory and Modeling Theory and Modeling Combustion Kinetics High Pressure Chemistry Chemistry of Autoignition

  6. Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Photo of a gasoline emissions in advanced engine technologies. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL's combustion research and combustion and engine research activities include: Developing experimental and simulation research platforms

  7. Spray combustion of biomass-based renewable diesel fuel using multiple injection strategy in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2016-05-26

    Effect of a two-injection strategy associated with a pilot injection on the spray combustion process was investigated under conventional diesel combustion conditions (1000 K and 21% O2 concentration) for a biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, i.e., biomass to liquid (BTL), and a regular No. 2 diesel in a constant volume combustion chamber using multiband flame measurement and two-color pyrometry. The spray combustion flame structure was visualized by using multiband flame measurement to show features of soot formation, high temperature and low temperature reactions, which can be characterized by the narrow-band emissions of radicals or intermediate species such as OH, HCHO, and CH. The objective of this study was to identify the details of multiple injection combustion, including a pilot and a main injection, and to provide further insights on how the two injections interact. For comparison, three injection strategies were considered for both fuels including a two-injection strategy (Case TI), single injection strategy A (Case SA), and single injection strategy B (Case SB). Multiband flame results show a strong interaction, indicated by OH emissions between the pilot injection and the main injection for Case TI while very weak connection is found for the narrow-band emissions acquired through filters with centerlines of 430 nm and 470 nm. A faster flame development is found for the main injection of Case TI compared to Cases SA and SB, which could be due to the high temperature environment and large air entrainment from the pilot injection. A lower soot level is observed for the BTL flame compared to the diesel flame for all three injection types. Case TI has a lower soot level compared to Cases SA and SB for the BTL fuel, while the diesel fuel maintains a similar soot level among all three injection strategies. Soot temperature of Case TI is lower for both fuels, especially for diesel. Based on these results, it is expected that the two-injection strategy could be

  8. High Frequency Combustion Instabilities of LOx/CH4 Spray Flames in Rocket Engine Combustion Chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliphorst, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the early stages of space transportation in the 1940’s, and the related liquid propellant rocket engine development, combustion instability has been a major issue. High frequency combustion instability (HFCI) is the interaction between combustion and the acoustic field in the combustion

  9. Findings on pollutant formation in wood and chip board combustion. Erkenntnisse zur Schadstoffbildung bei der Verbrennung von Holz und Spanplatten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marutzky, R.

    1991-10-01

    Combustion experiments were carried out using wood and several types of chip boards with binders on the basis of urea, melamine and phenol formaldehyde resins, polyureas, and PVC. The combustion process was observed, and the flue gas constituents in case of incomplete combustion were analyzed. The origins of the various organic and inorganic materials were discussed taking account of the results of pyrolysis experiments. (orig.).

  10. Leaching from biomass combustion ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    The use of biomass combustion ashes for fertilizing and liming purposes has been widely addressed in scientific literature. Nevertheless, the content of potentially toxic compounds raises concerns for a possible contamination of the soil. During this study five ash samples generated at four...

  11. An incinerator for combustable radwastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingquan; Jiang Yun; Zhang Yinsheng; Chen Boling; Zhang Shihang

    1989-01-01

    An incinerator has been built up in Shanghai. In this paper, the devices of the incinerator, main parameters of the process, and the results of non-radioactive waste and simulated radwaste combustion tests were contributed. That provides reference information for radwaste treatment with incineration process

  12. 75 FR 32142 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    .... Contact Mat Chibbaro, P.E., Fire Protection Engineer, Office of Safety Systems, OSHA Directorate of..., and metals (such as aluminum and magnesium). Industries that may have combustible dust hazards include..., chemical manufacturing, textile manufacturing, furniture manufacturing, metal processing, fabricated metal...

  13. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Kiil, Søren

    2000-01-01

    Several options are available to control the emission of SO2 from combustion processes. One possibility is to use a cleaner technology, i.e. fuel switching from oil and coal to natural gas or biomass, or to desulphurize coal and oil. Another possibility is to change to a different technology...

  14. Multi-zone modelling of PCCI combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egüz, U.; Somers, L.M.T.; Leermakers, C.A.J.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Early Direct Injection Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (EDI PCCI) combustion is a promising concept for the diesel combustion. Although EDI PCCI assures very low soot and NO xemission levels, the injection is uncoupled from combustion, which narrows down the operating conditions. The main

  15. Method and device for diagnosing and controlling combustion instabilities in internal combustion engines operating in or transitioning to homogeneous charge combustion ignition mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert M [Knoxville, TN; Daw, Charles S [Knoxville, TN; Green, Johney B [Knoxville, TN; Edwards, Kevin D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-07

    This invention is a method of achieving stable, optimal mixtures of HCCI and SI in practical gasoline internal combustion engines comprising the steps of: characterizing the combustion process based on combustion process measurements, determining the ratio of conventional and HCCI combustion, determining the trajectory (sequence) of states for consecutive combustion processes, and determining subsequent combustion process modifications using said information to steer the engine combustion toward desired behavior.

  16. Coal combustion products: trash or treasure?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, T.

    2006-07-15

    Coal combustion by-products can be a valuable resource to various industries. The American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) collects data on production and uses of coal combustion products (CCPs). 122.5 million tons of CCPs were produced in 2004. The article discusses the results of the ACCA's 2004 survey. Fly ash is predominantly used as a substitute for Portland cement; bottom ash for structural fill, embankments and paved road cases. Synthetic gypsum from the FGD process is commonly used in wallboard. Plant owners are only likely to have a buyer for a portion of their CCPs. Although sale of hot water (from Antelope Valley Station) from condensers for use in a fish farm to raise tilapia proved unviable, the Great Plains Synfuels Plant which manufactures natural gas from lignite produces a wide range of products including anhydrous ammonia, phenol, krypton, carbon dioxide (for enhanced oil recovery), tar oils and liquid nitrogen. ACCA's goal is to educate people about CCPs and how to make them into useful products, and market them, in order to reduce waste disposal and enhance revenue. The article lists members of the ACCA. 2 photos., 1 tab.

  17. Environmental optimisation of waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Robert [AaF Energikonsult, Stockholm (Sweden); Berge, Niclas; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    The regulations concerning waste combustion evolve through R and D and a strive to get better and common regulations for the European countries. This study discusses if these rules of today concerning oxygen concentration, minimum temperature and residence time in the furnace and the use of stand-by burners are needed, are possible to monitor, are the optimum from an environmental point of view or could be improved. No evidence from well controlled laboratory experiments validate that 850 deg C in 6 % oxygen content in general is the best lower limit. A lower excess air level increase the temperature, which has a significant effect on the destruction of hydrocarbons, favourably increases the residence time, increases the thermal efficiency and the efficiency of the precipitators. Low oxygen content is also necessary to achieve low NO{sub x}-emissions. The conclusion is that the demands on the accuracy of the measurement devices and methods are too high, if they are to be used inside the furnace to control the combustion process. The big problem is however to find representative locations to measure temperature, oxygen content and residence time in the furnace. Another major problem is that the monitoring of the operation conditions today do not secure a good combustion. It can lead to a false security. The reason is that it is very hard to find boilers without stratifications. These stratifications (stream lines) has each a different history of residence time, mixing time, oxygen and combustible gas levels and temperature, when they reach the convection area. The combustion result is the sum of all these different histories. The hydrocarbons emission is in general not produced at a steady level. Small clouds of unburnt hydrocarbons travels along the stream lines showing up as peaks on a THC measurement device. High amplitude peaks has a tendency to contain higher ratio of heavy hydrocarbons than lower peaks. The good correlation between some easily detected

  18. Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Joel Meier [Niskayuna, NY; Mosbacher, David Matthew [Cohoes, NY; Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian [Troy, NY; Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan [Mason, OH

    2011-03-22

    A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

  19. Volatiles and char combustion rates of demineralised lignite and wood blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilgin, Melek; Pehlivan, Dursun

    2009-01-01

    Today, much interest is given to the utilisation of materials of plant origin as substitutions of fossil fuels in meeting energy needs to reduce the level of atmospheric pollutant emissions and global warming threat, and emphasis has been placed on the co-combustion of coal and biomass. In this study, volatiles and char combustion behaviour of the fuel pellets composed from demineralised lignite and poplar wood sawdust, were investigated in a cylindrical wire mesh basket placed in a preheated tube furnace. The results have shown that ignition times of the pellets decreased with the burning temperature and shortened further due to demineralisation of lignite. Volatiles combustion rates of the samples did not correlate well with combustion times. However, they can be correlated with their respective proximate volatile matter contents. Char burnout times decreased with increasing combustion rates and correlated well with the respective proximate fixed carbon contents of the samples. Deviations were more considerable in the case of rate data. (author)

  20. Detection and control of combustion instability based on the concept of dynamical system theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Yuta; Kobayashi, Masaki; Okuno, Yuta; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    We propose an online method of detecting combustion instability based on the concept of dynamical system theory, including the characterization of the dynamic behavior of combustion instability. As an important case study relevant to combustion instability encountered in fundamental and practical combustion systems, we deal with the combustion dynamics close to lean blowout (LBO) in a premixed gas-turbine model combustor. The relatively regular pressure fluctuations generated by thermoacoustic oscillations transit to low-dimensional intermittent chaos owing to the intermittent appearance of burst with decreasing equivalence ratio. The translation error, which is characterized by quantifying the degree of parallelism of trajectories in the phase space, can be used as a control variable to prevent LBO.

  1. Detection and control of combustion instability based on the concept of dynamical system theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Yuta; Kobayashi, Masaki; Okuno, Yuta; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    We propose an online method of detecting combustion instability based on the concept of dynamical system theory, including the characterization of the dynamic behavior of combustion instability. As an important case study relevant to combustion instability encountered in fundamental and practical combustion systems, we deal with the combustion dynamics close to lean blowout (LBO) in a premixed gas-turbine model combustor. The relatively regular pressure fluctuations generated by thermoacoustic oscillations transit to low-dimensional intermittent chaos owing to the intermittent appearance of burst with decreasing equivalence ratio. The translation error, which is characterized by quantifying the degree of parallelism of trajectories in the phase space, can be used as a control variable to prevent LBO.

  2. Numerical investigation of high temperature synthesis gas premixed combustion via ANSYS Fluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashchenko Dmitry

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model of the synthesis gas pre-mixed combustion is developed. The research was carried out via ANSYS Fluent software. Verification of the numerical results was carried out using experimental data. A visual comparison of the flame contours that obtained by the synthesis gas combustion for Re = 600; 800; 1000 was performed. A comparison of the wall temperature of the combustion chamber, obtained with the help of the developed model, with the results of a physical experiment was also presented. For all cases, good convergence of the results is observed. It is established that a change in the temperature of the syngas/air mixture at the inlet to the combustion chamber does not significantly affect the temperature of the combustion products due to the dissipation of the H2O and CO2 molecules. The obtained results are of practical importance for the design of heat engineering plants with thermochemical heat recovery.

  3. Numerical simulation of pulverized coal combustion to reduce pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Bagher Ayani; Behnam Rahmanian

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In this research, the numerical simulation of pollutant reduction and in a pulverized coal combustion at 2D combustion chamber have been studied. Finite volume method using structured grid arrangement was utilized for modeling the pulverized coal combustion. The pressure base algorithm and implicit solver has been employed to simulate non-premix combustion model. The air was diluted by some participative gaseous such as whose percentages varied from 0 % to 20 %. Participative gases and air were preheated by a high-temperature gas generator, and the preheated oxidizer temperature could achieve. The combustion simulation with the generalized finite rate chemistry model, referred to as the Magnussen model and the reacting flow with the mixture fraction PDF/ equilibrium chemistry model, referred to as the PDF model are studied. Quick scheme was adopted for the discretization of all convective terms of the advective transport equations. So, as a result of addition participative gases into oxidizer the rate of formation of pollutants as well as NO x suppressed. The addition only a few percent of halogen components can make some systems nonflammable. The effects of addition halogen components and non-reaction gaseous such as Helium and Argon are fuel dilution and its acts as catalysts in reducing the H atom concentration necessary for the chain branching reaction sequence. Moreover, they act like surface and they make the increment of surface ratio versus volume. Because of this, the number of radical conflicts and hence destruction them will be increase. Furthermore, the rate of formation of pollutants will be decreased if the halogen components and non-reaction gaseous injection will be increased. However, as a result of this research, in the case of injection in pulverized coal combustion the flame temperature is lower than Steam, Argon and Helium. So, the emission levels of carbon dioxide is significantly lower than other participative gases, but in this

  4. Coal combustion waste management study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    Coal-fired generation accounted for almost 55 percent of the production of electricity in the United States in 1990. Coal combustion generates high volumes of ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes, estimated at almost 90 million tons. The amount of ash and flue gas desulfurization wastes generated by coal-fired power plants is expected to increase as a result of future demand growth, and as more plants comply with Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Nationwide, on average, over 30 percent of coal combustion wastes is currently recycled for use in various applications; the remaining percentage is ultimately disposed in waste management units. There are a significant number of on-site and off-site waste management units that are utilized by the electric utility industry to store or dispose of coal combustion waste. Table ES-1 summarizes the number of disposal units and estimates of waste contained at these unites by disposal unit operating status (i.e, operating or retired). Further, ICF Resources estimates that up to 120 new or replacement units may need to be constructed to service existing and new coal capacity by the year 2000. The two primary types of waste management units used by the industry are landfills and surface impoundments. Utility wastes have been exempted by Congress from RCRA Subtitle C hazardous waste regulation since 1980. As a result of this exemption, coal combustion wastes are currently being regulated under Subtitle D of RCRA. As provided under Subtitle D, wastes not classified as hazardous under Subtitle C are subject to State regulation. At the same time Congress developed this exemption, also known as the ''Bevill Exclusion,'' it directed EPA to prepare a report on coal combustion wastes and make recommendations on how they should be managed

  5. Modeling of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki

    2012-10-01

    Recently, many experimental study of plasma-assisted combustion has been done. However, numerous complex reactions in combustion of hydrocarbons are preventing from theoritical study for clarifying inside the plasma-assisted combustion, and the effect of plasma-assist is still not understood. Shinohara and Sasaki [1,2] have reported that the shortening of flame length by irradiating microwave without increase of gas temperature. And they also reported that the same phenomena would occur when applying dielectric barrier discharges to the flame using simple hydrocarbon, methane. It is suggested that these phenomena may result by the electron heating. To clarify this phenomena, electron behavior under microwave and DBD was examined. For the first step of DBD plasma-assisted combustion simulation, electron Monte Carlo simulation in methane, oxygen and argon mixture gas(0.05:0.14:0.81) [2] has been done. Electron swarm parameters are sampled and electron energy distribution function (EEDF)s are also determined. In the combustion, gas temperature is higher(>1700K), so reduced electric field E/N becomes relatively high(>10V/cm/Torr). The electrons are accelerated to around 14 eV. This result agree with the optical emission from argon obtained by the experiment of reference [2]. Dissociation frequency of methane and oxygens are obtained in high. This might be one of the effect of plasma-assist. And it is suggested that the electrons should be high enough to dissociate methane, but plasma is not needed.[4pt] [1] K. Shinohara et al, J. Phys. D:Appl. Phys., 42, 182008 (1-7) (2009).[0pt] [2] K. Sasaki, 64th Annual Gaseous Electronic Conference, 56, 15 CT3.00001(2011).

  6. Combustive management of oil spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Extensive experiments with in situ incineration were performed on a desert site at the University of Arizona with very striking results. The largest incinerator, 6 feet in diameter with a 30 foot chimney, developed combustion temperatures of 3000, F, and attendant soot production approximately 1000 times less than that produced by conventional in situ burning. This soot production, in fact, is approximately 30 times less than current allowable EPA standards for incinerators and internal combustion engines. Furthermore, as a consequence of the high temperature combustion, the bum rate was established at a very high 3400 gallons per hour for this particular 6 foot diameter structure. The rudimentary design studies we have carried out relative to a seagoing 8 foot diameter incinerator have predicted that a continuous burn rate of 7000 gallons per hour is realistic. This structure was taken as a basis for operational design because it is compatible with C130 flyability, and will be inexpensive enough ($120,000 per copy) to be stored at those seaside depots throughout the US coast line in which the requisite ancillary equipments (booms, service tugs, etc.) are already deployed. The LOX experiments verified our expectations with respect to combustion of debris and various highly weathered or emulsified oils. We have concluded, however, that the use of liquid oxygen in actual beach clean up is not promising because the very high temperatures associated with this combustion are almost certain to produce environmentally deleterious effects on the beach surface and its immediately sublying structures. However, the use of liquid oxygen augmentation for shore based and flyable incinerators may still play an important role in handing the problem of accumulated debris

  7. The Combination of Internal-Combustion Engine and Gas Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, K.

    1947-01-01

    While the gas turbine by itself has been applied in particular cases for power generation and is in a state of promising development in this field, it has already met with considerable success in two cases when used as an exhaust turbine in connection with a centrifugal compressor, namely, in the supercharging of combustion engines and in the Velox process, which is of particular application for furnaces. In the present paper the most important possibilities of combining a combustion engine with a gas turbine are considered. These "combination engines " are compared with the simple gas turbine on whose state of development a brief review will first be given. The critical evaluation of the possibilities of development and fields of application of the various combustion engine systems, wherever it is not clearly expressed in the publications referred to, represents the opinion of the author. The state of development of the internal-combustion engine is in its main features generally known. It is used predominantly at the present time for the propulsion of aircraft and road vehicles and, except for certain restrictions due to war conditions, has been used to an increasing extent in ships and rail cars and in some fields applied as stationary power generators. In the Diesel engine a most economical heat engine with a useful efficiency of about 40 percent exists and in the Otto aircraft engine a heat engine of greatest power per unit weight of about 0.5 kilogram per horsepower.

  8. Proteoglycan from salmon nasal cartridge promotes in vitro wound healing of fibroblast monolayers via the CD44 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Gen; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takeda, Yoshie; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proteoglycan from salmon nasal cartridge (SNC-PG) promoted wound healing in fibroblast monolayers. • SNC-PG stimulated both cell proliferation and cell migration. • Interaction between chondroitin sulfate-units and CD44 is responsible for the effect. - Abstract: Proteoglycans (PGs) are involved in various cellular functions including cell growth, adhesion, and differentiation; however, their physiological roles are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the effect of PG purified from salmon nasal cartilage (SNC-PG) on wound closure using tissue-cultured cell monolayers, an in vitro wound-healing assay. The results indicated that SNC-PG significantly promoted wound closure in NIH/3T3 cell monolayers by stimulating both cell proliferation and cell migration. SNC-PG was effective in concentrations from 0.1 to 10 μg/ml, but showed much less effect at higher concentrations (100–1000 μg/ml). The effect of SNC-PG was abolished by chondroitinase ABC, indicating that chondroitin sulfates (CSs), a major component of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in SNC-PG, are crucial for the SNC-PG effect. Furthermore, chondroitin 6-sulfate (C-6-S), a major CS of SNC-PG GAGs, could partially reproduce the SNC-PG effect and partially inhibit the binding of SNC-PG to cells, suggesting that SNC-PG exerts its effect through an interaction between the GAGs in SNC-PG and the cell surface. Neutralization by anti-CD44 antibodies or CD44 knockdown abolished SNC-PG binding to the cells and the SNC-PG effect on wound closure. These results suggest that interactions between CS-rich GAG-chains of SNC-PG and CD44 on the cell surface are responsible for the SNC-PG effect on wound closure

  9. Proteoglycan from salmon nasal cartridge promotes in vitro wound healing of fibroblast monolayers via the CD44 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Gen; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takeda, Yoshie [Department of Physiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Sokabe, Masahiro, E-mail: msokabe@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Mechanobiology Institute Singapore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117411 (Singapore)

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • Proteoglycan from salmon nasal cartridge (SNC-PG) promoted wound healing in fibroblast monolayers. • SNC-PG stimulated both cell proliferation and cell migration. • Interaction between chondroitin sulfate-units and CD44 is responsible for the effect. - Abstract: Proteoglycans (PGs) are involved in various cellular functions including cell growth, adhesion, and differentiation; however, their physiological roles are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the effect of PG purified from salmon nasal cartilage (SNC-PG) on wound closure using tissue-cultured cell monolayers, an in vitro wound-healing assay. The results indicated that SNC-PG significantly promoted wound closure in NIH/3T3 cell monolayers by stimulating both cell proliferation and cell migration. SNC-PG was effective in concentrations from 0.1 to 10 μg/ml, but showed much less effect at higher concentrations (100–1000 μg/ml). The effect of SNC-PG was abolished by chondroitinase ABC, indicating that chondroitin sulfates (CSs), a major component of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in SNC-PG, are crucial for the SNC-PG effect. Furthermore, chondroitin 6-sulfate (C-6-S), a major CS of SNC-PG GAGs, could partially reproduce the SNC-PG effect and partially inhibit the binding of SNC-PG to cells, suggesting that SNC-PG exerts its effect through an interaction between the GAGs in SNC-PG and the cell surface. Neutralization by anti-CD44 antibodies or CD44 knockdown abolished SNC-PG binding to the cells and the SNC-PG effect on wound closure. These results suggest that interactions between CS-rich GAG-chains of SNC-PG and CD44 on the cell surface are responsible for the SNC-PG effect on wound closure.

  10. Catalytic reduction of emissions from small scale wood combustion. State of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargitai, T.; Silversand, F.A. [Katator AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    Small-scale combustion of big-fuel often results in excessive emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), polyaromatic compounds (PAM) and carbon monoxide (CO). These compounds have a negative impact on human health and urban air quality. The predominant volatile organic compounds present in flue gases from big-fuel combustion are propylene, ethylene, butadiene, methanol, ethanol, methane, phenol and benzene. The poor combustion performance of some wood stoves has in certain cases led to legislation against small-scale combustion of big-fuel in urban areas. Catalytic cleaning is one very efficient way of decreasing the environmental impacts of big-fuel combustion. Several studies concerning catalytic purification of flue gases from big-fuel combustion have been presented over the years. Several problems must be addressed when designing a catalyst for this application: Clogging problems from deposition of ashes and particulates in the catalyst; Catalyst poisoning by sulphur, phosphorus, alkali metals etc.; Catalyst fouling due to deposition of ashes and particulates; Catalyst overheating at high flue-gas temperatures and Poor catalyst performance during start-up Most studies have been focused on monolith-type catalysts and- the conversion of CO, VOC and PAH typically is above 80 %. The observed problems are associated with increased pressure drop due to catalyst clogging and decreased catalyst performance due to fouling and poisoning. In most cases precious metals, preferably Pt. have been used as active combustion catalyst. Precious metals have a high activity for the combustion of CO and hydrocarbons and a fair stability against poisoning with compounds present in flue gases from big-fuel, e.g. sulphur and alkali metals. The majority of the studies on precious metals have been focused on Pt. Rh and Pd, which are especially active in catalytic combustion. Some metal oxides are used in catalytic combustion, especially at low temperatures (e.g. in VOC abatement

  11. Bioenergy originating from biomass combustion in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crujeira, T.; Gulyurtlu, I.; Lopes, H.; Abelha, P.; Cabrita, I. [INETI/DEECA, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2008-07-01

    Bioenergy could significantly contribute to reducing and controlling greenhouse emissions (GHG) and to replace fossil fuels in large power plants. Although the use of biomass, originating from forests, could be beneficial, particularly in preventing fires, there are obstacles to achieve a sustainable supply chain of biomass in most European countries. In addition, there are also technical barriers as requirements of biomass combustion may differ from those of coal, which could mean significant retrofitting of existing installations. The combustion behaviour of different biomass materials were studied on a pilot fluidised bed combustor, equipped with two cyclones for particulate matter removal. The gaseous pollutants leaving the stack were sampled under isokinetic conditions for particulate matter, chlorine compounds, heavy metals and dioxins and furans (PCDD/F). The results obtained indicated that the combustion of these materials did not present any operational problem, although for temperatures above 800{sup o}C, bed agglomeration could be observed for all biomass materials studied. Most of the combustion of biomass, contrary to what is observed for coal, takes place in the riser where the temperature was as much as 150{sup o}C above that of the bed. Stable combustion conditions were achieved as well as high combustion efficiency. When compared with the emissions of bituminous coal, the most used fossil fuel, the emissions of CO and SO2 were found to be lower and NOx emissions were similar to those of coal. HCl and PCDD/F could be considerable with biomasses containing high chlorine levels, as in the case of straw. It was observed that the nature of ash could give rise serious operating problems.

  12. Use of combustible wastes as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.; Salamov, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Achievements of science and technology in creating and using units for combustion of wastes with recovery of heat of the escaping gases has been systematized and generalized. Scales and outlooks are examined for the use of general, industrial and agricultural waste as fuel, composition of the waste, questions of planning and operating units for combustion of solid refuse, settling of waste water and industrial and agricultural waste. Questions are covered for preparing them for combustion use in special units with recovery of heat and at ES, aspects of environmental protection during combustion of waste, cost indicators of the employed methods of recovering the combustible waste.

  13. A Reduced Order Model for the Design of Oxy-Coal Combustion Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Rowan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxy-coal combustion is one of the more promising technologies currently under development for addressing the issues associated with greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. Oxy-coal combustion involves combusting the coal fuel in mixtures of pure oxygen and recycled flue gas (RFG consisting of mainly carbon dioxide (CO2. As a consequence, many researchers and power plant designers have turned to CFD simulations for the study and design of new oxy-coal combustion power plants, as well as refitting existing air-coal combustion facilities to oxy-coal combustion operations. While CFD is a powerful tool that can provide a vast amount of information, the simulations themselves can be quite expensive in terms of computational resources and time investment. As a remedy, a reduced order model (ROM for oxy-coal combustion has been developed to supplement the CFD simulations. With this model, it is possible to quickly estimate the average outlet temperature of combustion flue gases given a known set of mass flow rates of fuel and oxidant entering the power plant boiler as well as determine the required reactor inlet mass flow rates for a desired outlet temperature. Several cases have been examined with this model. The results compare quite favorably to full CFD simulation results.

  14. Distributed Low Temperature Combustion: Fundamental Understanding of Combustion Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    behaviour as compared to ethanol. The latter fuel has also been considered along with methane. Work has also been performed on the further assessment of... behaviour as compared to ethanol. The latter fuel has also been considered along with methane. Work has also been performed on the further assess- ment of...identification of various combustion gas states. A range of Damköhler numbers (Da) from the conventional propagating flamelet regime well into the distributed

  15. Spectral modeling of radiation in combustion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Gopalendu

    Radiation calculations are important in combustion due to the high temperatures encountered but has not been studied in sufficient detail in the case of turbulent flames. Radiation calculations for such problems require accurate, robust, and computationally efficient models for the solution of radiative transfer equation (RTE), and spectral properties of radiation. One more layer of complexity is added in predicting the overall heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems due to nonlinear interactions between turbulent fluctuations and radiation. The present work is aimed at the development of finite volume-based high-accuracy thermal radiation modeling, including spectral radiation properties in order to accurately capture turbulence-radiation interactions (TRI) and predict heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems correctly and efficiently. The turbulent fluctuations of temperature and chemical species concentrations have strong effects on spectral radiative intensities, and TRI create a closure problem when the governing partial differential equations are averaged. Recently, several approaches have been proposed to take TRI into account. Among these attempts the most promising approaches are the probability density function (PDF) methods, which can treat nonlinear coupling between turbulence and radiative emission exactly, i.e., "emission TRI". The basic idea of the PDF method is to treat physical variables as random variables and to solve the PDF transport equation stochastically. The actual reacting flow field is represented by a large number of discrete stochastic particles each carrying their own random variable values and evolving with time. The mean value of any function of those random variables, such as the chemical source term, can be evaluated exactly by taking the ensemble average of particles. The local emission term belongs to this class and thus, can be evaluated directly and exactly from particle ensembles. However, the local absorption term

  16. Molten salt combustion of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, L.F.; McKenzie, D.E.; Richards, W.L.; Oldenkamp, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    The Atomics International Molten Salt Combustion Process reduces the weight and volume of combustible β-γ contaminated transuranic waste by utilizing air in a molten salt medium to combust organic materials, to trap particulates, and to react chemically with any acidic gases produced during combustion. Typically, incomplete combustion products such as hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide are below detection limits (i.e., 3 ) is directly related to the sodium chloride vapor pressure of the melt; >80% of the particulate is sodium chloride. Essentially all metal oxides (combustion ash) are retained in the melt, e.g., >99.9% of the plutonium, >99.6% of the europium, and >99.9% of the ruthenium are retained in the melt. Both bench-scale radioactive and pilot scale (50 kg/hr) nonradioactive combustion tests have been completed with essentially the same results. Design of three combustors for industrial applications are underway

  17. Effect of urea on PCDD/F formation during combustion of coal and olive kernels in a pilot scale boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skodras, G. [Laboratory of Environmental and Energy Processes, Thermi-Thessaloniki (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute]|[Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Center for Research and Technology Hellas, Ptolemais (Greece)]|[Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Palladas, A.; Sakellaropoulos, G.P. [Laboratory of Environmental and Energy Processes, Thermi-Thessaloniki (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute]|[Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Center for Research and Technology Hellas, Ptolemais (Greece)

    2004-09-15

    Solid fuel combustion is a major source of Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) that are highly toxic compounds even in trace amounts. In addition, the complex conditions of the flue gases could favor, in same cases, PCDD/F formation. Thus, the presence of chlorine and metal catalysts (i.e. copper) in the flue gases, could lead, through heterogeneous reactions, to PCDD/F formation between 250-400 C. Three major theories have been established to elucidate the formation of PCDD/Fs in combustion systems: PCDD/Fs are already present in the incoming feed and are incompletely destroyed or transformed during combustion PCDD/Fs can be formed during combustion and PCDD/Fs can be formed by de novo mechanism that is in the low-temperature post-combustion zone of incinerators through some heterogeneous catalytic reactions that occur in the flue gas-fly ash environment. Post-combustion and precombustion techniques have been elaborated to minimize the PCDD/F emissions. Post combustion techniques utilize gas-cleaning devices to capture or destroy them after formation, while certain compounds could be added in the raw, prior the combustion zone, to inhibit PCDD/Fs formation (pre-combustion measures). In his work the PCDD/F emissions during the combustion of lignite, olive kernel and blends were measured and the efficiency of urea to act as potential inhibitor in PCDD/F formation was investigated also.

  18. Dynamic neutron radiography of a combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, J.; Hillenbach, A.; Schillinger, B.

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic neutron radiography is a non-destructive testing method, which made big steps in the last years. Depending on the neutron flux, the object and the detector a time resolution down to 50 ms is possible. In the case of repetitive processes the object can be synchronized with the detector and better statistics in the image can be obtained by adding radiographies of the same phase. By delaying the trigger signal a radiography movie can be composed with a time resolution down to 100 μs. A combustion engine is an ideal sample for the explained technique, because the motor block of metal is relatively easy to penetrate, while oil and fuel attenuate the thermal neutron beam much stronger. Various experiments were performed at ILL and PSI. Soon the tomography station ANTARES at FRM-II will be ready for measurements. (author)

  19. Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, William de

    2010-07-31

    The project which extended from November 2005 to May of 2010 demonstrated the application of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) with engine out NOx levels of 0.2 g/bhp-hr throughout the program target load of 12.6bar BMEP. The project showed that the range of loads could be extended to 16.5bar BMEP, therefore matching the reference lug line of the base 2007 MY Navistar 6.4L V8 engine. Results showed that the application of LTC provided a dramatic improvement over engine out emissions when compared to the base engine. Furthermore LTC improved thermal efficiency by over 5% from the base production engine when using the steady state 13 mode composite test as a benchmark. The key enablers included improvements in the air, fuel injection, and cooling systems made in Phases I and II. The outcome was the product of a careful integration of each component under an intelligent control system. The engine hardware provided the conditions to support LTC and the controller provided the necessary robustness for a stable combustion. Phase III provided a detailed account on the injection strategy used to meet the high load requirements. During this phase, the control strategy was implemented in a production automotive grade ECU to perform cycle-by-cycle combustion feedback on each of the engine cylinders. The control interacted on a cycle base with the injection system and with the Turbo-EGR systems according to their respective time constants. The result was a unique system that could, first, help optimize the combustion system and maintain high efficiency, and secondly, extend the steady state results to the transient mode of operation. The engine was upgraded in Phase IV with a Variable Valve Actuation system and a hybrid EGR loop. The impact of the more versatile EGR loop did not provide significant advantages, however the application of VVA proved to be an enabler to further extend the operation of LTC and gain considerable benefits in fuel economy and soot reduction. Finally

  20. Combustion process science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    An important and substantial area of technical work in which noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) is desired is that involving combustion process research. In the planning for this workshop, it was hoped that W. Serignano would provide a briefing regarding the experimental requirements for thermal measurements to support such research. The particular features of thermal measurement requirements included those describing the timeline for combustion experiments, the requirements for thermal control and diagnostics of temperature and other related thermal measurements and the criticality to the involved science to parametric features of measurement capability including precision, repeatability, stability, and resolution. In addition, it was hoped that definitions could be provided which characterize the needs for concurrent imaging as it relates to science observations during the conduct of experimentation.

  1. Dynamical issues in combustion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, P.C.; Williams, F.

    1991-01-01

    This book looks at the world of combustion phenomena covering the following topics: modeling, which involves the elucidation of the essential features of a given phenomenon through physical insight and knowledge of experimental results, devising appropriate asymptotic and computational methods, and developing sound mathematical theories. Papers in this book describe how all of these challenges have been met for particular examples within a number of common combustion scenarios: reactive shocks, low Mach number premixed reactive flow, nonpremixed phenomena, and solid propellants. The types of phenomena examined are also diverse: the stability and other properties of steady structures, the long time dynamics of evolving solutions, properties of interfaces and shocks, including curvature effects, and spatio-temporal patterns

  2. SPECIFIC EMISSIONS FROM BIOMASS COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skopec

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with determining the specific emissions from the combustion of two kinds of biomass fuels in a small-scale boiler. The tested fuels were pellets made of wood and pellets made of rape plant straw. In order to evaluate the specific emissions, several combustion experiments were carried out using a commercial 25 kW pellet-fired boiler. The specific emissions of CO, SO2 and NOx were evaluated in relation to a unit of burned fuel, a unit of calorific value and a unit of produced heat. The specific emissions were compared with some data acquired from the reference literature, with relatively different results. The differences depend mainly on the procedure used for determining the values, and references provide no information about this. Although some of our experimental results may fit with one of the reference sources, they do not fit with the other. The reliability of the references is therefore disputable.

  3. Oxy-coal Combustion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Eddings, E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Lighty, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Ring, T. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Smith, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Thornock, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Y Jia, W. Morris [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Pedel, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rezeai, D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wang, L. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Zhang, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kelly, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-01-06

    The objective of this project is to move toward the development of a predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for pilot-scale, single-burner, oxy-coal operation. This validation research brings together multi-scale experimental measurements and computer simulations. The combination of simulation development and validation experiments is designed to lead to predictive tools for the performance of existing air fired pulverized coal boilers that have been retrofitted to various oxy-firing configurations. In addition, this report also describes novel research results related to oxy-combustion in circulating fluidized beds. For pulverized coal combustion configurations, particular attention is focused on the effect of oxy-firing on ignition and coal-flame stability, and on the subsequent partitioning mechanisms of the ash aerosol.

  4. Setting up experimental incineration system for low-level radioactive samples and combustion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, Yasuhiro; Hanafusa, Tadashi; Nagamatsu, Tomohiro; Okada, Shigeru

    1997-01-01

    An incineration system was constructed which were composed of a combustion furnace (AP-150R), a cyclone dust collector, radioisotope trapping and measurement apparatus and a radioisotope storage room built in the first basement of the Radioisotope Center. Low level radioactive samples (LLRS) used for the combustion experiment were composed of combustible material or semi-combustible material containing 500 kBq of 99m TcO 4 or 23.25 kBq of 131 INa. The distribution of radioisotopes both in the inside and outside of combustion furnace were estimated. We measured radioactivity of a smoke duct gas in terminal exit of the exhaust port. In case of combustion of LLRS containing 99m TcO 4 or 131 INa, concentration of radioisotopes at the exhaust port showed less than legal concentration limit of these radioisotopes. In cases of combustion of LLRS containing 99m TcO 4 or 131 INa, decontamination factors of the incineration system were 120 and 1.1, respectively. (author)

  5. Modeling and simulation of combustion chamber and propellant dynamics and issues in active control of combustion instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Giorgio Carlo

    A method for a comprehensive approach to analysis of the dynamics of an actively controlled combustion chamber, with detailed analysis of the combustion models for the case of a solid rocket propellant, is presented here. The objective is to model the system as interconnected blocks describing the dynamics of the chamber, combustion and control. The analytical framework for the analysis of the dynamics of a combustion chamber is based on spatial averaging, as introduced by Culick. Combustion dynamics are analyzed for the case of a solid propellant. Quasi-steady theory is extended to include the dynamics of the gas-phase and also of a surface layer. The models are constructed so that they produce a combustion response function for the solid propellant that can be immediately introduced in the our analytical framework. The principal objective mechanisms responsible for the large sensitivity, observed experimentally, of propellant response to small variations. We show that velocity coupling, and not pressure coupling, has the potential to be the mechanism responsible for that high sensitivity. We also discuss the effect of particulate modeling on the global dynamics of the chamber and revisit the interpretation of the intrinsic stability limit for burning of solid propellants. Active control is also considered. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of time delay (between sensing and actuation); several methods to compensate for it are discussed, with numerical examples based on the approximate analysis produced by our framework. Experimental results are presented for the case of a Dump Combustor. The combustor exhibits an unstable burning mode, defined through the measurement of the pressure trace and shadowgraph imaging. The transition between stable and unstable modes of operation is characterized by the presence of hysteresis, also observed in other experimental works, and hence not a special characteristic of this combustor. Control is introduced in the

  6. Oxy-fuel combustion as an alternative for increasing lime production in rotary kilns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, D.A.; Chejne, F.; Mejía, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A one-dimensional model for oxy-fuel combustion in a rotary kiln was developed. • Flue gas recirculation becomes an important parameter for controlling the process. • Combustion process decreases the flame length making it more dense. • Increases of 12% in raw material with 40% of FGR and conversion of 98% was obtained. - Abstract: The effect of Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) on the decarbonation process during oxy-fuel combustion in a lime (and cement) rotary kiln is analyzed using an unsteady one-dimensional Eulerian–Lagrangian mathematical model. The model considers gas and limestone as continuous phases and the coal particles as the discrete phase. The model predicts limestone decarbonation, temperature and species distribution of gas and solid phases along the kiln. Simulation results of an air-combustion case are successfully validated with reported experimental data. This model is used to study and to compare the conventional air combustion process with oxy-fuel combustion with FGR ratios between 30% and 80% as controller parameter in this process. Changes in decarbonation process due to energy fluxes by convection and radiation with different FGRs were simulated and analyzed. Simulation results indicate a temperature increase of 20% in the gas and solid phases and a higher decarbonation rate of 40% in relation to the air-combustion case, for a given constant fuel consumption rate. However, for a given temperature, the increase of the CO_2 partial pressure in the oxy-fuel case promotes a reduction of the decarbonation rate. Therefore, there is a compromise between FGR and decarbonation rate, which is analyzed in the present study. Simulation results of the decarbonation step in low FGR cases, compared to air-combustion case, shows that conversion takes place in shorter distances in the kiln, suggesting that the production rate can be increased for existing kilns in oxy-fuel kilns or, equivalently, shorter kilns can be designed for an

  7. Coal combustion technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.X.

    1994-01-01

    Coal is the most important energy source in China, the environmental pollution problem derived from coal burning is rather serious in China. The present author discusses coal burning technologies both in boilers and industrial furnaces and their relations with environmental protection problems in China. The technological situations of Circulating Fluidized Bed Coal Combustor, Pulverized Coal Combustor with Aerodynamic Flame Holder and Coal Water Slurry Combustion have been discussed here as some of the interesting problems in China only. (author). 3 refs

  8. Example Problems in LES Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Lesieur, M., Turbulence in Fluids , 2nd Revised Ed., Fluid Mechanics and Its Applications, Vol. 1, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, Massachusetts, 1990...34, Journal of Fluid Mechanics , Vol. 238, 1992, pp. 155-185. 5. Hirsch, C., Numerical Computation of Internal and External Flows, Vol. 2, Computational...reaction mechanisms for the oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels in flames", Combustion Science and Technology, Vol. 27, 1981, pp. 31-43. 14. Spalding, D.B

  9. Dual-Pump CARS Development and Application to Supersonic Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnotti, Gaetano

    Successful design of hypersonic air-breathing engines requires new computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for turbulence and turbulence-chemistry interaction in supersonic combustion. Unfortunately, not enough data are available to the modelers to develop and validate their codes, due to difficulties in taking measurements in such a harsh environment. Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is a non-intrusive, non-linear, laser-based technique that provides temporally and spatially resolved measurements of temperature and absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in H2-air flames. A dual-pump CARS instrument has been developed to obtain measurements in supersonic combustion and generate databases for the CFD community. Issues that compromised previous attempts, such as beam steering and high irradiance perturbation effects, have been alleviated or avoided. Improvements in instrument precision and accuracy have been achieved. An axis-symmetric supersonic combusting coaxial jet facility has been developed to provide a simple, yet suitable flow to CFD modelers. The facility provides a central jet of hot "vitiated air" simulating the hot air entering the engine of a hypersonic vehicle flying at Mach numbers between 5 and 7. Three different silicon carbide nozzles, with exit Mach number 1, 1.6 and 2, are used to provide flows with the effects of varying compressibility. H2 co-flow is available in order to generate a supersonic combusting free jet. Dual-pump CARS measurements have been obtained for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Approximately one million Dual-pump CARS single shots have been collected in the supersonic jet for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Data have been acquired with a H2 co-flow (combustion case) or a N 2 co-flow (mixing case). Results are presented and the effects of the compressibility and of the heat release are discussed.

  10. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. Clearly, the key to successful gas turbine development is based on understanding the effects of geometry and operating conditions on combustion instability, emissions (including UHC, CO and NO{sub x}) and performance. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors.

  11. Combustion char characterisation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, P; Ingermann Petersen, H; Sund Soerensen, H; Thomsen, E; Guvad, C

    1996-06-01

    The aim was to correlate reactivity measures of raw coals and the maceral concentrates of the coals obtained in a previous project with the morphology of the produced chars by using a wire grid devolatilization method. Work involved determination of morphology, macroporosity and a detailed study by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Systematic variations in the texture of chars produced in different temperature domains and heating rates were demonstrated by using incident light microscopy on polished blocks and by SEM studies directly on the surfaces of untreated particles. Results suggest that work in the field of char reactivity estimates and correlations between char morphology and coal petrography can be accomplished only on chars produced under heating rates and temperatures comparable to those for the intended use of coal. A general correlation between the coals` petrography and the the morphology of high temperature chars was found. The SEM study of the chars revealed that during the devolatilization period the particles fuse and the macroporosity and thus the morphotypes are formed. After devolatilization ceases, secondary micropores are formed. These develop in number and size throughout the medium combustion interval. At the end of the combustion interval the macrostructure breaks down, caused by coalescence of the increased number of microspores. This can be observed as a change in the morphology and the macroporosity of the chars. Results indicate that char reactivity is a function of the macroporosity and thus the morphology of combustion chars. (AB) 34 refs.

  12. Management of coal combustion wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-02-01

    It has been estimated that 780 Mt of coal combustion products (CCPs) were produced worldwide in 2010. Only about 53.5% were utilised, the rest went to storage or disposal sites. Disposal of coal combustion waste (CCW) on-site at a power plant may involve decades-long accumulation of waste, with hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of tonnes of dry ash or wet ash slurry being stored. In December 2008, a coal combustion waste pond in Kingston, Tennessee, USA burst. Over 4 million cubic metres of ash sludge poured out, burying houses and rivers in tonnes of toxic waste. Clean-up is expected to continue into 2014 and will cost $1.2 billion. The incident drew worldwide attention to the risk of CCW disposal. This caused a number of countries to review CCW management methods and regulations. The report begins by outlining the physical and chemical characteristics of the different type of ashes generated in a coal-fired power plant. The amounts of CCPs produced and regulations on CCW management in selected countries have been compiled. The CCW disposal methods are then discussed. Finally, the potential environmental impacts and human health risks of CCW disposal, together with the methods used to prevent them, are reviewed.

  13. Aerodynamic and thermal studies of cans of gas cooled fuel elements; Etudes aerodynamiques et thermiques de gaines d'elements combustibles refroidis par gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelin, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Milliat, J P [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1964-07-01

    Research on clusters was undertaken at the CEA in 1959, while studies on herring-bone cans were developed at the EDF Laboratory at Chatou and the CEA laboratory at Saclay at the end of 1959. In 1962, a general study on corrugations was begun at the Saclay Laboratory with a view to improving the clusters, and continued later in both laboratories relative to the internal cooling of annular fuel elements. As these studies progressed, trial facilities were extended while experimental methods have improved constantly. At the present time, both laboratories, working in complete collaboration, have powerful means at their disposal. Work on the clusters has been concerned chiefly with pressure losses due to the assembly parts, and with the temperature variations around the elements of the cluster. In this way, we have been able to determine satisfactorily the hot points of the can, the deformations of the rods and the conditions of stability of these deformations. In the case of the herring-bone cans, studies have been directed to the evolution of performances as a function of the geometric parameters on the one hand, and to the special aerodynamic and thermal features caused by the fins and by interruptions of cartridge on the other hand. These studies have led to a very thorough knowledge of the cartridges chosen for the reactors EDF 2 and EDF 3, and now open up very hopeful prospects for future reactors, particularly those fitted with annular elements; among the alternatives suitable for the inner surface of the annular element can, corrugations and longitudinal fins have been fairly extensively tested over a wide range of Reynolds number. (authors) [French] Les etudes de grappes ont ete entreprises au C.E.A. en 1959, tandis que les etudes de gaines a chevrons se sont developpees au Laboratoire de Chatou de l'EDF et au Laboratoire de Saclay du C.E.A. a la fin de l'annee 1959. En 1962, une etude generale sur les corrugations a ete commencee au Laboratoire de Saclay pour

  14. Ash and heavy metals in fluidized-bed combustion of wood wastes; Tuhka ja raskasmetallit puuperaeisen jaetteen kerrosleijupoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaessi, T; Aittoniemi, P [IVO Power Engineering, Vantaa (Finland); Kauppinen, E; Latva-Somppi, J; Kurkela, J [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Partanen, J [IVO Technology Centre, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Ash formation and deposition mechanisms during co-combustion of pulp mill sludge and bark in industrial bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor have been studied. Similar fuels were used in a bench-scale BFB for co-combustion of sludge and bark pellets and comparative studies with separate combustion of these fuels. Results indicated that in industrial scale unit significant fraction of ash had vaporization. About 14 mass-% of the total fly ash was found in the particle size below 0.2 {mu}m. The vaporized species consisted of potassium (K), sulfur (S), chlorine (Cl) and also of minor quantities of sodium (Na). In the benchscale similar vaporization fractions during co-combustion were measured, about 11 mass-%. During the combustion of bark this ratio, about 20 mass-%, was higher than during sludge combustion. The vaporized ash fraction was in the case of dried sludge combustion about 7 mass-%, but with wet sludge the vaporization rate was remarkably lower, about 1-2 mass-%. An increase in the bed temperature increased also ash vaporization. Test run period without combustion at elevated temperatures produced very low quantities of vaporized ash. The vaporized species in bench-scale test during bark pellet combustion were K, S and Cl, for sludge combustion also Na was clearly detected. No condensation of the vaporized species in bed area or furnace walls was observed. Bed defluidization was studied in the bench-scale unit. During bark pellet combustion the bed-agglomeration proceeded via small ash particle, below 2 {mu}m, coating on sand particle surface and consequent bonding between the ash layers. In the case of sludge combustion the accumulation of large ash particles and sintering of these porous agglomerates was observed to cause bed coarsening and defluidization. (orig.)

  15. Fuel injection system for internal combustion engines. Kraftstoffeinspritzsystem fuer Brennkraftmaschinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafner, U.

    1990-09-13

    A fuel injection system for an internal combustion engine is provided with a fuel supply line (13) and at least one electromagnetically actuated fuel injection valve (14) for apportioning a quantity of fuel for injection. A connection muzzle (24) coming from the valve body (23) juts into an opening (22) in the suction pipe (21) of the internal combustion engine. The end of the injection valve opposite the connecting muzzle (24) is connected with the fuel supply line via a fuel entry. The valve body (23) is enclosed by a casing (25) in order to provide the conditions required for a warm start. An annulus (31) extending over a large part of the axial length of the valve remains between the casing and the valve body (23). The annulus (31) communicates with the fuel flow through the fuel supply line (13) via an afflux and an efflux opening (32, 33) (Fig. 1).

  16. Modelling of NO formation in the combustion of coal blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenillas, A.; Backreedy, R.I.; Jones, J.M.; Pis, J.J.; Pourkashanian, M.; Rubiera, F.; Williams, A. [CSIC, Instituto Nacional del Carbon, Oviedo (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    Coal blending is becoming of increasing importance in power stations firing pulverised coal as a result of increasing competition, stricter emission legislation and is an attractive way of improving plant economic and combustion performance. Presently, the two general methods used by power station operators to assess or predict the performance of an unknown coal blend to be fired in power station boilers are by the use of experimental large scale rig tests or correlation indices derived from experience of firing other coal blends in the power station environment. The first is expensive and the second is of doubtful accuracy in some cases. This paper evaluates the application of mathematical modelling of the combustion of a series of binary coal blends in the test situation of a drop tube reactor to predict the NO emissions and degree of char burnout. Its applicability to low NOx burners used in power stations is discussed and it is concluded that present mathematical coal combustion models are not developed sufficiently to enable an adequate description of the binary blends and the physical and chemical processes, which may include interactions, during combustion of the blend. This means that accurate predictions cannot be made. 20 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Heat transfer and combustion in microgravity; Mujuryokuka deno netsukogaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, K [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-09-05

    Examples of thermal engineering under gravity free state are introduced. When making semiconductor crystals, the thermal conductivity of the molten substance becomes important but in a microgravity environment where the thermal convection is suppressed, this value can be accurately measured. Although there are many unknown points regarding the thermal conductive mechanism of thermal control equipment elements under microgravity, theoretical analysis is being advanced. It is anticipated that the verification of this theory using liquid droplets will be made. The conveying of boiling heat under microgravity is suppressed because the bubbles stick to the heat source. When a non-azeotropic composition is used, Marangoni convection occurs, and the conveying is promoted. Since there is no thermal convection in microgravity combustion, diffusion dominates. In order to make the phenomenon clear, the free-fall tower can be utilized. A liquid droplet flame will become a complete, integrated, spherical flame. Vaporization coefficient and combustion velocity which are impossible to measure on the ground can be measured. In the case of metal fires occuring in space, the movement of metal dominates the combustion. In microgravity, dust coal will float in a stationary state so the process of combustion can be observed. It is believed that the diffusion flame of hydrocarbons will be thicker than the flame on the ground. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  19. Burn up physics; Physique des combustibles irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretiakoff, O [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The present communication is devoted to a body of theoretical and experimental work carried out at the C.E.A. with the aim of adding to the current knowledge on the evolution of the reactivity (during fuel irradiation) in natural or slightly enriched Uranium reactors. The difficulties of performing direct experiments on large amounts of irradiated fuels are reviewed - especially in operating power reactors - and the necessity is underlined for fundamental research in two directions: on one hand, the change in the composition of the fuels (chains of heavy nuclei, fission products), and on the other hand the effect of changes in composition on the neutron balance. Before presenting three types of experiments which have been carried out, the importance of the problems associated with the neutron spectra is stressed and the practical methods used for the calculations are briefly described. The systematic irradiation of several types of fuel, followed by their chemical and isotopic analysis has been going on for several years. An outline of the experimental programme is given with a description of the methods employed: {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma} chain for the preparation of samples determination of the plutonium content by coulometry and double isotopic dilution, separation of Boron used in some cases for the measurement of integrated neutron densities. The interpretation of the measurements is discussed with some examples. A second and more recent series of experiments deals with the investigation of lattices, using synthetic fuels (Uranium-Plutonium alloys) as compared to slightly depleted or enriched Uranium Various experiments are considered on heavy water and on cold graphite, then on graphite heated up to 500 C Some results already obtained are listed. These experiments, requiring nearly a metric ton of each type of fuel cannot be pursued in a systematic manner. This is why is developed since several years a method of differential measurement by oscillation, which

  20. Impacts of heavy metals and radioactivity from coal combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.

    1977-01-01

    Coal-fueled plants appear to have the potential for a slightly higher radiologic impact on the population than do nuclear-powered plants although in both cases the impact appears to be quite small. The additional impact from trace elements in and on respirable fly ash is of concern and should be factored into the total assessment of potential health consequences associated with a major increase in coal combustion. For some time the paucity of essential data will hamper realistic evaluations

  1. Unsteady Motions in Combustion Chambers for Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    active in wind musical instruments. In all such cases, °ow separation is involved, followed by instability of a shear layer and formation of vortices... musical instruments. The idea that vortices might be responsible for oscillations in a solid propellant rocket seems to have been proposed ¯rst by...Combustion Oscillation in a Ducted Premixed Flame," Inst. Mech. Engineers, Int. Conf. on Comb. in Eng., Oxford, pp. 85{94. Campos -Delgado, D.V., Scheuermans

  2. Type-specific detection of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) in self-sampled cervicovaginal cells applied to FTA elute cartridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Inger; Sanner, Karin; Lindell, Monica; Strand, Anders; Olovsson, Matts; Wikström, Ingrid; Wilander, Erik; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2011-08-01

    Most procedures for self-sampling of cervical cells are based on liquid-based media for transportation and storage. An alternative is to use a solid support, such as dry filter paper media. To evaluate if self-sampling of cervicovaginal fluid using a cytobrush (Viba-brush; Rovers Medical Devices B.V., Oss, The Netherlands) and a solid support such as the Whatman Indicating FTA Elute cartridge (GE Healthcare, United Kingdom) can be used for reliable typing of human papillomavirus (HPV), as compared to cervical samples obtained by a physician using a cytobrush and the indicating FTA Elute Micro card and biopsy analysis. A total of 50 women with a previous high-risk (HR) HPV positive test were invited to perform self-sampling using the Viba-brush and the FTA cartridge and thereafter a physician obtained a cervical sample using the cytobrush and a FTA card, together with a cervical biopsy for histology and HPV typing. Detection of HR-HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58 and 59 was performed using three multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. All samples contained sufficient amounts of genomic DNA and the self-samples yielded on average 3.5 times more DNA than those obtained by the physician. All women that were positive for HR-HPV in the biopsy sample also typed positive both by self-sampling and physician-obtained sampling. For women with a histological diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (CIN 2-3) all three HPV samples showed 100% concordance. A higher number of women were HPV positive by self-sampling than by physician-obtained sampling or by biopsy analysis. The Viba-brush and the FTA cartridge are suitable for self-sampling of vaginal cells and subsequent HR-HPV typing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Checking the sealing of fuel elements by helium sweating - case of the reactors G2 (1960); Controle de l'etancheite des elements combustibles par ressuage d'helium - cas du reacteur G2 (1960)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, B; D' Orival, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Choumoff, S [Compagnie Francaise Thomson-Houston, 75 - Paris (France)

    1960-07-01

    The G2 slug is a welded, hermetically sealed unit; the seal is checked by placing the fuel element in a helium atmosphere under pressure, then measuring the quantity of helium it releases in a vessel under vacuum. The theoretical aspect and the conditions of industrial application are reviewed, and the installations described. (author) [French] La cartouche G2 se presente comme un ensemble soude, hermetique; le controle d'etancheite s'effectue en immergeant l'element combustible dans une atmosphere d'helium sous pression puis en mesurant la quantite d'helium qu'il restitue dans une enceinte sous vide. L'aspect theorique et les conditions d'exploitation industrielle sont evoques et les installations decrites. (auteur)

  4. IEA combustion agreement : a collaborative task on alternative fuels in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larmi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the alternative fuels in combustion task of the International Energy Agency is on high efficiency engine combustion, furnace combustion, and combustion chemistry. The objectives of the task are to develop optimum combustion for dedicated fuels by fully utilizing the physical and chemical properties of synthetic and renewable fuels; a significant reduction in carbon dioxide, NOx and particulate matter emissions; determine the minimum emission levels for dedicated fuels; and meet future emission standards of engines without or with minimum after-treatment. This presentation discussed the alternative fuels task and addressed issues such as synthetic fuel properties and benefits. The anticipated future roadmap was presented along with a list of the synthetic and renewable engine fuels to be studied, such as neat oxygenates like alcohols and ethers, biogas/methane and gas combustion, fuel blends, dual fuel combustion, high cetane number diesel fuels like synthetic Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel and hydrogenated vegetable oil, and low CN number fuels. Implementation examples were also discussed, such as fuel spray studies in optical spray bombs; combustion research in optical engines and combustion chambers; studies on reaction kinetics of combustion and emission formation; studies on fuel properties and ignition behaviour; combustion studies on research engines; combustion optimization; implementing the optimum combustion in research engines; and emission measurements. Overall milestone examples and the overall schedule of participating countries were also presented. figs.

  5. The study of partitioning of heavy metals during fluidized bed combustion of sewage sludge and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, I.; Lopes, M.H.; Abelha, P.; Cabrita, I.; Oliveira, J.F.S. [INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2006-06-15

    The behavior of Cd, Cr, Cu, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Hg during the combustion tests of a dry granular sewage sludge on a fluidized bed combustor pilot (FBC) of about 0.3 MW was evaluated. The emissions of these heavy metals from mono-combustion were compared with those of co-combustion of the sludge with a bituminous coal. The effect of the addition of limestone was also studied in order to retain sulphur compounds and to verify its influence on the retention of heavy metals (HM). Heavy metals were collected and analyzed from different locations of the installation, which included the stack, the two cyclones, and the material removed from the bed. The results showed that the volatility of metals was rather low, resulting in emissions below the legal limits of the new directive on incineration, with the exception of Hg during the mono-combustion tests. The partitioning of metals, except for Hg, appeared to follow that of ashes, amounting to levels above 90% in the bed streams in the mono-combustion case. For co-combustion, there was a lower fixation of HM in the bed ashes, mostly originating essentially from the sewage sludge, ranging between 40% and 80%. It is believed that in this latter case, a slightly higher temperature could have enhanced the volatilization, especially of Cd and Pb. However these metals were then retained in fly ashes captured in the cyclones. In the case of Hg, the volatilisation was complete. The bed ashes were free of Hg and part of Hg was retained in the cyclones and the rest was emitted either with fine ash particles or in gaseous forms. In mono-combustion the Hg emissions from the stack (particles and gas) accounted, for about 50%. This appeared to have significantly decreased in the case of co-combustion, as only about 75% has been emitted, due to the retention effect of cyclone ashes.

  6. The study of partitioning of heavy metals during fluidized bed combustion of sewage sludge and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim; Lopes, M. Helena; Abelha, Pedro; Cabrita, Isabel; Oliveira, J.F. Santos

    2003-07-01

    The behaviour of Cd, Cr, Cu, Co, Mn, Pb, Zn and Hg during the combustion tests of granular dry sewage sludges on a pilot FBC of about 0,3 MW was evaluated. The emissions of these heavy metals from mono-combustion were compared with those of co-combustion of the sludge with a bituminous coal. The effect of the addition of limestone was also studied in order to retain sulphur compounds and to verify its influence on the retention of heavy metals. Heavy metals were collected and analysed from different locations of the installation, which included the stack, the two cyclones and the material removed from the bed. The results showed that the volatility of metals was rather low, resulting in emissions below the legal limits of the new directive on incineration, with the exception of Hg during the mono-combustion tests. The partitioning of metals, except for Hg, appeared to follow that of ashes, amounting to levels above 90% in the bed streams in the mono-combustion case. For co-combustion, there was a lower fixation of HM in the bed ashes, mostly originating essentially from the sewage sludge, ranging between 40 and 80%. It is believed that in this latter case, a slightly higher bed temperature could have enhanced the volatilisation, especially of Cd and Pb. However these metals were then retained in cyclone ashes. In the case of Hg, the volatilisation was complete. The bed ashes were free of Hg and part of it was retained in the cyclone and emitted as both fine ash particles and in gaseous forms. In mono-combustion the Hg emissions from the stack (particles and gas) accounted for about 50%, although there was a significant amount unaccounted for. This appeared to have significantly decreased in the case of co-combustion, as only about 15% has been emitted, due to the retention effect of cyclone ashes which presented high quantities of unburned carton and possibly condensed sulphur species.

  7. Effects of preheated combustion air on laminar coflow diffusion flames under normal and microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi Yeganeh, Mohammad

    Global energy consumption has been increasing around the world, owing to the rapid growth of industrialization and improvements in the standard of living. As a result, more carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide are being released into the environment. Therefore, techniques for achieving combustion at reduced carbon dioxide and nitric oxide emission levels have drawn increased attention. Combustion with a highly preheated air and low-oxygen concentration has been shown to provide significant energy savings, reduce pollution and equipment size, and uniform thermal characteristics within the combustion chamber. However, the fundamental understanding of this technique is limited. The motivation of the present study is to identify the effects of preheated combustion air on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Combustion characteristics of laminar coflow diffusion flames are evaluated for the effects of preheated combustion air temperature under normal and low-gravity conditions. Experimental measurements are conducted using direct flame photography, particle image velocimetry (PIV) and optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics. Laminar coflow diffusion flames are examined under four experimental conditions: normal-temperature/normal-gravity (case I), preheated-temperature/normal gravity (case II), normal-temperature/low-gravity (case III), and preheated-temperature/low-gravity (case IV). Comparisons between these four cases yield significant insights. In our studies, increasing the combustion air temperature by 400 K (from 300 K to 700 K), causes a 37.1% reduction in the flame length and about a 25% increase in peak flame temperature. The results also show that a 400 K increase in the preheated air temperature increases CH concentration of the flame by about 83.3% (CH is a marker for the rate of chemical reaction), and also increases the C2 concentration by about 60% (C2 is a marker for the soot precursor). It can therefore be concluded that preheating the combustion air

  8. Combustion of Solid Propellants (La Combustion des Propergols Solides)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    the of ether and ethyl alcohol and removing objective of these lectures to give a this solvent. Instead of having a fibrous comprehensive understanding...do cetto esrne do Les propergols composites, A matrice confifrences une description tout A fait A polymarique charg~o pst, un oxydant at un jour des...rusa., De nouveaux souvant suppos6 qua la vitesa des gaz de oxydes de for ultrafirts mont aujourd’hui combustion est n~gligeable at qua d~velopps pour

  9. Straw combustion on slow-moving grates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2005-01-01

    Combustion of straw in grate-based boilers is often associated with high emission levels and relatively poor fuel burnout. A numerical grate combustion model was developed to assist in improving the combustion performance of these boilers. The model is based on a one-dimensional ‘‘walking......-column’’ approach and includes the energy equations for both the fuel and the gas accounting for heat transfer between the two phases. The model gives important insight into the combustion process and provides inlet conditions for a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the freeboard. The model predictions...... indicate the existence of two distinct combustion modes. Combustion air temperature and mass flow-rate are the two parameters determining the mode. There is a significant difference in reaction rates (ignition velocity) and temperature levels between the two modes. Model predictions were compared...

  10. Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Maja Bøg; Brix, Jacob; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is suggested as one of the possible, promising technologies for capturing CO2 from power plants. The concept of oxy-fuel combustion is removal of nitrogen from the oxidizer to carry out the combustion process in oxygen and, in most concepts, recycled flue gas to lower the flame...... provide additional options for improvement of process economics are however likewise investigated. Of particular interest is the change of the combustion process induced by the exchange of carbon dioxide and water vapor for nitrogen as diluent. This paper reviews the published knowledge on the oxy......-fuel process and focuses particularly on the combustion fundamentals, i.e. flame temperatures and heat transfer, ignition and burnout, emissions, and fly ash characteristics. Knowledge is currently available regarding both an entire oxy-fuel power plant and the combustion fundamentals. However, several...

  11. ZMOTTO- MODELING THE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZMOTTO program was developed to model mathematically a spark-ignited internal combustion engine. ZMOTTO is a large, general purpose program whose calculations can be established at five levels of sophistication. These five models range from an ideal cycle requiring only thermodynamic properties, to a very complex representation demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. ZMOTTO is a flexible and computationally economical program based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The calculations assume that heat transfer is expressed in terms of a heat transfer coefficient and that the cylinder average of kinetic plus potential energies remains constant. During combustion, the pressures of burned and unburned gases are assumed equal and their heat transfer areas are assumed proportional to their respective mass fractions. Even the simplest ZMOTTO model provides for residual gas effects, spark advance, exhaust gas recirculation, supercharging, and throttling. In the more complex models, 1) finite rate chemistry replaces equilibrium chemistry in descriptions of both the flame and the burned gases, 2) poppet valve formulas represent fluid flow instead of a zero pressure drop flow, and 3) flame propagation is modeled by mass burning equations instead of as an instantaneous process. Input to ZMOTTO is determined by the model chosen. Thermodynamic data is required for all models. Transport properties and chemical kinetics data are required only as the model complexity grows. Other input includes engine geometry, working fluid composition, operating characteristics, and intake/exhaust data. ZMOTTO accommodates a broad spectrum of reactants. The program will calculate many Otto cycle performance parameters for a number of consecutive cycles (a cycle being an interval of 720 crankangle degrees). A typical case will have a number of initial ideal cycles and progress through levels

  12. Co-Combustion of Animal Waste in a Commercial Waste-to-Energy BFB Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Moradian

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Co-combustion of animal waste, in waste-to-energy boilers, is considered a method to produce both heat and power and to dispose of possibly infected animal wastes. This research conducted full-scale combustion tests to identify the impact of changed fuel composition on a fluidized-bed boiler. The impact was characterized by analyzing the deposit formation rate, deposit composition, ash composition, and emissions. Two combustion tests, denoted the reference case and animal waste case, were performed based on different fuel mixes. In the reference case, a normal solid waste fuel mix was combusted in the boiler, containing sorted industry and household waste. In the animal waste case, 20 wt% animal waste was added to the reference fuel mix. The collected samples, comprising sampling probe deposits, fuel mixes, bed ash, return sand, boiler ash, cyclone ash and filter ash, were analyzed using chemical fractionation, SEM-EDX and XRD. The results indicate decreased deposit formation due to animal waste co-combustion. SEM-EDX and chemical fractionation identified higher concentrations of P, Ca, S, and Cl in the bed materials in the animal waste case. Moreover, the risk of bed agglomeration was lower in the animal waste case and also a decreased rate of NOx and SO2 emissions were observed.

  13. Numerical investigation of biogas flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ehsan; Bagheri, Ghobad; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel consumption decreases from 3.24 g/s in biogas conventional combustion to 1.07 g/s in flameless mode. • The differences between reactants and products temperature intensifies irreversibility in traditional combustion. • The temperature inside the chamber is uniform in biogas flameless mode and exergy loss decreases in this technique. • Low O 2 concentration in the flameless mode confirms a complete and quick combustion process in flameless regime. - Abstract: The purpose of this investigation is to analyze combustion characteristics of biogas flameless mode based on clean technology development strategies. A three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study has been performed to illustrate various priorities of biogas flameless combustion compared to the conventional mode. The effects of preheated temperature and wall temperature, reaction zone and pollutant formation are observed and the impacts of combustion and turbulence models on numerical results are discussed. Although preheated conventional combustion could be effective in terms of fuel consumption reduction, NO x formation increases. It has been found that biogas is not eligible to be applied in furnace heat up due to its low calorific value (LCV) and it is necessary to utilize a high calorific value fuel to preheat the furnace. The required enthalpy for biogas auto-ignition temperature is supplied by enthalpy of preheated oxidizer. In biogas flameless combustion, the mean temperature of the furnace is lower than traditional combustion throughout the chamber. Compared to the biogas flameless combustion with uniform temperature, very high and fluctuated temperatures are recorded in conventional combustion. Since high entropy generation intensifies irreversibility, exergy loss is higher in biogas conventional combustion compared to the biogas flameless regime. Entropy generation minimization in flameless mode is attributed to the uniform temperature inside the chamber

  14. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  15. A new wall function boundary condition including heat release effect for supersonic combustion flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Zhen-Xun; Jiang, Chong-Wen; Lee, Chun-Hian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new wall function including heat release effect is theoretically derived. • The new wall function is a unified form holding for flows with/without combustion. • The new wall function shows good results for a supersonic combustion case. - Abstract: A new wall function boundary condition considering combustion heat release effect (denoted as CWFBC) is proposed, for efficient predictions of skin friction and heat transfer in supersonic combustion flows. Based on a standard flow model including boundary-layer combustion, the Shvab–Zeldovich coupling parameters are introduced to derive a new velocity law-of-the-wall including the influence of combustion. For the temperature law-of-the-wall, it is proposed to use the enthalpy–velocity relation, instead of the Crocco–Busemann equation, to eliminate explicit influence of chemical reactions. The obtained velocity and temperature law-of-the-walls constitute the CWFBC, which is a unified form simultaneously holding for single-species, multi-species mixing and multi-species reactive flows. The subsequent numerical simulations using this CWFBC on an experimental case indicate that the CWFBC could accurately reflect the influences on the skin friction and heat transfer by the chemical reactions and heat release, and show large improvements compared to previous WFBC. Moreover, the CWFBC can give accurate skin friction and heat flux for a coarse mesh with y"+ up to 200 for the experimental case, except for slightly larger discrepancy of the wall heat flux around ignition position.

  16. Turbine Burners: Turbulent Combustion of Liquid Fuels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sirignano, William A; Liu, Feng; Dunn-Rankin, Derek

    2006-01-01

    The proposed theoretical/computational and experimental study addresses the vital two-way coupling between combustion processes and fluid dynamic phenomena associated with schemes for burning liquid...

  17. Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion of Sewage Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshizo; Nojima, Tomoyuki; Kakuta, Akihiko; Moritomi, Hiroshi

    A conceptual design of an energy recovering system from sewage sludge was proposed. This system consists of a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, a gas turbine, and a heat exchanger for preheating of combustion air. Thermal efficiency was estimated roughly as 10-25%. In order to know the combustion characteristics of the sewage sludge under the elevated pressure condition, combustion tests of the dry and wet sewage sludge were carried out by using laboratory scale pressurized fluidized bed combustors. Combustibility of the sewage sludge was good enough and almost complete combustion was achieved in the combustion of the actual wet sludge. CO emission and NOx emission were marvelously low especially during the combustion of wet sewage sludge regardless of high volatile and nitrogen content of the sewage sludge. However, nitrous oxide (N2O) emission was very high. Hence, almost all nitrogen oxides were emitted as the form of N2O. From these combustion tests, we judged combustion of the sewage sludge with the pressurized fluidized bed combustor is suitable, and the conceptual design of the power generation system is available.

  18. Emissions from small scale combustion of pelletized wood fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachs, A.

    1998-01-01

    Combustion of wood pellets in small scale heating systems with an effect below 20 kW has increased. During the winter season 1995/96 1500 small plants for heating houses are estimated to be in operation. Stack emissions from three pellet burners and two pellet stoves have been studied at laboratory. Different pellet qualities were tested. When the fraction of fines increased also the NO x emissions increased with about 10 %. As reference fuel 8 mm pellets was used. Tests with 6 mm pellets gave, in most cases, significant lower emissions of CO and THC. Eleven stoves, burners and boilers were studied in a field test. The results show that all the plants generally have higher emissions in the field than during conditions when the plants are adjusted with a stack gas monitoring instrument. A conclusion is that it is difficult for the operator to adjust the plant without a monitoring instrument. The emissions from the tested plants give an estimation of stack gas emissions from small scale pellet plants. The difference between the 'best' and 'worst' technologies is big. The span of emissions with the best technology to the worst is given below. The interval is concerning normal combustion . During abnormal conditions the emissions are on a significant higher level: * CO 80-1 000 mg/MJ; * Tar 0,3-19 mg/MJ; * THC (as methane equivalents) 2-100 mg/MJ; * NO x 50-70 mg/W;, and * Dust emissions 20-40 mg/MJ. Emissions from pellets heating are lower than from wood combustion and the best technology is close to the emission from oil burners. Wood and pellets have the same origin but the conditions to burn them in an environmental friendly way differ. Combustion of pellets could be improved through improved control of the air and fuel ratio that will create more stable conditions for the combustion

  19. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  20. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Using Indoor Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, L.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  1. COMBUSTION PROPERTIES OF EUCALYPTUS WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın ÖRS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the combustion properties of some impregnation materials (abiotic and biotic factors used for eucalyptus wood in interior or exterior environments were investigated. The experimental samples were prepared from Eucalyptus wood based on ASTM-D-1413-76 Tanalith-CBC, boric acid, borax, vacsol-WR, immersol-WR, polyethylen glycole-400 and ammonium sulphate were used as an impregnation material. The results indicated that, vacuum treatment on Eucalyptus gave the lowest retention value of salts. Compounds containing boron+salt increased fire resistance however water repellents decreased the wood flammability.

  2. Theoretical studies of combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, J.M. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The basic objectives of this research program are to develop and apply theoretical techniques to fundamental dynamical processes of importance in gas-phase combustion. There are two major areas currently supported by this grant. One is reactive scattering of diatom-diatom systems, and the other is the dynamics of complex formation and decay based on L{sup 2} methods. In all of these studies, the authors focus on systems that are of interest experimentally, and for which potential energy surfaces based, at least in part, on ab initio calculations are available.

  3. Modeling nitrogen chemistry in combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Miller, James A.; Ruscic, Branko

    2018-01-01

    the accuracy of engineering calculations and thereby the potential of primary measures for NOx control. In this review our current understanding of the mechanisms that are responsible for combustion-generated nitrogen-containing air pollutants is discussed. The thermochemistry of the relevant nitrogen...... via NNH or N2O are discussed, along with the chemistry of NO removal processes such as reburning and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction of NO. Each subset of the mechanism is evaluated against experimental data and the accuracy of modeling predictions is discussed....

  4. Engine combustion network (Ecn) : characterization and comparison of boundary conditions for different combustion vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, M.; Somers, L.M.T.; Johnson, J.; Naber, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Malbec, L.M.; Bruneaux, G.; Pickett, L.M.; Bardi, M.; Payri, R.; Bazyn, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Engine Combustion Network (ECN) is a worldwide group of institutions using combustion vessels and/or performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, whose aim is to advance the state of spray and combustion knowledge at engine-relevant conditions. A key activity is the use of spray

  5. Chemical speciation of PM2.5 emissions from residential wood combustion and meat cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.; Zielinska, B.; Fujita, E.; Chow, J.; Watson, J.; Sagebiel, J.; Sheetz, L.; Batie, S.

    1998-01-01

    Residential wood combustion and meat cooking emissions were each analyzed to develop a chemical emissions profile. Samples were collected using a DRI-constructed dilution stack sampler equipped with a 2.5 mm particle selective cyclone. Emissions were diluted 30-100 times, cooled to ambient temperature, and were allowed 80 seconds for condensation prior to collection. Fireplace and wood-stove emissions testing was conducted at the DRI facilities. Wood type, wood moisture, burn rate, and fuel load were varied for different experiments. Meat emissions testing was conducted at the CE-CERT stationary emissions lab in Riverside, California. Meat type, fat content, and the cooking appliance used were changed in different tests. Fine particle and semi-volatile organic compounds were collected on filter/PUF/XAD/PUF cartridges. Inorganic samples were collected on Teflon and quartz filters, which were analyzed for mass by gravimetry, elements by x-ray fluorescence, ammonium by automated colorimetry, organic and elemental carbon by thermal/optical reflectance, as well as chloride, nitrate, and sulfate by ion chromatography. Analysis of organic species was conducted by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These data have been utilized for constructing specific profiles for use in the Chemical Mass Balance model for apportionment of fine particle sources in the Denver, Colorado, region

  6. Comparison of the Usefulness of SPE Cartridges for the Determination of β-Blockers and β-Agonists (Basic Drugs in Environmental Aqueous Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Caban

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though the methodology used for the determination of β-blockers and β-agonists in environmental samples is based mainly on solid-phase extraction (SPE and gas chromatography or liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection, the available literature data on the applied SPE procedures is rather sparse. In this paper such comparison is presented. Moreover, the usefulness of the eight SPE cartridges for the determination of five β-blockers (acebutolol, atenolol, metoprolol, nadolol, and propranolol and two β-agonists (salbutamol and terbutaline in environmental aqueous samples using GC techniques is tested. Among them, three (the trifunction sorbent Strata Screen C, the copolymers LiChrolut EN, and the functionalized copolymer Isolute ENV+ were used for the first time for this purpose. It was confirmed that polystyrene-divinylbenzene-N-vinylpyrrolidone copolymers (PS-DVB-VP, Strata-X, and Oasis HLB cartridges have a better potential than a cation-exchange sorbent for the extraction of the target drugs from environmental water samples. However, it should be stressed out that the direct application of the tested SPE conditions for the analysis of real environmental water samples is not possible, and such parameters, like volume of loading sample, appropriate solvents for washing and elution steps, and so forth, must be optimized again in order to achieve satisfactory recovery values for the target compounds.

  7. Molecularly imprinted polymer cartridges coupled on-line with high performance liquid chromatography for simple and rapid analysis of dextromethorphan in human plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moein, Mohammad Mahdi; Javanbakht, Mehran; Akbari-Adergani, Behrouz

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a novel method is described for automated determination of dextromethorphan in biological fluids using molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) as a sample clean-up technique combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The water-compatible molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared using methacrylic acid as functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker, chloroform as porogen and dextromethorphan as template molecule. These imprinted polymers were used as solid-phase extraction sorbent for the extraction of dextromethorphan from human plasma samples. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the MIP cartridges were evaluated. The high selectivity of the sorbent coupled to the high performance liquid chromatographic system permitted a simple and rapid analysis of this drug in plasma samples with limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of 0.12 ng/mL and 0.35 ng/mL, respectively. The MIP selectivity was evaluated by analyzing of the dextromethorphan in presence of several substances with similar molecular structures and properties. Results from the HPLC analyses showed that the recoveries of dextromethorphan using MIP cartridges from human plasma samples in the range of 1-50 ng/mL were higher than 87%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Combustion modelling of a fuel oil flame; Modelisation de la combustion d`une flamme de fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flour, I.; Mechitouan, N.

    1996-10-01

    The combustion modelling of a fuel oil flame has been realised in the scope of the R and D `Combustion Turbines`. This report presents the results of the 2D simulation of a fuel oil flame (n-octane), at atmospherical pressure, without swirl, realised using the Eulerian two-phase flow software Melodif. This calculation has been defined in collaboration with IFP, using experimental data from the IFRP. The hollow cone spray of liquid fuel is injected in the middle of the combustion chamber, with a co-flowing annular air. The furnace diameter is 2 meter and its length is 6,25 meter. A large recirculation zone is induced by the air flow, and leads to take into account the whole furnace, in order to avoid some problems with the limit conditions at the outlet. This calculation deals with droplets evaporation, gaseous phase combustion and radiation heat transfer. Predictions concerning gaseous axial mean velocity and mean temperature gradient in the flame, are in good agreement with measurements. However the temperature is too low in the peripheral zone of the flow. This is probably due to the fact that heat exchanges at the wall furnace are not correctly represented, because of a lack of detailed limit conditions for the walls. The mean radial velocity is not so well predicted, but this measurement is also quite difficult in a strongly longitudinal flow. The results concerning the dispersed phase will not be compared, because no measurements on the liquid fuel were available. As it has been experimentally observed, the simulation shows that the fuel oil spray quickly evaporates as it enters the combustion chamber. This result allows to propose to use an homogeneous approach (hypothesis of no-slipping between the two phases) in an Eulerian one-phase flow code, in case of a 3D simulation of liquid fuel turbine. (authors)

  9. Combustion Sensors: Gas Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human, Mel

    2002-01-01

    This report documents efforts to survey the current research directions in sensor technology for gas turbine systems. The work is driven by the current and future requirements on system performance and optimization. Accurate real time measurements of velocities, pressure, temperatures, and species concentrations will be required for objectives such as combustion instability attenuation, pollutant reduction, engine health management, exhaust profile control via active control, etc. Changing combustor conditions - engine aging, flow path slagging, or rapid maneuvering - will require adaptive responses; the effectiveness of such will be only as good as the dynamic information available for processing. All of these issues point toward the importance of continued sensor development. For adequate control of the combustion process, sensor data must include information about the above mentioned quantities along with equivalence ratios and radical concentrations, and also include both temporal and spatial velocity resolution. Ultimately these devices must transfer from the laboratory to field installations, and thus must become low weight and cost, reliable and maintainable. A primary conclusion from this study is that the optics-based sensor science will be the primary diagnostic in future gas turbine technologies.

  10. Database of Small Molecule Thermochemistry for Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Goldsmith, C. Franklin; Magoon, Gregory R.; Green, William H.

    2012-01-01

    High-accuracy ab initio thermochemistry is presented for 219 small molecules relevant in combustion chemistry, including many radical, biradical, and triplet species. These values are critical for accurate kinetic modeling. The RQCISD(T)/cc-PV∞QZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method was used to compute the electronic energies. A bond additivity correction for this method has been developed to remove systematic errors in the enthalpy calculations, using the Active Thermochemical Tables as reference values. On the basis of comparison with the benchmark data, the 3σ uncertainty in the standard-state heat of formation is 0.9 kcal/mol, or within chemical accuracy. An uncertainty analysis is presented for the entropy and heat capacity. In many cases, the present values are the most accurate and comprehensive numbers available. The present work is compared to several published databases. In some cases, there are large discrepancies and errors in published databases; the present work helps to resolve these problems. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. Database of Small Molecule Thermochemistry for Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Goldsmith, C. Franklin

    2012-09-13

    High-accuracy ab initio thermochemistry is presented for 219 small molecules relevant in combustion chemistry, including many radical, biradical, and triplet species. These values are critical for accurate kinetic modeling. The RQCISD(T)/cc-PV∞QZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method was used to compute the electronic energies. A bond additivity correction for this method has been developed to remove systematic errors in the enthalpy calculations, using the Active Thermochemical Tables as reference values. On the basis of comparison with the benchmark data, the 3σ uncertainty in the standard-state heat of formation is 0.9 kcal/mol, or within chemical accuracy. An uncertainty analysis is presented for the entropy and heat capacity. In many cases, the present values are the most accurate and comprehensive numbers available. The present work is compared to several published databases. In some cases, there are large discrepancies and errors in published databases; the present work helps to resolve these problems. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Gel combustion synthesis of yttria stabilized zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijay, Soja K.; Chandramouli, V.; Anthonysamy, S.

    2013-01-01

    Nano - crystalline 8 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders were synthesized by gel combustion technique employing both microwave heating as well as conventional heating method. Three different fuels - citric acid, urea and glycine were used for the synthesis with fuel to oxidant ratio as 1:1. The effect of fuel on the crystal structure, particle size, specific surface area, morphology and sintering density was studied. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), BET gas adsorption technique, dynamic light scattering, transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM) and micro-Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the powders. The results obtained for powders obtained using both methods - microwave assisted and hotplate - were compared. The specific surface area of powders in all cases are comparable except in the case of urea as fuel where microwave assisted synthesis yielded powders with lower surface area. The particle size distribution of all samples obtained using microwave method was unimodal, whereas the particle size distribution of samples prepared using hot plate method using urea fuel showed bimodal distribution. The compacts obtained using powders with citric acid and glycine as fuel showed more than 94% theoretical density, whereas the samples obtained using urea showed density below 90% of theoretical density. (author)

  13. Effect of initial conditions on combustion generated loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1993-01-01

    This analytical study examines the effect of initial thermodynamic conditions on the loads generated by the combustion of homogeneous hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. The effect of initial temperature, pressure, hydrogen concentration, and steam concentration is evaluated for two cases, (1) constant volume and (2) constant initial pressure. For each case, the Adiabatic, Isochoric, Complete Combustion (AICC), Chapman-Jouguet (CJ), and normally reflected CJ pressures are calculated for a range of hydrogen and steam concentrations representative of the entire flammable regime. For detonation loads, pressure profiles and time-histories are also evaluated in one-dimensional Cartesian geometry. The results show that to a first approximation, the AICC and CJ pressures are directly proportional to the initial density. Increasing the hydrogen concentration up to stoichiometric concentrations significantly increases the AICC, CJ, and reflected CJ pressures. For the constant volume case, the AICC, CJ, and reflected CJ pressures increase with increasing hydrogen concentration on the rich side of stoichiometric concentrations. For the constant initial pressure case, the AICC, CJ, and reflected CJ pressures decrease with increasing hydrogen concentration on the rich side of stoichiometric values. The addition of steam decreases the AICC, CJ, and reflected CJ pressures for the constant initial pressure case, but increases them for the constant volume case. For detonations, the pressure time-histories can be normalized with the AICC pressure and the reverberation time for Cartesion geometry. (orig.)

  14. Combustion chemistry and formation of pollutants; Chimie de la combustion et formation des polluants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This book of proceedings reports on 7 papers on combustion chemistry and formation of pollutants presented during the workshop organized by the `Combustion and Flames` section of the French society of thermal engineers. The chemistry of combustion is analyzed in various situations such as: turbojet engines, spark ignition engines, industrial burners, gas turbines etc... Numerical simulation is used to understand the physico-chemical processes involved in combustion, to describe the kinetics of oxidation, combustion and flame propagation, and to predict the formation of pollutants. (J.S.)

  15. Combustion, cofiring and emissions characteristics of torrefied biomass in a drop tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndibe, Collins; Maier, Jörg; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The study investigates cofiring characteristics of torrefied biomass fuels at 50% thermal shares with coals and 100% combustion cases. Experiments were carried out in a 20 kW, electrically heated, drop-tube reactor. Fuels used include a range of torrefied biomass fuels, non-thermally treated white wood pellets, a high volatile bituminous coal and a lignite coal. The reactor was maintained at 1200 °C while the overall stoichiometric ratio was kept constant at 1.15 for all combustion cases. Measurements were performed to evaluate combustion reactivity, emissions and burn-out. Torrefied biomass fuels in comparison to non-thermally treated wood contain a lower amount of volatiles. For the tests performed at a similar particle size distribution, the reduced volatile content did not impact combustion reactivity significantly. Delay in combustion was only observed for test fuel with a lower amount of fine particles. The particle size distribution of the pulverised grinds therefore impacts combustion reactivity more. Sulphur and nitrogen contents of woody biomass fuels are low. Blending woody biomass with coal lowers the emissions of SO 2 mainly as a result of dilution. NO X emissions have a more complex dependency on the nitrogen content. Factors such as volatile content of the fuels, fuel type, furnace and burner configurations also impact the final NO X emissions. In comparison to unstaged combustion, the nitrogen conversion to NO X declined from 34% to 9% for air-staged co-combustion of torrefied biomass and hard coal. For the air-staged mono-combustion cases, nitrogen conversion to NO X declined from between 42% and 48% to about 10%–14%. - Highlights: • Impact of torrefaction on cofiring was studied at high heating rates in a drop tube. • Cofiring of torrefied biomasses at high thermal shares (50% and higher) is feasible. • Particle size impacts biomass combustion reactivity more than torrefaction. • In a drop tube reactor, torrefaction has no negative

  16. Experimental Investigations on Combustion Behaviors of Live PVC Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liufang; Zhang, Jiaqing; Zhang, Bosi; Liu, Min; Fan, Minghao; Li, Qiang

    2018-03-01

    This paper investigated the combustion behaviors of live PVC cables with overload currents experimentally. The smoke coefficient of released smoke and the released gas concentration were examined. The results indicate that the combustion of live PVC cables can be divided into four stages, i.e., core exposed with a little smoke, obvious flame, maximum smoke and smoke depress. For most cases, using blue laser is better than using rad laser, since the extinction coefficient of the rad laser was larger than that of the blue laser. The response time of the detection of the released typical gases due to cable pyrolysis decreased and the peak values of the typical gases increased with the overload currents. In addition, the time to reach the peak value of gas concentration also decreased with the overload currents.

  17. Hydrogen Generation, Combustibility and Mitigation in Nuclear Power Plant Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talha, K.A.; El-Sheikh, B.M.; Gad El-Mawla, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear power plant is provided with features to insure safety. The engineered safety features (ESFs) are devoted to set operating conditions under accident conditions. If ESFs fail to apply in some accidents, this would lead to what called severe accidents, and core damage. In this case hydrogen will be generated from different sources particularly from metal-water reactions. Since the containment is the final barrier to protect the environment from the release of radioactive materials; its integrity should not be threatened. In recent years, hydrogen concentration represents a real problem if it exceeds the combustibility limits. This work is devoted to calculate the amount of hydrogen to be generated, indelicate its combustibility and how to inertize the containment using different gases to maintain its integrity and protect the environment from the release of radioactive materials

  18. Experimental kinetic parameters in the thermo-fluid-dynamic modelling of coal combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliavacca, G.; Perini, M.; Parodi, E.

    2001-01-01

    The designing and the optimisation of modern and efficient combustion systems are nowadays frequently based on calculation tools for mathematical modelling, which are able to predict the evolution of the process starting from the first principles of physics. Otherwise, in many cases, specific experimental parameters are needed to describe the specific nature of the materials considered in the calculations. It is especially true in the modelling of coal combustion, which is a complex process strongly dependent on the chemical and physical features of the fuel. This paper describes some experimental techniques used to estimate the fundamental kinetic parameters of coal combustion and shows how this data may be introduced in a model calculation to predict the pollutant emissions from a real scale combustion plant [it

  19. Design Considerations for Remote High-Speed Pressure Measurements of Dynamic Combustion Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, D.L.; Ferguson, D.H.; Rohrssen, Robert (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV); Perez, Eduardo (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV)

    2007-01-01

    As gas turbine combustion systems evolve to achieve ultra-low emission targets, monitoring and controlling dynamic combustion processes becomes increasingly important. These dynamic processes may include flame extinction, combustion-driven instabilities, or other dynamic combustion phenomena. Pressure sensors can be incorporated into the combustor liner design, but this approach is complicated by the harsh operating environment. One practical solution involves locating the sensor in a more remote location, such as outside the pressure casing. The sensor can be connected to the measurement point by small diameter tubing. Although this is a practical approach, the dynamics of the tubing can introduce significant errors into the pressure measurement. This paper addresses measurement errors associated with semi-infinite coil remote sensing setups and proposes an approach to improve the accuracy of these types of measurements.

  20. Study of mechanically activated coal combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burdukov Anatolij P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion and air gasification of mechanically activated micro-ground coals in the flux have been studied. Influence of mechanically activated methods at coals grinding on their chemical activeness at combustion and gasification has been determined. Intense mechanical activation of coals increases their chemical activeness that enables development of new highly boosted processing methods for coals with various levels of metamorphism.

  1. Internal combustion engines in hybrid vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.; Weijer, C.J.T. van de; Beckman, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the use of internal combustion engines in hybrid powertrains is investigated. The substantial difference between the use of internal combustion engines in conventional and in hybrid vehicles mean that engines for hybrid vehicles should be designed specifically for the purpose. At the

  2. Flue Gas Emissions from Fluidized Bed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramer, E.A.; Valk, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the past decades fluidized bed coal combustion was developed as a technology for burning coal in an effective way meeting the standards for pollution control. During the earlier years of research on fluidized bed combustion, the potential for limiting the S02 emission by adding limestone to

  3. Combustion and extinction of magnesium fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.; Duverger de Cuy, G.

    1988-01-01

    The studies made in France on magnesium combustion and extinguishing means are associated at the nuclear fuel of the graphite-gas reactor. Safety studies are made for ameliorate our knowledge on: - magnesium combustion - magnesium fire propagation - magnesium fire extinguishing [fr

  4. Coal combustion ashes: A radioactive Waste?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michetti, F.P.; Tocci, M.

    1992-01-01

    The radioactive substances naturally hold in fossil fuels, such as Uranium and Thorium, after the combustion, are subjected to an increase of concentration in the residual combustion products as flying ashes or as firebox ashes. A significant percentage of the waste should be classified as radioactive waste, while the political strategies seems to be setted to declassify it as non-radioactive waste. (Author)

  5. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  6. 30 CFR 57.4104 - Combustible waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combustible waste. 57.4104 Section 57.4104... Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4104 Combustible waste. (a) Waste materials, including liquids, shall not accumulate in quantities that could create a fire hazard. (b) Waste or rags containing...

  7. Injector tip for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Tsu Pin; Ye, Wen

    2003-05-20

    This invention relates to a the tip structure of a fuel injector as used in a internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines using Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) technology require a tip structure that directs fuel spray in a downward direction. This requirement necessitates a tip design that is capable of withstanding mechanical stresses associated with the design.

  8. Ultra-low pollutant emission combustion method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khinkis, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for ultra-low pollutant emission combustion of fossil fuel. It comprises: introducing into a primary combustion chamber a first fuel portion of about 1 percent to about 20 percent of a total fuel to be combusted; introducing primary combustion air into the primary combustion chamber; introducing a first portion of water into the primary combustion chamber, having a first water heat capacity equivalent to a primary combustion air heat capacity of one of a primary combustion air amount of about 10 percent to about 60 percent of the first stoichiometirc requirement for complete combustion of the first fuel portion and an excess primary combustion air amount of about 20 percent to about 150 percent of the first stoichiometric requirement for complete combustion of the first fuel portion; burning the first fuel portion with the primary combustion air in the primary combustion chamber at a temperature abut 2000 degrees F to about 2700 degrees F producing initial combustion products; passing the initial combustion products into a secondary combustion chamber; introducing into the secondary combustion chamber a second fuel portion of about 80 percent to about 99 percent of the total fuel to be combusted; introducing secondary combustion air into the secondary combustion chamber in an amount of about 105 percent to about 130 percent of a second stoichiometric requirement for complete combustion of the second fuel portion; introducing a second portion of water into the secondary combustion chamber; burning the second fuel portion and any remaining fuel in the initial combustion products; passing the final combustion products into a dilution chamber; introducing dilution air into the dilution chamber; discharging the ultra-low pollutant emission vitiated air form the dilution chamber

  9. Integrated Project Management: A Case Study in Integrating Cost, Schedule, Technical, and Risk Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Greg

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a case study as a model for integrated project management. The ISS Program Office (ISSPO) developed replacement fluid filtration cartridges in house for the International Space Station (ISS). The presentation includes a step-by-step procedure and organizational charts for how the fluid filtration problem was approached.

  10. Internal and surface phenomena in metal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Molodetsky, Irina E.; Law, Chung K.

    1995-01-01

    Combustion of metals has been widely studied in the past, primarily because of their high oxidation enthalpies. A general understanding of metal combustion has been developed based on the recognition of the existence of both vapor-phase and surface reactions and involvement of the reaction products in the ensuing heterogeneous combustion. However, distinct features often observed in metal particle combustion, such as brightness oscillations and jumps (spearpoints), disruptive burning, and non-symmetric flames are not currently understood. Recent metal combustion experiments using uniform high-temperature metal droplets produced by a novel micro-arc technique have indicated that oxygen dissolves in the interior of burning particles of certain metals and that the subsequent transformations of the metal-oxygen solutions into stoichiometric oxides are accompanied with sufficient heat release to cause observed brightness and temperature jumps. Similar oxygen dissolution has been observed in recent experiments on bulk iron combustion but has not been associated with such dramatic effects. This research addresses heterogeneous metal droplet combustion, specifically focusing on oxygen penetration into the burning metal droplets, and its influence on the metal combustion rate, temperature history, and disruptive burning. A unique feature of the experimental approach is the combination of the microgravity environment with a novel micro-arc Generator of Monodispersed Metal Droplets (GEMMED), ensuring repeatable formation and ignition of uniform metal droplets with controllable initial temperature and velocity. The droplet initial temperatures can be adjusted within a wide range from just above the metal melting point, which provides means to ignite droplets instantly upon entering an oxygen containing environment. Initial droplet velocity will be set equal to zero allowing one to organize metal combustion microgravity experiments in a fashion similar to usual microgravity

  11. A predictive model of natural gas mixture combustion in internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Espinoza

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the development of a predictive natural gas mixture combustion model for conventional com-bustion (ignition engines. The model was based on resolving two areas; one having unburned combustion mixture and another having combustion products. Energy and matter conservation equations were solved for each crankshaft turn angle for each area. Nonlinear differential equations for each phase’s energy (considering compression, combustion and expansion were solved by applying the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The model also enabled studying different natural gas components’ composition and evaluating combustion in the presence of dry and humid air. Validation results are shown with experimental data, demonstrating the software’s precision and accuracy in the results so produced. The results showed cylinder pressure, unburned and burned mixture temperature, burned mass fraction and combustion reaction heat for the engine being modelled using a natural gas mixture.

  12. Interactive wood combustion for botanical tree models

    KAUST Repository

    Pirk, Sören

    2017-11-22

    We present a novel method for the combustion of botanical tree models. Tree models are represented as connected particles for the branching structure and a polygonal surface mesh for the combustion. Each particle stores biological and physical attributes that drive the kinetic behavior of a plant and the exothermic reaction of the combustion. Coupled with realistic physics for rods, the particles enable dynamic branch motions. We model material properties, such as moisture and charring behavior, and associate them with individual particles. The combustion is efficiently processed in the surface domain of the tree model on a polygonal mesh. A user can dynamically interact with the model by initiating fires and by inducing stress on branches. The flames realistically propagate through the tree model by consuming the available resources. Our method runs at interactive rates and supports multiple tree instances in parallel. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through numerous examples and evaluate its plausibility against the combustion of real wood samples.

  13. Solid waste combustion for alpha waste incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1981-02-01

    Radioactive waste incinerator development at the Savannah River Laboratory has been augmented by fundamental combustion studies at the University of South Carolina. The objective was to measure and model pyrolysis and combustion rates of typical Savannah River Plant waste materials as a function of incinerator operating conditions. The analytical models developed in this work have been incorporated into a waste burning transient code. The code predicts maximum air requirement and heat energy release as a function of waste type, package size, combustion chamber size, and temperature. Historically, relationships have been determined by direct experiments that did not allow an engineering basis for predicting combustion rates in untested incinerators. The computed combustion rates and burning times agree with measured values in the Savannah River Laboratory pilot (1 lb/hr) and full-scale (12 lb/hr) alpha incinerators for a wide variety of typical waste materials

  14. Final report: Prototyping a combustion corridor; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutland, Christopher J.; Leach, Joshua

    2001-01-01

    The Combustion Corridor is a concept in which researchers in combustion and thermal sciences have unimpeded access to large volumes of remote computational results. This will enable remote, collaborative analysis and visualization of state-of-the-art combustion science results. The Engine Research Center (ERC) at the University of Wisconsin - Madison partnered with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, and several other universities to build and test the first stages of a combustion corridor. The ERC served two important functions in this partnership. First, we work extensively with combustion simulations so we were able to provide real world research data sets for testing the Corridor concepts. Second, the ERC was part of an extension of the high bandwidth based DOE National Laboratory connections to universities

  15. Investigation of pressurized combustion and characterization of solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, M; Haemaelaeinen, J; Paakkinen, K [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Joutsenoja, T [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The objective of the research of Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) was to produce results of the effects of pressure and other important parameters on the combustion of pulverized coals using both experimental and theoretical methods. The results can be utilized to model pressurized combustion and to plan pilot-scale reactors. The studied coals were Polish hvb coal, French lignite (Gardanne), German anthracite (Niederberg) and German (Goettelborn) hvb coal. In was originally planned to study also a char of one of these coals. However, anthracite was selected instead of char, because the theoretical studies predicted maximum pressure effect to be found for antracite-type coals (with low reactivity and low content of volatiles). The pulverized coal samples were combusted in an electrically heated, pressurized entrained flow reactor (PEFR), where the experimental conditions were controlled with a high precision. The studied particle size fractions were 100-125 Em and 140-180 Am for anthracite and 140-180 {mu}m for the other coals. The studied things were combustion rates and temperatures of burning particles. Two types of sets of experiments were carried out. In the first case, experimental planning was done and the results were handled with multivariable partial least squares (PLS) method. Gas temperature varied from 1073K to 1473K and pressure from 0.2 MPa to 0.8 MPa. The other variables were PO2 and PCO{sub 2}. Some of the experiments were carried out at conditions prevailing during flue gas recirculation (CO{sub 2} concentration was > 20 vol%). In the second case, oxygen concentration was kept constant ( 10 vol%) and pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 0.8 MPa with an interval of 0.1 MPa

  16. Recent developments concerning French fuel elements used in natural uranium - graphite - CO{sub 2} reactor systems; Developpements recents des elements combustibles francais de la filiere uranium naturel - graphite - CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salesse, M; Stohr, J A; Jeanpierre, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    internal can of the annular element, has necessitated very much research work. - the exact temperature drop at the contact between the uranium and the can, and the strength of the lower end of the cartridge are points which are increasingly crucial in the case of the annular element. All in all the annular element thus calls for a great research effort. This effort is justified by the big step forwards in which it will result in the case of the EDF reactors thanks to its high specific power and to the high weight of uranium in each cartridge. (authors) [French] La politique choisie en France pour le developpement des elements combustibles destines aux reacteurs de l'Electricite de France, consiste a chercher, pour chaque pile nouvelle, a beneficier au maximum des progres techniques les plus recents en etudiant chaque fois un nouvel element combustible permettant une puissance par canal aussi elevee que possible. Les derniers elements combustibles ainsi etudies par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique sont de deux types differents: un element a tube d'uranium ferme aux deux extremites et refroidi exterieurement (ce type d'element, retenu pour les reacteurs EDF 2, EDF 3 et EDF 4 permet des puissances specifiques maximum de l'ordre de 6 MW/t). Un element a tube d'uranium ouvert, refroidi interieurement et exterieurement, appele clemont annulaire et dont on etudie la possibilite pour EDF5. Un tel element peut permettre des puissances specifiques superieures a 12 MW/t. Ces deux types d'elements possedent des caracteristiques communes: la gaine, pour le refroidissement externe, comporte des ailettes en chevron. Ce type de profil, qui a recu recemment des ameliorations notables augmentant son efficacite thermique, a l'avantage important d'eviter les vibrations de cartouche mais a pose des problemes technologiques de tenue au cyclage thermique qui ont necessite une etude approfondie. les cartouches sont placees a l'interieur de chemise en graphite, ce qui limite les efforts

  17. Modeling and simulating combustion and generation of NOx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaroiu, Gheorghe

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the modeling and simulation of combustion processes and generation of NO x in a combustion chamber and boiler, with supplementary combustion in a gas turbine installation. The fuel burned in the combustion chamber was rich gas with a chemical composition more complex than natural gas. Pitcoal was used in the regenerative boiler. From the resulting combustion products, 17 compounds were retained, including nitrogen and sulphur compounds. Using the developed model, the simulation resulted in excess air for a temperature imposed at the combustion chamber exhaust. These simulations made it possible to determine the concentrations of combustion compounds with a variation in excess combustion. (author)

  18. Numerical Modeling of MILD Combustion at High Pressure to Predict the Optimal Operating Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Vanteru, Mahendra Reddy; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    This Chapter presents numerical simulation on MILD combustion operating at high pressure. Influence of preheat and dilution of oxidizer and operating pressure on stabilization of MILD combustion are presented. Three different preheat temperatures (1100, 1300 and 1500 K) and three different dilution levels (3, 6 and 9% O2) are simulated over an operating pressure variation from 1 atm to 16 atm. A classical jet in hot coflow burner is considered for this study. Total of 45 cases are simulated and analyzed. Essential characteristics of MILD combustion, i.e., maximum temperature (Tmax), temperature rise (ΔT) and temperature distributions, are analyzed. The distribution of emissions OH and CO are also studied and presented. Well-stabilized MILD combustion is observed for all cases except for two cases with high preheated (1500 K). Peak temperature is observed to decrease with increasing operating pressure for a given level of preheat and dilution. OH mass faction is reduced with increasing pressure. The CO emissions show little sensitivity to operating pressure. However, CO mass fraction is slightly higher at 1 atm operating pressure as compared to 4 to 16 atm. Since the residence time of reactants increases as the operating pressure increases, well-stabilized MILD combustion is observed for all highly diluted and low temperature preheat cases (3% O2 and 1100 K).

  19. Numerical Modeling of MILD Combustion at High Pressure to Predict the Optimal Operating Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Vanteru, Mahendra Reddy

    2017-02-01

    This Chapter presents numerical simulation on MILD combustion operating at high pressure. Influence of preheat and dilution of oxidizer and operating pressure on stabilization of MILD combustion are presented. Three different preheat temperatures (1100, 1300 and 1500 K) and three different dilution levels (3, 6 and 9% O2) are simulated over an operating pressure variation from 1 atm to 16 atm. A classical jet in hot coflow burner is considered for this study. Total of 45 cases are simulated and analyzed. Essential characteristics of MILD combustion, i.e., maximum temperature (Tmax), temperature rise (ΔT) and temperature distributions, are analyzed. The distribution of emissions OH and CO are also studied and presented. Well-stabilized MILD combustion is observed for all cases except for two cases with high preheated (1500 K). Peak temperature is observed to decrease with increasing operating pressure for a given level of preheat and dilution. OH mass faction is reduced with increasing pressure. The CO emissions show little sensitivity to operating pressure. However, CO mass fraction is slightly higher at 1 atm operating pressure as compared to 4 to 16 atm. Since the residence time of reactants increases as the operating pressure increases, well-stabilized MILD combustion is observed for all highly diluted and low temperature preheat cases (3% O2 and 1100 K).

  20. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  1. Nanoparticle emissions from combustion engines

    CERN Document Server

    Merkisz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

     This book focuses on particulate matter emissions produced by vehicles with combustion engines. It describes the physicochemical properties of the particulate matter, the mechanisms of its formation and its environmental impacts (including those on human beings). It discusses methods for measuring particulate mass and number, including the state-of-the-art in Portable Emission Measurement System (PEMS) equipment for measuring the exhaust emissions of both light and heavy-duty vehicles and buses under actual operating conditions. The book presents the authors’ latest investigations into the relations between particulate emission (mass and number) and engine operating parameters, as well as their new findings obtained through road tests performed on various types of vehicles, including those using diesel particulate filter regeneration. The book, which addresses the needs of academics and professionals alike, also discusses relevant European regulations on particulate emissions and highlights selected metho...

  2. Radiation treatment of combustion gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, S.; Tokunaga, O.; Nishimura, K.; Hasimoto, S.; Kawakami, W.; Washino, M.; Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Adachi, K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot plant for the radiation treatment of combustion gas in a flow-system was planned and completed in 1974 at the Abara Mfg. Co. Ltd., Central Laboratory in Fujisawa. The plant has been successfully operated for more than one year. The capacity of the pilot plant is 1000 Nm 3 per hour of the gas with the use of an electron accelerator of 60 mA and 0.75 MeV. The objective of this paper is to review a series of the researches including recent unpublished results, and to discuss the characteristics of the process. The outline and typical results of the pilot plant are first reported here. (author)

  3. Ignition circuit for combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H W

    1977-05-26

    The invention refers to the ignition circuit for combustion engines, which are battery fed. The circuit contains a transistor and an oscillator to produce an output voltage on the secondary winding of an output transformer to supply an ignition current. The plant is controlled by an interrupter. The purpose of the invention is to form such a circuit that improved sparks for ignition are produced, on the one hand, and that on the other hand, the plant can continue to function after loss of the oscillator. The problem is solved by the battery and the secondary winding of the output transformers of the oscillator are connected via a rectifier circuit to produce a resultant total voltage with the ignition coil from the battery voltage and the rectified pulsating oscillator output.

  4. Trace emissions from gaseous combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seebold, J.G. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The U.S. Clean Air Act (CAA) was amended in 1990 to include the development of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) for certain stationary sources by November 2000. MACT emissions standards would affect process heaters and industrial boilers since combustion processes are a potential source for many air toxins. The author noted that one of the problems with MACT is the lack of a clear solid scientific footing which is needed to develop environmentally responsible regulations. In order to amend some of these deficiencies, a 4-year, $7 million research project on the origin and fate of trace emissions in the external combustion of gaseous hydrocarbons was undertaken in a collaborative effort between government, universities and industry. This collaborative project entitled the Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF) Project 92-19 produced basic information and phenomenological understanding in two important areas, one basic and one applied. The specific objectives of the project were to measure emissions while operating different full-scale burners under various operating conditions and then to analyze the emission data to identify which operating conditions lead to low air toxic emissions. Another objective was to develop new chemical kinetic mechanisms and predictive models for the formation of air toxic species which would explain the origin and fate of these species in process heaters and industrial boilers. It was determined that a flame is a very effective reactor and that trace emissions from a typical gas-fired industry burner are very small. An unexpected finding was that trace emissions are not affected by hydrocarbon gaseous fuel composition, nor by the use of ultra low nitrous oxide burners. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Availability analysis of a syngas fueled spark ignition engine using a multi-zone combustion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakopoulos, C.D.; Michos, C.N.; Giakoumis, E.G.

    2008-01-01

    A previously developed and validated zero-dimensional, multi-zone, thermodynamic combustion model for the prediction of spark ignition (SI) engine performance and nitric oxide (NO) emissions has been extended to include second-law analysis. The main characteristic of the model is the division of the burned gas into several distinct zones, in order to account for the temperature and chemical species stratification developed in the burned gas during combustion. Within the framework of the multi-zone model, the various availability components constituting the total availability of each of the multiple zones of the simulation are identified and calculated separately. The model is applied to a multi-cylinder, four-stroke, turbocharged and aftercooled, natural gas (NG) SI gas engine running on synthesis gas (syngas) fuel. The major part of the unburned mixture availability consists of the chemical contribution, ranging from 98% at the inlet valve closing (IVC) event to 83% at the ignition timing of the total availability for the 100% load case, which is due to the presence of the combustible fuel. On the contrary, the multiple burned zones possess mainly thermomechanical availability. Specifically, again for the 100% load case, the total availability of the first burned zone at the exhaust valve opening (EVO) event consists of thermomechanical availability approximately by 90%, with similar percentages for all other burned zones. Two definitions of the combustion exergetic efficiency are used to explore the degree of reversibility of the combustion process in each of the multiple burned zones. It is revealed that the crucial factor determining the thermodynamic perfection of combustion in each burned zone is the level of the temperatures at which combustion occurs in the zone, with minor influence of the whole temperature history of the zone during the complete combustion phase. The availability analysis is extended to various engine loads. The engine in question is

  6. Study of cartridge rupture detection installations; Contribution a l'etude des installations de detection de ruptures de gaine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graftieaux, J; Douet, P; Roguin, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    Very numerous physical or technological parameters are involved in the preparation of projects for can rupture detection installations. These parameters are connected essentially with the design of the reactor, the detector used, the disposition of the pneumatic circuits, the type of fuel and the safety required. The present report analyses the main problems arising and their mutual compatibilities; it defines a certain number of ideas which had up till now been accepted implicitly in the design. (authors) [French] De tres nombreux parametres physiques ou technologiques interviennent dans l'etablissement du projet d'une installation de detection de ruptures de gaines. Ces parametres decoulent essentiellement de la conception de la pile, du detecteur utilise, de l'organisation des circuits pneumatiques, du type du combustible et de la securite souhaitee. Le present document analyse les principaux problemes qui se posent ainsi que leurs compatibilites reciproques et precise un certain nombre de notions jusqu'alors admises implicitement lors de l'etablissement des projets. (auteurs)

  7. Low-Emission combustion of fuel in aeroderivative gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulysova, L. A.; Vasil'ev, V. D.; Berne, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    The paper is the first of a planned set of papers devoted to the world experience in development of Low Emission combustors (LEC) for industrial Gas Turbines (GT). The purpose of the article is to summarize and analyze the most successful experience of introducing the principles of low-emission combustion of the so-called "poor" (low fuel concentration in air when the excess air ratio is about 1.9-2.1) well mixed fuelair mixtures in the LEC for GTs and ways to reduce the instability of combustion. The consideration examples are the most successful and widely used aero-derivative GT. The GT development meets problems related to the difference in requirements and operation conditions between the aero, industrial, and power production GT. One of the main problems to be solved is the LEC development to mitigate emissions of the harmful products first of all the Nitrogen oxides NOx. The ways to modify or convert the initial combustors to the LEC are shown. This development may follow location of multiburner mixers within the initial axial envelope dimensions or conversion of circular combustor to the can type one. The most interesting are Natural Gas firing GT without water injection into the operating process or Dry Low emission (DLE) combustors. The current GT efficiency requirement may be satisfied at compressor exit pressure above 3 MPa and Turbine Entry temperature (TET) above 1500°C. The paper describes LEC examples based on the concept of preliminary prepared air-fuel mixtures' combustion. Each combustor employs its own fuel supply control concept based on the fuel flow-power output relation. In the case of multiburner combustors, the burners are started subsequently under a specific scheme. The can type combustors have combustion zones gradually ignited following the GT power change. The combustion noise problem experienced in lean mixtures' combustion is also considered, and the problem solutions are described. The GT test results show wide ranges of stable

  8. Effect of Variant End of Injection Period on Combustion Process of Biodiesel Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Amir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative fuel as a replacement to the standard diesel fuel in combustion diesel engine. The biodiesel fuel has a significantly influences throughout the combustion process and exhaust emission. The purpose of this research is to investigate the combustion process behavior during the End of Injection (EOI period and operates under variant conditions using Rapid Compression Machine (RCM. Experimental of RCM is used to simulate a combustion process and combustion characteristics of diesel engine combustion. Three types of biodiesel blend which are B5, B10 and B15 were tested at several injection pressures of 80 MPa, 90 MPa and 130 MPa under different ambient temperatures, 750 K to 1100 K. The results of this study showed that the ignition delay slightly reduced with increasing the content of biodiesel blends from B5, B10 and B15 and became more shorten as the injection pressure been enhanced. As the injection pressure increased, the behavior of combustion pressure at end of injection is reduced, radically increased the NOX emission. It is noted that the process of combustion at the end of injection increased as the ambient temperature is rising. In fact, higher initial ambient temperature improved the fuel atomization and mixing process. Under the biodiesel combustion with higher ambient temperature condition, the exhaust emission of CO, O2, and HC became less but increased in NOX emission. Besides, increased in blends of biodiesel ratio are found to enhance the combustion process, resulted a decreased in HC emissions.

  9. Extended lattice Boltzmann scheme for droplet combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashna, Mostafa; Rahimian, Mohammad Hassan; Fakhari, Abbas

    2017-05-01

    The available lattice Boltzmann (LB) models for combustion or phase change are focused on either single-phase flow combustion or two-phase flow with evaporation assuming a constant density for both liquid and gas phases. To pave the way towards simulation of spray combustion, we propose a two-phase LB method for modeling combustion of liquid fuel droplets. We develop an LB scheme to model phase change and combustion by taking into account the density variation in the gas phase and accounting for the chemical reaction based on the Cahn-Hilliard free-energy approach. Evaporation of liquid fuel is modeled by adding a source term, which is due to the divergence of the velocity field being nontrivial, in the continuity equation. The low-Mach-number approximation in the governing Navier-Stokes and energy equations is used to incorporate source terms due to heat release from chemical reactions, density variation, and nonluminous radiative heat loss. Additionally, the conservation equation for chemical species is formulated by including a source term due to chemical reaction. To validate the model, we consider the combustion of n-heptane and n-butanol droplets in stagnant air using overall single-step reactions. The diameter history and flame standoff ratio obtained from the proposed LB method are found to be in good agreement with available numerical and experimental data. The present LB scheme is believed to be a promising approach for modeling spray combustion.

  10. Bifurcation, pattern formation and chaos in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, A.; Matkowsky, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper problems in gaseous combustion and in gasless condensed phase combustion are studied both analytically and numerically. In gaseous combustion we consider the problem of a flame stabilized on a line source of fuel. The authors find both stationary and pulsating axisymmetric solutions as well as stationary and pulsating cellular solutions. The pulsating cellular solutions take the form of either traveling waves or standing waves. Transitions between these patterns occur as parameters related to the curvature of the flame front and the Lewis number are varied. In gasless condensed phase combustion both planar and nonplanar problems are studied. For planar condensed phase combustion we consider two models: accounts for melting and does not. Both models are shown to exhibit a transition from uniformly to pulsating propagating combustion when a parameter related to the activation energy is increased. Upon further increasing this parameter both models undergo a transition to chaos: by intermittency and by a period doubling sequence. In nonplanar condensed phase combustion the nonlinear development of a branch of standing wave solutions is studied and is shown to lead to relaxation oscillations and subsequently to a transition to quasi-periodicity

  11. Thermogravimetric analysis of biowastes during combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, M.; Sanchez, M.E.; Gomez, X.; Moran, A.

    2010-01-01

    The combustion of sewage sludge (SS), animal manure (AM) and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) was assessed and compared with that of a semianthracite coal (SC) and of a PET waste by thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Differences were found in the TG curves obtained for the combustion of these materials accordingly to their respective proximate analysis. Non-isothermal thermogravimetric data were used to assess the kinetics of the combustion of these biowastes. The present paper reports on the application of the Vyazovkin model-free isoconversional method for the evaluation of the activation energy necessary for the combustion of these biowastes. The activation energy related to SS combustion (129.1 kJ/mol) was similar to that corresponding to AM (132.5 kJ/mol) while the OFMSW showed a higher value (159.3 kJ/mol). These values are quite higher than the one determined in the same way for the combustion of SC (49.2 kJ/mol) but lower than that for the combustion of a PET waste (165.6 kJ/mol).

  12. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  13. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  14. Numerical simulation of premixed turbulent methane combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we study the behavior of a premixed turbulent methane flame in three dimensions using numerical simulation. The simulations are performed using an adaptive time-dependent low Mach number combustion algorithm based on a second-order projection formulation that conserves both species mass and total enthalpy. The species and enthalpy equations are treated using an operator-split approach that incorporates stiff integration techniques for modeling detailed chemical kinetics. The methodology also incorporates a mixture model for differential diffusion. For the simulations presented here, methane chemistry and transport are modeled using the DRM-19 (19-species, 84-reaction) mechanism derived from the GRIMech-1.2 mechanism along with its associated thermodynamics and transport databases. We consider a lean flame with equivalence ratio 0.8 for two different levels of turbulent intensity. For each case we examine the basic structure of the flame including turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The results indicate that flame wrinkling is the dominant factor leading to the increased turbulent flame speed. Joint probability distributions are computed to establish a correlation between heat release and curvature. We also investigate the effect of turbulent flame interaction on the flame chemistry. We identify specific flame intermediates that are sensitive to turbulence and explore various correlations between these species and local flame curvature. We identify different mechanisms by which turbulence modulates the chemistry of the flame

  15. Analysis of oxygen-enhanced combustion of gas power cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maidana, Cristiano Frandalozo; Carotenuto, Adriano; Schneider, Paulo Smith [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (GESTE/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos Termicos e Energeticos], E-mails: cristiano.maidana@ufrgs.br, pss@mecanica.ufrgs.br

    2010-07-01

    The majority of combustion processes use air as oxidant, roughly taken as 21% O{sub 2} and 79% N{sub 2}, by volume. In many cases, these processes can be enhanced by using an oxidant that contains higher proportion of O{sub 2} than in air. This is known as oxygen-enhanced combustion or OEC, and can bring important benefits like higher thermal efficiencies, lower exhaust gas volumes, higher heat transfer efficiency, reduction fuel consumption, reduced equipment costs and substantially pollutant emissions reduction. Within this scenario, this paper aims to investigate the influence of 21-30% oxygen concentration on the performance of a air-fired natural gas fueled power plant. This power plant operates under a Brayton cycle with models with the help of an air flow splitter after the compressor output in order to dose the oxygen rate of combustion and to keep the flue gas intake of the turbine at a prescribed temperature. Simulations shows that the enhancing of the oxidant stream reduced fuel consumption of about 10%, driven by higher adiabatic flame temperatures, which improves thermal and heat transfer efficiencies. A conclusion obtained is that the use of oxygen in higher proportions can be a challenge to retrofit existing air-fired natural gas power turbine cycles, because of the technological limitation of its materials with higher flame temperatures. (author)

  16. Computational optimization of biodiesel combustion using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganji Prabhakara Rao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work focuses on optimization of biodiesel combustion phenomena through parametric approach using response surface methodology. Physical properties of biodiesel play a vital role for accurate simulations of the fuel spray, atomization, combustion, and emission formation processes. Typically methyl based biodiesel consists of five main types of esters: methyl palmitate, methyl oleate, methyl stearate, methyl linoleate, and methyl linolenate in its composition. Based on the amount of methyl esters present the properties of pongamia bio-diesel and its blends were estimated. CONVERGETM computational fluid dynamics software was used to simulate the fuel spray, turbulence and combustion phenomena. The simulation responses such as indicated specific fuel consumption, NOx, and soot were analyzed using design of experiments. Regression equations were developed for each of these responses. The optimum parameters were found out to be compression ratio – 16.75, start of injection – 21.9° before top dead center, and exhaust gas re-circulation – 10.94%. Results have been compared with baseline case.

  17. The application of zonal trademark combustion monitoring and tuning system to coal boilers for efficiency improvement and emissions reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Guang; Zhou, Wei; Widmer, Neil C.; Moyeda, David K. [GE Energy, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Coal-fired boilers equipped with Low NO{sub x} Burner (LNB) and Overfire Air (OFA) are challenged with maintaining good combustion conditions. In many cases, the significant increases in carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned carbon levels can be attributed to local poor combustion conditions as a result of poorly controlled fuel-air distribution within the furnace. The Zonal trademark combustion monitoring and tuning system developed by GE is available to detect and correct the furnace air-fuel distribution imbalance. The system monitors the boiler excess oxygen (O{sub 2}) and combustible gases, primarily carbon monoxide (CO), by using spatially distributed multipoint sensors located in the boiler's high temperature upper convective backpass region. At these locations, the furnace flow is still significantly stratified allowing tracing of poor combustion zones to specific burners and OFA ports. Using a model-based tuning system, operators can rapidly respond to poor combustion conditions by redistributing airflows to select burners and OFA ports. By improving combustion at every point within the furnace, the boiler can operate at reduced excess O{sub 2} and reduced furnace exit gas temperature (FEGT) while also reducing localized hot spots, corrosive gas conditions, slag formation, and carbon-in-ash. Benefits include improving efficiency, reducing NO{sub X} emissions, increasing output and maximizing availability. This chapter presents the results from implementing the Zonal combustion monitoring and tuning system on a 460 MW tangential-fired coal boiler in the Western United States.

  18. The effect of control parameters to the quality of small-scale wood pellet combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruusunen, M. (Oulu Univ. (Finland). Contol Engineering Lab.), Email: mika.ruusunen@oulu.fi; Korpela, T.; Bjoerkqvist, T. (Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Dept. of Automation Science and Engineering), Email: timo.korpela@tut.fi, Email: tomas.bjorqvist@tut.fi

    2009-07-01

    The target is to clear out control variables and requirements for clean small-scale wood pellet combustion (<100 kW{sub th}). Experimental runs were carried out in the form of design of experiments (DOE) with two commercial 15 kW pellet burners, namely a horizontal gas-burner and a conventional horizontal burner in a 20 kW commercial pellet boiler. Analysed variables were fuel power, draught, air flows, and fuel feed period, and research variables were CO, O{sub 2} and efficiency. The target was to identify and characterise separately the magnitude and direction of the effect of each factor. After process identification and variable optimisation, the results show strong influence of the studied control parameters on the efficiency and the emissions. The effects and interactions between different process variables were rather similar with both burners. The major effects for CO levels were fuel feed and additionally draught affected in case of wood gas combustion. Additionally, the effects on combustion efficiency is described by draught, air feed and fuel feed period. Furthermore, the fuel feed period affected the excess air level in case of direct combustion principle. It was noticed, however, that the combustion properties and optimal parameter values vary significantly between the two cases. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of self-combustion risk in tire derived aggregate fills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Marcos; San Martin, Ignacio; Olivella, Sebastian; Saaltink, Maarten W

    2011-01-01

    Lightweight tire derived aggregate (TDA) fills are a proven recycling outlet for waste tires, requiring relatively low cost waste processing and being competitively priced against other lightweight fill alternatives. However its value has been marred as several TDA fills have self-combusted during the early applications of this technique. An empirical review of these cases led to prescriptive guidelines from the ASTM aimed at avoiding this problem. This approach has been successful in avoiding further incidents of self-combustion. However, at present there remains no rational method available to quantify self-combustion risk in TDA fills. This means that it is not clear which aspects of the ASTM guidelines are essential and which are accessory. This hinders the practical use of TDA fills despite their inherent advantages as lightweight fill. Here a quantitative approach to self-combustion risk evaluation is developed and illustrated with a parametric analysis of an embankment case. This is later particularized to model a reported field self-combustion case. The approach is based on the available experimental observations and incorporates well-tested methodological (ISO corrosion evaluation) and theoretical tools (finite element analysis of coupled heat and mass flow). The results obtained offer clear insights into the critical aspects of the problem, allowing already some meaningful recommendations for guideline revision. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel combustion concepts for sustainable energy development

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Avinash K; Gupta, Ashwani K; Aggarwal, Suresh K; Kushari, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    This book comprises research studies of novel work on combustion for sustainable energy development. It offers an insight into a few viable novel technologies for improved, efficient and sustainable utilization of combustion-based energy production using both fossil and bio fuels. Special emphasis is placed on micro-scale combustion systems that offer new challenges and opportunities. The book is divided into five sections, with chapters from 3-4 leading experts forming the core of each section. The book should prove useful to a variety of readers, including students, researchers, and professionals.

  1. The John Zink Hamworthy combustion handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Baukal, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Despite the length of time it has been around, its importance, and vast amounts of research, combustion is still far from being completely understood. Issues regarding the environment, cost, and fuel consumption add further complexity, particularly in the process and power generation industries. Dedicated to advancing the art and science of industrial combustion, The John Zink Hamworthy Combustion Handbook, Second Edition: Volume 3 - Applications offers comprehensive, up-to-date coverage of equipment used in the process and power generation industries. Under the leadership of Charles E. Baukal

  2. Characteristic of combustion of Colombian gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil B, Edison; Maya, Ruben; Andres, Amel A.

    1996-01-01

    The variety of gas locations in the country, makes that the gas that will be distributed by the net of present gas pipeline a very different composition, what bears to that these they behave in a different way during its use. In this work the main characteristics of the combustion are calculated for the Colombian gases, basically the properties of the combustion and the characteristics of the smoke, as basic information for the design and operation of the gas teams and their certification. These properties were calculated with the special help software for combustion developed by the authors

  3. Combustion of fuels with low sintering temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalin, D

    1950-08-16

    A furnace for the combustion of low sintering temperature fuel consists of a vertical fuel shaft arranged to be charged from above and supplied with combustion air from below and containing a system of tube coils extending through the fuel bed and serving the circulation of a heat-absorbing fluid, such as water or steam. The tube-coil system has portions of different heat-absorbing capacity which are so related to the intensity of combustion in the zones of the fuel shaft in which they are located as to keep all parts of the fuel charge below sintering temperature.

  4. Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabetakis, M. G. [Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1964-05-01

    This is a summary of the available limit of flammability, autoignition and burning-rate data for more than 200 combustible gases and vapors in air and other oxidants, as well as of empirical rules and graphs that can be used to predict similar data for thousands of other combustibles under a variety of environmental conditions. Spec$c data are presented on the paraffinic, unsaturated, aromatic, and alicyclic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, and sulfur compounds, and an assortment of fuels, fuel blends, hydraulic fluids, engine oils, and miscellaneous combustible gases and vapors.

  5. 3rd International Conference on Numerical Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Larrouturou, Bernard; Numerical Combustion

    1989-01-01

    Interest in numerical combustion is growing among applied mathematicians, physicists, chemists, engine manufacturers and many industrialists. This proceedings volume contains nine invited lectures and twenty seven contributions carefully selected by the editors. The major themes are numerical simulation of transsonic and supersonic combustion phenomena, the study of supersonic reacting mixing layers, and turbulent combustion. Emphasis is laid on hyperbolic models and on numerical simulations of hydrocarbon planes with a complete set of chemical reactions carried out in two-dimensional geometries as well as on complex reactive flow simulations.

  6. Annual Report: Advanced Combustion (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey [NETL; Richards, George

    2012-09-30

    The Advanced Combustion Project addresses fundamental issues of fire-side and steam-side corrosion and materials performance in oxy-fuel combustion environments and provides an integrated approach into understanding the environmental and mechanical behavior such that environmental degradation can be ameliorated and long-term microstructural stability, and thus, mechanical performance can lead to longer lasting components and extended power plant life. The technical tasks of this effort are Oxy-combustion Environment Characterization, Alloy Modeling and Life Prediction, and Alloy Manufacturing and Process Development.

  7. Plasma assisted combustion of parafin mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Chernyak, V.Ya.; Martysh, E.V.; Lisitchenko, T.E.; Vergun, O.Yu.; Orlovska, S.G.

    2013-01-01

    In this work the results of solid paraffin combustion with the aid of the plasma of transverse and rotational gliding arc studies are represented. The question of the additional activation of paraffin based solid fuels is examined. The mixture of n-paraffin and stearin in the solid state as the model of the solid paraffin based fuel is used. The plasma assisted combustion of this model is experimentally investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of discharge at the different regimes are measured. The population temperatures of excited rotational levels are determined. The flame temperature during the combustion of solid paraffin containing mixture is calculated

  8. Chaotic combustion in spark ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendeker, Miroslaw; Czarnigowski, Jacek; Litak, Grzegorz; Szabelski, Kazimierz

    2003-01-01

    We analyse the combustion process in a spark ignition engine using the experimental data of an internal pressure during the combustion process and show that the system can be driven to chaotic behaviour. Our conclusion is based on the observation of unperiodicity in the time series, suitable stroboscopic maps and a complex structure of a reconstructed strange attractor. This analysis can explain that in some circumstances the level of noise in spark ignition engines increases considerably due to nonlinear dynamics of a combustion process

  9. Particulate matter emissions, and metals and toxic elements in airborne particulates emitted from biomass combustion: The importance of biomass type and combustion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zosima, Angela T; Tsakanika, Lamprini-Areti V; Ochsenkühn-Petropoulou, Maria Th

    2017-05-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of biomass combustion with respect to burning conditions and fuel types on particulate matter emissions (PM 10 ) and their metals as well as toxic elements content. For this purpose, different lab scale burning conditions were tested (20 and 13% O 2 in the exhaust gas which simulate an incomplete and complete combustion respectively). Furthermore, two pellet stoves (8.5 and 10 kW) and one open fireplace were also tested. In all cases, 8 fuel types of biomass produced in Greece were used. Average PM 10 emissions ranged at laboratory-scale combustions from about 65 to 170 mg/m 3 with flow oxygen at 13% in the exhaust gas and from 85 to 220 mg/m 3 at 20% O 2 . At pellet stoves the emissions were found lower (35 -85 mg/m 3 ) than the open fireplace (105-195 mg/m 3 ). The maximum permitted particle emission limit is 150 mg/m 3 . Metals on the PM 10 filters were determined by several spectrometric techniques after appropriate digestion or acid leaching of the filters, and the results obtained by these two methods were compared. The concentration of PM 10 as well as the total concentration of the metals on the filters after the digestion procedure appeared higher at laboratory-scale combustions with flow oxygen at 20% in the exhaust gas and even higher at fireplace in comparison to laboratory-scale combustions with 13% O 2 and pellet stoves. Modern combustion appliances and appropriate types of biomass emit lower PM 10 emissions and lower concentration of metals than the traditional devices where incomplete combustion conditions are observed. Finally, a comparison with other studies was conducted resulting in similar results.

  10. An experimental investigation of concentrated slop combustion characteristics in cyclone furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panpokha, Suphaopich; Wongwuttanasatian, Tanakorn; Tangchaichit, Kiatfa

    2018-02-01

    Slop is a by-product in alcoholic industries requiring costly waste management. An idea of using slop as a fuel in a boiler for the industries was proposed. Due to high content of ash, a cyclone furnace was designed to combust the slop. This study aims to examine the concentrated slop combustion in a designed cyclone furnace, consisting of combustion temperature and exhaust gases. The tests were carried out under 4 different air-fuel ratios. Fuels injected into the furnace were 3 g/s of concentrated slop and 1 g/s of diesel. The air-fuel ratios were corresponding to 100, 120, 140 and 160 percent theoretical air. The results demonstrated that combustion of concentrated slop can gave temperature of 800-1000°C and a suitable theoretical air was 100%-120%, because the combustion temperature was higher than that of other cases. In cyclone combustion, excess air is not recommended because it affects a reduction in overall temperature inside the cyclone furnace. It is expected that utilization of the concentrated slop (by-product) will be beneficial in the development of green and zero waste factory.

  11. Controlling the excess heat from oxy-combustion of coal by blending with biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Turan, A.Z.; Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Two different biomass species such as sunflower seed shell and hazelnut shell were blended with Soma-Denis lignite to determine the effects of co-combustion on the thermal reactivity and the burnout of the lignite sample. For this purpose, Thermogravimetric Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry techniques were applied from ambient to 900 C with a heating rate of 40 C/min under dry air and pure oxygen conditions. It was found that the thermal reactivities of the biomass materials and the lignite are highly different from each other under each oxidizing medium. On the other hand, the presence of biomass in the burning medium led to important influences not only on the burnout levels but also on the heat flows. The heat flow from the burning of lignite increased fivefold when the oxidizing medium was altered from dry air to pure oxygen. But, in case of co-combustion under oxygen, the excess heat arising from combustion of lignite could be reduced and this may be helpful to control the temperature of the combustion chamber. Based on this, co-combustion of coal/biomass blends under oxygen may be suggested as an alternative method to the ''Carbon Dioxide Recycle Method'' encountered in the oxyfuel combustion systems. (author)

  12. Use of artificial intelligence techniques for optimisation of co-combustion of coal with biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.K.; Wilcox, S.J.; Ward, J. [University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd (United Kingdom). Division of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-03-15

    The optimisation of burner operation in conventional pulverised-coal-fired boilers for co-combustion applications represents a significant challenge This paper describes a strategic framework in which Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques can be applied to solve such an optimisation problem. The effectiveness of the proposed system is demonstrated by a case study that simulates the co-combustion of coal with sewage sludge in a 500-kW pilot-scale combustion rig equipped with a swirl stabilised low-NOx burner. A series of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed to generate data for different operating conditions, which were then used to train several Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) to predict the co-combustion performance. Once trained, the ANNs were able to make estimations of unseen situations in a fraction of the time taken by the CFD simulation. Consequently, the networks were capable of representing the underlying physics of the CFD models and could be executed efficiently for a large number of iterations as required by optimisation techniques based on Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs). Four operating parameters of the burner, namely the swirl angles and flow rates of the secondary and tertiary combustion air were optimised with the objective of minimising the NOx and CO emissions as well as the unburned carbon at the furnace exit. The results suggest that ANNs combined with EAs provide a useful tool for optimising co-combustion processes.

  13. Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L.; DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J.; Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M.

    1992-10-01

    A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m 3 internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h -1 was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO 2 , and NO x . Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion

  14. Rapid and simple detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus: Evaluation of a cartridge-based molecular detection system for use in basic laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goller, K V; Dill, V; Madi, M; Martin, P; Van der Stede, Y; Vandenberge, V; Haas, B; Van Borm, S; Koenen, F; Kasanga, C J; Ndusilo, N; Beer, M; Liu, L; Mioulet, V; Armson, B; King, D P; Fowler, V L

    2018-04-01

    Highly contagious transboundary animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) are major threats to the productivity of farm animals. To limit the impact of outbreaks and to take efficient steps towards a timely control and eradication of the disease, rapid and reliable diagnostic systems are of utmost importance. Confirmatory diagnostic assays are typically performed by experienced operators in specialized laboratories, and access to this capability is often limited in the developing countries with the highest disease burden. Advances in molecular technologies allow implementation of modern and reliable techniques for quick and simple pathogen detection either in basic laboratories or even at the pen-side. Here, we report on a study to evaluate a fully automated cartridge-based real-time RT-PCR diagnostic system (Enigma MiniLab ® ) for the detection of FMD virus (FMDV). The modular system integrates both nucleic acid extraction and downstream real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR). The analytical sensitivity of this assay was determined using serially diluted culture grown FMDV, and the performance of the assay was evaluated using a selected range of FMDV positive and negative clinical samples of bovine, porcine and ovine origin. The robustness of the assay was evaluated in an international inter-laboratory proficiency test and by deployment into an African laboratory. It was demonstrated that the system is easy to use and can detect FMDV with high sensitivity and specificity, roughly on par with standard laboratory methods. This cartridge-based automated real-time RT-PCR system for the detection of FMDV represents a reliable and easy to use diagnostic tool for the early and rapid disease detection of acutely infected animals even in remote areas. This type of system could be easily deployed for routine surveillance within endemic regions such as Africa or could alternatively be used in the developed world. © 2017 The Authors. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases

  15. Gasdynamic Model of Turbulent Combustion in TNT Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2010-01-08

    A model is proposed to simulate turbulent combustion in confined TNT explosions. It is based on: (i) the multi-component gasdynamic conservation laws, (ii) a fast-chemistry model for TNT-air combustion, (iii) a thermodynamic model for frozen reactants and equilibrium products, (iv) a high-order Godunov scheme providing a non-diffusive solution of the governing equations, and (v) an ILES approach whereby adaptive mesh refinement is used to capture the energy bearing scales of the turbulence on the grid. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of explosion fields from 1.5-g PETN/TNT charges were performed. Explosions in six different chambers were studied: three calorimeters (volumes of 6.6-l, 21.2-l and 40.5-l with L/D = 1), and three tunnels (L/D = 3.8, 4.65 and 12.5 with volumes of 6.3-l) - to investigate the influence of chamber volume and geometry on the combustion process. Predicted pressures histories were quite similar to measured pressure histories for all cases studied. Experimentally, mass fraction of products, Y{sub p}{sup exp}, reached a peak value of 88% at an excess air ratio of twice stoichiometric, and then decayed with increasing air dilution; mass fractions Y{sub p}{sup calc} computed from the numerical simulations followed similar trends. Based on this agreement, we conclude that the dominant effect that controls the rate of TNT combustion with air is the turbulent mixing rate; the ILES approach along with the fast-chemistry model used here adequately captures this effect.

  16. Pressurized waterproof case electronic device

    KAUST Repository

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2013-01-31

    A pressurized waterproof case for an electronic device is particularly adapted for fluid-tight containment and operation of a touch-screen electronic device or the like therein at some appreciable water depth. In one example, the case may be formed as an enclosure having an open top panel or face covered by a flexible, transparent membrane or the like for the operation of the touchscreen device within the case. A pressurizing system is provided for the case to pressurize the case and the electronic device therein to slightly greater than ambient in order to prevent the external water pressure from bearing against the transparent membrane and pressing it against the touch screen, thereby precluding operation of the touch screen device within the case. The pressurizing system may include a small gas cartridge or may be provided from an external source.

  17. Gradual combustion - method for nitrogen oxide suppression during brown coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.P.; Verzakov, V.N.; Lobov, T.V.

    1990-10-01

    Discusses combustion of brown coal in BKZ-500-140-1 boilers and factors that influence emission of nitrogen oxides. Temperature distribution in the furnace was evaluated. Effects of burner position, burner number and burner type as well as air excess ratio on chemical reactions during brown coal combustion, formation of nitrogen oxides and their emission were comparatively evaluated. Analyses showed that by optimum arrangement of burners and selecting the optimum air excess ratio a part of nitrogen oxides formed during the initial phase of combustion was reduced to molecular nitrogen in the second phase. On the basis of evaluations the following recommendations for furnace design are made: use of straight-flow burners characterized by a reduced mixing ratio with secondary air, parallel arrangement of burners which guarantees mixing of the combustion products from the burners with stable and unstable combustion (products of incomplete coal combustion), reducing the air excess ratio to below 1.0. 5 refs.

  18. Taylor dispersion in premixed combustion: Questions from turbulent combustion answered for laminar flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Joel; Pearce, Philip; Al-Malki, Faisal

    2018-02-01

    We present a study of Taylor dispersion in premixed combustion and use it to clarify fundamental issues related to flame propagation in a flow field. In particular, simple analytical formulas are derived for variable density laminar flames with arbitrary Lewis number Le providing clear answers to important questions arising in turbulent combustion, when these questions are posed for the case of one-scale laminar parallel flows. Exploiting, in the context of a laminar Poiseuille flow model, a thick flame distinguished asymptotic limit for which the flow amplitude is large with the Reynolds number Re fixed, three main contributions are made. First, a link is established between Taylor dispersion [G. Taylor, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 219, 186 (1953), 10.1098/rspa.1953.0139] and Damköhler's second hypothesis [G. Damköhler, Ber. Bunsen. Phys. Chem. 46, 601 (1940)] by describing analytically the enhancement of the effective propagation speed UT due to small flow scales. More precisely, it is shown that Damköhler's hypothesis is only partially correct for one-scale parallel laminar flows. Specifically, while the increase in UT due to the flow is shown to be directly associated with the increase in the effective diffusivity as suggested by Damköhler, our results imply that UT˜Re (for Re≫1 ) rather than UT˜√{Re} , as implied by Damköhler's hypothesis. Second, it is demonstrated analytically and confirmed numerically that, when UT is plotted versus the flow amplitude for fixed values of Re, the curve levels off to a constant value depending on Re. We may refer to this effect as the laminar bending effect as it mimics a similar bending effect known in turbulent combustion. Third, somewhat surprising implications associated with the dependence of UT and of the effective Lewis number Leeff on the flow are reported. For example, Leeff is found to vary from Le to Le-1 as Re varies from small to large values. Also, UT is found to be a monotonically increasing function

  19. Effects of boron addition on the formation of MoSi2 by combustion synthesis mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Peizhong; Wu Jie; Islam, S.H.; Liu Weisheng; Niu Jinan; Wang Xiaohong; Qiang Yinghuai

    2010-01-01

    The combustion synthesis behavior of Mo-Si-B powder was investigated. Test specimens with nominal compositions including MoSi 2 , Mo(Si 0.975 B 0.025 ) 2 , Mo(Si 0.95 B 0.05 ) 2 , Mo(Si 0.925 B 0.075 ) 2 and Mo(Si 0.9 B 0.1 ) 2 were employed. The combustion mode, propagation velocity of combustion wave, combustion temperature and combustion product structure were studied. The results showed that the combustion wave propagated along a spiral trajectory till reaching the bottom of the compacts. The combustion temperature was increased by the addition of boron, to as high as 1922 K in the case of the Mo(Si 0.95 B 0.05 ) 2 sample. However, the flame-front propagation velocity decreased as a result of the addition of boron. The X-ray diffraction results showed that the combustion products of the Mo(Si 0.975 B 0.025 ) 2 and Mo(Si 0.9 B 0.1 ) 2 samples were composed of MoSi 2 with minor MoB. Those of the Mo(Si 0.95 B 0.05 ) 2 and Mo(Si 0.925 B 0.075 ) 2 samples were composed of MoSi 2 with minor MoB and MoB 2 . And traces of Mo 2 B 5 were identified in the Mo(Si 0.95 B 0.05 ) 2 sample.

  20. Key factors of combustion from kinetics to gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, Nikolai M

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the main advances in the mechanisms of combustion processes. It focuses on the analysis of kinetic mechanisms of gas combustion processes and experimental investigation into the interrelation of kinetics and gas dynamics in gas combustion. The book is complimentary to the one previously published, The Modes of Gaseous Combustion.

  1. Comparison of different chemical kinetic mechanisms of methane combustion in an internal combustion engine configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Ennetta Ridha; Hamdi Mohamed; Said Rachid

    2008-01-01

    Three chemical kinetic mechanisms of methane combustion were tested and compared using the internal combustion engine model of Chemkin 4.02 [1]: one-step global reaction mechanism, four-step mechanism, and the standard detailed scheme GRIMECH 3.0. This study shows good concordances, especially between the four-step and the detailed mechanisms in the prediction of temperature and main species profiles. But reduced schemes were incapables to predict pollutant emissions in an internal combustion...

  2. Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2006-01-11

    This final project report presents the activities and accomplishments of the ''Coal Combustion Products Extension Program'' conducted at The Ohio State University from August 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to advance the beneficial uses of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highway and construction, mine reclamation, agricultural, and manufacturing sectors. The objective of this technology transfer/research program at The Ohio State University was to promote the increased use of Ohio CCPs (fly ash, FGD material, bottom ash, and boiler slag) in applications that are technically sound, environmentally benign, and commercially competitive. The project objective was accomplished by housing the CCP Extension Program within The Ohio State University College of Engineering with support from the university Extension Service and The Ohio State University Research Foundation. Dr. Tarunjit S. Butalia, an internationally reputed CCP expert and registered professional engineer, was the program coordinator. The program coordinator acted as liaison among CCP stakeholders in the state, produced information sheets, provided expertise in the field to those who desired it, sponsored and co-sponsored seminars, meetings, and speaking at these events, and generally worked to promote knowledge about the productive and proper application of CCPs as useful raw materials. The major accomplishments of the program were: (1) Increase in FGD material utilization rate from 8% in 1997 to more than 20% in 2005, and an increase in overall CCP utilization rate of 21% in 1997 to just under 30% in 2005 for the State of Ohio. (2) Recognition as a ''voice of trust'' among Ohio and national CCP stakeholders (particularly regulatory agencies). (3) Establishment of a national and international reputation, especially for the use of FGD materials and fly ash in construction applications. It is recommended that to increase Ohio's CCP utilization rate from 30% in 2005 to

  3. Aerodynamic properties of turbulent combustion fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, C. C.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    Flow fields involving turbulent flames in premixed gases under a variety of conditions are modeled by the use of a numerical technique based on the random vortex method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations and a flame propagation algorithm to trace the motion of the front and implement the Huygens principle, both due to Chorin. A successive over-relaxation hybrid method is applied to solve the Euler equation for flows in an arbitrarily shaped domain. The method of images, conformal transformation, and the integral-equation technique are also used to treat flows in special cases, according to their particular requirements. Salient features of turbulent flame propagation in premixed gases are interpreted by relating them to the aerodynamic properties of the flow field. Included among them is the well-known cellular structure of flames stabilized by bluff bodies, as well as the formation of the characteristic tulip shape of flames propagating in ducts. In its rudimentary form, the mechanism of propagation of a turbulent flame is shown to consist of: (1) rotary motion of eddies at the flame front, (2) self-advancement of the front at an appropriate normal burning speed, and (3) dynamic effects of expansion due to exothermicity of the combustion reaction. An idealized model is used to illustrate these fundamental mechanisms and to investigate basic aerodynamic features of flames in premixed gases. The case of a confined flame stabilized behind a rearward-facing step is given particular care and attention. Solutions are shown to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental results, especially with respect to global properties such as the average velocity profiles and reattachment length.

  4. Oxygenated palm biodiesel: Ignition, combustion and emissions quantification in a light-duty diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Cheng Tung; Ng, Jo-Han; Ahmad, Solehin; Rajoo, Srithar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Diesel engine test using palm biodiesel and diesel at varying speed and load. • Palm biodiesel shows better performance at late stage of cycle evolution. • Oxygen in palm biodiesel fuel improves local combustion at late stage of combustion. • Emissions of NO are lower at low and medium operating speed for palm biodiesel. • Formulation of trend guide for performance and emissions characteristics for light-duty diesel engines. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation of oxygenated neat palm biodiesel in a direct injection single cylinder diesel engine in terms of ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics. Conventional non-oxygenated diesel fuel is compared as baseline. The engine testing is performed between the operating speed of 2000–3000 rpm and load of up to 3 bar of brake mean effective pressure. From it, a total of 50 experiment cases are tested to form a comprehensive operational speed-load contour map for ignition and combustion; while various engine-out emissions such as NO, CO, UHCs and CO 2 are compared based on fuel type-speed combinations. The ignition and combustion evolution contour maps quantify the absolute ignition delay period and elucidate the difference between that of palm biodiesel and fossil diesel. Although diesel has shorter ignition delay period by up to 0.6 CAD at 3000 rpm and burns more rapidly at the start of combustion, combustion of palm biodiesel accelerates during the mid-combustion phase and overtakes diesel in the cumulative heat release rates (HRR) prior to the 90% cumulative HRR. This can be attributed to the oxygen contained in palm biodiesel assisting in localized regions of combustion. In terms of performance, the oxygenated nature of palm biodiesel provided mixed performances with improved thermal efficiency and increased brake specific fuel consumption, due to the improved combustion and lower calorific values, respectively. Emission measurements show that NO for palm biodiesel is

  5. A study of the current group evaporation/combustion theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion can be greatly enhanced by disintegrating the liquid fuel into droplets, an effect achieved by various configurations. A number of experiments carried out in the seventies showed that combustion of droplet arrays and sprays do not form individual flames. Moreover, the rate of burning in spray combustion greatly deviates from that of the single combustion rate. Such observations naturally challenge its applicability to spray combustion. A number of mathematical models were developed to evaluate 'group combustion' and the related 'group evaporation' phenomena. This study investigates the similarity and difference of these models and their applicability to spray combustion. Future work that should be carried out in this area is indicated.

  6. Distillation of combustibles at temperatures below fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalin, D

    1946-09-26

    A process is described for combustion and distillation for dry fuels, such as bituminous shales, below the temperature of fusion of the ash, for the production of heat, in which the temperature in the charge of fuel forming a vertical column is maintained beneath the temperature of fusion of the ash by a withdrawal of the heat from the combustible charge by means of a fluid absorbing this heat. This fluid being constituted, for example, by water in a suitable form, so that it can be circulated through a convenient cooling system, extending through the different parts of the charge. The fluid circulating also through the desired parts of the charge and absorbing the heat, the quantity of fluid or the surface of absorption increasing with the intensity of the combustion in the part of the combustible charge traversed by the fluid.

  7. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2001-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  8. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2000-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  9. CloudFlame: Cyberinfrastructure for combustion research

    KAUST Repository

    Goteng, Gokop; Nettyam, Naveena; Sarathy, Mani

    2013-01-01

    Combustion experiments and chemical kinetics simulations generate huge data that is computationally and data intensive. A cloud-based cyber infrastructure known as Cloud Flame is implemented to improve the computational efficiency, scalability

  10. Flex-flame burner and combustion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soupos, Vasilios; Zelepouga, Serguei; Rue, David M.; Abbasi, Hamid A.

    2010-08-24

    A combustion method and apparatus which produce a hybrid flame for heating metals and metal alloys, which hybrid flame has the characteristic of having an oxidant-lean portion proximate the metal or metal alloy and having an oxidant-rich portion disposed above the oxidant lean portion. This hybrid flame is produced by introducing fuel and primary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber containing the metal or metal alloy in a substoichiometric ratio to produce a fuel-rich flame and by introducing a secondary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber above the fuel-rich flame in a manner whereby mixing of the secondary combustion oxidant with the fuel-rich flame is delayed for a portion of the length of the flame.

  11. System and method for engine combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sczomak, David P.; Gallon, Robert J.; Solomon, Arun S.

    2018-03-13

    A combustion system for use with one or more cylinder bores of an internal combustion engine includes at least one cylinder head defining first and second intake ports in fluid communication with the one or more cylinder bores. A flap is adjustably connected to the at least one cylinder head. The flap includes a first flap portion cooperating with the first intake port extending from an arm and a second flap portion cooperating with the second intake port extending from the arm and disposed adjacent the first flap portion. A controller in electrical communication with an actuator monitors the condition of the engine and actuates the flap to position the first and second flap portions between first and second positions to create a first combustion condition and a second combustion condition.

  12. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  13. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO2, NOx, NMVOC, CH4, CO, CO2, N2O, NH3, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins, HCB and PAH. The CO2 emission in 2008...... incineration plants. The combustion of wood in residential plants has increased considerably in recent years resulting in increased emission of PAH, particulate matter and CO. The emission of NMVOC has increased since 1990 as a result of both the increased combustion of wood in residential plants...... and the increased emission from lean-burn gas engines. The dioxin emission decreased since 1990 due to flue gas cleaning on waste incineration plants. However in recent years the emission has increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential plants....

  14. Danish emission inventories for stationary combustion plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt

    Emission inventories for stationary combustion plants are presented and the methodologies and assumptions used for the inventories are described. The pollutants considered are SO2, NOx, NMVOC, CH4, CO, CO2, N2O, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins, HCB and PAH. The CO2 emission in 2007 was 10...... incineration plants. The combustion of wood in residential plants has increased considerably in recent years resulting in increased emission of PAH, particulate matter and CO. The emission of NMVOC has increased since 1990 as a result of both the increased combustion of wood in residential plants...... and the increased emission from lean-burn gas engines. The dioxin emission decreased since 1990 due to flue gas cleaning on waste incineration plants. However in recent years the emission has increased as a result of the increased combustion of wood in residential plants....

  15. Two phase exhaust for internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuk, Carl T [Denver, IA

    2011-11-29

    An internal combustion engine having a reciprocating multi cylinder internal combustion engine with multiple valves. At least a pair of exhaust valves are provided and each supply a separate power extraction device. The first exhaust valves connect to a power turbine used to provide additional power to the engine either mechanically or electrically. The flow path from these exhaust valves is smaller in area and volume than a second flow path which is used to deliver products of combustion to a turbocharger turbine. The timing of the exhaust valve events is controlled to produce a higher grade of energy to the power turbine and enhance the ability to extract power from the combustion process.

  16. DIAGNOSIS OF FAILURE OF COMBUSTION IN THE COMBUSTION CHAMBER WITH A THERMOVISION EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Vorobiev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of thermovision technology to diagnose failure of the combustion flame test tube of the main combustion chamber gas turbine engine is deal with in the article. Join the thermal radiation of the jet of combustion products and the internal elements was carried out using short-wave thermovision system AGA-782 with spectral spectral filters in several ranges from 3.2 to 5.6 microns. Thermovision is mounted on the axis of the flame tube. The output signal was recorded and processed on a computer in real time, allowing monitor the combustion process and the thermal state of the object during the experiment.

  17. Thermal and dynamic loads on the EPR containment due to hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyink, J.; Movahed, M.; Petzold, K.G.; Kotchourko, A.; Royl, P.; Travis, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    A major aspect of the EPR safety concept is to cope with severe accidents including core melt and to maintain the integrity of the containment even for those hypothetical events. One potential threat for the containment is related to the combustion of hydrogen, which may be produced in a large amount during core degradation. The European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) hydrogen mitigation concept consists of about 44 recombiners, located mainly in the equipment rooms (only 4 recombiners are located in the dome area). This paper is devoted to two important potential threats on the containment related to hydrogen removal: - Thermal loads resulting from recombiner action and/or combustion are of importance also with respect to the integrity of the local composite liner foreseen at some crucial locations of the containment; - Dynamic loads resulting from fast deflagration may impair containment wall or internal walls even if the AICC (adiabatic isochoric complete combustion) pressure is below the design pressure. Two types of combustion calculations have been performed: a) In cases, where fast deflagration cannot be excluded, combustion has been calculated with COM3D, a special CFD code developed to calculate dynamic pressure loads on walls, and b) 'Standing flame' combustion as well as recombination processes have been calculated with GASFLOW for bounding scenarios in order to evaluate maximum containment wall surface temperatures for cases of long-lasting combustion, mainly with emphasis on the application of a partial liner. Because of the depressurization of the reactor coolant system directly into the containment atmosphere via a relief tank and rupture discs a high concentration of steam is available for nearly all scenarios. For these scenarios no threat to internal walls is expected based on the combustion loads identified by the analyses presented here. In case of fast secondary cool-down a large amount of energy is removed to the secondary side of the SG and

  18. Comparison of thermal and radical effects of EGR gases on combustion process in dual fuel engines at part loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirouzpanah, V.; Khoshbakhti Saray, R.; Sohrabi, A.; Niaei, A.

    2007-01-01

    Dual fuel engines at part load inevitably suffer from lower thermal efficiency and higher emission of carbon monoxide and unburned fuel. This work is conducted to investigate the combustion characteristics of a dual fuel (Diesel-gas) engine at part loads using a single zone combustion model with detailed chemical kinetics for combustion of natural gas fuel. In this home made software, the presence of the pilot fuel is considered as a heat source that is deriving form two superposed Wiebe's combustion functions to account for its contribution to ignition of the gaseous fuel and the rest of the total released energy. The chemical kinetics mechanism consists of 112 reactions with 34 species. This combustion model is able to establish the development of the combustion process with time and the associated important operating parameters, such as pressure, temperature, heat release rate (HRR) and species concentration. Therefore, this work is an attempt to investigate the combustion phenomenon at part load and using exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to improve the above mentioned problems. Also, the results of this work show that each of the different cases of EGR (thermal, chemical and radical cases) has an important role on the combustion process in dual fuel engines at part loads. It is found that all the different cases of EGR have positive effects on the performance and emission parameters of dual fuel engines at part loads despite the negative effect of some diluent gases in the chemical case, which moderates too much the positive effects of the thermal and radical cases of EGR. Predicted values show good agreement with corresponding experimental values over the whole range of engine operating conditions. Implications will be discussed in detail

  19. Internal combustion engine and method for control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Daniel G

    2013-05-21

    In one exemplary embodiment of the invention an internal combustion engine includes a piston disposed in a cylinder, a valve configured to control flow of air into the cylinder and an actuator coupled to the valve to control a position of the valve. The internal combustion engine also includes a controller coupled to the actuator, wherein the controller is configured to close the valve when an uncontrolled condition for the internal engine is determined.

  20. Building America Expert Meeting. Combustion Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, Larry [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR), Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This is an overview of "The Best Approach to Combustion Safety in a Direct Vent World," held June 28, 2012, in San Antonio, TX. The objective of this Expert Meeting was to identify gaps and barriers that need to be addressed by future research, and to develop data-driven technical recommendations for code updates so that a common approach for combustion safety can be adopted by all members of the building energy efficiency and code communities.