WorldWideScience

Sample records for combined solution chemistry

  1. Solution chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1973-07-01

    Research progress is reported on studies in heavy element chemistry. Topics considered are: synergistic complexes of plutonyl ion; water uptake in synergistic systems; formation constants of some uranyl BETA -diketone complexes; thermodynamic acid dissociation constants of BETA -diketones; thermodynamic formation constants of uranyl BETA -diketonates; thiocyanate complexes of some trivalent lanthanides and actinides; stability constants of actinide complexes using dinonyl naphthalenesulfonic acid extraction; TBP extraction of actinides; stability constants of complexes of Pu(III) with 5- sulfosalicycllc acid; and solvent extraction behavior of Pu( VII). (DHM)

  2. Aqueous Solution Chemistry of Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, David L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Things I have learned working with plutonium: Chemistry of plutonium is complex; Redox equilibria make Pu solution chemistry particularly challenging in the absence of complexing ligands; Understanding this behavior is key to successful Pu chemistry experiments; There is no suitable chemical analog for plutonium.

  3. Combining supramolecular chemistry with biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlenheuer, D.A.; Petkau - Milroy, K.; Brunsveld, L.

    2010-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has primarily found its inspiration in biological molecules, such as proteins and lipids, and their interactions. Currently the supramolecular assembly of designed compounds can be controlled to great extent. This provides the opportunity to combine these synthetic

  4. Molybdenum: the element and aqueous solution chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter on the chemistry of the coordination compounds of molybdenum concentrates on the element itself, its recovery from ores and its use in the manufacture of steels. Most of the chapter is devoted to the aqueous solution chemistry of molybdenum in oxidation states II, III and IV. (UK)

  5. Solution chemistry of lanthanide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brittain, H.G.

    1979-01-01

    Intermolecular energy transfer from Tb 3+ to Eu 3+ , luminescence intensity measurements, potentiometric titrations, differential absorption spectroscopy, and spectroscopic titrations were all used to study the binding of lanthanide ions by serine and threonine. At low pH (3.0 to 6.0) the complexes are mononuclear and ligand is only weakly bound. In the pH interval of 6.0 to 8.5 stronger interaction takes place between the ligand and the metal (with possible coordination of the undissociated hydroxyl group), and self-association of complexes becomes important. Above pH 8.5, base hydrolysis of the complexes leads to highly associated species in solution and shortly above this pH an insoluble precipitate is formed. It was found that energy could be transferred from Tb 3+ to Eu 3+ more efficiently among complexes prepared from racemic ligands than in complexes made from resolved ligand, but this stereoselectivity was only observed at pH values greater than 6.5 and in solutions having a 1:10 ratio of metal-to-ligand. No stereoselectivity was found in solutions having 1:5 ratios, and this observation was explained by the existence of 1:2 metal-ligand complexes existing in solutions having the higher ratio of metal-to-ligand (only 1:1 complexes are then found at lower ratios of metal-to-ligand). (author)

  6. Computing UV/vis spectra using a combined molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry approach: bis-triazin-pyridine (BTP) ligands studied in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfener, Sebastian; Trumm, Michael; Koke, Carsten; Heuser, Johannes; Ekström, Ulf; Skerencak-Frech, Andrej; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Panak, Petra J

    2016-03-21

    We report a combined computational and experimental study to investigate the UV/vis spectra of 2,6-bis(5,6-dialkyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (BTP) ligands in solution. In order to study molecules in solution using theoretical methods, force-field parameters for the ligand-water interaction are adjusted to ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Based on these parameters, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out from which snapshots are extracted as input to quantum chemical excitation-energy calculations to obtain UV/vis spectra of BTP ligands in solution using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) employing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The range-separated CAM-B3LYP functional is used to avoid large errors for charge-transfer states occurring in the electronic spectra. In order to study environment effects with theoretical methods, the frozen-density embedding scheme is applied. This computational procedure allows to obtain electronic spectra calculated at the (range-separated) DFT level of theory in solution, revealing solvatochromic shifts upon solvation of up to about 0.6 eV. Comparison to experimental data shows a significantly improved agreement compared to vacuum calculations and enables the analysis of relevant excitations for the line shape in solution.

  7. Solution chemistry techniques in SYNROC preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.; Lynch, A.W.

    1981-07-01

    Investigations of titanate-based ceramic forms for radioactive waste immobilization are underway at Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Although the waste forms differ as to overall product composition, the waste-containing phases in both ceramic products have similar crystalline structure types. These include metallic phases along with oxides with structure types of the mineral analogues perovskite, zirconolite, and hollandite. Significant differences also exist in the area of processing. More conventional ceramic processing methods are used at LLNL to produce SYNROC while solution chemistry techniques involving metal alkoxide chemistry and ion exchange have been developed at SNLA to prepare calcium titanate-based waste ceramics. The SNLA techniques were recently modified and applied to producing SYNROC (compositions C and D) as part of an interlaboratory information exchange between SNLA and LLNL. This report describes the methods used in preparing SYNROC including the solution interaction, and hot-pressing methods used to obtain fully dense SYNROC monoliths

  8. Organoactinide chemistry: synthesis, structure, and solution dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.G.

    1985-12-01

    This thesis considers three aspects of organoactinide chemistry. In chapter one, a bidentate phosphine ligand was used to kinetically stabilize complexes of the type Cp 2 MX 2 . Ligand redistribution processes are present throughout the synthetic work, as has often been observed in uranium cyclopentadienyl chemistry. The effects of covalent M-L bonding on the solution and solid state properties of U(III) coordination complexes are considered. In particular, the nature of the more subtle interaction between the metal and the neutral ligand are examined. Using relative basicity data obtained in solution, and solid state structural data (and supplemented by gas phase photoelectron measurements), it is demonstrated that the more electron rich U(III) centers engage in significant U → L π-donation. Trivalent uranium is shown to be capable of acting either as a one- or two-electron reducing agent toward a wide variety of unsaturated organic and inorganic molecules, generating molecular classes unobtainable via traditional synthetic approaches, as well as offering an alternative synthetic approach to molecules accessible via metathesis reactions. Ligand redistribution processes are again observed, but given the information concerning ligand lability, this reactivity pattern is applied to the synthesis of pure materials inaccessible from redox chemistry. 214 refs., 33 figs., 10 tabs

  9. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of acetonitrile and propionitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shushtarian, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    The radiation chemistry of water and aqueous solutions is a branch of radiation chemistry dealing with chemical changes in water and aqueous solutions induced by high energy radiations. High energy radiations of interest in radiation chemistry are short-wave electromagnetic radiations (X- and γ-rays) and fast charged particles (α- and β-particles, electrons, deuterons and fission fragments). The energy of the particles and photons bringing about chemical reactions in the field of modern radiation chemistry is much higher than that of photons causing photochemical reactions

  10. Solutions to selected exercise problems in quantum chemistry and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Suggested solutions to a number of problems from the collection "Exercise Problems in Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy", previously published on ResearchGate (DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4024.8162).......Suggested solutions to a number of problems from the collection "Exercise Problems in Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy", previously published on ResearchGate (DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4024.8162)....

  11. Dense interstellar cloud chemistry: Basic issues and possible dynamical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.S.; Heere, K.R.; Tarafdar, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    Standing at crossroad of enthusiasm and frustration, dense intertellar cloud chemistry has a squarely posed fundamental problem: Why do the grains appear to play at best a minor role in the chemistry? Grain surface chemistry creates considerable difficulties when the authors treat dense clouds as static objects and ignore the implications of the processes by which the clouds became dense in the first place. A new generation of models which treat chemical and dynamical evolutions concurrently are therefore presented as possible solution to the current frustrations. The proposed modeling philosophy and agenda could make the next decade quite exciting for interstellar chemistry

  12. Radiation chemistry of amino acids and peptides in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, M.G.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation chemistry relevant to radiation preservation of high protein foods is reviewed. Some conclusions concerning the chemistry of irradiated amino acids, peptides, and proteins have been derived from product analysis of γ-irradiated solutions while the main mechanistic considerations result from the chemistry and kinetics of free radical intermediates observed by pulse radiolysis. The precursors of chemistry in not too concentrated solutions ( - , OH, and H. Their reactivity with molecules and their preference for characteristic groups within the molecule are discussed. The reviewed reactions of the model systems are accountable for a variety of radiolytic products found in irradiated foods. From detailed understanding of radiation chemistry in aqueous and frozen systems formation of many classes of compounds can be predicted or entirely eliminated in order to corroborate and extend the conclusions reached from the animal feeding experiments concerning the formation of toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic compounds and/or reduction of the nutritional value of foods

  13. Solution Calorimetry Experiments for Physical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizen, Deborah A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents two experiments: the first one measures the heat of an exothermic reaction by the reduction of permanganate by the ferris ion; the second one measures the heat of an endothermic process, the mixing of ethanol and cyclohexane. Lists tables to aid in the use of the solution calorimeter. (MVL)

  14. Complex chemistry of Np(V) in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yasushi

    1989-01-01

    Despite the importance of Np(V) in both the nuclear chemical engineering and the actinoid chemistry, little work has been performed on the complex chemistry of Np(V) in aqueous solutions, since Np(V) reacts less readily with various ligands. The author has directed his effort to understand the chemical behavior of Np(V) in aqueous solutions, especially the determination of the stability constants of Np(V) complexes with various ligands. A part of the results obtained so far is presented in the following order. (1) The synergistic extraction of Np(V) as a method for studying the complex chemistry of Np(V): TTA-MTOA(methyltrioctylammonium chloride), TTA-phen and TTA-TOPO. (2) The determination of the stability constants of Np(V) complexes with 22 organic- and 5 inorganic ligands by means of the solvent extraction. (3) The distribution of the chemical species of Np(V) in solutions under various conditions

  15. Solution chemistry and separation of metal ions in leached solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, J.

    1991-01-01

    The method to presume a dissolved state of metal ions in an aqueous solution and the technology to separate and concentrate metal ions in a leached solution are described in this paper. It is very important for the separation of metal ions to know the dissolved state of metal ions. If we know the composition of an aqueous solution and the stability constants of metal-ligand complexes, we can calculate and estimate the concentration of each species in the solution. Then, we can decide the policy to separate and concentrate metal ions. There are several methods for separation and purification; hydroxide precipitation method, sulfide precipitation method, solvent extraction method and ion exchange resin method. Solvent extraction has been used in purification processes of copper refinery, uranium refinery, platinum metal refinery and rare earth metal refinery. Fundamental process of solvent extraction, a kind of commercial extractants, a way of determining a suitable extractant and an equipment are discussed. Finally, it will be emphasized how the separation of rare earths is improved in solvent extraction. (author) 21 figs., 8 tabs., 8 refs

  16. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of hydrazine at elevated temperatures: Pt. 2. Solutions containing oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, G.V.; Stuart, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    Here, we investigate the effects of oxygen on the radiation chemistry of hydrazine at elevated temperatures. The chemistry of this system is important to reactor coolant chemistry, particularly under start-up conditions when hydrazine is added to suppress corrosion which would otherwise be caused by the ingress of oxygen. The radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of hydrazine has been investigated previously in the presence of oxygen by Ershov et al., but only at room temperature. In those experiments, both steady-state γ-radiolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to deduce the mechanism of decomposition of hydrazine in the presence of oxygen. (author)

  17. The aluminum chemistry and corrosion in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinsuo; Klasky, Marc; Letellier, Bruce C.

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum-alkaline solution systems are very common in engineering applications including nuclear engineering. Consequently, a thorough knowledge of the chemistry of aluminum and susceptibility to corrosion in alkaline solutions is reviewed. The aluminum corrosion mechanism and corrosion rate are examined based on current experimental data. A review of the phase transitions with aging time and change of environment is also performed. Particular attention is given to effect of organic and inorganic ions. As an example, the effect of boron is examined in detail because of the application in nuclear reactor power systems. Methods on how to reduce the corrosion rate of aluminum in alkaline solutions are also highlighted

  18. Towards combined global monthly gravity field solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggi, Adrian; Meyer, Ulrich; Beutler, Gerhard; Weigelt, Matthias; van Dam, Tonie; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Flury, Jakob; Flechtner, Frank; Dahle, Christoph; Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Bruinsma, Sean

    2014-05-01

    Currently, official GRACE Science Data System (SDS) monthly gravity field solutions are generated independently by the Centre for Space Research (CSR) and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ). Additional GRACE SDS monthly fields are provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for validation and outside the SDS by a number of other institutions worldwide. Although the adopted background models and processing standards have been harmonized more and more by the various processing centers during the past years, notable differences still exist and the users are more or less left alone with a decision which model to choose for their individual applications. This procedure seriously limits the accessibility of these valuable data. Combinations are well established in the area of other space geodetic techniques, such as the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Regularly comparing and combining space-geodetic products has tremendously increased the usefulness of the products in a wide range of disciplines and scientific applications. Therefore, we propose in a first step to mutually compare the large variety of available monthly GRACE gravity field solutions, e.g., by assessing the signal content over selected regions, by estimating the noise over the oceans, and by performing significance tests. We make the attempt to assign different solution characteristics to different processing strategies in order to identify subsets of solutions, which are based on similar processing strategies. Using these subsets we will in a second step explore ways to generate combined solutions, e.g., based on a weighted average of the individual solutions using empirical weights derived from pair-wise comparisons. We will also assess the quality of such a combined solution and discuss the potential benefits for the GRACE and GRACE-FO user community, but also address minimum processing

  19. Molecular Twister: A Game for Exploring Solution Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Masonjones, Sawyer R.; Masonjones, Heather D.; Malone, Megan C.; Williams, Ann H.; Beemer, Margaret M.; Waggett, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    pH is an essential biological concept with critical importance at various scales, from the molecular level, dealing with blood buffers, homeostasis, and proton gradients, all the way up to the ecosystem level, with soil chemistry and acid rain. However, pH is also a concept that spawns student misconceptions and misunderstanding in terms of what is happening in a solution on the atomic level. The Molecular Twister game, created for a Florida Department of Education funded professional develop...

  20. Physical chemistry of the interface between oxide and aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolivet, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The behavior and properties of small oxide particles in aqueous suspension are dominated by the physico-chemistry of their surface. It is electrostatically charged and strongly solvated. The origin of the surface charge is discussed through the MUSIC model [Hiemstra 1996], allowing to estimate the acid-base behavior of surface oxygen atoms. The stability of aqueous dispersions of particles is analysed following the DLVO model, with a special attention on the hydration layers allowing the peptization of flocs. Different adsorption mechanisms of metal cations are presented in terms of coordination chemistry (outer- and inner-sphere complexes) emphasizing the coordinating ability of the surface towards metal complexes in solution. The anion adsorption is also studied in relation with some interesting consequences on spinel iron oxide nano-particles. (author)

  1. The radiation chemistry of aqueous sodium terephthalate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.W.

    1980-04-01

    The radiation chemistry of cobalt-60 gamma-irradiated aqueous sodium terephthalate solutions has been studied. In aerated 4 x 10 -4 M sodium hydroxide solutions, the main products are hydroxyterephthalate (HTA) (G = 0.99 +- 0.01), carbonate (G = 1.31 +- 0.08), and peroxides (G = 2.84 +- 0.04). The HTA and carbonate species are both formed as a result of hydroxyl radical attack and account for approximately 90 per cent of hydroxyl radical reactions. Oxygen needs to be present for efficient conversion of the terephthalate-OH radical adduct to HTA and oxygenation increases G(HTA) above the aerated solution value. G(HTA) is unaffected by changes in terephthalate concentration between 1 x 10 -4 M and 1 x 10 -2 M in sodium hydroxide solutions at pH 10. Decreasing the solution pH does however affect G(HTA). In phosphate buffered solutions pH 6.85, G(HTA) is 0.93 +- 0.01 and lower values are obtained with further decrease in solution pH. The lowering of the G(HTA) value is attributed to recombination reactions between the terephthalate-OH radical products and reducing radical products. Experimental evidence supporting the recombination postulate was obtained from the measurement of a parallel decrease in the peroxide yield and the observation of a dose rate effect on G(HTA). Competition kinetic studies with the added solutes carbonate and bicarbonate gave the rate ratios k (OH + TA 2- ) : k(OH + CO 3 2- ) : k(OH + HCO 3 - ) = 1 : 0.105 : 0.0036

  2. Molecular Twister: A Game for Exploring Solution Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer R. Masonjones

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available pH is an essential biological concept with critical importance at various scales, from the molecular level, dealing with blood buffers, homeostasis, and proton gradients, all the way up to the ecosystem level, with soil chemistry and acid rain. However, pH is also a concept that spawns student misconceptions and misunderstanding in terms of what is happening in a solution on the atomic level. The Molecular Twister game, created for a Florida Department of Education funded professional development workshop for Florida high school teachers hosted at the University of Tampa  (Science Math Masters, seeks to model pH in such a way that students can visually and kinesthetically learn the concept in a few minutes. In addition, the basic design of the game pieces allow for teaching extensions to include more complex acid-base reactions. Challenge questions are provided to allow teachers to bring relevancy to the game, using examples of acid-base chemistry pulled from cases in human health and the environment.

  3. Transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in saturated porous media under various solution chemistry conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yu; Gao Bin; Morales, Verónica L.; Tian Yuan; Wu Lei; Gao Jie; Bai Wei; Yang Liuyan

    2012-01-01

    Because of its wide applications, nanosized titanium dioxide may become a potential environmental risk to soil and groundwater system. It is therefore important to improve current understanding of the environmental fate and transport of titanium oxides nanoparticles (TONPs). In this work, the effect of solution chemistry (i.e., pH, ionic strength, and natural organic matter (NOM) concentration) on the deposition and transport of TONPs in saturated porous media was examined in detail. Laboratory columns packed with acid-cleaned quartz sand were used in the experiment as porous media. Transport experiments were conducted with various chemistry combinations, including four ionic strengths, three pH levels, and two NOM concentrations. The results showed that TONP mobility increased with increasing solution pH, but decreased with increasing solution ionic strength. It is also found that the presence of NOM in the system enhanced the mobility of TONPs in the saturated porous media. The Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) theory was used to justify the mobility trends observed in the experimental data. Predictions from the theory agreed excellently with the experimental data.

  4. Stepwise effects of the BCR sequential chemical extraction procedure on dissolution and metal release from common ferromagnesian clay minerals: A combined solution chemistry and X-ray powder diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, P.C. [Geology Department, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States)], E-mail: pryan@middlebury.edu; Hillier, S. [Macaulay Institute, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH UK (United Kingdom); Wall, A.J. [Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Sequential extraction procedures (SEPs) are commonly used to determine speciation of trace metals in soils and sediments. However, the non-selectivity of reagents for targeted phases has remained a lingering concern. Furthermore, potentially reactive phases such as phyllosilicate clay minerals often contain trace metals in structural sites, and their reactivity has not been quantified. Accordingly, the objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of trace metal-bearing clay minerals exposed to the revised BCR 3-step plus aqua regia SEP. Mineral quantification based on stoichiometric analysis and quantitative powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) documents progressive dissolution of chlorite (CCa-2 ripidolite) and two varieties of smectite (SapCa-2 saponite and SWa-1 nontronite) during steps 1-3 of the BCR procedure. In total, 8 ({+-} 1) % of ripidolite, 19 ({+-} 1) % of saponite, and 19 ({+-} 3) % of nontronite (% mineral mass) dissolved during extractions assumed by many researchers to release trace metals from exchange sites, carbonates, hydroxides, sulfides and organic matter. For all three reference clays, release of Ni into solution is correlated with clay dissolution. Hydrolysis of relatively weak Mg-O bonds (362 kJ/mol) during all stages, reduction of Fe(III) during hydroxylamine hydrochloride extraction and oxidation of Fe(II) during hydrogen peroxide extraction are the main reasons for clay mineral dissolution. These findings underscore the need for precise mineral quantification when using SEPs to understand the origin/partitioning of trace metals with solid phases.

  5. Desorption of 1,3,5-Trichlorobenzene from Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Impact of Solution Chemistry and Surface Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Uddin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The strong affinity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs to environmental contaminants has raised serious concern that CNTs may function as a carrier of environmental pollutants and lead to contamination in places where the environmental pollutants are not expected. However, this concern will not be realized until the contaminants are desorbed from CNTs. It is well recognized that the desorption of environmental pollutants from pre-laden CNTs varies with the environmental conditions, such as the solution pH and ionic strength. However, comprehensive investigation on the influence of solution chemistry on the desorption process has not been carried out, even though numerous investigations have been conducted to investigate the impact of solution chemistry on the adsorption of environmental pollutants on CNTs. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength and surface functionalization on the desorption of preloaded 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (1,3,5-TCB from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs. The results suggested that higher pH, ionic strength and natural organic matter in solution generally led to higher desorption of 1,3,5-TCB from MWNTs. However, the extent of change varied at different values of the tested parameters (e.g., pH 7. In addition, the impact of these parameters varied with MWNTs possessing different surface functional groups, suggesting that surface functionalization could considerably alter the environmental behaviors and impact of MWNTs.

  6. Training Course of Experimental Chemistry in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Solid State and Solution Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju hyeong; Park, Kwangheon; Kim, Tae hoon; Park, Hyoung gyu; Kim, Jisu [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hyuk jin [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chan ki; Kang, Do kyu; Jeong, Hyeon jun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this experimental study program in Tohoku University, basic experiments were done by the participants. First one is the hydrogen reduction experiment of the mixture of UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}. Second one is to observe microscopic structure of solid solution of UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} using SEM/EDX and XRD system, simulated fuel debris. Third one is milking process of {sup 239}Np from {sup 243}Am by solvent extraction using Tri-n-Octylamine (TOA). Last one is solvent extraction in PUREX by the simulated mixed aqueous solution of U, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 239}Np which is represented minor actinide elements included in the spent nuclear fuel. Uranium is separated from aqueous phase to organic phase during solvent extraction procedure using TBP and dodecane. Also, neptunium can be extracted to organic phase as nitric acid concentration change. The extraction behavior of neptunium is different by oxidation state in aqueous phase. The behavior of neptunium is represented as a combined form of these oxidation states in experiment. Therefore, because the oxidation states of neptunium can be controlled by controlling the concentration of nitric acid, the extractability of neptunium can be controlled.

  7. Water chemistry at RBMK plants: Problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamet, V.; Yurmanov, V.

    2002-01-01

    After around 15 years of operation RBMK-1000 units undergo a major refit, which includes safety system upgrading, fuel tube replacement, etc. The above upgrading has created problems for water chemistry. In particular, in late 80's in-core insertion time of the portion of control rods was reduced 10-fold thanks to a transfer from water to filming cooling of scram channels. Scram channels are cooled with inner surface water film cooling and nitrogen is injected into heads via special pipelines. Such cooling system modernization ensures fast insertion of absorber rods. The above upgrade intensified nitric acid radiolytic generation in water coolant and pH 25 value shift to acid conditions (up to 4.5). The results of corrosion tests in such conditions proved the necessity to improve water chemistry to ensure corrosion protection of scram/control rod and circuit components, especially those made out of aluminium alloy. Since 1990 the new revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard specified the new normal operational limit and action levels for possible temporary deviations of pH 25 value. RBMK plant specific measures were implemented at RBMK plants to meet the above requirements of the 1990 revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard. Clean-up systems of the above circuit were upgraded to ensure intensive absorption of nitric acid from water and pH 25 maintenance in a slightly acid area. (authors)

  8. Water chemistry at RBMK plants: Problems and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamet, V.; Yurmanov, V. [VNIIAES (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    After around 15 years of operation RBMK-1000 units undergo a major refit, which includes safety system upgrading, fuel tube replacement, etc. The above upgrading has created problems for water chemistry. In particular, in late 80's in-core insertion time of the portion of control rods was reduced 10-fold thanks to a transfer from water to filming cooling of scram channels. Scram channels are cooled with inner surface water film cooling and nitrogen is injected into heads via special pipelines. Such cooling system modernization ensures fast insertion of absorber rods. The above upgrade intensified nitric acid radiolytic generation in water coolant and pH{sub 25} value shift to acid conditions (up to 4.5). The results of corrosion tests in such conditions proved the necessity to improve water chemistry to ensure corrosion protection of scram/control rod and circuit components, especially those made out of aluminium alloy. Since 1990 the new revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard specified the new normal operational limit and action levels for possible temporary deviations of pH{sub 25} value. RBMK plant specific measures were implemented at RBMK plants to meet the above requirements of the 1990 revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard. Clean-up systems of the above circuit were upgraded to ensure intensive absorption of nitric acid from water and pH{sub 25} maintenance in a slightly acid area. (authors)

  9. The development and chemistry of high efficiency combined cycle plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, Robert

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a boiler concept based on the combination of a low-pressure drum-type boiler with high-pressure once-through boiler and the appropriate water/steam cycle. An all volatile treatment is used in the low-pressure boiler and oxygenated treatment for the once-through high pressure system. Impurity control is achieved by adapted system design and materials, high quality make-up, an appropriate cleanliness concept and clean-up procedures for a cold start. Cycle refreshing is realized by blowdown from the high-pressure water-separator. This concept utilizes simper and less equipment than traditional solutions, resulting in increased power plant reliability and less requirement on maintenance and on capital cost [it

  10. Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers' Competencies in the Laboratory: A Cross-Grade Study in Solution Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, F. O.

    2016-01-01

    One of the prerequisites for chemistry teacher candidates is to demonstrate certain laboratory skills. This article aims to determine and discuss the competencies of pre-service chemistry teachers in a chemistry laboratory context working with solution chemistry content. The participants in this study consisted of a group of pre-service chemistry…

  11. Problems and solutions in quantum chemistry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Charles S

    1988-01-01

    Unusually varied problems, with detailed solutions, cover quantum mechanics, wave mechanics, angular momentum, molecular spectroscopy, scattering theory, more. 280 problems, plus 139 supplementary exercises.

  12. Solution chemistry of Mo(III) and Mo(IV): Thermodynamic foundation for modeling localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peiming; Wilson, Leslie L.; Wesolowski, David J.; Rosenqvist, Joergen; Anderko, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of molybdenum dissolution products in systems that approximate localized corrosion environments, solubility of Mo(III) in equilibrium with solid MoO 2 has been determined at 80 deg. C as a function of solution acidity, chloride concentration and partial pressure of hydrogen. The measurements indicate a strong increase in solubility with acidity and chloride concentration and a weak effect of hydrogen partial pressure. The obtained results have been combined with literature data for systems containing Mo(III), Mo(IV), and Mo(VI) in solutions to develop a comprehensive thermodynamic model of aqueous molybdenum chemistry. The model is based on a previously developed framework for simulating the properties of electrolyte systems ranging from infinite dilution to solid saturation or fused salt limit. To reproduce the measurements, the model assumes the presence of a chloride complex of Mo(III) (i.e., MoCl 2+ ) and hydrolyzed species (MoOH 2+ , Mo(OH) 2 + , and Mo(OH) 3 0 ) in addition to the Mo 3+ ion. The model generally reproduces the experimental data within experimental scattering and provides a tool for predicting the phase behavior and speciation in complex, concentrated aqueous solutions. Thus, it provides a foundation for simulating the behavior of molybdenum species in localized corrosion environments.

  13. Mixing of two solutions combined by gravity drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuptow, R M; Smith, K; Mockros, L F

    1995-01-01

    A variety of medical therapies require the mixing of solutions from two separate bags before use. One scenario for the mixing is to drain the solution from one bag into the other by gravity through a short connecting tube. The degree of mixing in the lower bag depends on the relative densities of the two solutions, the geometry of the two bags and the connecting tube, and the placement of the connecting tube. Solutions with densities differing by as much as 12% were mixed by draining the solution from an upper bag into a lower bag for a particular geometric configuration. The two solutions had different electrical conductivities, and the conductivity of the combined solution as it exited from the lower bag was used as a measure of the effectiveness of mixing. When the more dense solution was drained from the upper bag into the less dense solution in a lower bag, mixing was very effective. The incoming jet of high density solution entrained the low density solution. Flow visualization indicated that the incoming jet penetrated to the bottom of the lower bag, and resulting large vortical structures enhanced mixing. When the less dense solution was drained from the upper bag into the more dense solution in the lower bag mixing was less effective. The buoyancy force reduced the momentum of the incoming jet such that it did not penetrate to the bottom of the lower bag, resulting in stratification of the solutions.

  14. Combining metadynamics simulation and experiments to characterize dendrimers in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavan, G.M.; Barducci, A.; Albertazzi, L.; Parrinello, M.

    2013-01-01

    We report a combined theoretical-experimental approach to characterize dendrimers and Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)-dendrimer hybrids in solution. Well-tempered metadynamics simulation allows for an exhaustive sampling of the conformational fluctuations in solution. In contrast to classical molecular

  15. Dial-A-Decon Solution Chemistry GAP Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    M25, Ml00, M250 , Ml000). The pipette size used was determined by the amount of extraction solution to be delivered. The analytical GC vials used...dilutions were prepared using Gilson Microman positive displacement pipettes (Gilson product numbers MIO, M25, Ml00, M250 , Ml000). The pipette size

  16. Fluctuation theory of solutions applications in chemistry, chemical engineering, and biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    There are essentially two theories of solutions that can be considered exact: the McMillan-Mayer theory and Fluctuation Solution Theory (FST). The first is mostly limited to solutes at low concentrations, while FST has no such issue. It is an exact theory that can be applied to any stable solution regardless of the number of components and their concentrations, and the types of molecules and their sizes. Fluctuation Theory of Solutions: Applications in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Biophysics outlines the general concepts and theoretical basis of FST and provides a range of applications

  17. Combined LAURA-UPS solution procedure for chemically-reacting flows. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure seeks to combine the thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver LAURA with the parabolized Navier-Stokes solver UPS for the aerothermodynamic solution of chemically-reacting air flowfields. The interface protocol is presented and the method is applied to two slender, blunted shapes. Both axisymmetric and three dimensional solutions are included with surface pressure and heat transfer comparisons between the present method and previously published results. The case of Mach 25 flow over an axisymmetric six degree sphere-cone with a noncatalytic wall is considered to 100 nose radii. A stability bound on the marching step size was observed with this case and is attributed to chemistry effects resulting from the noncatalytic wall boundary condition. A second case with Mach 28 flow over a sphere-cone-cylinder-flare configuration is computed at both two and five degree angles of attack with a fully-catalytic wall. Surface pressures are seen to be within five percent with the present method compared to the baseline LAURA solution and heat transfers are within 10 percent. The effect of grid resolution is investigated and the nonequilibrium results are compared with a perfect gas solution, showing that while the surface pressure is relatively unchanged by the inclusion of reacting chemistry the nonequilibrium heating is 25 percent higher. The procedure demonstrates significant, order of magnitude reductions in solution time and required memory for the three dimensional case over an all thin-layer Navier-Stokes solution.

  18. The chemistry of nonaqueous solvents v.4 solution phenomena and aprotic solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Lagowski, J J

    1976-01-01

    The Chemistry of Nonaqueous Solvents, Volume IV: Solution Phenomena and Aprotic Solvents focuses on the chemistry of nonaqueous solvents, with emphasis on solution phenomena and aprotic solvents such as tetramethylurea, inorganic acid chlorides, cyclic carbonates, and sulfolane. This book is organized into seven chapters and begins with an overview of the theory of electrical conductivity and elementary experimental considerations, along with some of the interesting research on nonaqueous solvents. It then turns to a discussion on hydrogen bonding phenomena in nonaqueous systems as probed

  19. Exact Solutions to a Combined sinh-cosh-Gordon Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Long

    2010-01-01

    Based on a transformed Painleve property and the variable separated ODE method, a function transformation method is proposed to search for exact solutions of some partial differential equations (PDEs) with hyperbolic or exponential functions. This approach provides a more systematical and convenient handling of the solution process of this kind of nonlinear equations. Its key point is to eradicate the hyperbolic or exponential terms by a transformed Painleve property and reduce the given PDEs to a variable-coefficient ordinary differential equations, then we seek for solutions to the resulting equations by some methods. As an application, exact solutions for the combined sinh-cosh-Gordon equation are formally derived. (general)

  20. Electron enhanced Raman scattering and its applications in solution chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Hiroharu

    2007-01-01

    The present review describes a new enhancement technique for Raman scattering in aqueous solutions. Raman scattering spectroscopy has an inherent ability to distinguish between molecules with great similarity and provides useful information on local physical and chemical environments at their functional groups' level. Since the Raman scattering signals from water molecules are quite weak, Raman spectroscopy has great advantage for detection or discrimination of a trace amount of analytes in aqueous environments. However, Raman scattering cross-sections are inherently small and it generally requires high power excitation and long acquisition times to obtain high-quality Raman spectra. These conditions create disadvantages for the analyses for living cells and real-time monitoring for environmental analyses. Here, I describe a new Raman enhancement technique, namely electron enhanced Raman scattering (EERS)', where artificially generated electrons additionally affect the polarizability of target molecular systems and enhance their inherent Raman cross-section. Principles of the EERS and its applications to aqueous solution are presented. (author)

  1. Impacts of operating conditions and solution chemistry on osmotic membrane structure and performance

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Mavis C.Y.; Martinez, Kristina; Ramon, Guy Z.; Hoek, Eric M.V.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we report on changes in the performance of a commercial cellulose triacetate (CTA) membrane, imparted by varied operating conditions and solution chemistries. Changes to feed and draw solution flow rate did not significantly alter the CTA membrane's water permeability, salt permeability, or membrane structural parameter when operated with the membrane skin layer facing the draw solution (PRO-mode). However, water and salt permeability increased with increasing feed or draw solution temperature, while the membrane structural parameter decreased with increasing draw solution, possibly due to changes in polymer intermolecular interactions. High ionic strength draw solutions may de-swell the CTA membrane via charge neutralization, which resulted in lower water permeability, higher salt permeability, and lower structural parameter. This observed trend was further exacerbated by the presence of divalent cations which tends to swell the polymer to a greater extent. Finally, the calculated CTA membrane's structural parameter was lower and less sensitive to external factors when operated in PRO-mode, but highly sensitive to the same factors when the skin layer faced the feed solution (FO-mode), presumably due to swelling/de-swelling of the saturated porous substructure by the draw solution. This is a first attempt aimed at systematically evaluating the changes in performance of the CTA membrane due to operating conditions and solution chemistry, shedding new insight into the possible advantages and disadvantages of this material in certain applications. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Impacts of operating conditions and solution chemistry on osmotic membrane structure and performance

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Mavis C.Y.

    2012-02-01

    Herein, we report on changes in the performance of a commercial cellulose triacetate (CTA) membrane, imparted by varied operating conditions and solution chemistries. Changes to feed and draw solution flow rate did not significantly alter the CTA membrane\\'s water permeability, salt permeability, or membrane structural parameter when operated with the membrane skin layer facing the draw solution (PRO-mode). However, water and salt permeability increased with increasing feed or draw solution temperature, while the membrane structural parameter decreased with increasing draw solution, possibly due to changes in polymer intermolecular interactions. High ionic strength draw solutions may de-swell the CTA membrane via charge neutralization, which resulted in lower water permeability, higher salt permeability, and lower structural parameter. This observed trend was further exacerbated by the presence of divalent cations which tends to swell the polymer to a greater extent. Finally, the calculated CTA membrane\\'s structural parameter was lower and less sensitive to external factors when operated in PRO-mode, but highly sensitive to the same factors when the skin layer faced the feed solution (FO-mode), presumably due to swelling/de-swelling of the saturated porous substructure by the draw solution. This is a first attempt aimed at systematically evaluating the changes in performance of the CTA membrane due to operating conditions and solution chemistry, shedding new insight into the possible advantages and disadvantages of this material in certain applications. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Combination of monthly gravity field solutions from different processing centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Yoomin; Meyer, Ulrich; Jäggi, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the official GRACE Science Data System (SDS) monthly gravity field solutions are generated independently by the Centre for Space Research (CSR) and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ). Additional GRACE SDS monthly fields are provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for validation and outside the SDS by a number of other institutions worldwide. Although the adopted background models and processing standards have been harmonized more and more by the various processing centers during the past years, notable differences still exist and the users are more or less left alone with a decision which model to choose for their individual applications. Combinations are well-established in the area of other space geodetic techniques, such as the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), where regular comparisons and combinations of space-geodetic products have tremendously increased the usefulness of the products in a wide range of disciplines and scientific applications. In the frame of the recently started Horizon 2020 project European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM), a scientific combination service shall therefore be established to deliver the best gravity products for applications in Earth and environmental science research based on the unified knowledge of the European GRACE community. In a first step the large variety of available monthly GRACE gravity field solutions shall be mutually compared spatially and spectrally. We assess the noise of the raw as well as filtered solutions and compare the secular and seasonal periodic variations fitted to the monthly solutions. In a second step we will explore ways to generate combined solutions, e.g., based on a weighted average of the individual solutions using empirical weights derived from pair-wise comparisons. We will also assess the quality of such a combined solution and discuss the

  4. Managing Zirconium Chemistry and Phase Compatibility in Combined Process Separations for Minor Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Nathalie [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Nash, Ken [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Martin, Leigh [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2017-03-17

    In response to the NEUP Program Supporting Fuel Cycle R&D Separations and Waste Forms call DEFOA- 0000799, this report describes the results of an R&D project focusing on streamlining separation processes for advanced fuel cycles. An example of such a process relevant to the U.S. DOE FCR&D program would be one combining the functions of the TRUEX process for partitioning of lanthanides and minor actinides from PUREX(UREX) raffinates with that of the TALSPEAK process for separating transplutonium actinides from fission product lanthanides. A fully-developed PUREX(UREX)/TRUEX/TALSPEAK suite would generate actinides as product(s) for reuse (or transmutation) and fission products as waste. As standalone, consecutive unit-operations, TRUEX and TALSPEAK employ different extractant solutions (solvating (CMPO, octyl(phenyl)-N,Ndiisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide) vs. cation exchanging (HDEHP, di-2(ethyl)hexylphosphoric acid) extractants), and distinct aqueous phases (2-4 M HNO3 vs. concentrated pH 3.5 carboxylic acid buffers containing actinide selective chelating agents). The separate processes may also operate with different phase transfer kinetic constraints. Experience teaches (and it has been demonstrated at the lab scale) that, with proper control, multiple process separation systems can operate successfully. However, it is also recognized that considerable economies of scale could be achieved if multiple operations could be merged into a single process based on a combined extractant solvent. The task of accountability of nuclear materials through the process(es) also becomes more robust with fewer steps, providing that the processes can be accurately modeled. Work is underway in the U.S. and Europe on developing several new options for combined processes (TRUSPEAK, ALSEP, SANEX, GANEX, ExAm are examples). There are unique challenges associated with the operation of such processes, some relating to organic phase chemistry, others arising from the

  5. Application of solution-mineral equilibrium chemistry to solution mining of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riese, A.C.; Popp, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    The tests described were undertaken to determine the extent to leach solution-rock interactions with uranium-bearing ore obtained from the Mariano Lake mine. Leach solutions of an acidic (H/sub 2/O/sub 4/-sulfuric acid) and basic (NaHCO/sub 3/-sodium bicarbonate) nature were tested, in addition to a leach solution containing potassium chloride and sulfuric acid (KCl/H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). The latter solution was chosen in an attempt to equilibrate the aqueous phase with the rock-forming silicate minerals and minimize adverse effects such as clay formation, porosity loss, and lixiviant loss. 29 refs

  6. Application of solution-mineral equilibrium chemistry to solution mining of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riese, A.C.; Propp, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    Modern methods of uranium solution mining are typically accompanied by gains and losses of mass through reagent consumption by rock-forming minerals, with subsequent formation of clay minerals, gypsum, carbonates, and iron oxyhydroxides. A systematic approach to alleviate such problems involves the application of leach solutions that are in equilibrium with the host-rock minerals but in disequilibrium with the ore-forming minerals. This partial equilibrium can be approximated by solution-composition adjustments within the systems K 2 O-Al 2 O 3 SiO 2 -H 2 O and Na 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 SiO 2 -H 2 O. Uranium ore containing 0.15 percent U 3 O 8 from the Gulf Mineral Resources Corporation's Mariano Lake mine, the Smith Lake district of the Grants mineral belt, was collected for investigation. Presented are a theoretical evaluation of leachate data and an experimental treatment of the ore, which contained mainly K-feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, and quartz (with lesser amounts of micas, clay minerals, and organic carbonaceous material). Small-scale (less than or equal to 1 kg) column-leaching experiments were conducted to model the results of conventional leaching operations and to provide leachate solutions that could be compared with solutions calculated to be in equilibrium with the matrix minerals. Leach solutions employed include: 1) sulfuric acid, 2) sodium bicarbonate, and 3) sulfuric acid with 1.0 molal potassium chloride. The uranium concentrations in the sodium-bicarbonate leach solution and the acid-leach solution were about a gram per liter at the termination of the tests. However, the permeability of the ore in the acid leach was greatly reduced, owing to the formation of clay minerals. Uranium solubility in the leach column stabilized with the potassium-chloride solution was calculated from leachate compositions to be limited by the solubility of carnotite

  7. Physico-chemistry of actinides and other radioelements in solutions and at the interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the 61 papers (transparencies used during the presentations and posters) presented at the 1999 PRACTIS days, held February 17-18, 2000 in Villeneuve-les-Avignon. The content comprises 9 conferences dealing with 1)simulation of solvation, coordination and liquid-liquid extraction of rare earth and uranyl cations 2)overview on the complexation selectivity of actinides(III) and rare earths(III) by aromatic poly-nitrogenous ligands 3)detection, characterization and interaction between supramolecular aggregates of extractants: macroscopic consequences on the stability and on the macroscopic behaviour 4)chemistry of technetium in reducing medium: application to researches on radioactive waste management 5) separations by pyro-chemistry (CEA program) 6)overview on the Goethite operation 7)use of time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy to the determination of sorption sites at the interfaces 8)dissolution of uranium dioxide in an argillaceous water: results in oxidizing and reducing conditions 9)treatment and storage of radioactive wastes from weapon-grade plutonium production in Russia and other countries. A large part of the conference was devoted to poster sessions on the following topics: physico-chemistry in homogeneous solutions (22 posters), transfer kinetics of actinides and rare earths between liquid phases and separations (9 posters), physico-chemistry of the solid-solution interface (9 posters), simulation and molecular dynamics (5 posters), uranium dioxide and other oxides (1 poster), long-lived fission products (6 posters). (O.M.)

  8. The latest general chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Geun Bae; Choi, Se Yeong; Kim, Chin Yeong; Yoon, Gil Jung; Lee, Eun Seok; Seo, Moon Gyu

    1995-02-01

    This book deals with the latest general chemistry, which is comprised of twenty-three chapters, the contents of this book are introduction, theory of atoms and molecule, chemical formula and a chemical reaction formula, structure of atoms, nature of atoms and the periodic table, structure of molecule and spectrum, gas, solution, solid, chemical combination, chemical reaction speed, chemical equilibrium, thermal chemistry, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, acid-base, complex, aquatic chemistry, air chemistry, nuclear chemistry, metal and nonmetal, organic chemistry and biochemistry. It has exercise in the end of each chapter.

  9. Surface modification of carbon nanotubes via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Liu, Meiying; Zeng, Guangjian; Huang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qingsong [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Deng, Fengjie, E-mail: fengjiedeng@aliyun.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel strategy combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization has been developed for surface modification of carbon nanotubes with polymers for the first time. - Highlights: • Surface modification of CNTs via mussel inspired chemistry. • Preparation of aminated polymers through free radical polymerization. • Functionalized CNTs with aminated polymers via Michael addition reaction. • Highly dispersed CNTs in organic and aqueous solution. - Abstract: In this work, a novel strategy for surface modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was developed via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization. First, pristine CNTs were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA), which is formed via self-polymerization of dopamine in alkaline conditions. These PDA functionalized CNTs can be further reacted with amino-terminated polymers (named as PDMC), which was synthesized through chain transfer free radical polymerization using cysteamine hydrochloride as chain transfer agent and methacryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride as the monomer. PDMC perfectly conjugated with CNT-PDA was ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dispersibility of obtained CNT nanocomposites (named as CNT-PDA-PDMC) was further examined. Results showed that the dispersibility of CNT-PDA-PDMC in aqueous and organic solutions was obviously enhanced. Apart from PDMC, many other amino-terminated polymers can also be used to functionalization of CNTs via similar strategy. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a general strategy for fabrication various polymer nanocomposites.

  10. The Development of a Combined Search for a Heterogeneous Chemistry Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Jiang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A combined search, which joins a slow molecule structure search with a fast compound property search, results in more accurate search results and has been applied in several chemistry databases. However, the problems of search speed differences and combining the two separate search results are two major challenges. In this paper, two kinds of search strategies, synchronous search and asynchronous search, are proposed to solve these problems in the heterogeneous structure database and the property database found in ChemDB, a chemistry database owned by the Institute of Process Engineering, CAS. Their advantages and disadvantages under different conditions are discussed in detail. Furthermore, we applied these two searches to ChemDB and used them to screen for potential molecules that can work as CO2 absorbents. The results reveal that this combined search discovers reasonable target molecules within an acceptable time frame.

  11. The response of soil solution chemistry in European forests to decreasing acid deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, James; Pannatier, Elisabeth Graf; Carnicelli, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    to emissions controls. In this study, we assessed the response of soil solution chemistry in mineral horizons of European forests to these changes. Trends in pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), major ions, total aluminium (Altot) and dissolved organic carbon were determined for the period 1995–2012. Plots...... with at least 10 years of observations from the ICP Forests monitoring network were used. Trends were assessed for the upper mineral soil (10–20 cm, 104 plots) and subsoil (40–80 cm, 162 plots). There was a large decrease in the concentration of sulphate () in soil solution; over a 10‐year period (2000...... over the entire dataset. The response of soil solution acidity was nonuniform. At 10–20 cm, ANC increased in acid‐sensitive soils (base saturation ≤10%) indicating a recovery, but ANC decreased in soils with base saturation >10%. At 40–80 cm, ANC remained unchanged in acid‐sensitive soils (base...

  12. Combination of Cyclodextrin and Ionic Liquid in Analytical Chemistry: Current and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Boon Yih; Raoov, Muggundha; Zain, Nur Nadhirah Mohamad; Mohamad, Sharifah; Osman, Hasnah

    2017-09-03

    The growth in driving force and popularity of cyclodextrin (CDs) and ionic liquids (ILs) as promising materials in the field of analytical chemistry has resulted in an exponentially increase of their exploitation and production in analytical chemistry field. CDs belong to the family of cyclic oligosaccharides composing of α-(1,4) linked glucopyranose subunits and possess a cage-like supramolecular structure. This structure enables chemical reactions to proceed between interacting ions, radical or molecules in the absence of covalent bonds. Conversely, ILs are an ionic fluids comprising of only cation and anion often with immeasurable vapor pressure making them as green or designer solvent. The cooperative effect between CD and IL due to their fascinating properties, have nowadays contributed their footprints for a better development in analytical chemistry nowadays. This comprehensive review serves to give an overview on some of the recent studies and provides an analytical trend for the application of CDs with the combination of ILs that possess beneficial and remarkable effects in analytical chemistry including their use in various sample preparation techniques such as solid phase extraction, magnetic solid phase extraction, cloud point extraction, microextraction, and separation techniques which includes gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis as well as applications of electrochemical sensors as electrode modifiers with references to recent applications. This review will highlight the nature of interactions and synergic effects between CDs, ILs, and analytes. It is hoped that this review will stimulate further research in analytical chemistry.

  13. Chemistry in high temperature aqueous solutions application to the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.

    1990-01-01

    The power industry utilizes water (aqueous solutions) for two main functions: as a medium for heat transfer and transport and as a thermodynamic working fluid. These functions are performed in systems fabricated from a wide variety of materials, over a wide range of thermal and hydraulic conditions, and at medium temperatures and densities which determine the significant chemical properties. The major chemical interest is in the concentrated solutions derived from the dilute working fluid at selected sites defined by the physical arrangement and temperature and in their consequential effects on heat transfer and corrosion. Examples of these sites for typical fossil fired and nuclear steam generating equipment are described, as well as the extent and limit of the concentration process. The history of steam power plant water chemistry is discussed from the point of view of the chemical processes involved. The period covered is from the 1920s to the present state of the art, which is a major application of the subject of this symposium--chemistry in high temperature aqueous solution

  14. The chemistry of high temperature phosphate solutions in relation to steam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadbent, D.; Lewis, G.G.; Wetton, E.A.M.

    1978-01-01

    The problems associated with the use of phosphate for chemical treatment of the P.W.R. secondary circuit have prompted renewed interest in the physical chemistry of these solutions. Solubility and phase studies have been carried out at 250, 300 and 350 0 C with solutions having sodium to phosphate ratios from 1.0 to above 3.0. A solid phase of ratio about 2.8 exists in equilibrium with a wide range of saturated solution compositions at each temperature. Invariant points at which three phases are in equilibrium have been identified and at the two higher temperatures a region of liquid-liquid immiscibility occurs. Phase diagrams have been constructed for each temperature from which it is possible to predict the compositional changes occurring during the isothermal evaporation process. The corrosivity of these phosphate solutions to a range of steel alloys is being studied, the results reported in the present work, however, are confined to mild steel in the temperature and phosphate composition ranges of the phase studies. The corrosion of mild steel is generally considerably less than in sodium hydroxide solutions of equivalent concentration. The dependence of corrosion rate on sodium and phosphate concentrations in not readily explicable in terms of the solubility and phase studies and it is thought that the solubility of iron in the phosphate solutions is an important rate-determining factor since several complex compounds containing sodium, phosphorus and ferrous iron are present in the corrosion films. (author)

  15. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF 3 and dissolved UF 4 , and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC 2 . Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF 4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U 4+ /U 3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  16. Effect of wood ash application on soil solution chemistry of tropical acid soils: incubation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkana, J C Voundi; Demeyer, A; Verloo, M G

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of wood ash application on soil solution composition of three tropical acid soils. Calcium carbonate was used as a reference amendment. Amended soils and control were incubated for 60 days. To assess soluble nutrients, saturation extracts were analysed at 15 days intervals. Wood ash application affects the soil solution chemistry in two ways, as a liming agent and as a supplier of nutrients. As a liming agent, wood ash application induced increases in soil solution pH, Ca, Mg, inorganic C, SO4 and DOC. As a supplier of elements, the increase in the soil solution pH was partly due to ligand exchange between wood ash SO4 and OH- ions. Large increases in concentrations of inorganic C, SO4, Ca and Mg with wood ash relative to lime and especially increases in K reflected the supply of these elements by wood ash. Wood ash application could represent increased availability of nutrients for the plant. However, large concentrations of basic cations, SO4 and NO3 obtained with higher application rates could be a concern because of potential solute transport to surface waters and groundwater. Wood ash must be applied at reasonable rates to avoid any risk for the environment.

  17. Solution chemistry of carbonate minerals and its effects on the flotation of hematite with sodium oleate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Yin, Wan-zhong; Xue, Ji-wei; Yao, Jin; Fu, Ya-feng; Liu, Qi

    2017-07-01

    The effects of carbonate minerals (dolomite and siderite) on the flotation of hematite using sodium oleate as a collector were investigated through flotation tests, supplemented by dissolution measurements, solution chemistry calculations, zeta-potential measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The results of flotation tests show that the presence of siderite or dolomite reduced the recovery of hematite and that the inhibiting effects of dolomite were stronger. Dissolution measurements, solution chemistry calculations, and flotation tests confirmed that both the cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) and CO3 2- ions dissolved from dolomite depressed hematite flotation, whereas only the CO3 2- ions dissolved from siderite were responsible for hematite depression. The zeta-potential, FTIR spectroscopic, and XPS analyses indicated that Ca2+, Mg2+, and CO3 2- (HCO3 -) could adsorb onto the hematite surface, thereby hindering the adsorption of sodium oleate, which was the main reason for the inhibiting effects of carbonate minerals on hematite flotation.

  18. Molecular Structure of Salt Solutions: A New View of the Interface with Implications for Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Pavel; Tobias, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 43 (2001), s. 10468-10472 ISSN 1089-5647 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : air-solution interface * salt solutions * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.379, year: 2001

  19. Effects of different combinations of Hoagland's solution and Azolla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ALAN

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... hydroponic cultures containing different compositions of hydroponic solutions were evaluated in ... (Hoagland's solution minus N solution excluding Azolla; ..... nutrient deficiencies on photosynthesis and respiration in spinach.

  20. Radiation chemistry and advanced polymer materials studied by picosecond pulse radiolysis combined with femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, S.; Yoshida, Y.; Miki, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Ushida, K.; Izumi, Y.

    1996-01-01

    We have synchronized a single picosecond MeV electron pulse from L-band linear accelerator (linac) of The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research of Osaka University to a single femtosecond laser pulse of Ti:Sapphire laser. It is an essential technique for the future femtosecond pulse radiolysis and is also applied to many kinds of combined application of more than two different beams from accelerators in very short time range. Radiation chemistry and new type of polymers have been studied by LL (laser-linac) twin picosecond pulse radiolysis. Especially the early events in radiation chemistry such as geminate recombination processes of electrons and radical cations are have been studied in both liquids and solids. (author)

  1. Inkjet printing for biosensor fabrication: combining chemistry and technology for advanced manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Rossignol, Fabrice; Macdonald, Joanne

    2015-06-21

    Inkjet printing is emerging at the forefront of biosensor fabrication technologies. Parallel advances in both ink chemistry and printers have led to a biosensor manufacturing approach that is simple, rapid, flexible, high resolution, low cost, efficient for mass production, and extends the capabilities of devices beyond other manufacturing technologies. Here we review for the first time the factors behind successful inkjet biosensor fabrication, including printers, inks, patterning methods, and matrix types. We discuss technical considerations that are important when moving beyond theoretical knowledge to practical implementation. We also highlight significant advances in biosensor functionality that have been realised through inkjet printing. Finally, we consider future possibilities for biosensors enabled by this novel combination of chemistry and technology.

  2. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-01-01

    “Clumped-isotope” thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope “clumps”). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals.We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect.Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3− and CO32−. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many

  3. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-10-01

    ;Clumped-isotope; thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope ;clumps;). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals. We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect. Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3- and CO32-. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many natural systems. The two

  4. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Research progress is reported in programs on fuel-salt chemistry, properties of compounds in the Li--Te system, Te spectroscopy UF 4 --H equilibria, porous electrode studies of molten salts, fuel salt-coolant salt reactions, thermodynamic properties of transition-metal fluorides, and properties of sodium fluoroborate. Developmental work on analytical methods is summarized including in-line analysis of molten MSBR fuel, analysis of coolant-salts for tritium, analysis of molten LiF--BeF 2 --ThF 4 for Fe and analysis of LiF--BeF--ThF 4 for Te

  5. An abstraction layer for efficient memory management of tabulated chemistry and flamelet solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Steffen; Messig, Danny; Meyer, Bernd; Hasse, Christian

    2013-06-01

    A large number of methods for simulating reactive flows exist, some of them, for example, directly use detailed chemical kinetics or use precomputed and tabulated flame solutions. Both approaches couple the research fields computational fluid dynamics and chemistry tightly together using either an online or offline approach to solve the chemistry domain. The offline approach usually involves a method of generating databases or so-called Lookup-Tables (LUTs). As these LUTs are extended to not only contain material properties but interactions between chemistry and turbulent flow, the number of parameters and thus dimensions increases. Given a reasonable discretisation, file sizes can increase drastically. The main goal of this work is to provide methods that handle large database files efficiently. A Memory Abstraction Layer (MAL) has been developed that handles requested LUT entries efficiently by splitting the database file into several smaller blocks. It keeps the total memory usage at a minimum using thin allocation methods and compression to minimise filesystem operations. The MAL has been evaluated using three different test cases. The first rather generic one is a sequential reading operation on an LUT to evaluate the runtime behaviour as well as the memory consumption of the MAL. The second test case is a simulation of a non-premixed turbulent flame, the so-called HM1 flame, which is a well-known test case in the turbulent combustion community. The third test case is a simulation of a non-premixed laminar flame as described by McEnally in 1996 and Bennett in 2000. Using the previously developed solver 'flameletFoam' in conjunction with the MAL, memory consumption and the performance penalty introduced were studied. The total memory used while running a parallel simulation was reduced significantly while the CPU time overhead associated with the MAL remained low.

  6. Effects of feed solution chemistry on low pressure reverse osmosis filtration of cesium and strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Shiyuan, E-mail: dingshiyuan@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Yang, Yu, E-mail: yangyu@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Huang, Haiou, E-mail: huanghaiou@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Liu, Hengchen, E-mail: 799599501@qq.com [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Hou, Li-an, E-mail: houlian678@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Xi’an High-Tech Institute, No. 2, Tongxin Street, Baqiao District, Xi’an 710025 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • A low pressure spiral wound RO membrane can reject Cs and Sr efficiently. • The rejection of Cs and Sr is dependent on feed pH and co-existing ions. • Donnan exclusion and electrostatic interaction govern the rejection of Cs and Sr. • The differences of filtration mechanism were influenced by the size of ions. • Sr could strengthen the irreversible membrane fouling resistance with HA. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to identify the removal mechanisms of radionuclides by reverse osmosis (RO) membranes under conditions relevant to full-scale water treatment. For this purpose, the effects of feed solution chemistry on the removal of Cs and Sr by a low pressure RO system was investigated by systematically varying membrane surface charge, ionic composition, and organic matter concentrations. The results showed that the effects of solution chemistry on the filtration of Cs and Sr were related to their hydrated ionic radius, resulting in the predominance of the Donnan’s effect and electrostatic interactions, respectively. Consequently, the rejection of Cs increased more pronouncedly than Sr with the increases of feed concentration. Due to the Donnan’s effect, different anions decreased the rejection of Cs to different extents in accordance to the order of anions’ radii as SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} > Cl{sup −} > NO{sub 3}{sup −} > F{sup −}. The variations in Sr rejection were influenced by the electrostatic interactions between Sr{sup 2+} and the membrane. In addition, humic acid (HA) lowered the rejection of Cs and caused significant membrane flux decline, but did not change the rejection of Sr. Sr also aggravated HA fouling of the membrane.

  7. Influence of solution chemistry on the boron content in inorganic calcite grown in artificial seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Harper, Dustin T.; Penman, Donald E.; Zachos, James C.; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2017-12-01

    The ratio of boron to calcium (B/Ca) in marine biogenic carbonates has been proposed as a proxy for properties of seawater carbonate chemistry. Applying this proxy to planktic foraminifera residing in the surface seawater largely in equilibrium with the atmosphere may provide a valuable handle on past atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, precise controls on B/Ca in planktic foraminifera remain enigmatic because it has been shown to depend on multiple physicochemical seawater properties. To help establish a firm inorganic basis for interpreting the B/Ca records, we examined the effect of a suite of chemical parameters ([Ca2+], pH, [DIC], salinity and [PO43-]) on B/Ca in inorganic calcite precipitated in artificial seawater. These parameters were primarily varied individually while keeping all others constant, but we also tested the influence of pH and [DIC] at a constant calcite precipitation rate (R) by concurrent [Ca2+] adjustments. In the simple [Ca2+], pH and [DIC] experiments, both R and B/Ca increased with these parameters. In the pH-[Ca2+] and [DIC]-[Ca2+] experiments at constant R, on the other hand, B/Ca was invariant at different pH and decreased with [DIC], respectively. These patterns agree with the behavior of solution [BTotal/DIC] ratio such that, at a fixed [BTotal], it is independent of pH but decreases with [DIC]. Based on these results, R and [BTotal/DIC] ratio appear to be the primary controls on B/Ca in inorganic calcite, suggesting that both B(OH)4- and B(OH)3 are possibly involved in B incorporation. Moreover, B/Ca modestly increased with salinity and [PO43-]. Inorganic calcite precipitated at higher R and in the presence of oxyanions such as SO42- and PO43- in growth solutions often undergoes surface roughening due to formation of crystallographic defects, vacancies and, occasionally, amorphous/hydrous CaCO3. These non-lattice sites may provide additional space for B, particularly B(OH)3. Consequently, besides the macroscopic influence of

  8. EGSIEM combination service: combination of GRACE monthly K-band solutions on normal equation level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ulrich; Jean, Yoomin; Arnold, Daniel; Jäggi, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    The European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM) project offers a scientific combination service, combining for the first time monthly GRACE gravity fields of different analysis centers (ACs) on normal equation (NEQ) level and thus taking all correlations between the gravity field coefficients and pre-eliminated orbit and instrument parameters correctly into account. Optimal weights for the individual NEQs are commonly derived by variance component estimation (VCE), as is the case for the products of the International VLBI Service (IVS) or the DTRF2008 reference frame realisation that are also derived by combination on NEQ-level. But variance factors are based on post-fit residuals and strongly depend on observation sampling and noise modeling, which both are very diverse in case of the individual EGSIEM ACs. These variance factors do not necessarily represent the true error levels of the estimated gravity field parameters that are still governed by analysis noise. We present a combination approach where weights are derived on solution level, thereby taking the analysis noise into account.

  9. Effect of solution chemistry on the adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate onto mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuyang Y; Shiang Fu, Q; Gao, Dawen; Criddle, Craig S; Leckie, James O

    2010-04-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is an emergent contaminant of substantial environmental concerns, yet very limited information has been available on PFOS adsorption onto mineral surfaces. PFOS adsorption onto goethite and silica was investigated by batch adsorption experiments under various solution compositions. Adsorption onto silica was only marginally affected by pH, ionic strength, and calcium concentration, likely due to the dominance of non-electrostatic interactions. In contrast, PFOS uptake by goethite increased significantly at high [H+] and [Ca2+], which was likely due to enhanced electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged PFOS molecules and positively charged goethite surface. The effect of pH was less significant at high ionic strength, likely due to electrical double layer compression. PFOS uptake was reduced at higher ionic strength for a strongly positively charged goethite surface (pH 3), while it increased for a weakly charged surface (pH 7 and 9), which could be attributed to the competition between PFOS-surface electrostatic attraction and PFOS-PFOS electrostatic repulsion. A conceptual model that captures PFOS-surface and PFOS-PFOS electrostatic interactions as well as non-electrostatic interaction was also formulated to understand the effect of solution chemistry on PFOS adsorption onto goethite and silica surfaces. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of wood ash on soil solution and chemistry of leaves in a beech stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tothova, Slavka

    2005-01-01

    The short-term effects of wood ash fertilization on chemistry of soil solution and leaves were investigated in 4-year-old beech stand (Fagus sylvatica L.) on dystric cambisol in Central Spis. Four plots - the control plot and three plots with different ash treatments (different dose, date and method of application) were established. Plate lysimeters were installed under the upper layer of soil in depth 2 cm and 20 cm on the control plot and plot P1 with addition of wood ash 5 t/ha on the whole surface. Soil solution was collected in May - October 2002 every two weeks. Composite samples, which represent a one - month period, were analysed for pH, K, Ca, Mg, and NO 3 - . The leaves were collected 4 or 10 months after the treatment and analysed on Ca, K, Mg, P, S, N and heavy metals Cd, Pb, Cr and Hg. In the ash treatment the content of macronutrient increased (mainly K, Ca). Addition of ash did not increase of the content heavy metal in leaves

  11. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    Research and development activities dealing with the chemical problems related to design and ultimate operation of molten-salt reactor systems are described. An experimental test stand was constructed to expose metallurgical test specimens to Te 2 vapor at defined temperatures and deposition rates. To better define the chemistry of fluoroborate coolant, several aspects are being investigated. The behavior of hydroxy and oxy compounds in molten NaBF 4 is being investigated to define reactions and compounds that may be involved in corrosion and/or could be involved in methods for trapping tritium. Two corrosion products of Hastelloy N, Na 3 CrF 6 and Na 5 Cr 3 F 14 , were identified from fluoroborate systems. The evaluation of fluoroborate and alternate coolants continued. Research on the behavior of hydrogen and its isotopes is summarized. The solubilities of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium in Li 2 BeF 4 are very low. The sorption of tritium on graphite was found to be significant (a few milligrams of tritium per kilogram of graphite), possibly providing a means of sequestering a portion of the tritium produced. Development of analytical methods continued with emphasis on voltammetric and spectrophotometric techniques for the in-line analysis of corrosion products such as Fe 2+ and Cr 3+ and the determination of the U 3+ /U 4+ ratio in MSBR fuel salt. Similar studies were conducted with the NaBF 4 --NaF coolant salt. Information developed during the previous operation of the CSTF has been assessed and used to formulate plans for evaluation of in-line analytical methods in future CSTF operations. Electroanalytical and spectrophotometric research suggests that an electroactive protonic species is present in molten NaBF 4 --NaF, and that this species rapidly equilibrates with a volatile proton-containing species. Data obtained from the CSTF indicated that tritium was concentrated in the volatile species. (JGB)

  12. Transport of E. coli D21g with runoff water under different solution chemistry conditions and surface slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracer and indicator microbe runoff experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of solution chemistry on the transport, retention, and release of Escherichia coli D21g. Experiments were conducted in a chamber (2.25 m long, 0.15 m wide, and 0.16 m high) packed with ultrapure quartz sand (...

  13. Soil solution chemistry and element fluxes in three European heathlands and their responses to warming and drought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, I.K.; Tietema, A.; Williams, D.

    2004-01-01

    Soil water chemistry and element budgets were studied at three northwestern European Calluna vulgaris heathland sites in Denmark (DK), The Netherlands (NL), and Wales (UK). Responses to experimental nighttime warming and early summer drought were followed during a two-year period. Soil solution...

  14. Coupled effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on the mobility and transport of quantum dot nanomaterials in the Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the coupled effects of solution chemistry and vadose zone processes on the mobility of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles, laboratory scale transport experiments were performed. The complex coupled effects of ionic strength, size of QD aggregates, surface tension, contact angle, infiltrat...

  15. The global warming potential of methane reassessed with combined stratosphere and troposphere chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C. D.; Archibald, A. T.; Eastham, S. D.; Søvde, O. A.

    2017-12-01

    Methane is a direct and indirect greenhouse gas. The direct greenhouse effect comes from the radiation absorbed and emitted by methane itself. The indirect greenhouse effect comes from radiatively active gases that are produced during methane oxidation: principally O3, H2O, and CO2. Methane also suppresses tropospheric OH, which indirectly affects numerous greenhouses gases and aerosols. Traditionally, the methane global warming potential (GWP) has included the indirect effects on tropospheric O3 and OH and stratospheric H2O, with these effects estimated independently from unrelated tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry models and observations. Using this approach the CH4 is about 28 over 100 yr (without carbon cycle feedbacks, IPCC, 2013). Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the CH4 GWP in several 3-D global atmospheric models capable of simulating both tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry (GEOS-Chem, Oslo CTM3, UKCA). This enables us to include, for the first time, the indirect effects of CH4 on stratospheric O3 and stratosphere-troposphere coupling. We diagnose the GWP from paired simulations with and without a 5% perturbation to tropospheric CH4 concentrations. Including stratospheric chemistry nearly doubles the O3 contribution to CH4 GWP because of O3 production in the lower stratosphere and because CH4 inhibits Cl-catalyzed O3 loss in the upper stratosphere. In addition, stratosphere-troposphere coupling strengthens the chemical feedback on its own lifetime. In the stratosphere, this feedback operates by a CH4 perturbation thickening the stratospheric O3 layer, which impedes UV-driven OH production in the troposphere and prolongs the CH4 lifetime. We also quantify the impact of CH4-derived H2O on the stratospheric HOx cycles but these effects are small. Combining all of the above, these models suggest that the 100-yr GWP of CH4 is over 33.5, a 20% increase over the latest IPCC assessment.

  16. Supramolecular Pharmaceutical Sciences: A Novel Concept Combining Pharmaceutical Sciences and Supramolecular Chemistry with a Focus on Cyclodextrin-Based Supermolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Taishi; Iohara, Daisuke; Motoyama, Keiichi; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2018-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry is an extremely useful and important domain for understanding pharmaceutical sciences because various physiological reactions and drug activities are based on supramolecular chemistry. However, it is not a major domain in the pharmaceutical field. In this review, we propose a new concept in pharmaceutical sciences termed "supramolecular pharmaceutical sciences," which combines pharmaceutical sciences and supramolecular chemistry. This concept could be useful for developing new ideas, methods, hypotheses, strategies, materials, and mechanisms in pharmaceutical sciences. Herein, we focus on cyclodextrin (CyD)-based supermolecules, because CyDs have been used not only as pharmaceutical excipients or active pharmaceutical ingredients but also as components of supermolecules.

  17. Combining Fungicides and Prospective NPR1-Based "Just-in-Time" Immunomodulating Chemistries for Crop Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Xiahezi; Barraco, Charles; Després, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Each year, crop yield is lost to weeds competing for resources, insect herbivory and diseases caused by pathogens. To thwart these insults and preserve yield security and a high quality of traits, conventional agriculture makes use of improved cultivars combined with fertilizer and agrochemical applications. However, given that regulatory bodies and consumers are demanding environmentally safer agrochemicals, while at the same time resistance to agrochemicals is mounting, it is crucial to adopt a "holistic" approach to agriculture by not excluding any number of management tools at our disposal. One such tool includes chemicals that stimulate plant immunity. The development of this particular type of alternative crop protection strategy has been of great interest to us. We have approached this paradigm by studying plant immunity, specifically systemic acquired resistance (SAR). The deployment of SAR immunity requires the production by the crop plant of an endogenous small molecule metabolite called salicylic acid (SA). Furthermore, immunity can only be deployed if SA can bind to its receptor and activate the genes responsible for the SAR program. The key receptor for SAR is a transcription coactivator called NPR1. Since discovering this NPR1-SA receptor-ligand pair, we have embarked on a journey to develop novel chemistries capable of deploying SAR in the field. The journey begins with the development of a scalable assay to identify these novel chemistries. One such assay, presented here, is based on differential scanning fluorimetry technology and demonstrates that NPR1 is destabilized by binding to SA.

  18. The response of soil solution chemistry in European forests to decreasing acid deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Carnicelli, Stefano; Cecchini, Guia; Clarke, Nicholas; Cools, Nathalie; Hansen, Karin; Meesenburg, Henning; Nieminen, Tiina M; Pihl-Karlsson, Gunilla; Titeux, Hugues; Vanguelova, Elena; Verstraeten, Arne; Vesterdal, Lars; Waldner, Peter; Jonard, Mathieu

    2018-03-31

    Acid deposition arising from sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) emissions from fossil fuel combustion and agriculture has contributed to the acidification of terrestrial ecosystems in many regions globally. However, in Europe and North America, S deposition has greatly decreased in recent decades due to emissions controls. In this study, we assessed the response of soil solution chemistry in mineral horizons of European forests to these changes. Trends in pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), major ions, total aluminium (Al tot ) and dissolved organic carbon were determined for the period 1995-2012. Plots with at least 10 years of observations from the ICP Forests monitoring network were used. Trends were assessed for the upper mineral soil (10-20 cm, 104 plots) and subsoil (40-80 cm, 162 plots). There was a large decrease in the concentration of sulphate (SO42-) in soil solution; over a 10-year period (2000-2010), SO42- decreased by 52% at 10-20 cm and 40% at 40-80 cm. Nitrate was unchanged at 10-20 cm but decreased at 40-80 cm. The decrease in acid anions was accompanied by a large and significant decrease in the concentration of the nutrient base cations: calcium, magnesium and potassium (Bc = Ca 2+  + Mg 2+  + K + ) and Al tot over the entire dataset. The response of soil solution acidity was nonuniform. At 10-20 cm, ANC increased in acid-sensitive soils (base saturation ≤10%) indicating a recovery, but ANC decreased in soils with base saturation >10%. At 40-80 cm, ANC remained unchanged in acid-sensitive soils (base saturation ≤20%, pHCaCl2 ≤ 4.5) and decreased in better-buffered soils (base saturation >20%, pHCaCl2 > 4.5). In addition, the molar ratio of Bc to Al tot either did not change or decreased. The results suggest a long-time lag between emission abatement and changes in soil solution acidity and underline the importance of long-term monitoring in evaluating ecosystem response to decreases in deposition. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons

  19. Effects of solution chemistry and aging time on prion protein adsorption and replication of soil-bound prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E Saunders

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Prion interactions with soil may play an important role in the transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD and scrapie. Prions are known to bind to a wide range of soil surfaces, but the effects of adsorption solution chemistry and long-term soil binding on prion fate and transmission risk are unknown. We investigated HY TME prion protein (PrP(Sc adsorption to soil minerals in aqueous solutions of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and deionized water using western blotting. The replication efficiency of bound prions following adsorption in these solutions was also evaluated by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA. Aging studies investigated PrP(Sc desorption and replication efficiency up to one year following adsorption in PBS or DI water. Results indicate that adsorption solution chemistry can affect subsequent prion replication or desorption ability, especially after incubation periods of 30 d or longer. Observed effects were minor over the short-term (7 d or less. Results of long-term aging experiments demonstrate that unbound prions or prions bound to a diverse range of soil surfaces can readily replicate after one year. Our results suggest that while prion-soil interactions can vary with solution chemistry, prions bound to soil could remain a risk for transmitting prion diseases after months in the environment.

  20. A review of the radiation chemistry of iodine compounds in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, R.M.

    1977-06-01

    Large amounts of radioactive iodine are formed in the fission of uranium in nuclear reactors. Some of this may be released to the coolant from the fuel either by diffusion through the canning material, or following the failure of a fuel pin. The iodine, which is released mainly as I 2 and methyl iodide, is transported with the coolant and, in direct cycle water cooled reactors, some is carried over with the steam to the turbines, where contamination may build up in the vicinity of steam leaks. Any assessment of the mechanism of the transport of iodine requires a knowledge of the relative amounts of the various oxidation states present, and must consider not only the thermal behaviour of iodine in water, but also the radiation chemical effects. A review is presented of the radiation chemistry of inorganic iodine compounds and methyl iodide in aqueous solutions. A number of unstable intermediates have been identified including species with iodide in valency states II, IV, VI and VIII. A considerable number of discrepancies exist in the literature data, and requirements for further work are identified. (author)

  1. Effects of Solution Chemistry on Nano-Bubbles Transport in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Suzuki, K.; Nihei, N.; Nishimura, T.

    2017-12-01

    Nano-bubbles (NBs) have a considerable potential for the remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated by organic compounds, especially when used in conjunction with bioremediation technologies. Understanding the transport mechanisms of NBs in soils is essential to optimize NB-based remediation techniques. In this study, one-dimensional column transport experiments using glass beads with 0.1 mm size were conducted, where NBs created by oxygen gas at different pH and ionic strength were injected to the column at the constant flow rate. The NBs concentration in the effluent was quantified using a resonant mass measurement technique. Effects of solution chemistry of the NBs water on NB transport in the porous media were investigated. The results showed that attachment of NBs was enhanced under higher ionic strength and lower pH conditions, caused by the reduced repulsive force between NBs and glass beads. In addition, bubble size distributions in the effluents showed that relatively larger NBs were retained in the column. This trend was more significant at lower pH condition.

  2. Simulating the long-term chemistry of an upland UK catchment: Major solutes and acidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipping, E. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (Lancaster), Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk; Lawlor, A.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (Lancaster), Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Lofts, S. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (Lancaster), Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    CHUM-AM was used to investigate changes in soil and water chemical variables in four moorland sub-catchments in Cumbria UK, to which non-marine S deposition has declined by 65% since the 1970s. The principal processes represented in the model comprise N and S uptake and release, water movements, the binding of cations by soil organic matter, chemical interactions in solution, and chemical weathering. CHUM-AM reproduced reasonably well the current soil pH and pools of N and S, and changes in streamwater chemistry over the period 1970-2000, notably decreases in the concentrations of alkaline earth cations and sulphate, and increases in pH. The model also predicts streamwater pH-Al relationships in agreement with observations. Predictive calculations suggest that constant atmospheric deposition of N at present rates will lead to N saturation and re-acidification, whereas a 50% reduction in N would stabilise soil and streamwater pH at about the present levels. - CHUM-AM accounts for recovery from acidification due to sulphur deposition, but predicts re-acidification if nitrogen deposition is not reduced.

  3. Major Successes of Theory-and-Experiment-Combined Studies in Surface Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2009-11-21

    Experimental discoveries followed by theoretical interpretations that pave the way of further advances by experimentalists is a developing pattern in modern surface chemistry and catalysis. The revolution of modern surface science started with the development of surface-sensitive techniques such as LEED, XPS, AES, ISS and SIMS, in which the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists led to the quantitative determination of surface structure and composition. The experimental discovery of the chemical activity of surface defects and the trends in the reactivity of transitional metals followed by the explanations from the theoretical studies led to the molecular level understanding of active sites in catalysis. The molecular level knowledge, in turn, provided a guide for experiments to search for new generation of catalysts. These and many other examples of successes in experiment-and-theory-combined studies demonstrate the importance of the collaboration between experimentalists and theorists in the development of modern surface science.

  4. Effects of different combinations of Hoagland's solution and Azolla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The assessments of photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, evapotranspiration, intercellular CO2 concentration and chlorophyll content in Beta vulgaris subsp. cycla 'Fordhook Giant' grown in hydroponic cultures containing different compositions of hydroponic solutions were evaluated in this study. The aim of the study ...

  5. The Combined Effects of Classroom Teaching and Learning Strategy Use on Students' Chemistry Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Derek

    2015-01-01

    For students to be successful in school chemistry, a strong sense of self-efficacy is essential. Chemistry self-efficacy can be defined as students' beliefs about the extent to which they are capable of performing specific chemistry tasks. According to Bandura ("Psychol. Rev." 84:191-215, 1977), students acquire information about their…

  6. Assessment of a sequential extraction protocol by examining solution chemistry and mineralogical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubec, Nicolas; Pauwels, Hélène; Noël, Hervé; Bourrat, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of heavy metals, such as copper and zinc in sediments, is a key factor to improve the management of rivers. The mobility of these metals, which may be harmful to the environment, depends directly on their concentration and speciation , which in turn depend on physico-chemical parameters such as mineralogy of the sediment fraction, pH, redox potential, salinity etc ... (Anderson et al., 2000; Sterckeman et al., 2004; Van Oort et al., 2008). Several methods based on chemical extractions are currently applied to assess the behavior of heavy metals in soils and sediments. Among them, sequential extraction procedure is widely used in soil and sediment science and provides details about the origin, biological and physicochemical availability, mobilization and transports of trace metals elements. It is based on the use of a series of extracting reagents to extract selectively heavy metals according to their association within the solid phase (Cornu and Clozel, 2000) including the following different fraction : exchangeable, bound to carbonates, associated to oxides (reducible fraction), linked to organic matter and sulfides (oxidizable fraction) as well as silicate minerals so called residual fraction (Hickey and Kittrick, 1984; Tessier et al., 1979). Consequently sequential extraction method is expected to simulate a lot of potential natural and anthropogenic modifications of environmental conditions (Arey et al., 1999; Brannon and Patrick, 1987; Hickey and Kittrick, 1984; La Force et al., 1999; Tessier et al., 1979). For three decades, a large number of protocols has been proposed, characterized by specific reagents and experimental conditions (concentrations, number of steps, extraction orders and solid/solution ratio) (Das et al., 1995; Gomez Ariza et al., 2000; Quevauviller et al., 1994; Rauret, 1998; Tack and Verloo, 1995), but it appeared that several of them suffer from a lack of selectivity of applied reagents: besides target ones, some

  7. Novel bi-metallic uranyl complexes - Redox chemistry in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yardeni, A.; Mizrahi, E.; Maimon, I.; Zilbermann, G.; Meyerstein, D.; Zehavi-cohen, A.Z.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of organic ligands which can accommodate two uranium atoms at different oxidation states, mixed valency being then achieved by redox chemistry at room temperature is definitely a challenge in coordination chemistry. The following complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, MS, IR and UV-vis

  8. Use of pulse radiolysis for the study of the chemistry of aqueous ozone and ozonide solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Knud; Holcman, Jerzy; Bjergbakke, Erling

    1986-01-01

    The chemistry of aqeous ozone, O3, and ozonide, O3−, is of great interest from a technological, environmental and scientific point of view. The literature about their aqueous chemistry is extensive, the reaction mechanisms are still not well understood. The ozonide anion is a free radical that is...... reactions and provides kinetic data sufficient for computer simulations of aqueous O3/O3− chemistry.......The chemistry of aqeous ozone, O3, and ozonide, O3−, is of great interest from a technological, environmental and scientific point of view. The literature about their aqueous chemistry is extensive, the reaction mechanisms are still not well understood. The ozonide anion is a free radical...

  9. Heat-induced-radiolabeling and click chemistry: A powerful combination for generating multifunctional nanomaterials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hushan Yuan

    Full Text Available A key advantage of nanomaterials for biomedical applications is their ability to feature multiple small reporter groups (multimodality, or combinations of reporter groups and therapeutic agents (multifunctionality, while being targeted to cell surface receptors. Here a facile combination of techniques for the syntheses of multimodal, targeted nanoparticles (NPs is presented, whereby heat-induced-radiolabeling (HIR labels NPs with radiometals and so-called click chemistry is used to attach bioactive groups to the NP surface. Click-reactive alkyne or azide groups were first attached to the nonradioactive clinical Feraheme (FH NPs. Resulting "Alkyne-FH" and "Azide-FH" intermediates, like the parent NP, tolerated 89Zr labeling by the HIR method previously described. Subsequently, biomolecules were quickly conjugated to the radioactive NPs by either copper-catalyzed or copper-free click reactions with high efficiency. Synthesis of the Alkyne-FH or Azide-FH intermediates, followed by HIR and then by click reactions for biomolecule attachment, provides a simple and potentially general path for the synthesis of multimodal, multifunctional, and targeted NPs for biomedical applications.

  10. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  11. Quantifying enzymatic lysis: estimating the combined effects of chemistry, physiology and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Gabriel J; Weitz, Joshua S; Nelson, Daniel C

    2010-01-01

    The number of microbial pathogens resistant to antibiotics continues to increase even as the rate of discovery and approval of new antibiotic therapeutics steadily decreases. Many researchers have begun to investigate the therapeutic potential of naturally occurring lytic enzymes as an alternative to traditional antibiotics. However, direct characterization of lytic enzymes using techniques based on synthetic substrates is often difficult because lytic enzymes bind to the complex superstructure of intact cell walls. Here we present a new standard for the analysis of lytic enzymes based on turbidity assays which allow us to probe the dynamics of lysis without preparing a synthetic substrate. The challenge in the analysis of these assays is to infer the microscopic details of lysis from macroscopic turbidity data. We propose a model of enzymatic lysis that integrates the chemistry responsible for bond cleavage with the physical mechanisms leading to cell wall failure. We then present a solution to an inverse problem in which we estimate reaction rate constants and the heterogeneous susceptibility to lysis among target cells. We validate our model given simulated and experimental turbidity assays. The ability to estimate reaction rate constants for lytic enzymes will facilitate their biochemical characterization and development as antimicrobial therapeutics

  12. Quantifying enzymatic lysis: estimating the combined effects of chemistry, physiology and physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gabriel J; Nelson, Daniel C; Weitz, Joshua S

    2010-10-04

    The number of microbial pathogens resistant to antibiotics continues to increase even as the rate of discovery and approval of new antibiotic therapeutics steadily decreases. Many researchers have begun to investigate the therapeutic potential of naturally occurring lytic enzymes as an alternative to traditional antibiotics. However, direct characterization of lytic enzymes using techniques based on synthetic substrates is often difficult because lytic enzymes bind to the complex superstructure of intact cell walls. Here we present a new standard for the analysis of lytic enzymes based on turbidity assays which allow us to probe the dynamics of lysis without preparing a synthetic substrate. The challenge in the analysis of these assays is to infer the microscopic details of lysis from macroscopic turbidity data. We propose a model of enzymatic lysis that integrates the chemistry responsible for bond cleavage with the physical mechanisms leading to cell wall failure. We then present a solution to an inverse problem in which we estimate reaction rate constants and the heterogeneous susceptibility to lysis among target cells. We validate our model given simulated and experimental turbidity assays. The ability to estimate reaction rate constants for lytic enzymes will facilitate their biochemical characterization and development as antimicrobial therapeutics.

  13. Combination therapy of acne in women: searching for optimum solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Goryachkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current data on the acne pathogenesis are given. According to the authors, dermatosis is becoming more prevalent among women of mature age. Issues related to the clinical picture, effect of exogenous and endogenous factors on the course of acne, and psychosocial characteristics of delayed acne manifestations in women are described in detail. The essential role of medical and cosmetic products for the complex therapy of acne is discussed. The authors describe their own experience of treating delayed acne using the Hyseac line of medical and cosmetic products in a combination with microdermabrasion and no-needle mesotherapy using the vitaPeel/vital О2 device.

  14. A Unique Master's Program in Combined Nuclear Technology and Nuclear Chemistry at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarnemark, Gunnar; Allard, Stefan; Ekberg, Christian; Nordlund, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The need for engineers and scientists who can ensure safe and secure use of nuclear energy is large in Sweden and internationally. Chalmers University of Technology is therefore launching a new 2-year master's program in Nuclear Engineering, with start from the autumn of 2009. The program is open to Swedish and foreign students. The program starts with compulsory courses dealing with the basics of nuclear chemistry and physics, radiation protection, nuclear power and reactors, nuclear fuel supply, nuclear waste management and nuclear safety and security. There are also compulsory courses in nuclear industry applications and sustainable energy futures. The subsequent elective courses can be chosen freely but there is also a possibility to choose informal tracks that concentrate on nuclear chemistry or reactor technology and physics. The nuclear chemistry track comprises courses in e.g. chemistry of lanthanides, actinides and transactinides, solvent extraction, radioecology and radioanalytical chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals. The program is finished with a one semester thesis project. This is probably a unique master program in the sense of its combination of deep courses in both nuclear technology and nuclear chemistry.

  15. Photoresponsive Azopolyester–PMMA Block Copolymers Obtained by Combination of ATRP, Polycondensation, and “Click” Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berges, Cristina; Javakhishvili, Irakli; Hvilsted, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Novel azobenzene‐containing block copolymers (BCs) with a polyester block bearing azobenzene moieties in the side chain and a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block have been synthesized by the combination of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), polycondensation, and “click” chemistry. Two...

  16. Combining Chemical Information Literacy, Communication Skills, Career Preparation, Ethics, and Peer Review in a Team-Taught Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mary Lou Baker; Seybold, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    The widely acknowledged need to include chemical information competencies and communication skills in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum can be accommodated in a variety of ways. We describe a team-taught, semester-length course at Wright State University which combines chemical information literacy, written and oral communication skills,…

  17. Solute-specific patterns and drivers of urban stream chemistry revealed by long-term monitoring in Baltimore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, A. J.; Woytowitz, E.; Majcher, E.; Rosi, E. J.; Groffman, P.

    2017-12-01

    Urban streams receive a myriad of chemical inputs from the surrounding landscape due to altered lithology (asphalt, concrete), leaky sewage infrastructure, and other human activities (road salt, fertilizer, industrial wastes, wastewater effluent), potentially leading to multiple chemical stressors occurring simultaneously. To evaluate potential drivers of water chemistry change, we used approximately 20 years of weekly water chemistry monitoring data from streams in the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) to quantify trends of annual loads and flow-weighted concentrations for multiple solutes of interest, including nitrate (NO3-), phosphate (PO43-), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), chloride (Cl-), and sulfate (SO42-) and subsequently examined various gray and green infrastructure characteristics at the watershed scale. For example, we quantified annual volume and duration of reported sanitary sewer overflows (SSO) and cumulative storage volume and area of various best management practices (BMPs). Site- and solute-specific trends differed, but across our monitoring network we found evidence for decreasing annual export for multiple solutes. Additionally, we found that changes in gray- and green-infrastructure characteristics were related to changes in water quality at our most downstream (most urban) monitoring site. For example, annual NO3- loads increased with longer cumulative SSO duration, whereas annual PO43- and TP loads decreased with a cumulative BMP area in the watershed. Further, we used same long-term water chemistry data and multivariate analyses to investigate whether urban streams have unique water chemistry fingerprints representing the multiple chemical stressors at a given site, which could provide insight into sources and impacts of water-quality impairment. These analyses and results illustrate the major role gray and green infrastructure play in influencing water quality in urban environments, and illustrate that focusing on a variety of

  18. The Combined Effects of Classroom Teaching and Learning Strategy Use on Students' Chemistry Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Derek

    2015-02-01

    For students to be successful in school chemistry, a strong sense of self-efficacy is essential. Chemistry self-efficacy can be defined as students' beliefs about the extent to which they are capable of performing specific chemistry tasks. According to Bandura (Psychol. Rev. 84:191-215, 1977), students acquire information about their level of self-efficacy from four sources: performance accomplishments, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and physiological states. No published studies have investigated how instructional strategies in chemistry lessons can provide students with positive experiences with these four sources of self-efficacy information and how the instructional strategies promote students' chemistry self-efficacy. In this study, questionnaire items were constructed to measure student perceptions about instructional strategies, termed efficacy-enhancing teaching, which can provide positive experiences with the four sources of self-efficacy information. Structural equation modeling was then applied to test a hypothesized mediation model, positing that efficacy-enhancing teaching positively affects students' chemistry self-efficacy through their use of deep learning strategies such as metacognitive control strategies. A total of 590 chemistry students at nine secondary schools in Hong Kong participated in the survey. The mediation model provided a good fit to the student data. Efficacy-enhancing teaching had a direct effect on students' chemistry self-efficacy. Efficacy-enhancing teaching also directly affected students' use of deep learning strategies, which in turn affected students' chemistry self-efficacy. The implications of these findings for developing secondary school students' chemistry self-efficacy are discussed.

  19. Combining research in physical chemistry and chemical education: Part A. The femtosecond molecular dynamics of small gas-phase anion clusters. Part B. Surveying student beliefs about chemistry and the development of physical chemistry learning tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Jack

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation combines work in the areas of experimental physical chemistry and chemical education. In the area of physical chemistry, femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to interrogate the time-dependence for energy redistribution, solvent reorientation, and dissociation dynamics in small gas-phase anion clusters. The chemical education research addressed in this manuscript include the development and validation of a survey to measure students' beliefs about chemistry and the learning of chemistry and the development and testing of learning tutorials for use in undergraduate physical chemistry courses in thermodynamics and kinetics. In the first part of this dissertation, the Cu(CD3OD) dynamics are investigated using a combination of femtosecond pump-probe experiments and ab initio calculations. Dissociation of this complex into Cu and CD3OD occurs on two distinct time scales: 3 and 30 ps, which arise, respectively, from the coupling of intermolecular solvent rotations and excited methyl rotor rotation into the Cu-O dissociation component upon electron photodetachment of the precursor anion. In the second part of this dissertation, the time-resolved recombination of photodissociated IBr-(CO2)n (n = 5 - 10) cluster anions is investigated. Upon excitation to the A' 2pi 1/2 state of the chromophore, the bare anion results in I- and Br products, upon solvation with CO2, the IBr- chromophore regains near-IR absorption after recombination and vibrational relaxation on the ground electronic state. The recombination times vary with the number of solvent molecules from 12 ps for n = 5 to 900 ps for n = 10. Extensive electronic structure and non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations provide a framework to understand this behavior. In the third part of this dissertation, the modification and validation of the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) for use in chemistry is presented in detail. The CLASS survey is designed to measure student

  20. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed; Leij, Feike; Simunek, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models were developed to describe various rates of colloid release. These models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of Escherichia coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity. The retention and release of 20nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca(2+) than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca(2+) by Na(+) and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider other interactions (e.g., Born, steric, and/or hydration forces) and/or nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g for the examined conditions. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque; e.g., macroscopic roughness and grain-grain contacts. Our analysis and models improve our understanding and ability to describe the amounts

  1. Comparison of Chain Conformation of Poly(vinyl alcohol) in Solutions and Melts from Quantum Chemistry Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Matsuda, Tsunetoshi; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Confirmations of 2,4-dihydroxypentane (DHP), a model molecule for poly(vinyl alcohol), have been studied by quantum chemistry (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. QC calculations at the 6-311G MP2 level show the meso tt conformer to be lowest in energy followed by the racemic tg, due to intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxy groups. The Dreiding force field has been modified to reproduce the QC conformer energies for DHP. MD simulations using this force field have been carried out for DHP molecules in the gas phase, melt, and CHCl3 and water solutions. Extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed for the gas phase and CHCl3 solution, but not for the melt or aqueous solution, Such a condensed phase effect due to intermolecular interactions results in a drastic change in chain conformations, in agreement with experiments.

  2. Combination of graph heuristics in producing initial solution of curriculum based course timetabling problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Juliana; Hussin, Naimah Mohd

    2016-08-01

    The construction of population of initial solution is a crucial task in population-based metaheuristic approach for solving curriculum-based university course timetabling problem because it can affect the convergence speed and also the quality of the final solution. This paper presents an exploration on combination of graph heuristics in construction approach in curriculum based course timetabling problem to produce a population of initial solutions. The graph heuristics were set as single and combination of two heuristics. In addition, several ways of assigning courses into room and timeslot are implemented. All settings of heuristics are then tested on the same curriculum based course timetabling problem instances and are compared with each other in terms of number of population produced. The result shows that combination of saturation degree followed by largest degree heuristic produce the highest number of population of initial solutions. The results from this study can be used in the improvement phase of algorithm that uses population of initial solutions.

  3. Greener "Solutions" for the Organic Chemistry Teaching Lab: Exploring the Advantages of Alternative Reaction Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Lallie C.; Huffman, Lauren M.; Hutchison, James E.; Rogers, Courtney E.; Goodwin, Thomas E.; Spessard, Gary O.

    2009-01-01

    A major approach for implementing green chemistry is the discovery and development of synthetic strategies that reduce the quantity of solvent needed, eliminate it altogether, or rely on new reaction media. An increasing number of examples have demonstrated that greener reaction solvents or media can enhance performance as well as reduce hazard.…

  4. A combined wet chemistry and EXAFS study of U(VI) uptake by cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, E.; Harfouche, M.; Tits, J.; Kunz, D.; Daehn, R.; Fujita, T.; Tsukamoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption behaviour and speciation of U(VI) in cementitious systems was investigated by a combination of wet chemistry experiments and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. Radiotracer studies using 233 U were carried out on hardened cement paste (HCP) and calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), which are the major constituents of HCP, to determine the uptake kinetics and sorption isotherms. C-S-H phases were synthesized using different methods for solid phase preparation, which enabled us to study the U(VI) uptake by different types of C-S-H phases and a wide range of Ca/Si compositions, and to distinguish U(VI) sorption on the surface of C-S-H from U(VI) incorporation into the structure. XAS measurements were performed using U(VI) loaded HCP and C-S-H materials (sorption and co-precipitation samples) to gain structural information on the U(VI) speciation in these systems, i.e., the type and number of neighbouring atoms, and bond distances. Examples of studies that have utilized XAS to characterize U(VI) speciation in cementitious systems are still rare, and to the best of our knowledge, detailed XAS investigations of the U(VI)/C-S-H system are lacking. The results obtained from the combined use of wet chemical and spectroscopic techniques allow mechanistic models of the immobilization process to be proposed for cementitious waste forms containing low and high U(VI) inventories. In the latter case U(VI) immobilization is controlled by a solubility-limiting process with the U(VI) mineral predominantly formed under the conditions prevailing in cementitious systems. At low U(VI) concentrations, however, U(VI) appears to be predominantly bound onto C-S-H phases. The coordination environment of U(VI) taken up by C-S-H was found to resemble that of U(VI) in uranophane. A mechanistic understanding of the U(VI) binding by cementitious materials will allow more detailed and scientifically well founded predictions of the retention of

  5. The structural chemistry of metallocorroles: combined X-ray crystallography and quantum chemistry studies afford unique insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kolle E; Alemayehu, Abraham B; Conradie, Jeanet; Beavers, Christine M; Ghosh, Abhik

    2012-08-21

    Although they share some superficial structural similarities with porphyrins, corroles, trianionic ligands with contracted cores, give rise to fundamentally different transition metal complexes in comparison with the dianionic porphyrins. Many metallocorroles are formally high-valent, although a good fraction of them are also noninnocent, with significant corrole radical character. These electronic-structural characteristics result in a variety of fascinating spectroscopic behavior, including highly characteristic, paramagnetically shifted NMR spectra and textbook cases of charge-transfer spectra. Although our early research on corroles focused on spectroscopy, we soon learned that the geometric structures of metallocorroles provide a fascinating window into their electronic-structural characteristics. Thus, we used X-ray structure determinations and quantum chemical studies, chiefly using DFT, to obtain a comprehensive understanding of metallocorrole geometric and electronic structures. This Account describes our studies of the structural chemistry of metallocorroles. At first blush, the planar or mildly domed structure of metallocorroles might appear somewhat uninteresting particularly when compared to metalloporphyrins. Metalloporphyrins, especially sterically hindered ones, are routinely ruffled or saddled, but the missing meso carbon apparently makes the corrole skeleton much more resistant to nonplanar distortions. Ruffling, where the pyrrole rings are alternately twisted about the M-N bonds, is energetically impossible for metallocorroles. Saddling is also uncommon; thus, a number of sterically hindered, fully substituted metallocorroles exhibit almost perfectly planar macrocycle cores. Against this backdrop, copper corroles stand out as an important exception. As a result of an energetically favorable Cu(d(x2-y2))-corrole(π) orbital interaction, copper corroles, even sterically unhindered ones, are inherently saddled. Sterically hindered substituents

  6. Radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1973-07-01

    Research progress is reported on radiation chemistry of heavy elements that includes the following topics: radiation chemistry of plutonium in nitric acid solutions (spectrophotometric analysis and gamma radiolysis of Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) in nitric acid solution); EPR studies of intermediates formed in radiolytic reactions with aqueous medium; two-phase radiolysis and its effect on the distribution coefficient of plutonium; and radiation chemistry of nitric acid. (DHM)

  7. Effects of atmospheric deposition nitrogen flux and its composition on soil solution chemistry from a red soil farmland, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Peng, Ying; Chan, Andrew; Mao, Jingdong

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study on the solution chemistry of red soil in South China is presented. Data are collected from two simulated column-leaching experiments with an improved setup to evaluate the effects of atmospheric N deposition (ADN) composition and ADN flux on agricultural soil acidification using a (15)N tracer technique and an in situ soil solution sampler. The results show that solution pH values decline regardless of the increase of the NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio in the ADN composition or ADN flux, while exchangeable Al(3+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) concentrations increase at different soil depths (20, 40, and 60 cm). Compared with the control, ADN (60 kg per ha per year N, NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio of 2 : 1) decreases solution pH values, increases solution concentrations of NO3(-)-N, Al(3+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) at the middle and lower soil depths, and promotes their removal. NH4(+)-N was not detected in red soil solutions of all the three soil layers, which might be attributed to effects of nitrification, absorption and fixation in farmland red soil. Some of the NO3(-)-N concentrations at 40-60 cm soil depth exceed the safe drinking level of 10 mg L(-1), especially when the ADN flux is beyond 60 kg ha(-1) N. These features are critical for understanding the ADN agro-ecological effects, and for future assessment of ecological critical loads of ADN in red soil farmlands.

  8. Effects of lime and wood ash on soil-solution chemistry, soil chemistry and nutritional status of a pine stand in northern Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Bernard; Rumpf, Sabine; Mindrup, Michael; Meiwes, Karl-Josef; Khanna, Partap K.

    2002-01-01

    Lime and wood ash may be useful to improve acidic forest soils. A field experiment was conducted in a pine stand on a sandy podzol at Fuhrberg, Germany, which involved an application of dolomitic lime (3 t/ha) with three replications or wood ash (4.8 t/ha) without replications on the forest floor. During the 2 yr study period, lime affected the soil solution composition only slightly. Ash had a marked effect on solution chemistry of the mineral soil at 10 cm and the pH values dropped temporarily from 3.7 to 3.1. Nineteen months after the treatments, exchangeable calcium in the organic layer and mineral soil increased by 222 (lime addition) or 411 kg/ha (ash addition) and exchangeable magnesium increased by 101 (lime addition) or 39 kg/ha (ash addition). After ash addition, no marked change in heavy metal content was found below 4 cm of the organic layer. In the ash treatment, the potassium concentration of the 1-yr-old pine needles increased from 5.6 to 5.9 g/kg. This study suggests that ash from untreated wood may be recommended for amelioration of forest soils

  9. Solution and surface chemistry of the Se(IV)-Fe(0) reactions: Effect of initial solution pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xuefen; Ling, Lan; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2017-02-01

    Aspects of solution and solid-phase reactions between selenite (Se(IV)) and nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) were investigated. Experimental results on the effects of initial solution pH, formation and evolution of nZVI corrosion products, and speciation of selenium in nZVI were presented. In general, the rate of Se(IV) removal decreases with increasing initial pH. The observed rate constants of Se(IV) removal decreased from 0.3530 to 0.0364 min -1 as pH increased from 4.0 to 10.0. Composition and morphology of nZVI corrosion products and selenium species were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results confirmed that Se(IV) was reduced to Se(0) and Se(-II) by nZVI. Lower solution pH favored further reduction of Se(0) to Se(-II). Amorphous FeOOH, magnetite/maghemite (Fe 3 O 4 /γ-Fe 2 O 3 ) and ferrous hydroxide (Fe(OH) 2 ) were identified as the main corrosion products. Under alkaline conditions, the corrosion products were mainly of Fe(OH) 2 along with small amounts of Fe 3 O 4 , while nZVI in acidic solutions was oxidized to mostly Fe 3 O 4 and amorphous FeOOH. Furthermore, these corrosion products acted as intermediates for electron transfer and reactive/sorptive sites for Se(IV) adsorption and reduction, thus played a crucial role in the removal of aqueous Se(IV). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. New field of actinides solution chemistry; electrochemical study on actinide ion transfer at the interface of two immiscible electrolyte solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Zenko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kudo, Hiroshi [Tohoku Univ., Graduate School of Science, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Kihara, Sorin [Kyoto Inst. of Technolgy, Dept. of Chemistry, Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    A novel electrochemical method on the basis of a controlled electrolysis has been developed for the study of the ion transfer at the interface of two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES). The controlled-potential electrolysis for ITIES (CPEITIES) was applied to the transfer of actinide ions, and Gibbs energies for the transfer of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and Am{sup 3+} from aqueous solution (w) to nitrobenzene solution (nb) were determined to be 71.7 and 113 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. The ion transfer potentials for the facilitated transfer of UO{sub 2{sup +}} and Am{sup 3+} from w to nb in the presence of bis(diphenylphosphoryl)methane were determined, from which the stability constants of UO{sub 2}(BDPPM){sub 3}{sup 2+} and Am(BDPPM){sub 3}{sup 3+} complexes involved in the facilitated ion transfer reaction, were calculated to be 10{sup 23.9} and 10{sup 27.5}, respectively. On the basis of the results of CPEITIES, a feasibility of a new separation method, i.e., an electrolytic ion transfer separation, of actinide ions is evaluated. (author)

  11. K-maps: a vehicle to an optimal solution in combinational logic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    K-maps: a vehicle to an optimal solution in combinational logic design problems using digital multiplexers. ... Abstract. Application of Karnaugh maps (K-Maps) for the design of combinational logic circuits and sequential logic circuits is a subject that has been widely discussed. However, the use of K-Maps in the design of ...

  12. Acid in perchloroethylene scrubber solutions used in HTGR fuel preparation processes. Analytical chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.A.

    1979-02-01

    Acids and corrosion products in used perchloroethylene scrubber solutions collected from HTGR fuel preparation processes have been analyzed by several analytical methods to determine the source and possible remedy of the corrosion caused by these solutions. Hydrochloric acid was found to be concentrated on the carbon particles suspended in perchloroethylene. Filtration of carbon from the scrubber solutions removed the acid corrosion source in the process equipment. Corrosion products chemisorbed on the carbon particles were identified. Filtered perchloroethylene from used scrubber solutions contained practically no acid. It is recommended that carbon particles be separated from the scrubber solutions immediately after the scrubbing process to remove the source of acid and that an inhibitor be used to prevent the hydrolysis of perchloroethylene and the formation of acids

  13. The complex synthesis and solid state chemistry of ceria-lanthana solid solutions prepared via a hexamethylenetetramine precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, P.G.; Holmes, J.D.; Otway, D.J.; Morris, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Mixed oxide solid solutions are becoming ever more commercially important across a range of applications. However, their synthesis can be problematical. Here, we show that ceria-lanthana solid solutions can be readily prepared via simple precipitation using hexamethylenetetramine. However, the solution chemistry can be complex, which results in the precipitated particles having a complex structure and morphology. Great care must be taken in both the synthesis and characterisation to quantify the complexity of the product. Even very high heat treatments were not able to produce highly homogeneous materials and X-ray diffractions reveals the non-equilibrium form of particles prepared in this way. Unexpected crystal structures are revealed including a new metastable cubic La 2 O 3 phase. - Graphical abstract: The suggested mechanism for the formation of dual fluorite phase particles, where Step 1 corresponds to room temperature aging, Step 2; heating the solution to 90 deg. C, Step 3; cooling of the solution to room temperature, Step 4; calcination to 500 deg. C, Step 5; calcination to 700 deg. C and Step 6; calcination to 1300 deg. C. The terminology of e.g. La 1-x Ce x (OH) 3 is used to indicate the formation of a mixed oxy-hydroxy participate rather than a definitive assignment of stoichiometry. Similarly, La 1-y Ce y O 2 only implies a mixed solid solution. Highlights: → Mol% of prepared Ce-La oxides did not follow that of reactant mol%. → Complex reaction pathway found to be dependent on metal solution concentrations. → At certain concentrations core shell particles were found to form. → A reaction model was produced based on cationic solubility. → Report lanthana solubility higher than previously reported in CeO 2 .

  14. Gamma irradiation of isocitric and citric acid in aqueous solution: Relevance in prebiotic chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negrón-Mendoza, A., E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.mx; Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM. Cd. Universitaria, A. P. 70-543, 04510 México, D. F. México (Mexico)

    2015-07-23

    The radiation chemistry of hydroxy acids like citric and isocitric acids is rather scarce, even though they are crucial compounds in biological systems and for food irradiation. The aim of this work is to study the radiolytic behavior of these acids focused on the interconversion induced by radiation of citric and isocitric acid into other members of the Krebs cycle. The results showed that among the products formed were succinic, malonic, malic and other acids related to metabolic pathways, and these results are correlated with its possible role in chemical evolution processes.

  15. XI International conference Problems of solvation and complex formation in solutions, and VI Conference of young scientists Theoretical and experimental chemistry of liquid-phase systems (Krestovsky readings). Summary of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The collection contains materials of plenary, sectional and poster sessions, presented at the XI International conference Problems of solvation and complex formation in solutions, and VI Conference of young scientists Theoretical and experimental chemistry of liquid-phase systems (Krestovsky readings). Theoretical questions and new experimental methods of chemistry of solutions, structure and dynamics of molecular and ion-molecular systems in solution and at the phase boundary; modern aspects of applied chemistry of solutions are discussed [ru

  16. Recent studies of uranium and plutonium chemistry in alkaline radioactive waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, William D.; Wilmarth, William R.; Hobbs, David T.; Edwards, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Solubility studies of uranium and plutonium in a caustic, radioactive Savannah River Site tank waste solution revealed the existence of uranium supersaturation in the as-received sample. Comparison of the results to predictions generated from previously published models for solubility in these waste types revealed that the U model poorly predicts solubility while Pu model predictions are quite consistent with experimental observations. Separate studies using simulated Savannah River Site evaporator feed solution revealed that the known formation of sodium aluminosilicate solids in waste evaporators can promote rapid precipitation of uranium from supersaturated solutions

  17. Influence of corrosive solutions on microhardness and chemistry of magnesium oxide /001/ surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, H.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses and hardness experiments were conducted on cleaved magnesium oxide /001/ surfaces. The magnesium oxide bulk crystals were cleaved to specimen size along the /001/ surface, and indentations were made on the cleaved surface in corrosive solutions containing HCl, NaOH, or HNO3 and in water without exposing the specimen to any other environment. The results indicated that chloride (such as MgCl2) and sodium films are formed on the magnesium oxide surface as a result of interactions between an HCl-containing solution and a cleaved magnesium oxide surface. The chloride films soften the magnesium oxide surface. In this case microhardness is strongly influenced by the pH value of the solution. The lower the pH, the lower the microhardness. Sodium films, which are formed on the magnesium oxide surface exposed to an NaOH containing solution, do not soften the magnesium oxide surface.

  18. Radiation chemistry connection with the positronium formation in aqueous solution of triton X-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Ganguly, B.N.

    1996-01-01

    Positronium formation bears its connection to radiation chemical phenomenon. This has been demonstrated here to probe the micelle formation and further structural changes in Triton X-100 surfactant solution. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs

  19. Uranium chemistry in stack solutions and leachates of phosphogypsum disposed at a coastal area in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysandrou, M; Pashalidis, I

    2008-02-01

    The effect of the matrix composition (main constituents) on the concentration and chemical behavior of uranium in phosphogypsum stack solutions and leachates has been investigated. Solid and aqueous samples were taken from three different sub-areas of a phosphogypsum stack at a coastal area in Vasilikos (Cyprus). The sub-areas are characterized whether by their acidity (e.g. "aged" and "non-aged" phosphogypsum) or by their salt content, originating from pulping water during wet stacking or (after deposition) from the adjacent sea. Measurements in stack solutions and leachates showed that phosphogypsum characteristics affect both, the concentration and the chemical behavior of uranium in solution. Uranium concentration in solutions of increased salinity is up to three orders of magnitude higher than in solutions of low salinity and this is attributed to the effect of ionic strength on the solubility of phosphogypsum. Modelling showed that uranium in stack solutions is predominantly present in the form of uranium(VI) phosphate complexes (e.g. UO(2)(H(2)PO(4))(2), UO(2)HPO(4)), whereas in leachates uranium(VI) fluoro complexes (e.g. UO(2)F(2), UO(2)F(3)(-)) are predominant in solution. The latter indicates that elution of uranium from phosphogypsum takes places most probably in the form of fluoro complexes. Both, effective elution by saline water and direct migration of uranium to the sea, where it forms very stable uranium(VI) carbonato complexes, indicate that the adjacent sea will be the final receptor of uranium released from Vasilikos phosphogypsum.

  20. Effects of solution chemistry and atmosphere on leaching of alkali borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Christensen, H.; Clark, D.E.; Werme, L.

    1983-01-01

    The leaching behavior of two alkali-borosilicate glasses containing 9 wt % simulated fission products and 1.6 wt % uranium oxide has been studied. Samples were exposed to one of eight types of leachants including doubly distilled water, simulated ground silicate water, a brine solution, and solutions containing various concentrations of iron, aluminum or sodium maintained at either 25 0 C, 40 0 C or 90 0 C for up to 182 days. The most aggressive leachants were the solutions containing sodium (excluding brine) and simulated ground silicate water. These solutions increased the extent of leaching by a factor of 2 to 3 over that for distilled water for one of the glasses. A partially protective surface film rich in magnesium, potassium, and chlorine was formed on the glasses exposed to the brine solution. In order to evaluate the effects of atmosphere on leaching, samples were also immersed in doubly distilled water over which the relative concentrations of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide were varied. Increasing the carbon dioxide concentration from 0 to 50% resulted in a factor of 3 increase in the leaching rate

  1. Pore solution chemistry of simulated low-level liquid waste incorporated in cement grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    Expressed pore solutions from simulated low level liquid waste cement grouts cured at room temperature, 50 degree C and 90 degree C for various duration were analyzed by standard chemical methods and ion chromatography. The solid portions of the grouts were formulated with portland cement, fly ash, slag, and attapulgite clay in the ratios of 3:3:3:1. Two different solutions simulating off-gas condensates expected from vitrification of Hanford low level tank wastes were made. One is highly alkaline and contains the species Na + , P0 4 3- , N0 2 - , NO 3 - and OH - . The other is carbonated and contains the species, Na + , PO 4 3- , NO 2 - , NO 3 - , and CO 3 2- . In both cases phosphate rapidly disappeared from the pore solution, leaving behind sodium in the form of hydroxide. The carbonates were also removed from the pore solution to form calcium carbonate and possibly calcium monocarboaluminate. These reactions resulted in the increase of hydroxide ion concentration in the early period. Subsequently there was a significant reduction OH - and Na + ion concentrations. In contrast high concentration of N0 2 - and N0 3 - were retained in the pore solution indefinitely

  2. An Insight into Flotation Chemistry of Pyrite with Isomeric Xanthates: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Han

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The flotation chemistry between pyrite and isomeric xanthates (butyl xanthate and isobutyl xanthate was investigated by means of adsorption experiments, surface tension tests, and molecular dynamic simulations in this work. The flotation chemical results were confirmed and further interpreted by quantum chemical calculations. The experiment results demonstrated that the isobutyl xanthate exhibited superior adsorption capacity and surface activity than those of butyl xanthate in flotation chemistry. In addition, molecular dynamic simulations were simultaneously performed in constant number, constant volume and temperature (NVT, and constant number, constant volume, and pressure (NPT ensemble, indicating that the NPT ensemble was more suitable to the flotation system and the isobutyl xanthate was easier to be adsorbed on pyrite surface compared with butyl xanthate during an appropriate range of concentrations. Furthermore, the quantum chemical calculations elucidated that the isobutyl xanthate presented higher reactivity than that of the corresponding butyl xanthate based on the frontier molecular orbital theory of chemical reactivity, which was consistent with experimental and simulation results obtained. This work can provide theoretical guidance for an in-depth study of the flotation chemistry of pyrite with isomeric xanthates.

  3. Ant-mediated effects on spruce litter decomposition, solution chemistry, and microbial activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadler, B.; Schramm, Andreas; Kalbitz, K.

    2006-01-01

    the effects of ants and aphid honeydew on litter solution of Norway spruce, microbial enzyme activities, and needle decomposition in a field and greenhouse experiment during summer 2003. In the field, low ant densities had relatively little effects on litter solution 30 cm away from a tree trunk...... and %N were not affected by ants or honeydew. Our results suggest that ants have a distinct and immediate effect on solution composition and microbial activity in the litter layer indicating accelerated litter decay whereas the effect of honeydew was insignificant. Keywords: Ants; Decomposition; Formica......Forest management practices often generate clear-cut patches, which may be colonized by ants not present in the same densities in mature forests. In addition to the associated changes in abiotic conditions ants can initiate processes, which do not occur in old-growth stands. Here, we analyse...

  4. The impact of solution chemistry of electrolyte on the sorption of pentachlorophenol and phenanthrene by natural hematite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Fanfeng; He, Yan, E-mail: yhe2006@zju.edu.cn; Lian, Zhenghua; Xu, Jianming, E-mail: jmxu@zju.edu.cn

    2014-01-01

    Hematite nanoparticles (NPs) were studied as a sorbent for hydrophobic organic contaminants (OCs) under natural ambient conditions through specially designed contrasting solution chemistry of electrolyte. Ionizable pentachlorophenol (PCP) and non-ionizable phenanthrene (PHE) were selected as representative OCs. The sorption capacities of PCP and PHE were pH-dependent, and a larger amount of PCP was sorbed at pH values below its pK{sub a} (4.75). However, the PHE sorption capacity was higher at relatively high or low pHs (e.g. below 4.0 and above 10.0), possibly due to the larger available surface area of the hematite NPs, caused by the higher values of net charges and charge density. Changes in pH might thus affect the sorption of OCs by hematite NPs, through modification of the surface characteristics of the sorbent and the electronic properties of the sorbate molecules. The influence of different ionic strengths indicated that the amounts of PCP and PHE sorbed by hematite NPs decreased as a concentration function of different types of ions (e.g. Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2 +} and Ca{sup 2 +}), with the underlying mechanism possibly being due to four interactions i.e. hydrogen-bonding, competitive sorption by ions in the ambient solution, screening effects and aggregation effects. The results confirmed that the surface chemistry of hematite NPs, the chemical properties of PCP and PHE, and solution chemistry (e.g. pH and ionic strength) of the electrolyte all played an important role in PCP and PHE sorption by hematite NPs. By comparison of both sorption capacity and ecologic advantages, our results suggested that natural hematite NPs would be more competitive and efficient for PCP and PHE sorption than engineered NPs. This finding increases our knowledge regarding the environmental function of natural NPs (such as hematite NPs) for OC remediation through manipulating their interfacial behavior. - Highlights: •Hematite NPs was tested for PCP/PHE sorption under

  5. The radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of sodium 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchill, C.E.; Smith, D.M.; Charlton, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The 60 Co γ-radiolysis of aqueous solutions of sodium 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate has been studied in acidic, unbuffered, and alkaline conditions and with addition of N 2 O and 2-propanol. Mechanisms are proposed to account for the yields of H 2 O 2 and hydroxylated anthraquinone sulfonates. In neutral solution, in the absence of O 2 , the OH and e - adducts undergo preferential cross termination. Reduction of the OH adduct leads to dehydration and regeneration of the quinone. (author)

  6. Solution of problem of determining spin properties of molecules in unitary formalism of quantum chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimko, G.T.; Luzanov, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis has been made of the problem of calculating one- and two-particle spin densities, which are needed in calculations of spin-orbit and spin-spin coupling. The proposed solution is oriented toward the application of computational algorithms using unitary group representations; the solution consists of explicit expressions for the matrix elements of spin density operators in terms of the means of products of spin-free generators. This has eliminated a serious problem encountered previously in determining spin characteristics of molecules within the framework of unitary formalism

  7. Exploring Fundamental Concepts in Aqueous Solution Conductivity: A General Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasulu, Frazier; Stevanov, Kelly; Barlag, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Using a conductivity sensor, a temperature sensor, and a datalogger, fundamental factors that affect conductivity are explored. These factors are (i) concentration, (ii) temperature, (iii) ion charge, and (iv) size and or mass of anion. In addition, the conductivities of a number of other solutions are measured. This lab has been designed to…

  8. Changes in soil solution chemistry of Andisols following invasion by bracken fern

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. L. Johnson-Maynard; P. A. McDaniel; D. E. Ferguson; A. L. Falen

    1998-01-01

    Disturbed areas within the Grand Fir Mosaic (GFM) ecosystem of northern Idaho show little to no natural conifer regeneration. Clear-cut sites are invaded quickly by bracken fern successional communities and seem to be in an arrested state of secondary succession. This study compared the soil solution composition of Andisols supporting bracken fern successional...

  9. A New Global Vertical Land Movement Data Set from the TIGA Combined Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunegnaw, Addisu; Teferle, Felix Norman; Ebuy Abraha, Kibrom; Santamaría-Gómez, Alvaro; Gravelle, Médéric; Wöppelman, Guy; Schöne, Tilo; Deng, Zhiguo; Bingley, Richard; Hansen, Dionne Nicole; Sanchez, Laura; Moore, Michael; Jia, Minghai

    2017-04-01

    Globally averaged sea level has been estimated from the network of tide gauges installed around the world since the 19th century. These mean sea level (MSL) records provide sea level relative to a nearby tide gauge benchmark (TGBM), which allows for the continuation of the instrumental record in time. Any changes in the benchmark levels, induced by vertical land movements (VLM) affect the MSL records and hence sea level estimates. Over the last two decades sea level has also been observed using satellite altimeters. While the satellite observations are globally more homogeneous providing a picture of sea level not confined to coastlines, they require the VLM-corrected MSL records for the bias calibration of instrumental drifts. Without this calibration altimeter instruments from different missions cannot be combined. GPS has made it possible to obtain highly accurate estimates of VLM in a geocentric reference frame for stations at or close to tide gauges. Under the umbrella of the International GNSS Service (IGS), the Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Working Group (WG) has been established to apply the expertise of the GNSS community to solving issues related to the accuracy and reliability of the vertical component to provide estimates of VLM in a well-defined global reference frame. To achieve this objective, five TIGA Analysis Centers (TACs) contributed re-processed global GPS network solutions to TIGA, employing the latest bias models and processing strategies in accordance with the second re-processing campaign (repro2) of the IGS. These solutions include those of the British Isles continuous GNSS Facility - University of Luxembourg consortium (BLT), the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) Potsdam, the German Geodetic Research Institute (DGF) at the Technical University of Munich, Geoscience Australia (AUT) and the University of La Rochelle (ULR). In this study we present to the sea level community an evaluation of the VLM estimates from the

  10. Physico-chemistry of adsorption of copper, nickel and cobalt on lignite from ammoniacal solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    The present paper deals with a process developed for lignite adsorption that can be used to prevent the hard scale formation during distillation of NH/sub 3/ and CO/sub 2/, recover Cu, Ni and Cr from dilute solutions, Cu and NH/sub 3/ from waste effluent containing SO/sub 4/ radicals, separate Cu (NH/sub 3/)/sub 4//sup +2/ and AsO/sub 4//sup -3/ from ammonial solutions and recover Cu, Ni and Co from ore pulps. In additions to the study of the adsorptions of M, NH/sub 3/ and CO/sub 2/ on lignite with caustic soda) was also investigated. Changes of the functional groups of humic acid its salt, before and after the adsorption, were examined by infrared adsorption analysis. (author)

  11. Radiation chemistry of the aqueous aluminium nitrate solution (Preprint no. RC-26)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkar, C.D.; Date, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Radiolysis of aqueous aluminium nitrate solution is studied as a function of concentration in the range 10 -4 M to 10 -1 M. The stable radiolytic product of nitrate radiolysis is nitrite. The yield of nitrite linearly increases with absorbed dose. The G(NO 2 ) values are determined at various concentrations of aluminium nitrate. A suitable mechanism is proposed to explain the observed G-value for the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab

  12. Aspects of the structure and solution chemistry of some technetium-tripolyphosphate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Several distinctly different complexes of Tc(III) and Tc(IV) with the ligand tripolyphosphate were prepared and studied electrochemically. In acidic solution, a transient Tc(III) species was observed, the electrochemical behavior of which proves that it is not monomeric in Tc and strongly suggests that it is a dimer. This material is radically different in its polarographic behavior from the Tc(III) complex resulting from the controlled potential electrolysis of TcO 4 - at a mercury pool cathode in the same electrolyte. The latter, air sensitive, complex can be reversibly oxidized to a Tc(IV) complex which is stable towards further oxidation but which undergoes hydrolysis in both acidic and alkaline media. The rate law for the hydrolysis in basic solution is: rate = 582 I mol -1 min -1 [Tc(IV)][OH - ]. The hydrolytic reaction in acidic solution is accelerated by hydrogen ion, indicating that a mechanism different from that in basic media is involved. Tc(IV) tripolyphosphate complexes prepared by ligand exchange reactions of TcBr 6 2- were shown by polarography to be different from the complexes prepared electrochemically. The gel permeation chromatographic behavior of one ligand substitution product showed it to be polymeric with a limiting tripolyphosphate to technetium ratio of 1:1

  13. Modelling trends in soil solution concentrations under five forest-soil combinations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, van der C.; Vries, de W.; Kros, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of forest and soil properties on changes in soil solution concentration upon a reduction deposition was examined for five forest-soil combinations with the dynamic RESAM model. Predicted concentrations decreased in the direction Douglas fir - Scotch pine - oak, due to decreased

  14. Synergy in extraction system chemistry: combining configurational entropy, film bending and perturbation of complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Separative chemistry is a pillar of technologic development in extraction, separation and selective remediation of metals and molecules. It finds its applications in the fields of electronic, renewable energy, medicine and chemistry, which require more than ever the use of 'Strategic Metals'. The liquid-liquid extraction is a separation technique that is involved in hydrometallurgical processes for the recovery of strategic metals from primary deposits, secondary and urban mines. This work is part of global vision of optimization of liquid-liquid extraction processes used in synergy, consisting in understanding the mechanisms underlying the synergy, and generalizing these mechanisms to all synergistic extraction systems. The understanding of these mechanisms underlying synergism aims at predicting and developing new synergistic extractants mixtures.To better understand the driving forces at the origin of synergistic phenomena, a suitable methodology for the characterization of supramolecular structures of extractant in the organic phase was exploited during this thesis work. The use of techniques like Small Angle Neutron/X-ray Scattering (SAXS/ANS) and interfacial tensiometry was crucial for the understanding of the synergistic mechanisms. A thermodynamical was also proposed to estimate quantitatively the key driving forces involved in the liquid-liquid extraction mechanisms. The application of these keys of comprehension helped to design a new synergistic system for the extraction of rare earths elements from phosphoric medium. (author) [fr

  15. Chemistry of solutions from the 13°N East Pacific Rise hydrothermal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michard, G.; Albarède, F.; Michard, A.; Minster, J.-F.; Charlou, J.-L.; Tan, N.

    1984-03-01

    Ten samples were recovered by the submersible "Cyana" submersible from two groups of hydrothermal vents located 2600 m deep along the East Pacific Rise at 13°N. The maximum measured temperature was 317°C and minimum pH 3.8. A systematic determination of major and trace elements has been carried out and mixing lines between a high-temperature component (HTC) and seawater are observed. The water chemistry of the HTC slightly differs for several elements at the two sites. This HTC is deprived of SO 4 and Mg and is greatly enriched in most other species. Maximum concentrations are (in units per kg): Cl = 0.72mol; Br = 1.1mmol; Na = 0.55mol; K = 29mmol; Rb = 14 μmol; Ca = 52mmol; Sr = 170 μmol; Mn = 750 μmol; Fe = 1mmol; Al = 15 μmol; Si = 21mmol. For many elements, the magnitude of the anomaly relative to seawater does not compare with the results obtained from the Galapagos or East Pacific Rise 21°N. The enrichment of cations relative to seawater is likely related to the huge Cl excess through charge balance. The Br/Cl ratio is close to that for seawater. However, it is not clear whether the Cl excess is due to gas release or basalt hydration (formation of amphibole chlorite or epidote). P-T dependence of SiO 2 solubility suggests that water-rock interaction last occurred at a depth in excess of 1 km below the sea floor. A mixing line of 87Sr/ 86Sr vs. Mg/Sr demonstrates that the HTCs have a nearly identical 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of 0.7041 for both sites. A water/rock ratio of about 5 is inferred, which differs from the 1.5 value obtained at 21°N.

  16. Land cover controls on summer discharge and runoff solution chemistry of semi-arid urban catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Erika L.; Brooks, Paul D.; Lohse, Kathleen A.; McLain, Jean E. T.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryRecharge of urban runoff to groundwater as a stormwater management practice has gained importance in semi-arid regions where water resources are scarce and urban centers are growing. Despite this trend, the importance of land cover in controlling semi-arid catchment runoff quantity and quality remains unclear. Here we address the question: How do land cover characteristics control the amount and quality of storm runoff in semi-arid urban catchments? We monitored summertime runoff quantity and quality from five catchments dominated by distinct urban land uses: low, medium, and high density residential, mixed use, and commercial. Increasing urban land cover increased runoff duration and the likelihood that a rainfall event would result in runoff, but did not increase the time to peak discharge of episodic runoff. The effect of urban land cover on hydrologic responses was tightly coupled to the magnitude of rainfall. At distinct rainfall thresholds, roads, percent impervious cover and the stormwater drainage network controlled runoff frequency, runoff depth and runoff ratios. Contrary to initial expectations, runoff quality did not vary in repose to impervious cover or land use. We identified four major mechanisms controlling runoff quality: (1) variable solute sourcing due to land use heterogeneity and above ground catchment connectivity; (2) the spatial extent of pervious and biogeochemically active areas; (3) the efficiency of overland flow and runoff mobilization; and (4) solute flushing and dilution. Our study highlights the importance of the stormwater drainage systems characteristics in controlling urban runoff quantity and quality; and suggests that enhanced wetting and in-stream processes may control solute sourcing and retention. Finally, we suggest that the characteristics of the stormwater drainage system should be integrated into stormwater management approaches.

  17. Analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Myeong Hu; Lee, Hu Jun; Kim, Ha Seok

    1989-02-15

    This book give explanations on analytical chemistry with ten chapters, which deal with development of analytical chemistry, the theory of error with definition and classification, sample and treatment gravimetry on general process of gravimetry in aqueous solution and non-aqueous solution, precipitation titration about precipitation reaction and types, complexometry with summary and complex compound, oxidation-reduction equilibrium on electrode potential and potentiometric titration, solvent extraction and chromatograph and experiment with basic operation for chemical experiment.

  18. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Myeong Hu; Lee, Hu Jun; Kim, Ha Seok

    1989-02-01

    This book give explanations on analytical chemistry with ten chapters, which deal with development of analytical chemistry, the theory of error with definition and classification, sample and treatment gravimetry on general process of gravimetry in aqueous solution and non-aqueous solution, precipitation titration about precipitation reaction and types, complexometry with summary and complex compound, oxidation-reduction equilibrium on electrode potential and potentiometric titration, solvent extraction and chromatograph and experiment with basic operation for chemical experiment.

  19. A Titanium–Organic Framework as an Exemplar of Combining the Chemistry of Metal– and Covalent–Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ha L.; Gándara, Felipe; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Doan, Tan L. H.; Cordova, Kyle E.; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2016-04-06

    A crystalline material with a two-dimensional structure, termed metal–organic framework-901 (MOF-901), was prepared using a strategy that combines the chemistry of MOFs and covalent–organic frameworks (COFs). This strategy involves in situ generation of an amine-functionalized titanium oxo cluster, Ti6O6(OCH3)6(AB)6 (AB = 4-aminobenzoate), which was linked with benzene-1,4-dialdehyde using imine condensation reactions, typical of COFs. The crystal structure of MOF-901 is composed of hexagonal porous layers that are likely stacked in staggered conformation (hxl topology). This MOF represents the first example of combining metal cluster chemistry with dynamic organic covalent bond formation to give a new crystalline, extended framework of titanium metal, which is rarely used in MOFs. The incorporation of Ti(IV) units made MOF-901 useful in the photocatalyzed polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA). The resulting polyMMA product was obtained with a high-number-average molar mass (26 850 g mol–1) and low polydispersity index (1.6), which in many respects are better than those achieved by the commercially available photocatalyst (P-25 TiO2). Additionally, the catalyst can be isolated, reused, and recycled with no loss in performance.

  20. Combined use of computational chemistry and chemoinformatics methods for chemical discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Manabu, E-mail: sugimoto@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1, Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Institute for Molecular Science, 38 Nishigo-Naka, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Ideo, Toshihiro; Iwane, Ryo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1, Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    Data analysis on numerical data by the computational chemistry calculations is carried out to obtain knowledge information of molecules. A molecular database is developed to systematically store chemical, electronic-structure, and knowledge-based information. The database is used to find molecules related to a keyword of “cancer”. Then the electronic-structure calculations are performed to quantitatively evaluate quantum chemical similarity of the molecules. Among the 377 compounds registered in the database, 24 molecules are found to be “cancer”-related. This set of molecules includes both carcinogens and anticancer drugs. The quantum chemical similarity analysis, which is carried out by using numerical results of the density-functional theory calculations, shows that, when some energy spectra are referred to, carcinogens are reasonably distinguished from the anticancer drugs. Therefore these spectral properties are considered of as important measures for classification.

  1. High pressure in solid state chemistry: Combined experimental and modeling approaches for assessing and predicting properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etourneau, Jean; Matar, Samir F.

    2018-06-01

    The thermodynamic pressure parameter has been thoroughly used with mastership by Gérard Demazeau throughout his rich career in solid state chemistry and materials sciences and more recently in biosciences. After a review of such works, focus is made in this topical article on his contribution together with his team in the field of hard materials based on light elements B, C, N with a proposition of a new ultra-hard carbon nitride C2N on one hand and on the structural transformations under high pressures of perovskite into postperovskite with a change of dimensionality from 3D to 2D and related oxides, regarding the arrangement of octahedra, on the other hand. Investigation and concepts first arising from experimental observables are shown to be aided and accelerated via first principles calculations of energy and energy-related quantities.

  2. Meltwater chemistry and solute export from a Greenland ice sheet catchment, Watson River, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Jacob C.; Knudsen, N. Tvis; Hasholt, Bent

    2014-01-01

    –2010 for the Watson River sector of the GrIS that drains into the fjord Kangerlussuaq. The hydrochemistry is dominated by Ca2+ and HCO3− with a relatively high molar K+/Na+ ratio of 0.6 ± 0.1, typical for meltwaters draining a gneissic lithology. Low molar Ca2+/Na+ and Mg2+/Na+ ratios indicate that weathering....... However, when normalized by discharge the denudation rates are comparable to other Arctic sites. When extrapolating the results from the Watson River catchment to the entire Greenland for 2007–2010, the solute export from Greenland meltwater varied between 7.1 × 106 and 7.8 × 106 tons, whilst the major...

  3. Another intermediate in the photochemistry and radiation chemistry of alkaline aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telser, T.; Schindewolf, U.

    1985-01-01

    By UV flash photolytic and pulse radiolytic experiments of aqueous alkaline solutions we confirm older experiments of Walker et al. and Hart et al., showing that the decay of hydrated electrons gives rise to another intermediate X which by light absorption revives hydrated electrons again. X is formed by a reaction of 1. order with respect to hydrated electrons, the rate of its formation increases with pH, and it decays by a second order process with a rate constant not exceeding 5 . 10 9 M -1 sec -1 , probably leading to hydrogen (e - ->X; 2X->H 2 ). X has maximum light absorption around 270 nm with an extinction coefficient of about 5000 M -1 cm -1 . We will not speculate about the nature of X. (orig.)

  4. Guest-host chemistry with dendrimers—binding of carboxylates in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ficker, Mario; Petersen, Johannes Fabritius; Hansen, Jon Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and binding of anions in water is difficult due to the ability of water molecules to form strong hydrogen bonds and to solvate the anions. The complexation of two different carboxylates with 1-(4-carbomethoxypyrrolidone)-terminated PAMAM dendrimers was studied in aqueous solution using...... the carboxylate-dendrimer interaction selectively. The binding stoichiometry for 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate was found to be two strongly bound guest molecules per dendrimer and an additional 40 molecules with weak binding affinity. The NOESY NMR showed a clear binding correlation of sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate...... with the lyophilic dendrimer core, possibly with the two high affinity guest molecules. In comparison, sodium 2-naphthoate showed a weaker binding strength and had a stoichiometry of two guests per dendrimer with no additional weakly bound guests. This stronger dendrimer interaction with sodium 3-hydroxy-2...

  5. Antimicrobial activities of CuO films deposited on Cu foils by solution chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekthammathat, Nuengruethai [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Titipun, E-mail: ttpthongtem@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Somchai, E-mail: schthongtem@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Monoclinic CuO thin films on Cu foils were successfully synthesized by a simple wet chemical method in alkaline solution with the pH of 13 at room temperature for different lengths of time. The as-synthesized thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Formation mechanism of the phase and morphologies was also discussed according to the experimental results. In this research, assemblies of pure CuO nanospindles with different orientations containing in the thin film synthesized for 2 weeks with 400 nm and 413 nm violet emissions showed better antimicrobial activity against S. aureus than E. coli.

  6. Antimicrobial activities of CuO films deposited on Cu foils by solution chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekthammathat, Nuengruethai; Thongtem, Titipun; Thongtem, Somchai

    2013-01-01

    Monoclinic CuO thin films on Cu foils were successfully synthesized by a simple wet chemical method in alkaline solution with the pH of 13 at room temperature for different lengths of time. The as-synthesized thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Formation mechanism of the phase and morphologies was also discussed according to the experimental results. In this research, assemblies of pure CuO nanospindles with different orientations containing in the thin film synthesized for 2 weeks with 400 nm and 413 nm violet emissions showed better antimicrobial activity against S. aureus than E. coli.

  7. Bio fuel ash in a road construction: impact on soil solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurdin, R T; van Hees, P A W; Bylund, D; Lundström, U S

    2006-01-01

    Limited natural resources and landfill space, as well as increasing amounts of ash produced from incineration of bio fuel and municipal solid waste, have created a demand for useful applications of ash, of which road construction is one application. Along national road 90, situated about 20 km west of Sollefteå in the middle of Sweden, an experiment road was constructed with a 40 cm bio fuel ash layer. The environmental impact of the ash layer was evaluated from soil solutions obtained by centrifugation of soil samples taken on four occasions during 2001-2003. Soil samples were taken in the ash layer, below the ash layer at two depths in the road and in the ditch. In the soil solutions, pH, conductivity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the total concentration of cations (metals) and anions were determined. Two years after the application of the ash layers in the test road, the concentrations in the ash layer of K, SO4, Zn, and Hg had increased significantly while the concentration of Se, Mo and Cd had decreased significantly. Below the ash layer in the road an initial increase of pH was observed and the concentrations of K, SO4, Se, Mo and Cd increased significantly, while the concentrations of Cu and Hg decreased significantly in the road and also in the ditch. Cd was the element showing a potential risk of contamination of the groundwater. The concentrations of Ca in the ash layer indicated an ongoing hardening, which is important for the leaching rate and the strength of the road construction.

  8. Hydrolysis of Laboratory Made Tholins in Aqueous Solutions: Implications for Prebiotic Chemistry on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine; Somogyi, Á.; Lunine, J.; Smith, M.

    2008-09-01

    Laboratory experiments that simulate the reactions occurring in Titan's thick nitrogen-methane atmosphere produce complex organic precipitates known as tholins. Tholins have the general formula CxHyNz, and are spectrally similar to Titan's haze. When placed in liquid water, specific water soluble compounds in the tholins have been shown to produce oxygenated organic species with activation energies in the range of 60 ± 10 kJ mol-1 and half-lives between 0.3 and 17 days at 273 K (Neish et al. 2008). Oxygen incorporation into such materials - a necessary step towards the formation of biological molecules - is therefore fast compared to the freezing of impact melts and cryolavas on Titan. The rates quoted above are for reactions occurring in pure liquid water. The composition of impact melts and lavas on Titan are not likely to be pure water, but rather contain a few percent ammonia. Tobie et al. (2005) predict that Titan has a subsurface water layer with an ammonia concentration of 14 wt. % in the present era. The presence of ammonia would likely change the reaction rates and yields of the hydrolysis reactions of tholins. We have therefore extended our work to include the measurement of tholin hydrolysis rate coefficients in ammonia-water solutions. In this work, tholins were synthesized from a 0.98 N2/0.02 CH4 atmosphere in a high voltage AC flow discharge reactor, and dissolved in a 13 wt. % ammonia-water solution. Rates were determined by monitoring intensity changes of select species over time using high resolution FT-ICR MS. Comparisons between rates of similar species observed at different pH will be presented. This work was supported by the NASA Exobiology Program. C. Neish was supported by an NSERC Postgraduate Scholarship.

  9. Towards efficient next generation light sources: combined solution processed and evaporated layers for OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, D.; Sarfert, W.; Meier, S.; Bolink, H.; García Santamaría, S.; Wecker, J.

    2010-05-01

    Typically high efficient OLED device structures are based on a multitude of stacked thin organic layers prepared by thermal evaporation. For lighting applications these efficient device stacks have to be up-scaled to large areas which is clearly challenging in terms of high through-put processing at low-cost. One promising approach to meet cost-efficiency, high through-put and high light output is the combination of solution and evaporation processing. Moreover, the objective is to substitute as many thermally evaporated layers as possible by solution processing without sacrificing the device performance. Hence, starting from the anode side, evaporated layers of an efficient white light emitting OLED stack are stepwise replaced by solution processable polymer and small molecule layers. In doing so different solutionprocessable hole injection layers (= polymer HILs) are integrated into small molecule devices and evaluated with regard to their electro-optical performance as well as to their planarizing properties, meaning the ability to cover ITO spikes, defects and dust particles. Thereby two approaches are followed whereas in case of the "single HIL" approach only one polymer HIL is coated and in case of the "combined HIL" concept the coated polymer HIL is combined with a thin evaporated HIL. These HIL architectures are studied in unipolar as well as bipolar devices. As a result the combined HIL approach facilitates a better control over the hole current, an improved device stability as well as an improved current and power efficiency compared to a single HIL as well as pure small molecule based OLED stacks. Furthermore, emitting layers based on guest/host small molecules are fabricated from solution and integrated into a white hybrid stack (WHS). Up to three evaporated layers were successfully replaced by solution-processing showing comparable white light emission spectra like an evaporated small molecule reference stack and lifetime values of several 100 h.

  10. Combining metabolic engineering and biocompatible chemistry for high-yield production of homo-diacetyl and homo-(S,S)-2,3-butanediol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianming; Chan, Siu Hung Joshua; Brock-Nannestad, Theis

    2016-01-01

    Biocompatible chemistry is gaining increasing attention because of its potential within biotechnology for expanding the repertoire of biological transformations carried out by enzymes. Here we demonstrate how biocompatible chemistry can be used for synthesizing valuable compounds as well as for l...... of 82%. The diacetyl and S-BDO production rates and yields obtained are the highest ever reported, demonstrating the promising combination of metabolic engineering and biocompatible chemistry as well as the great potential of L. lactis as a new production platform.......Biocompatible chemistry is gaining increasing attention because of its potential within biotechnology for expanding the repertoire of biological transformations carried out by enzymes. Here we demonstrate how biocompatible chemistry can be used for synthesizing valuable compounds as well...

  11. Adsorption of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate on activated carbons: effects of solution chemistry and presence of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Toledo, M I; Méndez-Díaz, J D; Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J; Ferro-García, M A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to determine the effectiveness of activated carbon in removing sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and to analyze the chemical and textural characteristics of the activated carbons that are involved in the adsorption process. Studies were also performed on the influence of operational variables (pH, ionic strength, and presence of microorganisms) and on the kinetics and interactions involved in the adsorption of this pollutant on activated carbon. The kinetics study of SDBS adsorption revealed no problems in its diffusion on any of the activated carbons studied, and Weisz-Prater coefficient (C WP) values were considerably lower than unity for all activated carbons studied. SDBS adsorption isotherms on these activated carbons showed that: (i) adsorption capacity of activated carbons was very high (260-470 mg/g) and increased with larger surface area; and (ii) dispersive interactions between SDBS and carbon surface were largely responsible for the adsorption of this pollutant. SDBS adsorption was not significantly affected by the solution pH, indicating that electrostatic adsorbent-adsorbate interactions do not play an important role in this process. The presence of electrolytes (NaCl) in the medium favors SDBS adsorption, accelerating the process and increasing adsorption capacity. Under the working conditions used, SDBS is not degraded by bacteria; however, the presence of bacteria during the process accelerates and increases SDBS adsorption on the activated carbon. Microorganism adsorption on the activated carbon surface increases its hydrophobicity, explaining the results observed.

  12. Understanding the defect chemistry of alkali metal strontium silicate solid solutions: insights from experiment and theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bayliss, Ryan D.; Cook, Stuart N.; Scanlon, David O.; Fearn, Sarah; Cabana, Jordi; Greaves, Colin; Kilner, John A.; Skinner, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Recent reports of remarkably high oxide ion conduction in a new family of strontium silicates have been challenged. It has recently been demonstrated that, in the nominally potassium substituted strontium germanium silicate material, the dominant charge carrier was not the oxygen ion, and furthermore that the material was not single phase (R. D. Bayliss et. al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/c4ee00734d). In this work we re-investigate the sodium-doped strontium silicate material that was reported to exhibit the highest oxide ion conductivity in the solid solution, nominally Sr0.55Na0.45SiO2.775. The results show lower levels of total conductivity than previously reported and sub-micron elemental mapping demonstrates, in a similar manner to that reported for the Sr0.8K0.2Si0.5Ge0.5O2.9 composition, an inhomogeneous chemical distribution correlating with a multiphase material. It is also shown that the conductivity is not related to protonic mobility. A density functional theory computational approach provides a theoretical justification for these new results, related to the high energetic costs associated with oxygen vacancy formation. This journal is

  13. Understanding the defect chemistry of alkali metal strontium silicate solid solutions: insights from experiment and theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bayliss, Ryan D.

    2014-09-24

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Recent reports of remarkably high oxide ion conduction in a new family of strontium silicates have been challenged. It has recently been demonstrated that, in the nominally potassium substituted strontium germanium silicate material, the dominant charge carrier was not the oxygen ion, and furthermore that the material was not single phase (R. D. Bayliss et. al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/c4ee00734d). In this work we re-investigate the sodium-doped strontium silicate material that was reported to exhibit the highest oxide ion conductivity in the solid solution, nominally Sr0.55Na0.45SiO2.775. The results show lower levels of total conductivity than previously reported and sub-micron elemental mapping demonstrates, in a similar manner to that reported for the Sr0.8K0.2Si0.5Ge0.5O2.9 composition, an inhomogeneous chemical distribution correlating with a multiphase material. It is also shown that the conductivity is not related to protonic mobility. A density functional theory computational approach provides a theoretical justification for these new results, related to the high energetic costs associated with oxygen vacancy formation. This journal is

  14. Inactivation of B. Pumilus spores by combination hydrostatic pressure-radiation treatment of parenteral solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, P.A.

    1975-01-01

    Bacterial spores are inactivated by moderate hydrostatic pressures. The radiation dose required to sterilize radiation sensitive pharmaceuticals can be considerably reduced using a combination hydrostatic pressure-radiation treatment. This paper describes a combination pressure-radiation sterilization process using Bacillus pumilus spores suspended in water, 0.9% saline, and 5% dextrose solutions. The optimum temperatures for spore inactivation at 35 MPa and the degree of inactivation at 35, 70 and 105 MPa applied for times up to 100 min have been determined. Inactivation was greatest in saline and least in dextrose. Spores in dextrose were only slightly less radiation resistant than in saline or water. It was calculated that the radiation dose required for sterilization could be halved with appropriate compression treatment. Examples of combinations of pressure-radiation suitable for sterilization are given. One combination is compression at 105 MPa for 18 min for a dose of 1.25 Mrad. (author)

  15. Zinc-Nickel Codeposition in Sulfate Solution Combined Effect of Cadmium and Boric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Addi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of cadmium and boric acid on the electrodeposition of zinc-nickel from a sulfate has been investigated. The presence of cadmium ion decreases zinc in the deposit. In solution, cadmium inhibits the zinc ion deposition and suppresses it when deposition potential value is more negative than −1.2 V. Low concentration of CdSO4 reduces the anomalous nature of Zn-Ni deposit. Boric acid decreases current density and shifts potential discharge of nickel and hydrogen to more negative potential. The combination of boric acid and cadmium increases the percentage of nickel in the deposit. Boric acid and cadmium.

  16. Effects of solution chemistry on arsenic(V) removal by low-cost adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuru; Tsang, Daniel C W

    2013-11-01

    Natural and anthropogenic arsenic (As) contamination of water sources pose serious health concerns, especially for small communities in rural areas. This study assessed the applicability of three industrial byproducts (coal fly ash, lignite, and green waste compost) as the low-cost adsorbents for As(V) removal under various field-relevant conditions (dissolved oxygen, As(V)/Fe ratio, solution pH, and presence of competing species). The physico-chemical properties of the adsorbents were characterized by XRD, XRF, FT-IR, and NMR analysis. Batch experiments demonstrated that coal fly ash could provide effective As(V) removal (82.1%-95%) because it contained high content of amorphous iron/aluminium hydroxides for As(V) adsorption and dissolvable calcium minerals for calcium arsenate precipitation. However, the addition of lignite and green waste compost was found unfavourable since they hindered the As(V) removal by 10%-42% possibly due to dissolution of organic matter and ternary arsenate-iron-organic matter complexes. On the other hand, higher concentrations of dissolved iron (comparing As(V)/Fe ratios of 1:1 and 1:10) and dissolved oxygen (comparing 0.2 and 6 mg/L) only marginally enhanced the As(V) removal at pH 6 and 8. Thus, addition of dissolved iron, water aeration, or pH adjustment became unnecessary because coal fly ash was able to provide effective As(V) removal under the natural range of geochemical conditions. Moreover, the presence of low levels of background competing (0.8 or 8 mg/L of humic acid, phosphate, and silicate) imposed little influence on As(V) removal, possibly because the high adsorption capacity of coal fly ash was far from exhaustion. These results suggested that coal fly ash was a potentially promising adsorbent that warranted further investigation.

  17. Alteration of non-metallic barriers and evolution of solution chemistry in salt formations in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, H.J.; Becker, D.; Hagemann, S.; Meyer, Th.; Noseck, U.; Rubel, A.; Mauke, R.; Wollrath, J.

    2005-01-01

    Different Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) materials considered in Germany for the sealing of repositories in salt formations are presented. Their long term behaviour in terms of interactions with salt solutions is discussed and evaluated. The discussed EBS materials are crushed salt, self sealing salt backfill, bentonite and salt concrete. Whereas the knowledge concerning the geochemical, geomechanical, hydrological and thermal behavior of crushed salt and salt concrete is well advanced further research is needed for other EBS materials. The self healing salt backfill has also been investigated in depth recently. In order to fully qualify this material large scale in situ experiments are still needed. The present knowledge on compacted bentonites in a salt environment is not yet sufficient for reliable predictions of the long-term performance in salt formations. The sealing concept of the low- and intermediate-level Radioactive Waste Repository Morsleben (ERAM) in a former rock salt and potash mine is presented. This concept is based on cementitious materials, i.e. salt concrete. The geochemical stability of different salt concretes in contact with brines expected in ERAM is addressed. It is shown how the results from leaching experiments and geochemical modelling are used in the safety analyses and how the chemical boundary conditions prevailing in the EBS influence the development of the permeability of the sealing system and thus control the radionuclide release. As a result of modelling the behaviour of the seals in the safety assessment it is shown, that the seals are corroded within a time span of about 20 000 years. The influence of the uncertainty in the model parameters on the safety of the repository was assessed by a variation of the initial permeability of the seal. The maximum dose rate resulting from the radionuclide release from ERAM is nearly independent of the variation of the initial permeability within four orders of magnitude. (authors)

  18. Modeling the acid-base chemistry of organic solutes in Adirondack, New York, lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Charles T.; Lehtinen, Michael D.; Sullivan, Timothy J.

    1994-02-01

    Data from the large and diverse Adirondack Lake Survey were used to calibrate four simple organic acid analog models in an effort to quantify the influence of naturally occurring organic acids on lake water pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). The organic acid analog models were calibrated to observations of pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and organic anion (An-) concentrations from a reduced data set representing 1128 individual lake samples, expressed as 41 observations of mean pH, in intervals of 0.1 pH units from pH 3.9 to 7.0. Of the four organic analog approaches examined, including the Oliver et al. (1983) model, as well as monoprotic, diprotic, and triprotic representations, the triprotic analog model yielded the best fit (r2 = 0.92) to the observed data. Moreover, the triprotic model was qualitatively consistent with observed patterns of change in organic solute charge density as a function of pH. A low calibrated value for the first H+ dissociation constant (pKal = 2.62) and the observation that organic anion concentrations were significant even at very low pH (acidic functional groups. Inclusion of organic acidity in model calculations resulted in good agreement between measured and predicted values of lake water pH and ANC. Assessments to project the response of surface waters to future changes in atmospheric deposition, through the use of acidification models, will need to include representations of organic acids in model structure to make accurate predictions of pH and ANC.

  19. Efficacy and safety of fixed-combination bimatoprost/timolol ophthalmic solution

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Suk Bae; Han, Sang Beom

    2017-01-01

    Suk Bae Moon,1 Sang Beom Han21Department of Surgery, Kangwon National University Hospital, Kangwon National University Graduate School of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Kangwon National University Graduate School of Medicine, Chuncheon, KoreaWe read, with interest, the article by Sun et al1 entitled “Patient satisfaction with fixed-combination bimatoprost/timolol ophthalmic solution: a survey study in patients with gla...

  20. Combined solitary-wave solution for coupled higher-order nonlinear Schroedinger equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jinping; Tian Huiping; Li Zhonghao; Zhou Guosheng

    2004-01-01

    Coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations model several interesting physical phenomena. We used a trigonometric function transform method based on a homogeneous balance to solve the coupled higher-order nonlinear Schroedinger equations. We obtained four pairs of exact solitary-wave solutions including a dark and a bright-soliton pair, a bright- and a dark-soliton pair, a bright- and a bright-soliton pair, and the last pair, a combined bright-dark-soliton pair

  1. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Polyethylene-Based Macromolecular Architectures by Combining Polyhomologation with Powerful Linking Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Alkayal, Nazeeha

    2016-09-05

    Polyhomologation is a powerful method to prepare polyethylene-based materials with controlled molecular weight, topology and composition. This dissertation focuses on the discovery of new synthetic routes to prepare polyethylene-based macromolecular architectures by combining polyhomologation with highly orthogonal and efficient linking reactions such as Diels Alder, copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), and Glaser. Taking advantage of functionalized polyhomologation initiators, as well as of the efficient coupling chemistry, we were able to synthesize various types of polymethylene (polyethylene)-based materials with complex architectures including linear co/terpolymers, graft terpolymers, and tadpole copolymers. In the first project, a facile synthetic route towards well-defined polymethylene-based co/terpolymers, by combining the anthracene/maleimide Diels–Alder reaction with polyhomologation, is presented. For the synthesis of diblock copolymers the following approach was applied: (a) synthesis of α-anthracene-ω-hydroxy-polymethylene by polyhomologation using tri (9 anthracene-methyl propyl ether) borane as the initiator, (b) synthesis of furan-protected-maleimide-terminated poly(ε-caprolactone) or polyethylene glycol and (c) Diels–Alder reaction between anthracene and maleimide-terminated polymers. In the case of triblock terpolymers, the α-anthracene-ω-hydroxy polymethylene was used as a macroinitiator for the ring-opening polymerization of D, L-lactide to afford an anthracene-terminated PM-b-PLA copolymer, followed by the Diels–Alder reaction with furan-protected maleimide-terminated poly (ε-caprolactone) or polyethylene glycol to give the triblock terpolymers. The synthetic methodology is general and potentially applicable to a range of polymers. The coupling reaction applied in the second project of this dissertation was copper-catalyzed “click” cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC). Novel well-defined polyethylene

  2. Combination of GRACE monthly gravity field solutions from different processing strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Yoomin; Meyer, Ulrich; Jäggi, Adrian

    2018-02-01

    We combine the publicly available GRACE monthly gravity field time series to produce gravity fields with reduced systematic errors. We first compare the monthly gravity fields in the spatial domain in terms of signal and noise. Then, we combine the individual gravity fields with comparable signal content, but diverse noise characteristics. We test five different weighting schemes: equal weights, non-iterative coefficient-wise, order-wise, or field-wise weights, and iterative field-wise weights applying variance component estimation (VCE). The combined solutions are evaluated in terms of signal and noise in the spectral and spatial domains. Compared to the individual contributions, they in general show lower noise. In case the noise characteristics of the individual solutions differ significantly, the weighted means are less noisy, compared to the arithmetic mean: The non-seasonal variability over the oceans is reduced by up to 7.7% and the root mean square (RMS) of the residuals of mass change estimates within Antarctic drainage basins is reduced by 18.1% on average. The field-wise weighting schemes in general show better performance, compared to the order- or coefficient-wise weighting schemes. The combination of the full set of considered time series results in lower noise levels, compared to the combination of a subset consisting of the official GRACE Science Data System gravity fields only: The RMS of coefficient-wise anomalies is smaller by up to 22.4% and the non-seasonal variability over the oceans by 25.4%. This study was performed in the frame of the European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM; http://www.egsiem.eu) project. The gravity fields provided by the EGSIEM scientific combination service (ftp://ftp.aiub.unibe.ch/EGSIEM/) are combined, based on the weights derived by VCE as described in this article.

  3. Comparison of gravimetric and mantle flow solutions for sub-lithopsheric stress modeling and their combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshagh, Mehdi; Steinberger, Bernhard; Tenzer, Robert; Tassara, Andrés

    2018-05-01

    Based on Hager and O'Connell's solution to mantle flow equations, the stresses induced by mantle convection are determined using the density and viscosity structure in addition to topographic data and a plate velocity model. The solution to mantle flow equations requires the knowledge of mantle properties that are typically retrieved from seismic information. Large parts of the world are, however, not yet covered sufficiently by seismic surveys. An alternative method of modeling the stress field was introduced by Runcorn. He formulated a direct relation between the stress field and gravity data, while adopting several assumptions, particularly disregarding the toroidal mantle flow component and mantle viscosity variations. A possible way to overcome theoretical deficiencies of Runcorn's theory as well as some practical limitations of applying Hager and O'Connell's theory (in the absence of seismic data) is to combine these two methods. In this study, we apply a least-squares analysis to combine these two methods based on the gravity data inversion constraint on mantle flow equations. In particular, we use vertical gravity gradients from the Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer that are corrected for the gravitational contribution of crustal density heterogeneities prior to applying a localized gravity-gradient inversion. This gravitational contribution is estimated based on combining the Vening Meinesz-Moritz and flexural isostatic theories. Moreover, we treat the non-isostatic effect implicitly by applying a band-limited kernel of the integral equation during the inversion. In numerical studies of modeling, the stress field within the South American continental lithosphere we compare the results obtained after applying Runcorn and Hager and O'Connell's methods as well as their combination. The results show that, according to Hager and O'Connell's (mantle flow) solution, the maximum stress intensity is inferred under the northern Andes

  4. RETENTION OF HUMIC ACID FROM WATER BY NANOFILTRATION MEMBRANE AND INFLUENCE OF SOLUTION CHEMISTRY ON MEMBRANE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Zazouli, S. Nasseri, A. H. Mahvi, M. Gholami, A. R. Mesdaghinia, M. Younesian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to investigate the rejection efficiency of salt and hydrophobic fraction of natural organic matter, to study the flux decline behavior with a spiral wound nanofiltration membrane, and also to survey the influence of water chemistry on membrane performance. Experiments were conducted using a cross flow pilot-scale membrane unit with a full circulation mode. Humic acid was used as hydrophobic organic matter and NaCl as background electrolyte. Results showed that flux reduction increased with increasing ionic strength and humic acid concentration, and with lower pH. The rejection efficiency of organic and salt decreased with the decrease in pH and increase in ionic strength, because of osmotic pressure increase, leading to permeate flux decline and decrease in salt rejection. In addition, the improved salt rejection was likely due to Donnan exclusion by humic material close to membrane surfaces. The average rejection efficiency of humic acid and salt ranged between 91.2%-95.25% and 63.6%-80%, respectively. Dissolved organic carbon concentration was less than 0.57mg/L in permeate for all experiments. With increasing organic concentration, the charge of the membrane surface has become more negative due to the adsorption of organic foulants on the membrane surface, and thus increased the electrostatic repulsion. However, the increasing surface charge had the potential to result in a larger molecular weight cut-off of a fouled membrane due to membrane swelling which can lead to lower rejection solutes. Therefore, results of this study indicated that membrane fouling may significantly affect the rejection of organic and ion solute.

  5. Modelling the response of soil and soil solution chemistry upon roofing a forest in an area with high nitrogen deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. van der Salm

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Speuld forest, the Netherlands, the dynamic soil acidification model NuCSAM has been applied to a manipulation experiment in which part of the forest was roofed to control nitrogen (N and sulphur (S deposition. The roofed area was divided into two subplots watered artificially; one received ambient N and S deposition and one with pristine N and S deposition. Concentration measurements on each plots showed a high (time-dependent spatial variability. Statistical analyses of the concentrations on both subplots showed small but significant effects of the reduction in deposition on nitrate (NO3 sulphate (SO4 and aluminum (Al concentrations. The statistical significance of the effects was minimised by the large spatial variability within the plots. Despite these shortcomings, simulated concentrations were generally within the 95% confidence interval of the measurements although the effect of a reduction in N deposition on soil solution chemistry was underestimated due to a marked decline in N-uptake by the vegetation.

  6. Heterofunctional Glycopolypeptides by Combination of Thiol-Ene Chemistry and NCA Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krannig, Kai-Steffen; Schlaad, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Glycopolypeptides are prepared either by the polymerization of glycosylated amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs) or by the post-polymerization functionalization of polypeptides with suitable functional groups. Here we present a method for the in-situ functionalization and (co-) polymerization of allylglycine N-carboxyanhydride in a facile one-pot procedure, combining radical thiol-ene photochemistry and nucleophilic ring-opening polymerization techniques, to yield well-defined heterofunctional glycopolypeptides.

  7. General chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Yeong Sik; Lee, Dong Seop; Ryu, Haung Ryong; Jang, Cheol Hyeon; Choi, Bong Jong; Choi, Sang Won

    1993-07-01

    The book concentrates on the latest general chemistry, which is divided int twenty-three chapters. It deals with basic conception and stoichiometry, nature of gas, structure of atoms, quantum mechanics, symbol and structure of an electron of ion and molecule, chemical thermodynamics, nature of solid, change of state and liquid, properties of solution, chemical equilibrium, solution and acid-base, equilibrium of aqueous solution, electrochemistry, chemical reaction speed, molecule spectroscopy, hydrogen, oxygen and water, metallic atom; 1A, IIA, IIIA, carbon and atom IVA, nonmetal atom and an inert gas, transition metals, lanthanons, and actinoids, nuclear properties and radioactivity, biochemistry and environment chemistry.

  8. A global limit load solution for plates with surface cracks under combined end force and cross-thickness bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Yuebao; Fox, Mike J.H.

    2011-01-01

    A global limit load solution for rectangular surface cracks in plates under combined end force and cross-thickness bending is derived, which allows any combination of positive/negative end force and positive/negative cross-thickness moment. The solution is based on the net-section plastic collapse concept and, therefore, gives limit load values based on the Tresca yielding criterion. Solutions for both cases with and without crack face contact are derived when whole or part of the crack is located in the compressive stress zone. From the solution, particular global limit load solutions for plates with extended surface cracks and through-thickness cracks under the same loading conditions are obtained. The solution is consistent with the limit load solution for surface cracks in plates under combined tension and positive bending due to Goodall and Webster and Lei when both the applied end force and bending moment are positive. The solution reduces to the limit load solution for plain plates under combined end force and cross-thickness bending when the crack vanishes. - Highlights: → A global limit load solution for plates with surface cracks in plates is derived. → Combined positive/negative end force and positive/negative cross-thickness moment are considered. → The solution is based on the net-section plastic collapse concept.

  9. Actinide chemistry using singlet-paired coupled cluster and its combinations with density functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Alejandro J.; Sousa Alencar, Ana G.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2015-12-01

    Singlet-paired coupled cluster doubles (CCD0) is a simplification of CCD that relinquishes a fraction of dynamic correlation in order to be able to describe static correlation. Combinations of CCD0 with density functionals that recover specifically the dynamic correlation missing in the former have also been developed recently. Here, we assess the accuracy of CCD0 and CCD0+DFT (and variants of these using Brueckner orbitals) as compared to well-established quantum chemical methods for describing ground-state properties of singlet actinide molecules. The f0 actinyl series (UO22+, NpO23+, PuO24+), the isoelectronic NUN, and thorium (ThO, ThO2+) and nobelium (NoO, NoO2) oxides are studied.

  10. Green Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  11. Analysis of hide-out return and the composition of the steam generators' combined blowdown under ethanolamine chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Aliciardi, M; Belloni, M; Croatto, F; Ferrari, F; Herrera, C; Mendizabal, M; Montes, J; Saucedo, R; Rodriguez, I; Chocron, M

    2012-01-01

    Among the techniques recommended for the surveillance of the steam generators (SG's) are (i) the follow-up of the corrosion products in the feed water and blown-down water and the corresponding accumulation mass balance and (ii) the follow-up of the ionic impurities normally present in the main condensate and feed water that can enter in the cycle either through condenser leakages or even with the make-up water. This is, no matter how well the cycle is constructed or the make-up water plant behaves, given the continuous phase change present in the cycle, a concentration equilibrium is established. Moreover, a synergistic effect exists between both, corrosion products and impurities, (i) and (ii), because impurities concentrate in crevices and deposits creating a potentially corrosion risky environment for the SG's tubes. Hide-out return determination consists in the measurement of ions' concentrations, present in the blown-down water which are eluted in the shutdown during the power and temperature reduction. The integrated values allow graphical representations for performing several evaluations like: (i) the performance make-up water plant during a period, (ii) the presence of condenser in-leakages, (iii) the SG's deposits estimation and (iv) the internal chemistry of the SG's liquid phase inside the sludge pile. CNE, a CANDU 6 pressurized heavy-water reactor (PHWR) located in Embalse, Cordoba Province, Argentina, is close to reach the end-of-design-life and a life extension project is currently ongoing. In the plant also the chemistry of the BOP has been modified from a morpholine to an ethanolamine chemistry (Fernandez et. al, NPC'2010, October 3-7, Quebec City, Canada) to enhance protection of SG's internals and new SG's will be installed. Then, it is of interest to set up a hide-out return procedure and analysis of the combined blown-down crud collected during the shut down as a base line for the second period of

  12. Corrosion chemistry closing comments: opportunities in corrosion science facilitated by operando experimental characterization combined with multi-scale computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in characterization tools, computational capabilities, and theories have created opportunities for advancement in understanding of solid-fluid interfaces at the nanoscale in corroding metallic systems. The Faraday Discussion on Corrosion Chemistry in 2015 highlighted some of the current needs, gaps and opportunities in corrosion science. Themes were organized into several hierarchical categories that provide an organizational framework for corrosion. Opportunities to develop fundamental physical and chemical data which will enable further progress in thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of corrosion were discussed. These will enable new and better understanding of unit processes that govern corrosion at the nanoscale. Additional topics discussed included scales, films and oxides, fluid-surface and molecular-surface interactions, selected topics in corrosion science and engineering as well as corrosion control. Corrosion science and engineering topics included complex alloy dissolution, local corrosion, and modelling of specific corrosion processes that are made up of collections of temporally and spatially varying unit processes such as oxidation, ion transport, and competitive adsorption. Corrosion control and mitigation topics covered some new insights on coatings and inhibitors. Further advances in operando or in situ experimental characterization strategies at the nanoscale combined with computational modelling will enhance progress in the field, especially if coupling across length and time scales can be achieved incorporating the various phenomena encountered in corrosion. Readers are encouraged to not only to use this ad hoc organizational scheme to guide their immersion into the current opportunities in corrosion chemistry, but also to find value in the information presented in their own ways.

  13. Transport and retention of biochar nanoparticles in a paddy soil under environmentally-relevant solution chemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Dengjun; Yang, Fan; Xu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Nan; Cao, Xinde

    2017-11-01

    Land application of biochar has been increasingly recommended as a powerful strategy for carbon sequestration and soil remediation. However, the biochar particles, especially those in the nanoscale range, may migrate or carry the inherent contaminants along the soil profile, posing a potential risk to the groundwater. This study investigated the transport and retention of wood chip-derived biochar nanoparticles (NPs) in water-saturated columns packed with a paddy soil. The environmentally-relevant soil solution chemistry including ionic strength (0.10-50 mM), electrolyte type (NaCl and CaCl 2 ), and natural organic matter (0-10 mg L -1 humic acid) were tested to elucidate their effects on the biochar NPs transport. Higher mobility of biochar NPs was observed in the soil at lower ionic strengths, with CaCl 2 electrolyte being more effective than NaCl in decreasing biochar NPs transport. The retained biochar NPs in NaCl was re-entrained (∼57.7%) upon lowering transient pore-water ionic strength, indicating that biochar NPs were reversibly retained in the secondary minimum. In contrast, negligible re-entrainment of biochar NPs occurred in CaCl 2 due to the primary minimum and/or particle aggregation. Humic acid increased the mobility of biochar NPs, likely due to enhanced electrosteric repulsive interactions. The transport behaviors of biochar NPs can be well interpreted by a two-site kinetic retention model that assumes reversible retention for one site, and irreversible retention for the other site. Our findings indicated that the transport of wood chip biochar NPs is significant in the paddy soil, highlighting the importance of understanding the mobility of biochar NPs in natural soils for accurately assessing their environmental impacts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Removal of triazine-based pollutants from water by carbon nanotubes: Impact of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of organic pollutants by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the environment or removal of pollutants during water purification require deep understanding of the impacts of the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM is an integral part of environmental systems and plays a key role affecting the behavior of organic pollutants. In this study, the effects of solution chemistry (pH and ionic strength) and the presence of DOM on the removal of atrazine and lamotrigine by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) was investigated. The solubility of atrazine slightly decreased (∼5%) in the presence of DOM, whereas that of lamotrigine was significantly enhanced (by up to ∼70%). Simultaneous introduction of DOM and pollutant resulted in suppression of removal of both atrazine and lamotrigine, which was attributed to DOM-pollutant competition or blockage of adsorption sites by DOM. However the decrease in removal of lamotrigine was also a result of its complexation with DOM. Pre-introduction of DOM significantly reduced pollutant adsorption by the SWCNTs, whereas introduction of DOM after the pollutant resulted in the release of adsorbed atrazine and lamotrigine from the SWCNTs. These data imply that DOM exhibits higher affinity for the adsorption sites than the triazine-based pollutants. In the absence of DOM atrazine was a more effective competitor than lamotrigine for adsorption sites in SWCNTs. However, competition between pollutants in the presence of DOM revealed lamotrigine as the better competitor. Our findings help unravel the complex DOM-organic pollutant-CNT system and will aid in CNT-implementation in water-purification technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. HPLC-DAD-ELSD Combined Pharmacodynamics and Serum Medicinal Chemistry for Quality Assessment of Huangqi Granule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaguo Chen

    Full Text Available To more scientifically and reasonably control the quality of Huangqi Granules, preliminary studies on the pharmacodynamics and serum pharmacochemistry of this medicine were performed. DPPH and MTT experiments showed that water extracts of Huangqi Granules had good antioxidant activity and increased immunity. Timed blood samples collected 5 min, 15 min, and 30 min after oral administration of a set amount of Huangqi Granules were collected and tested using UPLC-ESI-MS/MS. As a result, calycosin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, ononin, calycosin, astragaloside IV, and formononetin were found to exist in rat blood after dosing, indicating that the five chemical compounds might have pharmacological activity, and based on this result, they were designated biomarkers for quality control of Huangqi Granules. Consequently, a simple, rapid and efficient method was developed in the present study for the simultaneous determination of the five characteristic compounds in Huangqi Granules using HPLC-DAD-ELSD.The separation was performed using an Agilent Hypersil ODS column (4.6 × 250 mm, 5 μm at 30 ℃. The mobile phase was composed of water (solvent A and acetonitrile (solvent B with a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The drift tube temperature of the ELSD system was set to 85 ℃, and the nitrogen pressure was 3.5 bar.All five characteristic compounds had good linear behavior with r2 values greater than 0.9972. The recoveries varied from 96.31% to 101.22%. Subsequently, the developed method was applied to evaluate the quality of Huangqi Granules from different batches, and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA was used to analyze the classification of the samples based on the values of the five compounds.The established HPLC method combined with HCA proved to be effective to evaluate the quality of Huangqi Granules.

  16. Effects of humic acid and solution chemistry on the aggregation and dispersion of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, G.; Gomez-Flores, A.; Choi, S.; Han, Y., , Dr; Kim, H.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of humic acid, ionic strength and ionic species on the aggregation and dispersion of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CB-NPs) was systemically investigated in aqueous media. The experimental conditions of stability tests were selected to the changes in the solution chemistry (0.1-10 mM NaCl and 0.01-1 mM CaCl2) and in the presence/absence of humic acid (1 and 5 mg L-1) in an aquatic environment. The CB-NPs suspension was more rapidly settled in NaCl solution than in CaCl2. Specifically, in the case of NaCl, the aggregation rate of CB-NPs increased with ionic strength. Contrary, CB-NPs dispersed in CaCl2 were insensitive to the aggregation as the ionic strength increased; that was because specific adsorption of the divalent cation Ca2+ occurred since the zeta potential of the CB-NPs is reversed to a positive charge with increasing of the ionic strength. It was confirmed that humic acid greatly influences the stability of the CB-NPs. In particular, the dispersion of CB-NPs was improved in the whole range of ionic strengths of NaCl as well as of CaCl2. To support the results, the interaction energy between CB-NPs was calculated for each condition by using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) and modified-DLVO theories. In the presence of humic acid, the improved stability of CB-NPs is attributed to the steric repulsive force.This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2015R1D1A3A01020766), the Ministry of Education (MOE) and National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) through the Human Resource Training Project for Regional Innovation (2015H1C1A1035930) and Korea Energy and Mineral Resources Engineering Program (KEMREP).

  17. Water Quality of NPP Secondary Side with Combined Water Chemistry of Ammonia and Ethanolamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, In-H.; Jung, Hyun-jun; Cho, Daechul; Park, Byunggi

    2012-09-01

    Ammonia (AM) and Ethanolamine (ETA), as pH control additive agents, were injected to the secondary side in a Korean NPP for the even pH in the entire secondary system including the wet region and the condensate. Ammonia and ETA are dominant in the vapor and liquid phases, respectively, since the former and latter are more and less volatile than water in the temperature range of 30 to 300 . pH of 9.5 to 9.7 was maintained in the water-steam cycle at the concentrations of ammonia with ∼1.0 ppm and ETA of ∼1.8 ppm. From the standpoint of corrosion, i.g, concentration of Fe, the water quality of secondary side was improved by the combined water treatment of ammonia and ETA, compared to all volatile treatment of ammonia. The electrical conductivity was increased from 6 to 10 μS/cm due to the presence of organic carboxylates produced by the decomposition of ETA. ETA was broken down by <5% in steam generator and converted into formate, acetate, and glycolate, among which acetate was largely formed. But inorganic ions such as Na + , Cl - , and SO 4 2- are not changed because their ingress was not made and the selectivity of resin over those ions was not fairly altered. The runtime of demineralizer in steam generator blowdown was shortened by a third for a mixture of ammonia and ETA. Most of Fe was originated from the shell side of heat exchangers including the condenser as a result of corrosion. Fe was only eliminated by ion exchange demineralizers, i.e., 46% at CPP and 3% at SG BD and 70% of Fe oxides were accumulated at the steam generator, on the basis of Fe concentration at the final feedwater. In conclusion, ETA is preferable to ammonia for the enhancement of pH in the liquid phase of water-steam mixture such as the shell side of heat exchanger and also the full-flow operation of CPP is more desirable than partial-flow operation for the improved removal of corrosion products, regardless of hydrogen- or amine-type operation. (authors)

  18. Combining crystallography and EPR: crystal and solution structures of the multidomain cochaperone DnaJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barends, Thomas R. M., E-mail: thomas.barends@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Brosi, Richard W. W. [Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Steinmetz, Andrea; Scherer, Anna; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Eschenbach, Jessica; Lorenz, Thorsten [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Seidel, Ralf [MPI for Molecular Physiology, Dortmund (Germany); Shoeman, Robert L.; Zimmermann, Sabine [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Bittl, Robert [Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal part of T. thermophilus DnaJ unexpectedly showed an ordered GF domain and guided the design of a construct enabling the first structure determination of a complete DnaJ cochaperone molecule. By combining the crystal structures with spin-labelling EPR and cross-linking in solution, a dynamic view of this flexible molecule was developed. Hsp70 chaperones assist in a large variety of protein-folding processes in the cell. Crucial for these activities is the regulation of Hsp70 by Hsp40 cochaperones. DnaJ, the bacterial homologue of Hsp40, stimulates ATP hydrolysis by DnaK (Hsp70) and thus mediates capture of substrate protein, but is also known to possess chaperone activity of its own. The first structure of a complete functional dimeric DnaJ was determined and the mobility of its individual domains in solution was investigated. Crystal structures of the complete molecular cochaperone DnaJ from Thermus thermophilus comprising the J, GF and C-terminal domains and of the J and GF domains alone showed an ordered GF domain interacting with the J domain. Structure-based EPR spin-labelling studies as well as cross-linking results showed the existence of multiple states of DnaJ in solution with different arrangements of the various domains, which has implications for the function of DnaJ.

  19. Radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swallow, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction (defines scope of article as dealing with the chemistry of reactive species, (e.g. excess electrons, excited states, free radicals and inorganic ions in unusual valency states) as studied using radiation with radiation chemistry in its traditional sense and with biological and industrial applications); gases; water and simple inorganic systems; aqueous metallo-organic compounds and metalloproteins; small organic molecules in aqueous solution; microheterogeneous systems; non-aqueous liquids and solutions; solids; biological macromolecules; synthetic polymers. (U.K.)

  20. Interactive effects of soil acidity and fluoride on soil solution aluminium chemistry and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, V; Loganathan, P; Tillman, R W; Parfitt, R L

    2007-02-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine if concentrations of fluoride (F), which would be added to acid soils via P fertilisers, were detrimental to barley root growth. Increasing rates of F additions to soil significantly increased the soil solution concentrations of aluminium (Al) and F irrespective of the initial adjusted soil pH, which ranged from 4.25 to 5.48. High rates of F addition severely restricted root growth; the effect was more pronounced in the strongly acidic soil. Speciation calculations demonstrated that increasing rates of F additions substantially increased the concentrations of Al-F complexes in the soil. Stepwise regression analysis showed that it was the combination of the activities of AlF2(1+) and AlF(2+) complexes that primarily controlled barley root growth. The results suggested that continuous input of F to soils, and increased soil acidification, may become an F risk issue in the future.

  1. Interactive effects of soil acidity and fluoride on soil solution aluminium chemistry and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) root growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoharan, V.; Loganathan, P.; Tillman, R.W.; Parfitt, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine if concentrations of fluoride (F), which would be added to acid soils via P fertilisers, were detrimental to barley root growth. Increasing rates of F additions to soil significantly increased the soil solution concentrations of aluminium (Al) and F irrespective of the initial adjusted soil pH, which ranged from 4.25 to 5.48. High rates of F addition severely restricted root growth; the effect was more pronounced in the strongly acidic soil. Speciation calculations demonstrated that increasing rates of F additions substantially increased the concentrations of Al-F complexes in the soil. Stepwise regression analysis showed that it was the combination of the activities of AlF 2 1+ and AlF 2+ complexes that primarily controlled barley root growth. The results suggested that continuous input of F to soils, and increased soil acidification, may become an F risk issue in the future. - Addition of high rates of fluoride to strongly acidic soils can reduce barley root growth due to the toxicity of aluminium-fluoride complexes formed in soil solution

  2. Analytical Solution of Interface Effect on the Strength of Combined Model Composed of Different Geologic Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-hui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the special combined structure of surrounding rock in western mining area of China, a micromechanical model with variable parameters containing contact interface was proposed firstly. Then, the derived stresses in coal and rock near the interface were analyzed on the basis of the harmonized strain relation, and the analytical solutions with respect to stress states near the interface were drawn up. The triaxial compressive strength of coal and rock was further determined in case the contact interface was in the horizontal position. Moreover, effects of stiffness ratio, interface angle, and stress level on the strength of two bodies near the contact area were expounded in detail. Results indicate that additional stresses which have significant effect on the strength of combined model are derived due to the adhesive effect of contact interface and lithological differences between geologic bodies located on both sides. The interface effect on the strength of combined body is most associated with the stiffness, interface angle, and the stress level. These conclusions are also basically valid for three-body model and even for the multibody model and lay important theory foundation to guide the stability study of soft strata composed of different geologic bodies.

  3. Degradation of p-nitrotoluene in aqueous solution by ozonation combined with sonolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Shuang; Xia Min; He Zhiqiao; Ying Haiping; Lue Bosheng; Chen Jianmeng

    2007-01-01

    p-Nitrotoluene (PNT) is a nitroaromatic compound that is hazardous to humans and is a suspected hormone disrupter. The degradation of PNT in aqueous solution by ozonation (O 3 ) combined with sonolysis (US) was investigated in laboratory-scale experiments in which pH, initial concentration of PNT, O 3 dose and temperature were varied. The degradation of PNT followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and degradation products were monitored during the process. The maximum degradation was observed at pH 10.0. As the initial concentration of PNT decreased, the degradation rate increased. Both temperature and ozone dose had a positive effect on the degradation of PNT. Of the total organic carbon (TOC) reduction, 8, 68, and 85% were observed with US, O 3 , and a combination of US and O 3 after reaction for 90 min, respectively, proving that ozonation combined with sonolysis for removal of TOC is more efficient than ozonation alone or ultrasonic irradiation alone. Major by-products, including p-cresol, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-(oxomethylene) cyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-one, but-2-enedioic acid, and acetic acid were detected by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry

  4. Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, Ms. Anna [Sentech, Inc.; Hampson, Anne [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Hedman, Mr. Bruce [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Garland, Patricia W [ORNL; Bautista, Paul [Sentech, Inc.

    2008-12-01

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) solutions represent a proven and effective near-term energy option to help the United States enhance energy efficiency, ensure environmental quality, promote economic growth, and foster a robust energy infrastructure. Using CHP today, the United States already avoids more than 1.9 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of fuel consumption and 248 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions annually compared to traditional separate production of electricity and thermal energy. This CO{sub 2} reduction is the equivalent of removing more than 45 million cars from the road. In addition, CHP is one of the few options in the portfolio of energy alternatives that combines environmental effectiveness with economic viability and improved competitiveness. This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its effectiveness and holds promise for the future as an: (1) Environmental Solution: Significantly reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through greater energy efficiency; (2) Competitive Business Solution: Increasing efficiency, reducing business costs, and creating green-collar jobs; (3) Local Energy Solution: Deployable throughout the US; and (4) Infrastructure Modernization Solution: Relieving grid congestion and improving energy security. CHP should be one of the first technologies deployed for near-term carbon reductions. The cost-effectiveness and near-term viability of widespread CHP deployment place the technology at the forefront of practical alternative energy solutions such as wind, solar, clean coal, biofuels, and nuclear power. Clear synergies exist between CHP and most other technologies that dominate the energy and environmental policy dialogue in the country today. As the Nation transforms how it produces, transports, and uses the many forms of energy, it must seize the clear opportunity afforded by CHP in terms of climate change, economic competitiveness, energy security, and infrastructure

  5. Effects of simulated acid rain on soil and soil solution chemistry in a monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qingyan; Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-05-01

    Acid rain is an environmental problem of increasing concern in China. In this study, a laboratory leaching column experiment with acid forest soil was set up to investigate the responses of soil and soil solution chemistry to simulated acid rain (SAR). Five pH levels of SAR were set: 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, and 4.5 (as a control, CK). The results showed that soil acidification would occur when the pH of SAR was ≤3.5. The concentrations of NO₃(-)and Ca(2+) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR fell 3.5. The concentration of SO₄(2-) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR was soil solution chemistry became increasingly apparent as the experiment proceeded (except for Na(+) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC)). The net exports of NO₃(-), SO₄(2-), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) increased about 42-86% under pH 2.5 treatment as compared to CK. The Ca(2+) was sensitive to SAR, and the soil could release Ca(2+) through mineral weathering to mitigate soil acidification. The concentration of exchangeable Al(3+) in the soil increased with increasing the acidity of SAR. The releases of soluble Al and Fe were SAR pH dependent, and their net exports under pH 2.5 treatment were 19.6 and 5.5 times, respectively, higher than that under CK. The net export of DOC was reduced by 12-29% under SAR treatments as compared to CK. Our results indicate the chemical constituents in the soil are more sensitive to SAR than those in the soil solution, and the effects of SAR on soil solution chemistry depend not only on the intensity of SAR but also on the duration of SAR addition. The soil and soil solution chemistry in this region may not be affected by current precipitation (pH≈4.5) in short term, but the soil and soil leachate chemistry may change dramatically if the pH of precipitation were below 3.5 and 3.0, respectively.

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of engineering solutions aimed at raising the efficiency of integrated gasification combined cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, S. I.; Bogatova, T. F.; Ryzhkov, A. F.

    2017-11-01

    Raising the efficiency and environmental friendliness of electric power generation from coal is the aim of numerous research groups today. The traditional approach based on the steam power cycle has reached its efficiency limit, prompted by materials development and maneuverability performance. The rival approach based on the combined cycle is also drawing nearer to its efficiency limit. However, there is a reserve for efficiency increase of the integrated gasification combined cycle, which has the energy efficiency at the level of modern steam-turbine power units. The limit of increase in efficiency is the efficiency of NGCC. One of the main problems of the IGCC is higher costs of receiving and preparing fuel gas for GTU. It would be reasonable to decrease the necessary amount of fuel gas in the power unit to minimize the costs. The effect can be reached by raising of the heat value of fuel gas, its heat content and the heat content of cycle air. On the example of the process flowsheet of the IGCC with a power of 500 MW, running on Kuznetsk bituminous coal, by means of software Thermoflex, the influence of the developed technical solutions on the efficiency of the power plant is considered. It is received that rise in steam-air blast temperature to 900°C leads to an increase in conversion efficiency up to 84.2%. An increase in temperature levels of fuel gas clean-up to 900°C leads to an increase in the IGCC efficiency gross/net by 3.42%. Cycle air heating reduces the need for fuel gas by 40% and raises the IGCC efficiency gross/net by 0.85-1.22%. The offered solutions for IGCC allow to exceed net efficiency of analogous plants by 1.8-2.3%.

  7. Combined solid state and solution NMR studies of α,ε-15N labeled bovine rhodopsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Karla; Lehner, Ines; Dhiman, Harpreet Kaur; Richter, Christian; Glaubitz, Clemens; Schwalbe, Harald; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Khorana, H. Gobind

    2007-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment of the vertebrate rod photoreceptor cell and is the only member of the G protein coupled receptor family for which a crystal structure is available. Towards the study of dynamics in rhodopsin, we report NMR-spectroscopic investigations of α,ε- 15 N-tryptophan labeled rhodopsin in detergent micelles and reconstituted in phospholipids. Using a combination of solid state 13 C, 15 N-REDOR and HETCOR experiments of all possible 13 C' i-1 carbonyl/ 15 N i -tryptophan isotope labeled amide pairs, and H/D exchange 1 H, 15 N-HSQC experiments conducted in solution, we assigned chemical shifts to all five rhodopsin tryptophan backbone 15 N nuclei and partially to their bound protons. 1 H, 15 N chemical shift assignment was achieved for indole side chains of Trp35 1.30 and Trp175 4.65 . 15 N chemical shifts were found to be similar when comparing those obtained in the native like reconstituted lipid environment and those obtained in detergent micelles for all tryptophans except Trp175 4.65 at the membrane interface. The results suggest that the integrated solution and solid state NMR approach presented provides highly complementary information in the study of structure and dynamics of large membrane proteins like rhodopsin

  8. Stability-indicating liquid Chromatographic assaymethod for Opthalmic solutions containing combination of Dexamethasone and Chloramphenicol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, R.M.; Al-Ashban, R.M.; Shah, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    A selective high-performance chromatographic procedure for the stability monitoring of ophthalmic solutions containing a combination of dexamethasone and chloramphenicolis demonstrated. The separation of the active components and the degradation product of chloramphenicol (1-amino-1-(4-nitrophenyl)-propane-1, 3diol) was achieved on a u-Bondapack C-18 column ( 5 um, 300 mm x 3.9 mm) maintained at ambient temperature (15-20C) by utilizing a mobile phase consisting acidified water (5% actified water with glacial acetic acid ) : acetonitrile : triethyl amine 700 : 300 : 2and pH was adjusted to 5.0 by using 10 M Na OH. The flow rate was 1.5 ml min-1; and elutes were followed with UV-detection at 254 nm. Complete resolution of dexamethasone, chloramphenicol and its hydrolytic product could be attained. The sensitivity, accuracy and specificity were tested. The method was successfully applied in post-marketing stability of the commercial batches of ophthalmic solutions. (author)

  9. Magnetic biochar combining adsorption and separation recycle for removal of chromium in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ouyang; Yitong, Han; Xi, Cao; Jiawei, Chen

    2017-03-01

    Biochar has been developed in recent years for the removal of contaminants such as Cr (VI) in water. The enhancement of the adsorption capacity of biochar and its recyclable use are still challenges. In this study, magnetic biochar derived from corncobs and peanut hulls was synthesized under different pyrolysis temperatures after pretreating the biomass with a low concentration of 0.5 M FeCl 3 solution. The morphology, specific surface area, saturation magnetization and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra were characterized for biochar. The magnetic biochar performed well in combining adsorption and separation recycle for the removal of Cr (VI) in water. The Cr (VI) adsorbance of the biochar was increased with the increase in pyrolysis temperature, and the magnetic biochar derived from corncobs showed better performance for both magnetization and removal of Cr (VI) than that from peanut hulls. The Langmuir model was used for the isothermal adsorption and the maximum Cr (VI) adsorption capacity of corncob magnetic biochar pyrolyzed at 650 °C reached 61.97 mg/g. An alkaline solution (0.1 M NaOH) favored the desorption of Cr (VI) from the magnetic biochar, and the removal of Cr (VI) still remained around 77.6% after four cycles of adsorption-desorption. The results showed that corncob derived magnetic biochar is a potentially efficient and recoverable adsorbent for remediation of heavy metals in water.

  10. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations Ax=b, where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O(NlogN) memory and executing an iteration in O(Nlog(2)N) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps.

  11. A Combined MPI-CUDA Parallel Solution of Linear and Nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Colmenares

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Poisson-Boltzmann equation models the electrostatic potential generated by fixed charges on a polarizable solute immersed in an ionic solution. This approach is often used in computational structural biology to estimate the electrostatic energetic component of the assembly of molecular biological systems. In the last decades, the amount of data concerning proteins and other biological macromolecules has remarkably increased. To fruitfully exploit these data, a huge computational power is needed as well as software tools capable of exploiting it. It is therefore necessary to move towards high performance computing and to develop proper parallel implementations of already existing and of novel algorithms. Nowadays, workstations can provide an amazing computational power: up to 10 TFLOPS on a single machine equipped with multiple CPUs and accelerators such as Intel Xeon Phi or GPU devices. The actual obstacle to the full exploitation of modern heterogeneous resources is efficient parallel coding and porting of software on such architectures. In this paper, we propose the implementation of a full Poisson-Boltzmann solver based on a finite-difference scheme using different and combined parallel schemes and in particular a mixed MPI-CUDA implementation. Results show great speedups when using the two schemes, achieving an 18.9x speedup using three GPUs.

  12. GRIM5-C1: Combination solution of the global gravity field to degree and order 120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Thomas; Bode, Albert; Reigber, Christoph; Schwintzer, Peter; Balmino, Georges; Biancale, Richard; Lemoine, Jean-Michel

    2000-12-01

    The new satellite Earth gravity field model GRIM5-S1 was recently prepared in a joint GFZ and GRGS effort. Based on this satellite solution and terrestrial and altimetric gravity anomalies from NIMA, a combined model GRIM5-C1, with full variance-covariance matrix up to degree and order 120, was computed. Surface gravity and altimetric gravity data are corrected for several systematic effects, such as ellipsoidal corrections and aliasing. A weighting scheme for gravity anomalies, according to their given standard deviations was developed. From each data set full normal equations were set up and finally combined with the GRIM5-S1 normals. To take into account good information from the satellite-only model a procedure was developed to identify such coefficients and appropriately weighed them in the final normal equation system. Internal error propagation and comparisons to external data sets show, that the GRIM5-C1 model represents the best state of long wavelength gravity field models.

  13. Effect of surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of herbicides diuron and amitrole from water by an activated carbon fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecha-Cámara, M A; López-Ramón, M V; Alvarez-Merino, M A; Moreno-Castilla, C

    2007-01-30

    A study was conducted on the effects of carbon surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of diuron and amitrole from aqueous solutions by adsorption on an as-received and oxidized activated carbon fiber. Results obtained were explained by the surface characteristics of the adsorbents and the characteristics of the herbicide molecules. Under the experimental conditions used, diuron uptake was much higher than that of amitrole, despite its larger molecular dimensions, due to the lesser water solubility, greater hydrophobicity, and larger dipolar moment of diuron compared with amitrole. Uptake variations associated with differences in carbon surface oxidation, solution pH, and ionic strength were explained by corresponding changes in electrostatic, hydrophobic, and van der Waals interactions.

  14. Multiple solutions in the theory of direct current glow discharges: Effect of plasma chemistry and nonlocality, different plasma-producing gases, and 3D modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, P. G. C.; Benilov, M. S. [Departamento de Física, CCCEE, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do Município, 9000 Funchal (Portugal)

    2013-10-15

    The work is aimed at advancing the multiple steady-state solutions that have been found recently in the theory of direct current (DC) glow discharges. It is shown that an account of detailed plasma chemistry and non-locality of electron transport and kinetic coefficients results in an increase of the number of multiple solutions but does not change their pattern. Multiple solutions are shown to exist for discharges in argon and helium provided that discharge pressure is high enough. This result indicates that self-organization in DC glow microdischarges can be observed not only in xenon, which has been the case until recently, but also in other plasma-producing gases; a conclusion that has been confirmed by recent experiments. Existence of secondary bifurcations can explain why patterns of spots grouped in concentric rings, observed in the experiment, possess in many cases higher number of spots in outer rings than in inner ones.

  15. Experimental determination of contaminant metal mobility as a function of temperature, time and solution chemistry. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruton, C.; Carroll, S.; O'Day, P.; Sahai, N.

    1997-01-01

    'Strontium is significantly more mobile than other hazardous radioactive metals. Its partitioning between aqueous and solid phases is controlled by reactions that occur at the interface between natural waters and minerals. At a groundwater site in Hanford (200-BP-5), the aerial extent of the 90 Sr plume is 100 times larger than the aerial extent of the 137 Cs and the 239 Pu plumes. Similarly, contaminated, perched watertables at INEL have much higher aqueous concentrations of 90 Sr than 137 Cs, presumably because Cs is preferentially sorbed to solids (Duncan 1995). Under high physical flow conditions, such as those in the highly fractured rock at Hanford and INEL, 90 Sr present in plumes may spread off-site and cause contamination of aquifers or other water sources. Geochemical factors that may contribute to the overall mobility of Sr in natural waters are the solubilities of phases such as strontianite (SrCO 3 ) and formation of strong complexes with sulfate and nitrate. Although 90 Sr is mobilized in natural waters in these examples, significant concentrations may also be present in solid phases. Sorption experiments using a wide variety of substrates at room temperature have shown that Sr is removed from solution under certain conditions. Additionally, strontianite (SrCO 3 ) may precipitate at low Sr concentrations in the pH range of waters in contact with basaltic rocks, which varies between pH 8 and 10. Waters contain variable amounts of carbonate owing to atmospheric interactions; the partial pressure of CO 2 is about 10 x 3.5 atm in air and commonly as high as 10 x 2.5 atm in soils. The objective of this work is to determine the fundamental data needed to predict the behavior of strontium at temperature and time scales appropriate to thermal remediation. The authors approach combines macroscopic sorption/precipitation and desorption/dissolution kinetic experiments, which track changes in solution composition, with direct molecular characterization of

  16. Finite-Difference Solution for Laminar or Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Axisymmetric Bodies with Ideal Gas, CF4, or Equilibrium Air Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, H. Harris, II; Millman, Daniel R.; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code was developed that uses an implicit finite-difference technique to solve nonsimilar, axisymmetric boundary layer equations for both laminar and turbulent flow. The code can treat ideal gases, air in chemical equilibrium, and carbon tetrafluoride (CF4), which is a useful gas for hypersonic blunt-body simulations. This is the only known boundary layer code that can treat CF4. Comparisons with experimental data have demonstrated that accurate solutions are obtained. The method should prove useful as an analysis tool for comparing calculations with wind tunnel experiments and for making calculations about flight vehicles where equilibrium air chemistry assumptions are valid.

  17. Aespoe HRL - Geoscientific evaluation 1997/4. Results from pre-investigation and detailed site characterization. Comparison of predictions and observations. Hydrogeology, groundwater chemistry and transport of solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhen, I; Gustafson, Gunnar [VBB Viak AB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Wikberg, P [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-06-01

    The pre-investigations for the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory were started in 1986 and involved extensive field measurements, aimed at characterizing the rock formations with regard to geology, hydrogeology, hydrochemistry and rock mechanics. Prior to the excavation in 1990 predictions were made for the excavation phase concerning: geology, ground water flow and chemistry, transport of solutes and mechanical stability. This report presents a comparison between these predictions and the observations made during the excavation. Also, investigation methods for the 700-2874 m sections of the tunnel are evaluated. 157 refs, 190 figs, 37 tabs.

  18. Aespoe HRL - Geoscientific evaluation 1997/4. Results from pre-investigation and detailed site characterization. Comparison of predictions and observations. Hydrogeology, groundwater chemistry and transport of solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhen, I.; Gustafson, Gunnar; Wikberg, P.

    1997-06-01

    The pre-investigations for the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory were started in 1986 and involved extensive field measurements, aimed at characterizing the rock formations with regard to geology, hydrogeology, hydrochemistry and rock mechanics. Prior to the excavation in 1990 predictions were made for the excavation phase concerning: geology, ground water flow and chemistry, transport of solutes and mechanical stability. This report presents a comparison between these predictions and the observations made during the excavation. Also, investigation methods for the 700-2874 m sections of the tunnel are evaluated

  19. Solid solutions of gadolinium doped zinc oxide nanorods by combined microwave-ultrasonic irradiation assisted crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Armin; Dastafkan, Kamran; Obeydavi, Ali; Rahimi, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    Nanocrystalline solid solutions consisting of un-doped and gadolinium doped zinc oxide nanorods were fabricated by a modified sol-gel process utilizing combined ultrasonic-microwave irradiations. Polyvinylpyrrolidone, diethylene glycol, and triethylenetetramine respectively as capping, structure directing, and complexing agents were used under ultrasound dynamic aging and microwave heating to obtain crystalline nanorods. Crystalline phase monitoring, lattice parameters and variation, morphology and shape, elemental analysis, functional groups, reducibility, and the oxidation state of emerged species were examined by PXRD, FESEM, TEM, EDX, FTIR, micro Raman, H2-TPR, and EPR techniques. Results have verified that irradiation mechanism of gelation and crystallization reduces the reaction time, augments the crystal quality, and formation of hexagonal close pack structure of Wurtzite morphology. Besides, dissolution of gadolinium within host lattice involves lattice deformation, unit cell distortion, and angular position variation. Structure related shape and growth along with compositional purity were observed through microscopic and spectroscopic surveys. Furthermore, TPR and EPR studies elucidated more detailed behavior upon exposure to the exerted irradiations and subsequent air-annealing including the formed oxidation states and electron trapping centers, presence of gadolinium, zinc, and oxygen disarrays and defects, as well as alteration in the host unit cell via gadolinium addition.

  20. A Multiple-star Combined Solution Program - Application to the Population II Binary μ Cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudehus, D. H.

    2001-05-01

    A multiple-star combined-solution computer program which can simultaneously fit astrometric, speckle, and spectroscopic data, and solve for the orbital parameters, parallax, proper motion, and masses has been written and is now publicly available. Some features of the program are the ability to scale the weights at run time, hold selected parameters constant, handle up to five spectroscopic subcomponents for the primary and the secondary each, account for the light travel time across the system, account for apsidal motion, plot the results, and write the residuals in position to a standard file for further analysis. The spectroscopic subcomponent data can be represented by reflex velocities and/or by independent measurements. A companion editing program which can manage the data files is included in the package. The program has been applied to the Population II binary μ Cas to derive improved masses and an estimate of the primordial helium abundance. The source code, executables, sample data files, and documentation for OpenVMS and Unix, including Linux, are available at http://www.chara.gsu.edu/\\rlap\\ \\ gudehus/binary.html.

  1. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kılıç, Emre; Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained

  2. Performance Evaluation of Ozonation Combined with Persulfate Application for Removal of Furfural from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Rahmani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Furfural is an organic compound which derived from a variety industrial, including petrochemicals, pulping, pharmaceutical, food. Also is a main agent in many industries and aromatic organic compounds entrance in the environment. There are several methods of treating including physical, chemical, biological and physicochemical for remove this matter. Among advanced oxidation methods can be combined ozonation process with persulfate catalytic are noted. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of ozonation process with the use of persulfate in removal furfural from aqueous solution. Materials and Methods: In this study, the efficiency of the process with a concentration furfural 5 to 30 mg/L, concentration persulfate 4 to 15 mM, pH = 3-11 and reaction time of 35 minutes in the semi-continuous reactor with a capacity of one liter was obtained. Results: The results of this study have been shown in  conditions of operation optimal , pH =,3 persulfate dosage 12 mM, ozone dosage of 1 g/min and the initial concentration of furfural  5 mg/L, this process is capable  remove of %93/34 percent Furfural and %70 of the initial COD. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the ozone/persulfate process can be a suitable process for the removal of organic aromatic compounds including pollutants of interest.

  3. A combination between Laplace transformation technique and numerical approximations to the Fokker-Planck equation solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monticelli, Cintia O.; Wortmann, Sergio; Segatto, Cynthia F.

    2005-01-01

    In this work is obtained a hybrid solution to the Fokker-Planck equation with energy dependency, very used in ion implantation problems. The main idea relies on the application of Laplace transform in the energy variable, and finite-difference in the spatial variable and in the angular variable. This procedure leads to a symbolic matrix problem for the transformed energy. To solve this system, is needed to do the Laplace inverse of the (sI+A) matrix, where s is a complex parameter, I is the identity matrix and A is a square matrix that was proceeded from the finite-difference in the spatial variable and in the angular variable. The matrix A is not defective, then is taken decomposition of A in a sum of two others matrices, where one is defective. It leads a iterative inversion method, similar the source fixed method combined with the diagonalization method, then is obtained the values to the angular flux. Hereafter we can to determine the energy deposited into the electronic system and in the nuclear system of the target. To comprove the results obtained, the simulation of implantation of B into Si at energies ranging from 1 KeV to 50 MeV was carried out and compared with the results by software SRIM2003. (author)

  4. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kılıç, Emre, E-mail: emre.kilic@tum.de; Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  5. Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, Anna [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States); Hampson, Anne [ICF, International, Arlington, VA (United States); Hedman, Bruce [ICF, International, Arlington, VA (United States); Garland, Patti [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bautista, Paul [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2008-12-01

    This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its effectiveness and holds promise for the future—as an: environmental solution, significantly reducing CO2 emissions through greater energy efficiency; competitive business solution, increasing efficiency, reducing business costs, and creating green-collar jobs; local energy solution, deployable throughout the United States; and infrastructure modernization solution, relieving grid congestion and improving energy security.

  6. Ion binding by humic and fulvic acids: A computational procedure based on functional site heterogeneity and the physical chemistry of polyelectrolyte solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Ephraim, J.; Mathuthu, A.

    1988-04-01

    Ion binding equilibria for humic and fulvic acids are examined from the point of view of functional site heterogeneity and the physical chemistry of polyelectrolyte solutions. A detailed explanation of the potentiometric properties of synthetic polyelectrolytes and ion-exchange gels is presented first to provide the basis for a parallel consideration of the potentiometric properties exhibited by humic and fulvic acids. The treatment is then extended to account for functional site heterogeneity. Sample results are presented for analysis of the ion-binding reactions of a standard soil fulvic acid (Armadale Horizons Bh) with this approach to test its capability for anticipation of metal ion removal from solution. The ultimate refined model is shown to be adaptable, after appropriate consideration of the heterogeneity and polyelectrolyte factors, to programming already available for the consideration of ion binding by inorganics in natural waters. (orig.)

  7. Differences in soil solution chemistry between soils amended with nanosized CuO or Cu reference materials: implications for nanotoxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Heather V A; Sunahara, Geoffrey I; Whalen, Joann K; Hendershot, William H

    2014-07-15

    Soil toxicity tests for metal oxide nanoparticles often include micrometer-sized oxide and metal salt treatments to distinguish between toxicity from nanometer-sized particles, non-nanometer-sized particles, and dissolved ions. Test result will be confounded if each chemical form has different effects on soil solution chemistry. We report on changes in soil solution chemistry over 56 days-the duration of some standard soil toxicity tests-in three soils amended with 500 mg/kg Cu as nanometer-sized CuO (nano), micrometer-sized CuO (micrometer), or Cu(NO3)2 (salt). In the CuO-amended soils, the log Cu2+ activity was initially low (minimum -9.48) and increased with time (maximum -5.20), whereas in the salt-amended soils it was initially high (maximum -4.80) and decreased with time (minimum -6.10). The Cu2+ activity in the nano-amended soils was higher than in the micrometer-amended soils for at least the first 11 days, and lower than in the salt-amended soils for at least 28 d. The pH, and dissolved Ca and Mg concentrations in the CuO-amended soils were similar, but the salt-amended soils had lower pH for at least 14 d, and higher Ca and Mg concentrations throughout the test. Soil pretreatments such as leaching and aging prior to toxicity tests are suggested.

  8. Efficient on-chip hotspot removal combined solution of thermoelectric cooler and mini-channel heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Xiaohong; Peng, Bei; Xie, Gongnan; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A combined solution of thermoelectric cooler (TEC) and mini-channel heat sink to remove the hotspot of the chip has been proposed. • The TEC's mathematical model is established to assess its work performance. • A comparative study on the proposed efficient On-Chip Hotspot Removal Combined Solution. - Abstract: Hotspot will significantly degrade the reliability and performance of the electronic equipment. The efficient removal of hotspot can make the temperature distribution uniform, and ensure the reliable operation of the electronic equipment. This study proposes a combined solution of thermoelectric cooler (TEC) and mini-channel heat sink to remove the hotspot of the chip in the electronic equipment. Firstly, The TEC's mathematical model is established to assess its work performance under different boundary conditions. Then, the hotspot removal capability of the TEC is discussed for different cooling conditions, which has shown that the combined equipment has better hotspot removal capability compared with others. Finally, A TEC is employed to investigate the hotspot removal capacity of the combined solution, and the results have indicated that it can effectively remove hotspot in the diameter of 0.5 mm, the power density of 600W/cm 2 when its working current is 3A and heat transfer thermal resistance is 0 K/W.

  9. Lifecycle comparison of selected Li-ion battery chemistries under grid and electric vehicle duty cycle combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Alasdair J.; Huang, Qian; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W.; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Reed, David M.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Choi, Daiwon

    2018-03-01

    Li-ion batteries are expected to play a vital role in stabilizing the electrical grid as solar and wind generation capacity becomes increasingly integrated into the electric infrastructure. This article describes how two different commercial Li-ion batteries based on LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) and LiFePO4 (LFP) chemistries were tested under grid duty cycles recently developed for two specific grid services: (1) frequency regulation (FR) and (2) peak shaving (PS) with and without being subjected to electric vehicle (EV) drive cycles. The lifecycle comparison derived from the capacity, round-trip efficiency (RTE), resistance, charge/discharge energy, and total used energy of the two battery chemistries are discussed. The LFP chemistry shows better stability for the energy-intensive PS service, while the NCA chemistry is more conducive to the FR service under the operating regimes investigated. The results can be used as a guideline for selection, deployment, operation, and cost analyses of Li-ion batteries used for different applications.

  10. Water as Life, Death, and Power: Building an Integrated Interdisciplinary Course Combining Perspectives from Anthropology, Biology, and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willermet, Cathy; Mueller, Anja; Juris, Stephen J.; Drake, Eron; Upadhaya, Samik; Chhetri, Pratik

    2013-01-01

    In response to a request from a campus student organization, faculty from three fields came together to develop and teach an integrated interdisciplinary course on water issues and social activism. This course, "Water as Life, Death, and Power", brought together topics from the fields of anthropology, biology and chemistry to explore…

  11. A comparison of amorphous calcium carbonate crystallization in aqueous solutions of MgCl2 and MgSO4: implications for paleo-ocean chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mei; Zhao, Yanyang; Zhao, Hui; Han, Zuozhen; Yan, Huaxiao; Sun, Bin; Meng, Ruirui; Zhuang, Dingxiang; Li, Dan; Liu, Binwei

    2018-04-01

    Based on the terminology of "aragonite seas" and "calcite seas", whether different Mg sources could affect the mineralogy of carbonate sediments at the same Mg/Ca ratio was explored, which was expected to provide a qualitative assessment of the chemistry of the paleo-ocean. In this work, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was prepared by direct precipitation in anhydrous ethanol and used as a precursor to study crystallization processes in MgSO4 and MgCl2 solutions having different concentrations at 60 °C (reaction times 240 and 2880 min). Based on the morphology of the aragonite crystals, as well as mineral saturation indices and kinetic analysis of geochemical processes, it was found that these crystals formed with a spherulitic texture in 4 steps. First, ACC crystallized into columnar Mg calcite by nearly oriented attachment. Second, the Mg calcite changed from columnar shapes into smooth dumbbell forms. Third, the Mg calcite transformed into rough dumbbell or cauliflower-shaped aragonite forms by local dissolution and precipitation. Finally, the aragonite transformed further into spherulitic radial and irregular aggregate forms. The increase in Ca2+ in the MgSO4 solutions compared with the MgCl2 solutions indicates the fast dissolution and slow precipitation of ACC in the former solutions. The phase transition was more complete in the 0.005 M MgCl2 solution, whereas Mg calcite crystallized from the 0.005 M MgSO4 solution, indicating that Mg calcite could be formed more easily in an MgSO4 solution. Based on these findings, aragonite and Mg calcite relative to ACC could be used to provide a qualitative assessment of the chemistry of the paleo-ocean. Therefore, calcite seas relative to high-Mg calcite could reflect a low concentration MgSO4 paleo-ocean, while aragonite seas could be related to an MgCl2 or high concentration of MgSO4 paleo-ocean.

  12. Role of Organic Solutes in the Chemistry Of Acid-Impacted Bog Waters of the Western Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    HrušKa, Jakub; Johnson, Chris E.; KráM, Pavel

    1996-04-01

    In many regions, naturally occurring organic acid anions can effectively buffer mineral acid inputs from atmospheric deposition, moderating their effect on surface water pH. We studied the effect of chronically high inputs of acid rain on the chemistry of three brown-water streams in the western Czech Republic. The dissolved organic acids in the streams were similar in character to those of other systems in Europe and North America. The site densities (the carboxyl group content per mass of C) were similar to values reported from Fenno-Scandia, and the relationship between the apparent pKa and pH conformed to those from two North American studies. Sulfate and organic acid anions (OA-) were the dominant anions in all three streams, yet despite high dissolved organic carbon and total organic acid concentrations, OA - comprised only 21-32% of total anion charge. This pattern was due to very high sulfate concentrations and, in two of the streams, a low degree of dissociation of the organic acids, probably the results of high long-term inputs of strong acids. Stream water pH was highly correlated to sulfate concentration, but uncorrelated with OA-, suggesting that free acidity is controlled by strong mineral acids rather than organic acids. Thus future reductions in strong acid inputs should result in increased pH and a return to organic control over acid-base chemistry.

  13. The chemistry of positronium. Part VI: inhibition and enhancement of positronium formation in aqueous solutions of halides, sulfide and thiocyanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplatre, G.; Abbe, J.C.; Maddock, A.G.; Haessler, A.

    1977-01-01

    The formation of positronium in aqueous solutions of halides, sulfide and thiocyanate has been investigated. Inhibiting and enhancing reactions of positronium formation are found. The results are discussed in terms of the spur model

  14. Time-dependent solution for axisymmetric flow over a blunt body with ideal gas, CF4, or equilibrium air chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, H. H., II; Spall, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    A time-asymptotic method has been used to obtain steady-flow solutions for axisymmetric inviscid flow over several blunt bodies including spheres, paraboloids, ellipsoids, and spherically blunted cones. Comparisons with experimental data and results of other computational methods have demonstrated that accurate solutions can be obtained using this approach. The method should prove useful as an analysis tool for comparing with experimental data and for making engineering calculations for blunt reentry vehicles.

  15. Computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  16. a Look at Nitrile Chemistry in SGR B2(N) Using the Combined Power of the GBT and the VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steber, Amanda; Zaleski, Daniel P.; Seifert, Nathan A.; Neill, Justin; Muckle, Matt; Pate, Brooks; Corby, Joanna F.; Remijan, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    Nitriles form the most prolific family of molecules known in the ISM, and laboratory work shows that radical-driven chemistry can account for the formation of a diverse set of nitrile and imine molecules. Broadband reaction screening of nitrile chemistry in a pulsed discharge nozzle coupled to a chirped-pulse Fourier transform rotational spectrometer has enabled detections of several new interstellar species including E- and Z-ethanimine and E-cyanomethanimine. The detections were made by direct comparisons of laboratory broadband rotational spectra with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) PRebiotic Interstellar MOlecule Survery (PRIMOS) survey towards Sgr B2(N), the most chemically complex interstellar region known. In order to probe nitrile chemistry in Sgr B2, we targeted low energy rotational transitions in the 18-21 GHz range of several nitriles with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at ˜1 arcsecond resolution. The data indicate that most nitriles and nitrile derivatives are co-spatial with shell shaped continuum features thought to be expanding ionization fronts. The CH2CN radical and imine species in particular are NOT associated with the hot core known as the "Large Molecule Heimat", where most large organic molecules are thought to reside. This result suggests radical driven nitrile chemistry may be promoted by near-UV radiation in moderate density regions of molecular clouds, and the data will be useful for evaluating possible formation mechanisms. R.A. Loomis et al. Ap. J. L., 765, (L9), 2013. D.P. Zaleski et al. Ap. J. L., 765, (L10), 2013.

  17. Influence of indian mustard (Brassica juncea) on rhizosphere soil solution chemistry in long-term contaminated soils: a rhizobox study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwon-Rae; Owens, Gary; Kwon, Soon-lk

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) root exudation on soil solution properties (pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), metal solubility) in the rhizosphere using a rhizobox. Measurement was conducted following the cultivation of Indian mustard in the rhizobox filled four different types of heavy metal contaminated soils (two alkaline soils and two acidic soils). The growth of Indian mustard resulted in a significant increase (by 0.6 pH units) in rhizosphere soil solution pH of acidic soils and only a slight increase (soil solution varied considerably amongst different soils, resulting in significant changes to soil solution metals in the rhizosphere. For example, the soil solution Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations increased in the rhizosphere of alkaline soils compared to bulk soil following plant cultivation. In contrast, the soluble concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Zn in acidic soils decreased in rhizosphere soil when compared to bulk soils. Besides the influence of pH and DOC on metal solubility, the increase of heavy metal concentration having high stability constant such as Cu and Pb resulted in a release of Cd and Zn from solid phase to liquid phase.

  18. Effect of porosity and surface chemistry on the adsorption-desorption of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakout, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Rice straw-based biochars modified with different chemical regents were used as an adsorbent for uranium(VI). Effect of pyrolysis temperature and nature of modifying agent's as well as surface chemistry, surface charge, and pore structure on U(VI) removal was investigated. Amount and nature of the surface groups has, in general, more influence than its porosity on U(VI) adsorption. The adsorption was maximum for the initial pH of 5.5. Rice straw derived biochars had comparable U(VI) adsorption as compared to other adsorbents. The U(VI) removal was 90 % from groundwater. NaHCO 3 was found to be the most efficient desorbent eluent for U(VI). (author)

  19. A hydrochemical modelling framework for combined assessment of spatial and temporal variability in stream chemistry: application to Plynlimon, Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.J. Foster

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent concern about the risk to biota from acidification in upland areas, due to air pollution and land-use change (such as the planting of coniferous forests, has generated a need to model catchment hydro-chemistry to assess environmental risk and define protection strategies. Previous approaches have tended to concentrate on quantifying either spatial variability at a regional scale or temporal variability at a given location. However, to protect biota from ‘acid episodes’, an assessment of both temporal and spatial variability of stream chemistry is required at a catchment scale. In addition, quantification of temporal variability needs to represent both episodic event response and long term variability caused by deposition and/or land-use change. Both spatial and temporal variability in streamwater chemistry are considered in a new modelling methodology based on application to the Plynlimon catchments, central Wales. A two-component End-Member Mixing Analysis (EMMA is used whereby low and high flow chemistry are taken to represent ‘groundwater’ and ‘soil water’ end-members. The conventional EMMA method is extended to incorporate spatial variability in the two end-members across the catchments by quantifying the Acid Neutralisation Capacity (ANC of each in terms of a statistical distribution. These are then input as stochastic variables to a two-component mixing model, thereby accounting for variability of ANC both spatially and temporally. The model is coupled to a long-term acidification model (MAGIC to predict the evolution of the end members and, hence, the response to future scenarios. The results can be plotted as a function of time and space, which enables better assessment of the likely effects of pollution deposition or land-use changes in the future on the stream chemistry than current methods which use catchment average values. The model is also a useful basis for further research into linkage between hydrochemistry

  20. Radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, F.; Rodgers, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book include: Interaction of ionizing radiation with matter; Primary products in radiation chemistry; Theoretical aspects of radiation chemistry; Theories of the solvated electron; The radiation chemistry of gases; Radiation chemistry of colloidal aggregates; Radiation chemistry of the alkali halides; Radiation chemistry of polymers; Radiation chemistry of biopolymers; Radiation processing and sterilization; and Compound index

  1. Solution of the linearly anisotropic neutron transport problem in a infinite cylinder combining the decomposition and HTSN methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Glenio A.; Bodmann, Bardo; Bogado, Sergio; Vilhena, Marco T.

    2008-01-01

    Analytical solutions for neutron transport in cylindrical geometry is available for isotropic problems, but to the best of our knowledge for anisotropic problems are not available, yet. In this work, an analytical solution for the neutron transport equation in an infinite cylinder assuming anisotropic scattering is reported. Here we specialize the solution, without loss of generality, for the linearly anisotropic problem using the combined decomposition and HTS N methods. The key feature of this method consists in the application of the decomposition method to the anisotropic problem by virtue of the fact that the inverse of the operator associated to isotropic problem is well know and determined by the HTS N approach. So far, following the idea of the decomposition method, we apply this operator to the integral term, assuming that the angular flux appearing in the integrand is considered to be equal to the HTS N solution interpolated by polynomial considering only even powers. This leads to the first approximation for an anisotropic solution. Proceeding further, we replace this solution for the angular flux in the integral and apply again the inverse operator for the isotropic problem in the integral term and obtain a new approximation for the angular flux. This iterative procedure yields a closed form solution for the angular flux. This methodology can be generalized, in a straightforward manner, for transport problems with any degree of anisotropy. For the sake of illustration, we report numerical simulations for linearly anisotropic transport problems. (author)

  2. Reduction of mercury from mackerel fillet using combined solution of cysteine, EDTA, and sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajeb, P; Jinap, S

    2012-06-13

    An acidic solution containing mercury chelating agents to eliminate mercury in raw fish (mackerel) fillet was developed. The solution contained hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, cysteine, EDTA, and NaCl. The optimum conditions for mercury reduction were achieved using response surface methodology (RSM) at cysteine concentration of 1.25%, EDTA of 275 mg/L, NaCl of 0.5%, pH of 3.75, and exposure time of 18 min. The optimized conditions produced a solution which can remove up to 91% mercury from raw fish fillet. Cysteine and EDTA were identified as potential chelating agents with the greatest potential for use. The solution can be employed in fish industries to reduce mercury in highly contaminated fish.

  3. Families of optimal thermodynamic solutions for combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, E.; Scenna, N.J.; Benz, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal designs of a CCGT power plant characterized by maximum second law efficiency values are determined for a wide range of power demands and different values of the available heat transfer area. These thermodynamic optimal solutions are found within a feasible operation region by means of a non-linear mathematical programming (NLP) model, where decision variables (i.e. transfer areas, power production, mass flow rates, temperatures and pressures) can vary freely. Technical relationships among them are used to systematize optimal values of design and operative variables of a CCGT power plant into optimal solution sets, named here as optimal solution families. From an operative and design point of view, the families of optimal solutions let knowing in advance optimal values of the CCGT variables when facing changes of power demand or adjusting the design to an available heat transfer area.

  4. Using an innovative combination of quality-by-design and green analytical chemistry approaches for the development of a stability indicating UHPLC method in pharmaceutical products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussès, Christine; Ferey, Ludivine; Vedrines, Elodie; Gaudin, Karen

    2015-11-10

    An innovative combination of green chemistry and quality by design (QbD) approach is presented through the development of an UHPLC method for the analysis of the main degradation products of dextromethorphan hydrobromide. QbD strategy was integrated to the field of green analytical chemistry to improve method understanding while assuring quality and minimizing environmental impacts, and analyst exposure. This analytical method was thoroughly evaluated by applying risk assessment and multivariate analysis tools. After a scouting phase aimed at selecting a suitable stationary phase and an organic solvent in accordance with green chemistry principles, quality risk assessment tools were applied to determine the critical process parameters (CPPs). The effects of the CPPs on critical quality attributes (CQAs), i.e., resolutions, efficiencies, and solvent consumption were further evaluated by means of a screening design. A response surface methodology was then carried out to model CQAs as function of the selected CPPs and the optimal separation conditions were determined through a desirability analysis. Resulting contour plots enabled to establish the design space (DS) (method operable design region) where all CQAs fulfilled the requirements. An experimental validation of the DS proved that quality within the DS was guaranteed; therefore no more robustness study was required before the validation. Finally, this UHPLC method was validated using the concept of total error and was used to analyze a pharmaceutical drug product. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Combining metabolic engineering and biocompatible chemistry for high-yield production of homo-diacetyl and homo-(S,S)-2,3-butanediol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianming; Chan, Siu Hung Joshua; Brock-Nannestad, Theis; Chen, Jun; Lee, Sang Yup; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2016-07-01

    Biocompatible chemistry is gaining increasing attention because of its potential within biotechnology for expanding the repertoire of biological transformations carried out by enzymes. Here we demonstrate how biocompatible chemistry can be used for synthesizing valuable compounds as well as for linking metabolic pathways to achieve redox balance and rescued growth. By comprehensive rerouting of metabolism, activation of respiration, and finally metal ion catalysis, we successfully managed to convert the homolactic bacterium Lactococcus lactis into a homo-diacetyl producer with high titer (95mM or 8.2g/L) and high yield (87% of the theoretical maximum). Subsequently, the pathway was extended to (S,S)-2,3-butanediol (S-BDO) through efficiently linking two metabolic pathways via chemical catalysis. This resulted in efficient homo-S-BDO production with a titer of 74mM (6.7g/L) S-BDO and a yield of 82%. The diacetyl and S-BDO production rates and yields obtained are the highest ever reported, demonstrating the promising combination of metabolic engineering and biocompatible chemistry as well as the great potential of L. lactis as a new production platform. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The New Color of Chemistry: Green Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry which is the new application of chemistry rules provides solutions to problems that mankind is faced with climate changes, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics, depletion of natural sources e.g. designing new chemicals and processes that production and utilization of hazardous matters. So, it is the indispensible tool for sustainable development. Current and future chemists should consider the human health and ecological issues in their professional life. In order to provide a solution for this requirement, green chemistry rules and under standings should be primarily taken in the university curriculum and at all educational levels.

  7. Solution chemistry of element 105. Pt. III. Hydrolysis and complex formation of Nb, Ta, Db and Pa in HF and HBr solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershina, V.; Bastug, T.

    1999-01-01

    Calculations of the electronic structure of MF 6 - and MBr 6 - complexes of Nb, Ta, Pa and element 105, Db, formed in HF and HBr solutions have been performed using the Dirac-Slater Discrete Variational method. On the basis of results of these calculations, relative values of the free energy change of reactions of complex formation have been determined. The order of the complex formation for both acids is shown to be Pa >> Nb > Db > Ta. Such a sequence is defined by a predominant electrostatic energy of the metal-ligand interaction. The hydrolysis of compounds, as a reverse process, proved to change as Ta > Db > Nb >> Pa. Using the theory of metal extraction by anion exchange, the following trend in the extraction of the anionic species from both the HF and HBr aqueous solutions has been predicted: Pa >> Nb ≥ Db > Ta. The strength of the ML 6 - complexes is shown to decrease from MF 6 , to MCl 6 and further to MBr 6 - which is reflected by shifting the complex formation process to the area of higher acid concentrations. (orig.)

  8. Adsorption of benzene and toluene from aqueous solutions onto activated carbon and its acid and heat treated forms: influence of surface chemistry on adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, N; Setyadhi, L; Wibowo, D; Setiawan, J; Ismadji, S

    2007-07-19

    The influence of surface chemistry and solution pH on the adsorption of benzene and toluene on activated carbon and its acid and heat treated forms were studied. A commercial coal-based activated carbon F-400 was chosen as carbon parent. The carbon samples were obtained by modification of F-400 by means of chemical treatment with HNO3 and thermal treatment under nitrogen flow. The treatment with nitric acid caused the introduction of a significant number of oxygenated acidic surface groups onto the carbon surface, while the heat treatment increases the basicity of carbon. The pore characteristics were not significantly changed after these modifications. The dispersive interactions are the most important factor in this adsorption process. Activated carbon with low oxygenated acidic surface groups (F-400Tox) has the best adsorption capacity.

  9. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY FOR ASTROPHYSICISTS: A SELF-CONSISTENT FORMALISM AND ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ARBITRARY C/O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heng, Kevin; Tsai, Shang-Min; Lyons, James R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a self-consistent formalism for computing and understanding the atmospheric chemistry of exoplanets from the viewpoint of an astrophysicist. Starting from the first law of thermodynamics, we demonstrate that the van’t Hoff equation (which describes the equilibrium constant), Arrhenius equation (which describes the rate coefficients), and procedures associated with the Gibbs free energy (minimization, rescaling) have a common physical and mathematical origin. We address an ambiguity associated with the equilibrium constant, which is used to relate the forward and reverse rate coefficients, and restate its two definitions. By necessity, one of the equilibrium constants must be dimensionless and equate to an exponential function involving the Gibbs free energy, while the other is a ratio of rate coefficients and must therefore possess physical units. We demonstrate that the Arrhenius equation takes on a functional form that is more general than previously stated without recourse to tagging on ad hoc functional forms. Finally, we derive analytical models of chemical systems, in equilibrium, with carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. We include acetylene and are able to reproduce several key trends, versus temperature and carbon-to-oxygen ratio, published in the literature. The rich variety of behavior that mixing ratios exhibit as a function of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio is merely the outcome of stoichiometric book-keeping and not the direct consequence of temperature or pressure variations

  10. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY FOR ASTROPHYSICISTS: A SELF-CONSISTENT FORMALISM AND ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ARBITRARY C/O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng, Kevin; Tsai, Shang-Min [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland); Lyons, James R., E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch [Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Bateman Physical Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    We present a self-consistent formalism for computing and understanding the atmospheric chemistry of exoplanets from the viewpoint of an astrophysicist. Starting from the first law of thermodynamics, we demonstrate that the van’t Hoff equation (which describes the equilibrium constant), Arrhenius equation (which describes the rate coefficients), and procedures associated with the Gibbs free energy (minimization, rescaling) have a common physical and mathematical origin. We address an ambiguity associated with the equilibrium constant, which is used to relate the forward and reverse rate coefficients, and restate its two definitions. By necessity, one of the equilibrium constants must be dimensionless and equate to an exponential function involving the Gibbs free energy, while the other is a ratio of rate coefficients and must therefore possess physical units. We demonstrate that the Arrhenius equation takes on a functional form that is more general than previously stated without recourse to tagging on ad hoc functional forms. Finally, we derive analytical models of chemical systems, in equilibrium, with carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. We include acetylene and are able to reproduce several key trends, versus temperature and carbon-to-oxygen ratio, published in the literature. The rich variety of behavior that mixing ratios exhibit as a function of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio is merely the outcome of stoichiometric book-keeping and not the direct consequence of temperature or pressure variations.

  11. Effect of Non-Stoichiometric Solution Chemistry on Improving the Performance of Wide-Bandgap Perovskite Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Kai [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yang, Mengjin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kim, Donghoe [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Li, Zhen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Reid, Obadiah G [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yu, Yue [University of Toledo; Song, Zhaoning [University of Toledo; Zhao, Dewei [University of Toledo; Wang, Changlei [University of Toledo; Li, Liwei [ENN Energy Research Institute; ENN Solar Energy Co., Ltd.; Meng, Yuan [ENN Energy Research Institute; ENN Solar Energy Co., Ltd.; Guo, Ted [ENN Energy Research Institute; ENN Solar Energy Co., Ltd.; Yan, Yanfa [University of Toledo

    2017-10-18

    A high-efficiency wide-bandgap (WBG) perovskite solar cell is critical for developing perovskite-related (e.g., all-perovskite, perovskite/Si, or perovskite/Cu(In,Ga)Se2) tandem devices. Here, we demonstrate the use of non-stoichiometric precursor chemistry with excess methylammonium halides (MAX; X = I, Br, or Cl) for preparing high-quality ~1.75-eV FA0.83Cs0.17Pb(I0.6Br0.4)3 perovskite solar cells. Among various methylammonium halides, using excess MABr in the non-stoichiometric precursor exhibits the strongest effect on improving perovskite crystallographic properties and device characteristics without affecting the perovskite composition. In contrast, using excess MAI significantly reduces the bandgap of perovskite due to the replacement of Br with I. Using 40% excess MABr, we demonstrate a single-junction WBG perovskite solar cell with stabilized efficiency of 16.4%. We further demonstrate a 20.3%-efficient 4-terminal tandem device by using a 14.7%-efficient semi-transparent WBG perovskite top cell and an 18.6%-efficient unfiltered (5.6%-efficient filtered) Si bottom cell.

  12. Stepwise adsorption of phenanthrene at the fly ash-water interface as affected by solution chemistry: experimental and modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chunjiang; Huang, Guohe

    2012-11-20

    Fly ash (FA) is predominantly generated from coal-fired power plants. Contamination during disposal of FA can cause significant environmental problems. Knowledge about the interaction of FA and hydrophobic organic pollutants in the environment is very limited. This study investigated the adsorption of phenanthrene at the interface of FA and water. The performance of phenanthrene adsorption on FA and the effects of various aqueous chemistry conditions were evaluated. The adsorption isotherms exhibited an increasing trend in the adsorbed amounts of phenanthrene, while a stepwise pattern was apparent. A stepwise multisite Langmuir model was developed to simulate the stepwise adsorption process. The adsorption of phenanthrene onto FA was noted to be spontaneous at all temperatures. The thermodynamic results indicated that the adsorption was an exothermic process. The adsorption capacity gradually decreased as pH increased from 4 to 8; however, this trend became less significant when pH was changed from 8 to 10. The binding affinity of phenanthrene to FA increased after the addition of humic acid (HA). The pH variation was also responsible for the changes of phenanthrene adsorption on FA in the presence of HA. High ionic strength corresponded to low mobility of phenanthrene in the FA-water system. Results of this study can help reveal the migration patterns of organic contaminants in the FA-water system and facilitate environmental risk assessment at FA disposal sites.

  13. Impact of an Alkaline Solution on the Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Sorption Properties of a Typic Rhodudult Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Alves de Almeida Calábria

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The preferred option for disposal of short-lived low and intermediate level radioactive wastes is a near surface disposal facility in which soil is one of the barriers that avoid radionuclide migration outside the controlled area. For construction of that kind of facility, concrete is widely used, and its interaction with water induces its degradation, resulting in a high pH solution. The alkaline solution may affect the near-field environment of radioactive waste repositories, including the soil, promoting mineralogical alterations that result in significant changes in key properties of materials, compromising their performance as safety components. In this study, a sample of a Brazilian Typic Rhodudult soil, previously investigated concerning its performance for Cs sorption, was subjected to interaction with the alkaline solution for 24 h and for 7, 14, and 28 days in order to evaluate the impact on its chemical, mineralogical, and sorption properties. X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and electron microprobe analysis were performed before and after each alteration period. Results indicated dissolution of minerals, such as kaolinite and quartz, associated with incorporation of K and Ca from the alkaline solution, likely resulting in the formation of hydrated calcium silicate phases (CSH, which are expected to be worse sorbents for alkaline elements (e.g., Cs than the original minerals. The Kd values for Cs in the altered samples also decreased according to the alteration period, demonstrating that alkaline interaction effectively modifies the soil sorption properties for Cs.

  14. A Designer Fluid for Aluminum Phase Change Devices, Vol. 1 of 3: General Inorganic Aqueous Solution (IAS) Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-17

    out in wicked phase change heat transfer devices. Wen [18] used nanoparticle suspensions to successfully increase the boiling heat transfer...Aqueous Solution of an Anionic Surfactant,” Journal of Heat Transfer 122, No. 4: 708. [18] Wen , D. and Ding, Y., 2005, “Experimental Investigation...Li, Y., 1974, “Diffusion of Ions in Sea Water and in Deep -Sea Sediments,” Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 88, pp. 703-714. [36] Negishi, K

  15. Natural spatial and temporal variations in groundwater chemistry in fractured, sedimentary rocks: scale and implications for solute transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoven, Stephen J. van der; Kip Solomon, D.; Moline, Gerilynn R.

    2005-01-01

    Natural tracers (major ions, δ 18 O, and O 2 ) were monitored to evaluate groundwater flow and transport to a depth of 20 m below the surface in fractured sedimentary (primarily shale and limestone) rocks. Large temporal variations in these tracers were noted in the soil zone and the saprolite, and are driven primarily by individual storm events. During nonstorm periods, an upward flow brings water with high TDS, constant δ 18 O, and low dissolved O 2 to the water table. During storm events, low TDS, variable δ 18 O, and high dissolved O 2 water recharges through the unsaturated zone. These oscillating signals are rapidly transmitted along fracture pathways in the saprolite, with changes occurring on spatial scales of several meters and on a time scale of hours. The variations decreased markedly below the boundary between the saprolite and less weathered bedrock. Variations in the bedrock units occurred on time scales of days and spatial scales of at least 20 m. The oscillations of chemical conditions in the shallow groundwater are hypothesized to have significant implications for solute transport. Solutes and colloids that adsorb onto aquifer solids can be released into solution by decreases in ionic strength and pH. The decreases in ionic strength also cause thermodynamic undersaturation of the groundwater with respect to some mineral species and may result in mineral dissolution. Redox conditions are also changing and may result in mineral dissolution/precipitation. The net result of these chemical variations is episodic transport of a wide range of dissolved solutes or suspended particles, a phenomenon rarely considered in contaminant transport studies

  16. AECL research programs in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, I.H.; Eastwood, T.A.; Smith, D.R.; Stewart, R.B.; Tomlinson, M.; Torgerson, D.F.

    1980-09-01

    Fundamental or underlying research in chemistry is being done in AECL laboratories to further the understanding of processes involved in current nuclear energy systems and maintain an awareness of progress at the frontiers of chemical research so that new advances can be turned to advantage in future AECL endeavours. The report introduces the current research topics and describes them briefly under the following headings: radiation chemistry, isotope separation, high temperature solution chemistry, fuel reprocessing chemistry, and analytical chemistry. (auth)

  17. Tautomeric transformations of piroxicam in solution: a combined experimental and theoretical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, D; Deneva, V; Nedeltcheva, D

    2015-01-01

    Piroxicam tautomerism was studied in solution by using UV-Vis spectroscopy, NMR measurements and advanced chemometrics. It has been found that in ethanol and DMSO the enol-amide tautomer is present mainly as a sandwich type dimer. The addition of water leads to distortion of the aggregate...

  18. Uniformly constructing combinatorial solutions, combining a rational function with hyperbolic or trigonometric functions, for the (2+1) dimensional Broer-Kaup-Kupershmidt equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qing; Wang Zihua

    2010-01-01

    According to two dependent rational solutions to a generalized Riccati equation together with the equation itself, a rational-exponent solution to a nonlinear partial differential equation can be constructed. By selecting different parameter values in the rational-exponent solution, many families of combinatorial solutions combined with a rational function such as hyperbolic functions or trigonometric functions, are rapidly derived. This method is applied to the Whitham-Broer-Kaup equation and a series of combinatorial solutions are obtained, showing that this method is a more concise and efficient approach and can uniformly construct many types of combined solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations.

  19. Exploiting Locality in Quantum Computation for Quantum Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Jarrod R; Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-12-18

    Accurate prediction of chemical and material properties from first-principles quantum chemistry is a challenging task on traditional computers. Recent developments in quantum computation offer a route toward highly accurate solutions with polynomial cost; however, this solution still carries a large overhead. In this Perspective, we aim to bring together known results about the locality of physical interactions from quantum chemistry with ideas from quantum computation. We show that the utilization of spatial locality combined with the Bravyi-Kitaev transformation offers an improvement in the scaling of known quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry and provides numerical examples to help illustrate this point. We combine these developments to improve the outlook for the future of quantum chemistry on quantum computers.

  20. At the crossroad of photochemistry and radiation chemistry: formation of hydroxyl radicals in diluted aqueous solutions exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomanová, K.; Přeček, Martin; Múčka, V.; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Čuba, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 43 (2017), s. 29402-29408 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA MŠk LQ1606; GA ČR GA17-06479S; GA ČR GA13-28721S Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : UV photolysis * water * aqueous solutions * quantum yields * OH radicals Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics ) Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  1. An analytical solution for two-dimensional vacuum preloading combined with electro-osmosis consolidation using EKG electrodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Shen

    Full Text Available China is a country with vast territory, but economic development and population growth have reduced the usable land resources in recent years. Therefore, reclamation by pumping and filling is carried out in eastern coastal regions of China in order to meet the needs of urbanization. However, large areas of reclaimed land need rapid drainage consolidation treatment. Based on past researches on how to improve the treatment efficiency of soft clay using vacuum preloading combined with electro-osmosis, a two-dimensional drainage plane model was proposed according to the Terzaghi and Esrig consolidation theory. However, the analytical solution using two-dimensional plane model was never involved. Current analytical solutions can't have a thorough theoretical analysis of practical engineering and give relevant guidance. Considering the smearing effect and the rectangle arrangement pattern, an analytical solution is derived to describe the behavior of pore-water and the consolidation process by using EKG (electro-kinetic geo synthetics materials. The functions of EKG materials include drainage, electric conduction and corrosion resistance. Comparison with test results is carried out to verify the analytical solution. It is found that the measured value is larger than the applied vacuum degree because of the stacking effect of the vacuum preloading and electro-osmosis. The trends of the mean measured value and the mean analytical value processes are comparable. Therefore, the consolidation model can accurately assess the change in pore-water pressure and the consolidation process during vacuum preloading combined with electro-osmosis.

  2. An analytical solution for two-dimensional vacuum preloading combined with electro-osmosis consolidation using EKG electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chenchen; Li, Yande

    2017-01-01

    China is a country with vast territory, but economic development and population growth have reduced the usable land resources in recent years. Therefore, reclamation by pumping and filling is carried out in eastern coastal regions of China in order to meet the needs of urbanization. However, large areas of reclaimed land need rapid drainage consolidation treatment. Based on past researches on how to improve the treatment efficiency of soft clay using vacuum preloading combined with electro-osmosis, a two-dimensional drainage plane model was proposed according to the Terzaghi and Esrig consolidation theory. However, the analytical solution using two-dimensional plane model was never involved. Current analytical solutions can’t have a thorough theoretical analysis of practical engineering and give relevant guidance. Considering the smearing effect and the rectangle arrangement pattern, an analytical solution is derived to describe the behavior of pore-water and the consolidation process by using EKG (electro-kinetic geo synthetics) materials. The functions of EKG materials include drainage, electric conduction and corrosion resistance. Comparison with test results is carried out to verify the analytical solution. It is found that the measured value is larger than the applied vacuum degree because of the stacking effect of the vacuum preloading and electro-osmosis. The trends of the mean measured value and the mean analytical value processes are comparable. Therefore, the consolidation model can accurately assess the change in pore-water pressure and the consolidation process during vacuum preloading combined with electro-osmosis. PMID:28771496

  3. The radiation induced chemistry of uranyl cation in aqueous carbonate –bicarbonate solutions as followed by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Snow, Lanee A.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Cho, Herman M.; Friese, Judah I.

    2006-05-01

    Alpha radiation induced formation of hydrogen peroxide in carbonate ?bicarbonate media was followed by 13C NMR using dissolved [233UO2(13CO3)3]4- as the alpha source (Dalpha= 12.1 Gy/hr). Between the pH region between 5.9 and 11.6 hydrogen peroxide causes a varied speciation of the uranyl carbonates that is a function of the uranium, carbonate and the hydrogen peroxide concentrations. It is shown that the speciation of the peroxy carbonates (or other species) formed in solution by titration with hydrogen peroxide are common to those formed by hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis. The radiolysis experiment was carried out above pH = 9.96 to minimize the loss of 13CO2 over a 2800 hr period. Radiolytic generation of hydrogen peroxide was followed by formation of a uranyl peroxy carbonate complex and complex formation accelerated for about 1200 hours. Complex formation was observed to terminate at a concentration between 1x10-4 and 5x10-4 M. It is assumed that either a steady state H2O2 production rate was established in solution or that some limiting feature of the experiment was responsible for slowing the yield of product.

  4. Role of solution chemistry on the trapping of radionuclide Th(IV) using titanate nanotubes as an efficient adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guodong Sheng; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei; Baowei Hu

    2013-01-01

    Titanate nanotubes (TNTs) have attracted great interest in multidisciplinary study since their discovery. The adsorption of thorium [Th(IV)] onto TNTs in the absence and presence of humic acid (HA)/fulvic acid (FA) was studied by batch technique. The influence of pH from 2.0 to 10.0, ionic strength from 0.001 to 0.1 mol L -1 NaClO 4 , and coexisting electrolyte cations (Li + , Na + , K + ) and anions (ClO 4 - , NO 3 - , Cl - ) on the adsorption of Th(IV) onto TNTs was tested. The adsorption isotherms of Th(IV) was determined at pH 3.0 and analyzed with Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption of Th(IV) onto TNTs increases steeply with increasing pH from 2.0 to 4.0. Generally, HA/FA was showed to enhance Th(IV) adsorption onto TNTs at low pH values, but to reduce Th(IV) adsorption onto TNTs at high pH values. The adsorption of Th(IV) onto TNTs was also dependent on coexisting electrolyte ions in aqueous solution under our experimental conditions. The adsorption of Th(IV) onto TNTs is exothermic and spontaneous. The findings indicating that TNTs can be used as a promising candidate for the enrichment and solidification of Th(IV) or its analogue actinides from large volume solution in real work. (author)

  5. Oxidizing dissolution of spent MOX47 fuel subjected to water radiolysis: Solution chemistry and surface characterization by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegou, C., E-mail: christophe.jegou@cea.f [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Marcoule Reasearch Center, B.P. 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Caraballo, R.; De Bonfils, J.; Broudic, V.; Peuget, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Marcoule Reasearch Center, B.P. 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Vercouter, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Saclay Reasearch Center, B.P. 11, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Roudil, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Marcoule Reasearch Center, B.P. 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2010-04-01

    The mechanisms of oxidizing dissolution of spent MOX fuel (MIMAS TU2 (registered) ) subjected to water radiolysis were investigated experimentally by leaching spent MOX47 fuel samples in pure water at 25 deg. C under different oxidizing conditions (with and without external gamma irradiation); the leached surfaces were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The highly oxidizing conditions resulting from external gamma irradiation significantly increased the concentration of plutonium (Pu(V)) and uranium (U(VI)) compared with a benchmark experiment (without external irradiation). The oxidation behavior of the plutonium-enriched aggregates differed significantly from that of the UO{sub 2} matrix after several months of leaching in water under gamma irradiation. The plutonium in the aggregates appears to limit fuel oxidation. The only secondary phases formed and identified to date by Raman spectroscopy are uranium peroxides that generally precipitate on the surface of the UO{sub 2} grains. Concerning the behavior of plutonium, solution analysis results appear to be compatible with a conventional explanation based on an equilibrium with a Pu(OH){sub 4(am)} phase. The fission product release - considered as a general indicator of matrix alteration - from MOX47 fuel also increases under external gamma irradiation and a change in the leaching mode is observed. Diffusive leaching was clearly identified, coinciding with the rapid onset of steady-state actinide concentrations in the bulk solution.

  6. The impact of new cathode materials relative to baseline performance of microbial fuel cells all with the same architecture and solution chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Wulin

    2017-04-21

    Differences in microbial fuel cell (MFC) architectures, materials, and solution chemistries, have previously hindered direct comparisons of improvements in power production due to new cathode materials. However, one common reactor design has now been used in many different laboratories around the world under similar operating conditions based on using: a graphite fiber brush anode, a platinum cathode catalyst, a single-chamber cube-shaped (4-cm) MFC with a 3-cm diameter anolyte chamber, 50 mM phosphate buffer, and an acetate fuel. Analysis of several publications over 10 years from a single laboratory showed that even under such identical operational conditions, maximum power densities varied by 15%, with an average of 1.36 ± 0.20 W m–2 (n=24), normalized to cathode projected area (34 W m–3 liquid volume). In other laboratories, maximum power was significantly less, with an average of 1.03 ± 0.46 W m–2 (n=11), despite identical conditions. One likely reason for the differences in power is cathode age. Power production with Pt catalyst cathodes significantly declined after one month of operation or more to 0.87 ± 0.31 W m–2 (n=18) based on studies where cathode aging was examined, while in many studies the age of the cathode was not reported. Using these studies as a performance baseline, we review the claims of improvements in power generation due to new anode or cathode materials, or changes in solution conductivities and substrates.

  7. Analytical solutions for tomato peeling with combined heat flux and convective boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccurullo, G.; Giordano, L.; Metallo, A.

    2017-11-01

    Peeling of tomatoes by radiative heating is a valid alternative to steam or lye, which are expensive and pollutant methods. Suitable energy densities are required in order to realize short time operations, thus involving only a thin layer under the tomato surface. This paper aims to predict the temperature field in rotating tomatoes exposed to the source irradiation. Therefore, a 1D unsteady analytical model is presented, which involves a semi-infinite slab subjected to time dependent heating while convective heat transfer takes place on the exposed surface. In order to account for the tomato rotation, the heat source is described as the positive half-wave of a sinusoidal function. The problem being linear, the solution is derived following the Laplace Transform Method. In addition, an easy-to-handle solution for the problem at hand is presented, which assumes a differentiable function for approximating the source while neglecting convective cooling, the latter contribution turning out to be negligible for the context at hand. A satisfying agreement between the two analytical solutions is found, therefore, an easy procedure for a proper design of the dry heating system can be set up avoiding the use of numerical simulations.

  8. Combination of precise GNSS orbit and clock solutions in a multi-constellation, multi-frequency environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Geist, Estefania

    2015-04-01

    Precise GNSS orbit and clock solutions are essential for the generation of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) and required for a broad variety of applications. Over the last decades the combination products of the International GNSS Service (IGS) have become the standard for all kinds of GNSS applications requiring highest accuracy. The emerging new GNSS constellations Galileo, BeiDou and the QZSS as well as the modernization of the already established GPS and GLONASS constellations will stimulate a new development in the GNSS data processing in order to gain be best benefit from the new signals and systems for geodetic and geodynamic applications. This introduces the question regarding the influence of this development on the orbit and clock products. What are the consequences for the consistency of the contributions from the Analysis Centres (ACs) of the IGS and how does the combination procedure need to react on his development? Another set of questions is related to the expected scenario in which not all IGS ACs will likely include all GNSS. The algorithm for the orbit and clock combination needs to be adapted for a multi-system combination to keep on one hand the internal consistency between the GNSS during the combination procedure but also consider the differences in the expected orbit qualities between the satellite systems (e.g., due to the number of satellites or network coverage). To investigate these questions ESOC and AIUB have agreed on a joint research fellowship for three years. The objective of this research is to analyse the capabilities and challenges when combining hybrid multi-GNSS solutions and to develop a concept, which compares and combines orbit and clock contributions to come up with a consistent, reliable, truly combined multi-GNSS combination product. Well-defined test scenarios shall be constructed and analysed based on the GNSS data processing software packages in the two institutions, namely "NAPEOS" and "Bernese GNSS Software

  9. Model for diffusion and porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite. Theoretical basis and the solution methodology for the transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehikoinen, J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the progress of the computer model for ionic transport in bentonite. The research is part of the project Microstructural and chemical parameters of bentonite as determinants of waste isolation efficiency within the Nuclear fission safety program organized by The Commission of the European Communities. The study was started by collecting a comprehensive body of available data on space-charge transport modelling and creating a conceptualization of the problem at hand. The numerical discretization of the governing equations by finite differences was also initiated. This report introduces the theoretical basis for the model, somewhat more elaborated than presented in Progress Report 1/1996, and rectifies a few mistakes appearing in that report. It also gives a brief introduction to the solution methodology of the disc retized governing equations. (orig.) (12 refs.)

  10. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Polyethylene-Based Macromolecular Architectures by Combining Polyhomologation with Powerful Linking Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Alkayal, Nazeeha

    2016-01-01

    synthetic route towards well-defined polymethylene-based co/terpolymers, by combining the anthracene/maleimide Diels–Alder reaction with polyhomologation, is presented. For the synthesis of diblock copolymers the following approach was applied: (a) synthesis

  11. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  12. Chemistry of americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    Essential features of the descriptive chemistry of americium are reviewed. Chapter titles are: discovery, atomic and nuclear properties, collateral reading, production and uses, chemistry in aqueous solution, metal, alloys, and compounds, and, recovery, separation, purification. Author and subject indexes are included. (JCB)

  13. Uranium (VI) chemistry at the interface solution/minerals (quartz and aluminium hydroxide): experiments and spectroscopic investigations of the uranyl surface species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froideval, A.

    2004-09-01

    This study deals with the understanding of the uranyl chemistry at the 0.1 M NaNO 3 solution/mineral (quartz and aluminium hydroxide) interface. The aims are:(i) to identify and to characterize the different uranyl surface species (mononuclear, polynuclear complexes and/or precipitates...), i.e. the coordination environments of sorbed/precipitated uranyl ions, by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), and;(ii) to investigate the influence of pH, initial uranyl aqueous concentration and hydroxyl ligand concentration on the uranyl surface speciation. Our study on the speciation of uranyl ions at the quartz surface (i) confirms the formation of uranyl polynuclear/oligomers on quartz from moderate (1 μmol/m 2 ) to high (26 μmol/m 2 ) uranyl surface concentrations and (ii) show that theses polynuclear species coexist with uranyl mononuclear surface species over a pH range ≅ 5-8.5 and a wide range of initial uranyl concentration o f the solutions (10-100 μM). The uranyl concentration of these surface species depends on pH and on the initial uranyl aqueous concentration. Hydrate (surface-) precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species and monomeric uranyl surface complexes are formed on aluminium hydroxide. Uranyl mononuclear complexes are predominant at acidic pH, as well as uranyl in solution or on the surface. Besides mononuclear species, precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species are predominantly formed at neutral pH values on aluminium hydroxide. A main contribution of our investigations is that precipitation and/or adsorption of polynuclear species seem to occur at low uranyl surface concentrations (0.01-0.4 μmol/m 2 ). The uranyl surface speciation is mainly dependent on the pH and the aluminol ligand concentration. (author)

  14. Synthesis of amphiphilic poly(ε-caprolactone)-b-poly( N-vinylcaprolactam) block copolymers via the combination of RAFT polymerization and click chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, Paulo Henrique; Aguiar, Graziele Aparecida de Jesus; Moraes, Rodolfo Minto de; Medeiros, Simone de Fatima; Santos, Amilton Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In recent years, well-defined block copolymers composed of a hydrophilic and hydrophobic segments have gained much interest as drug carriers, because of their enhanced solubility and sustained release of the drug in controlled delivery systems [1]. The development of strategies to obtain block copolymers has attracted considerable attention, due to the possibility to combine characteristic properties of the homopolymers. A wide variety of well-defined block copolymers have been successfully synthesized by combining the efficiency and selectivity of click chemistry with the powerful RAFT polymerization mechanism. In the present work, well-defined amphiphilic, biocompatible, partially biodegradable, and thermosensitive poly(ε-caprolactone)-b-poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PCL-b-PNVCL) block copolymers were synthesized by combining ring opening polymerization (ROP), reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and subsequent click chemistry reaction. Alkyne-terminated poly(ε-caprolactone) (alkyne-PCL) was obtained by the ring opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) using propargyl alcohol as initiator and stannous-2-ethylhexanoate [Sn(Oct) 2 ] as catalyst. The azide end-capped-poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PNVCL-N 3 ) was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer/macromolecular design via interchange of xanthates (RAFT/MADIX) polymerization of the N-vinylcaprolactam (NVCL) mediated by a novel chain transfer agent comprising an azide function , 2-azidoethyl[(ethoxycarbonothioyl)thio](phenyl)acetate. These functionalized homopolymers, alkyne-PCL and PNVCL-N 3 , were coupled by the 1,3 dipolar cycloaddition reaction in order to obtain the corresponding block copolymers. These (co)polymers were characterized by FTIR, 1 H NMR and GPC measurements. Reference: 1. RAMESH, K., SINGH, S., MITRA, K., CHATTOPADHYAY, D., MISRA, N., & RAY, B. (2015). Colloid and Polymer Science, 1-9. (author)

  15. Effects of increased deposition of atmospheric nitrogen on an upland moor: leaching of N species and soil solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, M G; Caporn, S J M; Carroll, J A; Cresswell, N; Lee, J A; Ashenden, T W; Brittain, S A; Reynolds, B; Emmett, B A

    2005-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the leaching response of an upland moorland to long-term (10 yr) ammonium nitrate additions of 40, 80 and 120 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) and to relate this response to other indications of potential system damage, such as acidification and cation displacement. Results showed increases in nitrate leaching only in response to high rates of N input, in excess of 96 and 136 kg total N input ha(-1) yr(-1) for the organic Oh horizon and mineral Eag horizon, respectively. Individual N additions did not alter ammonium leaching from either horizon and ammonium was completely retained by the mineral horizon. Leaching of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) from the Oh horizon was increased by the addition of 40 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), but in spite of increases, retention of total dissolved nitrogen reached a maximum of 92% and 95% of 80 kg added N ha(-1) yr(-1) in the Oh and Eag horizons, respectively. Calcium concentrations and calcium/aluminium ratios were decreased in the Eag horizon solution with significant acidification mainly in the Oh horizon leachate. Nitrate leaching is currently regarded as an early indication of N saturation in forest systems. Litter C:N ratios were significantly lowered but values remained above a threshold predicted to increase leaching of N in forests.

  16. Bibliographies on radiation chemistry: Pt. 12; Rate constants for reactions of nonmetallic inorganic radicals in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helman, W P; Ross, A B [Notre Dame Univ., IN (USA). Radiation Chemistry Data Center

    1990-01-01

    Rate constants have been determined by pulse radiolysis, flash photolysis, and other methods, for a wide variety of reactions involving transient radicals in aqueous solution. Reliable rate constants have been established for reactions of radicals from water (e{sub aq}{sup -}, {center dot}H, {center dot}OH/{center dot}O{sup -}) and the data have been tabulated (Buxton, 1988) through 1986. Kinetic data for HO{sub 2}{center dot}/O{sub 2}{center dot}{sup -} were tabulated. (Bielski, 1985) from papers published through 1983. A compilation of rate constants, from the literature through Mid-1987, for other nonmetallic inorganic radicals has also appeared recently (Neta, 1988). Together, these compilations contain rate constants for more than 6,000 different reactions, reported in about 2,000 references. The present bibliography provides a list of relevant references which have been collected since the publication of the above-mentioned compilations. The list contains references received through the end of December, 1989. (author).

  17. Low temperature hydrolysis of laboratory tholins in ammonia-water solutions: Implications for prebiotic chemistry on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Somogyi, Árpád; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Smith, Mark A.

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tholins react rapidly in 13 wt% ammonia-water at low temperature, producing complex organic molecules containing both oxygen and altered nitrogen functional groups. These reactions display first-order kinetics with half-lives between 0.3 and 14 days at 253 K. The reaction timescales are much shorter than the freezing timescales of impact melts and volcanic sites on Titan, providing ample time for the formation of oxygenated, possibly prebiotic, molecules on its surface. Comparing the rates of the hydrolysis reactions in ammonia-water to those measured in pure water [Neish, C.D, Somogyi, A., Imanaka, H., Lunine, J.I., Smith, M.A., 2008a. Astrobiology 8, 273-287], we find that incorporation of oxygen into the tholins is faster in the presence of ammonia. The rate increases could be due to the increased pH of the solution, or to the availability of new reaction pathways made possible by the presence of ammonia. Using labeled 15NH 3 water, we find that ammonia does incorporate into some products, and that the reactions with ammonia are largely independent of those with water. A related study in HO18 confirms water as the source of the oxygen incorporated into the oxygen containing products.

  18. Prediction of the effects of soil-based countermeasures on soil solution chemistry of soils contaminated with radiocesium using the hydrogeochemical code PHREEQC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormann, Volker; Kirchner, Gerald

    2002-04-22

    studied. It is shown that calculating the impacts of soil-based chemical countermeasures on soil solution chemistry using geochemical codes such as PHREEQC offers an attractive alternative to establishing these impacts by often time-consuming and site-specific experiments.

  19. Combined assessment of the environmental, economic and social impacts of structural solutions for residential construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraile-García, E.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development in construction is based on three fundamental pillars: economic, environmental and social. This type of approach aims to identify the best possible solutions for sustainably developing structures by conducting a joint evaluation of the impact on those three pillars. The proposed methodology incorporates metadata on the Spanish construction sector. First, a discrete database is generated with 360 alternatives covering a range of common solutions in residential building. A Pareto algorithm is utilized to select the optimal choices and the wide range of solutions is reduced to the 5 % of the initial group. The project manager is therefore provided with an objective assessment of suitable structural alternatives including the overall joint economic, social, and environmental impact. The results obtained demonstrate the importance and utility of the proposed methodology for sustainable construction.El desarrollo sostenible aplicado a la construcción se basa en tres pilares fundamentales: económico, medioambiental y social. El objetivo principal es identificar las mejores soluciones en términos de desarrollo sostenible de alternativas estructurales a partir de la evaluación conjunta de los impactos en dichos pilares. La metodología propuesta incorpora metadatos con información del sector de la construcción en España. Primero se genera una base de datos discreta de 360 alternativas estructurales que cubren el rango de soluciones habituales en edificación residencial. La selección de alternativas óptimas se realiza mediante el algoritmo de Pareto. El abanico de soluciones se reduce al 5 % de las iniciales. Se aporta una valoración objetiva que orienta al proyectista en la selección de alternativas estructurales idóneas, visualizando de forma conjunta el impacto económico, social y ambiental. Los resultados obtenidos muestran la importancia y utilidad de la metodología propuesta en el campo de la construcci

  20. Solutions to a combined problem of excessive hydrogen sulfide in biogas and struvite scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, W; Cord-Ruwisch, R; Ho, G; Costa, M; Spencer, P

    2006-01-01

    The Woodman Point Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) in Western Australia has experienced two separate problems causing avoidable maintenance costs: the build-up of massive struvite (MgNH4PO4. 6H2O) scaling downstream of the anaerobic digester and the formation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels in the digester gas to levels that compromised gas engine operation and caused high operating costs on the gas scrubber. As both problems hang together with a chemical imbalance in the anaerobic digester, we decided to investigate whether both problems could be (feasibly and economically) addressed by a common solution (such as dosing of iron solutions to precipitate both sulfide and phosphate), or by using separate approaches. Laboratory results showed that, the hydrogen sulfide emission in digesters could be effectively and economically controlled by the addition of iron dosing. Slightly higher than the theoretical value of 1.5 mol of FeCl3 was required to precipitate 1 mol of dissolved sulfide inside the digester. Due to the high concentration of PO4(3-) in the digested sludge liquor, significantly higher iron is required for struvite precipitation. Iron dosing did not appear an economic solution for struvite control via iron phosphate formation. By taking advantage of the natural tendency of struvite formation in the digester liquid, it is possible to reduce the risk of struvite precipitation in and around the sludge-dewatering centrifuge by increasing the pH to precipitate struvite out before passing through the centrifuge. However, as the Mg2+/PO4(3-) molar ratio in digested sludge was low, by increasing the pH alone (using NaOH) the precipitation of PO4(3-) was limited by the amount of cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) available in the sludge. Although this would reduce struvite precipitation in the centrifuge, it could not significantly reduce PO4(3-) recycling back to the plant. For long-term operation, maximum PO4(3-) reduction should be the ultimate aim to minimise PO4

  1. Chemistry and biology by new multiple choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hyeong Seok; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2003-02-01

    This book is divided into two parts, the first part is about chemistry, which deals with science of material, atom structure and periodic law, chemical combination and power between molecule, state of material and solution, chemical reaction and an organic compound. The second part give description of biology with molecule and cell, energy in cells and chemical synthesis, molecular biology and heredity, function on animal, function on plant and evolution and ecology. This book has explanation of chemistry and biology with new multiple choice.

  2. Combined low-volume polyethylene glycol solution plus stimulant laxatives versus standard-volume polyethylene glycol solution: A prospective, randomized study of colon cleansing before colonoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hookey, Lawrence C; Depew, William T; Vanner, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The effectiveness of polyethylene glycol solutions (PEG) for colon cleansing is often limited by the inability of patients to drink adequate portions of the 4 L solution. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a reduced volume of PEG combined with stimulant laxatives would be better tolerated and as or more effective than the standard dose. METHODS Patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy were randomly assigned to receive either low-volume PEG plus sennosides (120 mg oral sennosides syrup followed by 2 L PEG) or the standard volume preparation (4 L PEG). The subjects rated the tolerability of the preparations and their symptoms. Colonoscopists were blind to the colonic cleansing preparation and graded the cleansing efficacy using a validated tool (the Ottawa scale). RESULTS The low-volume PEG plus sennosides preparation was significantly better tolerated than the standard large volume PEG (Psennosides preparation was better tolerated, it was not as effective as standard large-volume PEG. However, in view of the significant difference in tolerance, further research investigating possible improvements in the reduced-volume regimen seems warranted. PMID:16482236

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Minoxidil 2% Solution in Combination With a Botanical Hair Solution in Women With Female Pattern Hair Loss/Androgenic Alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Amy; Pham, Hanh; von Grote, Erika; Meckfessel, Matthew H

    2016-04-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL), also known as female androgenic alopecia, affects over 21 million women in the United States with devastating effects on self-esteem and psychosocial functioning. Topical minoxidil 2% and 5% formulations are the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for FPHL. The length of time it typically takes to observe the benefits is a challenge for many patients, and may affect adherence to treatment. Herbal extracts, which are also believed to promote healthier-looking hair, have a long history of use in hair care formulations. The safety and efficacy of a twice-daily regimen of 2% minoxidil solution used in combination with the botanical hair solution for 12 weeks in 54 subjects was evaluated in a multicenter, single-arm, open-label study. Assessments included investigator and subject ratings of improvement and subject satisfaction. Investigator ratings indicated significant improvement in hair growth and overall treatment benefits in as early as 6 weeks (Pminoxidil treatment adherence.

  4. Combined ultrasound/ozone degradation of carbazole in APG{sub 1214} surfactant solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Guodong, E-mail: jiguodong@iee.pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Baolong; Wu, Yingchao [Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We first describe the role of US/O{sub 3} in promoting carbazole degradation in APG{sub 1214} solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 20 W ultrasound for 30 min improves the effectiveness of carbazole ozonolysis by 5-10%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 40 W or 80 W only plays a role in promoting degradation of carbazole in the first 5 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The content of {center_dot}OH radical is inversely proportional to the ultrasound power. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absolute value of zeta potential of APG{sub 1214} micelles is inversely proportional to US power. - Abstract: We examined the effects of power and treatment time on the ultrasonically enhanced ozonation of carbazole dissolved in APG{sub 1214} surfactant solutions, including an analysis of the mechanism of {center_dot}OH radical formation, the zeta potential of the colloidal suspension, the influence of ultrasound on micellar morphology, and the degradation kinetics for carbazole and APG{sub 1214}. A 30 min ultrasound treatment at 28 kHz and 20 W improved the degradation of carbazole by 5-10%, while power levels of 40 W and 80 W provided improvements only during the first 5 min and resulted in reduced degradation after 15 min. The {center_dot}OH concentration was inversely proportional to ultrasound power, and directly proportional to the irradiation time. The absolute value of the APG{sub 1214} micelle zeta potential was inversely proportional to power and decreased with increasing irradiation time. The relationships of {center_dot}OH radical concentration in APG{sub 1214} micelles, the zeta potential, and the micellar dynamic radius (R{sub h}) to ultrasonic power and time are the key factors affecting carbazole degradation in this system.

  5. Combined ultrasound/ozone degradation of carbazole in APG1214 surfactant solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Guodong; Zhang, Baolong; Wu, Yingchao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We first describe the role of US/O 3 in promoting carbazole degradation in APG 1214 solution. ► 20 W ultrasound for 30 min improves the effectiveness of carbazole ozonolysis by 5–10%. ► 40 W or 80 W only plays a role in promoting degradation of carbazole in the first 5 min. ► The content of ·OH radical is inversely proportional to the ultrasound power. ► Absolute value of zeta potential of APG 1214 micelles is inversely proportional to US power. - Abstract: We examined the effects of power and treatment time on the ultrasonically enhanced ozonation of carbazole dissolved in APG 1214 surfactant solutions, including an analysis of the mechanism of ·OH radical formation, the zeta potential of the colloidal suspension, the influence of ultrasound on micellar morphology, and the degradation kinetics for carbazole and APG 1214 . A 30 min ultrasound treatment at 28 kHz and 20 W improved the degradation of carbazole by 5–10%, while power levels of 40 W and 80 W provided improvements only during the first 5 min and resulted in reduced degradation after 15 min. The ·OH concentration was inversely proportional to ultrasound power, and directly proportional to the irradiation time. The absolute value of the APG 1214 micelle zeta potential was inversely proportional to power and decreased with increasing irradiation time. The relationships of ·OH radical concentration in APG 1214 micelles, the zeta potential, and the micellar dynamic radius (R h ) to ultrasonic power and time are the key factors affecting carbazole degradation in this system.

  6. Combined biotin-terpyridine systems : a new versatile bridge between biology, polymer science and metallo-supramolecular chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeier, H.; Pahnke, J.; Weidl, C.H.; Schubert, U.S.

    2004-01-01

    Biotin, a well-known binding unit for the proteins avidin and streptavidin, was combined with the chelating ligand terpyridine via polymeric and nonpolymeric spacers. An ¿-amino-functionalized terpyridyl-poly(ethylene glycol) was prepared and utilized for complex formation with iron(II), nickel(II),

  7. INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS IN BIOTECHNOLOGIES OF COMBINED YOGURT DRINKS WITH BALANCED CHEMICAL CONTENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tkachenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Expediency of development of recipes and innovative biotechnologies for combined milk-vegetational products with balanced chemical composition, strengthened probiotic properties and extended shelf life was proven in field of establishing proper diet for adult healthy people, both in everyday consumption and during treatment of illnesses and rehabilitation after it. Principles of scientific approach to creation of biotechnologies for fermented combined products with balance of basic food nutrients are described here, as well as innovative biotechnological approaches, which provide the possibility of getting desired products (yoghurt drinks with high probiotic properties and long shelf life. Main stages of development are described for recipes and biotechnologies of bifido-enabled combined yoghurt drinks with balanced chemical composition, rich on lively bifido- and Lactobacterium cells and long shelf life. A scheme for production of desired products with explanation of technological process parameters is provided, it was tested in industrial conditions at “Gormolzavod №1” Ltd. in Odesa, Ukraine. In samples of milk-rice and milk-spelt yoghurt drinks, which were produced in industrial conditions, we determined chemical composition and primary quality objectives. Desired products have balanced ratio of proteins : fats : carbohydrates (1 : 1 : 4, high sensory qualities, standard quality values during long shelf life (20 days in sealed tare, contain a high concentration of viable cells of probiotic cultures – such as B. animalis Bb-12 (not less than 3.6∙108 CFU / cm3 and mixed cultures of L. bulgaricus + S. thermophilus (not less than 4.0∙108 CFU/cm3, as well as physiologically significant number of prebiotics – lactulose and fiber (30 and 10%, according to the daily consumption norm when consuming 500 cm3 of product.

  8. The New Color of Chemistry: Green Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry which is the new application of chemistry rules provides solutions to problems that mankind is faced with climate changes, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics, depletion of natural sources e.g. designing new chemicals and processes that production and utilization of hazardous matters. So, it is the indispensible tool for sustainable development. Current and future chemists should consider the human health and ecological issues in their professional life. In order to provid...

  9. 'Ab initio' structure solution from electron diffraction data obtained by a combination of automated diffraction tomography and precession technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugnaioli, E.; Gorelik, T.; Kolb, U.

    2009-01-01

    Using a combination of our recently developed automated diffraction tomography (ADT) module with precession electron technique (PED), quasi-kinematical 3D diffraction data sets of an inorganic salt (BaSO 4 ) were collected. The lattice cell parameters and their orientation within the data sets were found automatically. The extracted intensities were used for 'ab initio' structure analysis by direct methods. The data set covered almost the complete set of possible symmetrically equivalent reflections for an orthorhombic structure. The structure solution in one step delivered all heavy (Ba, S) as well as light atoms (O). Results of the structure solution using direct methods, charge flipping and maximum entropy algorithms as well as structure refinement for three different 3D electron diffraction data sets were presented.

  10. Thermodynamics of Highly Supersaturated Aqueous Solutions of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs-Impact of a Second Drug on the Solution Phase Behavior and Implications for Combination Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasi, Niraj S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-08-01

    There is increasing interest in formulating combination products that contain two or more drugs. Furthermore, it is also common for different drug products to be taken simultaneously. This raises the possibility of interactions between different drugs that may impact formulation performance. For poorly water-soluble compounds, the supersaturation behavior may be a critical factor in determining the extent of oral absorption. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the maximum achievable supersaturation for several poorly water-soluble compounds alone, and in combination. Model compounds included ritonavir, lopinavir, paclitaxel, felodipine, and diclofenac. The "amorphous solubility" for the pure drugs was determined using different techniques and the change in this solubility was then measured in the presence of differing amounts of a second drug. The results showed that "amorphous solubility" of each component in aqueous solution is substantially decreased by the second component, as long as the two drugs are miscible in the amorphous state. A simple thermodynamic model could be used to predict the changes in solubility as a function of composition. This information is of great value when developing co-amorphous or other supersaturating formulations and should contribute to a broader understanding of drug-drug physicochemical interactions in in vitro assays as well as in the gastrointestinal tract. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. Combining Empirical Relationships with Data Based Mechanistic Modeling to Inform Solute Tracer Investigations across Stream Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, C.; Gonzalez-Pinzon, R.; Covino, T. P.; Mortensen, J.

    2015-12-01

    Solute transport studies in streams and rivers often begin with the introduction of conservative and reactive tracers into the water column. Information on the transport of these substances is then captured within tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) and used to estimate, for instance, travel times and dissolved nutrient and carbon dynamics. Traditionally, these investigations have been limited to systems with small discharges (turbidity (e.g., nitrate signals with SUNA instruments or fluorescence measures) and/or high total dissolved solids (e.g., making prohibitively expensive the use of salt tracers such as NaCl) in larger systems. Additionally, a successful time-of-travel study is valuable for only a single discharge and river stage. We have developed a method to predict tracer BTCs to inform sampling frequencies at small and large stream orders using empirical relationships developed from multiple tracer injections spanning several orders of magnitude in discharge and reach length. This method was successfully tested in 1st to 8th order systems along the Middle Rio Grande River Basin in New Mexico, USA.

  12. Combined radiofrequency ablation and acetic acid-hypertonic saline solution instillation: an in vivo study of rabbit liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-Min; Han, Joon-Koo; Kim, Se-Hyung; Choi, Byung-Ihn [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Kon; Kim, Sang-Won [Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    We wanted to determine whether combined radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and acetic acid-hypertonic saline solution (AHS) instillation can increase the extent of thermally mediated coagulation in in vivo rabbit liver tissue. We also wished to determine the optimal concentration of the solution in order to maximize its effect on extent of the RFA-induced coagulation. Forty thermal ablation zones were produced in 40 rabbits by using a 17-gauge internally cooled electrode with a 1-cm active tip under ultrasound guidance. The rabbits were assigned to one of four groups: group A: RFA alone (n=10); group B: RFA with 50% AHS instillation (n=10); group C: RFA with 25% AHS instillation (n=10); group D: RFA with 15% AHS instillation (n=10). A range of acetic acid concentrations diluted in 36% NaCl to a total volume of 2 mL were instilled into the liver before RFA. The RF energy (30W) was applied for three minutes. After RFA, in each group, the maximum diameters to the thermal ablation zones in the gross specimens were compared. Technical success and the complication that arose were evaluated by CT and on the basis of autopsy findings. All procedures are technically successful. There were six procedure-related complications (6/40; 15%); two localized perihepatic hematomas and four chemical peritonitis. The incidence of chemical peritonitis was highest for group B with the 50% AHS solution instillation (30%). With instillation of 15% AHS solution, a marked decrease of tissue impedance (24.5 {+-} 15.6 {omega}) and an increase of current (250 mA) occurred as compared to RFA alone. With instillation of the solutions before RFA (group B, C and D). this produced a greater mean diameter of coagulation necrosis than the diameters for rabbits not instilled with the solution (group A) ({rho}<0.05). However, there was no significant difference between group B, C, and D. Combined AHS instillation and RFA can increase the dimension of coagulation necrosis in the liver with a single

  13. Combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin promotes multiple adaptive solutions in hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, José M; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Bracho, María A; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Carnicer, Fernando; Olmo, Juan Del; Ortega, Enrique; González-Candelas, Fernando; Moya, Andrés

    2009-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) presents several regions involved potentially in evading antiviral treatment and host immune system. Two regions, known as PKR-BD and V3 domains, have been proposed to be involved in resistance to interferon. Additionally, hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein are also good candidates to participate in evasion from the immune system. In this study, we have used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin) for which samples obtained just before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment were available. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were obtained. The predominant amino acid sequences for each time sample and patient were determined. Next, the sequences of the PKR-BD and V3 domains and the hypervariable regions from different time samples were compared for each patient. The highest levels of variability were detected at the three hypervariable regions of the E2 protein and, to a lower extent, at the V3 domain of the NS5A protein. However, no clear patterns of adaptation to the host immune system or to antiviral treatment were detected. In summary, although high levels of variability are correlated to viral adaptive response, antiviral treatment does not seem to promote convergent adaptive changes. Consequently, other regions must be involved in evasion strategies likely based on a combination of multiple mechanisms, in which pools of changes along the HCV genome could confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Fine root biomass, necromass and chemistry during seven years of elevated aluminium concentrations in the soil solution of a middle-aged Picea abies stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldhuset, Toril D; Lange, Holger; de Wit, Helene A

    2006-10-01

    Toxic effects of aluminium (Al) on Picea abies (L.) Karst. (Norway spruce) trees are well documented in laboratory-scale experiments, but field-based evidence is scarce. This paper presents results on fine root growth and chemistry from a field manipulation experiment in a P. abies stand that was 45 years old when the experiment started in 1996. Different amounts of dissolved aluminium were added as AlCl3 by means of periodic irrigation during the growing season in the period 1997-2002. Potentially toxic concentrations of Al in the soil solution were obtained. Fine roots were studied from direct cores (1996) and sequential root ingrowth cores (1999, 2001, 2002) in the mineral soil (0-40 cm). We tested two hypotheses: (1) elevated concentration of Al in the root zone leads to significant changes in root biomass, partitioning into fine, coarse, living or dead fractions, and distribution with depth; (2) elevated Al concentration leads to a noticeable uptake of Al and reduced uptake of Ca and Mg; this results in Ca and Mg depletion in roots. Hypothesis 1 was only marginally supported, as just a few significant treatment effects on biomass were found. Hypothesis 2 was supported in part; Al addition led to increased root concentrations of Al in 1999 and 2002 and reduced Mg/Al in 1999. Comparison of roots from subsequent root samplings showed a decrease in Al and S over time. The results illustrated that 7 years of elevated Al(tot) concentrations in the soil solution up to 200 microM are not likely to affect root growth. We also discuss possible improvements of the experimental approach.

  15. Bad chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    General chemistry courses haven't changed significantly in forty years. Because most basic chemistry students are premedical students, medical schools have enormous influence and could help us start all over again to create undergraduate chemistry education that works.

  16. Mechanisms behind injecting the combination of nano-clay particles and polymer solution for enhanced oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili Nezhad, Seyyed Shahram; Cheraghian, Goshtasp

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory investigations and field applications have proved injection of polymer solution to be an effective means to improve oil recovery for reservoirs of medium oil viscosity. The incremental oil produced in this case is the result of an increase in areal and vertical sweep efficiencies. Biopolymers and synthetic polymers are the major categories used in the petroleum industry for specific reasons. Biopolymers like xanthan are limited in their application as they are more susceptible to biodegradation. Synthetic polymers like Hydrolyzed PolyAcrylaMide (HPAM) have a much wider application as they are less susceptible to biodegradation. Furthermore, development of nanotechnology has successfully provided technical and economical viable alternatives for present materials. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of combining clay nanoparticles with polymer solution on oil recovery. This paper includes a history match of both one-dimensional and two-dimensional polymer floods using a three-dimensional numerical model for fluid flow and mass transport. Results indicated that the amount of polymer adsorption decreased when clay nanoparticles were added to the PolyAcrylaMide solution; however, mobility ratio improvement is believed to be the main contributor for the proposed method in order to enhance much oil recovery compared to xanthan flood and HPAM flood.

  17. Selective Catalytic Synthesis Using the Combination of Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen: Catalytic Chess at the Interface of Energy and Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klankermayer, Jürgen; Wesselbaum, Sebastian; Beydoun, Kassem; Leitner, Walter

    2016-06-20

    The present Review highlights the challenges and opportunities when using the combination CO2 /H2 as a C1 synthon in catalytic reactions and processes. The transformations are classified according to the reduction level and the bond-forming processes, covering the value chain from high volume basic chemicals to complex molecules, including biologically active substances. Whereas some of these concepts can facilitate the transition of the energy system by harvesting renewable energy into chemical products, others provide options to reduce the environmental impact of chemical production already in today's petrochemical-based industry. Interdisciplinary fundamental research from chemists and chemical engineers can make important contributions to sustainable development at the interface of the energetic and chemical value chain. The present Review invites the reader to enjoy this exciting area of "catalytic chess" and maybe even to start playing some games in her or his laboratory. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Exploring Student-Generated Animations, Combined with a Representational Pedagogy, as a Tool for Learning in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Zeynep; Aubusson, Peter

    2018-02-01

    This article describes an investigation into teaching and learning with student-generated animations combined with a representational pedagogy. In particular, it reports on interactive discussions that were stimulated by the students' own animations as well as their critiques of experts' animations. Animations representing views of states of matter provided a vehicle by which to investigate learning in a series of lessons. The study was implemented with Year 11 high school students. After students constructed, presented and discussed their animations, they watched and critiqued experts' animations. They were then interviewed about the teaching-learning process. Most students (91%) spoke positively about follow-up discussion classes, saying that their previous conceptions and understanding of states of matter had improved. They explained that they had identified some alternative conceptions, which they had held regarding states of matter and explained how their conceptions had changed. They reported that the teaching/learning process had helped them to develop a deeper understanding of the changing states of matter.

  19. Effect of surface chemistries and characteristics of Ti6Al4V on the Ca and P adsorption and ion dissolution in Hank's ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E; Lee, T M

    2002-07-01

    This study examined the influence of chemistries and surface characteristics of Ti6Al4V on the adsorption of Ca and P species and ion dissolution behavior of the material exposed in Hank's solution with 8.0 mM ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid at 37 degrees C. The variation of chemistries of the alloy and nano-surface characteristics (chemistries of nano-surface oxides, amphoteric OH group adsorbed on oxides, and oxide thickness) was effected by surface modification and three passivation methods (34% nitric acid passivation. 400 degrees C heated in air, and aged in 100 degrees C water). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy were used for surface analyses. The chemistries of nano-surface oxides in a range studied should not change the capability of Ca and P adsorption. Nor is the capability affected significantly by amphoteric OH group and oxide thickness. However, passivations influence the surface oxide thickness and the early stage ion dissolution rate of the alloy. The rate-limiting step of the rate can be best explained by metal-ion transport through the oxide film, rather than hydrolysis of the film. Variation of the chemistries of titanium alloy alters the electromotive force potential of the metal, thereby affecting the corrosion and ion dissolution rate.

  20. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

    2008-09-29

    This work focuses on (1) searching/summarizing published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron catalysts with/without potassium/platinum promoters; (3) measurement of H{sub 2} and CO adsorption/dissociation kinetics on iron catalysts using transient methods; (3) analysis of the transient rate data to calculate kinetic parameters of early elementary steps in FTS; (4) construction of a microkinetic model of FTS on iron, and (5) validation of the model from collection of steady-state rate data for FTS on iron catalysts. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by non-aqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2} and thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. Kinetic parameters for CO adsorption, CO dissociation, and surface carbon hydrogenation on these catalysts were determined from temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO and temperature programmed surface hydrogenation (TPSR), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), and isothermal, transient hydrogenation (ITH). A microkinetic model was constructed for the early steps in FTS on polycrystalline iron from the kinetic parameters of elementary steps determined experimentally in this work and from literature values. Steady-state rate data were collected in a Berty reactor and used for validation of the microkinetic model. These rate data were fitted to 'smart' Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expressions derived from a sequence of elementary steps and using a combination of fitted steady-state parameters and parameters specified from the transient

  1. Mathematical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Trinajstić, Nenad; Gutman, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A brief description is given of the historical development of mathematics and chemistry. A path leading to the meeting of these two sciences is described. An attempt is made to define mathematical chemistry, and journals containing the term mathematical chemistry in their titles are noted. In conclusion, the statement is made that although chemistry is an experimental science aimed at preparing new compounds and materials, mathematics is very useful in chemistry, among other things, to produc...

  2. Application of 1 D Finite Element Method in Combination with Laminar Solution Method for Pipe Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudar, O. I.; Dudar, E. S.

    2017-11-01

    The features of application of the 1D dimensional finite element method (FEM) in combination with the laminar solutions method (LSM) for the calculation of underground ventilating networks are considered. In this case the processes of heat and mass transfer change the properties of a fluid (binary vapour-air mix). Under the action of gravitational forces it leads to such phenomena as natural draft, local circulation, etc. The FEM relations considering the action of gravity, the mass conservation law, the dependence of vapour-air mix properties on the thermodynamic parameters are derived so that it allows one to model the mentioned phenomena. The analogy of the elastic and plastic rod deformation processes to the processes of laminar and turbulent flow in a pipe is described. Owing to this analogy, the guaranteed convergence of the elastic solutions method for the materials of plastic type means the guaranteed convergence of the LSM for any regime of a turbulent flow in a rough pipe. By means of numerical experiments the convergence rate of the FEM - LSM is investigated. This convergence rate appeared much higher than the convergence rate of the Cross - Andriyashev method. Data of other authors on the convergence rate comparison for the finite element method, the Newton method and the method of gradient are provided. These data allow one to conclude that the FEM in combination with the LSM is one of the most effective methods of calculation of hydraulic and ventilating networks. The FEM - LSM has been used for creation of the research application programme package “MineClimate” allowing to calculate the microclimate parameters in the underground ventilating networks.

  3. A novel signal transduction protein: Combination of solute binding and tandem PAS-like sensor domains in one polypeptide chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, R; Wilton, R; Cuff, M E; Endres, M; Babnigg, G; Edirisinghe, J N; Henry, C S; Joachimiak, A; Schiffer, M; Pokkuluri, P R

    2017-04-01

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of a novel periplasmic ligand-binding protein, Dret_0059, from Desulfohalobium retbaense DSM 5692, an organism isolated from Lake Retba, in Senegal. The structure of the protein consists of a unique combination of a periplasmic solute binding protein (SBP) domain at the N-terminal and a tandem PAS-like sensor domain at the C-terminal region. SBP domains are found ubiquitously, and their best known function is in solute transport across membranes. PAS-like sensor domains are commonly found in signal transduction proteins. These domains are widely observed as parts of many protein architectures and complexes but have not been observed previously within the same polypeptide chain. In the structure of Dret_0059, a ketoleucine moiety is bound to the SBP, whereas a cytosine molecule is bound in the distal PAS-like domain of the tandem PAS-like domain. Differential scanning flourimetry support the binding of ligands observed in the crystal structure. There is significant interaction between the SBP and tandem PAS-like domains, and it is possible that the binding of one ligand could have an effect on the binding of the other. We uncovered three other proteins with this structural architecture in the non-redundant sequence data base, and predict that they too bind the same substrates. The genomic context of this protein did not offer any clues for its function. We did not find any biological process in which the two observed ligands are coupled. The protein Dret_0059 could be involved in either signal transduction or solute transport. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  4. Combined solid state and solution NMR studies of {alpha},{epsilon}-{sup 15}N labeled bovine rhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Karla; Lehner, Ines [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Dhiman, Harpreet Kaur [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology (United States); Richter, Christian; Glaubitz, Clemens; Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Khorana, H. Gobind [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Departments of Biology and Chemistry (United States)], E-mail: khorana@mit.edu

    2007-04-15

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment of the vertebrate rod photoreceptor cell and is the only member of the G protein coupled receptor family for which a crystal structure is available. Towards the study of dynamics in rhodopsin, we report NMR-spectroscopic investigations of {alpha},{epsilon}-{sup 15}N-tryptophan labeled rhodopsin in detergent micelles and reconstituted in phospholipids. Using a combination of solid state {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-REDOR and HETCOR experiments of all possible {sup 13}C'{sub i-1} carbonyl/{sup 15}N{sub i}-tryptophan isotope labeled amide pairs, and H/D exchange {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC experiments conducted in solution, we assigned chemical shifts to all five rhodopsin tryptophan backbone {sup 15}N nuclei and partially to their bound protons. {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N chemical shift assignment was achieved for indole side chains of Trp35{sup 1.30} and Trp175{sup 4.65}. {sup 15}N chemical shifts were found to be similar when comparing those obtained in the native like reconstituted lipid environment and those obtained in detergent micelles for all tryptophans except Trp175{sup 4.65} at the membrane interface. The results suggest that the integrated solution and solid state NMR approach presented provides highly complementary information in the study of structure and dynamics of large membrane proteins like rhodopsin.

  5. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell for cooperating households: A convenient combined heat and power solution for residential applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappa, Francesco; Facci, Andrea Luigi; Ubertini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we compare the technical and economical performances of a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell with those of an internal combustion engine for a 10 kW combined heat and power residential application. In a view of social innovation, this solution will create new partnerships of cooperating families aiming to reduce the energy consumption and costs. The energy system is simulated through a lumped model. We compare, in the Italian context, the total daily operating cost and energy savings of each system with respect to the separate purchase of electricity from the grid and production of the thermal energy through a standard boiler. The analysis is carried out with the energy systems operating with both the standard thermal tracking and an optimized management. The latter is retrieved through an optimization methodology based on the graph theory. We show that the internal combustion engine is much more affected by the choice of the operating strategy with respect to the fuel cell, in terms long term profitability. Then we conduct a net present value analysis with the aim of evidencing the convenience of using a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell for cogeneration in residential applications. - Highlights: • Fuel cells are a feasible and economically convenient solution for residential CHP. • Control strategy is fundamental for the economical performance of a residential CHP. • Flexibility is a major strength of the fuel cell CHP.

  6. Analytical solutions for a single vertical drain with time-dependent vacuum combined surcharge preloading in membrane and membraneless systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, X Y; Indraratna, B; Rujikiatkamjorn, C

    2010-01-01

    Vertical drains combined with vacuum pressure and surcharge preloading are widely used to accelerate the consolidation process of soft clay in order to decrease the pore pressure as well as to increase the effective stress. Currently there are two types of vacuum preloading systems commercially available; (a) membrane system with an airtight membrane over the drainage layer and, (b) membraneless system where a vacuum system is connected to individual drain. Their effectiveness varies from site to site depending on the type of soil treated and the characteristics of the drain-vacuum system. This study presents the analytical solutions of vertical drains with vacuum preloading for both membrane and membraneless systems. According to the field and laboratory observations, the vacuum in both of the membraneless and membrane system was assumed to be decreasing along the drain whereas in the membrane system, it was maintained at a constant level. This model was verified by using the measured settlements and excess pore pressures obtained from large-scale laboratory testing and case studies in Australia. The analytical solutions improved the accuracy of predicting the dissipation of pore water pressure and the associated settlement. The effects of the permeability of the sand blanket in a membrane system and the possible loss of vacuum were also discussed.

  7. Randomized trial of electrodynamic microneedle combined with 5% minoxidil topical solution for the treatment of Chinese male Androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Linlin; Gong, Lin; Guo, Menger; Liu, Taoming; Shi, Anyu; Zong, Haifeng; Xu, Xuegang; Chen, Hongduo; Gao, Xinghua; Li, Yuanhong

    2017-10-13

    In treating androgenetic alopecia, 5% minoxidil is a commonly used topical drug. By using electrodynamic microneedle at the same time may increase absorption of minoxidil and further stimulate hair growth. A 24-week, randomized, evaluator blinded, comparative study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of treating Chinese male androgenetic alopecia using microneedle combined with 5% minoxidil topical solution. Randomized subjects received topical 5% minoxidil (group 1, n = 20), local electrodynamic microneedle treatments (group 2, n = 20), or local electrodynamic microneedle treatments plus topical 5% minoxidil (group 3, n = 20). A total of 12 microneedle treatments were performed every 2 weeks with 2ml 5% minoxidil delivery in group 3 during each microneedle treatment. Patient receiving topical 5% minoxidil applied 1 ml of the solution twice daily over the course of the study. A total of 60 Chinese male subjects with Norwood-Hamilton type III-VI androgenetic alopecia were treated. The mean improvement in total hair density from baseline to 24 weeks was 18.8/cm 2 in group 1, 23.4/cm 2 in group 2, and 38.3/cm 2 in group 3. The hair growth in the 3 groups was significantly different (P = 0.002), but there were no significant differences in toxicity found between the 3 groups. Treatment with microneedle plus topical 5% minoxidil was associated with the best hair growth.

  8. Intensified depolymerization of aqueous polyacrylamide solution using combined processes based on hydrodynamic cavitation, ozone, ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapat, Amrutlal L; Gogate, Parag R

    2016-07-01

    The present work deals with intensification of depolymerization of polyacrylamide (PAM) solution using hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) reactors based on a combination with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ozone (O3) and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Effect of inlet pressure in hydrodynamic cavitation reactor and power dissipation in the case of UV irradiation on the extent of viscosity reduction has been investigated. The combined approaches such as HC+UV, HC+O3, HC+H2O2, UV+H2O2 and UV+O3 have been subsequently investigated and found to be more efficient as compared to individual approaches. For the approach based on HC+UV+H2O2, the extent of viscosity reduction under the optimized conditions of HC (3 bar inlet pressure)+UV (8 W power)+H2O2 (0.2% loading) was 97.27% in 180 min whereas individual operations of HC (3 bar inlet pressure) and UV (8 W power) resulted in about 35.38% and 40.83% intrinsic viscosity reduction in 180 min respectively. In the case of HC (3 bar inlet pressure)+UV (8 W power)+ozone (400 mg/h flow rate) approach, the extent of viscosity reduction was 89.06% whereas individual processes of only ozone (400 mg/h flow rate), ozone (400 mg/h flow rate)+HC (3 bar inlet pressure) and ozone (400 mg/h flow rate)+UV (8 W power) resulted in lower extent of viscosity reduction as 50.34%, 60.65% and 75.31% respectively. The chemical structure of the treated PAM by all approaches was also characterized using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectra and it was established that no significant chemical structure changes were obtained during the treatment. Overall, it can be said that the combination of HC+UV+H2O2 is an efficient approach for the depolymerization of PAM solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of Di(oxymethylene)glycol in the Raman Spectrum of Formaldehyde Aqueous Solutions by ab lnitio Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Delcroix, Pauline; Pagliai, M.; Cardini, G.; Bégué, D.; Hanoune, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 38 (2015), s. 9785-9793 ISSN 1089-5639 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrogen bond dynamics * chemical equilibria * liquid water Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.883, year: 2015

  10. Studies on the radiation chemistry of biomolecules in aqueous solution with specific objective of minimizing their radiolytic degradation. Coordinated programme for Asia and the Pacific Region on radiation sterilization practices significant to local medical supplies and conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana Rao, K.

    1979-01-01

    As part of a study of radiolytic degradation of pharmaceuticals during radiosterilization, the basic radiation chemistry of the B-group vitamins, nicotinamide, pyridoxin, riboflavin and thiamine, and the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with these same materials has been investigated. The various aspects studied were - radiolysis under controlled conditions, effects of phase, temperature, pH and nature and concentration of additives. Some of the conclusions are: 1) with oxygen saturated aqueous solutions containing glucose, the radiolytic degradation of the vitamins is reduced: 2) results a similar for N 2 O saturated aqueous solutions; 3) in glucose-containing solutions, the protective effect is considerably modified at higher temperatures; and 4) irradiation of air-saturated aqueous solutions in the frozen state leads to reduced decomposition. It is concluded that in the presence of oxygen, in frozen matrices at low temperature, it appears possible to reduce the radiolytic breakdown of vitamins to low levels

  11. Purification and identification of O-GlcNAc-modified peptides using phosphate-based alkyne CLICK chemistry in combination with titanium dioxide chromatography and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Benjamin L; Gupta, Pankaj; Cordwell, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    A selective method for the enrichment of O-GlcNAcylated peptides using a novel CLICK chemistry reagent is described. Peptides modified by O-GlcNAc were enzymatically labeled with N-azidoacetylgalactosamine. The azide was then reacted with a phospho-alkyne using CLICK chemistry and O-GlcNAcGalNAzPO4...

  12. Density functional theory-based prediction of the formation constants of complexes of ammonia in aqueous solution: indications of the role of relativistic effects in the solution chemistry of gold(I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Robert D; Bartolotti, Libero J

    2005-10-03

    A prediction of the formation constants (log K1) for complexes of metal ions with a single NH3 ligand in aqueous solution, using quantum mechanical calculations, is reported. DeltaG values at 298 K in the gas phase for eq 1 (DeltaG(DFT)) were calculated for 34 metal ions using density functional theory (DFT), with the expectation that these would correlate with the free energy of complex formation in aqueous solution (DeltaG(aq)). [M(H2O)6]n+(g) + NH(3)(g) = [M(H2O)5NH3]n+(g) + H2O(g) (eq 1). The DeltaG(aq) values include the effects of complex changes in solvation on complex formation, which are not included in eq 1. It was anticipated that such changes in solvation would be constant or vary systematically with changes in the log K(1) value for different metal ions; therefore, simple correlations between DeltaG(DFT) and DeltaG(aq) were sought. The bulk of the log K1(NH3) values used to calculate DeltaG(aq) were not experimental, but estimated previously (Hancock 1978, 1980) from a variety of empirical correlations. Separate linear correlations between DeltaG(DFT) and DeltaG(aq) for metal ions of different charges (M2+, M3+, and M4+) were found. In plots of DeltaG(DFT) versus DeltaG(aq), the slopes ranged from 2.201 for M2+ ions down to 1.076 for M4+ ions, with intercepts increasing from M2+ to M4+ ions. Two separate correlations occurred for the M3+ ions, which appeared to correspond to small metal ions with a coordination number (CN) of 6 and to large metal ions with a higher CN in the vicinity of 7-9. The good correlation coefficients (R) in the range of 0.97-0.99 for all these separate correlations suggest that the approach used here may be the basis for future predictions of aqueous phase chemistry that would otherwise be experimentally inaccessible. Thus, the log K1(NH3) value for the transuranic Lr3+, which has a half-life of 3.6 h in its most stable isotope, is predicted to be 1.46. These calculations should also lead to a greater insight into the factors

  13. Chemistry of plutonium revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connick, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    In 1941 one goal of the Manhattan Project was to unravel the chemistry of the synthetic element plutonium as rapidly as possible. In this paper the work carried out at Berkeley from the spring of 1942 to the summer of 1945 is described briefly. The aqueous chemistry of plutonium is quite remarkable. Important insights were obtained from tracer experiments, but the full complexity was not revealed until macroscopic amounts (milligrams) became available. Because processes for separation from fission products were based on aqueous solutions, such solution chemistry was emphasized, particularly precipitation and oxidation-reduction behavior. The latter turned out to be unusually intricate when it was discovered that two more oxidation states existed in aqueous solution than had previously been suspected. Further, an equilibrium was rapidly established among the four aqueous oxidation states, while at the same time any three were not in equilibrium. These and other observations made while doing a crash study of a previously unknown element are reported

  14. Supramolecular chemistry of adamantyldiazirines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobek, M.M.

    2000-10-01

    This work combines several aspects of organic chemistry and comprises synthetic, spectroscopic and theoretical considerations. An improvement in the synthesis of adamantane-2,4-dione is reported. Several adamantyldiazirines and their inclusion complexes with α- and β-cyclodextrin were prepared and thoroughly studied. The first single crystal X-ray structures of dialkyldiazirines could be obtained together with the first single crystal X-ray structure analysis of an encapsulated carbene precursor. Also the first single crystal X-ray structure of a bisdiazirine is reported. The complexes were analyzed in solution by 2D NMR spectroscopy and chiroptical techniques. The correlation of two different spectroscopic methods allowed to check the validity of rules established for the prediction of the conformation of cyclodextrin complexes. It could be shown, that these rules must not be applied to n-π* transitions of diazirines. The reactions of 5-substituted adamantylidenes were studied in solution and in the gas phase. Together with quantum mechanical calculations, the origin of the diastereoselectivity of allegedly sterically unbiased carbenes was elucidated. The scope and limitations of the photochemistry of the substituted diazirines in the confined space of cyclodextrin complexes is discussed. It could be shown, that the selectivity of the reactive intermediates is largely controlled by packing motives of the complex. The photochemical reaction of 2,6-diaziadamantane yielded an oligoazine-pseudopolyrotaxane. To the author's knowledge this is the first example of a photo polymerization involving carbenes in a constrained system. (author)

  15. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  16. Chemistry Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The Chemistry Dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use.

  17. Some Exact Solutions of Boundary Layer Flows along a Vertical Plate with Buoyancy Forces Combined with Lorentz Forces under Uniform Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asterios Pantokratoras

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exact analytical solutions of boundary layer flows along a vertical porous plate with uniform suction are derived and presented in this paper. The solutions concern the Blasius, Sakiadis, and Blasius-Sakiadis flows with buoyancy forces combined with either MHD Lorentz or EMHD Lorentz forces. In addition, some exact solutions are presented specifically for water in the temperature range of 0∘C≤≤8∘C, where water density is nearly parabolic. Except for their use as benchmarking means for testing the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, the presented exact solutions with EMHD forces have use in flow separation control in aeronautics and hydronautics, whereas the MHD results have applications in process metallurgy and fusion technology. These analytical solutions are valid for flows with strong suction.

  18. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  19. Aquatic Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Yeun; Kim, Oh Sik; Kim, Chang Guk; Park, Cheong Gil; Lee, Gwi Hyeon; Lee, Cheol Hui

    1987-07-01

    This book deals aquatic chemistry, which treats water and environment, chemical kinetics, chemical balance like dynamical characteristic, and thermodynamics, acid-base chemistry such as summary, definition, kinetics, and PH design for mixture of acid-base chemistry, complex chemistry with definition, and kinetics, precipitation and dissolution on summary, kinetics of precipitation and dissolution, and balance design oxidation and resolution with summary, balance of oxidation and resolution.

  20. Positronium chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James

    1964-01-01

    Positronium Chemistry focuses on the methodologies, reactions, processes, and transformations involved in positronium chemistry. The publication first offers information on positrons and positronium and experimental methods, including mesonic atoms, angular correlation measurements, annihilation spectra, and statistical errors in delayed coincidence measurements. The text then ponders on positrons in gases and solids. The manuscript takes a look at the theoretical chemistry of positronium and positronium chemistry in gases. Topics include quenching, annihilation spectrum, delayed coincidence

  1. The efficacy and safety of the targeted drug combined with adriamycin liposome solution for HER-2-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Ping Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the efficacy and safety of the targeted drug trastuzumab combined with adriamycin liposome solution for HER-2-positive breast cancer. Methods: A total of 112 patients with breast cancer who received chemotherapy in Department of Cardiothoracic Breast Surgery, Guangdong TongJiang Hospital between May 2014 and April 2016 were selected as the research subjects and divided into two groups by random number table, liposome group received trastuzumab + adriamycin liposome chemotherapy, and the control group received trastuzumab + adriamycin chemotherapy. Before chemotherapy as well as 4 weeks and 8 weeks after chemotherapy, serum levels of tumor markers, cytokines and myocardial injury indexes were detected, the electrocardiography was conducted and the degree of myocardial injury was determined. Results: 4 weeks and 8 weeks after chemotherapy, serum CEA, CA15-3, TPS, CTGF, TGF-β, TSGF, VEGF and MK levels of both groups were significantly lower than those before chemotherapy, serum CK-MB and cTnI levels were significantly higher than those before chemotherapy, limb leads QRS amplitudes and chest leads QRS amplitudes were significantly lower than those before chemotherapy, serum CEA, CA15-3, TPS, CTGF, TGF-β, TSGF, VEGF, MK, CK-MB and cTnI levels of liposome group were significantly lower than those of control group, and the limb leads QRS amplitudes and chest lead QRS amplitudes were significantly higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Targeted drug combined with adriamycin liposome therapy for HER-2-positive breast cancer can improve the curative effect and reduce the cardiotoxicity.

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Minoxidil 5% Foam in Combination With a Botanical Hair Solution in Men With Androgenic Alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaney, Terrence C; Pham, Hanh; von Grote, Erika; Meckfessel, Matthew H

    2016-04-01

    Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is the most common type of hair loss in men, characterized by hair miniaturization, hairline recession, and vertex balding. It affects approximately 50% of men, negatively affecting self-esteem and sociability. Topical minoxidil formulations are approved up to a 5% concentration for men, but patient adherence to treatment is challenged by gradual results that may be perceived as a lack of initial benefit. Herbal extracts, which are also believed to promote healthier-looking hair, have a long history of use in hair care formulations. The safety and efficacy of a twice-daily regimen of 5% minoxidil foam used in combination with a novel botanical hair solution was evaluated in a 12-week, multicenter, single-arm, open label study in 56 subjects with mild to moderate AGA. Assessments included investigator ratings of improvement and subject self-ratings of satisfaction. Investigator ratings indicated significant improvement in scalp hair coverage and perception of overall treatment benefit in as early as 4 weeks (P<.001). Subject self-ratings were significant for improved hair growth and hair appearance in as few as 4 weeks (P<.05). The regimen was well tolerated, and subjects indicated a high degree of satisfaction. Investigator and subject-assessed efficacy and subject satisfaction with this novel regimen provide clinicians with an effective treatment option for AGA that also provides a high level of patient satisfaction, which may help promote patient adherence to long-term treatment.

  3. Turnkey Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning and Lighting Retrofit Solution Combining Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebber, Ian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Deru, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Trenbath, Kim [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-04-12

    NREL worked with the Bonneville Power Administration's Technology Innovation Office to demonstrate a turnkey, retrofit technology that combines demand response (DR) and energy efficiency (EE) benefits for HVAC and lighting in retail buildings. As a secondary benefit, we also controlled various plug loads and electric hot water heaters (EHWH). The technology demonstrated was Transformative Wave's eIQ Building Management System (BMS) automatically responding to DR signals. The BMS controlled the HVAC rooftop units (RTU) using the CATALYST retrofit solution also developed by Transformative Wave. The non-HVAC loads were controlled using both hardwired and ZigBee wireless communication. The wireless controllers, manufactured by Autani, were used when the building's electrical layout was too disorganized to leverage less expensive hardwired control. The six demonstration locations are within the Seattle metro area. Based on the assets curtailed by the BMS at each location, we projected the DR resource. We were targeting a 1.7 W/ft2 shed for the summer Day-Ahead events and a 0.7 W/ft2 shed for the winter events. While summarized in Table ES-1, only one summer DR event was conducted at Casino #2.

  4. N-glycoproteome analysis of the secretome of human metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines combining hydrazide chemistry, HILIC enrichment and mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianyu Li

    Full Text Available Cancer cell metastasis is a major cause of cancer death. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown, which results in the lack of efficient diagnosis, therapy and prevention approaches. Nevertheless, the dysregulation of the cancer cell secretome is known to play key roles in tumor transformation and progression. The majority of proteins in the secretome are secretory proteins and membrane-released proteins, and, mostly, the glycosylated proteins. Until recently, few studies have explored protein N-glycosylation changes in the secretome, although protein glycosylation has received increasing attention in the study of tumor development processes. Here, the N-glycoproteins in the secretome of two human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cell lines with low (MHCC97L or high (HCCLM3 metastatic potential were investigated with a in-depth characterization of the N-glycosites by combining two general glycopeptide enrichment approaches, hydrazide chemistry and zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography (zic-HILIC, with mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1,213 unique N-glycosites from 611 N-glycoproteins were confidently identified. These N-glycoproteins were primarily localized to the extracellular space and plasma membrane, supporting the important role of N-glycosylation in the secretory pathway. Coupling label-free quantification with a hierarchical clustering strategy, we determined the differential regulation of several N-glycoproteins that are related to metastasis, among which AFP, DKK1, FN1, CD151 and TGFβ2 were up-regulated in HCCLM3 cells. The inclusion of the well-known metastasis-related proteins AFP and DKK1 in this list provides solid supports for our study. Further western blotting experiments detecting FN1 and FAT1 confirmed our discovery. The glycoproteome strategy in this study provides an effective means to explore potential cancer biomarkers.

  5. Forensic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  6. Liquid flow along a solid surface reversibly alters interfacial chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Dan; Backus, Ellen H G; Hunger, Johannes; Parekh, Sapun H; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-06-06

    In nature, aqueous solutions often move collectively along solid surfaces (for example, raindrops falling on the ground and rivers flowing through riverbeds). However, the influence of such motion on water-surface interfacial chemistry is unclear. In this work, we combine surface-specific sum frequency generation spectroscopy and microfluidics to show that at immersed calcium fluoride and fused silica surfaces, flow leads to a reversible modification of the surface charge and subsequent realignment of the interfacial water molecules. Obtaining equivalent effects under static conditions requires a substantial change in bulk solution pH (up to 2 pH units), demonstrating the coupling between flow and chemistry. These marked flow-induced variations in interfacial chemistry should substantially affect our understanding and modeling of chemical processes at immersed surfaces. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Exploring Ion-Ion Interactions in Aqueous Solutions by a Combination of Molecular Dynamics and Neutron Scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohagen, Miriam; Pluhařová, E.; Mason, Philip E.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 9 (2015), s. 1563-1567 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ion pairing * molecular dynamics * neutron scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 8.539, year: 2015 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.jpclett.5b00060

  8. Polish contribution to radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroh, J.

    1989-01-01

    This article outlines the history of radiation chemistry research in Poland from 1899 to the present day, with particular reference to radiolysis studies of aqueous solutions of radioactive compounds. (UK)

  9. Organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This book with sixteen chapter explains organic chemistry on linkage isomerism such as alkane, cycloalkane, alkene, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic halogen compound, alcohol, ether, aldehyde and ketone, carboxylic acid, dicarboxylic acid, fat and detergent, amino, carbohydrate, amino acid and protein, nucleotide and nucleic acid and spectroscopy, a polymer and medical chemistry. Each chapter has introduction structure and characteristic and using of organic chemistry.

  10. Technetium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-01-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  11. Chemistry Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Chemistry technology experts at NCATS engage in a variety of innovative translational research activities, including:Design of bioactive small molecules.Development...

  12. Migration chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, L.

    1992-05-01

    Migration chemistry, the influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour of pollutants in the environment, is an interplay between the actual natur of the pollutant and the characteristics of the environment, such as pH, redox conditions and organic matter content. The wide selection of possible pollutants in combination with varying geological media, as well as the operation of different chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions compleactes the prediction of the influence of these processes on the mobility of pollutants. The report summarizes a wide range of potential pollutants in the terrestrial environment as well as a variety of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions, which can be expected to influence the migration behaviour, comprising diffusion, dispersion, convection, sorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, transformations/degradations, biochemical reactions and complex formation. The latter comprises the complexation of metal ions as well as non-polar organics to naturally occurring organic macromolecules. The influence of the single types of processes on the migration process is elucidated based on theoretical studies. The influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour is unambiguous, as the processes apparently control the transport of pollutants in the terrestrial environment. As the simple, conventional K D concept breaks down, it is suggested that the migration process should be described in terms of the alternative concepts chemical dispersion, average-elution-time and effective retention. (AB) (134 refs.)

  13. Computational chemistry research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Eugene

    1987-01-01

    Task 41 is composed of two parts: (1) analysis and design studies related to the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Extended Operating Configuration (EOC) and (2) computational chemistry. During the first half of 1987, Dr. Levin served as a member of an advanced system planning team to establish the requirements, goals, and principal technical characteristics of the NAS EOC. A paper entitled 'Scaling of Data Communications for an Advanced Supercomputer Network' is included. The high temperature transport properties (such as viscosity, thermal conductivity, etc.) of the major constituents of air (oxygen and nitrogen) were correctly determined. The results of prior ab initio computer solutions of the Schroedinger equation were combined with the best available experimental data to obtain complete interaction potentials for both neutral and ion-atom collision partners. These potentials were then used in a computer program to evaluate the collision cross-sections from which the transport properties could be determined. A paper entitled 'High Temperature Transport Properties of Air' is included.

  14. Combined convective heat and airborne pollutant removals in a slot vented enclosure under different flow schemes: Parametric investigations and non unique flow solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Xiu-Hong; Hu, Jiang-Tao; Liu, Di; Zhao, Fu-Yun; Li, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Han-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Combined convective heat and airborne transports under different flow schemes. • Natural and forced convection dominated regimes were identified with transition. • Dual solution branches were sustained for the transitional mixing flow scheme. • Rest solutions evolving from motionless flows coincided with other solution branch. • Heat and species lines were presented to delineate heat and mass transport structures. - Abstract: This paper reports a numerical study of mixed convection on a heated and polluted strip within a slot ventilated enclosure in which the displacement and mixing flow schemes are considered. Contours of streamfunction, heatfunction, and massfunction are presented to clearly scrutinize the mechanism of heat and airborne pollutant transports. For the displacement flow scheme, thermal Nusselt and pollutant Sherwood numbers under different Reynolds numbers remain almost constant as the value of Gr/Re 2 decreases down to the regime of forced convection dominated. However, as Ar increases up to the regime of natural convection dominated, both Nu and Sh increase sharply with Ar (Gr/Re 2 ). Similar trends could be observed for the situation of mixing ventilated flow scheme. In the mixing scheme, non unique steady flow solutions could be observed for the range of transitional flow regime. Upward solutions, downward solutions and rest solutions have been exemplified with varying Gr/Re 2 . Dual solution branches could be sustained at the range of 39.0 ≤ Gr/Re 2  ≤ 6.0 × 10 3 , while the rest solutions obtained from rest states were completely coinciding with former continuous solutions. The present work could be significant for the natural optimization and passive control of heat and pollutant removals from the electronic boxes or building enclosures.

  15. Current organic chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    Provides in depth reviews on current progress in the fields of asymmetric synthesis, organometallic chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, natural product chemistry, and analytical...

  16. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors

  17. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors. (Auth.)

  18. Global limit load solutions for thick-walled cylinders with circumferential cracks under combined internal pressure, axial force and bending moment − Part II: Finite element validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuebing; Lei, Yuebao; Gao, Zengliang

    2014-01-01

    Global limit load solutions for thick-walled cylinders with circumferential internal/external surface and through-wall defects under combined positive/negative axial force, positive/negative global bending moment and internal pressure have been developed in Part I of this paper. In this Part II, elastic-perfectly plastic 3-D finite element (FE) analyses are performed for selected cases, covering a wide range of geometries and load combinations, to validate the developed limit load solutions. The results show that these limit load solutions can predict the FE data very well for the cases with shallow or deep and short cracks and are conservative. For the cases with very long and deep cracks, the predictions are reasonably accurate and more conservative. -- Highlights: • Elastic-perfectly plastic 3D finite element limiting analyses of cylinders. • Thin/thick-walled cylinders with circumferential surface defects. • Combined loading for pressure, end-force and global bending moment. • Totally 1458 cases analysed and tabulated normalised results provided. • Results used to validate the developed limit load solutions in Part I of this paper

  19. An open, comparative study of 10% potassium hydroxide solution versus salicylic and lactic acid combination in the treatment of molluscum contagiosum in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Osman; Özmen, İbrahim; Arca, Ercan

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate and compare the safety and efficacy of 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution and salicylic and lactic acid (SAL + LAC) combination in the treatment of molluscum contagiosum (MC). 26 patients with MC randomized into two treatment groups. 12 patients treated with 10% KOH solution and 14 patients treated with SAL + LAC combination for 6 weeks. Parents of patients were instructed to apply medication once daily only to lesions at study onset. Assessment of response of the treated lesions and side effects was performed at 2, 4 and 6 weeks of the treatment. Newly acquired lesions were not included in the study. At the end of therapy, 83.3% (n = 10) of KOH group demonstrated complete remission and 16.7% (n = 2) of them showed partial remission; four patients (33%) developed new lesions during the study. All the patients in the SAL + LAC combination group (100%) demonstrated complete remission of study entry lesions at the end of 6 weeks with five patients (35%) acquiring new lesions during the study. Minor side effects were observed in two groups. 10% KOH solution and SAL + LAC combination were found to be equally effective in the treatment of MC in children.

  20. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  1. Comparison of topical fixed-combination fortified vancomycin-amikacin (VA solution) to conventional separate therapy in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, C-C; Lin, J-M; Chen, W-L; Chiu, Y-T; Tsai, Y-Y

    2009-02-01

    In an in vitro study, fixed-combination fortified vancomycin and amikacin ophthalmic solutions (VA solution) had the same potency and stable physical properties as the separate components. In this retrospective clinical study, we evaluated the efficacy of the topical VA solution in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcer and comparison with separate topical fortified vancomycin and amikacin. Separate topical fortified eye drops was used prior to January 2004 and switched to the VA solution afterwards in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcer. The medical records of 223 patients diagnosed with bacterial corneal ulcers between January 2002 and December 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. There were 122 patients in the VA group and 101 in the separate group. Cure was defined as complete healing of the ulcer accompanied by a nonprogressive stromal infiltrate on two consecutive visits. No significant difference was found between the VA and separate therapy group. The mean treatment duration was 15.4 days in the VA group and 16.1 days in the separate therapy group. The average hospital stay was 5.4 days (VA) and 7.2 days (separate antibiotics). Stromal infiltration regressed significantly without further expansion in both groups. All corneal ulcers completely re-epithelialized without complications related to drugs. VA solution provided similar efficacy to the conventional separate therapy in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers; however, it is more convenient and tolerable, promotes patient's compliance, avoids the washout effect, and reduces nurse utilization. Hence, VA solution is a good alternative to separate therapy.

  2. Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms: The interplay between hot atom chemistry and gas kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Wolf, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms illustrate the power of an experimental approach to the solution of complex mechanistic problems that combines the study of the reactions of recoiling atoms with conventional gas kinetic techniques. Included will be the reactions of 11 C atoms with anisole, addressing the question whether an aromatic pi-electron system can compete as a reactive site with carbon-hydrogen bonds

  3. Direct measurement of CO2 solubility and pH in NaCl hydrothermal solutions by combining in-situ potentiometry and Raman spectroscopy up to 280 °C and 150 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truche, Laurent; Bazarkina, Elena F.; Berger, Gilles; Caumon, Marie-Camille; Bessaque, Gilles; Dubessy, Jean

    2016-03-01

    The in-situ monitoring of aqueous solution chemistry at elevated temperatures and pressures is a major challenge in geochemistry. Here, we combined for the first time in-situ Raman spectroscopy for concentration measurements and potentiometry for pH measurement in a single hydrothermal cell equipped with sampling systems and operating under controlled conditions of temperature and pressure. Dissolved CO2 concentration and pH were measured at temperatures up to 280 °C and pressures up to 150 bar in the H2O-CO2 and H2O-CO2-NaCl systems. A Pitzer specific-ion-interaction aqueous model was developed and confirmed the accuracy and consistency of the measurements, at least up to 250 °C. The revised Pitzer parameters for the H2O-CO2-NaCl system were formatted for the Phreeqc geochemical software. Significant changes with respect to the Pitzer.dat database currently associated with Phreeqc were observed. The new model parameters are now available for further applications. The Raman and pH probes tested here may also be applied to field monitoring of hydrothermal springs, geothermal wells, and oil and gas boreholes.

  4. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  5. A combined finite element-boundary integral formulation for solution of two-dimensional scattering problems via CGFFT. [Conjugate Gradient Fast Fourier Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Volakis, John L.; Jin, Jian-Ming

    1990-01-01

    A new technique is presented for computing the scattering by 2-D structures of arbitrary composition. The proposed solution approach combines the usual finite element method with the boundary-integral equation to formulate a discrete system. This is subsequently solved via the conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm. A particular characteristic of the method is the use of rectangular boundaries to enclose the scatterer. Several of the resulting boundary integrals are therefore convolutions and may be evaluated via the fast Fourier transform (FFT) in the implementation of the CG algorithm. The solution approach offers the principal advantage of having O(N) memory demand and employs a 1-D FFT versus a 2-D FFT as required with a traditional implementation of the CGFFT algorithm. The speed of the proposed solution method is compared with that of the traditional CGFFT algorithm, and results for rectangular bodies are given and shown to be in excellent agreement with the moment method.

  6. Analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Seong

    1993-02-15

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  7. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Seong

    1993-02-01

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  8. Acute Diarrhoea in Children: Determination of Duration Using a Combined Bismuth Hydroxide Gel and Oral Rehydration Solution Therapy vs. Oral Rehydration Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Oviedo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Oral rehydration salt (ORS treatment in young children with acute diarrhoea (AD has contributed to decrease mortality associated with dehydration although effective strategies to reduce morbidity associated with this disease are required. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diarrhoea duration when using combined colloidal bismuth hydroxide gel (CBHG and oral rehydration salt treatment compared with ORS therapy in children with AD. We designed a double-blind, randomised prospective study with treatment and control groups. Patients aged one to 12 years, with no prior pathology and with AD of less than 48 h were included. The Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney tests were used, as well as the Cox proportional hazards model and the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Patients were randomised into an ORS and CBHG treatment group and a control group for ORS plus placebo. (Average age: 3.2 years. The result of the post-treatment evaluation with respect to the average duration of AD was 25.5 h for the treated group vs. 41.5 h for the control group (p = 0.015. The average number of stools was 4.8 in the treated group and 8.2 in the control group (p = 0.032. We conclude that the use of CBHG plus ORS significantly reduced the duration of AD, the number of stools and the percentage of children with persistent AD after 24 h of treatment compared to the control group. AD remitted almost twice as fast in patients treated with CBHG and ORS compared to those who received ORS plus placebo.

  9. Radiation chemistry of DNA. II. Strand breaks and sugar release by. gamma. -irradiation of DNA in aqueous solution. The effect of oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dizdaroglu, M; Schulte-Frohlinde, D; von Sonntag, C [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (F.R. Germany). Abt. fuer Strahlenchemie

    1975-11-01

    From ..gamma..-irradiated oxygenated aqueous solutions of DNA, 2-deoxy-tetrodialdose (1) and 2-deoxy-pentos-4-ulose (2) have been isolated as free sugars. The formation of 1 indicates that in the presence of oxygen the DNA strand is not only broken by mere phosphate ester cleavage but also by C-C-bond rupture in the sugar moiety. Such a process has not been encountered in deoxygenated solutions so far. The mechanism for the formation of 1 is discussed.

  10. Novel chemistry of alpha-tosyloxy ketones: applications to the solution- and solid-phase synthesis of privileged heterocycle and enediyne libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaou, K C; Montagnon, T; Ulven, T

    2002-01-01

    New synthetic technologies for the preparation and elaboration of alpha-tosyloxy ketones in solution- and on solid-phase are described. Both olefins and ketones serve as precursors to these relatively stable chemical entities: olefins via a novel one-pot epoxidation, arylsulfonic acid displacemen...

  11. Seawater-driven forward osmosis for enriching nitrogen and phosphorous in treated municipal wastewater: effect of membrane properties and feed solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenchao; Tobino, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    Seawater-driven forward osmosis (FO) is considered to be a novel strategy to concentrate nutrients in treated municipal wastewater for further recovery as well as simultaneous discharge of highly purified wastewater into the sea with low cost. As a preliminary test, the performance of FO membranes in concentrating nutrients was investigated by both batch experiments and model simulation approaches. With synthetic seawater as the draw solution, the dissolved organic carbon, phosphate, and ammonia in the effluent from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating municipal wastewater were 2.3-fold, 2.3-fold, and 2.1-fold, respectively, concentrated by the FO process with approximately 57% of water reduction. Most of the dissolved components, including trace metals in the MBR effluent, were highly retained (>80%) in the feed side, indicating high water quality of permeate to be discharged. The effect of membrane properties on the nutrient enrichment performance was investigated by comparing three types of FO membranes. Interestingly, a polyamide membrane possessing a high negative charge demonstrated a poor capability of retaining ammonia, which was hypothesized because of an ion exchange-like mechanism across the membrane prompted by the high ionic concentration of the draw solution. A feed solution pH of 7 was demonstrated to be an optimum condition for improving the overall retention of nutrients, especially for ammonia because of the pH-dependent speciation of ammonia/ammonium forms. The modeling results showed that higher than 10-fold concentrations of ammonia and phosphate are achievable by seawater-driven FO with a draw solution to feed solution volume ratio of 2:1. The enriched municipal wastewater contains nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations comparable with typical animal wastewater and anaerobic digestion effluent, which are used for direct nutrient recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of reduced atmospheric deposition on soil and soil solution chemistry at a site subjected to long-term acidification, Nacetín, Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulehle, Filip; Hofmeister, Jenýk; Cudlín, Pavel; Hruska, Jakub

    2006-11-01

    During the 1990s the emissions of SO(2) fell dramatically by about 90% in the Czech Republic; the measured throughfall deposition of sulphur to a spruce forest at Nacetín in the Ore Mts. decreased from almost 50 kg ha(-1) in 1994 to 15 kg ha(-1) in 2005. The throughfall flux of Ca decreased from 17 kg ha(-1) in 1994 to 9 kg ha(-1) in 2005; no change was observed for Mg. The deposition of nitrogen ranged between 15 and 30 kg ha(-1) with no statistically significant trend in the period 1994-2005. The desorption of previously stored sulphur and the decrease of Ca deposition are the main factors controlling the recovery of soil solution. The pH of the soil solution at a depth of 30 cm remains unchanged, and the Al concentration decreased from 320 micromol l(-1) in 1997 to 140 micromol l(-1) in 2005. The enhanced leaching of base cations relative to no acidified conditions has continued, although the Ca concentration decreased from 110 microeq l(-1) in 1997 to 25 microeq l(-1) in 2005 in the mineral soil solution at 30 cm depth. This dramatic change was not observed for Mg concentration in soil solution, because its deposition remained stable during the observed period. Similar patterns were observed in the deeper soil solution at 90 cm. The reduction in Ca availability resulted in lower uptake by tree assimilatory tissues, measured as concentration in needles. Since 2005, the leaching of nitrate observed in soil solution at 30 cm depth has disappeared. By 2003 a similar situation occurred at 90 cm. Higher incorporation into the trees after 1997 could be an important factor. With respect to the formerly high sulphur deposition and consequently released aluminium, which could have negatively influenced the biotic immobilization driven by microbes and fungi, the recovery may have positively impacted and therefore improved retention in the ecosystem during recent years. The delay in the successful retention of nitrogen in the ecosystem was probably caused by the high

  13. The combined effect of food-simulating solutions, brushing and staining on color stability of composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tânia Mara Da; Sales, Ana Luísa Leme Simões; Pucci, Cesar Rogerio; Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the effect of food-simulating media associated with brushing and coffee staining on color stability of different composite resins. Materials and methods: Eighty specimens were prepared for each composite: Grandio SO (Voco), Amaris (Voco), Filtek Z350XT (3M/ESPE), Filtek P90 (3M/ESPE). They were divided into four groups according to food-simulating media for 7 days: artificial saliva (control), heptane, citric acid and ethanol. The composite surface was submitted to 10,950 brushing cycles (200 g load) in an automatic toothbrushing machine. The specimens were darkened with coffee solution at 37 °C for 24 h. After each treatment, color measurements were assessed by spectrophotometry, using CIE L*a*b* system. The overall color change (ΔE) was determined for each specimen at baseline (C1) and after the treatments (food-simulating media immersion/C2, brushing/C3 and dye solution/C4). Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (p composites (p = .001), time (p = .001) and chemical degradation (p = .002). The mean of ΔE for composites were: Z350XT (5.39)a, Amaris (3.89)b, Grandio (3.75)bc, P90 (3.36)c. According to food-simulating media: heptane (4.41)a, citric acid (4.24)a, ethanol (4.02)ab, artificial saliva (3.76)b. For the treatments: dye solution (4.53)a, brushing (4.26)a, after food-simulating media (3.52)b. Conclusions: The composite resin Filtek Z350XT showed significantly higher staining than all other composite resin tested. The immersion in heptane and citric acid produced the highest color alteration than other food-simulating media. The exposure of samples to brushing protocols and darkening in coffee solution resulted in significant color alteration of the composite resins. PMID:28642926

  14. Long term changes in atmospheric N and S throughfall deposition and effects on soil solution chemistry in a Scots pine forest in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxman, Andries W; Peters, Roy C J H; Roelofs, Jan G M

    2008-12-01

    In a Scots pine forest the throughfall deposition and the chemical composition of the soil solution was monitored since 1984. (Inter)national legislation measures led to a reduction of the deposition of nitrogen and sulphur. The deposition of sulphur has decreased by approximately 65%. The total mineral-nitrogen deposition has decreased by ca. 25%, which is mainly due to a reduction in ammonium-N deposition (-40%), since nitrate-N deposition has increased (+50%). The nitrogen concentration in the upper mineral soil solution at 10 cm depth has decreased, leading to an improved nutritional balance, which may result in improved tree vitality. In the drainage water at 90 cm depth the fluxes of NO3(-) and SO4(2-) have decreased, resulting in a reduced leeching of accompanying base cations, thus preserving nutrients in the ecosystem. It may take still several years, however, before this will meet the prerequisite of a sustainable ecosystem.

  15. The effect of reduced atmospheric deposition on soil and soil solution chemistry at a site subjected to long-term acidification, Nacetin, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oulehle, F.; Hofmeister, J.; Cudlín, Pavel; Hruška, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 370, 2-3 (2006), s. 532-544 ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/03/0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : long-term monitoring Norway spruce * Recovery * Soil solution * Base cations * Nitrogen * Norway spruce Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.359, year: 2006

  16. Transpiration and film cooling boundary layer computer program. Volume 1: Numerical solutions of the turbulent boundary layer equations with equilibrium chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. N.

    1971-01-01

    A finite difference turbulent boundary layer computer program has been developed. The program is primarily oriented towards the calculation of boundary layer performance losses in rocket engines; however, the solution is general, and has much broader applicability. The effects of transpiration and film cooling as well as the effect of equilibrium chemical reactions (currently restricted to the H2-O2 system) can be calculated. The turbulent transport terms are evaluated using the phenomenological mixing length - eddy viscosity concept. The equations of motion are solved using the Crank-Nicolson implicit finite difference technique. The analysis and computer program have been checked out by solving a series of both laminar and turbulent test cases and comparing the results to data or other solutions. These comparisons have shown that the program is capable of producing very satisfactory results for a wide range of flows. Further refinements to the analysis and program, especially as applied to film cooling solutions, would be aided by the acquisition of a firm data base.

  17. Evaluation of Solid-Solution Hardening in Several Binary Alloy Systems Using Diffusion Couples Combined with Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadambi, Sourabh B.; Divya, V. D.; Ramamurty, U.

    2017-10-01

    Analysis of solid-solution hardening (SSH) in alloys requires the synthesis of large composition libraries and the measurement of strength or hardness from these compositions. Conventional methods of synthesis and testing, however, are not efficient and high-throughput approaches have been developed in the past. In the present study, we use a high-throughput combinatorial approach to examine SSH at large concentrations in binary alloys of Fe-Ni, Fe-Co, Pt-Ni, Pt-Co, Ni-Co, Ni-Mo, and Co-Mo. The diffusion couple (DC) method is used to generate concentration ( c) gradients and the nanoindentation (NI) technique to measure the hardness ( H) along these gradients. The obtained H -c profiles are analyzed within the framework of the Labusch model of SSH, and the c^{2/3} dependence of H predicted by the model is found to be generally applicable. The SSH behavior obtained using the combinatorial method is found to be largely consistent with that observed in the literature using conventional and DC-NI methods. This study evaluates SSH in Fe-, Ni-, Co-, and Pt-based binary alloys and confirms the applicability of the DC-NI approach for rapidly screening various solute elements for their SSH ability.

  18. Can a combination of the conformal thin-sandwich and puncture methods yield binary black hole solutions in quasiequilibrium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannam, Mark D.; Evans, Charles R.; Cook, Gregory B.; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    We consider combining two important methods for constructing quasiequilibrium initial data for binary black holes: the conformal thin-sandwich formalism and the puncture method. The former seeks to enforce stationarity in the conformal three-metric and the latter attempts to avoid internal boundaries, like minimal surfaces or apparent horizons. We show that these two methods make partially conflicting requirements on the boundary conditions that determine the time slices. In particular, it does not seem possible to construct slices that are quasistationary and that avoid physical singularities while simultaneously are connected by an everywhere positive lapse function, a condition which must be obtained if internal boundaries are to be avoided. Some relaxation of these conflicting requirements may yield a soluble system, but some of the advantages that were sought in combining these approaches will be lost

  19. Steady state solution of the Fokker-Planck equation combined with unidirectional quasilinear diffusion under detailed balance conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hizanidis, K.

    1984-04-01

    The relativistic collisional Fokker-Planck equation combined with an externally imposed unidirectional quasilinear (rf) diffusion is solved for arbitrary values of rf diffusion coefficient under conditions of detailed balance of the staionary joint distribution involved. The detailed balance condition imposes a restriction on the functional form of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient which might be associated with the existence of a saturated spectrum of fluctuation in a quasilinearly rf-driven plasma

  20. Developing New Antimicrobial Therapies: Are Synergistic Combinations of Plant Extracts/Compounds with Conventional Antibiotics the Solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheesman, Matthew J.; Ilanko, Aishwarya; Blonk, Baxter; Cock, Ian E.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of penicillin nearly 90 years ago revolutionized the treatment of bacterial disease. Since that time, numerous other antibiotics have been discovered from bacteria and fungi, or developed by chemical synthesis and have become effective chemotherapeutic options. However, the misuse of antibiotics has lessened the efficacy of many commonly used antibiotics. The emergence of resistant strains of bacteria has seriously limited our ability to treat bacterial illness, and new antibiotics are desperately needed. Since the discovery of penicillin, most antibiotic development has focused on the discovery of new antibiotics derived from microbial sources, or on the synthesis of new compounds using existing antibiotic scaffolds to the detriment of other lines of discovery. Both of these methods have been fruitful. However, for a number of reasons discussed in this review, these strategies are unlikely to provide the same wealth of new antibiotics in the future. Indeed, the number of newly developed antibiotics has decreased dramatically in recent years. Instead, a reexamination of traditional medicines has become more common and has already provided several new antibiotics. Traditional medicine plants are likely to provide further new antibiotics in the future. However, the use of plant extracts or pure natural compounds in combination with conventional antibiotics may hold greater promise for rapidly providing affordable treatment options. Indeed, some combinational antibiotic therapies are already clinically available. This study reviews the recent literature on combinational antibiotic therapies to highlight their potential and to guide future research in this field. PMID:28989242

  1. Removal of trace mercury (II) from aqueous solution by in situ MnO(x) combined with poly-aluminum chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xixin; Huangfu, Xiaoliu; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Yaan; Ma, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Removal of trace mercury from aqueous solution by Mn (hydr)oxides formed in situ during coagulation with poly-aluminum chloride (PAC) (in situ MnO(x) combined with PAC) was investigated. The efficiency of trace mercury removal was evaluated under the experimental conditions of reaction time, Mn dosage, pH, and temperature. In addition, the ionic strength and the initial mercury concentration were examined to evaluate trace mercury removal for different water qualities. The results clearly demonstrated that in situ MnO(x) combined with PAC was effective for trace mercury removal from aqueous solution. A mercury removal ratio of 9.7 μg Hg/mg Mn was obtained at pH 3. Furthermore, at an initial mercury concentration of 30 μg/L and pH levels of both 3 and 5, a Mn dosage of 4 mg/L was able to lower the mercury concentration to meet the standards for drinking water quality at less than 1 μg/L. Analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests that the hydroxyls on the surface of Mn (hydr)oxides are the active sites for adsorption of trace mercury from aqueous solution.

  2. Chemistry management system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Katsumi; Maeda, Katsuji

    1998-01-01

    Recently, the chemistry management in the nuclear power plants has been changing from the problem solution to the predictive diagnosis and maintenance. It is important to maintain the integrity of plant operation by an adequate chemistry control. For these reasons, many plant operation data and chemistry analysis data should be collected and treated effectively to evaluate chemistry condition of the nuclear power plants. When some indications of chemistry anomalies occur, quick and effective root cause evaluation and countermeasures should be required. The chemistry management system has been developed as to provide sophisticate chemistry management in the nuclear power plants. This paper introduces the concept and functions of the chemistry management system for the nuclear power plants. (author)

  3. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.; Blomgren, J.C.; Fackelmann, J.M.

    1982-10-01

    Steam generators in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants have experienced tubing degradation by a variety of corrosion-related mechanisms which depend directly on secondary water chemistry. As a result of this experience, the Steam Generator Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major program to provide solutions to PWR steam generator problems. This report, PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines, in addition to presenting justification for water chemistry control parameters, discusses available analytical methods, data management and surveillance, and the management philosophy required to successfully implement the guidelines

  4. Indoor Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Carslaw, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    This review aims to encapsulate the importance, ubiquity, and complexity of indoor chemistry. We discuss the many sources of indoor air pollutants and summarize their chemical reactions in the air and on surfaces. We also summarize some of the known impacts of human occupants, who act as sources...... and sinks of indoor chemicals, and whose activities (e.g., cooking, cleaning, smoking) can lead to extremely high pollutant concentrations. As we begin to use increasingly sensitive and selective instrumentation indoors, we are learning more about chemistry in this relatively understudied environment....

  5. Kitchen chemistry: A scoping review of the diversionary use of pharmaceuticals for non-medicinal use and home production of drug solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hout, Marie Claire

    2014-01-01

    Misuse of pharmaceuticals is of increasing drug policy and public health concern. A scoping review was conducted on the diversionary use of pharmaceuticals for non-medicinal use and home production of drug solutions. The research question was broad: What is known from the existing literature about the diversion of pharmaceuticals for non-medicinal use and for home production of drug solutions? The scoping process centred on the systematic selection, collection, and summarization of extant knowledge within this broad thematic remit. One hundred and thirty-four records were grouped into discrete thematic categories namely: non medicinal use and tampering with pharmaceuticals, oral misuse of codeine cough syrups, homemade drug solutions, and home-produced drug-related harms in the narrative review design. Forms of abuse of codeine cough syrup include mixtures with alcohol or soft drinks ('Purple Drank'), with kratom leaves ('Kratom cocktails'), or chemically altered to extract dextromorphan ('Lemon Drop'). Production of homemade opiates ('Cheornaya', 'Kolyosa', Himiya', 'Braun', 'Krokodil'), methamphetamine ('Vint', 'Pervitin'), methcathinone ('Jeff'), and cathinone ('Boltushka') are described. Displacement patterns between the non-medical use of pharmaceuticals, commercial, and homemade drugs appear dependent on availability of opiates, prescribing practices, supervision of substitution drug dosing, availability of cheap ingredients, policing, and awareness of harms. Adverse health and social consequences relate to the use of unknown and contaminated (end) substances, injecting practices, redosing, medical complications, and death. The review highlights a public health imperative requiring a multidisciplinary approach to quantify potential impact and required integrated policy responses incorporating international regulation, enforcement, health surveillance and service delivery. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The chemistry of Pu in concentrated aqueous NaCl solution: Effects of alpha self-radiolysis and the interaction between hypochlorite and dioxoplutonium(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashalidis, I. (Inst. fuer Radiochemie, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany)); Kim, J.I. (Inst. fuer Radiochemie, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany) Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgungstechnik, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)); Lierse, C. (Inst. fuer Radiochemie, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany)); Sullivan, J.C. (Chemistry Div., Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The reactions between dioxoplutonium(VI) and hypochlorite in aqueous solution produce the species PuO[sub 2](OH)(ClO) and PuO[sub 2](ClO)[sub 2]. The results of spectrophotometric observations are presented and the data used to calculate values of log K=14.0 at pH=6.7 and 14.5 at pH=8.4 for the former complex and a value of 10.3 for the latter. The possible participation of 6d orbitals in these reactions is noted. (orig.)

  7. On the microstructure of organic solutions of mono-carboxylic acids: Combined study by infrared spectroscopy, small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremin, Roman A., E-mail: era@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo T. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); International University “Dubna”, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv 03022 (Ukraine); Rosta, László [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary); Grigoryeva, Natalia A. [Faculty of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, 198504 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-05

    Highlights: • The model of the scattering particle for a reliable SANS analysis is proposed. • The structural parameters of saturated mono-carboxylic acids in solutions are obtained. • The differences in nematic transitions correlate to solvation peculiarities. - Abstract: The data of infrared spectroscopy (IR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) have been combined to conclude about the nanoscale structural organization of organic non-polar solutions of saturated mono-carboxylic acids with different alkyl chain lengths for diluted solutions of saturated myristic (C14) and stearic (C18) acids in benzene and decalin. In particular, the degree of dimerization was found from the IR spectra. The structural anisotropy of the acids and their dimers was used in the treatment of the data of MD simulations to describe the solute–solvent interface in a cylindrical approximation and show its rather strong influence on SANS. The corresponding scattering length density profiles were used to fit the experimental SANS data comprising the information about the acid molecule isomerization. The SANS data from concentrated solutions showed a partial self-assembling of the acids within the nematic transition is different for two solvents due to lyophobic peculiarities.

  8. Approximate ideal multi-objective solution Q(λ) learning for optimal carbon-energy combined-flow in multi-energy power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaoshun; Yu, Tao; Yang, Bo; Zheng, Limin; Huang, Linni

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel optimal carbon-energy combined-flow (OCECF) model is firstly established. • A novel approximate ideal multi-objective solution Q(λ) learning is designed. • The proposed algorithm has a high convergence stability and reliability. • The proposed algorithm can be applied for OCECF in a large-scale power grid. - Abstract: This paper proposes a novel approximate ideal multi-objective solution Q(λ) learning for optimal carbon-energy combined-flow in multi-energy power systems. The carbon emissions, fuel cost, active power loss, voltage deviation and carbon emission loss are chosen as the optimization objectives, which are simultaneously optimized by five different Q-value matrices. The dynamic optimal weight of each objective is calculated online from the entire Q-value matrices such that the greedy action policy can be obtained. Case studies are carried out to evaluate the optimization performance for carbon-energy combined-flow in an IEEE 118-bus system and the regional power grid of southern China.

  9. The slow birth of green chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, I.

    1993-03-12

    Mainstream chemistry is beginning to look at environmental chemistry as an important solution to environmental problems. This can include research into developing cleaner-burning liquid fuels, cleaning up oil spills, or developing better process methods which engender less pollution, as opposed to previous practices of detecting pollutants without preventing their release to begin with. This article discusses the progress of this chemistry discipline, describes some of the ongoing research, and describes the future for environmental chemistry. An impetus for future growth will be generational change, as young scientists in training are beginning to push faculities into creating programs for environmental chemistry.

  10. Contributions to the chemistry of highly concentrated electrolyte solutions. XXXIX. Investigation of Be/sup 2 +/ complex formation by the method of molar volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedinakova, V [Vysoka Skola Chemicko-Technologicka, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Technologie Jadernych Paliv a Radiochemie

    1974-01-01

    The formation of aquo- and acido-complexes of the Be/sup 2 +/ ion in aqueous solutions of strong electrolytes was studied by densimetry. In all the systems studied, HClO/sub 4/, HNO/sub 3/, NaNO/sub 3/, KOH, Ca(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 2/, CaCl/sub 2/, the overall coordination number 4 was confirmed for the complex forms of the Be/sup 2 +/ ion. If BeSO/sub 4/ is used as the differential addition in a solvent not forming complexes, dissociation of the sulfate proceeds under the formation of the aquo-complex (Be(H/sub 2/O)/sub 4/)/sup 2 +/. If beryllium perchlorate is used, the Be/sup 2 +/ ion remains in that form, in which it is added to the solution (i.e. the complex form (Be(H/sub 2/O)/sub 2/(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 2/)), in the whole concentration range of the applied isomolar series Ca(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 2/-CaCl/sub 2/, NaClO/sub 4/-NaBr, and NaClO/sub 4/-NaI.

  11. The influence of surface incorporated lime and gypsiferous by-products on surface and subsurface soil acidity. I. Soil solution chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.L.; Hedley, M.J.; Bolan, N.S.; Horne, D.J. [New Zealand Forest Research Institute, Rotorua (New Zealand)

    1999-04-01

    Lime, fluidised bed boiler ash (FBA) and flue gas desulfurisation gypsum (FGDG) were incorporated in the top 50 mm of repacked columns of either an Allophanic (the Patua sand loam) or an Ultic (the Kaawa clay loam) soil, at rates containing calcium equivalent to 5000 kg/ha of CaCO{sub 3}. After leaching with water, the columns were sliced into sections for chemical analysis. In the columns of the variable-charged, allophanic Patua soil, topsoil-incorporated FBA ameliorated top and subsurface soil acidity through liming and the `self liming effect` induced by sulfate sorption, respectively. The soil solution pH of the top and subsurface layers of the Patua soil were raised to pH 6.40 and 5.35, respectively, by the FBA treatment. Consequently , phytotoxic labile monomeric aluminium (Al) concentration in the soil solution of the FBA treatment was reduced to {lt} 0.1 {mu}M Al. FGDG had a similar `self-liming effect` on subsurface of the Patua soil, but not the topsoil. Whereas FBA raised the pH of the Kaawa topsoil, no `self-liming effect` of subsurface soil by sulfate sorption was observed on the Kaawa subsurface soil, which is dominated by permanently charged clay minerals. Application of FBA and FGDG to both soils, however, caused significantly leaching of native soil Mg{sup 2+} and K{sup +}.

  12. Control of As and Ni releases from a uranium mill tailings neutralization circuit: Solution chemistry, mineralogy and geochemical modeling of laboratory study results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, John [MWH Americas, Inc., 1801 California Street, Denver, CO 80202 (United States)], E-mail: john.j.mahoney@mwhglobal.com; Slaughter, Maynard [Earth Science, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO 80639 (United States); Langmuir, Donald [Hydrochem Systems Corp., P.O. Box 23257, Silverthorne, CO 80498 (United States); Rowson, John [AREVA Resources Canada Inc., P.O. Box 9204, Saskatoon, SK, S7K 3X5 (Canada)

    2007-12-15

    Processing U ores in the JEB Mill of the McClean Lake Operation in northern Saskatchewan produces spent leaching solutions (raffinates) with pH {<=} 1.5, and As and Ni concentrations up to 6800 and 5200 mg L{sup -1}, respectively. Bench-scale neutralization experiments (pH 2-8) were performed to help optimize the design of mill processes for reducing As and Ni concentrations in tailings and raffinates to {<=}1 mg L{sup -1} prior to their disposal. Precipitate mineralogy determined by chemical analysis, XRD, SEM, EM, XM and EXAFS methods, included gypsum (the dominant precipitate), poorly crystalline scorodite (precipitated esp. from pH 2-4), annabergite, hydrobasaluminite, ferrihydrite, green rust II and theophrastite. The As was mostly in scorodite with smaller amounts in annabergite and trace As adsorbed and/or co-precipitated, probably by ferrihydrite. Geochemical modeling indicated that above pH 2, the ion activity product (IAP) of scorodite lies between the solubility products of amorphous and crystalline phases (log K{sub sp} = -23.0 and -25.83, respectively). The IAP decreases with increasing pH, suggesting that the crystallinity of the scorodite increases with pH. Forward geochemical models support the assumption that during neutralization, particles of added base produce sharp local pH gradients and disequilibrium with bulk solutions, facilitating annabergite and theophrastite precipitation.

  13. Chemistry of Secondary Metabolites (Production, Properties, Biological Activity, etc.: Solubility Study of the Interaction between Pamam G-3 Dendrimer and 5 Fluorouracil in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. PALECZ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Poly(amidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM are polymeric macromolecules that can find their use as carriers of small ligand molecules such as cosmetics and drugs. 5- Fluorouracil is a potent oncological drug, whose usage is limited because of its relatively high toxicity.The surface and internal layer groups in PAMAM dendrimer belonging to the third (G3 generation create an open-type structure, which facilitate small ligand molecules to bind with them.The formation equilibrium of PAMAM G3 dendrimer complex with an oncologic drug such as 5 fluorouracil (FU in water at room temperature was examined. Using the results of the drug solubility in dendrimer solutions, the maximal number of drug molecules in the dendrimer-drug complex was evaluated. Solubility results show that PAMAM G3 dendrimer can transfer tens 5 fluorouracil molecules in aqueous solution.This research work was funded from the Polish budget appropriations for science in the years 2013-2015, project number IP2012 022372.

  14. Corrosion behaviour of reinforcements in a carbonaceous concrete: influence of the chemistry of the interstitial solution and of a transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, B.

    2005-10-01

    The phenomenon of steel reinforcements corrosion in a carbonaceous concrete is a many-sided process, little understood and of a great economical importance. The aim of this work is to identify, in condition of concrete carbonation, the corrosion mechanisms of reinforcements in order to anticipate the long term damage of the buildings. An analytical and experimental study has been carried out and has revealed two hypotheses. These ones consist to characterize the control of the corrosion velocity, either by the anodic reaction or by addition of an oxidant. The corrosion experiments in solution which represents the interstitial solution of a carbonaceous cement paste show that the evolution of the metal/medium interface is very sensitive to the species introduced in the medium during the carbonation process. The change of the ionic strength and of the sulfate and alkali metals concentrations are the main factors influencing the localization of the reactional areas, the nature of the phases formed at the interface as well as the corrosion velocities and their change with time. The evolution of the water saturation degree of the coating is the preponderant factor on the corrosion velocity. The analytical calculations and the experimental results show that for fixed hydrous conditions, the corrosion velocity in stationary conditions is negligible. The taking into account of transient conditions of transport as well as humidification and drying cycles is required for the long term anticipation of the damage of reinforced concrete buildings. (O.M.)

  15. Handbook of heterocyclic chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katritzky, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    ... Heterocyclic Chemistry I (1984) Comprehensive Heterocyclic Chemistry II (1996) Comprehensive Heterocyclic Chemistry III (2008) Comprehensive Organic Functional Group Transformations I (1995) Compreh...

  16. Combined chelation based on glycosyl-mono- and bis-hydroxypyridinones for aluminium mobilization: solution and biodistribution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Sílvia; Dron, Paul I; Danalache, Florina A; Sacoto, Diana; Gano, Lurdes; Santos, M Amélia

    2009-11-01

    Taking into account the recognized interest of a poly-pharmacological strategy in chelation therapy, a study of aluminium combined chelation based on 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone (3,4-HP) compounds with complementary properties, associated to different denticity, size and extrafunctionality, is presented herein. In particular, Al-chelation has been explored, using a tetradentate IDA bis-(3,4-HP) ligand, L, and two N-glycosyl mono-(3,4-HP) derivatives (A or B). Combined complexation studies with the tetradentate and the most promising bidentate ligand (A) evidenced the formation of ternary complexes with high thermodynamic stability (Al-L-A) being the predominant species at physiological pH. In vivo studies on the ability for radiotracer ((67)Ga) removal from loaded mice, as a model of aluminium accumulation in body, have shown that the simultaneous administration to (67)Ga-loaded mice of a mono- and a bis-(3,4-HP) chelator (e.g. A and L) leads to a rapid metal elimination from main organs and whole animal model. This may be rationalized by coadjuvation and eventual synergistic effects, due to complementary accessibility of the chelators to different cellular compartments.

  17. The chemistry of plutonium revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connick, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    In 1941 one goal of the Manhattan Project was to unravel the chemistry of the synthetic element plutonium as rapidly as possible. Important insights were obtained from tracer experiments, but the full complexity of plutonium chemistry was not revealed until macroscopic amounts (milligrams) became available. Because processes for separation from fission products were aqueous solution based, such solution chemistry was emphasized, particularly precipitation and oxidation-reduction behavior. The latter turned out to be unusually intricate when it was discovered that two more oxidation states existed in aqueous solution than had previously been suspected. Further, it was found that an equilibrium was rapidly established among the four aqueous oxidation states while at the same time any three were not in equilibrium. These and other observations made while doing a crash study of a previously unknown element will be reported

  18. Reinventing Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Whitesides, George McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is in a period of change, from an era focused on molecules and reactions, to one in which manipulations of systems of molecules and reactions will be essential parts of controlling larger systems. This Essay traces paths from the past to possible futures.

  19. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  20. Higher Temperature Thermal Barrier Coatings with the Combined Use of Yttrium Aluminum Garnet and the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Maurice; Wang, Jiwen; Kumar, Rishi; Roth, Jeffery; Jiang, Chen; Jordan, Eric H.

    2018-02-01

    Gas-turbine engines are widely used in transportation, energy and defense industries. The increasing demand for more efficient gas turbines requires higher turbine operating temperatures. For more than 40 years, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) has been the dominant thermal barrier coating (TBC) due to its outstanding material properties. However, the practical use of YSZ-based TBCs is limited to approximately 1200 °C. Developing new, higher temperature TBCs has proven challenging to satisfy the multiple property requirements of a durable TBC. In this study, an advanced TBC has been developed by using the solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process that generates unique engineered microstructures with the higher temperature yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) to produce a TBC that can meet and exceed the major performance standards of state-of-the-art air plasma sprayed YSZ, including: phase stability, sintering resistance, CMAS resistance, thermal cycle durability, thermal conductivity and erosion resistance. The temperature improvement for hot section gas turbine materials (superalloys & TBCs) has been at the rate of about 50 °C per decade over the last 50 years. In contrast, SPPS YAG TBCs offer the near-term potential of a > 200 °C improvement in temperature capability.

  1. Higher Temperature Thermal Barrier Coatings with the Combined Use of Yttrium Aluminum Garnet and the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Maurice; Wang, Jiwen; Kumar, Rishi; Roth, Jeffery; Jiang, Chen; Jordan, Eric H.

    2018-04-01

    Gas-turbine engines are widely used in transportation, energy and defense industries. The increasing demand for more efficient gas turbines requires higher turbine operating temperatures. For more than 40 years, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) has been the dominant thermal barrier coating (TBC) due to its outstanding material properties. However, the practical use of YSZ-based TBCs is limited to approximately 1200 °C. Developing new, higher temperature TBCs has proven challenging to satisfy the multiple property requirements of a durable TBC. In this study, an advanced TBC has been developed by using the solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process that generates unique engineered microstructures with the higher temperature yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) to produce a TBC that can meet and exceed the major performance standards of state-of-the-art air plasma sprayed YSZ, including: phase stability, sintering resistance, CMAS resistance, thermal cycle durability, thermal conductivity and erosion resistance. The temperature improvement for hot section gas turbine materials (superalloys & TBCs) has been at the rate of about 50 °C per decade over the last 50 years. In contrast, SPPS YAG TBCs offer the near-term potential of a > 200 °C improvement in temperature capability.

  2. Handbook of relativistic quantum chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wenjian

    2017-01-01

    This handbook focuses on the foundations of relativistic quantum mechanics and addresses a number of fundamental issues never covered before in a book. For instance: How can many-body theory be combined with quantum electrodynamics? How can quantum electrodynamics be interfaced with relativistic quantum chemistry? What is the most appropriate relativistic many-electron Hamiltonian? How can we achieve relativistic explicit correlation? How can we formulate relativistic properties? - just to name a few. Since relativistic quantum chemistry is an integral component of computational chemistry, this handbook also supplements the ''Handbook of Computational Chemistry''. Generally speaking, it aims to establish the 'big picture' of relativistic molecular quantum mechanics as the union of quantum electrodynamics and relativistic quantum chemistry. Accordingly, it provides an accessible introduction for readers new to the field, presents advanced methodologies for experts, and discusses possible future perspectives, helping readers understand when/how to apply/develop the methodologies.

  3. Handbook of relativistic quantum chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenjian (ed.) [Peking Univ., Beijing (China). Center for Computational Science and Engineering

    2017-03-01

    This handbook focuses on the foundations of relativistic quantum mechanics and addresses a number of fundamental issues never covered before in a book. For instance: How can many-body theory be combined with quantum electrodynamics? How can quantum electrodynamics be interfaced with relativistic quantum chemistry? What is the most appropriate relativistic many-electron Hamiltonian? How can we achieve relativistic explicit correlation? How can we formulate relativistic properties? - just to name a few. Since relativistic quantum chemistry is an integral component of computational chemistry, this handbook also supplements the ''Handbook of Computational Chemistry''. Generally speaking, it aims to establish the 'big picture' of relativistic molecular quantum mechanics as the union of quantum electrodynamics and relativistic quantum chemistry. Accordingly, it provides an accessible introduction for readers new to the field, presents advanced methodologies for experts, and discusses possible future perspectives, helping readers understand when/how to apply/develop the methodologies.

  4. Unified solution of a non-convex SCUC problem using combination of modified Branch-and-Bound method with Quadratic Programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafie-khah, M.; Parsa Moghaddam, M.; Sheikh-El-Eslami, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A hybrid SCUC solution is developed to deal with large-scale, real-time and long-term problems. → New formulations are proposed for considering valve point effect and warmth-dependent start-up cost. → A new algorithm is developed for modeling the AC power flow in SCUC problems. → Using the power flow algorithm both steps in traditional SCUC is done simultaneously. → The proposed method provides better solutions than previous ones with a fast speed. - Abstract: In this paper, a new practical method is presented for solving the non-convex security constraint unit commitment (SCUC) problem in power systems. The accuracy of the proposed method is desirable while the shorter computation time makes it useful for SCUC solution of large-scale power systems, real-time market operation and long-term SCUC problems. The proposed framework allows inclusion of the valve point effects, warmth-dependent start-up costs, ramp rates, minimum up/down time constraints, multiple fuels costs, emission costs, prohibited operating zones and AC power flow limits in normal and contingency conditions. To solve the non-convex problem, combination of a modified Branch-and-Bound method with the Quadratic Programming is used as an optimization tool and a developed AC power flow algorithm is applied for considering the security and contingency concerns using the nonlinear/linear AC model. These modifications improve the convergence speed and solution precision of SCUC problem. In the proposed method, in contrast with traditional SCUC algorithms, unit commitment solution, checking and satisfying the security constraints are managed simultaneously. The obtained results are compared with other reported methods for investigating the effectiveness of the proposed method. Also, the proposed method is applied to an Iranian power system including 493 thermal units.

  5. Underlying chemistry research for the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.; Sagert, N.H.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Taylor, P.

    1984-04-01

    This document reviews the underlying chemistry research part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, carried out in the Research Chemistry Branch. This research is concerned with developing the basic chemical knowledge and under-standing required in other parts of the Program. There are four areas of underlying research: Waste Form Chemistry, Solute and Solution Chemistry, Rock-Water-Waste Interactions, and Abatement and Monitoring of Gas-Phase Radionuclides

  6. The retained templates as "helpers" for the spherical meso-silica in adsorption of heavy metals and impacts of solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhijie; Shi, Wenxin; Zhao, Zhiwei; Sun, Tianyi; Cui, Fuyi

    2017-06-15

    The spherical mesoporous silica (meso-silica) MCM-41 and those with different dosage of the retained templates were prepared and characterized. Particularly, effects of the retained template and its dosage on the adsorption of typical heavy metals (Cu 2+ and Cd 2+ ) in the synthesized materials were investigated. The results indicated that the retained templates acted as "helpers" for the adsorption of Cu 2+ and Cd 2+ in the spherical meso-silica MCM-41, and the maximum adsorption capacities (Q max ) increased with the increase of the retained template dosage. The interaction between the metal ions and the cationic heads of the templates contributed to the enhancement effect due to the anions (Cl - and OH - ) electronically adsorbed on the interface of the template micelles. Additionally, the presented results indicated that the adsorption of Cu 2+ and Cd 2+ depended on pH and high ion strength of the solution but not on the coexisted humic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Europium, uranyl, and thorium-phenanthroline amide complexes in acetonitrile solution: an ESI-MS and DFT combined investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Mei, Lei; Zhang, Xin-Rui; Wall, Nathalie; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-08-28

    The tetradentate N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-ditolyl-2,9-diamide-1,10-phenanthroline (Et-Tol-DAPhen) ligand with hard-soft donor atoms has been demonstrated to be promising for the group separation of actinides from highly acidic nuclear wastes. To identify the formed complexes of this ligand with actinides and lanthanides, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations was used to probe the possible complexation processes. The 1 : 2 Eu-L species ([EuL2(NO3)](2+)) can be observed in ESI-MS at low metal-to-ligand ([M]/[L]) ratios, whereas the 1 : 1 Eu-L species ([EuL(NO3)2](+)) can be observed when the [M]/[L] ratio is higher than 1.0. However, ([UO2L(NO3)](+)) is the only detected species for the uranyl complexes. The [ThL2(NO3)2](2+) species can be observed at low [M]/[L] ratios; the 1 : 2 species ([ThL2(NO3)](3+)) and a new 1 : 1 species ([ThL(NO3)3](+)) can be detected at high [M]/[L] ratios. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) results showed that Et-Tol-DAPhen ligands can coordinate strongly with metal ions, and the coordination moieties remain intact under CID conditions. Natural bond orbital (NBO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), electron localization function (ELF), atoms in molecules (AIM) and molecular orbital (MO) analyses indicated that the metal-ligand bonds of the actinide complexes exhibited more covalent character than those of the lanthanide complexes. In addition, according to thermodynamic analysis, the stable cationic M-L complexes in acetonitrile are found to be in good agreement with the ESI-MS results.

  8. Chemistry and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broerse, J.J.; Barendsen, G.W.; Kal, H.B.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    1983-01-01

    This book contains the extended abstracts of the contributions of the poster workshop sessions on chemistry and physics of the 7th international congress of radiation research. They cover the following main topics: primary processes in radiation physics and chemistry, general chemistry in radiation chemistry, DNA and model systems in radiation chemistry, molecules of biological interest in radiation chemistry, techniques in radiation chemistry, hot atom chemistry. refs.; figs.; tabs

  9. Highly Efficient Interception and Precipitation of Uranium(VI) from Aqueous Solution by Iron-Electrocoagulation Combined with Cooperative Chelation by Organic Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zhun, Bao; Wang, Xuegang; Liao, PingPing; Wang, Guanghui; Wang, Lizhang; Guo, Yadan; Zhang, Weimin

    2017-12-19

    A new strategy combining iron-electrocoagulation and organic ligands (OGLs) cooperative chelation was proposed to screen and precipitate low concentrations (0-18.52 μmol/L) of uranium contaminant in aqueous solution. We hypothesized that OGLs with amino, hydroxyl, and carboxyl groups hydrophobically/hydrophilically would realize precuring of uranyl ion at pH electrocoagulation would achieve faster and more efficient uranium precipitation. Experimentally, the strategy demonstrated highly efficient uranium(VI) precipitation efficiency, especially with hydrophilic macromolecular OGLs. The uranium removal efficiency at optimized experimental condition reached 99.65%. The decrease of zeta potential and the lattice enwrapping between U-OGLs chelates and flocculation precursor were ascribed to the enhanced uranium precipitation activity. Uranium was precipitated as oxides of U(VI) or higher valences that were easily captured in aggregated micelles under low operation current potential. The actual uranium tailing wastewater was treated, and a satisfied uranium removal efficiency of 99.02% was discovered. After elution of the precipitated flocs, a concentrated uranium solution (up to 106.52 μmol/L) with very few other metallic impurities was obtained. Therefore, the proposed strategy could remove uranium and concentrate it concurrently. This work could provide new insights into the purification and recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process.

  10. Probing structural homogeneity of La{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}PO{sub 4} monazite-type solid solutions by combined spectroscopic and computational studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huittinen, N., E-mail: n.huittinen@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Arinicheva, Y. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kowalski, P.M.; Vinograd, V.L. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6), 52425 Jülich (Germany); JARA High-Performance Computing, Schinkelstraße 2, 52062 Aachen (Germany); Neumeier, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6), 52425 Jülich (Germany); JARA High-Performance Computing, Schinkelstraße 2, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    Here we study the homogeneity of Eu{sup 3+}-doped La{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}PO{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.11, 0.33, 0.55, 0.75, 0.92, 1) monazite-type solid solutions by a combination of Raman and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopies (TRLFS) with complementary quasi-random structure-based atomistic modeling studies. For the intermediate La{sub 0.45}Gd{sub 0.55}PO{sub 4} composition we detected a significant broadening of the Raman bands corresponding to the lattice vibrations of the LnO{sub 9} polyhedron, indicating much stronger distortion of the lanthanide cation site than the PO{sub 4} tetrahedron. A distortion of the crystal lattice around the dopant site was also confirmed in our TRLFS measurements of Eu{sup 3+} doped samples, where both the half width (FWHM) of the excitation peaks and the {sup 7}F{sub 2}/{sup 7}F{sub 1} ratio derived from the emission spectra increase for intermediate solid-solution compositions. The observed variation in FWHM correlates well with the simulated distribution of Eu···O bond distances within the investigated monazites. The combined results imply that homogenous Eu{sup 3+}-doped La{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}PO{sub 4} monazite-type solid solutions are formed over the entire composition range, which is of importance in the context of using these ceramics for immobilization of radionuclides. - Highlights: •Homogenous Eu{sup 3+}-doped La{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}PO{sub 4} monazite-type solid solutions have been synthesized. •Solid solution formation is accompanied by slight distortion of the LnO{sub 9} polyhedron. •Raman and laser spectroscopic trends are observed within the monazite series. •Results are explained with atomistic simulations of Eu-O bond distance distribution.

  11. Fine chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laszlo, P.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Fine Chemistry laboratory (Polytechnic School, France) is presented. The research programs are centered on the renewal of the organic chemistry most important reactions and on the invention of new, highly efficient and highly selective reactions, by applying low cost reagents and solvents. An important research domain concerns the study and fabrication of new catalysts. They are obtained by means of the reactive sputtering of the metals and metal oxydes thin films. The Monte Carlo simulations of the long-range electrostatic interaction in a clay and the obtention of acrylamides from anhydrous or acrylic ester are summarized. Moreover, the results obtained in the field of catalysis are also given. The published papers and the congress communications are included [fr

  12. Radioanalytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The bibliography of Hungarian literature in the field of radioanalytical chemistry covers the four-year period 1976-1979. The list of papers contains 290 references in the alphabetical order of the first authors. The majority of the titles belongs to neutron activation analysis, labelling, separation and determination of radioactive isotopes. Other important fields like radioimmunoassay, environmental protection etc. are covered as well. (Sz.J.)

  13. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The division for Analytical Chemistry continued to try and develope an accurate method for the separation of trace amounts from mixtures which, contain various other elements. Ion exchange chromatography is of special importance in this regard. New separation techniques were tried on certain trace amounts in South African standard rock materials and special ceramics. Methods were also tested for the separation of carrier-free radioisotopes from irradiated cyclotron discs

  14. Combination of acoustic levitation with small angle scattering techniques and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism. Application to the study of protein solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiglio, Viviana; Grillo, Isabelle; Fomina, Margarita; Wien, Frank; Shalaev, Evgenyi; Novikov, Alexey; Brassamin, Séverine; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Pérez, Javier; Hennet, Louis

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic levitation technique is a useful sample handling method for small solid and liquids samples, suspended in air by means of an ultrasonic field. This method was previously used at synchrotron sources for studying pharmaceutical liquids and protein solutions using x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). In this work we combined for the first time this containerless method with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) to study the structural behavior of proteins in solutions during the water evaporation. SANS results are also compared with SAXS experiments. The aggregation behavior of 45μl droplets of lysozyme protein diluted in water was followed during the continuous increase of the sample concentration by evaporating the solvent. The evaporation kinetics was followed at different drying stage by SANS and SAXS with a good data quality. In a prospective work using SRCD, we also studied the evolution of the secondary structure of the myoglobin protein in water solution in the same evaporation conditions. Acoustic levitation was applied for the first time with SANS and the high performances of the used neutron instruments made it possible to monitor fast container-less reactions in situ. A preliminary work using SRCD shows the potentiality of its combination with acoustic levitation for studying the evolution of the protein structure with time. This multi-techniques approach could give novel insights into crystallization and self-assembly phenomena of biological compound with promising potential applications in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics industry. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fractional Er:YAG laser assisting topical betamethasone solution in combination with NB-UVB for resistant non-segmental vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ru; Yuan, Jinping; Chen, Hongqiang; Li, Yuan-Hong; Wu, Yan; Gao, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2017-09-01

    Resistant non-segmental vitiligo is difficult to be treated. Ablative erbium-YAG (Er:YAG) laser has been used in the treatment of vitiligo, but the ablation of entire epidermis frustrated the compliance of patients. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of fractional Er:YAG laser followed by topical betamethasone and narrow band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) therapy in the treatment of resistant non-segmental vitiligo. The vitiligo lesions of each enrolled patient were divided into four treatment parts, which were all irradiated with NB-UVB. Three parts were, respectively, treated with low, medium, or high energy of Er:YAG laser, followed by topical betamethasone solution application. A control part was spared with laser treatment and topical betamethasone. The treatment period lasted 6 months. The efficacy was assessed by two blinded dermatologists. Treatment protocol with high energy of 1800 mJ/P of fractional Er:YAG laser followed by topical betamethasone solution and in combination with NB-UVB made 60% patients achieve marked to excellent improvement in white patches. The protocol with medium energy of 1200 mJ/P of laser assisted approximate 36% patients achieve such improvement. The two protocols, respectively, showed better efficacies than NB-UVB only protocol. However, fractional Er:YAG laser at low energy of 600 mJ/P did not provide such contributions to the treatment of vitiligo. The fractional Er:YAG laser in combination with topical betamethasone solution and NB-UVB was suitable for resistant non-segmental vitiligo. The energy of laser was preferred to be set at relatively high level.

  16. Industrial chemistry engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This book on industrial chemistry engineering is divided in two parts. The first part deals with industrial chemistry, inorganic industrial chemistry, organic industrial chemistry, analytical chemistry and practical questions. The last parts explain the chemical industry, a unit parts and thermodynamics in chemical industry and reference. It reveals the test subjects for the industrial chemistry engineering with a written examination and practical skill.

  17. Green chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, John C.; Cannon, Amy S.; Dye, Kevin M.

    2004-01-01

    A grand challenge facing government, industry, and academia in the relationship of our technological society to the environment is reinventing the use of materials. To address this challenge, collaboration from an interdisciplinary group of stakeholders will be necessary. Traditionally, the approach to risk management of materials and chemicals has been through inerventions intended to reduce exposure to materials that are hazardous to health and the environment. In 1990, the Pollution Prevention Act encouraged a new tact-elimination of hazards at the source. An emerging approach to this grand challenge seeks to embed the diverse set of environmental perspectives and interests in the everyday practice of the people most responsible for using and creating new materials--chemists. The approach, which has come to be known as Green Chemistry, intends to eliminate intrinsic hazard itself, rather than focusing on reducing risk by minimizing exposure. This chapter addresses the representation of downstream environmental stakeholder interests in the upstream everyday practice that is reinventing chemistry and its material inputs, products, and waste as described in the '12 Principles of Green Chemistry'

  18. Promoting sustainability through green chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchhoff, Mary M. [American Chemical Society, 1155 Sixteenth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Green chemistry is an important tool in achieving sustainability. The implementation of green chemistry, the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances, is essential if the expanding global population is to enjoy an increased standard of living without having a negative impact on the health of the planet. Cleaner technologies will allow the chemical enterprise to provide society with the goods and services on which it depends in an environmentally responsible manner. Green chemistry provides solutions to such global challenges as climate change, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics in the environment, and the depletion of natural resources. A collaborative effort by industry, academia, and government is needed to promote the adoption of the green chemistry technologies necessary to achieve a sustainable society.

  19. Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using Fenton chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretreatment is a necessary step in “biomass to biofuel conversion” due to the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass. White-rot fungi utilize peroxidases and hydrogen peroxide (in vivo Fenton chemistry) to degrade lignin. In an attempt to mimic this process, solution phase Fenton chemistry ...

  20. Multicomponent Reactions in Ligation and Bioconjugation Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguera, Leslie; Méndez, Yanira; Humpierre, Ana R; Valdés, Oscar; Rivera, Daniel G

    2018-05-25

    Multicomponent reactions (MCRs) encompass an exciting class of chemical transformations that have proven success in almost all fields of synthetic organic chemistry. These convergent procedures incorporate three or more reactants into a final product in one pot, thus combining high levels of complexity and diversity generation with low synthetic cost. Striking applications of these processes are found in heterocycle, peptidomimetic, and natural product syntheses. However, their potential in the preparation of large macro- and biomolecular constructs has been realized just recently. This Account describes the most relevant results of our group in the utilization of MCRs for ligation/conjugation of biomolecules along with significant contributions from other laboratories that validate the utility of this special class of bioconjugation process. Thus, MCRs have proven to be efficient in the ligation of lipids to peptides and oligosaccharides as well as the ligation of steroids, carbohydrates, and fluorescent and affinity tags to peptides and proteins. In the field of glycolipids, we highlight the power of isocyanide-based MCRs with the one-pot double lipidation of glycan fragments functionalized as either the carboxylic acid or amine. In peptide chemistry, the versatility of the multicomponent ligation strategy is demonstrated in both solution-phase lipidation protocols and solid-phase procedures enabling the simultaneous lipidation and biotinylation of peptides. In addition, we show that MCRs are powerful methods for synchronized lipidation/labeling and macrocyclization of peptides, thus accomplishing in one step what usually requires long sequences. In the realm of protein bioconjugation, MCRs have also proven to be effective in labeling, site-selective modification, immobilization, and glycoconjugation processes. For example, we illustrate a successful application of multicomponent polysaccharide-protein conjugation with the preparation of multivalent

  1. Principles of quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    George, David V

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Quantum Chemistry focuses on the application of quantum mechanics in physical models and experiments of chemical systems.This book describes chemical bonding and its two specific problems - bonding in complexes and in conjugated organic molecules. The very basic theory of spectroscopy is also considered. Other topics include the early development of quantum theory; particle-in-a-box; general formulation of the theory of quantum mechanics; and treatment of angular momentum in quantum mechanics. The examples of solutions of Schroedinger equations; approximation methods in quantum c

  2. Theoretical chemistry periodicities in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Periodicities in Chemistry and Biology, Volume 4 covers the aspects of theoretical chemistry. The book discusses the stably rotating patterns of reaction and diffusion; the chemistry of inorganic systems exhibiting nonmonotonic behavior; and population cycles. The text also describes the mathematical modeling of excitable media in neurobiology and chemistry; oscillating enzyme reactions; and oscillatory properties and excitability of the heart cell membrane. Selected topics from the theory of physico-chemical instabilities are also encompassed. Chemists, mechanical engin

  3. The aqueous chemistry of oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Bunker, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    The Aqueous Chemistry of Oxides is a comprehensive reference volume and special topics textbook that explores all of the major chemical reactions that take place between oxides and aqueous solutions. The book highlights the enormous impact that oxide-water reactions have in advanced technologies, materials science, geochemistry, and environmental science.

  4. A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

  5. Visualizing Chemistry: Investigations for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealy, Julie B.; Ealy, James L., Jr.

    This book contains 101 investigations for chemistry classrooms. Topics include: (1) Physical Properties; (2) Reactions of Some Elements; (3) Reactions Involving Gases; (4) Energy Changes; (5) Solutions and Solubility; (6) Transition Metals and Complex Ions; (7) Kinetics and Equilibrium; (8) Acids and Bases; (9) Oxidation-Reduction; (10)…

  6. Interstellar chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemperer, William

    2006-08-15

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species observed is a challenge for complete understanding. The role and nature of reactions involving grain surfaces as well as new spectroscopic observations of interstellar and circumstellar regions are topics presented in this special feature.

  7. Recollections of the maturation of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dainton, F.S.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the background to the study of the identification of primary species in irradiated aqueous solutions is presented. Theoretical aspects are discussed. The radiation chemistry of glossy and crystalline solids is briefly discussed. (UK)

  8. Bubble and foam chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Pugh, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    This indispensable guide will equip the reader with a thorough understanding of the field of foaming chemistry. Assuming only basic theoretical background knowledge, the book provides a straightforward introduction to the principles and properties of foams and foaming surfactants. It discusses the key ideas that underpin why foaming occurs, how it can be avoided and how different degrees of antifoaming can be achieved, and covers the latest test methods, including laboratory and industrial developed techniques. Detailing a variety of different kinds of foams, from wet detergents and food foams, to polymeric, material and metal foams, it connects theory to real-world applications and recent developments in foam research. Combining academic and industrial viewpoints, this book is the definitive stand-alone resource for researchers, students and industrialists working on foam technology, colloidal systems in the field of chemical engineering, fluid mechanics, physical chemistry, and applied physics.

  9. Exploration Of `Click' Chemistry For Microelectronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Osama M.; Sridhar, Laxmisha M.

    The ‘Click’ chemistry was explored for low temperature snap cure and for possible use as an adhesion promoter in electronic applications. Several azide and alkyne resins were synthesized and their curing potential was evaluated with a special emphasis on exploring Cu(I) catalyst effect. The preliminary curing study in the absence of catalysts showed a strong dependence of cure temperatures on the electronic nature of alkynes. The cure temperatures showed a tendency to increase with decreasing electronegativity of the substituent on alkynes. The capability of Cu(I) catalysts to accelerate the ‘Click’ chemistry was demonstrated for the first time in bulk phase. Using several Cu(I) catalysts, the cure temperatures could be lowered by as much as 40-100°C compared to the control, depending on the nature of catalyst and the catalyst loading. We discovered a novel synergistic effect between Cu(I) and silver filler in lowering the cure temperatures. Using this combination, lower cure temperatures could be obtained than using either alone. Among several resins screened, one resin system has shown promise for 80°C snap-cure in which the aforementioned synergistic effect is operative. Solution phase ‘Click’ chemistry was employed for the synthesis of a hybrid triazole-epoxy resin system. This system was found to cure without added amine curative. The triazole group here serves as a linker as well as an internal adhesion promoter. To address the incompatibility and volatility issues, which arose during evaluation, a controlled oligomerization method has been developed using controlled heating of azides and alkynes in solution phase.

  10. Network Simulation solution of free convective flow from a vertical cone with combined effect of non- uniform surface heat flux and heat generation or absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immanuel, Y.; Pullepu, Bapuji; Sambath, P.

    2018-04-01

    A two dimensional mathematical model is formulated for the transitive laminar free convective, incompressible viscous fluid flow over vertical cone with variable surface heat flux combined with the effects of heat generation and absorption is considered . using a powerful computational method based on thermoelectric analogy called Network Simulation Method (NSM0, the solutions of governing nondimensionl coupled, unsteady and nonlinear partial differential conservation equations of the flow that are obtained. The numerical technique is always stable and convergent which establish high efficiency and accuracy by employing network simulator computer code Pspice. The effects of velocity and temperature profiles have been analyzed for various factors, namely Prandtl number Pr, heat flux power law exponent n and heat generation/absorption parameter Δ are analyzed graphically.

  11. Coordination and structure of Ca(II)-acetate complexes in aqueous solution studied by a combination of Raman and XAFS spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Noval, Álvaro; Nishio, Daisuke; Kuruma, Takuya; Hayakawa, Shinjiro

    2018-06-01

    The determination of the structure of Ca(II)-acetate in aqueous solution has been addressed by combining Raman and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. The pH-dependent speciation of the acetate/Ca(II) system has been studied observing modifications in specific Raman bands of the carboxyl group. The current results evidence the Ca(II)-acetate above acetate pKa forms a bidentate complex and presents a coordination 6, in which the Ca-O shell radius decrease of about 0.1 Å with respect the hydrated Ca2+ with coordination 8. The experimental results show the OCO angle of the carboxyl in the complex is close to 124°, being the OCaO angle about 60°.

  12. Solution Structures of Highly Active Molecular Ir Water-Oxidation Catalysts from Density Functional Theory Combined with High-Energy X-ray Scattering and EXAFS Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke R; Matula, Adam J; Kwon, Gihan; Hong, Jiyun; Sheehan, Stafford W; Thomsen, Julianne M; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H; Tiede, David M; Chen, Lin X; Batista, Victor S

    2016-05-04

    The solution structures of highly active Ir water-oxidation catalysts are elucidated by combining density functional theory, high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We find that the catalysts are Ir dimers with mono-μ-O cores and terminal anionic ligands, generated in situ through partial oxidation of a common catalyst precursor. The proposed structures are supported by (1)H and (17)O NMR, EPR, resonance Raman and UV-vis spectra, electrophoresis, etc. Our findings are particularly valuable to understand the mechanism of water oxidation by highly reactive Ir catalysts. Importantly, our DFT-EXAFS-HEXS methodology provides a new in situ technique for characterization of active species in catalytic systems.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of the coordination sphere of trivalent lanthanum in a highly concentrated LiCl aqueous solution: A combined classical and ab initio approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuilleumier, R.; Petit, L.; Maldivi, P.; Adamo, C.

    2008-01-01

    The first coordination sphere of trivalent lanthanum in a highly concentrated (14 M) lithium chloride solution is studied with a combination of classical molecular dynamics and density functional theory based first principle molecular dynamics. This method enables us to obtain a solvation shell of La 3+ containing 2 chloride ions and 6 water molecules. After refinement using first principle molecular dynamics, the resulting cation-water and cation-anion distances are in very good agreement with experiment. The 2 Cl - and the 6 water molecules arrange in a square anti-prism around La 3+ . Exchange of water molecules was also observed in the first-principle simulation, with an intermediate structure comprising 7 water molecules stable for 2.5 ps. Finally, evaluation of dipole moments using maximally localized Wannier functions shows a substantial polarization of the chloride anions and the water molecules in the first solvation shell of trivalent lanthanum. (authors)

  14. A novel signal transduction protein: Combination of solute binding and tandem PAS-like sensor domains in one polypeptide chain: Periplasmic Ligand Binding Protein Dret_0059

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Wilton, R. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Cuff, M. E. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Endres, M. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Babnigg, G. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Edirisinghe, J. N. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Henry, C. S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Joachimiak, A. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Schiffer, M. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Pokkuluri, P. R. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439

    2017-03-06

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of a novel periplasmic ligand-binding protein, Dret_0059, from Desulfohalobium retbaense DSM 5692, an organism isolated from the Salt Lake Retba in Senegal. The structure of the protein consists of a unique combination of a periplasmic solute binding protein (SBP) domain at the N-terminal and a tandem PAS-like sensor domain at the C-terminal region. SBP domains are found ubiquitously and their best known function is in solute transport across membranes. PAS-like sensor domains are commonly found in signal transduction proteins. These domains are widely observed as parts of many protein architectures and complexes but have not been observed previously within the same polypeptide chain. In the structure of Dret_0059, a ketoleucine moiety is bound to the SBP, whereas a cytosine molecule is bound in the distal PAS-like domain of the tandem PAS-like domain. Differential scanning flourimetry support the binding of ligands observed in the crystal structure. There is significant interaction between the SBP and tandem PAS-like domains, and it is possible that the binding of one ligand could have an effect on the binding of the other. We uncovered three other proteins with this structural architecture in the non-redundant sequence data base, and predict that they too bind the same substrates. The genomic context of this protein did not offer any clues for its function. We did not find any biological process in which the two observed ligands are coupled. The protein Dret_0059 could be involved in either signal transduction or solute transport.

  15. High-spatial-resolution isotropic three-dimensional fast-recovery fast spin-echo magnetic resonance dacryocystography combined with topical administration of sterile saline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Zhang; Lang, Chen; Qiu-Xia, Wang; Rong, Liu; Xin, Luo; Wen-Zhen, Zhu; Li-Ming, Xia; Jian-Pin, Qi; He, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the clinical performance of three-dimensional (3D) fast-recovery fast spin-echo (FRFSE) magnetic resonance dacryocystography (MRD) with topical administration of sterile saline solution for the assessment of the lacrimal drainage system (LDS). Methods: A total of 13 healthy volunteers underwent both 3D-FRFSE MRD and two-dimensional (2D)-impulse recovery (IR)-single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) MRD after topical administration of sterile saline solution, and 31 patients affected by primary LDS outflow impairment or postsurgical recurrent epiphora underwent 3D-FRFSE MRD and conventional T1- and T2-weighted sequences. All patients underwent lacrimal endoscopy or surgery, which served as a standard of reference for confirming the MRD findings. Results: 3D-FRFSE MRD detected more visualized superior and inferior canaliculi and nasolacrimal duct than 2D-IR-SSFSE MRD. Compared with 2D-IR-SSFSE MRD, 3D-FRFSE MRD showed more visualized segments per LDS, although the difference was not statistically significant. Significant improvements in the inferior canaliculus and nasolacrimal duct visibility grades were achieved using 3D-FRFSE MRD. 3D-FRFSE MRD had 100% sensitivity and 63.6% specificity for detecting LDS obstruction. In 51 out of the 62 LDSs that were assessed, a 90% agreement was noted between the findings of 3D-FRFSE MRD and lacrimal endoscopy in detecting the obstruction level. Conclusion: 3D-FRFSE MRD combined with topical administration of sterile saline solution is a simple and noninvasive method of obtaining detailed morphological and functional information on the LDS. Overall, 3D-FRFSE MRD could be used as a reliable diagnostic method in many patients with epiphora prior to surgery

  16. In situ characterization of uranium and americium oxide solid solution formation for CRMP process: first combination of in situ XRD and XANES measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caisso, Marie; Picart, Sébastien; Belin, Renaud C; Lebreton, Florent; Martin, Philippe M; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg; Neuville, Daniel R; Delahaye, Thibaud; Ayral, André

    2015-04-14

    Transmutation of americium in heterogeneous mode through the use of U1-xAmxO2±δ ceramic pellets, also known as Americium Bearing Blankets (AmBB), has become a major research axis. Nevertheless, in order to consider future large-scale deployment, the processes involved in AmBB fabrication have to minimize fine particle dissemination, due to the presence of americium, which considerably increases the risk of contamination. New synthesis routes avoiding the use of pulverulent precursors are thus currently under development, such as the Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP) process. It is based on the use of weak-acid resin (WAR) microspheres as precursors, loaded with actinide cations. After two specific calcinations under controlled atmospheres, resin microspheres are converted into oxide microspheres composed of a monophasic U1-xAmxO2±δ phase. Understanding the different mechanisms during thermal conversion, that lead to the release of organic matter and the formation of a solid solution, appear essential. By combining in situ techniques such as XRD and XAS, it has become possible to identify the key temperatures for oxide formation, and the corresponding oxidation states taken by uranium and americium during mineralization. This paper thus presents the first results on the mineralization of (U,Am) loaded resin microspheres into a solid solution, through in situ XAS analysis correlated with HT-XRD.

  17. Combining in situ characterization methods in one set-up: looking with more eyes into the intricate chemistry of the synthesis and working of heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentrup, Ursula

    2010-12-01

    Several in situ techniques are known which allow investigations of catalysts and catalytic reactions under real reaction conditions using different spectroscopic and X-ray methods. In recent years, specific set-ups have been established which combine two or more in situ methods in order to get a more detailed understanding of catalytic systems. This tutorial review will give a summary of currently available set-ups equipped with multiple techniques for in situ catalyst characterization, catalyst preparation, and reaction monitoring. Besides experimental and technical aspects of method coupling including X-ray techniques, spectroscopic methods (Raman, UV-vis, FTIR), and magnetic resonance spectroscopies (NMR, EPR), essential results will be presented to demonstrate the added value of multitechnique in situ approaches. A special section is focussed on selected examples of use which show new developments and application fields.

  18. Separations chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Results of studies on the photochemistry of aqueous Pu solutions and the stability of iodine in liquid and gaseous CO 2 are reported. Progress is reported in studies on: the preparation of macroporous bodies filled with oxides and sulfides to be used as adsorbents; the beneficiation of photographic wastes; the anion exchange adsorption of transition elements from thiosulfate solutions; advanced filtration applications of energy significance; high-resolution separations; and, the examination of the separation agents, octylphenylphosphoric acid (OPPA) and trihexyl phosphate (THP)

  19. New trends and developments in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    Radiation chemistry is a branch of chemistry that studies chemical transformations in materials exposed to high-energy radiations. It uses radiation as the initiator of chemical reactions. Practical applications of radiation chemistry today extend to many fields, including health care, food and agriculture, manufacturing, industrial pollution abatement, biotechnology and telecommunications. The important advantage of radiation chemistry lies in its ability to be used to produce, and study, almost any reactive atomic and molecular species playing a part in chemical reactions, synthesis, industrial processes, or in biological systems. The techniques are applicable to gaseous, liquid, solid, and heterogeneous systems. By combining different techniques of radiation chemistry with analytical chemistry, the reaction mechanism and kinetics of chemical reactions are studied. In November 1988 in Bologna, Italy, the IAEA convened an advisory group meeting to assess new trends and developments in radiation chemistry. The present publication includes most of the contributions presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Radiation chemistry and bioradical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferradini, C.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen metabolism results, at the cellular level, in the formation of superoxyde radical O 2 - · and probably also of hydroxyl radical OH·. Other radical species can be produced from exogenous or endogenous molecules and nearly all of them have the possibility to react with oxygen giving peroxyradicals. Some of these transients play a role in various biological processes such as phagocytosis, inflammation or ischemy although the mechanisms invoked are poorly understood. Radiation chemistry is an invaluable tool for obtaining a quantitative view of these mechanisms. A description is given of this interaction [fr

  1. Bibliographies on radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.Z.; Ross, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    The one-electron oxidation and reduction of metal ions and complexes can yield species in unusual oxidation states, and ligand-radicals coordinated to the central metal. These often unstable species can be mechanistically important intermediates in thermal, photochemical, and electrochemical reactions involving metal-containing substances. Their generation via radiolysis provides an alternate means of characterizing them using kinetic and spectroscopic techniques. We hope these bibliographies on the radiation chemistry of metal ions and complexes, presented according to periodic groups, will prove useful to researchers in metallo-redox chemistry. These bibliographies contain only primary literature sources; reviews are not included. However, a list of general review articles on the radiation chemistry of metal ions and complexes is presented here in the first section which covers cobalt, rhodium and iridium, Group 9 in the new IUPAC notation. Additional parts of the bibliography are planned, covering other periodic groups. Part A of the bibliography was prepared by a search of the Radiation Chemistry Data Center Bibliographic Data Base (RCDCbib) through January 1986 for papers on rhodium, iridium and cobalt compounds, and radiolysis (both continuous and pulsed). Papers in which the use of metal compounds was incidental to the primary objective of the study were excluded. Excluded also were publications in unrefereed and obscure sources such as meeting proceedings, internal reports, dissertations, and patents. The majority of the studies in the resultant compilation deal with experiments performed on solutions, mainly aqueous, although a substantial fraction is devoted to solid-state esr measurements. The references are listed in separate sections for each of the metals, and are presented in approximate chronological order. (author)

  2. Fundamentals of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, K.

    1982-01-01

    The textbook is a Czech-to-German translation of the second revised edition and covers the subject under the headings: general nuclear chemistry, methods of nuclear chemistry, preparative nuclear chemistry, analytical nuclear chemistry, and applied chemistry. The book is especially directed to students

  3. Monitoring snowmelt and solute transport at Oslo airport by combining time-lapse electrical resistivity, soil water sampling and tensiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, E.; French, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring contaminant transport at contaminated sites requires optimization of the configuration of a limited number of samplings points combined with heterogeneous flow and preferential flowpaths. Especially monitoring processes in the unsaturated zone is a major challenge due to the limited volume monitored by for example suction cups and their risk to clog in a highly active degradation zone. To make progress on soil contamination assessment and site characterization there is a strong need to integrate field-sale extensively instrumented tools, with non-invasive (geophysical) methods which provide spatially integrated measurements also in the unsaturated zone. Examples of sites that might require monitoring activities in the unsaturated zone are airports with winter frost where large quantities of de-icing chemicals are used each winter; salt and contaminant infiltration along roads; constructed infiltration systems for treatment of sewerage or landfill seepage. Electrical resistivity methods have proved to be useful as an indirect measurement of subsurface properties and processes at the field-scale. The non-uniqueness of the interpretation techniques can be reduced by constraining the inversion through the addition of independent geophysical measurements along the same profile. Or interpretation and understanding of geophysical images can be improved by the combination with classical measurements of soil physical properties, soil suction, contaminant concentration and temperatures. In our experiment, at the research field station at Gardermoen, Oslo airport, we applied a degradable de-icing chemical and an inactive tracer to the snow cover prior to snowmelt. To study the solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone time-lapse cross borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) measurements were conducted at the same time as soil water samples were extracted at multiple depths with suction cups. Measurements of soil temperature, and soil tension were

  4. Physical chemistry and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Garrett, B.C.; Kolb, C.E. Jr.; Shaw, R.W.; Choppin, G.R.; Wagner, A.F.

    1994-08-01

    From the ozone hole and the greenhouse effect to plastics recycling and hazardous waste disposal, society faces a number of issues, the solutions to which require an unprecedented understanding of the properties of molecules. We are coming to realize that the environment is a coupled set of chemical systems, its dynamics determining the welfare of the biosphere and of humans in particular. These chemical systems are governed by fundamental molecular interactions, and they present chemists with an unparalleled challenge. The application of current concepts of molecular behavior and of up-to-date experimental and computational techniques can provide us with insights into the environment that are needed to mitigate past damage, to anticipate the impact of current human activity, and to avoid future insults to the environment. Environmental chemistry encompasses a number of separate, yet interlocking, areas of research. In all of these areas progress is limited by an inadequate understanding of the underlying chemical processes involved. Participation of all chemical approaches -- experimental, theoretical and computational -- and of all disciplines of chemistry -- organic, inorganic, physical, analytical and biochemistry -- will be required to provide the necessary fundamental understanding. The Symposium on ''Physical Chemistry and the Environment'' was designed to bring the many exciting and challenging physical chemistry problems involved in environmental chemistry to the attention of a larger segment of the physical chemistry community

  5. Inhibition of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus weihenstephanensis in raw vegetables by application of washing solutions containing enterocin AS-48 alone and in combination with other antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo Molinos, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate; Lucas López, Rosario; Ben Omar, Nabil; Valdivia, Eva; Gálvez, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Enterocin AS-48 is a broad-spectrum cyclic antimicrobial peptide produced by Enterococcus faecalis. In the present study, the bacteriocin was tested alone and in combination with other antimicrobials for decontamination of Bacillus inoculated on alfalfa, soybean sprouts and green asparagus. Washing with enterocin AS-48 solutions reduced viable cell counts of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus weihenstephanensis by 1.0-1.5 and by 1.5-2.38 log units right after application of treatment, respectively. In both cases, the bacteriocin was effective in reducing the remaining viable population below detection levels during further storage of the samples at 6 degrees C, but failed to prevent regrowth in samples stored at 15 or 22 degrees C. Application of washing treatments containing enterocin AS-48 in combination with several other antimicrobials and sanitizers (cinnamic and hydrocinnamic acids, carvacrol, polyphosphoric acid, peracetic acid, hexadecylpyridinium chloride and sodium hypochlorite) greatly enhanced the bactericidal effects. The combinations of AS-48 and sodium hypochlorite, peracetic acid or hexadecylpyridinium chloride provided the best results. After application of the combined treatments on alfalfa sprouts contaminated with B. cereus or with B. weihenstephanensis, viable bacilli were not detected or remained at very low concentrations in the treated samples during a 1-week storage period at 15 degrees C. Inhibition of B. cereus by in situ produced bacteriocin was tested by cocultivation with the AS-48 producer strain E. faecalis A-48-32 inoculated on soybean sprouts. Strain A-48-32 was able to grow and produce bacteriocin on sprouts both at 15 and 22 degrees C. At 15 degrees C, growth of B. cereus was completely inhibited in the cocultures, while a much more limited effect was observed at 22 degrees C. The results obtained for washing treatments are very encouraging for the application of enterocin AS-48 in the decontamination of sprouts. Application of washing

  6. Medicinal electrochemistry: integration of electrochemistry, medicinal chemistry and computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, M O; Maltarollo, V G; de Toledo, R A; Shim, H; Santos, M C; Honorio, K M

    2014-01-01

    Over the last centuries, there were many important discoveries in medicine that were crucial for gaining a better understanding of several physiological processes. Molecular modelling techniques are powerful tools that have been successfully used to analyse and interface medicinal chemistry studies with electrochemical experimental results. This special combination can help to comprehend medicinal chemistry problems, such as predicting biological activity and understanding drug action mechanisms. Electrochemistry has provided better comprehension of biological reactions and, as a result of many technological improvements, the combination of electrochemical techniques and biosensors has become an appealing choice for pharmaceutical and biomedical analyses. Therefore, this review will briefly outline the present scope and future advances related to the integration of electrochemical and medicinal chemistry approaches based on various applications from recent studies.

  7. Chemistry Division : Annual progress report of 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Research and development activities (during 1974) of the Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, are described. Some of the activities of particular interest to nuclear science and technology are: (1) chemistry-based problems of the operating power reactors such as development of a decontaminating solution for power reactors, correlation of iodine-131 levels in the primary heat transport system of a reactor with its operation (2) release of fission gases like xenon from ceramic fuels and (3) radiation chemistry of nitrate solutions (M.G.B.)

  8. Chemistry of the actinide elements. Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, J.J.; Seaborg, G.T.; Morss, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    This is an exhaustive, updated discourse on the chemistry of Actinides, Volume 1 contains a systematic coverage of the elements Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu, which constitutes Part 1 of the work. The characterization of each element is discussed in terms of its nuclear properties, occurrence, preparation, atomic and metallic properties, chemistry of specific compounds, and solution chemistry. The first part of Volume 2 follows the same format as Volume 1 but is confined to the elements Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, and Es, plus a more condensed coverage of the Transeinsteinium elements (Fm, Md, No, Lw, and 104-109). Part 2 of this volume is devoted to a discussion of the actinide elements in general, with a specific focus on electronic spectra, thermodynamic and magnetic properties, the metallic state, structural chemistry, solution kinetics, organometallic chemistry for σ- and π-bonded compounds, and some concluding remarks on the superheavy elements

  9. Cyclodextrin chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.Z.; Chuaqui, C.A.

    1990-05-01

    The chemistry of cyclodextrins was studied. This study included synthesising some cyclodextrin derivatives, preparing selected inclusion complexes with cyclodextrin and investigating the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and certain linear oligosaccharides. This report presents a brief review of the structure and properties of cyclodextrins, the synthesis of cyclodextrin derivatives, their complexation and applications. This is followed by a description of the synthesis of some cyclodextrin derivatives and the preparation of inclusion complexes of cyclodextrin with some organic compounds. Finally, the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins, some of their derivatives and certain structurally related carbohydrates are discussed. The gamma irradiation studies were carried out for two reasons: to study the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and their derivatives; and to investigate selectivity during the gamma irradiation of cyclodextrin derivatives

  10. Astronomical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemperer, William

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of polar polyatomic molecules in higher-density regions of the interstellar medium by means of their rotational emission detected by radioastronomy has changed our conception of the universe from essentially atomic to highly molecular. We discuss models for molecule formation, emphasizing the general lack of thermodynamic equilibrium. Detailed chemical kinetics is needed to understand molecule formation as well as destruction. Ion molecule reactions appear to be an important class for the generally low temperatures of the interstellar medium. The need for the intrinsically high-quality factor of rotational transitions to definitively pin down molecular emitters has been well established by radioastronomy. The observation of abundant molecular ions both positive and, as recently observed, negative provides benchmarks for chemical kinetic schemes. Of considerable importance in guiding our understanding of astronomical chemistry is the fact that the larger molecules (with more than five atoms) are all organic.

  11. Reburning chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpin, P.; Hupa, M.; Glarborg, P.

    1992-01-01

    No reduction chemistry in natural gas (methane) reburning was studied using detailed kinetic modeling. A reaction set including 225 reversible elementary gas-phase reactions and 48 chemical species was applied to an ideal plug flow reactor, and the most important reactions leading to NO reduction were identified and quantified for a number of conditions relevant for natural gas reburning. In addition, the influence of different process parameters on the NO reduction was investigated in the reburn zone and burn-out zone, respectively. Further, comparison of the calculations to available laboratory-scale data on reburning is made. In this paper, the impact of various fluid dynamic, mixing, and chemical effects---not accounted for in the calculations---on the NO reduction and the optimum reburning conditions predicted is discussed

  12. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  13. Probing the influence of X-rays on aqueous copper solutions using time-resolved in situ combined video/X-ray absorption near-edge/ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesu, J. Gerbrand; Beale, Andrew M.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved in situ video monitoring and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy in combination with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) have been used for the first time in a combined manner to study the effect of synchrotron radiation on a series of homogeneous aqueous copper solutions in a

  14. Solution chemistry of element 104: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, K.R.; Gregorich, K.E.; Hannink, N.J.; Kacher, C.D.; Kadkhodayan, B.A.; Kreek, S.A.; Lee, D.M.; Nurmia, M.J.; Tuerler, A.; Seaborg, G.T.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid-liquid extractions of element 104 (Rf), Zr, Nb, Th, and Eu were conducted using triisooctylamine (TIOA), an organic soluble high molecular weight amine. Initial studies were conducted studying the extraction of Zr, Nb, Th and Eu from 12 M HCl in an organic phase of TIOA in benzene. Tracer loss due to thin sample formation was examined using 95 Zr. Based on the tracer extraction results, Rf extractions were conducted with an aqueous phase of 12 M HCl and an organic phase of 1.0 M and 0.1 M TIAO in benzene. The Rf extraction results showed that 0.1 M TIOA in benzene extracts Rf to a greater extent than 1.0 M TIOA in benzene. This difference is attributed to Rf loss during thin sample formation. The extraction of Rf by TIOA is further evidence that Rf behaves similar to the group 4 elements. (orig.)

  15. Physical and radiological chemistry on ocean solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This study is designed to investigate the rates and mechanisms of ocean mixing processes using natural and artificial radionuclides as tracers of these processes. Using these same radionuclides, especially 7 Be, rates of air-to-sea transfer of atmospheric aerosol can be determined. Measurement of the concentrations of anthropogenic pollutants in the aerosol provides the means for determining the magnitude of injection of these pollutants to the world's oceans

  16. Chemistry between the stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroto, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    During the past 15 years the techniques used by chemists to determine accurate molecular structures have combined with those of radio astronomers to probe the space between the stars. Together they paint a new picture of interstellar space, a picture which shows that vast clouds of gas and dust are continually collapsing to form stars and planets and that the main constituents of these clouds are molecules, some of which are quite complex organic species. It is now known that many of the organic building blocks, useful in the evolution of biologically significant macromolecules, existed long before the Earth was formed. These findings present a challenge to previous widely-accepted theories that such molecules were first generated in the Earth's primaeval atmosphere. In this paper certain aspects of these discoveries are considered with particular emphasis on the contributions made by techniques of use in general chemistry. After a brief astronomical introduction to the Interstellar Medium (ISM) the interaction between chemistry and radioastronomy is discussed. This is followed by details of some exciting, new and quite unexpected advances in our understanding of carbon chemistry, discovered during experiments aimed at understanding some of the more perplexing radioastronomy results. Finally an overview is given of the present knowledge of the molecular composition of the ISM and the resulting implications in so far as the origins of life are concerned. (author)

  17. Chemistry between the stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroto, H W

    1986-01-01

    During the past 15 years the techniques used by chemists to determine accurate molecular structures have combined with those of radio astronomers to probe the space between the stars. Together they paint a new picture of interstellar space, a picture which shows that vast clouds of gas and dust are continually collapsing to form stars and planets and that the main constituents of these clouds are molecules, some of which are quite complex organic species. It is now known that many of the organic building blocks, useful in the evolution of biologically significant macromolecules, existed long before the Earth was formed. These findings present a challenge to previous widely-accepted theories that such molecules were first generated in the Earth's primaeval atmosphere. In this paper certain aspects of these discoveries are considered with particular emphasis on the contributions made by techniques of use in general chemistry. After a brief astronomical introduction to the Interstellar Medium (ISM) the interaction between chemistry and radioastronomy is discussed. This is followed by details of some exciting, new and quite unexpected advances in our understanding of carbon chemistry, discovered during experiments aimed at understanding some of the more perplexing radioastronomy results. Finally an overview is given of the present knowledge of the molecular composition of the ISM and the resulting implications in so far as the origins of life are concerned.

  18. A Wet Chemistry Laboratory Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This picture of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) cell is labeled with components responsible for mixing Martian soil with water from Earth, adding chemicals and measuring the solution chemistry. WCL is part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite on board the Phoenix lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Theoretical chemistry advances and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Henry

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Advances and Perspectives, Volume 5 covers articles concerning all aspects of theoretical chemistry. The book discusses the mean spherical approximation for simple electrolyte solutions; the representation of lattice sums as Mellin-transformed products of theta functions; and the evaluation of two-dimensional lattice sums by number theoretic means. The text also describes an application of contour integration; a lattice model of quantum fluid; as well as the computational aspects of chemical equilibrium in complex systems. Chemists and physicists will find the book usef

  20. The process chemistry of the extraction and electrowinning of silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Conventional processing of Ag-bearing materials containing Au and Pt group metals involves smelting the material to bullion and purification of the Ag by electrorefining (ER). Au and Pt-group metals are recovered from the slimes generated by the Ag ER process. An alternative process that allows extraction of Ag from such feed materials using a combination of sulfate and nitrate chemistry is presented. The AgNO 3 solution produced is purified hydrolytically, and Ag is recovered as high purity crystals by electrowinning (EW). Advantages of the process include: production of high purity Ag, separation of precious metals from Ag at the head of the process, and elimination of the classical pyrometallurgical treatment processes with their attendant generation of recycle slags and challenging emission problems. This paper discusses the process chemistry and engineering of the process and provides information on its commercial application. (author)

  1. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  2. Avaliação físico-química de goiabas desidratadas osmoticamente em diferentes soluções Phisical-chemistry evaluate of guava osmostic dehidration in solutions different

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelen Cristina dos Reis

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o presente trabalho, objetivou-se avaliar o efeito do ácido ascórbico, do lactato de cálcio e do branqueamento na qualidade da goiaba desidratada osmoticamente através de análises físico-químicas. O tratamento com xarope de sacarose e lactato de cálcio obteve produto com maior pH não apresentando diferença significativa na textura do produto em relação ao tratamento apenas com xarope de sacarose. A imersão das amostras em solução osmótica aumentou os valores de sólidos solúveis e reduziu em média 10% a umidade das amostras. Nos frutos em que foi realizado o branqueamento antes da imersão na solução osmótica observaram-se menores valores de pH, acidez titulável e de textura em relação ao tratamento apenas com o xarope de sacarose. Os frutos controle apresentaram tonalidade de luz mais intensa comparado aos outros tratamentos.The present research had the purpose to evaluate the effect of ascorbic acid, calcium lactate and blanching in the quality of guava osmotic dehydrated through analyses physical-chemistry. The treatment with sucrose syrup and calcium lactate obtained product with larger pH not presenting significant difference in the texture of product in relation to the treatment just with sucrose syrup. The osmotic solution increases the solid soluble value and reduced 10% the humidity of the samples.The fruits blanching shown the smaller value for pH, acidity titratable and texture in relation to the treatment only sucrose syrup. The fruits control presented tonality more intense of light compared to other treatments.

  3. Environmental chemistry. Seventh edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, S.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1999-11-01

    This book presents a basic understanding of environmental chemistry and its applications. In addition to providing updated materials in this field, the book emphasizes the major concepts essential to the practice of environmental chemistry. Topics of discussion include the following: toxicological chemistry; toxicological chemistry of chemical substances; chemical analysis of water and wastewater; chemical analysis of wastes and solids; air and gas analysis; chemical analysis of biological materials and xenobiotics; fundamentals of chemistry; and fundamentals of organic chemistry.

  4. Basic Chemistry for the Cement Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mason

    This combined student workbook and instructor's guide contains nine units for inplant classes on basic chemistry for employees in the cement industry. The nine units cover the following topics: chemical basics; measurement; history of cement; atoms; bonding and chemical formulas; solids, liquids, and gases; chemistry of Portland cement…

  5. Uranium (VI) chemistry at the interface solution/minerals (quartz and aluminium hydroxide): experiments and spectroscopic investigations of the uranyl surface species; Chimie de l'uranium (VI) a l'interface solution/mineraux (quartz et hydroxyde d'aluminium): experiences et caracterisations spectroscopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froideval, A.

    2004-09-15

    This study deals with the understanding of the uranyl chemistry at the 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3} solution/mineral (quartz and aluminium hydroxide) interface. The aims are:(i) to identify and to characterize the different uranyl surface species (mononuclear, polynuclear complexes and/or precipitates...), i.e. the coordination environments of sorbed/precipitated uranyl ions, by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), and;(ii) to investigate the influence of pH, initial uranyl aqueous concentration and hydroxyl ligand concentration on the uranyl surface speciation. Our study on the speciation of uranyl ions at the quartz surface (i) confirms the formation of uranyl polynuclear/oligomers on quartz from moderate (1 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}) to high (26 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}) uranyl surface concentrations and (ii) show that theses polynuclear species coexist with uranyl mononuclear surface species over a pH range {approx_equal} 5-8.5 and a wide range of initial uranyl concentration o f the solutions (10-100 {mu}M). The uranyl concentration of these surface species depends on pH and on the initial uranyl aqueous concentration. Hydrate (surface-) precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species and monomeric uranyl surface complexes are formed on aluminium hydroxide. Uranyl mononuclear complexes are predominant at acidic pH, as well as uranyl in solution or on the surface. Besides mononuclear species, precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species are predominantly formed at neutral pH values on aluminium hydroxide. A main contribution of our investigations is that precipitation and/or adsorption of polynuclear species seem to occur at low uranyl surface concentrations (0.01-0.4 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}). The uranyl surface speciation is mainly dependent on the pH and the aluminol ligand concentration. (author)

  6. On an Approximate Solution Method for the Problem of Surface and Groundwater Combined Movement with Exact Approximation on the Section Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L. Glazyrina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the initial-boundary problem for two nonlinear parabolic combined equations has been considered. One of the equations is set on the bounded domain Ω from R2, another equation is set along the curve lying in Ω. Both of the equations are parabolic equations with double degeneration. The degeneration can be present at the space operator. Furthermore, the nonlinear function which is under the sign of partial derivative with respect to the variable t, can be bound to zero. This problem has an applied character: such structure is needed to describe the process of surface and ground water combined movement. In this case, the desired function determines the level of water above the given impenetrable bottom, the section simulates the riverbed. The Bussinesk equation has been used for mathematical description of the groundwater filtration process in the domain Ω; a diffusion analogue of the Saint-Venant's system has been used on the section for description of the process of water level change in the open channel. Earlier, the authors proved the theorems of generalized solution existence and uniqueness for the considered problem from the functions classes which are called strengthened Sobolev spaces in the literature. To obtain these results, we used the technique which was created by the German mathematicians (H.W. Alt, S. Luckhaus, F. Otto to establish the correctness of the problems with a double degeneration. In this paper, we have proposed and investigated an approximate solution method for the above-stated problem. This method has been constructed using semidiscretization with respect to the variable t and the finite element method for space variables. Triangulation of the domain has been accomplished by triangles. The mesh has been set on the section line. On each segment of the line section lying between the nearby mesh points, on both side of this segment we have constructed the triangles with a common side which matches with

  7. USSR Report Chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    Contents: Adsorption, Chemistry,Alkaloids, Analytical Chemistry, Catalysis,Chemical Industry,,Coal Gasification, Combustion, Electrochemistry,Explosives and Explosions, Fertilizers, Free Radicals, Inorganic...

  8. Water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Baston, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    Prior to the accident, the coolants in the primary and secondary systems were within normal chemistry specifications for an operating pressurized water reactor with once-through steam generators. During and immediately after the accident, additional boric acid and sodium hydroxide were added to the primary coolant for control of criticality and radioiodine solubility. A primary to secondary leak developed contaminating the water in one steam generator. For about 5 years after the accident, the primary coolant was maintained at 3800 +. 100 ppm boron and 1000 +. 100 ppm sodium concentrations. Dissolved oxygen was maintained 7.5, corrosion caused by increased dissolved oxygen levels (up to 8 ppm) and higher chloride ion content (up to 5 ppm) is minimized. Chemical control of dissolved oxygen was discontinued and the coolant was processed. Prior to removal of the reactor vessel head, the boron concentration in the coolant was increased to ≅ 5000 ppm to support future defueling operations. Decontamination of the accident generated water is described in terms of contaminated water management. In addition, the decontamination and chemical lay-up conditions for the secondary system are presented along with an overview of chemical management at TMI-2

  9. Separations chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Infrared spectra of Pu(IV) polymer show effects of CO 2 adsorption and of aging. Uv light (300 nm) increases the rate of reduction of PuO 2 2+ and Pu 4+ to Pu 3+ and the Pu--U separation factor using TBP. Distribution ratios for Zr and Hf between Dowex 50W--X8 resin and H 2 SO 4 solutions were found to decrease sharply with H 2 SO 4 content. Octylphenyl acid phosphate, a mixture of monooctylphenyl and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids, is being studied for U recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid. A study of HNO 3 leaching of Ra from U ores was completed. Effects of particle size of the packed bed on the dispersion of the boundary of the miscible phase used in oil recovery are being studied. Effects of sulfonates on toluene--n-butanol--water phase relations were determined, as were the effects of salts and solutes on the max water content of 1:1 toluene--alcohol solutions. A study was begun of hydrocarbon solubility in water--surfactant--alcohol. The mechanism of the formation of hydrous ZrO 2 --polyacrylate membranes and their use for sulfate rejection were studied. Salt rejection through hyperfiltration by clay membranes (bentonite and kaolin) was also investigated. Preliminary results are given for hyperfiltration of wood-pulping wastes by ZrO 2 membranes. 13 figures

  10. Comparative Study of the Preparation of Reducing Sugars Hydrolyzed from High-Lignin Lignocellulose Pretreated with Ionic Liquid, Alkaline Solution and Their Combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanny F. Sangian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ionicliquid [MMIM][DMP] was synthesized from the reactants methyl imidazole [MIM] and trimethylphosphate [TMP] and verified using 1HNMR and FTIR. Coconut coir dust was pretreated with a 1% alkaline solution.Its crystalline structure increased significantly due to the dissolution of lignin and hemicelluloses under alkaline conditions, exposing the cellulose. After NaOH and IL were employed, the XRD showed that peak (002 decreased significantly and peak (101 almost vanished. This significant decrease in crystallinity was related to the alteration of the substrate from the cellulose I structure to the cellulose II structure. The pretreated substrates were hydrolyzed to convert them to reducing sugars by pure cellulase and xylanase,and the reaction was conducted at 60°C, pH 3, for 12 or 48 hours. The yields of sugar hydrolyzed from untreated and NaOH-pretreated substrates were 0.07 and 0.12 g sugar/g lignocellulose, respectively. Pretreatment with IL or the combination of NaOH+IL resulted in yields of reducing sugars of 0.11 and 0.13 g/g, respectively. These findings showed that IL pretreatment of the high-lignin lignocellulose is a new prospect for the economical manufacture of reducing sugars and bioethanol in the coming years.

  11. Similarity Solution for Combined Free-Forced Convection Past a Vertical Porous Plate in a Porous Medium with a Convective Surface Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg P.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the mathematical implications of the two dimensional viscous steady laminar combined free-forced convective flow of an incompressible fluid over a semi infinite fixed vertical porous plate embedded in a porous medium. It is assumed that the left surface of the plate is heated by convection from a hot fluid which is at a temperature higher than the temperature of the fluid on the right surface of the vertical plate. To achieve numerical consistency for the problem under consideration, the governing non linear partial differential equations are first transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using a similarity variable and then solved numerically under conditions admitting similarity solutions. The effects of the physical parameters of both the incompressible fluid and the vertical plate on the dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are studied and analysed and the results are depicted both graphically and in a tabular form. Finally, algebraic expressions and the numerical values are obtained for the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number.

  12. Effects of intratesticular injection of zinc-based solution in rats in combination with anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs during chemical sterilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Regina Barros de Macedo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Chemical sterilization is a non-surgical method of contraception based on compounds injected into the testis to induce infertility. However, these injections can cause discomfort and pain able to impair the recovery of animals after this treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate if anti-inflammatories or pain relievers inhibited the sterilizing effect of zinc gluconate-based solution on the testis. Materials and Methods: Adult rats were treated in groups: G1 (control, G2 (dimethyl sulfoxide + dipyrone; G3 (dipyrone/ zinc; G4 (dipyrone + celecoxib/zinc; G5 (dipyrone + meloxicam/zinc, and G6 (dipyrone + dexamethasone/zinc in a single dose per day during 7 days. Animals were analyzed at 7, 15, and 30 days after treatments. Results: The zinc-induced a widespread testicular degeneration and decreased testosterone levels even in combination with anti-inflammatories or pain relievers. Testis, epididymis, prostate, and seminal vesicle had a weight reduction. The anti-inflammatory effect of dexamethasone interfered in the desired action of zinc gluconate in the 1st 15 days and celecoxib up to 7 days. Conclusion: Meloxicam plus dipyrone did not impair the chemical sterilization based on zinc gluconate, and it can be used to reduce nociceptive effects in animals after chemical sterilization.

  13. Combined operando X-ray diffraction–electrochemical impedance spectroscopy detecting solid solution reactions of LiFePO4 in batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Michael; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Villevieille, Claire; Novák, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are widely used for portable applications today; however, often suffer from limited recharge rates. One reason for such limitation can be a reduced active surface area during phase separation. Here we report a technique combining high-resolution operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to directly track non-equilibrium intermediate phases in lithium-ion battery materials. LiFePO4, for example, is known to undergo phase separation when cycled under low-current-density conditions. However, operando X-ray diffraction under ultra-high-rate alternating current and direct current excitation reveal a continuous but current-dependent, solid solution reaction between LiFePO4 and FePO4 which is consistent with previous experiments and calculations. In addition, the formation of a preferred phase with a composition similar to the eutectoid composition, Li0.625FePO4, is evident. Even at a low rate of 0.1C, ∼20% of the X-ray diffractogram can be attributed to non-equilibrium phases, which changes our understanding of the intercalation dynamics in LiFePO4. PMID:26345306

  14. Combined operando X-ray diffraction-electrochemical impedance spectroscopy detecting solid solution reactions of LiFePO4 in batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Michael; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Villevieille, Claire; Novák, Petr

    2015-09-08

    Lithium-ion batteries are widely used for portable applications today; however, often suffer from limited recharge rates. One reason for such limitation can be a reduced active surface area during phase separation. Here we report a technique combining high-resolution operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to directly track non-equilibrium intermediate phases in lithium-ion battery materials. LiFePO4, for example, is known to undergo phase separation when cycled under low-current-density conditions. However, operando X-ray diffraction under ultra-high-rate alternating current and direct current excitation reveal a continuous but current-dependent, solid solution reaction between LiFePO4 and FePO4 which is consistent with previous experiments and calculations. In addition, the formation of a preferred phase with a composition similar to the eutectoid composition, Li0.625FePO4, is evident. Even at a low rate of 0.1C, ∼20% of the X-ray diffractogram can be attributed to non-equilibrium phases, which changes our understanding of the intercalation dynamics in LiFePO4.

  15. Combination of micropreparative solution isoelectric focusing and high-performance liquid chromatography for differentiation of biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative Candida parapsilosis group from vascular catheter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vykydalová, Marie; Horká, Marie; Růžička, F.; Duša, Filip; Moravcová, Dana; Kahle, Vladislav; Šlais, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 812, Feb (2014), s. 243-249 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20112015021 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : Candida parapsilosis group * biofilm * sonicate from vascular cathether * sIEF * HPLC Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.513, year: 2014 http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0230766

  16. Chemistry in power plants 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Within the VGB Powertech conference from 25th to 27th October, 2011, in Munich (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures and poster contributions were presented: (1) The revised VGB standard for water-steam-cycle Chemistry; (2) Switchover from neutral operation to oxygen treatment at the power station Stuttgart-Muenster of EnBW Kraftwerke AG; (3) Steam contamination with degradation products of organic matters present in the feedwater of the Lanxess-Rubber cogeneration plant; (4) Laboratory scale on-line noble metal deposition experiments simulating BWR plant conditions; (5) Building a new demin installation for the power plant EPZ in Borssele; (6) Replacement of the cooling tower installations in the nuclear power plant Goesgen-Daenien AG; (7) Aging of IEX resins in demin plants - Cost optimisation by adaptation of regenerants; (8) The largest DOW trademark EDI System at a combined cycled plant in Europe; (9) Upgrading river Main water to boiler feed water - Experiences with ultrafiltration; (10) Experiences with treatment of the water-steam-cycle in the RDF power plant Nehlsen Stavenhagen with film-forming amines; (11) Comparative modelling of the bubbles thermal collapse and cavitations for estimation of bubbles collapse influence; (12) Overcoming the steam quality - issues from an HRSG for the production of process steam; (13) Legionella - new requirements for power plant operation; (14) How the right chemistry in the FGD helps to improve the removal in the waste water treatment plant; (15) High efficiency filtration in dry/semi-dry FGD plants; (16) Expanding the variety of renewable fuels in the biomass power plant Timelkam using the chemical input control; (17) Corrosion, operating experiences and process improvements to increase the availability and operating time of the biomass power plant Timelkam; (18) The influence of temperature on the measurement of the conductivity of highly diluted solutions; (19) A multiparameter instrumentation approach

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winners, Professors Charles A. Eckert and Charles L. Liotta, use supercritical CO2 as a solvent to combine reactions and separations, improve efficiency, and reduce waste.

  18. Electron tunneling in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamaraev, K.I.; Khajrutdinov, R.F.; Zhdanov, V.P.; Molin, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations are outlined systematically on electron tunnelling in chemical reactions. Mechanism of electron transport to great distances is shown to be characteristic to chemical compounds of a wide range. The function of tunnel reactions is discussed for various fields of chemistry, including radiation chemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry of solids, chemistry of surface and catalysis

  19. Mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersen, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    A brief description is given of the functional elements of a mass spectrometer and of some currently employed mass spectrometric techniques, such as combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, mass chromatography, and selected ion monitoring. Various areas of application of mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry are discussed, such as inborn errors of metabolism and other metabolic disorders, intoxications, quantitative determinations of drugs, hormones, gases, and trace elements, and the use of isotope dilution mass spectrometry as a definitive method for the establishment of true values for concentrations of various compounds in reference sera. It is concluded that mass spectrometry is of great value in clinical chemistry. (Auth.)

  20. Removal of Penicillin G by combination of sonolysis and Photocatalytic (sonophotocatalytic) process from aqueous solution: process optimization using RSM (Response Surface Methodology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasi, Ali; Dargahi, Abdollah; Mohamadi, Mitra; Biglari, Hamed; Amirian, Farhad; Raei, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Penicillin G (PG) is used in a variety of infectious diseases, extensively. Generally, when antibiotics are introduced into the food chain, they pose a threat to the environment and can risk health outcomes. The aim of the present study was the removal of Penicillin G from an aqueous solution through an integrated system of UV/ZnO and UV/WO 3 with Ultrasound pretreatment. In this descriptive-analytical work dealing with the removal of Penicillin G from an aqueous solution, four significant variables, contact time (60-120 min), Penicillin G concentration (50-150 mg/L), ZnO dose (200-400 mg/L), and WO 3 dose (100-200 mg/L) were investigated. Experiments were performed in a Pyrex reactor (batch, 1 Lit) with an artificial UV 100-Watt medium pressure mercury lamp, coupled with ultrasound (100 W, 40 KHz) for PG pre-treatment. Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) was selected to follow the performance of the photo-catalytic process and sonolysis. The experiments were based on a Central Composite Design (CCD) and analyzed by Response Surface Methodology (RSM). A mathematical model of the process was designed according to the proposed degradation scheme. The results showed that the maximum removal of PG occurred in ultrasonic/UV/WO 3 in the presence of 50 mg/L WO 3 and contact time of 120 minutes. In addition, an increase in the PG concentration caused a decrease in COD removal. As the initial concentration of the catalyst increased, the COD removal also increased. The maximum COD removal (91.3%) achieved by 200 mg/L WO 3 and 400 mg/l ZnO, a contact time of 120 minutes, and an antibiotic concentration of 50 mg/L. All of the variables in the process efficiency were found to be significant (p research data supported the conclusion that the combination of advanced oxidation process of sonolysis and photocatalytic (sonophotocatalytic) were applicable and environmentally friendly processes, which preferably can be applied extensively.

  1. Developing 21st Century Chemistry Learning through Designing Digital Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Ah-Nam; Osman, Kamisah

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of Malaysian "Kimia" (Chemistry) Digital Games (MyKimDG) module on students' achievement and motivation in chemistry as well as 21st century skills. Chemistry education in Malaysia should put greater emphasis on combination of cognitive, sociocultural and motivational aspects to…

  2. Radiation chemistry and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getoff, F.

    1998-01-01

    The rather strong and many-sided pollution of the environment (atmosphere, water resources, soil) as a consequence of human activities is summarized. The solution of the arised problems by application of radiation chemistry methods and the utilization of modern environmentally ''clean'' and economical technologies, founded on electron beam processing, are mentioned. Some basic environmental problems and their solution are briefly discussed: i) Removal of CO 2 from flue gases and its radiation induced utilization. ii) Principals for degradation of aqueous pollutants by electron beam processing in the presence of ozone (synergistic effect). The radiation chemistry as a modern and manifold discipline with very broad applications can also essentially contribute in the conservation of the environment

  3. Radiation chemistry and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    1999-01-01

    The rather strong and many-sided pollution of the environment (atmosphere, water resources, soil) as a consequence of human activity is summarized. The solution of the arised problems by application of radiation chemistry methods and the utilization of modern environmentally 'clean' and economical technologies, founded on electron beam processing, are mentioned. Some basic environmental problems and their solution are briefly discussed. (i) Removal of CO 2 from flue gases and its radiation induced utilization. (ii) Principals for degradation of aqueous pollutants by electron beam processing in the presence of ozone (synergistic effect). The radiation chemistry as a modern and manifold discipline with very broad applications can also essentially contribute in the conservation of the environment

  4. What History Tells Us about the Distinct Nature of Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hasok

    2017-11-01

    Attention to the history of chemistry can help us recognise the characteristics of chemistry that have helped to maintain it as a separate scientific discipline with a unique identity. Three such features are highlighted in this paper. First, chemistry has maintained a distinct type of theoretical thinking, independent from that of physics even in the era of quantum chemistry. Second, chemical research has always been shaped by its ineliminable practical relevance and usefulness. Third, the lived experience of chemistry, spanning the laboratory, the classroom and everyday life, is distinctive in its multidimensional sensuousness. Furthermore, I argue that the combination of these three features makes chemistry an exemplary science.

  5. Bibliographies on radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstock, C.L.; Ross, A.B.; Helman, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    This bibliography lists about 400 papers dealing solely with the production and reactivity of superoxide radical anions in irradiated aqueous and organic liquids. Only papers dealing with quantitative mechanistic, spectroscopic or kinetic data have been included. The listing was prepared by searching the RCDC bibliographic data base with SELECT keywords O 2 - or HO 2 and aqueous solution. The key words radicals (oxygen), peroxy radicals, pulse radiolysis, flash radiolysis, esr and gamma rays were also used. Additional relevant references were obtained from inspection of reviews, individual author indexes and cited references. The present bibliography excludes solid and gas phase studies, and also technical, government and in-house reports, theses, patents and some symposia proceedings. Several references prior to 1960 have been added, and the list should be reasonably comprehensive from 1965-1980. The listing is in chronological order, according to year of publication in the categories Photochemistry, Radiation Chemistry, Other, and Reviews. (author)

  6. Combining Multifunctionality and Ecosystem Services into a Win-Win Solution. The Case Study of the Serchio River Basin (Tuscany—Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Rovai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-war development—characterized by intensive processes of urbanization, concentration of agriculture on the most fertile lands, and abandonment of mountainous and marginal areas—brought about negative environmental and socio-economic consequences. They have been particularly severe in terms of increase of hydrogeological risk, which is high in most Italian regions. Over time, there has been an increasing awareness of the multiple functions played by agriculture in terms of provision of Ecosystem Services (ES, which contribute fundamentally to human well-being. In particular, some ES provided by farmers may help to reduce the hydrogeological risk of territories prone to landslides and floods. In this framework, the paper presents as a case study the project “Farmers as Custodians of a Territory.” This project was implemented in the Serchio River basin, Tuscany (Italy, and combines a multifunctional farm strategy of diversification with the provision of Ecosystem Services related to the hydraulic and hydrogeological protection of the river-basin territory. Although this case study should be read within the framework of the theories of agricultural multifunctionality and ES provision, it nevertheless took a very pragmatic and innovative approach, which differentiates it from most of the case studies given in the literature. Results of our analysis show that, by involving farmers as custodians of the territory, it is possible to reach a “win-win” solution characterized, on the one hand, by better services for the community at a lower cost for the Land Reclamation Consortia involved with hydrogeological risk prevention, thus improving the effectiveness and efficiency of ES provision; and on the other hand, by improving the economic situation and survival chances of local farms.

  7. Conformational analysis of the Sda determinant-containing tetrasaccharide and two mimics in aqueous solution by using 1H NMR ROESY spectroscopy in combination with MD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Jose L. Jimenez; Rooijen, Johannes J.M. van; Erbel, Paul J.A.; Leeflang, Bas R.; Kamerling, Johannis P.; Vliegenthart, Johannes F.G.

    2000-01-01

    The conformational behaviour of the spacer-linked synthetic Sd a tetrasaccharide β-d-GalpNAc-(1 → 4)-[α-Neu5Ac-(2 → 3)]-β-d-Galp-(1 → 4)-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1 → O) (CH 2 ) 5 NH 2 (1) and the two mimics β-d-Galp-(1 → 4)-[α-Neu5Ac-(2 → 3)]-β-d-Galp-(1 → 4)-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1 → O)(CH 2 ) 5 NH 2 (2) and β-d-GlcpNAc-(1 → 4)-[α-Neu5Ac-(2 → 3)]-β-d-Galp-(1 → 4)-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1 → O) (CH 2 ) 5 NH 2 (3) were investigated by 1 H NMR spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in water. Experimental 2D 1 H ROESY cross-peak intensities (ROEs) of the tetrasaccharides were compared with calculated ROEs derived from MD trajectories using the CROSREL program. Analysis of these data indicated that the oligosaccharidic skeletons of the compounds 1-3 are rather rigid, especially the β-d-Hex(NAc)-(1 → 4)-[α-Neu5Ac-(2 → 3)]-β-d-Galp fragments. The α- Neu5-Ac-(2 → 3)-β-d-Galp linkage occurred in two different energy minima in the three-dimensional structure of the compounds 1-3 in aqueous solution. Experimental data and dynamics simulations supported the finding that the higher energy rotamer (CHEAT forcefield) was abundant in compounds 1 and 3 due to the existence of a hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group of the sialic acid and the acetamido group of the terminal monosaccharide (GalNAc or GlcNAc) unit. The conformational similarity between 1 and 3 leads to the suggestion that also their activities will be alike.

  8. Combined effect of capillary barrier and layered slope on water, solute and nanoparticle transfer in an unsaturated soil at lysimeter scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prédélus, Dieuseul; Coutinho, Artur Paiva; Lassabatere, Laurent; Bien, Le Binh; Winiarski, Thierry; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    It is well recognized that colloidal nanoparticles are highly mobile in soils and can facilitate the transport of contaminants through the vadose zone. This work presents the combined effect of the capillary barrier and soil layer slope on the transport of water, bromide and nanoparticles through an unsaturated soil. Experiments were performed in a lysimeter (1×1×1.6m(3)) called LUGH (Lysimeter for Urban Groundwater Hydrology). The LUGH has 15 outputs that identify the temporal and spatial evolution of water flow, solute flux and nanoparticles in relation to the soil surface conditions and the 3D system configuration. Two different soil structures were set up in the lysimeter. The first structure comprises a layer of sand (0-0.2cm, in diameter) 35cm thick placed horizontally above a layer of bimodal mixture also 35cm thick to create a capillary barrier at the interface between the sand and bimodal material. The bimodal material is composed of a mixture 50% by weight of sand and gravel (0.4-1.1cm, in diameter). The second structure, using the same amount of sand and bimodal mixture as the first structure represents an interface with a 25% slope. A 3D numerical model based on Richards equation for flow and the convection dispersion equations coupled with a mechanical module for nanoparticle trapping was developed. The results showed that under the effect of the capillary barrier, water accumulated at the interface of the two materials. The sloped structure deflects flow in contrast to the structure with zero slope. Approximately 80% of nanoparticles are retained in the lysimeter, with a greater retention at the interface of two materials. Finally, the model makes a good reproduction of physical mechanisms observed and appears to be a useful tool for identifying key processes leading to a better understanding of the effect of capillary barrier on nanoparticle transfer in an unsaturated heterogeneous soil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Advances in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Mary L.

    2012-09-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water chemistry control with examples of plant experiences at U.S. designed BWRs. Water chemistry advances provide some of the most effective methods for mitigating materials degradation, reducing fuel performance concerns and lowering radiation fields. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials remains a high priority and improved techniques that have been demonstrated in BWRs will be reviewed, specifically hydrogen injection combined with noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and the newer on-line noble metal application process (OLNC). Hydrogen injection performance, an important part of SCC mitigation, will also be reviewed for the BWR fleet, highlighting system improvements that have enabled earlier injection of hydrogen including the potential for hydrogen injection during plant startup. Water chemistry has been significantly improved by the application of pre-filtration and optimized use of ion exchange resins in the CP (condensate polishing) and reactor water cleanup (RWCU) systems. EPRI has monitored and supported water treatment improvements to meet water chemistry goals as outlined in the EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines, particularly those for SCC mitigation of reactor internals and piping, minimization of fuel risk due to corrosion and crud deposits and chemistry control for radiation field reduction. In recent years, a significant reduction has occurred in feedwater corrosion product input, particularly iron. A large percentage of plants are now reporting <0.1 ppb feedwater iron. The impacts to plant operation and chemistry of lower feedwater iron will be explored. Depleted zinc addition is widely practiced across the fleet and the enhanced focus on radiation reduction continues to emphasize the importance of controlling radiation source term. In addition, shutdown chemistry control is necessary to avoid excessive release of activated corrosion products from fuel

  10. Porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    In this study, the porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite, considered as an engineered barrier in the repository of spent fuel, has been studied in interaction experiments. Many parameters, like the composition and density of bentonite, composition of the solution, bentonite-to-water ratio (B/W), surrounding conditions and experimental time have been varied in the experiments. At the end of the interaction the equilibrating solution, the porewaters squeezed out of the bentonite samples, and bentonites themselves were analyzed to give information for the interpretation and modelling of the interaction. Equilibrium modelling was performed with the HYDRAQL/CE computer code 33 refs.

  11. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Smita Talaviya; Falguni Majumdar

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceut...

  12. Covalent electron transfer chemistry of graphene with diazonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Geraldine L C; Wang, Qing Hua; Strano, Michael S

    2013-01-15

    Graphene is an atomically thin, two-dimensional allotrope of carbon with exceptionally high carrier mobilities, thermal conductivity, and mechanical strength. From a chemist's perspective, graphene can be regarded as a large polycyclic aromatic molecule and as a surface without a bulk contribution. Consequently, chemistries typically performed on organic molecules and surfaces have been used as starting points for the chemical functionalization of graphene. The motivations for chemical modification of graphene include changing its doping level, opening an electronic band gap, charge storage, chemical and biological sensing, making new composite materials, and the scale-up of solution-processable graphene. In this Account, we focus on graphene functionalization via electron transfer chemistries, in particular via reactions with aryl diazonium salts. Because electron transfer chemistries depend on the Fermi energy of graphene and the density of states of the reagents, the resulting reaction rate depends on the number of graphene layers, edge states, defects, atomic structure, and the electrostatic environment. We limit our Account to focus on pristine graphene over graphene oxide, because free electrons in the latter are already bound to oxygen-containing functionalities and the resulting chemistries are dominated by localized reactivity and defects. We describe the reaction mechanism of diazonium functionalization of graphene and show that the reaction conditions determine the relative degrees of chemisorption and physisorption, which allows for controlled modulation of the electronic properties of graphene. Finally we discuss different applications for graphene modified by this chemistry, including as an additive in polymer matrices, as biosensors when coupled with cells and biomolecules, and as catalysts when combined with nanoparticles.

  13. From hot atom chemistry to epithermal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, K.

    2004-01-01

    The rise and fall of hot atom chemistry (HAC) over the years from 1934 to 2004 is reviewed. Several applications are discussed, in particular to astrophysics and the interaction of energetic ions and atoms in space. Epithermal chemistry (ETC) is proposed to substitute the old name, since it better fits the energy range as well as the non-thermal and non-equilibrium character of the reactions. ETC also avoids the strong connexion of HAC to nuclear chemistry and stands for the opening of the field to physical chemistry and astrophysics. (orig.)

  14. Kerr generalized solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papoyan, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    A Kerr generalized solution for a stationary axially-symmetric gravitational field of rotating self-gravitational objects is given. For solving the problem Einstein equations and their combinations are used. The particular cases: internal and external Schwarzschild solutions are considered. The external solution of the stationary problem is a Kerr solution generalization. 3 refs

  15. Radiation chemistry and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majima, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Effects of radiation to human body have been seriously discussed nowadays. These are important issues for the realization of sustainable society. It should be emphasized that various reactive intermediates generated by radiation play important roles in each cases. Radiation chemical studies will provide various reaction-mechanistic aspects on these important issues. Our research group has continuously carried out reaction-mechanistic studies using radiation chemical methods. From these studies, we have obtained a variety of results on basic molecular systems, reactions, materials that are close to practical application, biological systems and so on. Reactive species are generated from the radiation reactions in solution, and can be used as one-electron oxidative and reductive reagent to give selectively radical cation and anion of solute molecules such as various organic and inorganic molecules. Therefore, the radiation chemistry has contributed significantly to chemistry in which one-electron oxidation and reduction play the important role. The kinetics of such redox processes and the following reduction play the important role. The kinetics of such redox processes and the following reactions can be studied in real time with the transition absorption measurement by the pulse radiolysis technique. Even though the target compounds cannot be oxidized and reduced in chemical or electrochemical oxidation and reduction, their one-electron redox can be performed by the electron beam radiation. Therefore, radiation chemistry is very useful technique for basic science. Moreover, application potentials of radiation chemistry are so high for various research subjects. Moreover, application potentials of radiation chemistry are so high for various research subjects

  16. Nitrogen Compounds in Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, H.E.; Dey, G.R.; Vaudey, C.E.; Peaucelle, C.; Boucher, J.L.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Koppenol, W.H.; Janata, E.; Dauvois, V.; Durand, D.; Legand, S.; Roujou, J.L.; Doizi, D.; Dannoux, A.; Lamouroux, C.

    2009-01-01

    Water radiolysis in presence of N 2 is probably the topic the most controversy in the field of water radiolysis. It still exists a strong discrepancy between the different reports of ammonia formation by water radiolysis in presence of N 2 and moreover in absence of oxygen there is no agreement on the formation or not of nitrogen oxide like NO 2 - and NO 3 -. These discrepancies come from multiple sources: - the complexity of the reaction mechanisms where nitrogen is involved - the experimental difficulties - and, the irradiation conditions. The aim of the workshop is to capitalize the knowledge needed to go further in simulations and understanding the problems caused (or not) by the presence of nitrogen / water in the environment of radioactive materials. Implications are evident in terms of corrosion, understanding of biological systems and atmospheric chemistry under radiation. Topics covered include experimental and theoretical approaches, application and fundamental researches: - Nitrate and Ammonia in radiation chemistry in nuclear cycle; - NOx in biological systems and atmospheric chemistry; - Formation of Nitrogen compounds in Nuclear installations; - Nitrogen in future power plant projects (Gen4, ITER...) and large particle accelerators. This document gathers the transparencies available for 7 of the presentations given at this workshop. These are: - H.E SIMS: 'Radiation Chemistry of Nitrogen Compounds in Nuclear Power Plant'; - G.R. DEY: 'Nitrogen Compounds Formation in the Radiolysis of Aqueous Solutions'; - C.E. VAUDEY et al.: 'Radiolytic corrosion of nuclear graphite studied with the dedicated gas irradiation cell of IPNL'; - J.L. BOUCHER: 'Roles and biosynthesis of NO in eukaryotes and prokaryotes'; - W.H. KOPPENOL: 'Chemistry of NOx'; - E. JANATA: 'Yield of OH in N 2 O saturated aqueous solution'; - V. DAUVOIS: 'Analytical strategy for the study of radiolysis gases'

  17. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  18. Binuclear Pt-Tl bonded complex with square pyramidal coordination around Pt: a combined multinuclear NMR, EXAFS, UV-Vis, and DFT/TDDFT study in dimethylsulfoxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgel, Mihály; Maliarik, Mikhail; Glaser, Julius; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Persson, Ingmar; Tóth, Imre

    2011-07-04

    The structure and bonding of a new Pt-Tl bonded complex formed in dimethylsulfoxide (dmso), (CN)(4)Pt-Tl(dmso)(5)(+), have been studied by multinuclear NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies, and EXAFS measurements in combination with density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. This complex is formed following the equilibrium reaction Pt(CN)(4)(2-) + Tl(dmso)(6)(3+) ⇆ (CN)(4)Pt-Tl(dmso)(5)(+) + dmso. The stability constant of the Pt-Tl bonded species, as determined using (13)C NMR spectroscopy, amounts to log K = 2.9 ± 0.2. The (NC)(4)Pt-Tl(dmso)(5)(+) species constitutes the first example of a Pt-Tl bonded cyanide complex in which the sixth coordination position around Pt (in trans with respect to the Tl atom) is not occupied. The spectral parameters confirm the formation of the metal-metal bond, but differ substantially from those measured earlier in aqueous solution for complexes (CN)(5)Pt-Tl(CN)(n)(H(2)O)(x)(n-) (n = 0-3). The (205) Tl NMR chemical shift, δ = 75 ppm, is at extraordinary high field, while spin-spin coupling constant, (1)J(Pt-Tl) = 93 kHz, is the largest measured to date for a Pt-Tl bond in the absence of supporting bridging ligands. The absorption spectrum is dominated by two strong absorption bands in the UV region that are assigned to MMCT (Pt → Tl) and LMCT (dmso → Tl) bands, respectively, on the basis of MO and TDDFT calculations. The solution of the complex has a bright yellow color as a result of a shoulder present on the low energy side of the band at 355 nm. The geometry of the (CN)(4)Pt-Tl core can be elucidated from NMR data, but the particular stoichiometry and structure involving the dmso ligands are established by using Tl and Pt L(III)-edge EXAFS measurements. The Pt-Tl bond distance is 2.67(1) Å, the Tl-O bond distance is 2.282(6) Å, and the Pt-C-N entity is linear with Pt-C and Pt···N distances amounting to 1.969(6) and 3.096(6) Å, respectively. Geometry optimizations on

  19. Influence of radiolytic products on the chemistry of uranium VI in brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchini, J-F.; Reed, D.T.; Borkowski, M.; Rafalski, A.; Conca, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the near field of a salt repository of nuclear waste, ionizing radiations can strongly affect the chemistry of concentrated saline solutions. Radiolysis can locally modify the redox conditions, speciation, solubility and mobility of the actinide compounds. In the case of uranium VI, radiolytic products can not only reduce U(VI), but also react with uranium species. The net effect on the speciation of uranyl depends on the relative kinetics of the reactions and the buildup of molecular products in brine solutions. The most important molecular products in brines are expected to be hypochlorite ion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Although U(VI) is expected not to be significantly affected by radiolysis, the combined effects of the major molecular radiolytic products on the chemistry of U(VI) in brines have not been experimentally established previously. (authors)

  20. Simultaneous treatment of NO and SO{sub 2} with aqueous NaClO{sub 2} solution in a wet scrubber combined with a plasma electrostatic precipitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun-Woo [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Regional Innovation Center for Environmental Technology of Thermal Plasma (RIC-ETTP), INHA University, 100 Inha-ro, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sooseok, E-mail: sooseok@jejunu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, Jeju National University, 102 Jejudaehak-ro, Jeju-si, Jeju Special Self-Governing Province, 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong-Wha, E-mail: dwpark@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Regional Innovation Center for Environmental Technology of Thermal Plasma (RIC-ETTP), INHA University, 100 Inha-ro, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • This study was conducted to investigate simultaneous removal of NO and SO{sub 2}. • Proposed process consists of wet chemical reactor and non-thermal plasma reactor. • In the wet chemical reactor, NO and SO{sub 2} were absorbed and oxidized by NaClO{sub 2}. • In the non-thermal plasma reactor, aerosol particles were collected on anode surface. • NO and SO{sub 2} were removed more efficiently by proposed process than other methods. - Abstract: NO and SO{sub 2} gases that are generally produced in thermal power plants and incinerators were simultaneously removed by using a wet scrubber combined with a plasma electrostatic precipitator. The wet scrubber was used for the absorption and oxidation of NO and SO{sub 2}, and non-thermal plasma was employed for the electrostatic precipitation of aerosol particles. NO and SO{sub 2} gases were absorbed and oxidized by aerosol particles of NaClO{sub 2} solution in the wet scrubber. NO and SO{sub 2} reacted with the generated NaClO{sub 2} aerosol particles, NO{sub 2} gas, and aqueous ions such as NO{sub 2}{sup −}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, HSO{sub 3}{sup −}, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}. The aerosol particles were negatively charged and collected on the surface of grounded anode in the plasma electrostatic precipitator. The NO and SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies of the proposed system were 94.4% and 100% for gas concentrations of 500 mg/m{sup 3} and a total gas flow rate of 60 Nm{sup 3}/h, when the molar flow rate of NaClO{sub 2} and the gas–liquid contact time were 50 mmol/min and 1.25 s, respectively. The total amount and number of aerosol particles in the exhaust gas were reduced to 7.553 μg/m{sup 3} and 210 /cm{sup 3} at the maximum plasma input power of 68.8 W, which are similar to the values for clean air.

  1. Organic chemistry on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1979-01-01

    Features taken from various models of Titan's atmosphere are combined in a working composite model that provides environmental constraints within which different pathways for organic chemical synthesis are determined. Experimental results and theoretical modeling suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite is dominated by two processes: photochemistry and energetic particle bombardment. Photochemical reactions of CH4 in the upper atmosphere can account for the presence of C2 hydrocarbons. Reactions initiated at various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic rays, Saturn 'wind', and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4-N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the UV-visible absorbing stratospheric haze, the reddish appearance of the satellite, and some of the C2 hydrocarbons. In the lower atmosphere photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. It is concluded that the surface of Titan may contain ancient or recent organic matter (or both) produced in the atmosphere.

  2. PEROXYNITRITE CHEMISTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lymar, S.V.

    2000-11-29

    This century old area of research has been experiencing a renaissance during the last decade, with the annual number of publications on the subject increasing from only one in 1990 to nearly 200 in the late-1990s. This renewed interest is stimulated by the discovery of biological roles of nitric oxide, distinguished by the 1998 Nobel prize, and the recognition that the conversion of nitric oxide into peroxynitrite may play major roles in human diseases associated with oxidative stress and in cellular defense against invading pathogens. Peroxynitrite (ONOO{sup {minus}})is a structural isomer of nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) that contains a peroxo bond. The physiological route to ONOO{sup {minus}} is provided by the combination of nitric oxide ({center_dot}NO) with superoxide ({center_dot}O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}), an extremely rapid reaction occurring upon every encounter of these radicals (the upper dot denotes radical species). Both {center_dot}NO and {center_dot}O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} are the oxygen metabolic products simultaneously generated in a number of cell types within a human body. Compared to its precursors, peroxynitrite is a much stronger oxidant capable of oxidizing proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids.

  3. Degradation of Highly Alloyed Metal Halide Perovskite Precursor Inks: Mechanism and Storage Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, Benjia [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wheeler, Lance M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christians, Jeffrey A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Moore, David [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Harvey, Steven P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Berry, Joseph J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Van Hest, Marinus F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Barnes, Frank S. [University of Colorado; Shaheen, Sean E. [University of Colorado

    2018-03-02

    Whereas the promise of metal halide perovskite (MHP) photovoltaics (PV) is that they can combine high efficiency with solution-processability, the chemistry occurring in precursor inks is largely unexplored. Herein, we investigate the degradation of MHP solutions based on the most widely used solvents, dimethylformamide (DMF) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). For the MHP inks studied, which contain formamidinium (FA+), methylammonium (MA+), cesium (Cs+), lead (Pb2+), bromide (Br-), and iodide (I-), dramatic compositional changes are observed following storage of the inks in nitrogen in the dark. We show that hydrolysis of DMF in the precursor solution forms dimethylammonium formate, which subsequently incorporates into the MHP film to compromise the ability of Cs+ and MA+ to stabilize FA+-based MHP. The changes in solution chemistry lead to a modification of the perovskite film stoichiometry, band gap, and structure. The solid precursor salts are stable when ball-milled into a powder, allowing for the storage of large quantities of stoichiometric precursor materials.

  4. Effect of addition of heavy metal ion on decolouration and degradation of azo dye in aqueous solution by gamma irradiation combined with ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.J.; Jin, J.H.; Nho, Y.C.; Arai, H.

    1998-01-01

    In decomposition of azo dyes solution by simultaneous application of gamma-ray and ozone treatment, the effect of addition of heavy metal ion upon decolouration and decomposition was studied. Cupric ion was used as a heavy metal ion. For the aqueous solution with and without addition of cupric ion, the degree of decolouration of 552 nm, the changes of pH, the reduction of TOC and BOD were measured as function of dose under condition of fixed concentration of ozone. It appeared that the addition of cupric ion played a positive role in decomposition of azo dye solution, but played a negative role in decolouration

  5. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratoryThe Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  6. Electrostatics in Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fundamental concepts of electrostatics as applied to atoms and molecules. The electric ... chemistry, the chemistry of the covalent bond, deals with the structures ..... the position of an asteroid named Ceres ... World Scientific. Singapore, 1992.

  7. Local hydrated structure of an Fe2+/Fe3+ aqueous solution: an investigation using a combination of molecular dynamics and X-ray absorption fine structure methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Qing; Zhou Jing; Zhao Haifeng; Chen Xing; Chu Wangsheng; Zheng Xusheng; Marcelli, Augusto; Wu Ziyu

    2013-01-01

    The hydrated shell of both Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ aqueous solutions are investigated by using the molecular dynamics (MD) and X-ray absorption structure (XAS) methods. The MD simulations show that the first hydrated shells of both Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ are characterized by a regular octahedron with an Fe-O distance of 2.08Å for Fe 2+ and 1.96Å for Fe 3+ , and rule out the occurrence of a Jahn-Teller distortion in the hydrated shell of an Fe 2+ aqueous solution. The corresponding X-ray absorption near edge fine structure (XANES) calculation successfully reproduces all features in the XANES spectra in Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ aqueous solution. A feature that is located at energy 1 eV higher than the white line (WL) in an Fe 3+ aqueous solution may be assigned to the contribution of the charge transfer. (authors)

  8. Preparative radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drawe, H.

    1978-01-01

    Preparative synthesis of compounds with the aid of radiation chemistry is increasingly used in laboratories as well as on a technical scale. A large number of new compounds has been produced with the methods of radiation chemistry. With the increasing number of available radiation sources, also the number of synthesis metods in radiation chemistry has increased. This paper can only briefly mention the many possible ways of synthesis in radiation chemistry. (orig./HK) [de

  9. USSR Report Chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    THIS REPORT CONTAINS FOREIGN MEDIA INFORMATION FROM THE USSR CONCERNING Adsorption, Alkaloids, ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, CATALYSIS, ELECTROCHEMISTRY, Fertilizers, INORGANIC COMPOUNDS, ORGANOPHOSPHOROUS...

  10. Frontiers in Gold Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed A. Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Basic chemistry of gold tells us that it can bond to sulfur, phosphorous, nitrogen, and oxygen donor ligands. The Frontiers in Gold Chemistry Special Issue covers gold complexes bonded to the different donors and their fascinating applications. This issue covers both basic chemistry studies of gold complexes and their contemporary applications in medicine, materials chemistry, and optical sensors. There is a strong belief that aurophilicity plays a major role in the unending applications of g...

  11. Organic chemistry experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Seok Sik

    2005-02-01

    This book deals with organic chemistry experiments, it is divided five chapters, which have introduction, the way to write the experiment report and safety in the laboratory, basic experiment technic like recrystallization and extraction, a lot of organic chemistry experiments such as fischer esterification, ester hydrolysis, electrophilic aromatic substitution, aldol reaction, benzoin condensation, wittig reaction grignard reaction, epoxidation reaction and selective reduction. The last chapter introduces chemistry site on the internet and way to find out reference on chemistry.

  12. Analytical chemistry instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laing, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    In nine sections, 48 chapters cover 1) analytical chemistry and the environment 2) environmental radiochemistry 3) automated instrumentation 4) advances in analytical mass spectrometry 5) fourier transform spectroscopy 6) analytical chemistry of plutonium 7) nuclear analytical chemistry 8) chemometrics and 9) nuclear fuel technology

  13. Fundamentals of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, V.

    1982-01-01

    The author of the book has had 25 years of experience at the Nuclear Chemistry of Prague Technical University. In consequence, the book is intended as a basic textbook for students of this field. Its main objectives are an easily understandable presentation of the complex subject and in spite of the uncertainty which still characterizes the definition and subjects of nuclear chemistry - a systematic classification and logical structure. Contents: 1. Introduction (history and definition); 2. General nuclear chemistry (physical fundamentals, hot atom chemistry, interaction of nuclear radiation with matter, radioactive elements, isotope effects, isotope exchange, chemistry of radioactive trace elements); 3. Methods of nuclear chemistry of nuclear chemistry (radiochemical methods, activation, separation and enrichment chemistry); 4. Preparative nuclear chemistry (isotope production, labelled compounds); 5. Analytival nuclear chemistry; 6. Applied nuclear chemistry (isotope applications in general physical and analytical chemistry). The book is supplemented by an annex with tables, a name catalogue and a subject index which will facilitate access to important information. (RB) [de

  14. Supramolecular chemistry at interfaces: host-guest interactions for fabricating multifunctional biointerfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Xi; Scherman, Oren A

    2014-07-15

    . We begin by reviewing the current state of stimuli-responsive supramolecular assemblies formed by host-guest interactions, discussing how to transfer host-guest chemistry from solution onto surfaces required for fabricating multifunctional biosurfaces and biointerfaces. Then, we present different stimuli-responsive biosurfaces and biointerfaces, which have been prepared through a combination of cyclodextrin- or cucurbituril-based host-guest chemistry and various surface technologies such as self-assembled monolayers or layer-by-layer assembly. Moreover, we discuss the applications of these biointerfaces and biosurfaces in the fields of drug release, reversible adsorption and release of some organic molecules, peptides, proteins, and cells, and photoswitchable bioelectrocatalysis. In addition, we summarize the merits and current limitations of these methods for fabricating multifunctional stimuli-responsive biointerfaces in a dynamic noncovalent manner. Finally, we present possible strategies for future designs of stimuli-responsive multifunctional biointerfaces and biosurfaces by combining host-guest chemistry with surface science, which will lead to further critical development of supramolecular chemistry at interfaces.

  15. American Association for Clinical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find the answer to your question IN CLINICAL CHEMISTRY Hs-cTnI as a Gatekeeper for Further Cardiac ... Online Harmonization.net Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry American Board of Clinical Chemistry Clinical Chemistry Trainee ...

  16. The chemistry of the actinide elements. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, J.J.; Seaborg, G.T.; Morss, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Chemistry of the Actinide Elements is a comprehensive, contemporary and authoritative exposition of the chemistry and related properties of the 5f series of elements: actinium, thorium, protactinium, uranium and the first eleven. This second edition has been completely restructured and rewritten to incorporate current research in all areas of actinide chemistry and chemical physics. The descriptions of each element include accounts of their history, separation, metallurgy, solid-state chemistry, solution chemistry, thermo-dynamics and kinetics. Additionally, separate chapters on spectroscopy, magnetochemistry, thermodynamics, solids, the metallic state, complex ions and organometallic compounds emphasize the comparative chemistry and unique properties of the actinide series of elements. Comprehensive lists of properties of all actinide compounds and ions in solution are given, and there are special sections on such topics as biochemistry, superconductivity, radioisotope safety, and waste management, as well as discussion of the transactinides and future elements

  17. Surface chemistry essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Birdi, K S

    2013-01-01

    Surface chemistry plays an important role in everyday life, as the basis for many phenomena as well as technological applications. Common examples range from soap bubbles, foam, and raindrops to cosmetics, paint, adhesives, and pharmaceuticals. Additional areas that rely on surface chemistry include modern nanotechnology, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. There is extensive literature on this subject, but most chemistry books only devote one or two chapters to it. Surface Chemistry Essentials fills a need for a reference that brings together the fundamental aspects of surface chemistry w

  18. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1981-12-01

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  19. Multi-Scale Modeling of the Gamma Radiolysis of Nitrate Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Gregory P; Donoclift, Thomas A; Sims, Howard E; Orr, Robin M; Pimblott, Simon M

    2016-11-17

    A multiscale modeling approach has been developed for the extended time scale long-term radiolysis of aqueous systems. The approach uses a combination of stochastic track structure and track chemistry as well as deterministic homogeneous chemistry techniques and involves four key stages: radiation track structure simulation, the subsequent physicochemical processes, nonhomogeneous diffusion-reaction kinetic evolution, and homogeneous bulk chemistry modeling. The first three components model the physical and chemical evolution of an isolated radiation chemical track and provide radiolysis yields, within the extremely low dose isolated track paradigm, as the input parameters for a bulk deterministic chemistry model. This approach to radiation chemical modeling has been tested by comparison with the experimentally observed yield of nitrite from the gamma radiolysis of sodium nitrate solutions. This is a complex radiation chemical system which is strongly dependent on secondary reaction processes. The concentration of nitrite is not just dependent upon the evolution of radiation track chemistry and the scavenging of the hydrated electron and its precursors but also on the subsequent reactions of the products of these scavenging reactions with other water radiolysis products. Without the inclusion of intratrack chemistry, the deterministic component of the multiscale model is unable to correctly predict experimental data, highlighting the importance of intratrack radiation chemistry in the chemical evolution of the irradiated system.

  20. Radiation chemistry of the liquid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, G.V.

    1987-01-01

    More is known about the radiation chemistry of water than any other liquid. From a practical viewpoint out knowledge is virtually complete, and water radiolysis now provides a very convenient way of generating an enormous variety of unstable species under well-defined conditions. This facility, coupled with the techniques of pulse radiolysis, has opened up new areas in aqueous inorganic, organic, and biochemistry that cannot be readily studied by thermal or photochemical methods. This chapter is aimed, therefore, at those who wish to use radiolytic methods to generate and study unstable species in aqueous solution. The basic features of the radiation chemistry of water are described first to show how the primary radical and molecular products evolve with time and to delineate the bounds of useful experimental conditions. Next, the properties of the primary radicals are summarized, and examples are given to show how the primary radicals can be converted into secondary radicals, often of a single kind. This is an important aspect of the radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions. Lastly, the impact of our knowledge of the radiation chemistry of water on advances in general chemistry is illustrated by examples from the fields of inorganic and organic chemistry

  1. Annual report 1985 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funck, J.; Larsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1986-03-01

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All particles and reports published and lectures given in 1985 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  2. Annual report 1984 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funck, J.; Larsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1985-03-01

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry , environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  3. Soil conditions under a Fagus sylvatica CONECOFOR stand in Central Italy: an integrated assessment through combined solid phase and solution studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido SANESI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available As soil solution represents the major phase of soil chemical reactions, its study is a powerful tool for ecological investigations. Soil solution chemical composition gives a realistic idea about the soil chemical components immediately available in the environment, mainly in relation to the soil ecosystem reaction to the disturbance due to acidifying loads. Within the CONECOFOR Program, the monitoring of forest soil conditions was performed in a level II plot (ABR I, under a Fagus sylvatica (European beech stand, through the study of throughfall and soil solutions collected from depths ranging between the base of the litter layers and 90 cm. To be able to investigate solution contents of nutrients, acidifying agents and DOC throughout the profile, both zero tension and tension lysimeters were used. The first ones were inserted below the organic horizons, while tension lysimeters were placed within the mineral horizons at 15, 25, 55 and 90 cm depth. Sampled solutions were analyzed for Na, K, Ca, Mg, NH4, Cl, F, NO3, SO4, and DOC. The results evidence a clear seasonal pattern, mainly for macronutrients and inorganic N components. Acidic pulses were mostly evident below the organic horizons, in relation to strong nitric N releases from litter; these last were not always immediately neutralized by basic cations. Acid solutions leaving the organic horizons were invariably neutralized in the surface mineral horizons, within 15 cm depth. Temporal patterns of sulphate retention and release suggest that the soil has low retention capability for this anion. Such behaviour can be explained by the composition of the solid phase, where potential anion adsorbants appear strongly linked with organic matter in long residence time complexes. Sulphate and nitrate loading of this soil appear, anyway, to be mostly non-anthropogenic, but rather linked to natural mineralization pulses and, for sulphate, to aeolian solid transport from the south.

  4. Fundamentals of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matel, L.; Dulanska, S.

    2013-01-01

    This text-book is an introductory text in nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry, aimed on university undergraduate students in chemistry and related disciplines (physics, nuclear engineering). It covers the key aspects of modern nuclear chemistry. The text begins with basic theories in contemporary physics. It relates nuclear phenomena to key divisions of chemistry such as atomic structure, spectroscopy, equilibria and kinetics. It also gives an introduction to sources of ionizing radiation, detection of ionizing radiation, nuclear power industry and accident on nuclear installations as well as basic knowledge's of radiobiology. This book is essential reading for those taking a first course in nuclear chemistry and is a useful companion to other volumes in physical and analytical chemistry. It will also be of use to those new to working in nuclear chemistry or radiochemistry.

  5. Trace electrochemical analysis of Europium, Ytterbium, and Cerium at their joint presence in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Matakova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the course of several decades at the department of analytical chemistry and chemistry of rare elements there were studied the electrode processes with participation of rare-earth metals (REM in accordance with the long awaiting problem of the development of rare-metal and rare-earth branch of non-ferrous metallurgy of Kazakhstan. With the aim of express and highly sensitive analytical control of raw materials and final product of rare-earth industry there were developed the methods of inversion-voltamperometric determination of low concentrations of europium, ytterbium and cerium under the conditions of their individual and combined presence in the solution.

  6. Nuclear chemistry in the traditional chemistry program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppinger, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    The traditional undergraduate program for chemistry majors, especially at institutions devoted solely to undergraduate education, has limited space for 'special topics' courses in areas such as nuclear and radiochemistry. A scheme is proposed whereby the basic topics covered in an introductury radiochemistry course are touched upon, and in some cases covered in detail, at some time during the four-year sequence of courses taken by a chemistry major. (author) 6 refs.; 7 tabs

  7. Approximate inclusion of triple excitations in combined coupled cluster/molecular mechanics: Calculations of electronic excitation energies in solution for acrolein, water, formamide, and n-methylacetamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneskov, Kristian; Gras, Eduard Matito; Kongsted, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    as being applicable for averaging over many solvent configurations derived from, for example, molecular simulations. We test the proposed model using as a benchmark the two lowest-lying valence singlet excitations (n → π* and π → π*) of acrolein, formamide, and N-methylacetamide in aqueous solution as well...

  8. Effect of solution temperature, light intensity and light in combination with sunlight using mirror duct on growth of leaf lettuce (Lactuca savtiva L. cv. 'Greenwave')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, H.; Kushida, M.; Fujinuma, W.; Sekine, M.; Kaiho, K.; Arai, H.; Shibusawa, S.

    2004-01-01

    Leaf lettuce crops (Lactuca sativa L. cv. 'Greenwave') were grown in a plant production system using a Mirror Duct which intensified sunlight and transferred it to the inside of buildings. This system was expected to reduce the operational energy and lighting cost. The experiments were conducted under four photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPF) of 140,160, 180, and 200 micro mol mE-2 sE-1, in two light conditions, fluorescent light only and fluorescent light plus sunlight transferred with the Mirror Duct, and were repeated five times in total from August 2002 to July 2003. Five different solution temperatures were finally obtained through all the experiments due to temperature changes inside the experiment facility. Variance was analyzed to estimate the effect of these environmental factors on the growth of leaf lettuce. It was found that the fresh weight of leaf lettuce increased as PPF increased and the rate of increase of weight was 0.6 to 1.0 g per unit PPF in both 17.4 deg C and 23.5 deg C solution temperatures; the solution temperature had a significant effect upon the fresh weight; and a difference in fresh weight at harvest of between 40 and 60 g was observed between 17.4 deg C and 23.5 deg C solution temperatures. The light containing 10% sunlight was not effective for increasing fresh weight at harvest compared to the fluorescent lamp

  9. Combined Effect of Temperature and pKa on the Kinetics of Absorption of Carbon Dioxide in Aqueous Alkanolamine and Carbonate Solutions with Carbonic Anhydrase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penders-Van Elk, Nathalie J M C; Oversteegen, S. Martijn; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2016-01-01

    In present work the absorption of carbon dioxide in aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine, N,N-dimethylethanolamine, and triisopropanolamine solutions with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase has been studied in a stirred cell reactor at temperatures varying between 278 and 313 K, at an alkanolamine

  10. Use of combined ion exchangers on the basis of KU-23 and KM-2p cation exchangers for purification of ammonium molybdate and tungstate solutions from phosphate, arsenate, and silicate impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhin, A.A.; Majorov, D.Yu.; Kopyrin, A.A.; Taushkanov, V.P.

    2002-01-01

    Using the Tracer technique ( 32 P) and elementary analysis, potentiality of using combined ionites on the basis of macroporous cation-exchange resins KU-23 or KM-2p and hydrated zirconium oxide for purification of concentrated solutions of ammonium molybdate and tungstate from phosphate-, arsenate-, and silicate-ions impurities was studied. High selectivity of the combined ionites towards impurity ions was ascertained, which permits reducing the content of impurities by a factor of 50-100 compared with the initial one [ru

  11. Variability in chemistry of surface and soil waters of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water chemistry is important for the maintenance of wetland structure and function. Interpreting ecological patterns in a wetland system therefore requires an in-depth understanding of the water chemistry of that system. We investigated the spatial distribution of chemical solutes both in soil pore water and surface water, ...

  12. Antiparallel Dynamic Covalent Chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Bartosz M; Nowak, Piotr; Cvrtila, Ivica; Pappas, Charalampos G; Liu, Bin; Komáromy, Dávid; Otto, Sijbren

    2017-05-17

    The ability to design reaction networks with high, but addressable complexity is a necessary prerequisite to make advanced functional chemical systems. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry has proven to be a useful tool in achieving complexity, however with some limitations in controlling it. Herein we introduce the concept of antiparallel chemistries, in which the same functional group can be channeled into one of two reversible chemistries depending on a controllable parameter. Such systems allow both for achieving complexity, by combinatorial chemistry, and addressing it, by switching from one chemistry to another by controlling an external parameter. In our design the two antiparallel chemistries are thiol-disulfide exchange and thio-Michael addition, sharing the thiol as the common building block. By means of oxidation and reduction the system can be reversibly switched from predominantly thio-Michael chemistry to predominantly disulfide chemistry, as well as to any intermediate state. Both chemistries operate in water, at room temperature, and at mildly basic pH, which makes them a suitable platform for further development of systems chemistry.

  13. Mars aqueous chemistry experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Benton C.; Mason, Larry W.

    1994-06-01

    Mars Aqueous Chemistry Experiment (MACE) is designed to conduct a variety of measurements on regolith samples, encompassing mineral phase analyses, chemical interactions with H2O, and physical properties determinations. From these data, much can be learned or inferred regarding the past weathering environment, the contemporaneous soil micro-environments, and the general chemical and physical state of the Martian regolith. By analyzing both soil and duricrust samples, the nature of the latter may become more apparent. Sites may be characterized for comparative purposes and criteria could be set for selection of high priority materials on future sample return missions. The second year of the MACE project has shown significant progress in two major areas. MACE Instrument concept definition is a baseline design that has been generated for the complete MACE instrument, including definition of analysis modes, mass estimates and thermal model. The design includes multiple reagent reservoirs, 10 discrete analysis cells, sample manipulation capability, and thermal control. The MACE Measurement subsystems development progress is reported regarding measurement capabilities for aqueous ion sensing, evolved gas sensing, solution conductivity measurement, reagent addition (titration) capabilities, and optical sensing of suspended particles.

  14. Mars aqueous chemistry experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Benton C.; Mason, Larry W.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Aqueous Chemistry Experiment (MACE) is designed to conduct a variety of measurements on regolith samples, encompassing mineral phase analyses, chemical interactions with H2O, and physical properties determinations. From these data, much can be learned or inferred regarding the past weathering environment, the contemporaneous soil micro-environments, and the general chemical and physical state of the Martian regolith. By analyzing both soil and duricrust samples, the nature of the latter may become more apparent. Sites may be characterized for comparative purposes and criteria could be set for selection of high priority materials on future sample return missions. The second year of the MACE project has shown significant progress in two major areas. MACE Instrument concept definition is a baseline design that has been generated for the complete MACE instrument, including definition of analysis modes, mass estimates and thermal model. The design includes multiple reagent reservoirs, 10 discrete analysis cells, sample manipulation capability, and thermal control. The MACE Measurement subsystems development progress is reported regarding measurement capabilities for aqueous ion sensing, evolved gas sensing, solution conductivity measurement, reagent addition (titration) capabilities, and optical sensing of suspended particles.

  15. Combining nutrition, food science and engineering in developing solutions to Inflammatory bowel diseases--omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Smith, Bronwen G; James, Bryony J

    2010-10-01

    The Inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are debilitating conditions, characterised by lifelong sensitivity to certain foods, and often a need for surgery and life-long medication. The anti-inflammatory effects of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated acids justify their inclusion in enteral nutrition formulas that have been associated with disease remission. However, there have been variable data in clinical trials to test supplementary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in inducing or maintaining remission in these diseases. Although variability in trial design has been suggested as a major factor, we suggest that variability in processing and presentation of the products may be equally or more important. The nature of the source, and rapidity of getting the fish or other food source to processing or to market, will affect the percentage of the various fatty acids, possible presence of heavy metal contaminants and oxidation status of the various fatty acids. For dietary supplements or fortified foods, whether the product is encapsulated or not, whether storage is under nitrogen or not, and length of time between harvest, processing and marketing will again profoundly affect the properties of the final product. Clinical trials to test efficacy of these products in IBD to date have utilised the relevant skills of pharmacology and gastroenterology. We suggest that knowledge from food science, nutrition and engineering will be essential to establish the true role of this important group of compounds in these diseases. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010

  16. Importance of nuclear power for chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolotyrkin, J.

    1982-01-01

    Examples are given of the use of ionizing radiations in nuclear chemistry, in radiation cross-linking of polymers. The possibilities are also indicated of applications in the disinfection of wastes, in fertilizer production and packaging, in the production of cellulose and hydrogen. The implementation of the said technologies depends on the solution of a number organizational problems. (J.B.)

  17. Applications, benefits and challenges of flow chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitic, Aleksandar; Heintz, Søren; Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer

    2013-01-01

    , environmental and manufacturing perspective. A potential solution to resolve these issues is to use flow chemistry in such processes, preferably with applications of micro-and mini-sized equipment. In addition, Process Analytical Technology (PAT) may be implemented in a very efficient way in such equipment due...

  18. Hitch code capabilities for modeling AVT chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibovitz, J.

    1985-01-01

    Several types of corrosion have damaged alloy 600 tubing in the secondary side of steam generators. The types of corrosion include wastage, denting, intergranular attack, stress corrosion, erosion-corrosion, etc. The environments which cause attack may originate from leaks of cooling water into the condensate, etc. When the contaminated feedwater is pumped into the generator, the impurities may concentrate first 200 to 400 fold in the bulk water, depending on the blowdown, and then further to saturation and dryness in heated tube support plate crevices. Characterization of local solution chemistries is the first step to predict and correct the type of corrosion that can occur. The pH is of particular importance because it is a major factor governing the rate of corrosion reactions. The pH of a solution at high temperature is not the same as the ambient temperature, since ionic dissociation constants, solubility and solubility products, activity coefficients, etc., all change with temperature. Because the high temperature chemistry of such solutions is not readily characterized experimentally, modeling techniques were developed under EPRI sponsorship to calculate the high temperature chemistry of the relevant solutions. In many cases, the effects of cooling water impurities on steam generator water chemistry with all volatile treatment (AVT), upon concentration by boiling, and in particular the resulting acid or base concentration can be calculated by a simple code, the HITCH code, which is very easy to use. The scope and applicability of the HITCH code are summarized

  19. Education in Environmental Chemistry: Setting the Agenda and Recommending Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, Uri

    2005-01-01

    The effective utilization of Education in Environmental Chemistry (EEC) in addressing global and societal environmental problems requires integration between educational, technical, financial, ethical and societal considerations. An interdisciplinary approach is fundamental to efforts to achieve long-term solutions.

  20. Radiation chemistry and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    In recent years considerable progress has been made in understanding the fundamental chemical reactions that occur when materials are irradiated. This has followed from the development of new techniques for studying these reactions. The International Atomic Energy Agency held a Panel on Radiation Chemistry in Vienna on 17-21 April 1967, to review the current status of various sources, new techniques in radiation chemistry, and their applications. The main sources mentioned by the Panel were isotope sources, electron accelerators, and chemonuclear reactors. Among the basic techniques discussed were pulsed radiolysis, flash photolysis, fast ESR methods, irradiation at liquid helium temperatures, electric discharge methods and far ultra-violet methods. Interesting industrial applications were discussed, such as the development of wood-plastic combinations, and a paper was given on the curing of paints and thin films Refs, figs and tabs