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Sample records for combined oral contraceptive

  1. Combined oral contraceptives: health benefits beyond contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, D; Ralli, E; Matteucci, E; Bordi, G; Mallozzi, M; Moscarini, M

    2014-09-01

    It has been recognized for over 50 years that combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are also capable of offering health benefits beyond contraception through the treatment and prevention of several gynaecological and medical disorders. During the last years a constant attention was given to the adverse effects of COCs, whereas their non-contraceptive benefits were underestimated. To date, most women are still unaware of the therapeutic uses of hormonal contraceptives, while on the contrary there is an extensive and constantly increasing of these non-contraceptive health benefits. This review summarizes the conditions of special interest for physicians, including dysmenorrhoea, menorrhagia, hyperandrogenism (acne, hirsutism, polycystic ovary syndrome), functional ovarian cysts, endometriosis, premenstrual syndrome, myomas, pelvic inflammatory disease, bone mineral density, benign breast disease and endometrial/ovarian and colorectal cancer. The benefits of COCs in rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, menstrual migraine and in perimenopause have also been treated for more comprehensive information. Using COCs specifically for non-contraceptive indications is still outside the product licence in the majority of cases. We strongly believe that these aspects are not of minor relevance and they deserve a special consideration by health providers and by the mass media, which have the main responsibility in the diffusion of scientific information. Thus, counseling and education are necessary to help women make well-informed health-care decisions and it is also crucial to increase awareness among general practitioners and gynaecologists.

  2. Choosing a combined oral contraceptive pill

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The combined oral contraceptive pill is an effective contraceptive method which can also offer other benefits. However, other contraceptive options should be discussed. If the pill is the chosen method, prescribe a pill with the lowest effective dose of oestrogen and progestogen.

  3. The combined oral contraceptive pill -- recent developments, risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoman, Monica V

    2014-08-01

    The introduction of the birth control pill as an effective, coitally-independent method of contraception was a public health milestone of the last century. Over time, combined oral contraception (COC) formulations and pill-taking regimens have evolved with improved safety and tolerability while maintaining contraceptive efficacy. In addition to protection against pregnancy, use of combined oral contraception confers a number of significant non-contraceptive benefits to users. COC use is also associated with well-studied risks. Common side effects are generally self-limiting and improve with increasing duration of use while serious adverse events, including venous thromboembolism, are rare among healthy COC users. Contraceptive decision-making should include consideration of both the risks and benefits of a given method versus the real consequences of unintended pregnancy.

  4. Influence of combined oral contraceptives on the periodontal condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Santos Domingues

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Most studies investigating the impact of oral contraceptives have been performed some years ago, when the level of sexual hormones was greater than the actual formulations. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of current combined oral contraceptives (COC on periodontal tissues, correlating the clinical parameters examined with the total duration of continuous oral contraceptive intake. Material and methods: Twenty-five women (19-35 years old taking combined oral contraceptives for at least 1 year were included in the test group. The control group was composed by 25 patients at the same age range reporting no use of hormone-based contraceptive methods. Clinical parameters investigated included pocket probing depth (PD, clinical attachment level (CAL, sulcular bleeding index (SBI and plaque index (Pl.I. Data were statistically evaluated by unpaired t test, Pearson’s correlation test and Spearman’s correlation test. Results: The test group showed increased PD (2.228±0.011 x 2.154±0.012; p<0.0001 and SBI (0.229±0.006 x 0.148±0.005, p<0.0001 than controls. No significant differences between groups were found in CAL (0.435±0.01 x 0.412±0.01; p=0.11. The control group showed greater Pl.I than the test group (0.206±0.007 x 0.303±0.008; p<0.0001. No correlation between the duration of oral contraceptive intake, age and periodontal parameters was observed. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the use of currently available combined oral contraceptives can influence the periodontal conditions of the patients, independently of the level of plaque accumulation or total duration of medication intake, resulting in increased gingival inflammation.

  5. Female sexual dysfunction with combined oral contraceptive use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jean Jasmin M L; Tan, Thiam Chye; Ang, Seng Bin

    2017-06-01

    Combined oral contraceptive pills (COCs) remain one of the most popular forms of contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancy in women. While it is known that COCs can cause sexual dysfunction in women, there is currently no recommendation to screen for sexual function before and after initiation of COCs. We propose that, based on the evidence available, assessment of sexual function should be done at initiation of COCs, as well as at regular intervals thereafter. This would allow COC-related sexual dysfunction to be managed early, such as by switching the patient to newer-generation COCs or other forms of contraception. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  6. Phototoxic reaction to a combined oral contraceptive (levonorgestrel/ethinylestradiol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richarz, N A; Aguilera, J; Castillo, G; Fuente, M J; Ferrándiz, C; Carrascosa, J M

    2017-09-13

    We present the case of a phototoxic skin reaction due to the regular intake of a combined oral contraceptive (levonorgestrel/ethinylestradiol). Upon spectrophotometer testing, we demonstrated high absorption in the UV-B region of the solar spectrum of the combined product (Ovoplex®), especially for the estrogen compound (ethinylestradiol).

  7. Oral Contraceptive Pills: Combinations, Dosages and the Rationale behind 50 Years or Oral Hormonal Contraceptive Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabe T

    2011-01-01

    symptoms, but also to find new compounds and formulas intended to replace those at the end of their patent lifespan. Methods of Good Clinical Practice have been established and large-scale epidemiological studies initiated (i.e. Study of the Royal College of General Practitioners, 1974 [566]. Several general approaches to OC development can be followed. Synthetic or natural estrogens provide a reliable cycle control and prevent estrogen deficiency symptoms due to the decreased secretion of endogenous estrogen from growth follicles. More selective, highly specific progestins have been developed with pharmacological properties similar to natural progesterone, some with antiandrogenic properties and suitable for transvaginal, transdermal, subdermal or intrauterine application. Furthermore, these new progestins produce fewer undesired effects on the breast and other reproductive organs and exhibit low carcinogenicity. Various additives have been tested for their additional non-contraceptive benefits (i.e. iron, folate, DHEA either by preventing certain undesired side effects of estrogens and progestins or by improving the general health status. Combinations of estrogen and progestin have evolved from monophasic to multiphasic formulations. Combination products require lower doses of steroids and provide a clinical profile similar to the normal menstrual cycle. New regimens (21 + 7, 22 + 6, 24 + 4, 84 + 7 with and without placebo pills or continuous administration have been used to maintain the contraceptive efficacy of the higher dose products and to achieve a stable bleeding pattern at lower doses. To date only Ortho-McNeil, Bayer HealthCare, MSD and Pfizer have been able to afford scientific research in the field of contraception and develop new products. The loss of patent lawsuits on their part, however, has allowed for the production of generic alternatives of oral contraceptives by other companies thus making it difficult for them to continue research in this specific

  8. Combined oral contraceptives: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiley, Jessica; Hammond, Cassing

    2007-12-01

    Millions of women use birth control pills for contraceptive and noncontraceptive reasons. Although there have been reports of rare adverse events, birth control pills do offer well-documented health benefits, including a decrease in the risk of ovarian and endometrial carcinoma. In addition, manufacturers continue to modify birth control pills to reduce side effects and medical risks.

  9. Oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  10. Oxidative Stress in Female Athletes Using Combined Oral Contraceptives

    OpenAIRE

    Cauci, S; Buligan, C; Marangone, M; Francescato, Mp.

    2016-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress in female athletes is understudied. We investigated oxidative stress in sportswomen of different disciplines according to combined oral contraceptive (OC) use and lifestyle/alimentary habits. Methods Italian sportswomen (n?=?144; mean age 23.4???4.2?years; body mass index 21.2???2.2?kg?m?2; sport activity 9.2???4.1?h?week?1) were analyzed; 48?% were volleyball players, 12.5?% soccer players, 10.4?% track-and-field sports, and followed by other disciplines? athletes...

  11. Lifetime cancer risk and combined oral contraceptives: the Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Lisa; Sivasubramaniam, Selvaraj; Lee, Amanda J; Fielding, Shona; Hannaford, Philip C

    2017-06-01

    Oral contraceptives have been used by hundreds of millions of women around the world. Important questions remain regarding the very long-term cancer risks that are associated with oral contraception. Despite previous research, important questions remain about the safety of these contraceptives: (1) How long do endometrial, ovarian, and colorectal cancer benefits persist? (2) Does combined oral contraceptive use during the reproductive years produce new cancer risks later in life? (3) What is the overall balance of cancer among past users as they enter the later stages of their lives? The purpose of this study was to examine the very long-term cancer risks or benefits associated with the use of combined oral contraceptives, including the estimated overall life-time balance. The 46,022 women who were recruited to the UK Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study in 1968 and 1969 were observed for up to 44 years. Directly standardized rates of specific and any cancer were calculated for "ever" and "never" users of combined oral contraceptives; data were standardized for age, parity, social class, and smoking. Attributable risk and preventive fraction percentages were calculated. Poisson regression that adjusted for the same variables was used to estimate incidence rate ratios between ever and never users and to examine effects by time since last oral contraceptive use. There were 4661 ever users with at least 1 cancer during 884,895 woman-years of observation and 2341 never users with at least 1 cancer during 388,505 woman-years of observation. Ever use of oral contraceptives was associated with reduced colorectal (incidence rate ratio, 0.81; 99% confidence interval, 0.66-0.99), endometrial (incidence rate ratio, 0.66; 99% confidence interval, 0.48-0.89), ovarian (incidence rate ratio, 0.67; 99% confidence interval, 0.50-0.89), and lymphatic and hematopoietic cancer (incidence rate ratio, 0.74; 99% confidence interval, 0.58-0.94). An increased

  12. Headache induced by the use of combined oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Gianni; Gabellari, Ilaria Castagnoli; Airola, Gisella; Borgogno, Paola; Schiapparelli, Paola; Benedetto, Chiara

    2009-05-01

    Although combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are a safe and highly effective method of birth control, they may also give rise to problems of clinical tolerability in migraine patients. Indeed, headache is among the most common side effects reported with the use of COCs, frequently leading to their being discontinued. The latest International Classification of Headache Disorders identified at least two entities evidently related to the use of COCs, i.e., exogenous hormone-induced headache and estrogen-withdrawal headache. As to the former, the newest formulations of COCs are generally well tolerated by migraine without aura patients, but can worsen headache in migraine with aura patients. Headache associated with COCs, generally, tends to improve as their use continues. However, although it is not yet clear if there is an association between headache and the composition of COCs (both in the type and amount of hormones), it has been observed that the incidence of headache during COC use seems greater if migraine is associated with menstrual trigger. The estrogen-withdrawal headache is a headache that generally appears within the first 5 days after cessation of estrogen use and resolves within 3 days, even if in some cases it may appear on the sixth or seventh day after pill suspension and lasts more than 3 days.

  13. Combined oral contraceptives in polycystic ovary syndrome - indications and cautions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, Gurkan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2013-01-01

    Combined oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) have been used in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) for the treatment of menstrual disorders, acne and hirsutism. Despite years of their use and broad clinical experience, there are still ongoing doubts concerning their implications for the cardiovascular system and carbohydrate metabolism both in the general population and women with PCOS. In the general population, the risk of venous thromboembolism is reported to be increased. However, arterial thrombotic events seem to require concomitant risk factors to appear during administration of OCPs. In terms of carbohydrate metabolism, available data do not consistently suggest an increased risk of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or conversion of IGT to type 2 diabetes mellitus, in spite of some subtle fluctuations in glucose and insulin levels. In subgroup analyses of epidemiological studies in the general population, there is no finding indicating an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and related mortality in premenopausal women with PCOS. There is no significant alteration in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism after use of OCP in PCOS either. The absence of further cardiometabolic risk with OCP use in PCOS might suggest some unproven preventive alterations in this patient population.

  14. Oxidative Stress in Female Athletes Using Combined Oral Contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauci, Sabina; Buligan, Cinzia; Marangone, Micaela; Francescato, Maria Pia

    2016-12-01

    Oxidative stress in female athletes is understudied. We investigated oxidative stress in sportswomen of different disciplines according to combined oral contraceptive (OC) use and lifestyle/alimentary habits. Italian sportswomen (n = 144; mean age 23.4 ± 4.2 years; body mass index 21.2 ± 2.2 kg m(-2); sport activity 9.2 ± 4.1 h week(-1)) were analyzed; 48 % were volleyball players, 12.5 % soccer players, 10.4 % track-and-field sports, and followed by other disciplines' athletes. Oxidative stress was evaluated by free oxygen radical test (FORT) assessing blood hydroperoxides and free oxygen radical defense (FORD) assay evaluating antioxidant capacity in OC users (n = 42) compared to non-OC users. Elevated oxidative stress levels (≥310 FORT units) were found in 92.9 % of OC users and in 23.5 % of non-OC users (crude OR = 42, 95 % CI 12-149, p correlated to hydroperoxides. In non-OC users only, hydroperoxide values were positively correlated with weight and BMI and inversely correlated with chocolate and fish consumption. The markedly elevated oxidative stress we revealed in OC-user athletes could be detrimental to physical activity and elevate cardiovascular risk (as thromboembolism). Further research is needed to extend our results, to clarify the biochemical pathways leading to increased hydroperoxides (mainly lipid peroxides) and reduced antioxidant defense, and to elucidate the potential effects on athletic performance. OC use should be considered when developing gender-focused strategies against oxidative stress.

  15. Combined oral contraceptive pills for treatment of acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arowojolu, Ayodele O; Gallo, Maria F; Lopez, Laureen M; Grimes, David A

    2012-07-11

    Acne is a common skin disorder among women. Although no uniform approach to the management of acne exists, combination oral contraceptives (COCs), which contain an estrogen and a progestin, often are prescribed for women. To determine the effectiveness of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) for the treatment of facial acne compared to placebo or other active therapies. In January 2012, we searched for randomized controlled trials of COCs and acne in the computerized databases of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, POPLINE, and LILACS. We also searched for clinical trials in ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (Aug 2011). For the initial review, we wrote to researchers to seek any unpublished or published trials that we might have missed. We considered randomized controlled trials reported in any language that compared the effectiveness of a COC containing an estrogen and a progestin to placebo or another active therapy for acne in women. We extracted data on facial lesion counts, both total and specific (i.e., open or closed comedones, papules, pustules and nodules); acne severity grades; global assessments by the clinician or the participant, and discontinuation due to adverse events. Data were entered and analyzed in RevMan. For continuous data, we calculated the mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CI). For dichotomous data, we calculated the Peto odds ratio (OR) and 95% CI. The review includes 31 trials with 12,579 participants. Of 24 comparisons made, 6 compared a COC to placebo, 17 different COCs, and 1 compared a COC to an antibiotic. Of nine placebo-controlled trials with data for analysis, all showed COCs reduced acne lesion counts, severity grades and self-assessed acne compared to placebo. A levonorgestrel-COC group had fewer total lesion counts (MD -9.98; 95% CI -16.51 to -3.45), inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesion counts, and were more likely to

  16. Use of combined oral contraceptive pills among teenage girls in Calabar, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iklaki CU

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Christopher U Iklaki,1 John E Inaku,2 John E Ekabua,1 Patience O Odusolu,1 Charles O Njoku11Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, NigeriaAbstract: The objective of this study was to find out about the use of combined oral contraceptive pills by women in Calabar, Nigeria, with a particular interest in single nulliparous teenage women. During the period from 2006 to 2010, a total of 1980 women seen in the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital's family planning unit used various methods of contraception. Of these, 316 (15.96% used combined oral contraceptive pills. Twenty girls aged between 13 and 19 years accounted for 6.3% of those who used combined oral contraceptive pills. There were 296 (93.6% women between the ages of 20 and 34 years who accounted for the remaining users. Of these women, 195 (61.5% were educated to the secondary level, and 34 (10.8% were educated to primary level. No women without formal education used combined oral contraceptive pills during the period of study. The majority of the users were nulliparous (128; 40.4%; the rest had parity values of at least one to more than four. One hundred thirty-seven (43.4% of the users were single, 112 (35.4% were married, and the remaining 67 (21.1% were separated, divorced, or widowed. There is a growing need to educate young Nigerian women about the use of combined oral contraceptive pills; this medication is suitable and effective for most young women, and it also has additional noncontraceptive health benefits.Keywords: combined, oral, contraception, pills

  17. Oral steroid contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sech, Laura A; Mishell, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Oral steroid contraception is a popular method of family planning worldwide. Over the past several decades, this method of contraception has changed significantly by decreasing the estrogen dose, changing the progestin component, and reducing the hormone free interval. Despite the popularity of oral steroid contraception, there has been much criticism regarding the associated risks of venous thromboembolism and stroke. Despite these established, yet uncommon risks, oral steroid contraception has many important health benefits. This review highlights the available formulations of oral contraceptives along with their evidence-based associated risks and benefits. Highlights regarding future directions for development of novel oral contraceptives are also addressed.

  18. Sexual Dysfunction in Two Types of Hormonal Contraception: Combined Oral Contraceptives versus Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate

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    Nourossadat Kariman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Sexual health is an essential element of quality of life, affecting both physical and psychological domains. Hormones used in contraceptive methods have contradictory effects on sexual function. In this study, we aimed to compare sexual function in women using combined oral contraceptives (COC and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA, referred to healthcare centers affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran in 2013. Methods: This descriptive, comparative study was performed on 240 women (n=120 per group, selected through multistage sampling in Tehran, Iran. A questionnaire consisting of three parts, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28, demographic characteristics, and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI, was completed through interviews. For data analysis, descriptive statistics were calculated, and independent t-test, Mann-Whitney test, Chi-square, and Fisher's exact test were performed, using SPPS version 16. P-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean age at marriage in women using DMPA was lower than those using COC (18.55±3.61 vs. 19.92±3.98 years. Based on the findings, the menstrual status in the majority of DMPA users was irregular (46.7% in DMPA group vs. 8.3% in COC group. The difference in sexual function between the COC and DMPA groups was significant. Sexual arousal and lubrication were more favorable in the COC group in comparison with the DMPA group; also, pain in this group was lower than the DMPA group. Scores of total sexual function (27.35±5.22 in DMPA group vs. 29.15±6.13 in COC group, sexual arousal (4.11±0.90 in DMPA group vs. 4.51±1.39 in COC group, and vaginal lubrication (4.82±1.30 in DMPA group vs. 5.26±1.35 in COC group were lower in the DMPA group, compared to the COC group. Pain scores (4.91±1.25 in DMPA group vs. 5.28±1.19 in COC group were higher in the DMPA group in comparison with the COC group (P

  19. New contraceptive eligibility checklists for provision of combined oral contraceptives and depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate in community-based programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, A.; Schwingl, P.; Rivera, R.

    2000-01-01

    Community-based services (CBS) have long used checklists to determine eligibility for contraceptive method use, in particular for combined oral contraceptives (COCs) and the 3-month injectable contraceptive depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). As safety information changes, however, checklists can quickly become outdated. Inconsistent checklists and eligibility criteria often cause uneven access to contraceptives. In 1996, WHO produced updated eligibility criteria for the use of all contraceptive methods. Based on these criteria, new checklists for COCs and DMPA were developed. This article describes the new checklists and their development. Several rounds of expert review produced checklists that were correct, comprehensible and consistent with the eligibility requirements. Nevertheless, field-testing of the checklists revealed that approximately half (48%) of the respondents felt that one or more questions still needed greater comprehensibility. These findings indicated the need for a checklist guide. In March 2000, WHO convened a meeting of experts to review the medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use. The article reflects also the resulting updated checklist. PMID:10994285

  20. The role of combined oral contraceptives in the management of acne and seborrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Marmol, V; Teichmann, A; Gertsen, K

    2004-06-01

    Acne and seborrhea (or facial oiliness) are related androgenic skin disorders which affect a high proportion of women after menarche. They can have a negative effect on psychological well-being and social life. Androgens play an important role in the pathogenesis of acne through the stimulation of sebum secretion, increasing sebaceous gland size and possibly through follicular hyperkeratinization. Conversely, estrogens decrease sebum production by suppressing gonadotropin release and androgen production and increasing sex hormone binding globulin production. One of the treatment options for these conditions is hormonal therapy, especially for women who require contraception. The effect of combined oral contraceptives in androgenic skin disorders depends on their estrogen:progestogen balance and on the antiestrogenic activity of the progestogen component. Improved understanding of what women value about oral contraceptives suggests that the choice of product should be tailored as much as possible to the individual. Several combined oral contraceptives containing new-generation progestogens (e.g. desogestrel, gestodene) or progestational antiandrogens (e.g. cyproterone acetate, chlormadinone acetate) have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of women with acne, although comparisons between trials are difficult because of differing endpoints. Seborrhea has been less well studied, but the few studies that are available show an improvement in women with this condition using combined oral contraceptives.

  1. [Effect of combined hormonal oral contraception on the somatic and psychic status of women of reproductive age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertkin, A L; Nosova, A V

    2012-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the topical problem of maintaining somatic and psychic health of the women of reproductive age by rational pregnancy planning and prevention of abortions by modern methods of contraception including combined oral hormonal contraception. Unfortunately, this approach is rarely employed in this country (5-6%). Results of retrospective analysis of medical documentation, clinical efficacy and safety of modern combined oral hormonal contraception are presented.

  2. Restoring testosterone levels by adding dehydroepiandrosterone to a drospirenone containing combined oral contraceptive : II. Clinical effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, Y.; Foidart, J. M.; Pintiaux, A.; Minon, J. M.; Fauser, B. C J M; Cobey, K.; Coelingh Bennink, H. J T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) decrease androgen levels, including testosterone (T), which may be associated with sexual dysfunction and mood complaints in some women. We have shown that 'co-administration' of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to a drospirenone (DRSP)-containing COC

  3. Restoring testosterone levels by adding dehydroepiandrosterone to a drospirenone containing combined oral contraceptive : I. Endocrine effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, Y.; Foidart, J. M.; Pintiaux, A.; Minon, J. M.; Fauser, B. C J M; Cobey, K.; Coelingh Bennink, H. J T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) decrease testosterone (T) levels. This study investigated restoration of T and other androgen concentrations during COC use by 'co-administration' of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Study design In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

  4. [DVT and combined oral contraceptives: update of the pluridisciplinary CNGOF-FNCGM-GEHT-SFMV group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabbert-Buffet, N; Guigues, B; Trillot, N; Biron, C; Morange, P; Pernod, G; Scheffler, M; Brugere, S; Hedon, B

    2013-06-01

    Thrombotic risk among combined oral contraceptives (COC) users has recently been debated following a court action initiated by a patient. Recent epidemiological data, as well as accumulating biological data underlying these data, have led French Health authorities to modify COC prescription and reimbursement modalities. A short synthesis is proposed by a multidisciplinary group of experts from four French societies (CGOF, FNCGM, GHT, and SFMV).

  5. Deep vein thrombosis in a woman taking oral combined contraceptive pills

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Oral combined contraceptive pill (OCCP) is popular as birth control pills. Like all other drugs, they are not free from risks. Women taking certain types of OCCP have higher risk of developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT). A 29 year old married woman had taken OCCP for 3.5 months, developed deep vein thrombosis of left leg. Hereditary and acquired causes of DVT were excluded. She was treated with parenteral and oral anticoagulants simultaneously and was advised to discontinue OCCP. Initially th...

  6. Deep vein thrombosis in a woman taking oral combined contraceptive pills

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran G Piparva; Buch, Jatin G.

    2011-01-01

    Oral combined contraceptive pill (OCCP) is popular as birth control pills. Like all other drugs, they are not free from risks. Women taking certain types of OCCP have higher risk of developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT). A 29 year old married woman had taken OCCP for 3.5 months, developed deep vein thrombosis of left leg. Hereditary and acquired causes of DVT were excluded. She was treated with parenteral and oral anticoagulants simultaneously and was advised to discontinue OCCP. Initially th...

  7. Efficacy, safety, and patient acceptability of the combined chlormadinone acetate-ethinylestradiol oral contraceptive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Ferrari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Serena Ferrari, Marianna Cannoletta, Matteo Generali, Lucia Cazzato, Angelo CagnacciDepartment of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Pediatrics, Azienda Ospedaliero, Universitaria di Modena, ItalyAbstract: Since their introduction in 1959, development of hormonal contraceptives has been ongoing, with the ultimate aim of creating not only an effective and safe contraceptive method, but also a drug able to meet the need for treatment of other conditions, such as acne, seborrhea, and hirsutism, with few or no side effects. With this objective, a new progestin, chlormadinone acetate (CMA, has been developed as a derivative of progesterone for ­contraception. This new molecule has been introduced in combination with ethinylestradiol (EE 30 µg as a safe ­contraceptive with antiandrogenic properties. Many clinical studies have investigated this new oral combination and found it to be safe, with a Pearl Index similar to that of other combined hormonal contraceptives. CMA, because of its antiandrogenic properties, has been also considered effective for resolution of acne, seborrhea, and hirsutism. The data show it to be a safe molecule in terms of glucose and lipid metabolism. No major weight changes have been linked with its use, and it seems to be the only progestin able to reduce fat mass during use. The CMA-EE combination is well tolerated and acceptable to women. Adverse events related to its use are similar to those reported with other third-generation ­contraceptives. We can conclude that CMA-EE is an effective, safe, and well tolerated ­antiandrogenic hormonal contraceptive.Keywords: chlormadinone acetate, acne, weight, metabolism, safety, hormonal contraceptive

  8. The evolution of combined oral contraception: improving the risk-to-benefit ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkman, Ronald; Bell, Carrie; Serfaty, David

    2011-07-01

    Since its introduction in 1960, the combined oral contraceptive (COC) pill has become one of the most widely and frequently used methods of contraception worldwide. Although highly effective, early COC formulations were associated with significant adverse effects and unacceptable cardiovascular risk. Improvements in tolerability and safety have been achieved, without compromises in effectiveness, primarily via hormone dosage reductions and the development of several new progestins. Multiphasic COCs and extended-/continuous-cycle COCs have also been introduced, although the clinical advantages of these formulations vs. traditional COCs have yet to be established. Inclusion of natural estrogens such as estradiol valerate and 17β-estradiol with selective progestins in new combinations that maintain good cycle control is the most recent evolutionary step designed to improve COC tolerability and safety. Vigorous research needs to continue to help guarantee that the unmet need for safe and effective contraception is satisfied in future generations.

  9. Combined oral contraceptives' influence on weight, body composition, height, and bone mineral density in girls younger than 18 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warholm, Lina; Petersen, Kresten R; Ravn, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are increasingly used by adolescents. The aim of this review is to investigate the evidence regarding COCs' influence on weight, height and bone mineral density (BMD) in girls younger than 18 years.......Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are increasingly used by adolescents. The aim of this review is to investigate the evidence regarding COCs' influence on weight, height and bone mineral density (BMD) in girls younger than 18 years....

  10. Comparison of the pharmacologic and clinical profiles of new combined oral contraceptives containing estradiol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen JT

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey T Jensen,1 Johannes Bitzer,2 Marco Serrani3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA; 2Department of Social Medicine and Psychosomatics, Women’s Hospital, University Hospital of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 3Global Medical Affairs, Women’s Healthcare, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Berlin, Germany Abstract: Three estradiol (E2-containing oral contraceptives, estradiol valerate/cyproterone acetate (E2V/CPA, Femilar®, estradiol valerate/dienogest (E2V/DNG, Qlaira®/Natazia™, and estradiol/nomegestrol acetate (E2/NOMAC; Zoely®, have received approval for use in general practice. Only Finnish women currently have access to all three E2-based formulations. E2/NOMAC is currently approved only in Europe, while E2V/DNG is approved globally. To assist clinicians counseling women considering use of one of these formulations, we conducted a review of the published information about the current E2-containing oral contraceptives. A literature search was conducted using the Ovid interface and a combination of free search terms relevant to estradiol and oral contraception to identify suitable articles for inclusion in this review. The available data show that E2V/DNG, E2/NOMAC, and E2V/CPA are all effective oral contraceptives. While direct comparisons are lacking, indirect evidence suggests that E2V/DNG and E2/NOMAC may have better bleeding profiles than E2V/CPA. E2V/DNG is also approved for the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding. Both E2V/DNG and E2/NOMAC have minimal influence on hemostatic, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism parameters, or induce less change in these parameters relative to ethinylestradiol-based oral contraceptives. However, the predictive value of these surrogate parameters is a matter of debate, and whether these differences can be translated into meaningful clinical outcomes needs to be established in large-scale, post-marketing, prospective, Phase IV cohort

  11. Potencies of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgren, R A; Sturtevant, F M

    1976-08-15

    Oral contraceptives are combinations of estrogens and progestogens or, in the case of the mini-pills, progestogens alone. With specific test procedures in laboratory animals or human subjects, it is possible to assign potency evaluations to the components relative to the progestational, estrogenic, or antiestrogenic activities of the progestogen or to the estrogenic potencies of the estrogenic component. It might even be possible to quantify the synergistic effects of the estrogen on the progestational agent. Unfortunately, however, it is impossible now to amalgamate such assay results into single estimates of the potencies of the combinations (either the combination products per se or the combination tablets of sequential products). For example, an over-all estrogenic potency of a combination preparation would involve the integration of contributions form the estrogen itself plus the estrogenic products of metabolism of the progestogen minus the antagonistic effect of the progestational agent, if any. These factors cannot now be quantified independently, much less merged into a single figure of clinical significance. Further, even if it were possible to produce such an estimate, it is unlikely that the evaluation would be meaningful in relation to any putative side effect or adverse reaction, i.e., the alleged thrombogenic effects of oral contraceptives cannot currently be related directly to any measure of potency that will allow prediction of these clinical conditions from laboratory models. Any evaluation of the potential of a given contraceptive to produce a specific side effect will depend upon data generated with specific regard to that adverse reaction and the individual product in question.

  12. [Clinical experience of combined oral contraceptives of low doses in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldívar Rodríguez, Donato; Vázquez, Juanita; Lara, Roger; Ramos, Carlos; Lira, Josefina; Rodríguez, Ever; Romo, Jorge

    2006-11-01

    The combined oral contraceptives are one of the most prescribed medicines. Across the years they have given to more than 60 million women of the whole world a suitable method for the highly reliable and effective natal control. The oral contraceptives are different from other medicines; principally they are not in use for controlling any disease and have the potential of giving advantages. To evaluate the control of the cycle, tolerability and acceptance of an oral contraceptive of ultralow dose with gestodene (60 microg) and ethinylestradiol (15 microg) in a population of healthy women from 18 to 35 years. The study included adult healthy women, all the users signed assent of informed before being included to the study and of the beginning of any procedure in agreement with the declarations of Helsinki and its amendments. Descriptive statistics was used for the demographic information and the comparison between the initial and final visits of the variables of efficiency. There was used the test (Proof) of ranges of Wilcoxon's sign for related samples. There were included 113 women. The average of age was 26.08 years (SD = 4.43), weight of 62.02 kg (SD = 11.13) and height of 159.20 cm (SD = 6.06). The distribution in four centers was: 32 in the University Hospital (Monterrey), 21 in the Country 2000 (Guadalajara), 30 in in the Medical Center La Mora (Aguascalientes) and 30 in Perinatology National Institute (Mexico City). The contraceptive efficiency of the combination of 15 microg of ethinylestradiol and 60 microg of gestodene has been demonstrated in previous studies. This study ratifies the international results of efficiency and tolerability.

  13. Therapeutic, prophylactic, untoward, and contraceptive effects of combined oral contraceptives: catholic teaching, natural law, and the principle of double effect when deciding to prescribe and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; Salzman, Todd A

    2014-01-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COC) have been demonstrated to have significant benefits for the treatment and prevention of disease. These medications also are associated with untoward health effects, and they may be directly contraceptive. Prescribers and users must compare and weigh the intended beneficial health effects against foreseeable but unintended possible adverse effects in their decisions to prescribe and use. Additionally, those who intend to abide by Catholic teachings must consider prohibitions against contraception. Ethical judgments concerning both health benefits and contraception are approached in this essay through an overview of the therapeutic, prophylactic, untoward, and contraceptive effects of COC and discussion of magisterial and traditional Catholic teachings from natural law. Discerning through the principle of double effect, proportionate reason, and evidence gathered from the sciences, medical and moral conclusions are drawn that we believe to be fully compliant with good medicine and Catholic teaching.

  14. Effect of progestin vs. combined oral contraceptive pills on lactation: A double-blind randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Eve; Ogburn, Tony; Leeman, Larry; Singh, Rameet; Schrader, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effect of progestin-only vs. combined hormonal contraceptive pills on rates of breastfeeding continuation in postpartum women. Secondary outcomes include infant growth parameters, contraceptive method continuation and patient satisfaction with breastfeeding and contraceptive method. Methods In this randomized controlled trial, postpartum breastfeeding women who desired oral contraceptives were assigned to progestin-only vs. combined hormonal contraceptive pills. At two and eight weeks postpartum, participants completed in-person questionnaires that assessed breastfeeding continuation and contraceptive use. Infant growth parameters including weight, length and head circumference were assessed at eight weeks postpartum. Telephone questionnaires assessing breastfeeding, contraceptive continuation and satisfaction were completed at 3-7 weeks and 4 and 6 months. Breastfeeding continuation was compared between groups using Cox proportional hazards regression. Differences in baseline demographic characteristics and in variables between the two intervention groups were compared using chi-square tests, Fisher’s Exact test, or two-sample t-tests as appropriate. Results Breastfeeding continuation rates, contraceptive continuation, and infant growth parameters did not differ between users of progestin-only and combined hormonal contraceptive pills. Infant formula supplementation and maternal perception of inadequate milk supply were associated with decreased rates of breastfeeding in both groups. Conclusions Choice of combined or progestin-only birth control pills administered two weeks postpartum did not adversely affect breastfeeding continuation. PMID:22143258

  15. Noncontraceptive benefits of the estradiol valerate/dienogest combined oral contraceptive: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nappi RE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rossella E Nappi,1 Marco Serrani,2 Jeffrey T Jensen3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Research Centre for Reproductive Medicine, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 2Global Medical Affairs Women's Healthcare, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Berlin, Germany; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: Combined oral contraceptives formulated to include estradiol (E2 have recently become available for the indication of pregnancy prevention. A combined estradiol valerate and dienogest pill (E2V/DNG, designed to be administered using an estrogen step-down and a progestin step-up regimen over 26 days of active treatment followed by 2 days of placebo (26/2-day regimen, has also undergone research to assess the potential for additional noncontraceptive benefits. Randomized, placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that E2V/DNG is an effective treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding – a reduction in median menstrual blood loss approaching 90% occurs after 6 months of treatment. To date, E2V/DNG is the only oral contraceptive approved for this indication. Comparator studies have also demonstrated a reduction in hormone withdrawal-associated symptoms in users of E2V/DNG compared with a conventional 21/7-day regimen of ethinylestradiol/levonorgestrel. Other potential noncontraceptive benefits associated with E2V/DNG, like improvement in dysmenorrhea, sexual function, and quality of life, are comparable with those associated with other combined oral contraceptives and are discussed further in this review. Keywords: heavy menstrual bleeding, hormone withdrawal-associated symptoms, quality of life

  16. Serum Level and 24hr. Excretion Pattern of Potassium Following the Intake of Combined Oral Contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kamyab

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum level and 24hr urinary excretion pattern of potassium have been studied in 104 healthy women, aged 18-44 years, using combinedoral contraceptives for a period of 3-48 months, and results h av e been compared with those obtained from 21 healthy controls of the same clinic. aged 19-40 years, using IUD. There was no sign ificant change observed in s erum potassium level, but 24hr urinary excretion pattern of potassium decreased significantly in 90% of the individuals equivalent to 2. &- 78 . 3% of the mean control, possibly due to a retention of potas sium in the cells.

  17. History of oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  18. Knowledge and attitudes of Latin American gynecologists regarding unplanned pregnancy and use of combined oral contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahamondes L

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Luis Bahamondes,1 Josefina Lira-Plasencia,2 Ricardo Martin,3 Victor Marin,4 Maria Y Makuch1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP, Campinas, Brazil; 2Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, México, DF, México; 3Hospital Universitario, Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá, Bogotá, Colombia; 4Hospital Central, Petróleos Mexicanos, México, DF, México Background: Unintended pregnancy is a public health problem and unmet medical need worldwide. It is estimated that in the year 2012, almost 213 million pregnancies occurred, and the global pregnancy rate decreased only slightly from 2008 to 2012. It was also estimated that 85 million pregnancies (40% of all pregnancies were unintended and that 38% ended in an unintended birth. Objectives: To assess knowledge and attitudes of Latin American (LA obstetricians and gynecologists (OBGYNs regarding unintended pregnancies and aspects of combined oral contraceptive (COC use. Methods: A survey was conducted during a scientific meeting about contraception in 2014, in which OBGYNs from 12 LA countries who provide attention in contraception were invited to respond to a multiple-choice questionnaire to assess their knowledge and attitudes regarding unplanned pregnancy and some aspects regarding COC use. Results: A total of 210 OBGYNs participated in the study. Their knowledge regarding COC failure was low. The participants reported they believed that their patients habitually forgot to take a pill and that their patients did not know what to do in these situations. They were aware of the benefits of COC use; however, they were less prone to prescribe COCs for the purpose of protecting against ovarian and endometrial cancer, and one-quarter of them had doubts about the association between COC use and cancer risk. Conclusion: The interviewed LA OBGYNs showed some flaws in terms of knowledge of COC failure rates and the non-contraceptive benefits and risks

  19. ORMELOXIFEN HCL VS. COMBINED ORAL CONTRACEPTIVE PILL IN TREATMENT OF DUB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : DUB is defined as a state of abnormal uterine bleeding without any clinically detectable organic pelvic pathology - tumor , inflammation or pregnancy. The present study was conducted to compare the effect of ormeloxifene HCL ( SERM and combined oral contraceptive pills in medical treatment of DUB. MATERIAL & METHOD: This study is based on 100 cases of DUB from age group of 20 to 50 years , out of which fifty cases were prescribed Ormeloxifen HCL (Drug A and another 50 cases were given Combined Contrac eptive pills. (Drug B Ormeloxifen HCL was given in doses of 60mg biweekly for 12 weeks and from 13 th week one tablet weekly for another 12 weeks. CC pills (Levonorgestrel 0.15mg & Ethinyloestradiol 0.03mg – One tablet from 5th day of menses for 21 days g iven cyclically for six months. Regular cyclic follow - up was done to assess response , compliance tolerance and recurrence of the symptoms and side effects of every patient. RESULT : The study revealed marked decrease in PBAC score 82% vs. 35% , reduction in percentage of bleeding 100%vs 68% , regularization of menstrual cycle100%vs74% , recurrence of symptoms in the form of excessive bleeding 4% vs. 64% and irregular cycle 0%vs 68% in drug A vs. drug B and side effects were comparable in both the groups. CONCL USION : Ormeloxifen HCL is more effective , well tolerated with superior compliance than combined oral contraceptive pills in medical treatment of DUB.

  20. Pharmacokinetic overview of ethinyl estradiol dose and bioavailability using two transdermal contraceptive systems and a standard combined oral contraceptive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Birte; Reinecke, Isabel; Schuett, Barbara; Merz, Martin; Zurth, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative bioavailability of ethinyl estradiol (EE) and gestodene (GSD) after application of a novel transdermal contraceptive patch vs. a standard combined oral contraceptive (COC) pill (study 1), and to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of EE after application of the EE/GSD patch compared with an EE/norelgestromin (NGMN) patch (study 2). Materials: Participants were healthy, non-obese women aged 18 – 45 years (study 1) or 18 – 35 years (study 2). Compositions of study treatments were as follows: 0.55 mg EE/2.1 mg GSD (EE/GSD patch); 0.02 mg EE/0.075 mg GSD (standard COC); 0.6 mg EE/6 mg NGMN (EE/NGMN patch). Methods: In study 1, which consisted of 3 treatment periods (each followed by 7 patch- or pill-free days), treatments were administered in one of two randomized orders: either P–M–E (EE/GSD patch (P) every 7 days for 28 days → COC (M) once-daily for 21 days → two 7-day patch-wearing periods followed by one 10-day patch-wearing phase (E)), or the same treatments administered in sequence M–P–E. For study 2, participants received either the EE/GSD patch or EE/NGMN patch for seven treatment cycles (one patch per week for 3 weeks followed by a 7-day patch-free interval). Results: In study 1, average daily exposure to EE was similar for treatments P and M; the mean daily area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) ratio of treatment P vs. treatment M for EE was 1.06 (90% confidence interval (CI): 0.964 – 1.16), indicating average daily delivery similar to oral administration of 0.019 – 0.023 mg EE. For unbound GSD, average daily exposure was lower for treatment P vs. treatment M. The mean AUC ratio of treatment P vs. treatment M for unbound GSD was 0.820 (90% CI: 0.760 – 0.885), indicating average daily delivery from the patch of 0.057 – 0.066 mg GSD. Prolonged patch wearing did not result in a distinct decline in GSD and EE serum concentrations. In study 2, AUC at steady state (AUC0–168,ss

  1. Serum resistin levels in women taking combined oral contraceptives containing desogestrel or gestodene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechberger, Tomasz; Tomaszewski, Jacek; Pieprzowska-Białek, Anna; Kulik-Rechberger, Beata; Skorupski, Paweł

    2004-06-01

    Resistin is a hormone secreted by adipose tissue that could be involved in the development of insulin resistance. Previous studies confirmed that endogenous sex steroids may influence serum resistin concentration in women. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of combined oral contraceptives containing desogestrel or gestodene on circulating levels of resistin. Fifty-three women were enrolled in the study. Thirteen patients received 20 microg ethinylestradiol/150 microg desogestrel, 15 women were treated with 20 microg ethinylestradiol/75 microg gestodene, 11 with 30 microg ethinylestradiol/150 microg desogestrel and 14 with 30 microg ethinylestradiol/75 microg gestodene. Blood samples for estimation of serum resistin and insulin levels were drawn before administration of oral contraceptive and after 6 cycles of therapy. We found that serum resistin level remained unchanged in women receiving ethinylestradiol/desogestrel and was reduced in women treated with formulations containing gestodene. We conclude that ethinylestradiol combined with desogestrel or gestodene is unlikely to induce insulin resistance through resistin pathway.

  2. Non-contraceptive benefits of oral contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhont M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Marc Dhont Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium Abstract: The health benefits of the oral contraceptive (OC pill are numerous and outweigh the risks of OC use. There are unintended but useful preventive side effects and potential therapeutic uses of OCs apart from contraception itself. Unequivocal evidence for the protective influence of combined OCs against ovarian and endometrial cancers, and colon cancer to a lesser extent, has been found. The pill also reduces the incidence of benign breast disease, functional ovarian cysts, pelvic inflammatory disease requiring hospitalization, ectopic pregnancy, and iron-deficiency anemia. The pill can be used for the treatment of several gynecologic disorders such as dysmenorrhea, irregular or excessive bleeding, acne, hirsutism, and endometriosis-associated pain, whether prescribed solely to treat these symptoms or prescribed to treat them in addition to providing contraception. These health benefits are often underestimated, as they get too little attention from the mass media. Keywords: the pill, estrogens, progestogens, safety, contraception

  3. Deep vein thrombosis in a woman taking oral combined contraceptive pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piparva, Kiran G; Buch, Jatin G

    2011-07-01

    Oral combined contraceptive pill (OCCP) is popular as birth control pills. Like all other drugs, they are not free from risks. Women taking certain types of OCCP have higher risk of developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT). A 29 year old married woman had taken OCCP for 3.5 months, developed deep vein thrombosis of left leg. Hereditary and acquired causes of DVT were excluded. She was treated with parenteral and oral anticoagulants simultaneously and was advised to discontinue OCCP. Initially the risk of blood clot was believed to be due to dose of estrogen but recent study relates it to the type of progesterone involved in OCCP. Thus, it is still a matter of debate, whether to associate risk of DVT to the amount of estrogen alone or also to the type of progestin. Apart from careful selection of patients, one should also look for the risk of venous thromboembolism irrespective of type of OCCP prescribed.

  4. Deep vein thrombosis in a woman taking oral combined contraceptive pills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran G Piparva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral combined contraceptive pill (OCCP is popular as birth control pills. Like all other drugs, they are not free from risks. Women taking certain types of OCCP have higher risk of developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT. A 29 year old married woman had taken OCCP for 3.5 months, developed deep vein thrombosis of left leg. Hereditary and acquired causes of DVT were excluded. She was treated with parenteral and oral anticoagulants simultaneously and was advised to discontinue OCCP. Initially the risk of blood clot was believed to be due to dose of estrogen but recent study relates it to the type of progesterone involved in OCCP. Thus, it is still a matter of debate, whether to associate risk of DVT to the amount of estrogen alone or also to the type of progestin. Apart from careful selection of patients, one should also look for the risk of venous thromboembolism irrespective of type of OCCP prescribed.

  5. Knowledge and attitudes of Latin American gynecologists regarding unplanned pregnancy and use of combined oral contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamondes, Luis; Lira-Plascencia, Josefina; Martin, Ricardo; Marin, Victor; Makuch, Maria Y

    2015-01-01

    Background Unintended pregnancy is a public health problem and unmet medical need worldwide. It is estimated that in the year 2012, almost 213 million pregnancies occurred, and the global pregnancy rate decreased only slightly from 2008 to 2012. It was also estimated that 85 million pregnancies (40% of all pregnancies) were unintended and that 38% ended in an unintended birth. Objectives To assess knowledge and attitudes of Latin American (LA) obstetricians and gynecologists (OBGYNs) regarding unintended pregnancies and aspects of combined oral contraceptive (COC) use. Methods A survey was conducted during a scientific meeting about contraception in 2014, in which OBGYNs from 12 LA countries who provide attention in contraception were invited to respond to a multiple-choice questionnaire to assess their knowledge and attitudes regarding unplanned pregnancy and some aspects regarding COC use. Results A total of 210 OBGYNs participated in the study. Their knowledge regarding COC failure was low. The participants reported they believed that their patients habitually forgot to take a pill and that their patients did not know what to do in these situations. They were aware of the benefits of COC use; however, they were less prone to prescribe COCs for the purpose of protecting against ovarian and endometrial cancer, and one-quarter of them had doubts about the association between COC use and cancer risk. Conclusion The interviewed LA OBGYNs showed some flaws in terms of knowledge of COC failure rates and the non-contraceptive benefits and risks of COCs. To adequately counsel their patients regarding COC intake, OBGYNs must be updated regarding all aspects of COC use. PMID:25999766

  6. Body composition is improved during 12 months' treatment with metformin alone or combined with oral contraceptives compared with treatment with oral contraceptives in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Altinok, Magda Lambaa; Mumm, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    inclusion. OCP and M+OCP were superior to M regarding reduction in free T levels. Conclusions: M treatment alone or in combination with OCP was associated with weight loss and improved body composition compared with OCP, whereas free T levels decreased during M+OCP or OCP. Combined treatment with M......Context: Central obesity in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with increased inflammatory markers and increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate whether treatment with metformin (M) or M combined with oral contraceptive pills (OCPs...... (150 mg desogestrel+30 μg ethinylestradiol), or OCP. Whole-body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans and clinical and hormonal evaluations were performed before and after the intervention period. A total of 65 of 90 patients completed the study. Main Outcome Measures: Changes in weight at 6 and 12...

  7. Economic Evaluations of Thrombophilia Screening Prior to Prescribing Combined Oral Contraceptives: A Systematic and Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Erin; Hiedemann, Bridget; Bowie, Bonnie H

    2017-03-13

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) increase the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), particularly among women with inherited clotting disorders. The World Health Organization classifies combined hormonal contraception as an "unacceptable health risk" for women with thrombogenic mutations but advises against universal thrombophilia screening before prescribing COCs given the low prevalence of thrombophilia and high screening costs. Through the lens of lifetime costs and benefits, this paper systematically and critically reviews all published economic evaluations of thrombophilia screening prior to prescribing COCs. We searched relevant databases for economic evaluations of thrombophilia screening before prescribing COCs. After extracting the key study characteristics and economic variables, we evaluated each article using the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) and the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) instruments. Seven economic evaluations of thrombophilia screening before prescribing COCs met our inclusion criteria. Only the two economic evaluations focusing exclusively on selective screening exceeded the 75-point threshold for high-quality economic studies based on the QHES instrument, whereas only one of these exceeded the 85% CHEERS threshold. Only three of the seven economic evaluations performed sensitivity analysis on key parameters. Most studies underestimated the benefits of thrombophilia screening by comparing one-time costs of genetic screening against benefits per person-year, thus implicitly assuming a 1-year duration of COC use, neglecting the long-term implications of VTE and/or neglecting the lifetime benefits of awareness of inherited thrombophilia. Our review highlights the lack of methodologically rigorous economic evaluations of universal thrombophilia screening before prescribing COCs.

  8. Efficacy and safety of combined ethinyl estradiol/drospirenone oral contraceptives in the treatment of acne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry KL Tan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Jerry KL Tan1, Chemanthi Ediriweera21University of Western Ontario and Windsor Clinical Research Inc., Windsor, Ontario, Canada; 2University of Western Ontario, Southwest Ontario Medical Education Network, Windsor, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Acne is a common disorder affecting the majority of adolescents and often extends into adulthood. The central pathophysiological feature of acne is increased androgenic stimulation and/or end-organ sensitivity of pilosebaceous units leading to sebum hypersecretion and infundibular hyperkeratinization. These events lead to Propionibacterium acnes proliferation and subsequent inflammation. Hormonal therapy, including combined oral contraceptives (OCs, can attenuate the proximate androgenic trigger of this sequence. For many women, hormonal therapy is a rational option for acne treatment as it may be useful across the spectrum of severity. Drospirenone (DRSP is a unique progestin structurally related to spironolactone with progestogenic, antimineralocorticoid, and antiandrogenic properties. It is available in 2 combined OC preparations (30 µg EE/3 mg DRSP; Yasmin® in a 21/7 regimen; and 20 µg EE/3 mg DRSP; Yaz® in a 24/4 regimen. These preparations are bereft of the fluid retentional side effects typical of other progestins and their safety has been demonstrated in large epidemiological studies in which no increased risk of vascular thromboembolic disease or arrhythmias was observed. In acne, the efficacy of DRSP-containing OCs has been shown in placebo-controlled superiority trials and in active-comparator non-inferiority trials.Keywords: acne vulgaris, combined oral contraceptives, drosperinone, ethinyl estradiol, efficacy, safety, treatment

  9. Combined Oral Contraception and Obesity Are Strong Predictors of Low-Grade Inflammation in Healthy Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Cecilie J; Pedersen, Ole B; Petersen, Mikkel S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-established marker of inflammation. The level of CRP is affected by several lifestyle factors. A slightly increased CRP level, also known as low-grade inflammation (LGI), is associated with increased risk of several diseases, especially cardiovascular...... disease. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of increased CRP levels in healthy individuals. We therefore assessed CRP in a large cohort of blood donors. METHODS: We measured plasma CRP levels in 15,684 participants from the Danish Blood Donor Study. CRP was measured by a commercial assay...... and abdominal obesity strongly predicted LGI among healthy individuals. However, the most striking finding was the high prevalence of LGI among premenopausal women who used combined oral contraception. Although the significance of CRP as a marker of inflammation is well known, the role of CRP in pathogenesis...

  10. [Gynecological use of a phlebokinetic drug with special reference to its combination with oral contraceptives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, D

    1975-09-30

    Controlled experiments confirmed the therapeutic usefulness in gynecology of a phlebokinetic drug, in which EPL (polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine) was combined with escine and rutine. The drug is particularly recommended for the prophylaxis and treatment of vein disorders caused by oral contraceptives. A total of 75 patients were treated with the drug (Essaven), in addition to the usual treatment (such as anticoagulants), while 75 controls received the usual treatment only. Results were excellent in cases of varicose veins, where the symptoms were eliminated in almost all cases. In cases of phlebitis and thrombophlebitis, the response was less univocal, but a definite improvement was evident in a good number of cases treated with Essaven; the drug also favored the return to normal conditions after thrombophlebitis attacks, reducing the duration of their painful aftereffects. The drug can be used daily for very long periods without side effects. It can also be used safely during pregnancy, without adverse effects on the fetus and on delivery. It is regarded as ideal to avoid the side effects of contraceptives on the venous system.

  11. Metabolic profile of a continuous versus a cyclic low-dose combined oral contraceptive after one year of use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rad, M.; Kluft, C.; Kam, M.L. de; Meijer, P.; Cohen, A.F.; Grubb, G.S.; Constantine, G.D.; Burggraaf, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives?To compare the effects of a combined oral contraceptive (COC) taken continuously with those of one of similar composition taken cyclically on 30 variables related to haemostasis, lipids, carbohydrates, bone metabolism, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Methods?Randomised,

  12. Metabolic profile of a continuous versus a cyclic low-dose combined oral contraceptive after one year of use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rad, M.; Kluft, C.; Kam, M.L. de; Meijer, P.; Cohen, A.F.; Grubb, G.S.; Constantine, G.D.; Burggraaf, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives?To compare the effects of a combined oral contraceptive (COC) taken continuously with those of one of similar composition taken cyclically on 30 variables related to haemostasis, lipids, carbohydrates, bone metabolism, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Methods?Randomised, open-labe

  13. Metabolic profile of a continuous versus a cyclic low-dose combined oral contraceptive after one year of use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rad, M.; Kluft, C.; Kam, M.L. de; Meijer, P.; Cohen, A.F.; Grubb, G.S.; Constantine, G.D.; Burggraaf, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives?To compare the effects of a combined oral contraceptive (COC) taken continuously with those of one of similar composition taken cyclically on 30 variables related to haemostasis, lipids, carbohydrates, bone metabolism, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Methods?Randomised, open-labe

  14. Oral contraception following abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707). In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P abortion (P abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. PMID:27399060

  15. Extended cycle combined oral contraceptives and prophylactic frovatriptan during the hormone-free interval in women with menstrual-related migraines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee, Andrea L; Sulak, Patricia J; Hill, Alexandria J; Hansen, Darci J; Kuehl, Thomas J; Clark, Jeffrey W

    2014-04-01

    Migraine headaches are a significant problem for American women with many of them suffering from headaches around the time of their menstrual cycle. Women taking oral contraceptives in the standard 21/7 cycle regimen often suffer from headaches around the time of the hormone free intervals (HFIs) as well. Extended oral contraceptive regimens have been shown to decrease the frequency, but not eliminate these headaches. This study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study of participants with menstrual-related migraines (MRMs) who were initiated on extended combined oral contraceptives and given frovatriptan prophylactically during HFIs. Participants having spontaneous menstrual cycles or taking daily combined oral contraceptives in a 21/7 regimen with MRMs were placed on a contraceptive containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol. Analyses compared headache scores during pre-study baseline cycles to those in a 168-day extended regimen with placebo versus frovatriptan treatments during HFIs. Daily headache scores decreased (p=0.034) from 1.29 ± 0.10 during pre-study cycles to 1.10 ± 0.14 during extended combined oral contraceptive use. Frovatriptan blocked the increase in headache score over the placebo during HFIs. However, following the withdrawal of frovatriptan, headache scores increased (p>0.01) despite resuming combined oral contraceptive use. Extended combined oral contraceptive regimen reduces MRM severity. Frovatriptan prevents headaches during HFIs, but is associated with new headache symptoms when withdrawn.

  16. The effect of combined oral contraceptives and age on dysmenorrhoea: an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Ingela; Ellström, Agneta Andersson; Milsom, Ian

    2012-03-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are widely advocated as treatment for primary dysmenorrhoea, but their efficacy has been questioned in a Cochrane review. The aim of this study was to evaluate COCs and the influence of age on the severity of dysmenorrhoea. Postal questionnaires regarding weight/height, contraception, pregnancy history and other reproductive health factors were sent to random samples of 19-year-old women born in 1962 (n = 656), 1972 (n = 780) and 1982 (n = 666) resident in the city of Gothenburg in 1981, 1991 and 2001. The responders were assessed again 5 years later at the age of 24 years. Current severity of dysmenorrhoea was measured on each occasion by a verbal multidimensional scoring system (VMS) and by a visual analogue scale (VAS). The severity of dysmenorrhoea was lower (PVMS score: a reduction of 0.3 units/VAS: a reduction of 9 mm, both PVMS score: a reduction of 0.1 units per 5 years, P< 0.0001/VAS: a reduction of 5 mm per 5 years, P< 0.0001). Childbirth also reduced the severity of dysmenorrhoea (VAS, P< 0.01 with a reduction of 7 mm). Women from the 82-cohort reported a greater severity of dysmenorrhoea compared with the 62 and 72 cohorts at both 19 and 24 years of age. In this longitudinal case-control study, COC use and increasing age, independent of each other, reduced the severity of dysmenorrhoea. COC use reduced the severity of dysmenorrhoea more than increasing age and childbirth. There was a trend over time regarding the severity of dysmenorrhoea where women from the 82-cohort reported a greater severity of dysmenorrhoea compared with the 62 and 72 cohorts.

  17. Different combined oral contraceptives and the risk of venous thrombosis: systematic review and network meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegeman, Bernardine H; de Bastos, Marcos; Rosendaal, Frits R; van Hylckama Vlieg, A; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Stijnen, Theo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide a comprehensive overview of the risk of venous thrombosis in women using different combined oral contraceptives. Design Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Data sources PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Academic Search Premier, and ScienceDirect up to 22 April 2013. Review methods Observational studies that assessed the effect of combined oral contraceptives on venous thrombosis in healthy women. The primary outcome of interest was a fatal or non-fatal first event of venous thrombosis with the main focus on deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Publications with at least 10 events in total were eligible. The network meta-analysis was performed using an extension of frequentist random effects models for mixed multiple treatment comparisons. Unadjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were reported. The requirement for crude numbers did not allow adjustment for potential confounding variables. Results 3110 publications were retrieved through a search strategy; 25 publications reporting on 26 studies were included. Incidence of venous thrombosis in non-users from two included cohorts was 1.9 and 3.7 per 10 000 woman years, in line with previously reported incidences of 1-6 per 10 000 woman years. Use of combined oral contraceptives increased the risk of venous thrombosis compared with non-use (relative risk 3.5, 95% confidence interval 2.9 to 4.3). The relative risk of venous thrombosis for combined oral contraceptives with 30-35 µg ethinylestradiol and gestodene, desogestrel, cyproterone acetate, or drospirenone were similar and about 50-80% higher than for combined oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. A dose related effect of ethinylestradiol was observed for gestodene, desogestrel, and levonorgestrel, with higher doses being associated with higher thrombosis risk. Conclusion All combined oral contraceptives investigated in this analysis were

  18. Efficacy and safety of combined ethinyl estradiol/drospirenone oral contraceptives in the treatment of acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jerry Kl; Ediriweera, Chemanthi

    2010-08-09

    Acne is a common disorder affecting the majority of adolescents and often extends into adulthood. The central pathophysiological feature of acne is increased androgenic stimulation and/or end-organ sensitivity of pilosebaceous units leading to sebum hypersecretion and infundibular hyperkeratinization. These events lead to Propionibacterium acnes proliferation and subsequent inflammation. Hormonal therapy, including combined oral contraceptives (OCs), can attenuate the proximate androgenic trigger of this sequence. For many women, hormonal therapy is a rational option for acne treatment as it may be useful across the spectrum of severity. Drospirenone (DRSP) is a unique progestin structurally related to spironolactone with progestogenic, antimineralocorticoid, and antiandrogenic properties. It is available in 2 combined OC preparations (30 μg EE/3 mg DRSP; Yasmin(®) in a 21/7 regimen; and 20 μg EE/3 mg DRSP; Yaz(®) in a 24/4 regimen). These preparations are bereft of the fluid retentional side effects typical of other progestins and their safety has been demonstrated in large epidemiological studies in which no increased risk of vascular thromboembolic disease or arrhythmias was observed. In acne, the efficacy of DRSP-containing OCs has been shown in placebo-controlled superiority trials and in active-comparator non-inferiority trials.

  19. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development

  20. Pharmacokinetic interaction study between riociguat and the combined oral contraceptives levonorgestrel and ethinylestradiol in healthy postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Reiner; Unger, Sigrun; van der Mey, Dorina; Becker, Corina; Saleh, Soundos; Wensing, Georg; Mück, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Female patients requiring treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are advised to avoid pregnancy because of the high associated mortality rate. Oral contraception is one of the main methods of preventing pregnancy in this context, mandating pharmacokinetic and safety studies for new agents in this setting. Riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator approved for treatment of PAH and inoperable and persistent or recurrent chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. This single-center, randomized, nonblinded study involving healthy postmenopausal women investigated the effect of riociguat on plasma concentrations of levonorgestrel (0.15 mg) and ethinylestradiol (0.03 mg) in a combined oral contraceptive. Treatment A was a single oral tablet of levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. In treatment B, subjects received 2.5 mg riociguat 3 times daily for 12 days. On the eighth day, they also received a single oral tablet of levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. Subjects received both regimens in a crossover design. There was no change in area under the plasma concentration-time curves of levonorgestrel or ethinylestradiol or maximum concentration in plasma (C max) of levonorgestrel during combined administration versus levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol alone. A 20% increase in the C max of ethinylestradiol was noted during coadministration; this is not anticipated to adversely impact the contraceptive efficacy or to require any dose adjustment for ethinylestradiol. Plasma concentrations and exposures of riociguat were within the expected range and were not influenced by coadministration with levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. Combined treatment was safe and well tolerated. In conclusion, riociguat did not change the exposure to levonorgestrel or ethinylestradiol relative to oral contraceptive administered alone.

  1. Cardiovascular disease and combined oral contraceptives: reviewing the evidence and balancing the risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, T M; Meirik, O; Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Cardiovascular risks have been a concern since combined oral contraceptives (OCs) were first introduced. In the past four years new, mostly reassuring information on the safety of modern, low oestrogen dose OCs has become available. However, in 1995 the new information showed higher venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk for OCs containing desogestrel and gestodene compared with levonorgestrel- or norethindrone-containing OCs. The controversial responses by national authorities, their scientific and public health merits were hotly debated and many considered the differences in risk small and resulted from bias and/or confounding. We discuss these arguments and conclude they lack empirical support or cannot account for the 2-fold increased risk. The risk of ischaemic stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) associated with low oestrogen dose OCs are very small in women without cardiovascular risk factors, while increased risk of haemorrhagic stroke is confined to women >35 years of age. Applying the most recent risks to models of OC-attributable events and deaths, OC-attributable mortality in women mortality (about 90 per million women of reproductive age annually in the UK) such risks appear small. Over the age of 35 years, OC-attributable mortality is a more important concern, particularly among smokers. In the absence of any appreciable OC-attributable mortality in young healthy women, the additional VTE risk for third compared with second generation OCs should be considered when women choose which OC to use.

  2. Post-marketing Surveillance for Combined Oral Contraceptive Containing Desogestrel (Marvelon?) in Chinese Rural Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess the side effects and the continuation rate of combined oral contraceptive (COC) containing desogestrel (Marvelon ) during 12 months. Methods This was a post-marketing surveillance study on Marvelon COC among 870 healthy rural women in 5 different counties of Jiangsu Province during 12 months. Results About 24.02% of the women who used Marvelon COC experienced side effects during 12 months. Gastrointestinal disorder, bleeding/spotting and chloasma were ranked the first three in the side effects. The rate of side effects of Marvelon COC users during the first 3 months in southern area of Jiangsu was significantly higher than that of users in northern area of Jiangsu. Most of the users did not experience obvious weight changes i.e., loss or increase in weight of more than 5 kg during 12 months. Blood pressure and biochemical indicators of almost 99% among users were within the normal range. The gross cumulative continuation rate for 12 months was 83.14%; the most common medical reason for discontinuation was gastrointestinal disorder. There was an increased risk of discontinuation use among women with lower educational level.Conclusion Marvelon COC brought fewer side effects and was well accepted when applied in Chinese rural women.

  3. Dose finding in a low-dose 21-day combined oral contraceptive containing gestodene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdicke, F; Sullivan, H; Spona, J; Elstein, M

    2001-10-01

    An open label, non-comparative study was carried out in 22 women over a total of five cycles. After an untreated cycle, oral administration of 20 microg ethinyl estradiol (EE) with 50 microg gestodene (GST) (tablets taken daily for 21 days with a break of 7 days) was commenced, and three treatment cycles were followed by an untreated follow-up control cycle. The ability of this formulation to inhibit ovulation and suppress ovarian activity was assessed by using hormonal parameters and ultrasound. One ovulation occurred during treatment. Luteinized unruptured follicles were observed in three cases in the second treatment cycle and in one case during the third treatment cycle. Follicle-like structures larger than 13 mm associated with a serum estradiol level of more than 30 pg/mL were noted in 19% of the women in the first treatment cycle. The rate of active follicle-like structures was 43% in the second treatment cycle and 28% in the third treatment cycle. The results were compared with previously reported findings of a preparation containing 20 microg EE and 75 microg GST. With regard to ovarian grading and endogenous hormone secretion, considerably more residual ovarian activity, with all parameters examined, was found in the 20 microg EE and 50 microg GST preparation compared to the 20 microg EE and 75 microg GST preparation. It was concluded that the 20 microg EE and 50 microg GST preparation administered for 21 days does not meet the requirements of a combined oral contraceptive with respect to ovulation inhibition.

  4. Venous thromboembolism and desogestrel- or gestodene-containing combination oral contraceptives: what are the facts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The UK's prescription drug regulatory agency warned the public and health care providers about the possible increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) among users of the combined oral contraceptives (OCs) containing desogestrel or gestodene. Data from three large not-yet-published studies served as the basis for the warning. The studies found about a 2-fold increased risk of VTE for these OC users when compared to users of OCs with other progestins. Yet the observational studies are subject to inherent biases (e.g., hospitalized cases and selection bias), which may explain the increased risk. Assuming the increased risk to be true, the risk of VTE is still lower than that linked to pregnancy (30 vs. 60 VTE cases per 100,000). The risk of VTE for users of OCs containing older progestins is about 15 VTE cases and that among healthy, nonpregnant, nonusers is about 4 VTE cases. The mortality risk associated with VTE among users of OCs containing desogestrel or gestodene is 1-1.5 deaths/1 million woman-years. The US Food and Drug Administration has examined the data and has concluded that the risk is not high enough to justify switching to other OCs or stopping use of OCs containing desogestrel or gestodene. It recommends that users of the OCs in question discuss the OCs with their providers and make an informed choice based on the benefits and risks and individual preferences. It might consider changes in labeling, but not pulling the OCs off the market. In Germany, women aged less than 30 were temporarily advised not to begin use of desogestrel- or gestodene-containing OCs. Women using them were advised to continue their use, however. The European Union announced that bias or chance could account for the findings and thus did not recommend changes in prescribing desogestrel- or gestodene-containing OCs.

  5. Use of Simulated Patients to Evaluate Combined Oral Contraceptive Dispensing Practices of Community Pharmacists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obreli-Neto, Paulo Roque; Pereira, Leonardo Régis Leira; Guidoni, Camilo Molino; Baldoni, André de Oliveira; Marusic, Srecko; de Lyra-Júnior, Divaldo Pereira; de Almeida, Kelsen Luis; Pazete, Ana Claudia Montolezi; do Nascimento, Janaina Dutra; Kos, Mitja; Girotto, Edmarlon; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Background Combined oral contraceptive (COC) use is the most commonly used reversible method of birth control. The incorrect use of COCs is frequent and one of the most common causes of unintended pregnancies. Community pharmacists (CPs) are in a strategic position to improve COC use because they are the last health professional to interact with patients before drug use. Objective To evaluate the COC dispensing practices of CPs in a developing country. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted in community pharmacies of Assis and Ourinhos microregions, Brazil, between June 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012. Four simulated patients (SPs) (with counseled audio recording) visited community pharmacies with a prescription for Ciclo 21® (a COC containing ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg + levonorgestrel 15 mcg). The audio recording of every SP visit was listened to independently by 3 researchers to evaluate the COC dispensing practice. The percentage of CPs who performed a screening for safe use of COCs (i.e., taking of patients’ medical and family history, and measuring of blood pressure) and provided counseling, as well as the quality of the screening and counseling, were evaluated. Results Of the 185 CPs contacted, 41 (22.2%) agreed to participate in the study and finished the study protocol. Only 3 CPs asked the SP a question (1 question asked by each professional), and all of the questions were closed-ended, viz., “do you smoke?” (n = 2) and “what is your age?” (n = 1). None of the CPs measured the patient’s blood pressure. Six CPs provided counseling when dispensing COCs (drug dosing, 5 CPs; possible adverse effects, 2 CPs), and one CP provided counseling regarding both aspects. Conclusion The CPs evaluated did not dispense COC appropriately and could influence in the occurrence of negatives therapeutic outcomes such as adverse effects and treatment failure. PMID:24324584

  6. Use of simulated patients to evaluate combined oral contraceptive dispensing practices of community pharmacists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roque Obreli-Neto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combined oral contraceptive (COC use is the most commonly used reversible method of birth control. The incorrect use of COCs is frequent and one of the most common causes of unintended pregnancies. Community pharmacists (CPs are in a strategic position to improve COC use because they are the last health professional to interact with patients before drug use. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the COC dispensing practices of CPs in a developing country. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted in community pharmacies of Assis and Ourinhos microregions, Brazil, between June 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012. Four simulated patients (SPs (with counseled audio recording visited community pharmacies with a prescription for Ciclo 21(® (a COC containing ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg + levonorgestrel 15 mcg. The audio recording of every SP visit was listened to independently by 3 researchers to evaluate the COC dispensing practice. The percentage of CPs who performed a screening for safe use of COCs (i.e., taking of patients' medical and family history, and measuring of blood pressure and provided counseling, as well as the quality of the screening and counseling, were evaluated. RESULTS: Of the 185 CPs contacted, 41 (22.2% agreed to participate in the study and finished the study protocol. Only 3 CPs asked the SP a question (1 question asked by each professional, and all of the questions were closed-ended, viz., "do you smoke?" (n = 2 and "what is your age?" (n = 1. None of the CPs measured the patient's blood pressure. Six CPs provided counseling when dispensing COCs (drug dosing, 5 CPs; possible adverse effects, 2 CPs, and one CP provided counseling regarding both aspects. CONCLUSION: The CPs evaluated did not dispense COC appropriately and could influence in the occurrence of negatives therapeutic outcomes such as adverse effects and treatment failure.

  7. Peripheral arterial disease in a female using high-dose combined oral contraceptive pills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Pallavee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between oral contraceptive (OC pills and vascular diseases is well-known, although, the present generation of pills is considered to be relatively safer in this regard. Hormonal treatment for severe abnormal uterine bleeding is usually considered after ruling out malignancy, when such bleeding is resistant to all other forms of treatment. We report a case of severe peripheral arterial disease in a female, who had been on high-dose OC pills for an extended period of time for severe uterine bleeding.

  8. Importance of levonorgestrel dose in oral contraceptives for effects on coagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluft, C.; Maat, M.P.M. de; Heinemann, L.A.J.; Spannagl, M.; Schramm, W.

    1999-01-01

    Combined oral contraceptives show clear differences in effect on the tissue factor-initiated coagulation test of activated protein C resistance, which is dependent on the presence and dosage of levonorgestrel. Multiphasic levonorgestrol oral contraceptives differ from monophasic contraceptives and

  9. Effectiveness and acceptability of progestogens in combined oral contraceptives – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulier Regina

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progestogen component of oral contraceptives (OCs has undergone changes since it was recognized that their chemical structure can influence the spectrum of minor adverse and beneficial effects. Methods The objective of this review was to evaluate currently available low-dose OCs containing ethinylestradiol and different progestogens in terms of contraceptive effectiveness, cycle control, side effects and continuation rates. The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched. Randomized trials reporting clinical outcomes were considered for inclusion and were assessed for methodological quality and validity. Results Twenty–two trials were included in the review. Eighteen were sponsored by pharmaceutical companies and in only 5 there was an attempt for blinding. Most comparisons between different interventions included one to three trials, involving usually less than 500 women. Discontinuation was less with second-generation progestogens compared to first–generation (RR 0.79; 95% CI 0.69–0.91. Cycle control appeared to be better with second-compared to first-generation progestogens for both, mono-and triphasic preparations (RR 0.69; 95% CI 0.52–0.91 and (RR 0.61; 95% CI 0.43–0.85, respectively. Intermenstrual bleeding was less with third- compared to second-generation pills (RR 0.71; 95% CI 0.55–0.91. Contraceptive effectiveness of gestodene (GSD was comparable to that of levonorgestrel (LNG, and had similar pattern of spotting, breakthrough bleeding and absence of withdrawal bleeding. Drospirenone (DRSP was similar compared to desogestrel (DSG regarding contraceptive effectiveness, cycle control and side effects. Conclusion The third- and second-generation progestogens are preferred over first generation in all indices of acceptability. Current evidence suggests that GSD is comparable to LNG in terms of contraceptive effectiveness and for most cycle control indices. GSD is also

  10. Combining oral contraceptives with a natural nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitor for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Hugo; Haddad, Clarice; Casoy, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic disease in which a persistent state of heightened inflammation is maintained by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. The progestins present in oral contraceptives are potent inhibitors of NF-κB translocation to cell nuclei, while Pycnogenol® (Pinus pinaster) acts by blocking post-translational events. In this study, the effects of Pycnogenol on pain scores were investigated in patients with endometriosis using oral contraceptives containing either gestodene or drospirenone in extended regimens. Pain scores were determined using a visual analog scale before and after 3 months of treatment. Oral contraceptives, used alone (groups 1 and 3) or in association with Pycnogenol (groups 2 and 4), resulted in significant decreases in pain scores after 3 months of treatment; however, this reduction was significantly greater in the groups using oral contraceptives + Pycnogenol (groups 2 and 4) compared with those using oral contraceptives alone (groups 1 and 3). In the groups using oral contraceptives alone, 50% of patients became pain-free by the end of the third month of treatment. These results suggest that Pycnogenol increases the efficacy of oral contraceptives for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. PMID:24379702

  11. The relevance of the pharmacologic properties of a progestational agent to its clinical effects as a combination oral contraceptive.

    OpenAIRE

    Upton, G. V.; Corbin, A

    1989-01-01

    Levonorgestrel (LNg) is known for its marked progestational/contraceptive activity. As shown in animal experiments, however, high doses of LNg are required to elicit an androgenic response; in contrast, considerably lower doses of LNg are required for antiovulatory (contraceptive) action. Thus, a large dose separation exists between androgenic and contraceptive activity. When LNg is combined with an estrogen, as in the contraceptive formulations, the androgenic response is attenuated or negat...

  12. Oral contraceptives and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostardi, R A; Woebkenberg, N R; Jarrett, M T

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken with volunteer females (aged 20-25) to determine the effect of OCs (oral contraceptives) on hematologic and metabolic variables during exercise. 5 of the women studied were naturally cycling and 7 were taking OCs. The women worked at 2 workloads on a bicycle ergometer at 50% and 90% of their maximal aerobic capacity during 3 different phases of their menstrual cycle. There was no better time of the month for doing the 50% or the 90% workload in either group. Heartrate for the OC group was significantly higher at the 50% maximal capacity. Results of the test indicate tha women on OCs have somewhat reduced cardiac efficiency and are ventilating more to carry out a given amount of work when compared to women who are naturally cycling. Possible explanations for the higher heart rate are put forward. The main limitation of the study is that the subject numbers involved are small and the number of cycles studied is also small.

  13. Oral contraception in Denmark 1998-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Nadia M; Laursen, Maja; Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2012-01-01

    Oral contraceptives (OC) are the most popular contraception in Denmark. Overall figures on use are well described, but more detailed use patterns according to type and age need to be updated.......Oral contraceptives (OC) are the most popular contraception in Denmark. Overall figures on use are well described, but more detailed use patterns according to type and age need to be updated....

  14. [Mercilon - the optimal oral contraceptive].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachev, E; Damianov, L; Kolarov, G; Novachkov, V; Ivanov, S

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the effect of the oral contraceptive Mercilon on menstrual cycle, contraceptive efficacy, lipid profile, safety profile and adverse effects in a group of 32 women, included in the survey. The results of the trial show excellent contraceptive effect with Pearl Index of 0.00 and good control over the menstrual cycle. No negative or unfavorable effects were seen on the lipid profile as well as on the liver kidney and coangulant system function. Minor side effects were seen in only 5% of the patients.

  15. Combining oral contraceptives with a natural nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitor for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia H Jr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hugo Maia Jr,1–3 Clarice Haddad,3 Julio Casoy3 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, School of Medicine, Federal University of Bahia, 2Itaigara Memorial Day Hospital, 3Centro de Pesquisas e Assistência em Reprodução Humana (CEPARH, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil Abstract: Endometriosis is a chronic disease in which a persistent state of heightened inflammation is maintained by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB activation. The progestins present in oral contraceptives are potent inhibitors of NF-κB translocation to cell nuclei, while Pycnogenol® (Pinus pinaster acts by blocking post-translational events. In this study, the effects of Pycnogenol on pain scores were investigated in patients with endometriosis using oral contraceptives containing either gestodene or drospirenone in extended regimens. Pain scores were determined using a visual analog scale before and after 3 months of treatment. Oral contraceptives, used alone (groups 1 and 3 or in association with Pycnogenol (groups 2 and 4, resulted in significant decreases in pain scores after 3 months of treatment; however, this reduction was significantly greater in the groups using oral contraceptives + Pycnogenol (groups 2 and 4 compared with those using oral contraceptives alone (groups 1 and 3. In the groups using oral contraceptives alone, 50% of patients became pain-free by the end of the third month of treatment. These results suggest that Pycnogenol increases the efficacy of oral contraceptives for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Keywords: Pycnogenol®, aromatase, endometriosis, nuclear factor-kappa B

  16. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oral contraceptive pill is much more than a birth control pill. Adolescent girls and young women are frequently prescribed the ... Control Pills: General Information Medical Uses of the Birth Control Pill PCOS: All ... Chat with us! Our PCOS chats are safe places for teens and young women who share a common condition ...

  17. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor-Q.D.® ... only oral contraceptives are safe for use by breast-feeding mothers. If you are fully breastfeeding (not ... 6 weeks after delivery. If you are partially breast-feeding (giving your baby some food or formula), ...

  18. Oral Contraceptives after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Schlatter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bariatric surgery offers a highly effective mode of treatment for obese patients. Some procedures such as bypass cause an alteration in normal gastrointestinal tract with possible consequences for the uptake of orally administered drugs. Methods: We assessed the literature to ascertain whether the use of oral drugs and especially oral contraceptives is effective and adequate after bariatric surgery. Results: The bioavailability of drugs could be affected by the solubility and pH of the modified medium after bariatric surgery and by the loss of gastrointestinal transporters. Bariatric surgery could potentially result in a transient change in the absorption of drugs such as analgesics, antibiotics, antiarrhythmics, anticoagulants, psychotropic, and oral contraceptive drugs. Effective contraception is especially critical in the postoperative period, and implants might be representing a safe contraceptive method in women undergoing bariatric surgery. Conclusion: Each drug will have to be evaluated with respect to its site of absorption and its mechanism of absorption, with special attention on parameters influencing the effectiveness of the absorption processes.

  19. Oral contraceptives in the treatment of acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J K; Degreef, H

    2001-02-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) can reduce acne by lowering the production of adrenal and ovarian androgens, by inhibiting 5-alpha-reductase, which in turn, reduces the levels of dihydrotestosterone, and by stimulating sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), thus reducing the levels of free testosterone. In newer OCs, such as Tricyclen and Diane-35, the progestin component is minimally androgenic and anti-androgenic respectively, thereby enhancing the favorable profile of these products in the treatment of hyperandrogenic disorders, including acne. The efficacy of these agents and their long-term safety profile supports their use in various grades of acne in females: * As adjunctive therapy to topical agents for women with mild non-scarring acne desiring oral contraception * As primary therapy for patients with moderate non-scarring acne in combination with topical therapy and systemic antibiotics * As one of two preferred methods of contraception in patients with scarring and severe inflammatory acne being treated with systemic isotretinoin.

  20. Efficacy, safety, and patient acceptability of the combined chlormadinone acetate-ethinylestradiol oral contraceptive

    OpenAIRE

    Serena Ferrari; Marianna Cannoletta, Matteo Generali; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Serena Ferrari, Marianna Cannoletta, Matteo Generali, Lucia Cazzato, Angelo CagnacciDepartment of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Pediatrics, Azienda Ospedaliero, Universitaria di Modena, ItalyAbstract: Since their introduction in 1959, development of hormonal contraceptives has been ongoing, with the ultimate aim of creating not only an effective and safe contraceptive method, but also a drug able to meet the need for treatment of other conditions, such as acne, seborrhea, and hirsutism, with fe...

  1. 复方口服避孕药与血脂异常%Combined oral contraceptives and dyslipidemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪立伟; 李可欣

    2011-01-01

    Combined oral contraceptives are the most widely used contraceptives preparations, they contain two sex hormone:progestogen and estrogen. COC may cause cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiological evidence suggests that the dyslipidemia may he associated with these diseases. The mechanism of this phenomenon is not entirely clear; the elevation of blood triglyceride levels may be related to a decrease in lipolytic activity of liver and triglyceride removed as well as an increase in blood insulin levels. Different preparations of COC should be altemated if possible for a long-term use of the contraceptives in women of child-bearing age, and blood lipid levels should be monitored during the period of COC use.%复方口服避孕药(COC)为最常用的避孕制剂,其含有2种性激素:孕激素和雌激素.COC 可致心血管疾病.流行病调查显示COC引起的心血管疾病与血脂异常有关.其机制尚不完全清楚;三酰甘油水平的升高可能与肝脏分解脂肪和清除三酰甘油能力降低及血液中胰岛素水平增高有关.育龄期妇女长期使用时应尽可能交替使用不同种类的COC,用药期间进行血脂监测.

  2. Effects of combined oral contraceptives, depot medroxyprogesterone acetate and the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system on the vaginal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, J Paul; Edwards, David J; Blithe, Diana L; Fettweis, Jennifer M; Serrano, Myrna G; Sheth, Nihar U; Strauss, Jerome F; Buck, Gregory A; Jefferson, Kimberly K

    2017-04-01

    Prior studies suggest that the composition of the vaginal microbiome may positively or negatively affect susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). Some female hormonal contraceptive methods also appear to positively or negatively influence STI transmission and BV. Therefore, changes in the vaginal microbiome that are associated with different contraceptive methods may explain, in part, effects on STI transmission and BV. We performed a retrospective study of 16S rRNA gene survey data of vaginal samples from a subset of participants from the Human Vaginal Microbiome Project at Virginia Commonwealth University. The subset included 682 women who reported using a single form of birth control that was condoms, combined oral contraceptives (COCs), depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) or the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). Women using COCs [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13-0.64] and DMPA (aOR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13-0.89), but not LNG-IUS (aOR 1.55, 95% CI 0.72-3.35), were less likely to be colonized by BV-associated bacteria relative to women who used condoms. Women using COCs (aOR 1.94, 95% CI 1.25-3.02) were more likely to be colonized by beneficial H2O2-producing Lactobacillus species compared with women using condoms, while women using DMPA (aOR 1.09, 95% CI 0.63-1.86) and LNG-IUS (aOR 0.74, 95% CI 0.48-1.15) were not. Use of COCs is significantly associated with increased vaginal colonization by healthy lactobacilli and reduced BV-associated taxa. COC use may positively influence gynecologic health through an increase in healthy lactobacilli and a decrease in BV-associated bacterial taxa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Choosing the Right Oral Contraceptive Pill for Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) continue to be the most commonly used form of prescription contraceptives used by adolescents in the United States. With proper use, oral contraceptives provide safe and effective birth control. Broad categories of OCPs include progestin-only pills (POPs) and combined oral contraceptive pills (COCs). Certain types of progestins have more potent antiandrogenic properties and are more effective in treating acne, hirsutism, and polycystic ovary syndrome. This article reviews types of OCPs, discusses risks and benefits of OCPs, and provides guidance for how to choose the most beneficial and appropriate OCP for individual adolescent patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiovascular risk in Egyptian healthy consumers of different types of combined oral contraceptives pills: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Haggar, Sahar M; Mostafa, Tarek M

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the associated cardiovascular risk in Egyptian healthy consumers of different types of combined oral contraceptives pills (COCPs) via determination of lipids profiles, Castelli index I, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin concentrations as cardiovascular risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, the study groups consisted of control group that represented by 30 healthy married women who were not on any contraceptive mean or any hormonal therapy and had normal menstrual cycles, group two consisted of 30 women who were users of Levonorgesterl 0.15 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle, group three consisted of 30 women who were users of Gestodene 0.075 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle, and group four consisted of 30 women who were users of Drospirenone 3 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle. One-way analysis of variance followed by LSD post hoc test was used for comparison of variables. P value index. Formulation containing ethinylestradiol combined with gestodene neither altered adipose tissue function nor showed deleterious effect on lipid panel. Formulation containing ethinylestradiol combined with drospirenone resulted in significantly higher HDL-C and adiponectin concentrations. In conclusion, the uptake of COCPs containing levonorgestrel plus ethinylestradiol is associated with high cardiovascular risk since this formulation showed significantly lower adiponectin concentration, significantly higher leptin, resistin, and atherogenic index as compared to other studied groups. By contrast, the formulations containing ethinylestradiol combined with third generation progestin gestodene or fourth generation progestin drospirenone are associated with low cardiovascular risk since they neither altered adipose tissue function nor impaired lipoprotein metabolism as experienced by their favorable effect on leptin, adiponectin, and resistin, with non-changed atherogenic index, higher HDL-C levels and

  5. 复方口服避孕药的临床应用进展%Recent advances in clinical application of combined oral contraceptive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄立冬; 吴玉英; 杨柳(综述); 陈昌益(审校)

    2015-01-01

    复方口服避孕药由于避孕效果可靠,一直是世界范围使用最广泛的避孕方法之一,同时也是国际上认为研究最深入的领域之一。该文将对复方口服避孕药的早期发现、新型口服避孕药的发展趋势和目前应用现状进行简要综述。%Combined oral contraceptive( COC) is one of the most frequently used contraception drugs world-wide, and researches on COC has become one of the most intensively investigated area in gynecology.The early dis-covery of COC, current status of its clinical use, and trends of new oral contraceptive are reviewed in this paper.

  6. Recent innovations in oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Miriam; Phan-Weston, Scarlett; Jacobs, Adam

    2010-03-01

    Traditional forms of oral contraception contain 21 days of hormone-containing pills and 7 days of placebo during the hormone-free interval (HFI). Since 2003, the Food and Drug Administration has approved 24/4, 84/7, and 365-day regimens. These regimens shorten the HFI in an attempt to decrease bleeding and menstrual-associated side effects. Safety and efficacy of these regimens is comparable with traditional 21/7 dosing. Extended regimens are associated with high patient satisfaction. Bleeding patterns are similar or shorter in women using extended regimens, along with improvement in menstrual symptoms. One of the new formulations contains the new progestin drospirenone, which has antimineralocorticoid and antiandrogenic properties. This review summarizes the data about new formulations of oral contraception available in the United Sates and also provides a summary of the current literature on drospirenone.

  7. Nomegestrol acetate-17b-estradiol for oral contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anne Burke Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Oral contraceptives remain a popular method of contraception over 50 years after their introduction. While safe and effective for many women, the failure rate of oral contraception is about 8%. Concerns about the risk of venous thromboembolism continue to drive the search for the safest oral contraceptive formulations. The oral contraceptive NOMAC-E2 contains nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC 2.5 mg + 17b-estradiol (E2 1.5 mg. The approved dosing regimen is 24 days of active hormone, followed by a 4-day hormone-free interval. NOMAC is a progestin derived from testosterone, which has high bioavailability, rapid absorption, and a long half-life. Estradiol, though it has a lower bioavailability, has been successfully combined with NOMAC in a monophasic oral contraceptive. Two recently published randomized controlled trials demonstrate that NOMAC-E2 is an effective contraceptive, with a Pearl Index less than one pregnancy per 100 woman-years. The bleeding pattern on NOMAC-E2 is characterized by fewer bleeding/spotting days, shorter withdrawal bleeds, and a higher incidence of amenorrhea than the comparator oral contraceptive containing drospirenone and ethinyl estradiol. The adverse event profile appears to be acceptable. Few severe adverse events were reported in the randomized controlled trials. The most common adverse events were irregular bleeding, acne, and weight gain. Preliminary studies suggest that NOMAC-E2 does not seem to have negative effects on hemostatic and metabolic parameters. While no one oral contraceptive formulation is likely to be the optimum choice for all women, NOMAC-E2 is a formulation with effectiveness comparable with that of other oral contraceptives, and a reassuring safety profile.Keywords: oral contraception, nomegestrol acetate, estradiol

  8. Comparison of a transdermal contraceptive patch vs. oral contraceptives on hemostasis variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluft, C.; Meijer, P.; LaGuardia, K.D.; Fisher, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare effects of the transdermal contraceptive patch, a desogestrel/ethinyl estradiol (EE)-containing, monophasic combination oral contraceptive (COC) and a levonorgestrel/EE-containing, triphasic COC on hemostasis variables. Study Design: This was a

  9. Comparison of a transdermal contraceptive patch vs. oral contraceptives on hemostasis variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluft, C.; Meijer, P.; LaGuardia, K.D.; Fisher, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare effects of the transdermal contraceptive patch, a desogestrel/ethinyl estradiol (EE)-containing, monophasic combination oral contraceptive (COC) and a levonorgestrel/EE-containing, triphasic COC on hemostasis variables. Study Design: This was a randomize

  10. Increased apparent oral clearance of valproic acid during intake of combined contraceptive steroids in women with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Carlo Andrea; Mazzucchelli, Iolanda; Arbasino, Carla; Canevini, Maria Paola; Fattore, Cinzia; Perucca, Emilio

    2006-09-01

    To determine potential changes in total and unbound serum valproic acid (VPA) concentrations at steady-state during a cycle of intake of combined hormonal contraceptive (HC) steroids. Blood samples were collected from nine women stabilized on VPA monotherapy on two separate randomized occasions: (i) at the end of the 4- to 7-day HC-free interval, and (ii) on the last day of the HC intake period. Trough concentrations of VPA in serum and serum ultrafiltrates were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. In all women, total and unbound VPA concentrations were higher during the HC-free interval than during HC intake (means +/- SD: 425 +/- 184 vs. 350 +/- 145 micromol/L, respectively, for total VPA, p = 0.002, and 55 +/- 37 vs. 39 +/- 25 micromol/L, respectively, for unbound VPA, p = 0.005). Compared with the HC-free interval, HC intake was associated with a mean 21.5% increase in VPA total apparent oral clearance (from 8.0 +/- 5.2 to 9.7 +/- 6.4 ml/h/kg, p = 0.01) and a 45.2 % increase in VPA unbound apparent oral clearance (from 79 +/- 81 to 115 +/- 121 ml/h/kg, p = 0.029). The apparent oral clearance of total and unbound VPA increases during the HC intake period compared with the HC-free interval, probably due to induction of glucuronosyltransferase by ethinylestradiol. The magnitude of the change varies across individuals, being potentially clinically relevant in some cases. Serum VPA concentrations should be monitored when adding or discontinuing HC steroids, and possibly during the on-off intervals of a HC cycle.

  11. Maternal use of oral contraceptives and risk of fetal death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Rikke; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Jørgensen, Tina;

    2008-01-01

    Intrauterine exposure to artificial sex hormones such as oral contraceptives may be associated with an increased risk of fetal death. Between 1996 and 2002, a total of 92 719 women were recruited to The Danish National Birth Cohort and interviewed about exposures during pregnancy. Outcome.......2%) women took oral contraceptives during pregnancy. Use of combined oestrogen and progesterone oral contraceptives (COC) or progesterone-only oral contraceptives (POC) during pregnancy was not associated with increased hazard ratios of fetal death compared with non-users, HR 1.01 [95% CI 0.71, 1.45] and HR...... 1.37 [95% CI 0.65, 2.89] respectively. Neither use of COC nor POC prior to pregnancy was associated with fetal death. Stratification by maternal age and smoking showed elevated risks of fetal death for women contraception during pregnancy, but the interactions were...

  12. LEVELS OF KEY CYTOKINES, MACROGLOBULINS AND THEIR SPECIFIC IMMUNE COMPLEXES IN BLOOD SERA OF WOMEN TAKING COMBINED ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Zorina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. We investigated effects of combined oral contraceptives (COC containing low- and microdoses of estrogenic components upon serum levels of macroglobulin family proteins (alpha-2-macroglobulin, α2-MG, and pregnancy-associated alpha-2-glycoprotein, α2-PAG, their immune complexes with IgG, as well as concentrations of some cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, IFNγ. It was shown that cytokine levels did not differ with control, whereas α2-MG concentrations showed a time-dependent decrease in a group of women taking COC with microdoses of estrogens, and α2-PAG levels increased tenfold, independent on dosage and time of COC application. Meanwhile, contents of PAG-IgG complexes exhibits a gradual decrease, along with increase in MG-IgG. Considering PAG as a marker of normal and malignant proliferation, we suggest, that the levels of α2-PAG may be useful in monitoring of women taking COC, in order to predict high risk of pathological  proliferation  by  evaluation  of  individuals with  elevated  α2-PAG  levels.  (Med.  Immunol.,  2011, vol. 13, N 6, pp 635-638 

  13. Effect of a combined oral contraceptive containing 20 microg ethinyl estradiol and 75 microg gestodene on hemostatic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrighi, José Mendes; De Campos, Luis Salvoni Carneiro; Eluf Gebara, Otávio Celso; Petta, Carlos Alberto; Bahamondes, Luis

    2006-01-01

    The effects of a combined oral contraceptive (COC) containing 20 microg ethinyl estradiol (EE) and 75 microg gestodene (GSD) on prothrombin activity (PA), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), platelet number, fibrinogen, antithrombin III (ATIII), protein C, protein S and D-dimer were evaluated over 6 months in 23 young, healthy women. Laboratory assessments were performed prior to initiation of COC use (pretreatment) and after 3 and 6 months of use. Results showed no significant changes in fibrinogen, protein C, ATIII or D-dimer during COC use, compared with pretreatment values. The increase in platelet count, decreases in protein S level, PA and APTT, and the prolongation of TT were significant. In conclusion, the use of a COC containing 20 microg EE and 75 microg GSD did not cause any significant changes in the hemostatic parameters studied that could be suggestive of a higher prothrombotic risk. Further studies with a larger sample size are necessary in order to obtain conclusive data.

  14. Efficacy of Acupuncture versus Combined Oral Contraceptive Pill in Treatment of Moderate-to-Severe Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intira Sriprasert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This open-label randomized controlled trial was designed to compare the efficacy of acupuncture and combined oral contraceptive (COC pill in treating moderate-to-severe primary dysmenorrhea. Fifty-two participants were randomly assigned to receive either acupuncture (n = 27 or COC (n = 25 for three menstrual cycles. Mefenamic acid was prescribed as a recue analgesic drug with both groups. The statistical approach used for efficacy and safety assessments was intention-to-treat analysis. By the end of the study, both treatments had resulted in significant improvement over baselines in all outcomes, that is, maximal dysmenorrhea pain scores, days suffering from dysmenorrhea, amount of rescue analgesic used, and quality of life assessed by SF-36 questionnaire. Over the three treatment cycles, COC caused greater reduction in maximal pain scores than acupuncture, while improvements in the remaining outcomes were comparable. Responders were defined as participants whose maximal dysmenorrhea pain scores decreased at least 33% below their baseline. Response rates following both interventions at the end of the study were not statistically different. Acupuncture commonly caused minimal local side effects but did not cause any hormone-related side effects as did COC. In conclusion, acupuncture is an alternative option for relieving dysmenorrhea, especially when COC is not a favorable choice.

  15. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in women under combined oral contraceptive. The PILl Genetic RIsk Monitoring (PILGRIM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchon, Pierre; Al Frouh, Fadi; Henneuse, Agathe; Ibrahim, Manal; Brunet, Dominique; Barthet, Marie-Christine; Aillaud, Marie-Françoise; Venton, Geoffroy; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Identifying women at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major public health issue. The objective of this study was to identify environmental and genetic determinants of VTE risk in a large sample of women under combined oral contraceptives (COC). A total of 968 women who had had one event of VTE during COC use were compared to 874 women under COC but with no personal history of VTE. Clinical data were collected and a systematic thrombophilia screening was performed together with ABO blood group assessment. After adjusting for age, family history, and type and duration of COC use, main environmental determinants of VTE were smoking (odds ratio [OR] =1.65, 95% confidence interval [1.30-2.10]) and a body mass index higher than 35 kg.m⁻² (OR=3.46 [1.81-7.03]). In addition, severe inherited thrombophilia (OR=2.13 [1.32-3.51]) and non-O blood groups (OR=1.98 [1.57-2.49]) were strong genetic risk factors for VTE. Family history poorly predicted thrombophilia as its prevalence was similar in patients with or without first degree family history of VTE (29.3% vs 23.9%, p=0.09). In conclusion, this study confirms the influence of smoking and obesity and shows for the first time the impact of ABO blood group on the risk of VTE in women under COC. It also confirms the inaccuracy of the family history of VTE to detect inherited thrombophilia.

  16. Oral contraceptive compliance during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfaty, D

    1997-06-17

    A review of the available literature suggests that adolescent lack of compliance with oral contraceptives (OCs) is a multifactorial problem that requires a multifactorial solution. Because of their lack of experience with contraception, higher frequency of intercourse, higher intrinsic fertility, and pattern of frequent stopping or switching of methods, adolescents experience higher OC failure rates than do adult women. Adolescents also are more likely to forget to take the pill or to discontinue due to side effects, without consulting their physician. A survey of European young women identified contraceptive protection without weight gain as the most necessary change in OCs. Adolescents must be counseled not to miss a single pill, observe the pill-free interval, take phasic formulations in the right order, and use a back-up method in case of diarrhea and vomiting or when certain medications (e.g., antibiotics and anti-epileptics) are used concurrently, and be informed of steps to take in the event of side effects and unprotected intercourse. The quality of the counseling appears to be more important to compliance than the quantity of information provided. Pharmacists should complete the counseling initiated by the physician and explain prescription use. The most significant predictor of consistent OC use is the adolescent's motivation.

  17. Comparison of the impact of vaginal and oral administration of combined hormonal contraceptives on hepatic proteins sensitive to estrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitruk-Ware, R.L.; Menard, J.; Rad, M.; Burggraaf, J.; Kam, M.L.de; Tokay, B.A.; Sivin, I.; Kluft, C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effects of a new combined hormonal contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR) delivering the nonandrogenic progestin Nestorone® (NES) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) on several key estrogen-sensitive hepatic proteins that may be markers for the risk of arterial or venous disease events

  18. Comparison of the impact of vaginal and oral administration of combined hormonal contraceptives on hepatic proteins sensitive to estrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitruk-Ware, R.L.; Menard, J.; Rad, M.; Burggraaf, J.; Kam, M.L.de; Tokay, B.A.; Sivin, I.; Kluft, C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effects of a new combined hormonal contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR) delivering the nonandrogenic progestin Nestorone® (NES) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) on several key estrogen-sensitive hepatic proteins that may be markers for the risk of arterial or venous disease events

  19. Use of combined oral contraceptives and risk of venous thromboembolism: nested case-control studies using the QResearch and CPRD databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupland, Carol; Hippisley-Cox, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between use of combined oral contraceptives and risk of venous thromboembolism, taking the type of progestogen into account. Design Two nested case-control studies. Setting General practices in the United Kingdom contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD; 618 practices) and QResearch primary care database (722 practices). Participants Women aged 15-49 years with a first diagnosis of venous thromboembolism in 2001-13, each matched with up to five controls by age, practice, and calendar year. Main outcome measures Odds ratios for incident venous thromboembolism and use of combined oral contraceptives in the previous year, adjusted for smoking status, alcohol consumption, ethnic group, body mass index, comorbidities, and other contraceptive drugs. Results were combined across the two datasets. Results 5062 cases of venous thromboembolism from CPRD and 5500 from QResearch were analysed. Current exposure to any combined oral contraceptive was associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (adjusted odds ratio 2.97, 95% confidence interval 2.78 to 3.17) compared with no exposure in the previous year. Corresponding risks associated with current exposure to desogestrel (4.28, 3.66 to 5.01), gestodene (3.64, 3.00 to 4.43), drospirenone (4.12, 3.43 to 4.96), and cyproterone (4.27, 3.57 to 5.11) were significantly higher than those for second generation contraceptives levonorgestrel (2.38, 2.18 to 2.59) and norethisterone (2.56, 2.15 to 3.06), and for norgestimate (2.53, 2.17 to 2.96). The number of extra cases of venous thromboembolism per year per 10 000 treated women was lowest for levonorgestrel (6, 95% confidence interval 5 to 7) and norgestimate (6, 5 to 8), and highest for desogestrel (14, 11 to 17) and cyproterone (14, 11 to 17). Conclusions In these population based, case-control studies using two large primary care databases, risks of venous thromboembolism associated with combined oral

  20. [Health risks of oral contraceptives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Christoph R

    2011-06-01

    Oral contraceptives (OC) are either composed of a combination of an estrogen derivative (usually ethinly estradiol) and a progestogen, or they contain a progestogen only. OC are characterized by a high effectiveness and have a low failure rate if taken correctly. Most women tolerate OC relatively well, but adverse effects do occur which are driven by the estrogen dose as well as by the type of progestogen. The most frequently reported adverse effects are nausea or vomiting, breast tenderness, headache or inbalanced mood, but these unwanted side effects are often transient. The fear of weight gain of many OC users is not necessarily supported by data from studies which report relatively little differences in body mass index on average during OC use. Nevertheless, substantial weight gain can occur in individual women. The widely discussed fear of breast cancer is also not justified, and the risk of developing ovarian or endometrial cancer is reduced for women who use OC on a regular basis. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the adverse effect with the greatest potential for serious harm if pulmonary embolism develops. This rare, but potentially dangerous adverse effect of OC has been discussed emotionally for many years and keeps attracting a lot of public interest. VTE is rare in young women, but the VTE risk is increased two- to sixfold for OC users as compared to non-users. The VTE risk increases with increasing estrogen dose, is highest in the first year of use, and is higher for OC from the third generation (containing desogestrel, gestodene or norgestimate) than for OC from the second generation (containing levonorgestrel) or than for the progestogen-only pill. According to most studies, OC containing the progestogens drospirenone or cyproterone acetate are similar with regard to VTE risks than OC from the third generation. Individual genetic susceptibility affecting the clotting system plays a major role in the risk of developing VTE in combination with OC, and

  1. Condom practices of urban teens using Norplant contraceptive implants, oral contraceptives, and condoms for contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darney, P D; Callegari, L S; Swift, A; Atkinson, E S; Robert, A M

    1999-04-01

    The availability of long-acting hormonal birth control methods has created new contraceptive options for adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine whether teens initiating these methods use condoms less frequently than teens using oral contraceptive pills or condoms alone and may therefore be at an increased risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections. To investigate ongoing condom behavior in teens using levonorgestrel (Norplant) contraceptive implants, oral contraceptives, and condoms alone, we examined data from a 2-year prospective cohort study of 399 urban teens. The study consisted of 3 clinic-based cohorts of adolescent female contraceptive users: Norplant contraceptive implants (n = 200), oral contraceptives (n = 100), and condoms alone (n = 99). Data were collected at an admission interview and at 1- and 2-year follow-up from method continuers. Norplant contraceptive implant users were less likely than oral contraceptive or condom users to report condom use at last sex or consistent condom use at 1- and 2-year follow-up. The implant group showed a significant decrease in condom use from admission to 2 years after method initiation. The proportion of implant users self-reporting new sexually transmitted infections at 2-year follow-up, however, was not significantly greater than that of oral contraceptive or condom users. Our findings indicate that teen users of Norplant contraceptive implants are less likely to use condoms than teens who choose oral contraceptives but, probably because of differences in sexual behavior, are no more likely to self-report sexually transmitted infections. Our findings also indicate that teens who choose oral contraceptives and condoms do not use them consistently enough to avoid pregnancies or sexually transmitted infections.

  2. Residual ovarian activity during oral contraception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Heusden

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe study objectives in this thesis focus on pituitary-ovarian activity in women using oral contraceptive steroids. Contraceptive steroids influence the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in order to interfere with normal follicular development and ovulation. Additional effects on the e

  3. Residual ovarian activity during oral contraception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Heusden

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe study objectives in this thesis focus on pituitary-ovarian activity in women using oral contraceptive steroids. Contraceptive steroids influence the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in order to interfere with normal follicular development and ovulation. Additional effects on the e

  4. Effects of oral contraceptives in vaginal cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, M B; Ferreira, A C; Fenólio, J C; Franceschini, S A; Toloi, M R

    2000-06-01

    Many literature studies have shown that long-term use of oral contraceptives (OC) is associated with lack of protection of the epithelium of the uterine cervix. Forty-five patients, from 18 to 35 years old, users of two contraceptive formulations, of different estrogenic concentration, took part in this study as volunteers to evaluate the predisposition of the cervix to pathologies. The results found before OC use were 11% of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and 13% of HPV infection. These pathologies were correctly treated and after 5 months of OC use we found total remission of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and 4% of persistent HPV infection. These data lead us to conclude that the OC studied here interfered very little with the presented pathologic results. The risk factors that we considered relevant were: 1) age group (the patients that presented HPV and C. trachomatis infections were young university students); 2) lifestyle (most patients certified that they did not combine the use of barrier contraceptives with the use of OC); 3) multiple sexual partners; 4) low socioeconomic condition.

  5. Is oral contraceptive associated with genital warts?

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the association between oral contraceptive use and the prevalence of genital warts in women. METHODS: Cross sectional case control study comparing oral contraceptive use in women with and without genital warts attending a city centre genitourinary medicine clinic controlling for recent sexual activity, the presence of other sexually transmitted infections, socio-economic class and history of pregnancy using a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: After control...

  6. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between antiretrovirals and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittle, Victoria; Bull, Lauren; Boffito, Marta; Nwokolo, Nneka

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 % of women living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are of reproductive age, but there are limitations to the administration of oral contraception for HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy due to drug-drug interactions caused by metabolism via the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and glucuronidation. However, with the development of newer antiretrovirals that use alternative metabolic pathways, options for contraception in HIV-positive women are increasing. This paper aims to review the literature on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral hormonal contraceptives when given with antiretroviral agents, including those currently used in developed countries, older ones that might still be used in salvage regimens, or those used in resource-limited settings, as well as newer drugs. Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), the usual backbone to most combined antiretroviral treatments (cARTs) are characterised by a low potential for drug-drug interactions with oral contraceptives. On the other hand non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs) may interact with oral contraceptives. Of the NNRTIs, efavirenz and nevirapine have been demonstrated to cause drug-drug interactions; however, etravirine and rilpivirine appear safe to use without dose adjustment. PIs boosted with ritonavir are not recommended to be used with oral contraceptives, with the exception of boosted atazanavir which should be used with doses of at least 35 µg of estrogen. Maraviroc, an entry inhibitor, is safe for co-administration with oral contraceptives, as are the integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir and dolutegravir. However, the INI elvitegravir, which is given in combination with cobicistat, requires a dose of estrogen of at least 30 µg. Despite the growing evidence in this field, data are still lacking in terms of large cohort studies, randomised trials and correlations to real clinical outcomes, such as pregnancy rates, in women

  7. The impact of using the combined oral contraceptive pill for cycle scheduling on gene expression related to endometrial receptivity.

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    Bermejo, Alfonso; Iglesias, Carlos; Ruiz-Alonso, María; Blesa, David; Simón, Carlos; Pellicer, Antonio; García-Velasco, Juan

    2014-06-01

    Does the combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) change endometrial gene expression when used for cycle programming? COCP used for scheduling purposes does not have a significant impact on endometrial gene expression related to endometrial receptivity. Controversy exists around COCP pretreatment for IVF cycle programming, as some authors claim that it might be detrimental to the live birth rate. Microarray technology applied to the study of tissue gene expression has previously revealed the behavior of genes related to endometrial receptivity under different conditions. Proof-of-concept study of 10 young healthy oocyte donors undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) recruited between June 2012 and February 2013. Microarray data were obtained from endometrial biopsies from 10 young healthy oocyte donors undergoing COS with GnRH antagonists and recombinant FSH. In group A (n = 5), COCP pretreatment was used for 12-16 days, and stimulation began after a 5-day pill-free interval. Stimulation in group B (n = 5) was initiated on cycle day 3 after a spontaneous menses. Endometrial biopsies were collected 7 days after triggering with hCG. No individual genes exhibited increased or decreased expression (fold change (FC) >2) in patients with prior COCP treatment (group A) compared with controls (group B). However, the results of the functional analysis showed a total of 11 biological processes that were significantly enriched in group A compared with group B (non-COCP). The Endometrial Receptivity Array (ERA) has only been validated on endometrial samples obtained in natural cycles and after hormonal replacement treatment (HRT). Therefore, it was not possible in this study to classify the endometrial samples as receptive or non-receptive. We used the ERA to focus on 238 genes that are intimately related to endometrial receptivity, thus simplifying the analysis and understanding of the data. Cycle scheduling is common in IVF units and is used to avoid weekend

  8. Effects on hemostasis after two-year use of low dose combined oral contraceptives with gestodene or levonorgestrel.

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    Prasad, R N; Koh, S C; Viegas, O A; Ratnam, S S

    1999-01-01

    We studied 67 healthy women who were randomly allocated to receive third generation gestodene (Gynera) or second generation levonorgestrel (Microgynon 30) combination of low-dose estrogen oral contraceptives (OCs) for their hemostatic effects over 2 years. Hemostatic changes were apparent within 3 months of OC use. Hematocrit (Hct) was not affected, but hemoglobin (Hb) concentration decreased by 18 months. Shortened prothrombin time (PT) and activated plasma thromboplastin time (APTT) were associated with elevated fibrinogen within the 12-month use of both OCs. Factor VII was reduced only in Micro 30 during the 18 months of use. Enhanced thrombin-antithrombin (TAT)-complex level was seen at 18 months of Gynera use. Prothrombin fragment1+2 (F1+2) rise was seen at 3 months with Micro 30. Reduced antithrombin III (ATIII) activity was seen at 18 months with Gynera and at 24 months with Micro 30. Increased protein C activity was seen at 3 months and reduced protein S occurred at 18 months of Gynera use. Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) activity was enhanced for 6 months in both OCs with raised D-dimer levels for 12 months with Gynera and 6 months with Micro 30. Decreased t-PA antigen was seen at 18 months and decreased urokinaselike plasminogen activator (u-PA) antigen occurred throughout the 24 months of both OCs use. Enhanced u-PA activity was only seen in Gynera users. Elevated plasminogen levels were apparent throughout both OCs use. PAI-1 levels were significantly decreased with Micro 30. With Gynera, the decreased PAI-1 activity was seen only at 18 months and PAI-1 antigen at 12 months. No change in platelets and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were seen in long-term OC use except that beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) showed decreased trends reaching statistical significance by 18 and 24 months of Micro 30 use and by 24 months of Gynera use. A further significant decrease in beta-TG, u-PA antigen, ATIII, and protein S levels were seen 3 months after pill stoppage

  9. Semaglutide, a Once-Weekly Human GLP-1 Analog, Does Not Reduce the Bioavailability of the Combined Oral Contraceptive, Ethinylestradiol/Levonorgestrel

    OpenAIRE

    Kapitza, Christoph; Nosek, Leszek; Jensen, Lene; Hartvig, Helle; Jensen, Christine B; Flint, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The effect of semaglutide, a once-weekly human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog in development for type 2 diabetes (T2D), on the bioavailability of a combined oral contraceptive was investigated. Postmenopausal women with T2D (n = 43) on diet/exercise ± metformin received ethinylestradiol (0.03 mg)/levonorgestrel (0.15 mg) once daily for 8 days before (semaglutide-free) and during (steady-state 1.0 mg) semaglutide treatment (subcutaneous once weekly; dose escalation: 0.25 mg 4 weeks; 0....

  10. The comparative study of side effect of the two kinds of LD combined oral contraceptive pills containing Norgestimate and Levonorgestrel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazizade Sh

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to compare the new generation of oral contraceptive pills containing Norgestimate (NGM with currently available pills containing levonorgestrel (LNG a clinical trial was conducted. 413 women (age 18-35 years with no contrainindication to pill use entered the study and randomly received one type of pills. Premenstrual syndrome and depression were significantly decreased in NGM group (P=0.00016, P=0.005, on the other hand, breast tenderness, mood changes and hair loss were significantly increased in LNG group (P=0.001, P=0.042, P=0.011. Comparing two groups with each other, following variables were significantly lower in NGM group: headache (P<0.05, vertigo (P<0.05, cloasma (P<0.05, acne (P<0.04, depression (P<0.05, appetite change (P<0.03. Overall patient satisfaction was similar in two groups.

  11. Oral contraception and risk of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueck AO

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Alfred O Mueck1, Harald Seeger1, Xiangyan Ruan2 1Department of Endocrinology and Menopause, University Women's Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany; 2Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China Abstract: No placebo-controlled studies concerning hormonal contraception in general have been published, and only investigations on biological mechanisms and observational clinical studies are available. Thus, associations can be described but not their causality. Experimental studies strongly suggest protective effects of the progestagen component of hormonal contraception against development of estrogen-related (type 1 endometrial cancer. In light of this research, it seems biologically plausible that, in more than 20 published studies, a reduction in endometrial cancer risk was achieved in up to 50% of users of combined oral contraceptives (COC, compared with nonusers. Few data exist for progestin-only oral preparations. However, in view of the mechanisms involved, a reduction in cancer risk should also be expected. Whereas hormonal dose-dependency has been investigated in only a few studies, which showed a stronger risk reduction with increasing progestagenic potency, a decreased risk dependent on duration of use has been clearly demonstrated, and after stopping COC this effect has persisted for up to 20 years. Possible confounders, including family history, parity, and smoking, have been investigated in a few studies, with only a minor impact on hormonal effect of endometrial cancer risk, with the exception of obesity, which was a strong risk factor in most but not all studies. There are obvious differences in the incidence of endometrial cancer in women using COC when evaluated in absolute numbers for Western and Asian countries, being about 3–5-fold higher in the US than in Asia. Further research should include the noncontraceptive benefit of COC

  12. The possible role of enterohepatic cycling on bioavailability of norethisterone and gestodene in women using combined oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elomaa, K; Ranta, S; Tuominen, J; Lähteenmäki, P

    2001-01-01

    Using steady-state conditions we aimed to test if administration of oral activated charcoal affects the bioavailability of norethisterone acetate (NET Ac) and gestodene (GEST) by inhibiting their enterohepatic recirculation. Thirteen volunteers received, in a randomized order, Minulet (75 microg GEST and 30 microg ethinylestradiol [EE(2)]) and Econ/30 (1 mg NET Ac and 30 microg EE(2)), each for 4 months. Serum GEST and norethisterone (NET) levels were evaluated with respect to C(max,) t(max) and 24-h area under the curve (AUC(0-24h)) in the middle of the control (3rd) cycle and the charcoal treatment (4th) cycle during both pill treatments. No statistically significant difference was seen in any of the aforementioned variables between the control and charcoal treatment cycles of either pill. Neither was a difference seen in the bioavailability of GEST and NET as evaluated by the ratios of two 24-h AUCs calculated in the control and charcoal cycles of each pill treatment (p = 0.29). The results suggest that enterohepatic circulation of GEST and NET is not of clinical importance. We conclude that women on oral contraceptives can take activated charcoal for the treatment of diarrhea when administered 3 h after and at least 12 h before pill intake.

  13. The Current Status of Oral Contraceptives: Progress and Recent Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golobof, Alexandra; Kiley, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Millions of women in the United States and abroad use oral contraceptive pills. These popular contraceptives are the most common reversible birth control method in the United States, and a wide variety of pills are available for prescription. Oral contraceptives provide safe and effective protection against pregnancy and offer several noncontraceptive benefits. Over the years, advances in the laboratory and knowledge gained through epidemiologic data promoted the development of new contraceptive preparations. Generations of oral contraceptives emerged over time, containing lower doses of estrogens and new and novel progestins. The current review discusses the clinical characteristics of oral contraceptives, with emphasis on basic pharmacology and the evolution of various contraceptive formulations and regimens.

  14. The risks of oral contraceptive pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pymar, H C; Creinin, M D

    2001-12-01

    Oral contraceptive pills have been associated with increased risk for myocardial infarction, stroke, and venous thromboembolism. Studies have been published recently that suggest that these risks are minimal in appropriately chosen low-risk women. Stroke is a very uncommon event in childbearing women, occurring in approximately 11 per 100,000 women over 1 year. Thus, even a doubling of this risk with oral contraceptive pills would have minimal effect on attributable risk. The estimated risk of myocardial infarction associated with oral contraceptive pill use in nonsmokers is 3 per million women over 1 year. The estimated risk of venous thromboembolism attributable to oral contraceptive pills is less than 3 per 10,000 women per year. Additionally, the literature suggests that there may be an increased risk of breast cancer associated with long-term oral contraceptive pill use in women under the age of 35. However, because the incidence of breast cancer is so low in this population, the attributable risk of breast cancer from birth control pill use is small.

  15. Pelvic inflammatory disease and oral contraceptive use.

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    Feldblum, P J; Burton, N; Rosenberg, M J

    1986-10-01

    Oral contraceptive use has been shown to protect against gonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), but the effect on chlamydial PID is uncertain. Chlamydia infection is rising in incidence and has become the major cause of PID in many areas. PID may cause infertility, impairing the future reproduction of women. Previous studies on oral contraceptives and PID relied on hospitalized women, which may have biased the sample to include mainly gonococcal PID. Several studies show increased risk of endocervical chlamydia infection in users of oral contraceptives. The postulated mechanism is cervical ectopy, exposing more squamous epithelium to the organisms. Nevertheless, there is evidence indicating that despite the increased incidence of endocervical infection, oral contraceptives may inhibit the organisms from ascending, thus still offering a protective affect against both gonococcal and chlamydial PID. Future research must focus on the prevalence of chlamydia infection in Africa, and the natural history of the illness. The effect of different types of oral contraceptives on chlamydia infection must be evaluated.

  16. A new estradiol-dienogest oral contraceptive marks "The Pill's" 50th anniversary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keder, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    Oral contraceptive pills were first approved by the Food and Drug Administration 50 years ago. Discovery of the physiology of reproduction and demonstration of the ability to inhibit ovulation with ovarian extracts laid the early groundwork for the development of contraceptives. Later, characterization of the hormones controlling ovulation and synthesis of progestins allowed production of oral contraceptives. Modern estrogen and progestin pills have undergone significant changes since their initial introduction. New formulations have been developed, doses have been lowered, and extended use introduced. The Food and Drug Administration has recently approved a new oral contraceptive containing estradiol valerate and dienogest. This pill contains an orally active estradiol in combination with a progestin with strong endometrial activity. The decreasing estrogen dose combined with an increasing progestin dose decreases the risk of break through bleeding when compared to previous estradiol valerate formulations. The contraceptive efficacy and a tolerability of this new pill are similar to currently marketed low dose combined estrogen-progestin oral contraceptives.

  17. Oral contraception for women of middle age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiangyan; Mueck, Alfred O

    2015-11-01

    Women at middle age have decreased fertility and their pregnancies are higher risk. Combined oral contraceptives (COC) are effective but confer increased risk of age-related diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. These risks are lower, however, with progestogen-only pills (POP). Therefore, other than the levonorgestrel intrauterine device (LNG-IUD), POP are usually the first choice, even though they do often lead to bleeding problems, which are already frequent in the perimenopause. However, the main risk of COC, venous thromboembolism, seems not to be relevant in (non-hospitalized) Chinese women and perhaps also other Asian women. COC may therefore be in fact a better choice than POP for these groups. In contrast to POP and IUDs, they have a variety of benefits especially important for middle-aged women, including a large decrease of the risk of ovarian, endometrial and colorectal cancer, an improvement in bleeding irregularities, a reduction of climacteric symptoms and some protection against bone loss. Further research is needed into individualized and safe contraception that takes into account ethnicity, as well as other factors.

  18. Semaglutide, a once-weekly human GLP-1 analog, does not reduce the bioavailability of the combined oral contraceptive, ethinylestradiol/levonorgestrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitza, Christoph; Nosek, Leszek; Jensen, Lene; Hartvig, Helle; Jensen, Christine B; Flint, Anne

    2015-05-01

    The effect of semaglutide, a once-weekly human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog in development for type 2 diabetes (T2D), on the bioavailability of a combined oral contraceptive was investigated. Postmenopausal women with T2D (n = 43) on diet/exercise ± metformin received ethinylestradiol (0.03 mg)/levonorgestrel (0.15 mg) once daily for 8 days before (semaglutide-free) and during (steady-state 1.0 mg) semaglutide treatment (subcutaneous once weekly; dose escalation: 0.25 mg 4 weeks; 0.5 mg 4 weeks; 1.0 mg 5 weeks). Bioequivalence of oral contraceptives was established if 90%CI for the ratio of pharmacokinetic parameters during semaglutide steady-state and semaglutide-free periods was within prespecified limits (0.80-1.25). The bioequivalence criterion was met for ethinylestradiol area under the curve (AUC0-24 h ) for semaglutide steady-state/semaglutide-free; 1.11 (1.06-1.15). AUC0-24 h was 20% higher for levonorgestrel at semaglutide steady-state vs. semaglutide-free (1.20 [1.15-1.26]). Cmax was within bioequivalence criterion for both contraceptives. Reductions (mean ± SD) in HbA1c (-1.1 ± 0.6%) and weight (-4.3 ± 3.1 kg) were observed. Semaglutide pharmacokinetics were compatible with once-weekly dosing; the semaglutide dose and dose-escalation regimen were well tolerated. Adverse events, mainly gastrointestinal, were mild to moderate in severity. Asymptomatic increases in mean amylase and lipase were observed. Three subjects had elevated alanine aminotransferase levels ≥3x the upper limit of normal during semaglutide/oral contraceptive coadministration, which were reported as adverse events, but resolved during follow-up. Semaglutide did not reduce the bioavailability of ethinylestradiol and levonorgestrel.

  19. Blood glucose, serum insulin, serum growth hormone and serum glycosylated proteins during two years' oral contraception with low-estrogen combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liukko, P; Erkkola, R; Lammintausta, R; Grönroos, M; Kloosterboer, H J

    1987-01-01

    Body weight, fasting blood glucose (GP) (BFG), serum immunoreactive insulin (IRI), serum growth hormone (GH) and serum glycosylated proteins were longitudinally followed in 2 groups of women during two years' oral contraception. One group (n = 10) received a combination of 0.030 mg ethinylestradiol and 0.150 mg levonorgestrel and the other (n = 10) a combination of 0.030 mg ethinylestradiol and 0.150 mg of desogestrel. There was a significant increase in BFG during the study and the values were still rising, when examined 2 months after discontinuation of the pill. Two subjects, reaching the level of 5.5 mmol/l showed normal pretreatment values, when investigated one year later. After 6 months' use of either preparation, GH significantly increased, remained on that level throughout the study and returned to the pretreatment level after discontinuation of the pill. Body weight, IRI and GPP did not change significantly during the study.

  20. Antibiotics and oral contraceptive failure - a case-crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toh, Sengwee; Mitchell, Allen A.; Anderka, Marlene; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the association between antibiotic use and combined oral contraceptive (COC) failure is controversial. We examined the effect of concomitant antibiotic treatment on the risk of breakthrough pregnancy among COC users. Study Designs: We performed a case-crossover study of 1330

  1. Venous and arterial thrombosis during oral contraceptive use: risks and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, Bea C; Rosendaal, Frits R

    2003-02-01

    Since the introduction of oral contraceptives, their use has been associated with an increased risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis. Pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, and stroke are serious disorders with a considerable risk of mortality. Because worldwide over 100 million women use oral contraceptives, issues of drug safety are of great importance. The risk of venous thrombosis during low-dose oral contraceptive use is three- to sixfold increased compared with that of nonusers. The association is not only attributed to the estrogen component of the pill: the risk is twice as high for desogestrel and gestodene (third generation) containing oral contraceptives as for levonorgestrel (second generation) containing oral contraceptives. The risk of venous thrombosis is highest in the first year of use and in women with genetic or acquired risk factors for thrombosis. Both venous or arterial thrombosis are unrelated to duration of use or past use of combined oral contraceptives. The risk of myocardial infarction and stroke during low-dose oral contraceptive use is two- to fivefold increased relative to that of nonusers. The risk of arterial thrombosis induced by oral contraceptive use is more pronounced in smokers and women with hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. All types of thrombosis have strongly age-dependent incidences, and therefore in absolute figures the risks and effects of risk factors increase with age. The lowering of the estrogen dose in combined oral contraceptives from 50 microg to 20-30 microg in the last decade did not clearly reduce the risk of venous thrombosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, or peripheral arterial disease. For stroke and peripheral arterial disease no difference in risk was found between second and third generation oral contraceptives. For myocardial infarction study results are conflicting, and a small benefit of third- over second-generation oral contraceptives cannot be ruled out. However, this is

  2. [Oral contraception and circulatory risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingrave, S J

    1984-10-01

    The longterm prospective study of health effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) conducted by the Royal College of General Practitioners compared 23,000 OC users with 23,000 controls matched for age and marital status. As of 1981, 55 deaths attributable to circulatory problems had occurred in ever-users of OCs, ciompared to 10 in controls, giving a relative risk of 4.2 for OC users. No relation was found between duration of use and mortality risk among users, although mortality risks were greater at all durations of use than for nonusers. Parity was related to mortality risk among users but not among controls. The most significant factors affecting the relation between pill use and circulatory risk were age and smoking. Among users who smoked, the risk ratios were 3.4 for those aged 25-34, 4.2 for those aged 35-44, 7.4 for those aged 45 and over, and 5.1 for the entire group. Among nonsmoking pill users, the ratios were 1.6 for those aged 25-34, 3.3 for those aged 35-44, 4.6 for those 45 and over, and 3.2 for the total sample. Among smokers, the rates of excess deaths were 1 in 10,000 for users aged 15-34, 1 in 2000 for those aged 35-44, and 1 in550 for those aged 45 and over. Among nonsmokers, the rates were 1 in 50,000 users for those aged 25-34, 1 in 6700 for those aged 35-44, and 1 in 2500 for those aged 45 and over. The majority of deaths were attributed to ischemic cardiac problems and to sub-arachnoid hemorrhages, and risks appeared to be elevated in former as well as current users. The total incidence of circulatory effects in former users appears to be elevated only for cerebrovascular disorders, but the suggestion of residual effects requires further study before conclusions can be drawn. Smokers who developed cardiovascular or cerebrovascular problems were at 2-3 times greater risk of dying than were other women. The percentages of fatal cases of ischemic heart and cerebrovascular diseases were 22.8% among ever-users who smoked, 10.9% among controls who

  3. Low dose oestrogen combined oral contraception and risk of pulmonary embolism, stroke, and myocardial infarction in five million French women: cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalichampt, Marie; Raguideau, Fanny; Ricordeau, Philippe; Blotière, Pierre-Olivier; Rudant, Jérémie; Alla, François; Zureik, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk of pulmonary embolism, ischaemic stroke, and myocardial infarction associated with combined oral contraceptives according to dose of oestrogen (ethinylestradiol) and progestogen. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Data from the French national health insurance database linked with data from the French national hospital discharge database. Participants 4 945 088 women aged 15-49 years, living in France, with at least one reimbursement for oral contraceptives and no previous hospital admission for cancer, pulmonary embolism, ischaemic stroke, or myocardial infarction, between July 2010 and September 2012. Main outcome measures Relative and absolute risks of first pulmonary embolism, ischaemic stroke, and myocardial infarction. Results The cohort generated 5 443 916 women years of oral contraceptive use, and 3253 events were observed: 1800 pulmonary embolisms (33 per 100 000 women years), 1046 ischaemic strokes (19 per 100 000 women years), and 407 myocardial infarctions (7 per 100 000 women years). After adjustment for progestogen and risk factors, the relative risks for women using low dose oestrogen (20 µg v 30-40 µg) were 0.75 (95% confidence interval 0.67 to 0.85) for pulmonary embolism, 0.82 (0.70 to 0.96) for ischaemic stroke, and 0.56 (0.39 to 0.79) for myocardial infarction. After adjustment for oestrogen dose and risk factors, desogestrel and gestodene were associated with statistically significantly higher relative risks for pulmonary embolism (2.16, 1.93 to 2.41 and 1.63, 1.34 to 1.97, respectively) compared with levonorgestrel. Levonorgestrel combined with 20 µg oestrogen was associated with a statistically significantly lower risk than levonorgestrel with 30-40 µg oestrogen for each of the three serious adverse events. Conclusions For the same dose of oestrogen, desogestrel and gestodene were associated with statistically significantly higher risks of pulmonary embolism but not arterial

  4. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  5. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  6. A multicentre, open-label, randomised phase III study comparing a new levonorgestrel intrauterine contraceptive system (LNG-IUS 8) with combined oral contraception in young women of reproductive age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgatta, Lynn; Buhling, Kai J; Rybowski, Sarah; Roth, Katrin; Rosen, Kimberly

    2016-10-01

    To compare user satisfaction and adverse events (AEs) with a levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS 8; average levonorgestrel release rate approximately 8 μg/24 h over the first year [total content 13.5 mg]) and a 30 μg ethinyl estradiol/3 mg drospirenone (EE/DRSP) combined oral contraceptive (COC) in a population of young women. Nulliparous and parous women (aged 18-29 years) with regular menstrual cycles (21-35 days) were randomised to LNG-IUS 8 or EE/DRSP for 18 months. The primary endpoint was the overall user satisfaction rate at month 18/end of study visit. Overall, 279 women were randomised to LNG-IUS 8 with attempted placement and 281 women were randomised to EE/DRSP and took ≥1 pill; the mean age was 23.7 and 23.9 years, and 77.4% and 73.3% were nulliparous, respectively. At month 18/end of study, 82.1% and 81.9% of women, respectively, reported being 'very satisfied' or 'satisfied' with their treatment; however, significantly more LNG-IUS 8 users reported a preference to continue their treatment post-study (66.2% vs 48.8%; p = 0.0001). There were two pregnancies (one ectopic pregnancy, one spontaneous abortion) reported in the LNG-IUS 8 group and six (three live births, two spontaneous abortions, one induced abortion) in the EE/DRSP group. LNG-IUS 8 and EE/DRSP were associated with similarly high user satisfaction rates. However, LNG-IUS 8 users were significantly more likely to prefer to continue their contraceptive method post-study, indicating that a levonorgestrel intrauterine system is an appealing contraceptive option for young women.

  7. The use of oral contraception by adolescents for contraception, menstrual cycle problems or acne

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, M.H.A. van; Hirasing, R.A.; Kaptein, M.B.M.; Koppenaal, C.; Voorhorst, F.J.; Schoemaker, J.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Oral contraceptives are prescribed as contraception but also as therapy for menstrual cycle disturbances and acne. We studied the prevalence of oral contraceptive (OC) use and the indications to start OC use among adolescents. Methods. A cohort consisting of ninth grade secondary school

  8. The use of oral contraception by adolescents for contraception, menstrual cycle problems or acne

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, M.H.A. van; Hirasing, R.A.; Kaptein, M.B.M.; Koppenaal, C.; Voorhorst, F.J.; Schoemaker, J.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Oral contraceptives are prescribed as contraception but also as therapy for menstrual cycle disturbances and acne. We studied the prevalence of oral contraceptive (OC) use and the indications to start OC use among adolescents. Methods. A cohort consisting of ninth grade secondary school

  9. Oral contraceptives and the prothrombin time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangrazzi, J; Roncaglioni, M C; Donati, M B

    1980-02-02

    Dr. De Teresa and others reported that mean prothrombin time ratio of 12 patients on long-term anticoagulation with warfarin was significantly higher when they were also taking oral contraceptives (OCs). A study of prothrombin complex activity was recently conducted in female rats treated with an estrogen-progestogen combination (lynestrenol 5 mg; mestranol 0.3 mg/kg body weight) which resulted in a 100% infertility in this species. After 1 treatment for only 1 estral cycle, OC-treated rats had a significantly longer Normotest clotting time (37.7+ or-0.5 sec) than control rats (31.0+or-0.4); the difference was even more notable after 10 cycles. Although this finding has not been reported in women on OCs, it may be that the estrogen-induced "lability" of the prothrombin complex occurs in humans only in special conditions, such as anticoagulation. Alternatively, liver dysfunction occurring among women on OCs may be responsible for reduced metabolism of warfarin, contributing to the effectiveness of the anticoagulation. Further pharmacology studies should be done to clarify the interaction between OCs and oral anticoagulants.

  10. [Myocardial infarction associated with oral contraceptive use, smoking and elevated cholesterol level in a young patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasznai, Zsuzsa; Tóth, Péter

    2011-09-04

    Oral hormonal contraceptives are the safest methods for young patients to avoid unwanted pregnancy. They are well accepted and have certain beneficial effects; however, physicians should pay attention to risk factors even when applied in young age. Obesity, dyslipidemia, smoking and oral contraceptive pills alone or in combination may lead to serious adverse events. Authors present a young woman who developed acute myocardial infarction in association with several unconsidered risk factors including the use of contraceptive pills.

  11. Change to Either a Nonandrogenic or Androgenic Progestin-Containing Oral Contraceptive Preparation is Associated with Improved Sexual Function in Women with Oral Contraceptive-Associated Sexual Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Susan R; Bitzer, Johannes; Giraldi, Annamaria

    2013-01-01

    It is a commonly held belief that combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills containing an androgenic progestin may be less likely to impair sexual function than COCs containing an anti-androgenic progestin.......It is a commonly held belief that combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills containing an androgenic progestin may be less likely to impair sexual function than COCs containing an anti-androgenic progestin....

  12. Oral contraceptive pills: considerations for the adolescent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, P F; Daley, A M

    2000-01-01

    Combined oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) are the most commonly prescribed method of birth control for adolescents. This article presents an overview of OCP pharmacology and summarizes the different types of OCPs. The initial patient evaluation and subsequent care are described, with a focus on management plans specific to adolescents. Emergency contraception, an alternative use of OCPs, is described as well. A thorough knowledge of OCPs and an appreciation of adolescent-specific management plans will enhance nurse practitioners' skills in preventing pregnancy in their adolescent patients.

  13. Do oral contraceptives increase epileptic seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2017-02-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are used by over 100 million people worldwide. Recently, there has been an emerging interest in studying the potential impact of oral contraceptives (OCs) on certain neurological conditions. It has been suspected for some time that hormonal birth control increases seizure activity in women with epilepsy, but there is little supportive data. Areas covered: Literature from PubMed and online sources was analyzed with respect to hormonal contraception and epilepsy or seizures. New evidence indicates that OCs can cause an increase in seizures in women with epilepsy. The epilepsy birth control registry, which surveyed women with epilepsy, found that those using hormonal contraceptives self-reported 4.5 times more seizures than those that did not use such contraceptives. A preclinical study confirmed these outcomes wherein epileptic animals given ethinyl estradiol, the primary component of OCs, had more frequent seizures that are more likely to be resistant. Expert commentary: OC pills may increase seizures in women with epilepsy and such refractory seizures are more likely to cause neuronal damage in the brain. Thus, women of child bearing age with epilepsy should consider using non-hormonal forms of birth control to avoid risks from OC pills. Additional research into the mechanisms and prospective clinical investigation are needed.

  14. [Emergency oral contraception policy: the Peruvian experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretell-Zárate, Eduardo A

    2013-07-01

    Emergency oral contraception is part of the sexual and reproductive rights of women. In 2001, this health policy was incorporated into the Rules of the National Family Planning Program of the Ministry of Health, primarily to prevent unwanted pregnancy and its serious consequences, induced abortion and the high associated maternal mortality rate, which are major public health problems. Scientific research has confirmed that the main mechanism of action of levonorgestrel, component of emergency oral contraception (EOC) is to inhibit or delay ovulation, preventing fertilization of the egg; additionally, it increases the thickening of the cervical mucus, making the sperm migration more difficult. No study has found endometrial abnormalities that may interfere with the implantation of the fertilized egg or embryo development of an implanted egg. However, despite the support of medical science and legal backing, the EOC is available only to users with economic resources, but its use has not been fully implemented in public sector services, due to obstacles created by groups opposed to contraception under claim of an alleged abortive effect that has already been ruled out scientifically. This article describes the administrative experience and legal confrontations between groups of power that prevent the proper implementation of an emergency contraception policy in Peru.

  15. Comparative Effects of Injectable and Oral Hormonal Contraceptives on Lipid Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayor Adegoke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and AimsThe continual use of hormonal contraceptives among women within reproductive age has been on the increase. The effects of these contraceptives on lipid metabolism vary depending on the type of hormonal contraceptive. This study was carried out among Nigerian women, to compare theeffects of injectable hormonal contraceptives to that of combined oral contraceptives on lipid profile (triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and low density lipo-protein-cholesterol.MethodsThe lipid profile of a total of 83 women (50 of whom were non-users of contraceptives while the remaining 33 used different hormonal contraceptives; 26 of them used the injectable hormonalcontraceptives while 7 used oral contraceptives were estimated using enzymatic methods except low density lipoprotein- cholesterol (LDL-C which was by calculation.ResultsThere was a significant change (p 0.05 in total cholesterol (TC and high density lipoprotein- cholesterol (HDL-C levels in women on oral contraceptives, while in injectable hormonal contraceptive users, there was significant change (p < 0.05 in HDL-C and LDL-C, and no significant change in TG and TC levels. The Castelli risk index I and II (TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C were more reduced in women using injectable contraceptives (1.65 and 0.45, respectively than in oral contraceptive users (1.80 and 0.56,respectively.ConclusionThe result indicated that the use of injectable hormonal contraceptives is more beneficial than combined oral contraceptives among these women.

  16. Effects on hemostatic variables of desogestrel- and gestodene-containing oral contraceptives in comparison with levonorgestrel-containing oral contraceptives: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, U H

    1998-09-01

    In some studies third-generation oral contraceptives have been reported to be associated with a higher risk of venous thromboembolism than are second-generation oral contraceptives, whereas recent, more refined studies have not confirmed this. The reasons for the alleged differences are under discussion, and differential effects on hemostasis have been proposed. Eighteen studies comparing second- and third-generation oral contraceptives with respect to their effects on hemostasis were analyzed. Significant changes from baseline were reported for many variables with both second- and third-generation oral contraceptives without significant between-group differences. Also, in a combined analysis of nonsignificant changes, no consistent pattern of change emerged for any marker, with the exception of higher factor VII levels associated with third-generation oral contraceptives. However, factor VII is not related to venous thromboembolism risk. In addition, 1 cross-sectional study with an unvalidated assay reported a higher ratio of activated protein C sensitivity with third-generation oral contraceptives. Only 2 components of the hemostatic system (factor VII and activated protein C sensitivity ratio) emerged as potentially differentially affected by second- and third-generation oral contraceptives; the association with venous thromboembolism risk is questionable in the former case and unknown in the latter.

  17. EFFECTS OF ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES ON COAGULATING FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. Sadeghipour Roudsari.

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Thirty young, healthy, nonsmoking women (mean age approximately 28 years taking low-dose oral contraceptive pills were recruited for the study of the effects of these pills on coagulating factors. Twenty subjects were taking LD pill (Ethinyl estradiol 0.03 mg, levonorgestrel 0.15 mg and 10 others were taking Cilest (Ethinyl estradiol 0.035 mg, Norgestimate 0.25 mg for six months. The control subjects did not receive any oral contraceptives or other medications. Our results showed that:"n1. There is no significant difference between the effects of LD and Cilest (with a different progestin content on coagulating factors."n2. No significant changes were observed between both LD users and controls in PT, APTT, and fibrinogen levels."n3. No significant changes were observed between both Cilest users and controls in PT, APTT, and fibrinogen levels."n

  18. Oral contraceptives induce lamotrigine metabolism: evidence from a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob; Petrenaite, Vaiva; Attermann, Jørn

    2007-01-01

    and taking combination-type oral contraceptives, were randomized to treatment with placebo or a standard combination-type contraceptive pill. The dose-corrected trough plasma concentration of LTG and the ratio of N-2-glucuronide/unchanged LTG on urine after 21 days of concomitant placebo treatment...... was analyzed versus those after 21 days of concomitant treatment with the oral contraceptive pill. RESULTS: The mean dose-corrected LTG concentration after placebo treatment was 84%[95% confidence interval (CI), 45-134%] higher than after oral contraceptives, signifying an almost doubling of the concentration......PURPOSE: This study evaluates the effect of oral contraceptives on lamotrigine (LTG) plasma concentrations and urine excretion of LTG metabolites in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study in patients with epilepsy. METHODS: Women with epilepsy, treated with LTG in monotherapy...

  19. Communication about Contraception and Knowledge of Oral Contraceptives amongst Norwegian High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil

    2003-01-01

    Examines communication about contraception and specific knowledge of oral contraceptives (OCs) in a sample of Norwegian high school students. More females than males discussed contraception at least monthly. Discussions were predominantly held with peers and not adults. Females were far more knowledgeable about OCs than males. The most significant…

  20. Residual ovarian activity during oral steroid contraception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Heusden; B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractSteroid drugs with contraceptive properties have been available in the clinical setting for over four decades and are still subject to improvement. Estrogens, progestins and anti-progestins have been used alone or in various combinations, regimens and routes of administ

  1. Bleeding pattern and cycle control with estetrol-containing combined oral contraceptives: results from a phase II, randomised, dose-finding study (FIESTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apter, Dan; Zimmerman, Yvette; Beekman, Louise; Mawet, Marie; Maillard, Catherine; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Coelingh Bennink, Herjan J T

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to assess vaginal bleeding patterns and cycle control of oral contraceptives containing estetrol (E4) combined with either drospirenone (DRSP) or levonorgestrel (LNG). An open-label, multicentre, randomised, dose-finding study lasting six cycles in healthy women aged 18-35 years was used. Four treatments (15 mg or 20 mg E4, combined with either 3 mg DRSP or 150 mcg LNG) were administered in a 24/4-day regimen. A marketed dosing regimen of estradiol valerate with dienogest (E2V/DNG) served as reference since it contains (like E4) a natural oestrogen. A total of 396 women were randomised, of whom 389 received study medication, and 316 completed the study. By cycle 6, the frequencies of unscheduled bleeding and/or spotting and absence of withdrawal bleeding were the lowest in the 15 mg E4/DRSP group (33.8% and 3.5%, respectively). In the E2V/DNG reference group, these frequencies were 47.8% and 27.1%, respectively. By cycle 6, the frequency of women with absence of withdrawal bleeding was <20% for all E4 treatment groups: 3.5-3.8% combined with DRSP and 14.0-18.5% combined with LNG. By cycle 6, unscheduled intracyclic bleeding was reported by <20% of women in the 20 mg E4/LNG group (18.9%) and in the 15 mg E4/DRSP group (16.9%). This study showed that, of the four treatment modalities investigated, the 15 mg E4/DRSP combination has the most favourable bleeding pattern and cycle control. Due to its favourable bleeding pattern and cycle control, the 15 mg E4/DRSP combination is the preferred combination for further phase III clinical development. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The risk of breast, cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancer in oral contraceptive users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljković Milena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Oral contraceptives, mainly combined monophasic pills, are widely used by young women who expect their physicians to prescribe them safe drugs which will not harm their health and which will simplify their life. Numerous epidemiologic studies have been performed to determine the relation between oral contraceptive use and the development of neoplasms. Breast cancer. An increased incidence of breast cancer has occurred simultaneously with the growing use of oral contraceptives. The possibility of a link between the oral contraceptive use and breast cancer has led to intensive research, but studies have provided inconsistent results causing confusion among clinicians. It was noticed that the risk of breast cancer was slightly elevated in current and recent young oral contraceptives users. That finding could be influenced by a detection bias or could be due to the biologic effect of the pills. The absolute number of additional breast cancer cases will be very small because of low baseline incidence of the disease in young women. Oral contraceptives probably promote growth of the already existing cancer, they are probably promoters not initiators of breast cancer. The available data do not provide a conclusive answer that is need. Cervical cancer. Numerous factors may influence the development of cervical cancer. The evidence suggests that current and recent oral contraceptive users have an increased risk of cervical cancer which decline after discontinuation of the application of medication. Oral contraceptives might increase the biological vulnerability of the cervix. Cervical cancer develops slowly over a long time period and can be effectively prevented by periodic cervical screening. Fortunately, oral contraceptives do not mask abnormal cervical citology. Conclusions regarding invasive cervical cancer and oral contraceptive use are not definitive but if there is any increased risk, it is low. Endometrial cancer. In oral

  3. [Headache and oral contraceptives (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias Da Silva, W; Benicio, G

    1978-01-01

    175 patients using oral contraceptives (OCs) for periods from 2 months-6 years were studied. A survey was made of the secondary effects of the treatment. Among the total group, 101 of them had not presented headache before the use of contraceptives, and the remaining 75 patients had previously complained of chronic headaches which were considered due to different etiologies. 50 patients from the group without previous headache claimed that OC treatment marked the initiation of the headaches. 25 had vascular headaches and 25 had tension headaches. Among the 75 patients included in the other group as complainers of chronic headache prior to treatment, 30 had a worsening of the symptoms after use of the OCs. The authors compare their results with those referred to in the literature. (author's)

  4. Effects of Administration of Fostamatinib on Blood Concentrations of an Oral Contraceptive in Healthy Female Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    Scientific Terminology Rheumatoid Arthritis, Healthy Female Volunteers, Pharmacokinetics, Oral Contraceptive, Drug-drug Interaction; Laymen Terminology Level of Oral Contraceptive in Blood, Oral Contraceptive, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Drug -Drug Interaction

  5. Stress, serotonergic function, and mood in users of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuiten, A; Panhuysen, G; Koppeschaar, H; Fekkes, D; Pijl, H; Frölich, M; Krabbe, P; Everaerd, W

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between stress and changes in insulin levels, plasma ratio of tryptophan to other large neutral amino acids (LNAAs), mood, and food intake was investigated in women taking monophasic oral contraceptives containing progestagens. Subjects experiencing high levels of stress displayed significant decreases of insulin and tryptophan to other LNAAs ratios, before and after the consumption of a standard meal during the pill-free period as compared with the period of pill use. The decline of the tryptophan to other LNAAs ratio was accompanied by worsening of mood. In a control group of subjects experiencing low levels of stress there was no relationship between insulin and tryptophan to other LNAAs ratio, nor between tryptophan to other LNAAs ratio and mood. These results suggest that the combination of stress and alterations in sex hormones may be responsible for mood changes during the pill-free period in women taking oral contraceptives.

  6. [Oral contraceptive pill and thrombotic risk: epidemiological studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruzzetti, F; Perini, D; Spirito, N; Manca, R

    2012-12-01

    The venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a rare event during childbearing age and during the assumption of combined oral contraceptive. The absolute risk of VTE in users of combined oral contraceptives is 20-30 per 100000 women years. A number of case-control studies published in recent years have shown an apparent increase in the risk of VTE among users of oral contraceptives (OCs) containing desogestrel, gestodene, drospirenone and cyproterone, relative to the use of levonorgestrel. The data derived from these recent studies is of borderline statistical significance because any important factors are not considered to evaluate the real correlation between the assumption of OCs and risk of venous thromboembolism. Among the factors that should be considered, there are: EE dose, duration of use, coexistance of other risk factors of venous thromboembolism (age, BMI, familiarity, surgical interventions) and other prescription bias. The lack of these factors is likely to contribute to the increased risk of venous thromboembolism observed in users of third-generation OCs when compared to that in users of second-generation OCs. To date, because of the inadequacy of epidemiological studies, the data about the correlation between OCs and TVE, are not conclusive and it will be necessary to carry out other studies to clarify this debating point, definitively.

  7. Post-coital oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J M; Van Wagenen, G

    1966-01-01

    The observation that estrogens in sufficient dosage given postcoitally may prevent implantation of the ovum have led to studies regarding practical clinical application. Estrogens that appear effective in humans include stilbestrol and ethinyl estradiol orally and estrone parenterally. Mestranol should also be effective as well as ORF-3858. Any estrongenic substance in sufficient dosage would probably prevent implantation. Effective period of administration is only between time of fertilization and implantation or 4 to 6 days following coitus. Test dosages have been 25-50 mg stilbestrol or .5-2 mg esthinyl estradiol daily for 5 days. It is now considered that 2-5 mg ethinyl estradiol would be more effective. In over 100 midcycle exposures there have been no pregnancies. Others have reported failures with inadequate dosage. Injectable estrone, 2-20 mg on alternate days for 3 doses, has also been reported effective. The process of implantation is discussed. Endometrial biopsies have usually revealed a "retarded endometrium," a possible mode of action. Side effects have been those usually associated with estrogens: nausea, vomiting, breast soreness, prolonged menses.

  8. Bone mineral density in a cohort of adolescents during use of norethisterone enanthate, depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate, or combined oral contraceptives and after discontinuation of norethisterone enanthate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beksinska, Mags E; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Smit, Jenni A; Farley, Timothy M M

    2013-01-01

    Background Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), norethisterone enanthate (NET-EN) and combined oral contraceptives (COCs) have been shown to have a negative effect on bone mineral density (BMD) in adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate BMD in 15-to 19-year-old new users of DMPA, NET-EN and COCs. Study Design This 5-year longitudinal study followed-up new users of DMPA (n=115), NET-EN (n=115), and COCs (n=116), and 144 nonuser controls. BMD was measured at the distal radius using dual x-ray absorptiometry. Results BMD increased in all groups (annual percent increase: nonusers, 1.49%; DMPA, 1.39%; NET-EN, 1.03%; COCs, 0.84%) during follow-up (p<0.001). There was evidence for lower BMD increases per annum in NET-EN (p=.050) and COC (p=.010) users compared to nonusers but no difference between DMPA and nonusers (p=.76). In 14 NET-EN discontinuers, an overall reduction of 0.61% per year BMD was followed upon cessation by an increase of 0.69% per year (p=.066). Conclusion This study suggests that BMD increases in adolescents may be less in NET-EN and COC users; however, recovery of BMD in NET-EN users was found in the small sample of adolescents followed post-discontinuation. PMID:19341845

  9. 复方口服避孕药的避孕效果和依从性%The Effect and Compliance of Combined Oral Contraceptives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史惠蓉

    2009-01-01

    在美国和世界其他一些国家,复方口服避孕药(combined oral contraceptive,COC)是育龄妇女常用的可逆性避孕方法之一。2002年的统计数据显示:在美国有1160万15—44岁的妇女正在使用COC,大约有4450万15~44岁的妇女曾经使用过COC。COC在欧洲的使用居各种避孕方法之首位。最近的研究表明,在法国、德国、意大利、西班牙和英国,大约有220万妇女使用COC并有较高的满意度。在拉丁美洲和加勒比海国家,大约14%的已婚妇女使用COC,仅次于女性绝育术。但在亚洲国家COC的使用普及率相对较低。

  10. Use of and access to oral and injectable contraceptives in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Mareni Rocha; Leite, Silvana Nair; Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Arrais, Paulo Sergio Dourado; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Mengue, Sotero Serrate

    2016-01-01

    contraceptives from SUS. Monophasic combined oral contraceptives were the most frequently reported (71.6%) and low-level levonorgestrel + ethinylestradiol combination accounted for 38.7% of them. The most frequently reported medicines are included in the Relação Nacional de Medicamentos Essenciais (RENAME – National List of Essential Medicines. CONCLUSIONS Most women aged 15 to 49 who reported using contraceptives had access to the medicine and use monophasic combined oral contraceptives of appropriate efficiency and safety purchased by direct payment, mainly from retail pharmacies. PMID:27982384

  11. Use of and access to oral and injectable contraceptives in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareni Rocha Farias

    obtain contraceptives from SUS. Monophasic combined oral contraceptives were the most frequently reported (71.6% and low-level levonorgestrel + ethinylestradiol combination accounted for 38.7% of them. The most frequently reported medicines are included in the Relação Nacional de Medicamentos Essenciais (RENAME – National List of Essential Medicines. CONCLUSIONS Most women aged 15 to 49 who reported using contraceptives had access to the medicine and use monophasic combined oral contraceptives of appropriate efficiency and safety purchased by direct payment, mainly from retail pharmacies.

  12. Fatores associados à descontinuação do uso de anticoncepcionais orais combinados Associated factors with discontinuation use of combined oral contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Bahamondes

    2011-06-01

    sobre os eventos adversos esperados que são mínimos e temporários e sobre os benefícios não contraceptivos dos ACO.PURPOSE: Due to the scarce information available in Brazil in relation to the number of women who initiated the use of combined oral contraceptives and prematurely discontinued, the objective was to assess the reasons for discontinuation of the use of several combined oral contraceptives among Brazilian women living in urban areas. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with 400 gynecologists registered withy the Brazilian Federation of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Each physician interviewed 10 non-pregnant, not breastfeeding, not amenorrheic women aged 18 to 39 years who consulted requesting combined oral contraceptive (COC with a questionnaire at the beginning of use and at six months later. The questionnaire included sociodemographic data, type of COC chosen or prescribed and reasons for discontinuation when it occurred during follow-up. The strategy of selection allowed the inclusion of women from different socioeconomic strata, however, only those attended at private or insurance offices. The sample size was estimated at 1,427 women. RESULTS: A total of 3,465 interviews were conducted at the first visit and 1,699 six months later. The women were 20 to 29 years old, 57.3% were single and an equal proportion of 45.0% attended high school or college. Most (60.7% were nulligravidas and among those who had used some contraceptive before, 71.8% had used a COC. Among the more prescribed or chosen COC the most prevalent were monophasic with ethynil estradiol (20 µg and regarding progestin the most prevalent was with gestodene (36.5% followed by a COC with drosperinone (22.0%. At six months 63.5% still used COC. Among those who discontinued the main reasons were wishing to become pregnant (36.5% and side effects (57.3% and the most prevalent were headache (37.6%, weight gain (16.6% and irregular bleeding (23.6%. CONCLUSIONS: The continuation rate of COC was

  13. [Depression, pyridoxine and oral contraception (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leriche, A M; Romain, J L

    1981-07-01

    Numerous publications have, in recent years, associated the apparition of depressive syndrome with OC (oral contraception). The study of modified triptophane metabolism in OC patients has also involved the study of quantitative modifications of serotonin in certain types of depressive syndrome, as well as the positive effects of vitamin B6 and of pyridoxine administration. On the other hand, there is strong evidence showing that the involvement of OCs in depression cannot always be incriminated, and that, in the majority of cases, the causes are to be found in other, and mostly psychological, factors. Even in these last cases pyridoxine can be prescribed for a limited time without interruption of OC treatment.

  14. Evaluation of smartphone oral contraceptive reminder applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Noga; Zite, Nikki B; Wallace, Lorraine S

    2015-01-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) are the most widely used contraceptive method among women of reproductive age in the United States (US). Routine download and use of health-related smartphone applications (apps) continues to increase. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of English-language, smartphone-platform OC reminder apps currently available for download in the US. During June-July 2013, official Internet-based, mobile app platforms for the two major smartphone operating systems in the US-Android (Google Play Store) and iPhone (iTunes)-were searched. "Birth control," "the pill," and "contraception" were entered into the search-bar of each Smartphone store. Apps were assessed for the following: cost, health care professionals' involvement in app development, reminder mechanisms, and functionality. Of the 39 unique OC reminder apps meeting inclusion criteria, 7 (18%) did not operate as intended when downloaded. Most apps functioned without an Internet connection (97%) and included pop-up notifications (84%). Certain app features overcome common causes of missing an alarm, and hypothetically, may minimize likelihood of an OC user missing a daily pill. Health care providers should inform users of potential pitfalls and advise them that an OC reminder app should be not be used as a sole reminder method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fibrin formation and dissolution in women receiving oral contraceptive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, A P; McKee, P A

    1977-04-01

    Factors affecting fibrin formation and dissolution were compared for 15 women taking combined oral contraceptives and 15 women using nonpharmacological methods of birth control. The two groups were matched for age, body weight, time of blood collection, and day in menstrual cycle; none of the women was receiving other drugs known to affect the blood coagulation or fibrinolytic parameters measured in this study. Fibrinogen concentrations tended to be higher in the experimental group; the degree of fibrinogen degradation, number of fibrin cross-links, and levels of factor XIII and plasminogen were the same for both group. There were significant reductions in antithrombin activity, the euglobulin lysis time, and fibrinolytic inhibitor level in women using oral contraceptives. An estrogen dose effect was suggested for fibrinogen concentration and the degree of antithrombin activity. The increased fibrinolytic activity and decreased fibrinolytic inhibitor levels are consistent with in vitro observations that antithrombin also inhibits plasmin activity. Thus while oral contraceptive-induced depression of antithrombin III could possibly predispose to thrombosis by diminishing the inhibition of the serine protease clotting factors, the concomitant decreased level of plasmin inhibition might balance the system by favoring thrombolysis as well as the digestion and inactivation of certain clotting factors by plasmin.

  16. Affective and Physical Changes Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Alane L.; And Others

    Although investigations of the physiological effects of oral contraceptives suggest that affective changes may accompany their use, empirical documentation of these effects has not been consistent. This study examined physiological and affective changes accompanying use of a low-dosage oral contraceptive while controlling for possible expectancy…

  17. [Combined hormonal contraception in cycles artificially extended].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustillos-Alamilla, Edgardo; Zepeda-Zaragoza, J; Hernández-Ruiz, M A; Briones-Landa, Carlos Humberto

    2010-01-01

    To compare the bleeding patterns, satisfaction and tolerability of 3 different contraceptive in an extended regimens in the service of Family Planning of the North Central Hospital of PEMEX. Healthy, adult women with desire of contraception for one year (N 120) were randomly assigned to receive oral contraceptive drospirenone/ethinyl E2 (group1), the norelgestromin/ethinyl E2 transdermal patch (group 2) and vaginal ring etonogestrel/ ethinyl E2 (group 3) in an extended regimen (42 consecutive days, 1 hormone-free week). Study assessments were conducted at scheduled visits at the time of initial screening, at baseline after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Subjects recorded menstrual associated symptoms bleeding data and completed satisfaction questionnaires. Subjects and investigators provided overall assessments of the regimens. Extended use of 3 different contraceptive resulted in fewer bleeding days in every group (66.6%, 55% and 58.3% P 0.0024), and less mastalgia and menstrual pain. Subjects were highly satisfied with three regimens (93.3%, 96.6% and 91.6% P 0.00421). Although not mayor adverse events were reported with this regimen, there was an increase in spotting days; it decreased with each successive cycle of therapy. Efficacy and safety were similar to those reported for traditional cycle. Extended-contraceptive regimen delays menses and reduces bleeding, a profile that may be preferred by women who seek flexibility with their contraceptive method.

  18. Estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihal, H J; Peppler, R D; Dickey, R P

    1975-01-01

    The estrogen potencies of 9 oral contraceptive pills, Enovid-E, Enovid-5, Ovulen, Demulen, Norinyl+80, Norinyl+50, Ovral, Norlestrin 1 mg. and Norlestrin 2.5 mg., were determined by bioassay. Relative estrogen potency was determined by analysis of variance. Enovid-5, the most estrogenic compound, had a potency of 4.88 compared to ethinyl estradiol, 50 mcg. equal 1.00; Ovral, the least estrogenic compound, had a potency of 0.81, a sixfold difference. Estrogen potencies at a fractional dose of 0.00155 correlate with reports of the incidence of minor side effects and thromboembolic disease. The effect of progestins on estrogen potency was purely additive (norgestrel and norethynodrel), purely antagonistic, or additive at low concentrations and antagonistic at high concentrations (norethindrone, norethindrone acetate, and ethynodiol diacetate). These results suggest that pills with a greater margin of safety might be developed by utilizing greater ratios of progestin to estrogen. In addition, differences in relative estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills may be used as a basis for better clinical selection.

  19. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  20. Platelet function studies in women on oral contraceptive pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, R; Mohamed, A B; Hassan, K

    1990-06-01

    A study was conducted on a total of 100 women attending the Family Planning Clinic in Kuala Lumpur. 50 took combined low-dose estrogen and progesterone pills for a year or more and the other 50 used different methods of birth control. Platelet aggregation, ATP release, Thromboxane B2, and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha estimations were made to evaluate the effect of oral contraceptives (OCs) on platelet function and prostanoid production. The results showed no significant differences in the parameters measured in the 2 groups investigated. These findings are comparable to those reported by other studies, suggesting relatively low risk, if any, of thrombosis in OC users.

  1. Efficacy and safety of metformin or oral contraceptives, or both in polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang YM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Young-Mo Yang, Eun Joo Choi College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju, South Korea Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is an endocrinopathy that affects approximately 10% of reproductive-aged women throughout their lives. Women with PCOS present with heterogeneous symptoms including ovulatory dysfunction, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries. Therefore, lifelong individualized management should be considered. Pharmacological agents commonly used to manage the symptoms are metformin and oral contraceptive pills. Although these medications have been beneficial in treating PCOS symptoms, their efficacy and safety are still not entirely elucidated. This study aimed to report the efficacy and safety of metformin, oral contraceptives, or their combination in the treatment of PCOS and to define their specific individual roles.Methods: A literature search of original studies published in PubMed and Scopus was conducted to identify studies comparing metformin with oral contraceptives or evaluating the combination of both in PCOS.  Results: Eight clinical trials involving 313 patients were examined in the review. The intervention dosage of metformin ranged from 1,000 to 2,000 mg/d and that of oral contraceptives was ethinylestradiol 35 µg and cyproterone acetate 2 mg. Lower body mass index was observed with regimens including metformin, but increased body mass index was observed in monotherapy with oral contraceptives. Administration of metformin or oral contraceptives, especially as monotherapy, had a negative effect on lipid profiles. In addition, there are still uncertainties surrounding the effects of metformin or oral contraceptives in the management of insulin level, although they improved total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin levels. In the included studies, significant side effects due to metformin or oral contraceptives were not reported.  Conclusion: The clinical trials suggest that metformin or oral

  2. Comparative study on the acceptability of two modern monophasic oral contraceptive preparations: 30 microgram ethinyl estradiol combined with 150 microgram desogestrel or 75 microgram gestodene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zichella, L; Sbrignadello, C; Tomassini, A; Di Lieto, A; Montoneri, C; Zarbo, G; Mancone, M; Pietrobattista, P; Bertoli, G; Perrone, G

    1999-01-01

    Cycle control and tolerability of two monophasic oral contraceptive pills containing 30 microg ethinyl estradiol (EE) with either 150 microg desogestrel (DSG) or 75 microg gestodene (GSD) were compared in women starting oral contraception. A minimum of 200 healthy women at risk for pregnancy were to be treated for a total of 6 cycles per patient in a prospective, randomized open parallel-group multicenter trial. Two hundred and forty-one subjects were randomized, 115 to DSG/EE and 126 to GSD/EE. Compliance to the study preparation was high (around 95%) in both groups and no pregnancies occurred during the study. Cycle control was excellent; there were no differences between the two groups with regard to incidence of spotting and breakthrough bleeding or duration and intensity of withdrawal bleeding. Side-effects were mild and in general comparable in the two groups. Both at baseline and during treatment, a higher proportion of women taking GSD/EE complained about breast tenderness. This resulted in more early withdrawals because of breast tenderness in the GSD/EE group. It was concluded that monophasic DSG/EE and GSD/EE are equally effective, have similar cycle control and both are generally well tolerated.

  3. Gestodene: a review of its pharmacology, potency and tolerability in combined contraceptive preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczyk, Frank Z; Archer, David F

    2014-04-01

    Combined progestin-estrogen pills are an established and reliable contraceptive option used by women worldwide. Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) containing the progestins--gestodene, desogestrel or norgestimate--were developed to minimize androgenic side effects and are considered an effective, well-tolerated contraceptive option. Gestodene achieves contraceptive efficacy with the lowest dose of any progestin in a COC, and has an established and favorable short- and long-term tolerability profile. In this review we present an overview of the pharmacology, potency and tolerability of gestodene.

  4. Oral Contraception: A Survey of College Women's Concerns and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Robin G.; Beck, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a study which examined attitudes, experiences, and concerns of college women (N=237) regarding oral contraception. Implications of the findings for health educators are discussed. (IAH)

  5. [Oral contraceptives: recent safety studies (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgren, R A

    1983-09-01

    Considerable research evidence now exists to suggest that the risks of oral contraceptive (OC) use were seriously overestimated in earlier work. Because experimentation in medicine is never possible in the rigorous sense in which it is employed in basic sciences, other sources of information must be substituted. Information on the dangers of OC use has come from anecdotal reports, retrospective case control studies, prospective cohort studies, and statistical analyses of deaths, each source being associated with specific problems of interpretation. Recent findings of the Royal College of General Practitioners, the Walnut Creek Study, and the Oxford Study have suggested a lowered incidence of malignant neoplasms in OC than in IUD or diaphragm users; a reduced incidence of breast cancer although the relationship did not consistently achieve statistical significance, and a reduced incidence of ovarian and endometrial cancer. The risks of cervical cancer among OC users appeared slightly higher but disappeared when sexual behavior was controlled. Despite much concern with the possibility of postpill amenorrhea and perhaps sterility among women discontinuing OC use, it now appears that after 2 years there is no difference in the fertility of women who have discontinued use of OCs, IUDs, or diaphragms. Use of OCs as a contraceptive before pregnancy does not appear to be associated with fetal malformations, spontaneous abortion, or perinatal mortality, and the inadvertent use of OCs in early pregnancy is apparently associated with only a very slight risk of anomalies. Recent studies of cardiovascular disease risks indicate that the relative risks of cardiovascular disease among OC users have been greatly exaggerated, especially when smoking is taken into account. Various studies of mortality data have failed to establish a link between OC use and excess mortality from cardiovascular disease.

  6. A systematic review of cost-effectiveness analysis of screening interventions for assessing the risk of venous thromboembolism in women considering combined oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademi, Zanfina; Sutherland, C Simone; Van Stiphout, Joris; Michaud, Jöelle; Tanackovic, Goranka; Schwenkglenks, Matthias

    2017-09-16

    Use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) by women increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which can have a major impact on an individuals' quality of life. VTE is also associated with an increase in healthcare costs. Our aim was to systematically review cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) considering any screening for risk of VTE in women using COCs. The quality of reporting in each study was assessed, a summary of results was prepared, and the key drivers of cost effectiveness in each of the eligible CEAs were identified. A search strategy using MeSH terms was performed in MEDLINE, Embase, the Centre for Review and Dissemination (CRD) database including the Economic Evaluation Database from the UK National Health Service, and Cochrane reviews. Two reviewers independently screened and determined the final articles, and a third reviewer resolved any discrepancies. Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards was used to assess the quality of reporting in terms of perspective, effectiveness measures, model structure, cost, time-horizon and discounting. Four publications (three from Europe, one from the United States) were eligible for inclusion in the review. According to current criteria, relevant elements were sometimes not captured and the sources of epidemiological and effectiveness data used in the CEAs were of limited quality. The studies varied in terms of type of costs assessed, country settings, model assumptions and uncertainty around input parameters. Key drivers of CEAs were sensitivity and specificity of the test, incidence rate of VTE, relative risk of prophylaxis, and costs of the test. The reviewed studies were too dissimilar to draw a firm conclusion on cost-effectiveness analysis about universal and selective screening in high-risk groups. The new emerging diagnostic tools for identifying women at risk of developing VTE, that are more predictive and less costly, highlight the need for more studies that apply the latest

  7. Chlamydia trachomatis and oral contraceptive use: a quantitative review.

    OpenAIRE

    Cottingham, J.; Hunter, D.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Chlamydia trachomatis is now recognised as a major sexually transmitted disease; oral contraceptive use is rapidly increasing particularly in developing countries. There are thus important public health implications of the many reports that isolation of C trachomatis is more frequent among users of oral contraceptives. The aim of this analysis was to assess the strength and consistency of this association by summarising published studies between 1972 and 1990. DESIGN--Studies iden...

  8. Menstrual nirvana: amenorrhea through the use of continuous oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Alison

    2002-12-01

    Medically induced amenorrhea has been used successfully in women who have medical conditions that worsen during menstruation. Menstrual suppression through the use of continuous oral contraceptives has been proven to be safe, effective, and extremely acceptable to women. Women without medical indications for menstrual suppression may find medically induced amenorrhea to be a significant improvement in their quality of life. Greater satisfaction with use of oral contraception may encourage compliance and increase the prevalence of pill-related health benefits.

  9. [Treatment of diminished sexual response associated with the use of oral contraceptives (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucs, G B; Coutinho, E M

    1975-01-01

    Loss of libido associated with the use of oral contraceptives has been studied in 113 women of reproductive age who had taken a combined pill for periods ranging from 1 to 3 years. The patients were divided in four groups. In the first group (I) of 24 women oral contraceptive treatment was discontinued and all women received in intra-uterine contraceptive device (IUCD). The second group (II) of 36 patients, the brand of oral contraceptive was changed. Women in group (III) had their oral contraceptive maintained receiving in addition a mixture of an androgen and an estrogen (methyltestosterone 4 mg and ethynilestradiol 0.002 mg) daily. To women of group (IV) the oral contraceptive was discontinued but the androgen-estrogen mixture was given. All women in this group received an IUCD. Evaluation of the psyco-sexual parameters included changes in libido, time to reach an orgasm, duration and intensity or orgasms. Frequency of intercourse and response to autostimulation was also investigated. Libido was restored in 94.2% of patients in group II, in 97.3% of group III and in 92.8% of group IV. In group I only 55.6% of patients had libido fully restored. In view of the prompt restoration of libido in all groups except in patients discontinuing oral contraceptive therapy, it is suggested that loss of libido in oral contraceptive users has an important physological component which can be overcome probably by psychotherapy. Short term treatment with a mixture of methyltestosterone and ethynilestradiol seems to be highly effective in restoring libido in all patients.

  10. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... comparing the effectiveness of oral contraceptives to other methods of contraception. (4) A boxed warning... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives... Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. The...

  11. [Social psychological and sexological aspects of oral contraception (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Keep, P A

    1976-01-01

    An inventory is made on the hindrances to the acceptance of contraception in general and oral contraception in particular. They are grouped as hindrances related to the social and psychological significance of "making children", hindrances related to the social and psychological significance of "having children" hindrances, related to the method of oral contraception itself, to be divided in social hindrances, psychological hindrances and medical hindrances and finally hindrances related to the provision of the pill to the individual user. Each of these is amply discussed, the author expresses the hope that by identification of these hindrances, lessons may be learned for the future, when other methods of contreception become available.

  12. Combined oral contraceptive containing drospirenone does not modify 24-h ambulatory blood pressure but increases heart rate in healthy young women: prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnacci, Angelo; Ferrari, Serena; Napolitano, Antonella; Piacenti, Ilaria; Arangino, Serenella; Volpe, Annibale

    2013-09-01

    Hypertension is a primary cardiovascular risk factor. Oral contraceptives (OCs) may increase blood pressure and cardiovascular events. We evaluated whether an OC containing ethynylestradiol (EE) in association with the spironolactone-derived progestin drospirenone (DRSP) influences 24-h ambulatory blood pressure of normotensive women. Twenty-four-hour blood pressure was measured every 30 min by an ambulatory blood pressure device in 18 normotensive healthy women prior to and after 6 months of use of an OC containing 30 mcg EE and 3 mg DRSP. OC induced no modification in 24-h, nighttime and daytime blood pressure. Heart rate increased about 4 beats/min in the 24-h (pblood pressure, and significantly increases 24-h and daytime heart rate. These data suggest a neutral effect on hypertension-associated cardiovascular risk and point out an unreported effect on heart rate of which cause and effect require further evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultra-low-dose oral contraceptive pill: a new approach to a conventional requirement

    OpenAIRE

    Meenakshi Ahuja; Pramod Pujari

    2017-01-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) offer a convenient, safe, effective, and reversible method of contraception. However, their use is limited by side effects. Several strategies have been suggested to make COC use more acceptable among women. Reduction in the dose of estrogen is a commonly accepted approach to reduce the side effects of COC. Use of newer generation of progestins, such as gestodene, reduces the androgenic side effects generally associated with progestogens. Furthermore, reduc...

  14. The identification, selection and use of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, C E; Griffith, S F

    1975-01-01

    Facts about oral contraceptives and their use are provided for the practcing generalist and specialist. Identification of oral contraceptives is given in chart form including company, name, contents, pill color, number in pack and special markings. Section 2 entitled "facts that may be helpful in prescribing or changing the prescription of oral contraceptives" includes potency of progestins and estrogens and symptoms indicating excessive or deficient progestin and estrogen activity. Contraindications such as migraine headaches, epilepsy, hepatic disease, renal disease and hypertension are among the reasons for obtaining a complete family history prior to prescription of oral contraceptives. This information provides the basis for choice of contraception tailored to the individual. A 100 pound 17 year old with a normal menstrual history and with adequate estrogen production would be safest with a medication low in estrogen and progestin. An older heavier woman with prolonged menstruation and cramps would require a pill which is potent in progestins since these are excellent for causing endometrium regression and vascular reduction. Length of time on oral c ontraceptives depends upon the patient's general health. If responding well to contraceptives the patient should continue to use them because 1) the body is programmed for lengthy periods of ovulation suppression; 2) the patient becomes accustomed to infertility and 3) too many unplanned pregnancies occur during rest intervals. Complaints of nausea, migraine headaches, change in libido, chloasma or thrombophlebitis determine the termination of the drug.

  15. Oral contraceptives and changes in nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmery, M; Saraceno, A; Vaiarelli, A; Carlomagno, G

    2013-07-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) are a major class of prescription drug, used by a large proportion of women starting from early adolescence. Much research has been conducted to investigate the physiological changes that occur in women who take OCs. These include changes in general health as well as in nutritional needs. In terms of nutrition, several studies investigated whether women on OCs need different amounts of some vitamins and minerals. In particular, a report from the World Health Organization (WHO) points out that the influence of OCs on nutrient requirements is a topic of high clinical relevance and should, therefore, receive great attention. It has been shown that the key nutrient depletions concern folic acid, vitamins B2, B6, B12, vitamin C and E and the minerals magnesium, selenium and zinc. Most research has focused on the levels of these vitamins and minerals in the blood of women who take OCs compared to women who do not. Since women who take OCs not always have adequate diet, may have unhealthy life style or may suffer from pathologies of malabsorption, the possibility to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiencies by taking appropriate dietary supplements should be considered a first-line approach by clinicians.

  16. Use of Oral Contraceptives for Management of Acne Vulgaris: Practical Considerations in Real World Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Julie C

    2016-04-01

    Acne vulgaris may be effectively treated with combination oral contraceptive pills (COCs) in women. COCs may be useful in any woman with acne in the absence of known contraindications. When prescribing a COC to a woman who also desires contraception, the risks of the COC are compared with the risks associated with pregnancy. When prescribing a COC to a woman who does not desire contraception, the risks of the COC must be weighed against the risks associated with acne. COCs may take 3 cycles of use to show an effect in acne lesion count reductions.

  17. Estradiol + dienogest. Oral contraception: estradiol does not provide a therapeutic advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    A monophasic combination of ethinylestradiol plus levonorgestrel or norethisterone is the oral contraceptive with which we have most experience. A quadriphasic combination of estradiol and dienogest was recently authorised in various European Union member states. The results of two non-comparative trials and one comparative trial versus ethinylestradiol + levonorgestrel suggest that the contraceptive efficacy of the estradiol + dienogest combination is no better than that of other oral contraceptives. In addition, there is no tangible difference in regulation of the menstrual cycle compared to the ethinylestradiol + levonorgestrel combination, as assessed by bleeding during and after dosing. The estradiol + dienogest combination has the same frequent and mild adverse effects as other combined contraceptives, such as nausea, breast tenderness and headache. In contrast, little is known of the potential cardiovascular adverse effects of the new combination, including the risk of thrombosis. Use of this quadriphasic combination is inconvenient. The monthly blister pack contains 5 different tablets, with different compositions, that must be taken in exactly the right order. In addition, a woman must follow complicated directions for catching up if she misses a pill, and they differ throughout the cycle. In practice, it is better to continue to use a well-documented combined contraceptive such as the monophasic ethinylestradiol + levonorgestrel combination.

  18. Treatment of acne with oral contraceptives: criteria for pill selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulianos, G T

    2000-10-01

    Combination oral contraceptives (OCs) (those that contain estrogen and progestin) are widely used in the treatment of acne because they modify an excessively androgenic hormonal environment and can decrease lesions. Dermatologists' knowledge of the most appropriate OC may be hampered by an incomplete understanding of these agents, misleading promotion, and confusion surrounding the new generation of OCs. Despite reports attributing significance to the degree of androgenicity of the progestin components of OCs, in vitro and animal bioassays of androgenicity have little clinical relevance. Because all of today's low-dose combination OCs are estrogen dominant, they are equally beneficial in women with androgenic conditions such as acne. Use of the OC containing the lowest dose of each hormone, consistent with the patient's needs, can enhance compliance by preventing or limiting common early-cycle side effects (e.g., nausea/vomiting, breast tenderness, weight gain, headache), while providing acne improvement.

  19. Factors affecting the enterohepatic circulation of oral contraceptive steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, M L; Back, D J

    1990-12-01

    Oral contraceptive steroids may undergo enterohepatic circulation, but it is relevant for only estrogens, because these compounds can be directly conjugated in the liver. Animal studies show convincing evidence of the importance of the enterohepatic circulation, but studies in humans are much less convincing. The importance of the route and the rate of metabolism of ethinyl estradiol are reviewed. Some antibiotics have been reported anecdotally to reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptive steroids, but controlled studies have not confirmed this observation. Although gut flora are altered by oral antibiotics, the blood levels of ethinyl estradiol are not reduced, and one antibiotic at least (cotrimoxazole) enhances the activity of ethinyl estradiol.

  20. Changes in blood levels of proteinase inhibitors, pregnancy zone protein, steroid carriers and complement factors induced by oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Poulsen, H K; Teisner, B

    1993-01-01

    Three low-dose oral contraceptives Trinordiol, Gynatrol, and Marvelon, containing ethinylestradiol (EE) in combination with triphasic levonorgestrel (LNg), monophasic levonorgestrel, and monophasic desogestrel (DGS), respectively, were given to 65 healthy women, n = 21-22 in each group. Blood...

  1. Intrauterine devices: an effective alternative to oral hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    (1) Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are placed in the uterine cavity with the objective of providing long-term contraception, mainly by preventing fertilisation. The best-known IUDs contain copper, but there is also an IUD delivering levonorgestrel, a progestin; (2) How effective are these devices, and what are their adverse effects? To answer these questions, we analysed the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology; (3) T-shaped copper IUDs, with a copper surface area of 380 mm2 on 3 arms, and the levonorgestrel-releasing device, have similar contraceptive efficacy as combined oral contraceptives that are used correctly. In contrast, IUDs are more effective than oral contraception used incorrectly; (4) Among IUD users, there are on average about 6 pregnancies per 1000 woman-years. There is less experience with the levonorgestrel IUD which seems to be at least as effective as copper IUDs; (5) The rare intrauterine pregnancies that occur in women using an IUD generally end in miscarriage. About 25% of these pregnancies end in a live birth if the device is left in place, compared to about 90% if the device is removed; (6) Ectopic pregnancies are rarer in IUD users than in women who do not use contraception. However, about one in 20 pregnancies that occur in women using an IUD is ectopic; (7) The IUD is expelled in about 5% to 10% of cases within 5 years, and expulsion recurs in about 30% of these women; (8) Problems such as difficult insertion, pain, bleeding and syncope are reported in less than 1.5% of cases overall; (9) Uterine perforation during insertion is rare, occurring in 0.6 to 16 cases per 1000 insertions, regardless of the type of IUD. The risk of perforation is higher when the IUD is inserted less than 4 to 6 weeks after delivery or elective abortion; (10) During the first 3 months after insertion, the risk of pelvic infection is slightly higher than in the general population, especially in women with pre-existing asymptomatic Chlamydia

  2. Factors affecting the association of oral contraceptives and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, D W; Hutchison, G B; Welch, W R; Scully, R E; Knapp, R C

    1982-10-21

    We investigated the relation between epithelial ovarian cancer and the use of oral contraceptives in a case-control study of 144 white women under the age of 60 who had ovarian cancer and 139 white women under 60 who were selected from the general population. We observed a decreased risk for ovarian cancer associated with the use of oral contraceptives in subjects 40 through 59 years of age at the time of the study. The relative risk, adjusted for parity, was 0.11, with 95 per cent confidence limits of 0.04 to 0.33. In contrast to the findings in older women, a decreased risk for ovarian cancer associated with oral-contraceptive use was not found in women under 40. In this group, the adjusted relative risk associated with any use of oral contraceptives was 1.98, with 95 per cent confidence limits of 0.74 to 5.27. The lowest risk for ovarian cancer associated with the use of oral contraceptives was observed in older parous subjects and in women who had discontinued use more than 10 years previously.

  3. An ethinyl estradiol-levonorgestrel containing oral contraceptive does not alter cytochrome P4502C9 in vivo activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherala, Ganesh; Pearson, Jacob; Maslen, Cheryl; Edelman, Alison

    2014-03-01

    Oral contraceptives have been in wide use for more than 50 years. Levonorgestrel, a commonly employed progestin component of combined oral contraceptives, was implicated in drug-drug interactions mediated via CYP2C9. Although in vitro studies refuted this interaction, there are no confirmatory in vivo studies. In the current study, we examined the phenotypic status of CYP2C9 using low-dose (125 mg) tolbutamide before and after oral contraceptive use in reproductive age women. Blood was collected 24 hours after the tolbutamide oral dose was administered, plasma was isolated, and tolbutamide concentration (C24) was measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The natural logarithm of tolbutamide C24, a metric for CYP2C9 phenotype, was found to be equivalent (within 80%-125% equivalency boundaries) before and after oral contraceptive use. In conclusion, levonorgestrel-containing oral contraceptives, the most commonly used form of oral contraception, do not affect the status of the CYP2C9 enzyme. This suggests that it is safe to co-administer levonorgestrel-containing oral contraceptives and CYP2C9 substrates, which include a wide array of drugs.

  4. Comparative study between ormeloxifene and oral contraceptive pills in the treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimitkumar Jamanadas Chhatrala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is the most common cause of abnormal uterine bleeding. It can cause anemia, reduces the quality of life and increases healthcare costs. The present study was carried out to study the efficacy of ormeloxifene and compare it to combined oral contraceptive pills in the treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Methods: 140 patients with dysfunctional uterine bleeding were selected randomly and divided into 2 groups of 70 each. Group A was given ormeloxifene tablet 60 mg twice a week for 12 weeks followed by 60 mg once a week for next 12 weeks. Group B was given low dose oral contraceptive pills containing 30 and #956;g of ethinyl estradiol and 150 and #956;g levonorgestrel from day 1 of the menstrual cycle to day 21 for 6 consecutive cycles. Follow up for six months on every cycle was done to assess the symptoms in the form of amount of bleeding (which was assessed by pictorial blood loss assessment chart score, recurrence of symptoms and also the side effects of each drug. Patient's improvement was assessed by performing blood hemoglobin level. Patient's level of satisfaction was judged by general health, limitation of social activity, sexual life and patient's wish to continue treatment with the same drug. Results: The reduction in mean pictorial blood loss assessment score with ormeloxifene (174 to 75 was significantly more than with oral contraceptive pills (171 to 106 at 6 months (P 0.05. Recurrence of symptoms was 11% with ormeloxifene and 24% with oral contraceptive pills. The side effects were minimal in both the groups. 68.6% patients with ormeloxifene and 47.2% with oral contraceptive pills were highly satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Ormeloxifene is more effective, with convenient dose schedule, well tolerated, with better compliance and shows less recurrence rate in treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding than oral contraceptive pills. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol

  5. Cystic disease, family history of breast cancer, and use of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, D V; Elinson, L; Morgan, R W

    1981-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies show a lower frequency of fibrocystic breast disease among users of oral contraceptives than among women who have never used them. Family history of breast cancer appears to be more common among benign breast disease patients than among their controls. To determine the use of oral contraceptives and the presence of family history of breast cancer, information was obtained from 211 cystic cases and their matched controls from the metropolitan Toronto area. Cystic cases compared to controls had a higher proportion of women with a family history of breast cancer (21% vs 15%). For both a positive and negative family history of breast cancer, as well as for all women combined, the mean duration of oral contraceptive use was lower for cystic cases than for controls. The odds ratio for oral contraceptive use according to family history of breast cancer for cystic cases and controls was 0.42 and 0.81 respectively. The possibility that a woman is more protected against benign breast disease by using oral contraceptives if she has a family history of breast cancer deserves more attention in future investigations on the long-term effects of birth control pills.

  6. The lowest-dose, extended-cycle combined oral contraceptive pill with continuous ethinyl estradiol in the United States: a review of the literature on ethinyl estradiol 20 µg/levonorgestrel 100 µg + ethinyl estradiol 10 µg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Krishnan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Sheila Krishnan, Jessica KileyDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USAAbstract: Extended-cycle oral contraceptives (OCs are increasing in popularity in the United States. A new extended-cycle OC that contains the lowest doses of ethinyl estradiol (EE and levonorgestrel (LNG + continuous EE throughout the cycle is now available. It provides 84 days of a low-dose, combined active pill containing levonorgestrel 100 µg and ethinyl estradiol 20 µg. Instead of 7 days of placebo following the active pills, the regimen delivers 7 days of ethinyl estradiol 10 µg. Existing studies reveal a similar efficacy and adverse effect profile compared with other extended-regimen OCs. Specifically, the unscheduled bleeding profile is similar to other extended-cycle OCs and improves with the increase in the duration of use. Although lower daily doses of hormonal exposure have potential benefit, to our knowledge, there are no published studies indicating that this specific regimen offers a lower incidence of hormone-related side effects or adverse events. In summary, this new extended-cycle OC provides patients a low-dose, extended-regimen OC option without sacrificing efficacy or tolerability.Keywords: continuous regimen, ethinyl estradiol, extended cycle, oral contraceptive

  7. Oral contraceptives as anti-androgenic treatment of acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, André; Poulin, Yves

    2002-07-01

    Although acne is seldom associated with high serum levels of androgens, it has been shown that female acne patients have definite increases in ovarian and adrenal androgen levels when compared to appropriate controls. As shown in several pilot and in multiple open and comparative studies, oral contraceptives (OCs) are effective in causing a significant regression of mild to moderate acne. These results have been confirmed by multicentre randomized trials where low-dose OCs did not cause side effects different from those of the placebo-controlled group. The beneficial effect of OCs is related to a decrease in ovarian and adrenal androgen precursors; to an increase in sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which limits free testosterone; and to a decrease in 3a-androstenediol glucuronide conjugate, the catabolite of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) formed in peripheral tissues. The estrogen-progestin combination containing cyproterone acetate (CPA) is particularly effective in treating acne, since this progestin also has a direct peripheral anti-androgenic action in blocking the androgen receptor. Only two open studies and one randomized study on small numbers of patients have reported some efficacy of spironolactone used alone or in combination with an OC in the treatment of acne. The new non-steroidal anti-androgens flutamide and finasteride are being evaluated for the treatment of hirsutism. Oral antibiotics are prescribed to patients with inflammatory lesions, where they are effective in decreasing the activity of microbes, the activity of microbial enzymes, and leukocyte chemotaxis. Concomitant intake of an OC and an antibiotic usually prescribed for acne does not impair the contraceptive efficacy of the OC. A second effective contraceptive method should be used whenever there would be decreased absorption or efficacy of the OC (digestive problems, breakthrough bleeding), lack of compliance and use of a type or dose of antibiotic different from that usually prescribed

  8. Vitamin nutritional status of women using oral contraceptive pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, N K; Vijaya, S

    1980-03-01

    A comparative study was conducted to assess the biochemical effects of a low-estrogen combined OC (oral contraceptive). The focus of the study was on possible biochemical effects indicative of altered nutritional status. Both low and high income women on pills were compared with others not on pills. The groups were further divided according to the duration of OC usage. Blood hemoglobin, serum Vitamin A, plasma ascorbic acid, folic acid, riboflavin, and aspartate transaminase levels were measured. Higher income women had better measures on all the indices than the low income women, indicating a better initial nutritional status. Deficiencies increased with duration of use. Results of the study show that OCs reduce the vitamin nutritional level in women. For poor women on OCs, special nutrition intervention programs should be instituted.

  9. Letter: supplementary pyridoxine given to women using oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, F

    1975-07-15

    This letter is a response to an article describing the efficacy of administering large doses of tryptophan to depressive patients taking oral contraceptives. This letter-writer argues that the salient action of mood elevation is a result of the supplemental pyridoxine (vitamin B) which ameliorates the deficiency induced by oral contraceptive use that leads to depression resulting from inhibition of synthesis of biogenic amines in the central nervous system. Instead of large doses of tryptophan, which may cause dangerous accumulations of possibly carcinogenic and diabetogenic metabolites when therapy for depression is indicated, pyridoxine should be administered together with the tryptophan; the tryptophan should be discontinued once the deficiency is corrected, although the vitamin therapy should continue throughout oral contraceptive use.

  10. Oral contraceptives and venous thromboembolism: a five-year national case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Edström, Birgitte; Kreiner, Svend

    2002-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism; Oral contraceptives; Pulmonary embolism; Third-generation; Second-generation; Pill Scare......Venous thromboembolism; Oral contraceptives; Pulmonary embolism; Third-generation; Second-generation; Pill Scare...

  11. Oral contraceptives and venous thromboembolism: pill scares and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Robert L

    2011-11-01

    Post-marketing surveillance of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) for rare complications such as venous thromboembolism (VTE) presents unique challenges. Prospective studies, which are costly and time consuming, have to date been undertaken by only a few contraceptive manufacturers willing to commit to full evaluation of product safety. Often such studies are conducted with the approval of regulatory authorities as a precondition for marketing. Alternatively, independent investigators with access to large databases have conducted retrospective studies to compare the incidence of VTE between new and older products. Such studies, however, run the risk of erroneous conclusions if they cannot ensure comparable risk profiles for users of these different products. Often database studies are unable to access information on important confounders, and medical records may not be available to validate the actual diagnosis of VTE. "Pill scares" generated following publication and media dissemination of worrisome findings, when the conclusions are in doubt and not corroborated by stronger prospective study designs, are frequently damaging to public health. From a review of recent publications on the VTE risk with drospirenone-containing COCs, it can be concluded that the best quality evidence does not support a difference in risk between users of COCs containing drospirenone and those of COCs containing levonorgestrel.

  12. Risk of venous thromboembolism from use of oral contraceptives containing different progestogens and oestrogen doses: Danish cohort study, 2001-9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel;

    2011-01-01

    To assess the risk of venous thromboembolism from use of combined oral contraceptives according to progestogen type and oestrogen dose.......To assess the risk of venous thromboembolism from use of combined oral contraceptives according to progestogen type and oestrogen dose....

  13. Oral Contraceptives and Multiple Sclerosis/Clinically Isolated Syndrome Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hellwig

    Full Text Available The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS is rising in women.To determine whether the use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs are associated with MS risk and whether this varies by progestin content.We conducted a nested case-control study of females ages 14-48 years with incident MS or clinically isolated syndrome (CIS 2008-2011 from the membership of Kaiser Permanente Southern California. Controls were matched on age, race/ethnicity and membership characteristics. COC use up to ten years prior to symptom onset was obtained from the complete electronic health record.We identified 400 women with incident MS/CIS and 3904 matched controls. Forty- percent of cases and 32% of controls had used COCs prior to symptom onset. The use of COCs was associated with a slightly increased risk of MS/CIS (adjusted OR = 1.52, 95%CI = 1.21-1.91; p<0.001. This risk did not vary by duration of COC use. The association varied by progestin content being more pronounced for levenorgestrol (adjusted OR = 1.75, 95%CI = 1.29-2.37; p<0.001 than norethindrone (adjusted OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.16-2.12; p = 0.003 and absent for the newest progestin, drospirenone (p = 0.95.Our findings should be interpreted cautiously. While the use of some combination oral contraceptives may contribute to the rising incidence of MS in women, an unmeasured confounder associated with the modern woman's lifestyle is a more likely explanation for this weak association.

  14. 人工流产术后使用短效口服避孕药的价值%The Value of Using Combined Oral Contraceptive Pills after Induced Abortion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 刘慧; 张炜

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the clinical value of using combined oral contraceptive pils after induced abortion.Methods 200 health women with early pregnant who were voluntary to receive induced abortion in outpatient clinic from 2013 September to 2014 September were analyzed. They were divided to the OC group and the control group according to their voluntary choice of contraception. The drospirenone and ethinylestradiol tables (Yasmin?) were uesed at the first day of abortion in the OC group(1# qd po, for 21 days),and the next folowing stage would start at the fourth day of menstruation. Six periods were observed. The other contraceptive Methods , such as condom, safe period and coitus interruptus, were used in the control group. The volume and duration of vaginal bleeding, status of endometrium, menstruation recovery, pregnant rates as wel as the side effects of oral contraceptive were observed.Results The volume and duration of vaginal bleeding after abortion, menstruation recovery and the contraception efficiency in the OC group were better than these in the control group(P < 0.05).Conclusion Using combined oral contraceptive pils after induced abortion is the key content of Post Abortion Care.%目的 探讨人工流产术后口服短效避孕药的临床意义.方法 选择2013年9月~2014年9月来我院门诊就诊,自愿要求非意愿行人工流产的健康早孕妇女200例,根据患者意愿自行选择避孕方法,选择复方口服避孕药进行避孕的进入OC组,选择屏障避孕法、安全期及体外排精一般避孕方法进入对照组.二组均于人流术后开始常规口服抗生素预防感染,并于服药前检查血常规及肝肾功能.(1)OC组:于人流术后当天口服复方避孕药屈螺酮炔雌醇片(商品名:优思明,拜耳医药保健有限公司)服用方法:1片,qd,连服21天为1疗程;月经第4天开始第2疗程,服用方法同前,共服用六个周期;(2)对照组:于人流术后每次性生活前自行选择一般避孕

  15. Dangerous triplet: Polycystic ovary syndrome, oral contraceptives and Kounis syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nurdan; Erol; Aysu; Turkmen; Karaagac; Nicholas; G; Kounis

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by ovulatory dysfunction, androgen excess and polycystic ovaries and is associated with hypertension, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular events. Oral contraceptives constitute first-line treatment, particularly when symptomatic hyperandrogenism is present. However, these drugs are associated with cardiovascular events and hypersensitivity reactions that pose problem in differential diagnosis and therapy. We present a 14 year-old female with polycystic ovary syndrome taking oral contraceptive and suffering from recurrent coronary ischemic attacks with increased eosinophils, and troponin levels suggesting Kounis syndrome.

  16. Novel oral contraceptive for heavy menstrual bleeding: estradiol valerate and dienogest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafie S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sally Rafie,1 Laura Borgelt,2 Erin R Koepf,3 Mary E Temple-Cooper,4 K Joy Lehman51Department of Pharmacy, University of California San Diego Health System, San Diego, CA, 2Departments of Clinical Pharmacy and Family Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, 3Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of New England College of Pharmacy, Portland, ME, 4Department of Pharmacy, Hillcrest Hospital, Cleveland Clinic, Mayfield Heights, OH, 5Department of Pharmacy, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB is associated with significant direct medical costs and impacts both society and the quality of life for individual women. Heavy menstrual bleeding, a subset of AUB, also referred to as menorrhagia, is defined as menstrual blood loss greater than 80 mL or the patient's perception of excessive blood loss. The newest treatment option available is a novel combination oral contraceptive product containing estradiol valerate (E2V and dienogest (DNG. As with other combination oral contraceptives, E2V/DNG works primarily by preventing ovulation. However, in contrast with other combination oral contraceptives, it is the progestin component of E2V/DNG that is responsible for endometrial stabilization. Use of E2V/DNG for six months has led to significant reductions in heavy menstrual bleeding with an average 65% reduction in mean blood loss. Approximately half of the women with heavy menstrual bleeding who received E2V/DNG for six months demonstrated an 80% reduction in mean blood loss. Additionally, significant improvements in hematologic indicators (ie, ferritin, hemoglobin, and hematocrit have been shown. Based on its chemical properties, E2V/DNG may have fewer adverse effects on lipid and glucose metabolism and reduced risk of thromboembolic complications compared with other combination oral contraceptives. This has not yet been shown in clinical trials and until then it

  17. Oral Contraceptive Pill Alters Acute Dietary Protein-Induced Thermogenesis in Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhita, Maharani Retna; Schutz, Yves; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Dulloo, Abdul G; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L

    2017-09-01

    There is much interest in the role of dietary protein for weight control. However, there remains a need to characterize individual determinants of the thermogenic effects of protein. This study aimed to investigate the influence of menstrual cycle phase and the combined, monophasic oral contraceptive pill on the thermogenic response to a standardized high-protein (HP) versus normal-protein (NP) meal. Following an overnight fast, resting energy expenditure (EE) was measured in 16 healthy young women (8 taking and 8 not taking the pill) and 8 men for 30 minutes pre ingestion and 3 hours post ingestion of a NP (11%) or HP (24%) meal. There was no effect of menstrual phase or contraceptive pill use on fasting EE or NP response. However, HP increased EE significantly more than NP in women not taking the oral contraceptive pill and in men, but not in women taking the pill. This study shows an absence of the greater thermic effect of HP versus NP in women taking the oral contraceptive pill and has important implications regarding the effectiveness of HP for body weight regulation in women. With current obesity treatment/prevention strategies remaining largely ineffective, understanding the relationship between oral contraceptive pill use and protein-induced thermogenesis may enable the successful recalibration of existing dietary recommendations. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  18. Effects of the Menstrual Cycle and Oral Contraception on Singers' Pitch Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Filipa M. B.; Sundberg, Johan; Howard, David M.; Sa-Couto, Pedro; Freitas, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Difficulties with intonation and vibrato control during the menstrual cycle have been reported by singers; however, this phenomenon has not yet been systematically investigated. Method: A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial assessing effects of the menstrual cycle and use of a combined oral contraceptive pill (OCP) on pitch…

  19. Effects of the Menstrual Cycle and Oral Contraception on Singers' Pitch Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Filipa M. B.; Sundberg, Johan; Howard, David M.; Sa-Couto, Pedro; Freitas, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Difficulties with intonation and vibrato control during the menstrual cycle have been reported by singers; however, this phenomenon has not yet been systematically investigated. Method: A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial assessing effects of the menstrual cycle and use of a combined oral contraceptive pill (OCP) on pitch…

  20. Myocardial infarction and stroke in young women: what is the impact of oral contraceptives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M A

    1998-09-01

    Recent discussions have centered on the small apparent risk increase for venous thromboembolism found with newer oral contraceptives (third-generation oral contraceptives containing the progestins desogestrel and gestodene) compared with older oral contraceptives (second-generation). This article reviews the studies addressing the association between oral contraceptive use and thromboembolic conditions affecting the arterial system, ischemic stroke, and myocardial infarction. Differences are found between a US database study, which showed no risk of ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction associated with low-dose oral contraceptive use, and the European studies, which showed oral contraceptive use in general to be associated with increased risks of ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction. The European studies showed no difference between oral contraceptive generations with respect to the occurrence of ischemic stroke; however, the risk of myocardial infarction associated with oral contraceptive use was consistently lower for third- than for second-generation oral contraceptives. Although there seems to be no differential risk of ischemic stroke associated with oral contraceptive generations, third-generation oral contraceptives appear to be consistently associated with no excess risk of myocardial infarction. In all instances, however, cardiovascular risk factors other than oral contraceptive use play the predominant role in the occurrence of ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction.

  1. 复方口服避孕药对垂体-卵巢轴激素及卵泡发育的影响%Pituitary-ovarian hormone and follicular development of various combined oral contraceptives regimens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄培; 黄勋彬

    2015-01-01

    复方口服避孕药(combined oral contraceptives,COCs)由外源性雌孕激素配伍而成,主要是通过高于生理水平的雌孕激素负反馈抑制垂体-卵巢轴,降低内源性促性腺激素和性激素的水平,影响卵泡的发育而避孕.但在周期性的COCs的无活性药间期(hormone-free interval,HFI)会有垂体-卵巢轴活性的恢复,其激素水平的变化及卵泡发育的情况与雌激素的剂量、孕激素的剂型、HFI的改变相关.

  2. Stress, serotonergic function, and mood in users of oral contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuiten, A; Panhuysen, G; Koppeschaar, H; Fekkes, D; Pijl, H; Frölich, M; Krabbe, P; Everaerd, W

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between stress and changes in insulin levels, plasma ratio of tryptophan to other large neutral amino acids (LNAAs), mood, and food intake was investigated in women taking monophasic oral contraceptives containing progestagens. Subjects experiencing high levels of stress displayed s

  3. Effect of oral contraceptive progestins on serum copper concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Kohlmeier, L; Brenner, H

    1998-01-01

    using oral contraceptives containing antiandrogen progestins (55%; 95% CI: 37-76%), followed by desogestrel (46%; 95% CI: 36-56%), norethisteron/lynestrenol (42%; 95% CI: 29-57%), and levonorgestrel (34%; 95% CI: 24-45%). CONCLUSION: While elevated serum copper concentration was found in users of all...

  4. Oral Contraceptives and Bone Health in Female Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    SUBJECT TERMS bone mass, oral contraceptives, runners, randomized trial, epidemiology, stress fracture, osteoporosis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...irregularity, and osteopenia/ osteoporosis , is of concern among female athletes. Because of the interrelationships among dietary, exercise, and...Figure 1). Reasons for withdrawing included: geographic relocation, pregnancy , illness, and lack of time. Of the remaining 127 participants, 42 (33

  5. Laryngeal Aerodynamics Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham-Rowan, Mary; Fowler, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in laryngeal aerodynamic measures during connected speech associated with oral contraceptive (OC) use. Eight women taking an OC, and eight others not taking an OC, participated in the study. Three trials of syllable /p[subscript alpha] /repetitions were obtained using a…

  6. No effect of oral contraceptives on the metabolism of levetiracetam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Christensen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The effect on clearance of levetiracetam (LEV) was estimated in women with epilepsy of childbearing potential using oral contraceptives (OCs). The estimated clearance (plasma concentration/daily dose) was 39 nmol/L/mg (range 14-88 nmol/L/mg) among women who did not use OC (n=30) and 38 nmol/L/mg ...

  7. Stress, serotonergic function, and mood in users of oral contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuiten, A; Panhuysen, G; Koppeschaar, H; Fekkes, D; Pijl, H; Frölich, M; Krabbe, P; Everaerd, W

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between stress and changes in insulin levels, plasma ratio of tryptophan to other large neutral amino acids (LNAAs), mood, and food intake was investigated in women taking monophasic oral contraceptives containing progestagens. Subjects experiencing high levels of stress displayed s

  8. A combined oral contraceptive containing 3-mg drospirenone/ 20-microg ethinyl estradiol in the treatment of acne vulgaris: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating lesion counts and participant self-assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucky, Anne W; Koltun, William; Thiboutot, Diane; Niknian, Minoo; Sampson-Landers, Carole; Korner, Paul; Marr, Joachim

    2008-08-01

    This study compared the efficacy of a low-dose combined oral contraceptive (COC) containing 3-mg drospirenone and 20-microg ethinyl estradiol (3-mg DRSP/20-microg EE) administered in a 24-day active pill/4-day inert pill (24/4) regimen and placebo in women with moderate acne vulgaris during 6 treatment cycles. A total of 534 participants were randomized and dispensed study medication (n = 266 [3-mg DRSP/20-microg EE 24/4 regimen COC group]; n = 268 [placebo group]). Women of reproductive age were eligible for inclusion in the study. Treatment with the 3-mg DRSP/20-microg EE 24/4 regimen COC was associated with a greater reduction from baseline to end point in individual lesion counts (papules, pustules, open and closed comedones) compared with placebo. The mean nodule count remained essentially constant throughout the study and was low in both treatment groups. There was a significantly higher probability that a participant had an improved assessment on the investigator's overall improvement rating scale (odds ratio [OR], 4.02; 95% CI [confidence interval], 2.29-7.31; P self-assessment rating scale (OR, 2.82; 95% CI, 1.60-5.13; P = .0005) in the 3-mg DRSP/20-microg EE 24/4 regimen COC group than in the placebo group. The COC 3-mg DRSP/20-microg EE 24/4 regimen is a suitable option for women with moderate acne vulgaris who require contraception.

  9. Factors affecting pituitary gonadotropin function in users of oral contraceptive steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J A; Brenner, P F; Kletzky, O A; Mishell, D R

    1978-04-01

    In order to determine whether certain factors influence the direct pituitary suppressive effect of contraceptive steroid, 50 subjects who had used various formulations of oral contraceptive steroids for periods of time ranging from one to nine years were stimulated with 50 microgram of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) during the last week of oral contraceptive ingestion. The response of lutinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was compared to the results obtained in nine control subjects with regard to: (1) age of subject. (2) type of contraceptive formulation used, and (3) length of use. Prestimulation levels of LH and FSH, respectively, were significantly decreased in 37 (74 per cent) and 42 (84 per cent) of the subjects. Following GnRH stimulation, peak responses of serum LH and FSH, respectively, were also significantly lower than those in the control subjects in 40 (80 per cent) and 45 (90 per cent of the subjects. The degree of suppression of pituitary gonadotropins, both before and after GnRH administration was significantly correlated with the type of steroid formulation used, being greatest with a combination of d-norgestrel and ethinyl estradiol. No correlation was found with length of use of oral contraceptives or age of the subjects.

  10. Psychodiagnostic follow-up of Neovletta -- a new low dose oral contraceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor-Freybergh, P; Hjelmqvist, M; Zador, G

    1976-01-01

    In 45 somatically healthy women the possible occurrence of psychic effects of a new low dose combined oral contraceptive was studied using different psychodiagnostic test methods. All the participants were previous users of some of the standard combined oral contraceptives, but had discontinued either due to experienced, side-effects, due to fear of such effects or due to other reasons. Four patients dropped out before the end of the six-month-observation period. Women who discontinued previous use of oral contraceptives due to side-effects or due to fear of side-effects exhibited a more pronounced degree of neuroticism compared to those who terminated due to other reasons. Those who experienced side-effects during earlier medication had initially a higher depression score than the two remaining groups suggesting that women's basic psychic nature seems to play an important role in the development of psychic symptoms during oral contraceptive therapy. None of the three groups developed additional signs of depression during treatment. Moreover, no impairment of the sexual function, assessed by a number of parameters, was found. The findings clearly indicate that Neovletta did not cause any psychic disturbance in the patients studied.

  11. Hormonal contraception decreases bacterial vaginosis but oral contraception may increase candidiasis: implications for HIV transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M; Verwijs, Marijn C; Turner, Abigail Norris; Morrison, Charles S

    2013-08-24

    A 2012 WHO consultation concluded that combined oral contraception (COC) does not increase HIV acquisition in women, but the evidence for depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is conflicting. We evaluated the effect of COC and DMPA use on the vaginal microbiome because current evidence suggests that any deviation from a 'healthy' vaginal microbiome increases women's susceptibility to HIV. We conducted a systematic review and reanalysed the Hormonal Contraception and HIV Acquisition (HC-HIV) study. Vaginal microbiome outcomes included bacterial vaginosis by Nugent scoring, vaginal candidiasis by culture or KOH wet mount and microbiome compositions as characterized by molecular techniques. Our review of 36 eligible studies found that COC and DMPA use reduce bacterial vaginosis by 10-20 and 18-30%, respectively. The HC-HIV data showed that COC and DMPA use also reduce intermediate microbiota (Nugent score of 4-6) by 11% each. In contrast, COC use (but not DMPA use) may increase vaginal candidiasis. Molecular vaginal microbiome studies (n=4) confirm that high oestrogen levels favour a vaginal microbiome composition dominated by 'healthy' Lactobacillus species; the effects of progesterone are less clear and not well studied. DMPA use does not increase HIV risk by increasing bacterial vaginosis or vaginal candidiasis. COC use may predispose for vaginal candidiasis, but is not believed to be associated with increased HIV acquisition. However, the potential role of Candida species, and vaginal microbiome imbalances other than bacterial vaginosis or Candida species, in HIV transmission cannot yet be ruled out. Further in-depth molecular studies are needed.

  12. Oral contraception in women with mild thrombophilia: what have we learned recently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Molina, Ángeles

    2012-10-01

    Mild thrombophilias include heterozygous forms of Factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutation and high levels of factor VIII. These defects are responsible for only a moderate increase of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk compared with strong thrombophilias (antithrombin III, protein C and protein S deficiencies and homozygous forms of factor V Leiden and G20210A prothrombin mutation). Combined oral contraceptives increase the VTE risk in women in a fertile age, and in a far more important way in thrombophilia carrier women. Universal screening of thrombophilia test before the use of combined oral contraceptives is not recommended. However, selective VTE-history based screening is associated with a better cost-effectiveness, especially in asymptomatic relatives of carriers of strong thrombophilia. Currently, combined oral contraceptives are discouraged in women with any thrombophilic defects. The VTE risk is higher during pregnancy and postpartum period compared to hormonal contraceptive use period in women with mil thrombophilia. For this reason, a careful election of an alternative birth control method is necessary in these women.

  13. Effects of hormonal contraceptives on breast milk composition and infant growth. World Health Organization (WHO) Task Force on Oral Contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Breast milk volume and composition and infant growth were measured at three- and four-week intervals, up to six months, in a multicenter randomized double-blind trial comparing a low-dose combined oral contraceptive (OC) with a progestogen-only OC. A nonrandom group using nonhormonal methods was also studied in the three centers: Szeged, Hungary; Bangkok, Thailand; and Khon Kaen, Thailand. A fourth group, users of depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) was included in the two Thai centers. Altogether, 341 women were recruited into the study. Combined OCs caused a significant decrease in milk output and total energy content as well as widespread changes in milk constituents. In the DMPA group, no significant changes were observed in milk volume, and only minor shifts occurred in milk composition, which varied between centers. No differences were found between the progestogen-only pill and DMPA. No hormonal contraceptive was associated with any significant difference in infant weight or fat fold, nor in the rate of discontinuation for failure to gain weight. This study reiterates the need to avoid combined OCs during the first few weeks or months of lactation. Both norgestrel and DMPA appear to be safe for use in both developing and developed countries, at least when the nutritional status of the mother and infant are adequate, but further research is needed on the safety of these contraceptives in populations with malnutrition.

  14. Erythema multiforme limited to the oral mucosa in a teenager on oral contraceptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawetz, Robert E; Elkin, Avigayil; Michael, Lisa; Jawetz, Sheryl A; Shin, Helen T

    2007-10-01

    Erythema multiforme has been linked to numerous drugs and infectious agents. A link to oral contraceptive use has been reported in the past in the adult population but thus far has not been reported in children or adolescents. We report the case of an 18-yr-old female who developed oral erosions consistent with erythema multiforme two and a half weeks after initiating therapy with an oral contraceptive agent. A thorough examination for other inciting factors was negative, and the lesions slowly resolved over the course of 3 weeks. This case illustrates that erythema multiforme should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adolescents with oral erosions who have been prescribed oral contraceptives.

  15. Fulminant Hepatitis E in a Woman Taking Oral Contraceptive Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos Lindemann, Maria Luisa; Morales, Javier Graus; Fernández-Barredo, Salceda; Domínguez, Mario Rodríguez; García de la Hoz, Fernando; Halfon, Philippe; Pérez Gracia, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We describe a fulminant autochthonous hepatic failure caused by hepatitis E (HEV) in a patient admitted in our hospital for liver-transplant evaluation. The only risk factor recorded for this severe course was the use of oral contraceptives that are known to mimic a hormonal status similar to pregnancy. The diagnosis was based on the presence of IgG and IgM anti-HEV in the serum of the patient and confirmed by the isolation of a strain of HEV genotype 3f from a blood sample obtained the fourth day after hospital admission. HEV genotype 3 is present in human and swine populations in Spain. The patient began to recover while waiting for a liver transplant. To our knowledge, this is the first report of fulminant hepatitis E in a non-pregnant European patient on oral contraceptives. PMID:20064988

  16. Dangerous triplet: Polycystic ovary syndrome, oral contraceptives and Kounis syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Erol, Nurdan; Karaagac, Aysu Turkmen; Kounis, Nicholas G.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by ovulatory dysfunction, androgen excess and polycystic ovaries and is associated with hypertension, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular events. Oral contraceptives constitute first-line treatment, particularly when symptomatic hyperandrogenism is present. However, these drugs are associated with cardiovascular events and hypersensitivity reactions that pose problem in differential diagnosis and therapy. We present a 14 year-old female wi...

  17. Hypertension among Oral Contraceptive Users in El Paso, Texas

    OpenAIRE

    White, Kari; Potter, Joseph E.; Hopkins, Kristine; Amastae, Jon; Grossman, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    On the U.S.-Mexico border, residents frequently cross into Mexico to obtain medications or medical care. We previously reported relatively high prevalence of hypertension among Latina oral contraceptive users in El Paso, particularly those obtaining pills over the counter (OTC) in Mexico. Here, we examine factors associated with having hypertension among 411 OTC users and 399 clinic users. We also assess hypertension awareness and interest in using blood pressure kiosks. Women age 35 to 44 an...

  18. Oral Contraceptive Use and Affective Changes Across the Menstral Cycle,

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    41(61. 785-791. Bancroft, J, & Rennie, D. (1993). The impact of oral contraceptives on the experience of perimenstrual mood, clumsiness, food craving ...Confusion 10. Cramps - uterine or pelvic 11. Craving for specific foods or tastes* 12. Craving for alcohol 13. Decreased appetite 14. Decreased food ...evaluated separately from non-users. A questionnaire and modified Keye calendar were used to prospectively collect data. They found that negative

  19. Oral Contraceptives and User Satisfaction in Kanchanaburi, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwarat Tor.Jarern; Kusol Soonthorndhada

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to identify the factors that affect women who use public and private oral contraceptive services. It also aims to assess user satisfaction among pill users, particularly those who are covered by the 30-Baht card of the Universal Coverage Scheme. 1,234 women of reproductive age from the Kanchanaburi DSS (Round 5, 2004) were studied by using logistic regression to determine factors affecting the selection of family planning providers. More than half of the pill users used privat...

  20. Evaluation of emotional reactions to oral contraceptive use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, F J

    1976-12-15

    A review of available clinical studies indicates that 10 to 40 per cent of oral contraceptive users may suffer mild to moderate depression syndromes. Clinical and animal data indicate that a variety of mechanisms may be involved, including alterations in folate, pyridoxine, and vitamine B12 metabolism, as well as related effects on biogenic amine metabolism. Interactive effects may result, such as impairment of usual coping mechnisms and psychological defenses by altered central nervous system function.

  1. Chlamydial salpingitis in female guinea pigs receiving oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, A L; Pasley, J N; Rank, R G; White, H J; Mrak, R E

    1988-01-01

    Female guinea pigs were given daily doses of a combination of oral contraceptive (OC) agents, consisting of mestranol and norethynodrel suspended in sesame oil or distilled H2O, and were infected in the genital tract with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Counts of chlamydial inclusions in cells of vaginal smears collected during infection, showed prolongation and enhancement of infection in OC-treated animals as compared with controls. Appearance of IgG and IgA antibodies to GPIC in genital secretions, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was also delayed in OC-treated animals as compared with controls. OC-treated infected animals were killed on days 15 and 43, and gross pathological evidence for ascending infection culminating in salpingitis was found in all of five and four of five animals, respectively. On the other hand, among untreated infected controls on each sacrifice day, only one of five animals had any evidence for ascending infection. Chlamydiae were detected by light and electron microscopy in fallopian tube tissue collected on day 15 following OC-treatment but not in tissue from control animals.

  2. Increased capillary permeability for plasma proteins in oral contraceptive users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollan, A; Kvenild, K; Strand, H; Oian, P; Maltau, J M

    1992-05-01

    The transcapillary fluid balance was examined in eleven women before administration of a monophasic oral contraceptive (desogestrel 0.15 mg, ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg), and after three and six months of use. The interstitial colloid osmotic pressure was measured by the "wick" method, and the interstitial hydrostatic pressure by the "wick-in-needle" method in subcutaneous tissue on thorax and leg. During the six-month observation period, the following changes were observed: Plasma colloid osmotic pressure decreased (mean 1.8 mmHg, p = 0.047), as well as serum albumin (mean 5.1 g/l, p = 0.0006), total protein concentration (mean 2.8 g/l, p = 0.0006), hemoglobin (mean 0.5 g/dl, p = 0.014) and hematocrit (mean 1.8%, p = 0.047). Blood pressure and body weight remained unchanged, but foot volume showed a significant increase. The colloid osmotic pressure gradient (plasma-interstitium) was significantly reduced. The results indicate an increase in plasma volume in addition to an increased capillary permeability to plasma proteins during oral contraceptive use. We suggest that the observed changes in transcapillary fluid balance is caused by the estrogen component of the oral contraceptive pill.

  3. Safety, efficacy and patient satisfaction with continuous daily administration of levonorgestrel/ethinylestradiol oral contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Benagiano

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Benagiano, Sabina Carrara, Valentina FilippiDepartment of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Sapienza University, Rome, ItalyAbstract: The progestational steroid norgestrel was synthesized and tested between 1960 and 1965 through an international cooperation between Wyeth, USA and Schering, Berlin. It is a mixture of two “enantiomers,” with only one form (designated as levonorgestrel biologically active. When taken orally, it is rapidly absorbed, not subjected to a “first-pass” effect and is approximately 90% bioavailable, with a circulating half-life around 15 hours. Its contraceptive action is exerted at the central (hypothalamic and peripheral (cervical mucus and endometrium levels. Levonorgestrel (LNG, alone or in combination with ethinyl estradiol (EE, is the most widely employed contraceptive progestin: it is used in combined oral contraceptives, progestogen-only pills, long-acting contraceptive implants, intrauterine contraceptive systems and in emergency contraception. It is also the steroid of choice for new oral contraceptive regimens aimed at reducing the frequency of bleeding episodes. This novel approach, already tried more than 30 years ago, gained interest around the year 2000 when surveys of women’s attitudes toward monthly menstrual bleeding started to show a major change: more and more women declared that they would welcome a hormonal contraceptive method that reduced bleeding episodes to 4, 2 or even 1 per year. At this point, while the debate on the significance and “usefulness” of menstruation went on, attention focused on new regimens. The first new modality consisted of changing the 7-day medication-free interval, either shortening it to fewer than 7 days, or by the administration of low-dose estrogens during the interval between packages. Then, continuous administration regimens started to be investigated. This, however, did not happen suddenly, since, in specific situations, doctors had for years

  4. Oral contraceptive use and impact of cumulative intake of estrogen and progestin on risk of ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, M T; Jensen, A; Frederiksen, K

    2013-01-01

    women aged 35–79 years; 554 women with epithelial ovarian cancer and 1,564 age-matched controls were included in the analyses. Data were analyzed in multiple logistic regression models. RESULTS: The use of combined oral contraceptives only and the mixed use of combined and progestin-only pills decreased...... the risk of ovarian cancer, while no association was found with exclusive use of progestin-only pills. No major differences in risk were found for users of combined oral contraceptives with high- and low-potency estrogen and progestin. There was no effect of cumulative progestin intake, but decreased risks......PURPOSE: Oral contraceptive use decreases the risk of ovarian cancer, but no previous studies have assessed the impact of cumulative intake of estrogen and progestin on ovarian cancer risk. METHODS: We used data from a population-based case–control study conducted in Denmark in 1995–1999 among...

  5. [The CHOICE study (Contraceptive Health Research Of Informed Choice Experience)--an educational research program for Polish women planning combined hormonal contraceptives use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Jacek; Paszkowski, Tomasz; Debski, Romuald; Kotarski, Jan; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta; Spaczyński, Robert Z; Pawelczyk, Leszek

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to develop an optimal educational model for contraceptive counseling, to analyze conditions influencing choice of hormonal contraception, to study patients' opinions on present, planned and proposed contraceptive methods and to link these data with socioeconomic and demographic conditions. One thousand eight hundred fifty women (mean age 26.8 +/- 5.9 yrs) willing to use hormonal contraception were presented with essential information on combined hormonal contraception and asked to fill the anonymous questionnaire investigating factors influencing contraceptive choice and patients' opinion on alternative forms of birth regulation. The study was conducted in selected 185 centers in Poland and was a part of a larger survey (CHOICE) conducted on 11 216 women in Europe and Israel. Majority of the studied women were in stable relationship (85,5%), had higher or incomplete higher education (54.8%) and permanent job (54%). The purpose of the visit was to start/change contraception (64.2%), a routine gynecologic check-up (36.7%) or the need for a prescription for the continued contraceptive medication (18.7%). The most commonly used contraceptive methods were oral contraceptive pills (OCP 38.7%) and condom (24.9%). Majority of women highly valued contraceptive counseling and more than 90% were eager to get familiarized with information leaflets. Before the counseling majority of subjects stated that were convinced to use OCP (52.7%; major advantages named: easy to use, favorable bleeding profile, amelioration of menstrual discomfort, comfortable, discrete) and contraceptive patch (22%; major advantages named: applied once a week, comfortable, simple, low risk for noncompliance, favorable bleeding profile). After the counseling there was an increase in proportion of women interested in contraceptive hormonal ring (by 19%; major advantages named: applied once a month, comfortable, very low risk for noncompliance, high efficacy and positive

  6. A survey of bonobo (Pan paniscus) oral contraceptive pill use in North American zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Mary K; Asa, Cheryl S; Clyde, Victoria L; Keller, Dominique L; Meinelt, Audra

    2016-09-01

    Contraception is an essential tool in reproductive management of captive species. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Reproductive Management Center (RMC) gathers data on contraception use and provides recommendations. Although apes have been given oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) for at least 30 years, there have been no published reports with basic information on why the pill is administered, formulations and brands used, and effects on physiology and behavior. Here, we report survey results characterizing OCP use in bonobos (Pan paniscus) housed in North American zoos, as well as information accumulated in the RMC's Contraception Database. Of 26 females treated, there have been no failures and nine reversals. The most commonly administered OCP formulation in bonobos contained ethinyl estradiol (EE) 35 μg/norethindrone 1 mg. Few females on combined oral contraceptives (COCs) were given a continuous active pill regimen; a hormone-free interval of at least 5 days was allowed in most. Crushing the pill and mixing with juice or food was common. Females on COCs seldom experienced breakthrough estrus or bleeding, while these conditions were sometimes observed for females on continuous COCs. All females on COCs exhibited some degree of perineal swelling, with a mean score of 3 or 3+ most commonly reported. Behavioral changes included less sexual behavior, dominant females becoming subordinate, and a negative effect on mood. No appreciable change in weight was noted. Taken together, these results indicate that OCPs are an effective and reversible contraceptive option for bonobos that can be used by zoos and sanctuaries to limit reproduction. Zoo Biol. 35:444-453, 2016. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. 复方口服避孕药对糖代谢和脂代谢的影响%Influence of Combination Oral Contraceptives on Carbohydrates and Lipids Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王巍; 王蔼明; 姜文; 贾晓宁

    2012-01-01

    Combination oral contraceptives (COCs) should affect a series of metabolic factors, such as carbohydrates and lipids profile. The metabolic effects of the COCs seem to be related to their types and dose. The lower doses of estrogen influence the metabolism smaller. The metabolic effects of the progestins seem to be related to their androgenic properties. Non-androgenic or anti-androgenic progestins exert minimal influence on the lipid profile and carbohydrate metabolism. The carbohydrates and lipids metabolic effects of different kinds of COCs, different routes of delivery, and different methods of administration are discussed in this article. The metabolic effect of oral contraceptives on women with PCOS are discussed at the same time. This review are expected to reinforce the benefits and the risks of COCs.%复方口服避孕药可以影响一系列代谢因素的改变,如糖代谢和脂代谢相关指标.雌、孕激素对代谢的影响因其剂量和种类而异.雌激素剂量越低对代谢的影响越小;孕激素对代谢的影响与其雄激素样特性有关,非雄激素样或抗雄激素样特性的孕激素对糖代谢和脂代谢影响最小.本文分别就不同类型口服避孕药、不同给药途径和不同给药方式对糖代谢和脂代谢的影响,以及在避孕药的特殊使用人群多囊卵巢综合征患者中糖代谢和脂代谢的变化加以综述,使我们能够对避孕药有更加准确和客观的认识.

  8. Factors associated with the contraindicated use of oral contraceptives in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Daniele Aparecida Silva; Felisbino-Mendes, Mariana Santos; Mendes, Mayara Santos; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of the contraindicated use of oral contraceptives and the associated factors in Brazilian women. METHODS 20,454 women who answered the VIGITEL survey in 2008 also participated in this study, of which 3,985 reported using oral contraceptives. We defined the following conditions for the contraindicated use of contraceptives: hypertension; cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack, stroke/cerebrovascular accident; diabetes mellitus; being smoker and 35 years old or older. We estimated the prevalence and 95% confidence intervals of contraindicated use in users of oral contraceptives and the factors associated with contraindication by prevalence ratio and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS In the total population, 21% (95%CI 19.7–21.9) of women showed some contraindication to the use of oral contraceptives, of which 11.7% (95%CI 10.6–13.7) belonged to the group of users of oral contraceptives. The most frequent contraindication in users of oral contraceptives was hypertension (9.1%). The largest proportion of women with at least one contraindication was aged between 45 and 49 years (45.8%) and with education level between zero and eight years (23.8%). The prevalence of contraindication to oral contraceptives was higher in women less educated (zero to eight years of study) (PR = 2.46; 95%CI 1.57–3.86; p oral contraceptives. PMID:28099550

  9. Safety, efficacy and patient satisfaction with continuous daily administration of levonorgestrel/ethinylestradiol oral contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Carrara, Sabina; Filippi, Valentina

    2009-01-01

    The progestational steroid norgestrel was synthesized and tested between 1960 and 1965 through an international cooperation between Wyeth, USA and Schering, Berlin. It is a mixture of two “enantiomers,” with only one form (designated as levonorgestrel) biologically active. When taken orally, it is rapidly absorbed, not subjected to a “first-pass” effect and is approximately 90% bioavailable, with a circulating half-life around 15 hours. Its contraceptive action is exerted at the central (hypothalamic) and peripheral (cervical mucus and endometrium) levels. Levonorgestrel (LNG), alone or in combination with ethinyl estradiol (EE), is the most widely employed contraceptive progestin: it is used in combined oral contraceptives, progestogen-only pills, long-acting contraceptive implants, intrauterine contraceptive systems and in emergency contraception. It is also the steroid of choice for new oral contraceptive regimens aimed at reducing the frequency of bleeding episodes. This novel approach, already tried more than 30 years ago, gained interest around the year 2000 when surveys of women’s attitudes toward monthly menstrual bleeding started to show a major change: more and more women declared that they would welcome a hormonal contraceptive method that reduced bleeding episodes to 4, 2 or even 1 per year. At this point, while the debate on the significance and “usefulness” of menstruation went on, attention focused on new regimens. The first new modality consisted of changing the 7-day medication-free interval, either shortening it to fewer than 7 days, or by the administration of low-dose estrogens during the interval between packages. Then, continuous administration regimens started to be investigated. This, however, did not happen suddenly, since, in specific situations, doctors had for years empirically utilized various continuous administration regimens. The first extended-cycle oral contraceptive regimen introduced in clinical practice is an 84

  10. Effect of educational leaflets and questions on knowledge of contraception in women taking the combined contraceptive pill: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, P; Griffin, S; Kelly, J; Dickson, N; Sadler, C

    1998-06-27

    To assess whether provision of educational leaflets or questions on contraception improves knowledge of contraception in women taking the combined contraceptive pill. Randomisation of women into three groups according to type of educational leaflet on contraceptive information. These groups were subdivided into two on the basis of questions on contraception asked by the doctor or practice nurse. The women were followed up by postal questionnaire 3 months later. 15 general practices in South and West region. 636 women attending check up appointment for repeat prescription of the combined contraceptive pill. Knowledge of: factors causing pill failure, subsequent action, emergency contraception, and all the rules (pill rules) that apply to the contraceptive pill. 523 women returned completed questionnaires (response rate 82%). Knowledge of contraception with no intervention was low with only 10 (12%) women knowing all the pill rules. Educational intervention had a highly significant effect on knowledge of: factors causing pill failure (likelihood ratio chi2=22); subsequent action (21); emergency contraception (24); and all the pill rules (22) (PWomen attending check ups for repeat prescriptions of the contraceptive pill should be provided with educational leaflets on contraception or asked relevant questions to help improve their knowledge of contraception. Asking questions in addition to providing a summary leaflet is time consuming, but results in the most knowledge gained.

  11. Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the Oral Contraceptive Pill and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N Allan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes our current knowledge of the role of the oral contraceptive pill in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBO, followed by a review of fertility in women and men. IBD and pregnancy, including the impact on the fetus and the mother with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, is considered. The safety of drug treatment during pregnancy, the outcome of surgical treatment during pregnancy and the problems that may be encountered during pregnancy in patients with an ileostomy or ileo-anal pouch are discussed, followed by a review of the short and long term prognosis of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease partition.

  12. Use of oral contraceptives in the management of acne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melis GB

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gian Benedetto Melis, Marisa Orrù, Maria Francesca Marotto, Monica Pilloni, Mariagrazia Perseu, Stefano Lello, Anna Maria PaolettiClinica Ginecologica Ostetrica e di Fisiopatologia della Riproduzione Umana, Universita' di Cagliari, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Cagliari, Cagliari, ItalyAbstract: The pathogenesis of acne (the most common disorder involving the sebaceous gland originates from increased sebum production by the sebaceous gland followed by colonization of the hair follicle with Propionibacterium acnes, hyperkeratinization of the upper follicle, and release of inflammatory mediators into the skin. Androgens are the main stimulators of sebum production. Androgens originate from the gonads and adrenal glands, but can also be locally produced within the sebaceous gland from dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. In the presence of high androgen levels, which can be either a normal pattern of adolescence or a consequence of gonadal or adrenal disease, overproduction of sebum triggers the pathogenesis of acne which, mainly in adolescent women, has deleterious psychological consequences. Estrogens exert the opposite action on sebum production, probably due to the reduction of androgen availability, a direct consequence of estrogen-related increased production of hepatic sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG. The inhibition of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis induced by oral contraceptives is followed by reduced androgen production. Oral contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol, which has strong estrogenic activity, amplify the hypoandrogenic effect via estrogen-related stimulation of SHBG. The hypoandrogenic effect of oral contraceptives is modulated by the progestin compound. Progestins derived from 19-nortestosterone bind androgenic receptors, whereas others exert antiandrogenic properties by antagonizing the binding of androgens to their receptors, reduce 5α-reductase, and do not bind SHBG. Through this last effect, SHBG is freely

  13. Active E-rosette formation in women taking oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, P S; Fleming, W E; Johnston, K A; Ozmun, J M

    1977-01-06

    On the assumption that the number of E-rosettable lymphocytes (active T lymphocytes) is an index of cell-mediated immunity, rosette assays were performed at early cycle and at midcycle for 6 women taking oral contraceptives (OCs) for 1-4 years. OC subjects at midcycle had 21.4% active rosette-forming lymphocytes as compared with 14.1% in controls (p less than .05). The 2 youngest subjects had higher values during the early cycle. These results imply the possibility of hormonal regulation of human T-cell activity.

  14. Perceived side effects of oral contraceptives among adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, E S; Goodwin, M S

    1980-11-22

    Knowledge and attitudes of adolescent females regarding the side effects of oral contraceptives were investigated. The data source was a large study of sexual and contraceptive attitudes and experience. The questionnaire responses of 486 single females attending 10 birth control and pregnancy counseling centers in Ontario, Canada were examined. The age range of the subjects was from 13-20; 71% were attending school and 69% were living at home. They were attending the centers in order to obtain contraceptives (55%), to renew OC prescriptions (20%), or to receive pregnancy counseling (25%). 29% of the subjects had used OCs before coming to the clinic, but 91% planned to use OC after their clinic visit. 8% were planning to use an IUD; 1% were planning to use a diaphragm; and less than 1% were planning to have their boyfriend use condoms. 85% of the subjects indicated that they had heard abut side effcts of OCs with weight gain as the best known side effect. Other side effects familiar to many included nausea, circulatory disorders, headaches, emotional changes, menstrual problems and cancer. About 1/2 of the subjects had learned about these side effects from the mass media or female friends, 25% from a school sex education class, 15% from their mothers, and 3% from a physician. Despite knowledge regarding side effects, most of the subjects had positive attitudes toward OCs with 59% believing that the advnatages outweighed any disadvantages.

  15. Progestogen-only injectable contraceptive: Experience of women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    menstrual pattern are a well known side effect of this effective contraceptive method. .... For most teenagers requesting contraceptive, ... Injectables offer the advantage of not requiring ... insertion, and the combined oral contraceptive pills.

  16. Use of and access to oral and injectable contraceptives in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Mareni Rocha; Leite, Silvana Nair; Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Arrais, Paulo Sergio Dourado; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Mengue, Sotero Serrate

    2016-12-01

    combined oral contraceptives were the most frequently reported (71.6%) and low-level levonorgestrel + ethinylestradiol combination accounted for 38.7% of them. The most frequently reported medicines are included in the Relação Nacional de Medicamentos Essenciais (RENAME - National List of Essential Medicines. Most women aged 15 to 49 who reported using contraceptives had access to the medicine and use monophasic combined oral contraceptives of appropriate efficiency and safety purchased by direct payment, mainly from retail pharmacies. Analisar a prevalência do uso atual de contraceptivos orais e injetáveis por mulheres brasileiras, segundo variáveis demográficas, socioeconômicas e aspectos relacionados ao acesso a esses medicamentos. Estudo transversal, analítico, baseado nos dados da Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM), de base populacional e amostra probabilística, realizada entre setembro/2013 e fevereiro/2014, em 20.404 domicílios urbanos brasileiros. A prevalência foi calculada a partir do relato das mulheres de 15 a 49 anos, não grávidas, sobre o uso de contraceptivos orais ou contraceptivos injetáveis. As variáveis independentes foram sexo, idade, escolaridade, nível socioeconômico, região geográfica e situação conjugal. Também foram analisados acesso, fontes de financiamento, fontes de obtenção e medicamentos citados. As análises estatísticas consideraram intervalos de confiança de 95% (IC95%) e teste Qui-quadrado de Pearson para avaliação da significância estatística das diferenças entre os grupos, considerando o nível de significância de 5%. A prevalência de uso de contraceptivos orais (CO) foi 28,2% e de contraceptivos injetáveis (CI), 4,5%. A prevalência de contraceptivos orais foi maior no Sul (37,5%) e menor no Norte (15,7%). Para contraceptivos injetáveis não houve diferença entre as regiões. O acesso foi maior para as usuárias de contraceptivos orais (90

  17. Treatment with liraglutide--a once-daily GLP-1 analog--does not reduce the bioavailability of ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel taken as an oral combination contraceptive drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Lisbeth V; Vouis, Jan; Hindsberger, Charlotte; Zdravkovic, Milan

    2011-12-01

    Liraglutide is a once-daily human GLP-1 analog for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Like other GLP-1 analogs, liraglutide delays gastric emptying, which could potentially affect absorption of concomitantly administered oral drugs. This study investigated the effect of liraglutide on the pharmacokinetics of the components of an oral contraceptive (ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel). Postmeno-pausal healthy women (n = 21) were included. A single dose of this contraceptive was administered. Blood samples for ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel measurements were drawn until 74 hours post dosing of the contraceptive during liraglutide and placebo treatments. The 90% confidence interval (CI) of the ratio of the area under the curve (AUC) (1.06; 90% CI, 0.99-1.13) for ethinyl estradiol (during liraglutide and placebo) was within defined limits, demonstrating equivalence. The 90% CI for the ratio of AUC for levonorgestrel was not fully contained within the limits (1.18; 90% CI, 1.04-1.34) (levonorgestrel AUC was 18% greater with liraglutide vs placebo). However, equivalence was demonstrated for levonorgestrel AUC(0-t) (1.15; 90% CI, 1.06-1.24). Equivalence was not demonstrated for maximum concentration (C(max)); values for ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel C(max) were 12% and 13% lower with liraglutide versus placebo, respectively. Both reached C(max) ~1.5 hours later with liraglutide. No clinically relevant reduction in bioavailability of ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel occurred.

  18. Peculiar observations in measuring testosterone in women treated with oral contraceptives supplemented with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijboer, Annemieke C; Zimmerman, Yvette; de Boer, Theo; Coelingh Bennink, Herjan; Blankenstein, Marinus A

    2014-03-20

    Total testosterone is considered to be decreased during the use of combined oral contraceptives. There is, however, considerable concern about the quality of testosterone assays, especially at low levels. We aimed to confirm testosterone levels measured by direct radioimmunoassay in a recent clinical trial with a state-of-the-art LC-MSMS method. Surplus specimens with known testosterone levels collected during the study (Clinical Trial Registration number ISRCTN06414473) were reanalyzed with an LC-MSMS method. This method was compared to another LC-MSMS method that had shown to concur excellently to a reference method. Follow-up experiments were designed to explain the results. In contrast to our expectation, LC-MSMS measurements did not corroborate the data obtained by radioimmunoassay. Subsequent experiments showed that this could be attributed to a strong dependency of the radioimmunoassay on SHBG. Testosterone results (n = 198) obtained by direct radioimmunoassay showed a negative correlation to SHBG levels (r = -0.676; p<0.001). By contrast, testosterone results obtained by LC-MSMS were not related to SHBG (r = 0.100; NS). In conclusion, our results indicate that total testosterone measurements during oral contraceptive use are unreliable when performed with assays sensitive to the SHBG concentration. The discrepancy with the literature can most likely be explained by the sensitivity of the immunoassay used to SHBG. Given the sharp increase in SHBG during the use of many oral contraceptives, total testosterone may not decrease, whereas its bioavailability, estimated by free testosterone levels, will be diminished. Studies aiming at restoration of testosterone homeostasis during oral contraception need to take this into account. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lipid profile of women using oral contraceptive pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, F; Jyoti, S; Akhtar, N; Afzal, M; Siddique, Y H

    2012-10-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) are the most popular type of birth control pills. The study was designed to examine the biochemical changes which occur due to the use of oral contraceptive pills (OCs). The study was based on the questionnaire for having the information of any reproductive history fasting, age, health, nature of menstrual cycle, bleeding, disease etc and blood profiling for biochemical analysis of the women includes high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG). Lipid profiling was carried out by using a commercially available diagnostic test kits. SPSS was used to analyze the data. The results showed statistically significant differences among users of OCs compared to non-users. Total cholesterol (242.92 +/- 2.842 mg dL(-1)), HDL-C (58.65 +/- 1.098 mg dL(-1)), LDL-C (115.84 +/- 1.266 mg dL(-1)) and triglycerides (105.56 +/- 2.341 mg dL(-1)) were significantly higher compared to the non-users (Total cholesterol 218.49 +/- 1.762, HDL-C 48.17 +/- 0.543, LDL-C 100.321 +/- 0.951 and triglycerides 83.77 +/- 2.299 mg dL(-1)). The result suggests that OCs increase the level of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG).

  20. [ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES AND MOOD/SEXUAL DISORDERS IN WOMEN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirakov, M; Tomova, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral contraceptives are used since more than 50 years and are very popular due to offering more than 99% confidence in preventing pregnancy. Over 100 million women worldwide use oral contraceptives. In the UK 27% of women between 16 and 49 y. use pills. In the United States they are about 30%, in Germany - 40%, and in The Netherlands - 60%. According to a study by B. Pehlivanov, 2008, in Bulgaria only 4% of women use OC. (1) Despite the convenience and security, in the U.S.A. 29% of women taking OC interrupt prematurely their use (2), while the percentage of adolescents appears to be higher (3) Earlier studies of the reasons for refusal of OC focus on their influence on the menstrual cycle, as well as on some physical side effects such as the appearance of hair growth, weight gain, bloating etc. They paid very little attention to their impact on mood and sexual behavior of women (4). Newer studies suggest that the side effects associated with mood and sexual behavior proved more powerful factor leading to early termination of the use of OC (5). This paper is a review of the literature and evaluation of the facts presented in studies from different countries. They found a high incidence of symptoms such as anxiety, susceptibility to stress, mood changes, incl. depression, anxiety, increased irritability and affection of sexual desire of women. (6) There are many indications that OC-users are at increased risk of suicide and mental illnesses. (9).

  1. Changes in blood levels of proteinase inhibitors, pregnancy zone protein, steroid carriers and complement factors induced by oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Poulsen, Henning Kvist; Teisner, Børge

    1993-01-01

    Three low-dose oral contraceptives Trinordiol, Gynatrol, and Marvelon, containing ethinylestradiol (EE) in combination with triphasic levonorgestrel (LNg), monophasic levonorgestrel, and monophasic desogestrel (DGS), respectively, were given to 65 healthy women, n = 21-22 in each group. Blood...... presumably enhances fibrinolysis, and that LNg has higher anti-estrogenicity and androgenicity than DSG. Udgivelsesdato: 1993-Sep...

  2. Changes in blood levels of proteinase inhibitors, pregnancy zone protein, steroid carriers and complement factors induced by oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Poulsen, H K; Teisner, B

    1993-01-01

    Three low-dose oral contraceptives Trinordiol, Gynatrol, and Marvelon, containing ethinylestradiol (EE) in combination with triphasic levonorgestrel (LNg), monophasic levonorgestrel, and monophasic desogestrel (DGS), respectively, were given to 65 healthy women, n = 21-22 in each group. Blood...... presumably enhances fibrinolysis, and that LNg has higher anti-estrogenicity and androgenicity than DSG....

  3. Oral contraceptive pill, progestogen or estrogen pre-treatment for ovarian stimulation protocols for women undergoing assisted reproductive techniques (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, B.; Oirschot, S.M. van; Farquhar, C.; Rombauts, L.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For many subfertile women, assisted reproductive techniques (ART) is the only hope for a pregnancy and live birth. The combined oral contraceptive pill (OCP) given prior to the hormone therapy in an IVF cycle may result in better pregnancy outcomes of ART. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether p

  4. Oral contraceptive pill, progestogen or estrogen pre-treatment for ovarian stimulation protocols for women undergoing assisted reproductive techniques (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, B.; Oirschot, S.M. van; Farquhar, C.; Rombauts, L.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For many subfertile women, assisted reproductive techniques (ART) is the only hope for a pregnancy and live birth. The combined oral contraceptive pill (OCP) given prior to the hormone therapy in an IVF cycle may result in better pregnancy outcomes of ART. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether p

  5. Ultra-low-dose oral contraceptive pill: a new approach to a conventional requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Ahuja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined oral contraceptives (COCs offer a convenient, safe, effective, and reversible method of contraception. However, their use is limited by side effects. Several strategies have been suggested to make COC use more acceptable among women. Reduction in the dose of estrogen is a commonly accepted approach to reduce the side effects of COC. Use of newer generation of progestins, such as gestodene, reduces the androgenic side effects generally associated with progestogens. Furthermore, reduction in hormone-free interval, as a 24/4 regimen, can reduce the risk of escape ovulation (hence preventing contraceptive failure and breakthrough bleeding. It also reduces hormonal fluctuations, thereby reducing the withdrawal symptoms. A COC with gestodene 60 µg and ethinylestradiol (EE 15 µg offers the lowest hormonal dose in 24/4 treatment regimen. This regimen has been shown to offer good contraceptive efficacy and cycle control. With the progress of treatment cycles, the incidence of breakthrough bleeding reduces. Gestodene/EE low dose 24/4 regimen was associated with lower incidence of estrogen-related adverse events, such as headache, breast tenderness, and nausea. Furthermore, COCs containing low dose of estrogen have not been associated with any adverse effect on haemostasis in healthy women. Ultra-low-dose COCs can be considered in women who are at risk of developing estrogen-related side effects.

  6. Estradiol valerate and dienogest: a novel four-phasic oral contraceptive pill effective for pregnancy prevention and treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micks, Elizabeth; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2011-09-01

    Estradiol valerate and dienogest have been combined to create a novel four-phasic oral contraceptive pill effective for both pregnancy prevention and treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding. This formulation represents the only oral contraceptive pill available in the USA containing an estrogen component that is biologically active as the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol. This medication was developed out of efforts to replace the most common estrogen in contraceptive pills, ethinyl estradiol, which is known to be a potent inducer of hepatic protein synthesis. Estradiol valerate has been available since the 1970s in oral and injectable forms indicated for the treatment of menopausal climacteric symptoms. Dienogest has been used in other oral contraceptive pills for over 10 years. Previous attempts to develop an oral contraceptive pill with natural estradiol or estradiol valerate were unsuccessful due to poor cycle control. A novel dynamic-dosing regimen was devised to improve the bleeding pattern. This medication has been shown in several clinical trials to have good contraceptive efficacy and cycle control. Recent studies have also demonstrated that this medication is effective for the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding. However, compared with other oral contraceptive pills, this medication is associated with a higher frequency of absent withdrawal bleeding. Furthermore, the dynamic dosing regimen requires relatively complex instructions for users who miss pills.

  7. Offering extended use of the combined contraceptive pill: a survey of specialist family planning services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauer U

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike Sauer,1 Sue Mann,2 Nataliya Brima,3 Judith Stephenson21Reproductive and Sexual Health, Enfield Community Service, Enfield, 2Sexual and Reproductive Health Research Group, Institute for Women’s Health, 3Research Department of Infection and Population Health, University College London, London, UKBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine attitudes to, and provision of, extended regimens for taking the combined oral contraceptive pill (COC by specialist contraception practitioners from three contrasting specialist contraception services in London.Methods: An online cross-sectional survey was administered to all doctors and nurses, who counsel, provide, or prescribe the oral contraceptive pill at each clinic.Results: A total of 105 clinicians received the questionnaire and 67 (64% responded. Only one of three clinics initiated and maintained guidelines for extended COC use. In that service, 60% of staff prescribing COC advised more than 50% of patients regarding alternative COC regimens. In the other two services, this was discussed with 20% and 6% of patients, respectively (P < 0.001. The reasons for prescribing extended use included cyclic headaches, menorrhagia, patient request, menstrual-related cramps, and endometriosis, and did not differ between the three different settings. The most common extended regimens were 63 pills or continuous use until bleeding occurs, followed by a hormone-free interval. Concerns highlighted by providers and patients were “unhealthy not to have a monthly bleed”, “future fertility”, and “breakthrough bleeding”. Such comments highlight the need for further information for providers and patients.Conclusion: There is growing evidence, backed by national guidance, about extended COC use, but routine provision of this information is patchy and varies ten-fold, even within specialist family planning services. Targeted training, use of service guidelines, and implementation research will be

  8. Pharmacists' knowledge and interest in developing counseling skills relating to oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mohamed E K

    2016-04-01

    Possessing correct therapeutic information on oral contraceptives is an important prerequisite for the provision of sound advice to women who are using these products. This study examines Egyptian pharmacists' knowledge of pharmacotherapeutic aspects of oral contraceptives as well as interest in developing skills in providing counseling on oral contraceptive pills. Community pharmacies throughout Alexandria, Egypt. A cross-sectional survey was self-administered by a random sample of community pharmacists in Alexandria, Egypt. Five multiple choice questions likely to arise when counseling women on oral contraceptives were constructed. Questions covered compatibility with breastfeeding, precautions, health risks and managing missed pills of oral contraceptives. Using ordered logistic regression, a model was estimated to predict pharmacists' interest in developing skills in providing counseling on oral contraceptives. Pharmacists' aggregate scores for knowledge questions and pharmacists' interest in developing skills in providing counseling on oral contraceptive pills. Of the 181 approached pharmacists, 92 % participated. Twenty one pharmacists (13 %) did not know the correct answer to any question, 122 (73 %) answered one-two correctly, 23 (14 %) answered three-four correctly. No pharmacist answered all five questions correctly. For pharmacists' interest in developing skills in providing counseling on oral contraceptives, the percentage values for answers were: not interested at all (10.2 %), slightly interested (27.0 %), somewhat interested (23.4 %), interested (30.0 %) and extremely interested (9.6 %). Pharmacists' interest in developing skills in providing counseling on oral contraceptives was significantly associated with the number of women who requested advice from the pharmacists on oral contraceptives (OR 1.54, CI 1.24-1.91). In terms of the learning method of preference, percentage values for answers were: attending a workshop (4 %), online course (18

  9. Oral contraceptive use and protective behavior after missed pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, D; Potter, L; de Leon-Wong, E; Visness, C

    1997-01-01

    A three-month prospective study of 103 women initiating oral contraceptive use examined how consistently the women took their pills and whether those who missed pills employed other means to avoid pregnancy. The results showed that 52% took each active pill or never missed more than one pill at a time after the first week of the initial cycle, according to electronic devices that recorded the date and time each pill was removed from the blister pack. Another 21% were protected by behaviors that reduce the risk of pregnancy when two or more consecutive pills have been missed: avoiding coitus for the next seven days (18%) or using backup contraception during that period (3%). The remaining 27% were at increased risk of pregnancy. Predictors of increased risk were receiving low partner support for effective pill use, being unmarried and not considering it especially important to avoid pregnancy. Increased risk was most likely during the first seven days and during the third cycle of pill use.

  10. Carbohydrate metabolism after one year of using a gestodene containing monophasic oral contraceptive

    OpenAIRE

    Ayşegül Yıldırım; Efe Onganer; Kemal Erkal

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To prospectively evaluate the effects of an oral contraceptive containing the progestin gestodene on carbohydrate metabolism in ordinary Turkish women Material / Method: Carbohydrate metabolism was prospectively evaluated in 53 normal women prior to and during their use of monophasic oral contraceptive containing the progestin gestodene plus ethinyl estradiol for one year. The women had a two hour oral glucose tolerance test using 75 gram glucose load, measuring serum glucose and ...

  11. [Clinical experiences with a gestodene containing oral contraceptive (femoden)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimes, G; Valent, S

    1998-09-01

    In order to reduce the side-effects (blood-lipid alterations, androgen effects etc.) new gestogens were introduced, while the ethinyl-estradiol component of the pill was unchanged. Authors report about clinical trial on monophasic oral contraceptive containing 0.030 mg ethinyl-estradiol and 0.075 mg gestodene. In a follow up of 92 women, in 1740 cycles no pregnancy and no cardivascular or thromboembolic complication was observed. The frequency of bleeding disorders was below 10% already in the first cycle. The quantity of withdrawal bleeding, as well the frequency of breakthrough bleeding and spotting decreased during the treatment. Significant alteration in body weight or blood pressure did not occur. Femoden containing third generation gestogen has an excellent cycle control and good patient compliance.

  12. Pharmacist conscience clauses and access to oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, D P

    2008-07-01

    The introduction of conscience clauses after the 1973 US Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade allowed physicians and nurses to opt out of medical procedures, particularly abortions, to which they were morally opposed. In recent years pharmacists have requested the same consideration with regard to dispensing some medicines. This paper examines the pharmacists' role and their professional and moral obligations to patients in the light of recent refusals by pharmacists to dispense oral contraceptives. A review of John Rawls's concepts of the "original position" and the "veil of ignorance", along with consideration of the concept of compartmentalisation, are used to assess pharmacists' requests and the moral and legal rights of patients to have their prescriptive needs met.

  13. Stroke in women - oral contraception, pregnancy, and hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Kirsi; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease affecting millions of people worldwide every year. Female stroke victims have higher mortality rates and they do not re-cover as well as men. Women's longevity and different vascular risk factor burden like a larger prevalence of atrial fibrillation play a role. Women also have unique risk factors such as oral contraception, pregnancy, estrogen decrease after the menopause and hormone replacement therapy, which should all be evaluated and taken into consideration in treatment decisions both in the acute phase of stroke and in secondary prevention. In this review, the evidence regarding these hormonal aspects and the risk of stroke in women are evaluated. The relevant guidelines are studied and research gaps identified. Future topics for research are recommended and current treatment possibilities and their risks discussed.

  14. Efficacy and safety of the new antiandrogenic oral contraceptive Belara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahradnik, H P; Goldberg, J; Andreas, J O

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this open, noncontrolled phase III study was the assessment of the contraceptive efficacy and the evaluation of the safety of long-term use of Belara (30 micrograms ethinyl estradiol plus 2 mg chlormadinone acetate). Furthermore, cycle stability during administration of Belara and the influence of Belara on acne and seborrhea as clinical signs of androgenization were observed. Belara was taken by 1655 women for a total of 22,337 cycles. For the theoretical Pearl index, a value of 0.269 (95% CI [0.109, 0.600]) was calculated. In 1655 of 22,337 cycles (7.4%), no withdrawal bleeding was documented, whereas in 2565 of 22,308 cycles (11.5%), spottings and, in 786 of 22,308 cycles (3.5%), breakthrough bleeding occurred. After the intake of Belara for 12 cycles, acne on the face/neck improved in 64.1% of the women (209 of 326). In 53.4% of the women (175 of 326), acne disappeared completely. Seborrhea improved after 12 cycles in 89 of 131 women (67.9%), of whom 76 women (58.0%) were completely cured. Sixty-two serious adverse events (SAE) occurred in 59 of 1655 women. Accidents and injuries of the musculoskeletal system were the SAE with the highest incidence (0.66%). Two cases of deep venous thrombosis, one pulmonary embolism, and two cases of visual disturbances were observed. Only for the two cases of deep venous thrombosis could a relation to Belara be assumed. Of the adverse events commonly reported for oral contraceptives, headache was observed for the first time under study medication in 37.4%, nausea in 23.1%, breast tenderness in 21.7%, and vaginal discharge in 19.4% of the women. The frequency of adverse events decreased with longer duration of a drug consisting of intake of Belara. In conclusion, Belara can be described as an effective and safe oral contraceptive with marked antiandrogenic properties.

  15. Factors associated with the contraindicated use of oral contraceptives in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Aparecida Silva Corrêa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of the contraindicated use of oral contraceptives and the associated factors in Brazilian women. METHODS 20,454 women who answered the VIGITEL survey in 2008 also participated in this study, of which 3,985 reported using oral contraceptives. We defined the following conditions for the contraindicated use of contraceptives: hypertension; cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack, stroke/cerebrovascular accident; diabetes mellitus; being smoker and 35 years old or older. We estimated the prevalence and 95% confidence intervals of contraindicated use in users of oral contraceptives and the factors associated with contraindication by prevalence ratio and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS In the total population, 21% (95%CI 19.7–21.9 of women showed some contraindication to the use of oral contraceptives, of which 11.7% (95%CI 10.6–13.7 belonged to the group of users of oral contraceptives. The most frequent contraindication in users of oral contraceptives was hypertension (9.1%. The largest proportion of women with at least one contraindication was aged between 45 and 49 years (45.8% and with education level between zero and eight years (23.8%. The prevalence of contraindication to oral contraceptives was higher in women less educated (zero to eight years of study (PR = 2.46; 95%CI 1.57–3.86; p < 0.05 and with age between 35-44 years (PR = 4.00; 95%CI 2.34–6.83 and 45-49 years (PR = 5.59; 95%CI 2.90–10.75. CONCLUSIONS Age greater than or equal to 35 and low education level were demographic and iniquity factors, respectively, in the contraindicated use of oral contraceptives.

  16. Oral contraceptives after myomectomy: a short term trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisi, Stefano; Ciani, Valentina; Gabbanini, Massimo; Sollazzi, Sofia; Torricelli, Michela; Calonaci, Francesco; Petraglia, Felice

    2009-01-01

    Following myomectomy the rate of fertility is restored and pregnancy may be attempted with a good outcome. In the present study a 3 month treatment with OCs in a group of women after a myomectomy was evaluated. The drug compliance and side effects, the benefits of OC in order to reduce symptoms, to increase post-surgical hemoglobin levels and to avoid an early pregnancy after myomectomy were analyzed. A group of women (n = 55) each with myoma >/=5 cm was recruited: they presented menorrhagia, pelvic pain, dyspareunia and dysmenorrhae. After laparotomic myomectomy the women were divided into 3 groups. Group 1: women (n = 16) treated with pill A (15 mcg of ethynilestradiol + 60 mcg of gestodene); group 2: women (n = 23) treated with pill B (20 mcg of ethynilestradiol + 100 mcg of levonorgestrel); group 3: women (n = 16) treated with a placebo (oral calcium). After three months from myomectomy and treatment patients in each group reported a reduced menorrhagia, dismenorrhea and pelvic pain. Serum haemoglobin levels increased in all women (P < .05). No pregnancy occurred in any group and the compliance was good. A post surgery treatment by using oral contraceptives guarentees pregnancy prevention, associated with reduction of pain, and improvement of haematologic conditions.

  17. Gestodene. A review of its pharmacology, efficacy and tolerability in combined contraceptive preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, M I; Balfour, J A

    1995-08-01

    The newer progestogens gestodene, desogestrel and norgestimate were developed in an attempt to produce agents with more selective progestational activity that would improve cycle control and minimise metabolic changes and adverse events while effectively preventing pregnancy. In clinical practice, gestodene is combined with ethinylestradiol in monophasic or triphasic combined oral contraceptive preparations. The drug has pharmacokinetic advantages over the other new progestogens in that it is active per se (the others are prodrugs) and has high bioavailability (approximately 100%). The ability of gestodene-containing oral contraceptives to inhibit ovulation is similar to that of preparations containing other progestogens although the required dosage is lower. In common with oral contraceptives containing desogestrel or norgestimate, and in contrast with those containing levonorgestrel, gestodene-containing preparations are associated with neutral or positive changes in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. The effects of gestodene preparations on coagulation parameters, like those of desogestrel and levonorgestrel, are balanced by changes in the fibrinolytic system. Although the impact of these changes on clinical cardiovascular end-points has not been determined, the altered lipid profile is not likely to have significant clinical relevance because of the predominantly thrombogenic nature of cardiovascular disease in oral contraceptive users. Pregnancy rates and Pearl Indices with gestodene-containing preparations are low and similar to those with preparations containing other progestogens. Most pregnancies are attributable to user failure. Cycle control appears to be better with gestodene preparations than with levonorgestrel preparations, and available data suggest that cycle control may also be better with monophasic gestodene/ethinylestradiol than with monophasic desogestrel- or norgestimate-containing preparations, and better with triphasic gestodene- than with

  18. Effects of oral contraceptive agents and sex steroids on carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkhoff, R K

    1972-01-01

    The article offers a general interpretation of the influence of oral contraceptive agents on glucose tolerance, emphasizing comparisons of synthetic sex hormones. Although there are conflicting reports on steroid-induced diabetes in normal women, their glucose curves are often higher when under oral contraceptive treatment, suggesting that oral contraceptives may induce a form of subclinical diabetes melitus that is reversible. Evidence from diabetic women suggests definite deliterious effects from contraceptive administration. Estradiol, estriol, and estrone may improve glucose tolerance in nondiabetic women and reduce insulin requirements in diabetics. Progesterone has little effect on carbohydrate tolerance, as did synthetic progestin. Conjugated equine estrogens (equilenine or Premarin) may provoke mild to moderate deterioration of carbohydrate tolerance. Parenterally administered natural estrogens and orally administered synthetic derivatives appear to differ sharply in their effects. Sex hormones' effects on carbohydrate metabolism likely involve interactions with insulin and endogenous glucocorticoids.

  19. Side and site of deep vein thrombosis in women using oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, A

    1985-01-01

    The anatomy of the thrombus in acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in women using oral contraceptives was studied in 277 reports on DVT received by the Swedish Adverse Drug Reaction Advisory Committee (SADRAC). The study revealed a similarity between the anatomy of DVT in women on oral contraceptives and that of DVT in pregnant women, suggesting a pharmacologic influence of the hormones in the pill on the pathogenesis of DVT in women on oral contraceptives. The anatomy of DVT in women on low-estrogen pills was identical with that of DVT in women on high-estrogen pills, suggesting an identical pharmacologic influence of the two types of pill on the pathogenesis of DVT in women on oral contraceptives.

  20. Sexual Activity and Contraceptive Use among Female

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adolescents — A Report from Port Harcourt, Nigeria ... rather low level (56%) of knowledge of effective contraceptive methods, and limitation of .... Combined oral contraceptive pills 20.5 .... moted for its dual advantages —— prevention of.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral testosterone enanthate plus dutasteride for 4 weeks in normal men: implications for male hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, John K; Kalhorn, Thomas F; Page, Stephanie T

    2008-01-01

    Oral administration of testosterone enanthate (TE) and dutasteride increases serum testosterone and might be useful for male hormonal contraception. To ascertain the contraceptive potential of oral TE and dutasteride by determining the degree of gonadotropin suppression mediated by 4 weeks of oral TE plus dutasteride, 20 healthy young men were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of either 400 mg oral TE twice daily or 800 mg oral TE once daily in a double-blinded, controlled fashion at a single site. All men received 0.5 mg dutasteride daily. Blood for measurement of serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone, dihydrotesterone (DHT), and estradiol was obtained prior to treatment, weekly during treatment, and 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 13, 14, 16, 20, and 24 hours after the morning dose on the last day of treatment. FSH was significantly suppressed throughout treatment with 800 mg TE once daily and after 4 weeks of treatment with 400 mg TE twice daily. LH was significantly suppressed after 2 weeks of treatment with 800 mg TE, but not with 400 mg TE. Serum DHT was suppressed and serum estradiol increased during treatment in both groups. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was suppresed during treatment, but liver function tests, hematocrit, creatinine, mood, and sexual function were unaffected. The administration of 800 mg oral TE daily combined with dutasteride for 28 days significantly suppresses gonadotropins without untoward side effects and might have utility as part of a male hormonal contraceptive regimen.

  2. Comparison of Drospirenone-with Cyproterone Acetate-Containing Oral Contraceptives, Combined with Metformin and Lifestyle Modifications in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Metabolic Disorders: A Prospective Randomized Control Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Yi Wang; Yong Song; Wei Huang; Li Xiao; Qiu-Shi Wang; Gui-Mei Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background:While combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are commonly used to treat polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS),comparative data regarding metabolic effects of different progestogens on this patient population are missing.This study aimed to compare the different effects of drospirenone (DRP)-containing COCs with cyproterone acetate (CPA)-containing COCs,combined with metformin and lifestyle modifications in women with PCOS and metabolic disorders.Methods:Ninety-nine women with PCOS and a metabolic disorder between January 2011 and January 2013 were enrolled into this prospective randomized clinical trial.Participants were randomized into two groups such as DRP-containing COCs,and CPA-containing COCs.Participants took COCs cyclically for 6 months,combined with metformin administration (1.5 g/d) and lifestyle modifications (diet and exercise).Clinical measures and biochemical and hormone profiles were compared.Comparisons for continuous variables were evaluated with paired and unpaired Student's t-tests.The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used when the data were not normally distributed.Analysis of covariance was used to control for age,body mass index (BMI),and baseline data of each analyzed parameter when compared between the two groups.Results:A total of 68 patients have completed the study.The combination regimen of COCs,metformin,and lifestyle modifications in these patients resulted in a significant decrease in BMI,acne,and hirsutism scores when compared to baseline levels in both groups (P < 0.05).Blood pressure (BP) was significantly different in the CPA group when compared to baseline (75.14 ± 6.77 mmHg vs.80.70 ± 5.60 mmHg,P < 0.01),and after 6 months of treatment,only the change in systolic BP was significantly different between the two groups (4.00 [-6.00,13.00] mmHg vs.-3.50 [-13.00,9.00] mmHg,P =0.009).Fasting glucose,fasting insulin,and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance decreased significantly in the DRP group (5.40 ± 0.41 mmol

  3. Comparison of Drospirenone- with Cyproterone Acetate-Containing Oral Contraceptives, Combined with Metformin and Lifestyle Modifications in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Metabolic Disorders: A Prospective Randomized Control Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu-Yi; Song, Yong; Huang, Wei; Xiao, Li; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Feng, Gui-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background: While combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are commonly used to treat polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), comparative data regarding metabolic effects of different progestogens on this patient population are missing. This study aimed to compare the different effects of drospirenone (DRP)-containing COCs with cyproterone acetate (CPA)-containing COCs, combined with metformin and lifestyle modifications in women with PCOS and metabolic disorders. Methods: Ninety-nine women with PCOS and a metabolic disorder between January 2011 and January 2013 were enrolled into this prospective randomized clinical trial. Participants were randomized into two groups such as DRP-containing COCs, and CPA-containing COCs. Participants took COCs cyclically for 6 months, combined with metformin administration (1.5 g/d) and lifestyle modifications (diet and exercise). Clinical measures and biochemical and hormone profiles were compared. Comparisons for continuous variables were evaluated with paired and unpaired Student's t-tests. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used when the data were not normally distributed. Analysis of covariance was used to control for age, body mass index (BMI), and baseline data of each analyzed parameter when compared between the two groups. Results: A total of 68 patients have completed the study. The combination regimen of COCs, metformin, and lifestyle modifications in these patients resulted in a significant decrease in BMI, acne, and hirsutism scores when compared to baseline levels in both groups (P < 0.05). Blood pressure (BP) was significantly different in the CPA group when compared to baseline (75.14 ± 6.77 mmHg vs. 80.70 ± 5.60 mmHg, P < 0.01), and after 6 months of treatment, only the change in systolic BP was significantly different between the two groups (4.00 [–6.00, 13.00] mmHg vs. –3.50 [–13.00, 9.00] mmHg, P = 0.009). Fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance decreased significantly

  4. Does oral contraceptive pill increase the risk of abnormal Pap smear?

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Binesh; Ali Akhavan; Azar Pirdehghan; Mahnoosh Davoodi

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is noted that oral contraceptive pills increase the risk of abnormal Pap smear but results have been inconsistent across the populations. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the association between oral contraceptive pill (OCP) consumption and abnormal Pap smear in women who referred to Shahid Sadoughi and Madar hospitals in Yazd. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional descriptive study was carried out and a database of all Pap smear reports from 2009-2011 at Cytopa...

  5. Effect of a low dose combined oral contraceptive pill on the hormonal profile and cycle outcome following COS with a GnRH antagonist protocol in women over 35 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakas, Panagiotis; Hassiakos, Dimitrios; Grigoriadis, Charalampos; Vlahos, Nikolaos F; Liapis, Angelos; Creatsas, George

    2014-11-01

    This prospective study examines if pre-treatment with two different doses of an oral contraceptive pill (OCP) modifies significantly the hormonal profile and/or the IVF/ICSI outcome following COS with a GnRH antagonist protocol. Infertile patients were allocated to receive either OCP containing 0.03 mg of ethinylestradiol and 3 mg of drospirenone, or OCP containing 0.02 mg of ethinylestradiol and 3 mg of drospirenone prior to initiation of controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) with recombinant gonadotropins on a variable multi-dose antagonist protocol (Ganirelix), while the control group underwent COS without OCP pretreatment. Lower dose OCP was associated with recovery of FSH on day 3 instead of day 5, but the synchronization of the follicular cohort, the number of retrieved oocytes and the clinical pregnancy rate were similar to higher dose OCP.

  6. Review of the safety, efficacy and patient acceptability of the combined dienogest/estradiol valerate contraceptive pill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Guida

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Guida, Giuseppe Bifulco, Attilio Di Spiezio Sardo, Mariamaddalena Scala, Loredana Maria Sosa Fernandez, Carmine NappiDipartimento di Scienze Ostetriche Ginecologiche Urologiche e Medicina della Riproduzione Umana, Università degli Studi “Federico II”, Napoli, Italia Abstract: The aim of this review is to define the role of the combined dienogest (DNG/­estradiol valerate (E2V contraceptive pill, in terms of biochemistry, metabolic and ­pharmacological effects and clinical application as well. E2V is the esterified form of 17β-estradiol (E2, while dienogest is a fourth-generation progestin with a partial antiandrogenic effect. The cycle stability is achieved with 2 to 3 mg DNG, supporting contraceptive efficacy. In this new oral contraceptive, E2V is combined with DNG in a four-phasic dose regimen (the first two tablets contain 3 mg E2V; the next five tablets include 2 mg E2V + 2 mg DNG, followed by 17 tablets with 2 mg E2V + 3 mg DNG; followed by two tablets with 1 mg E2V only, and finally two placebo tablets. Duration and intensity of scheduled withdrawal bleeding are lower with this ­contraceptive pill, whereas the incidence and the intensity of intra-cyclic bleeding are similar to the other oral contraceptive. With this new pill the levels of high density lipoprotein increased, while the levels of prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 and D-dimer remained relatively unchanged; the levels of sex hormone binding globulin, cortisol binding globulin, thyroxine binding globulin increased. The most frequently reported adverse events are: breast pain, headache, acne, alopecia, migraine, increase of ­bodyweight. The satisfaction rate is about 79.4%.Keywords: estradiol valerate, dienogest, combined oral contraceptive, four-phasic regimen, contraceptive safety

  7. Multicenter comparison of the contraceptive ring and patch: a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Creinin, Mitchell D; Meyn, Leslie A; Borgatta, Lynn; Barnhart, Kurt; Jensen, Jeff; Burke, Anne E; Westhoff, Carolyn; Gilliam, Melissa; Dutton, Caryn; Ballagh, Susan A

    2008-01-01

    To understand if the contraceptive ring or patch was more acceptable, as measured primarily by continuation, to women using an oral contraceptive and interested in a nondaily, combined hormonal contraceptive...

  8. A Survey of Teenagers' Attitudes Toward Moving Oral Contraceptives Over the Counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Ruth; Kottke, Melissa

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that over-the-counter access to oral contraceptives may help expand use among adult women. Teenagers may particularly benefit from this approach, as they experience disproportionately high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique challenges accessing contraceptives. However, limited research has explored teenagers' attitudes toward over-the-counter access. In 2014, a sample of 348 females aged 14-17, recruited via Facebook advertisements, participated in an online survey assessing teenagers' attitudes toward over-the-counter access and their understanding of how to use oral contraceptives after reading a prototype over-the-counter product label. Differences by participants' characteristics were assessed in bivariate analyses (Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests for categorical measures, and independent t tests and one-way analyses of variance for continuous measures). Seventy-three percent of participants supported over-the-counter access, and 61% reported that they would likely use oral contraceptives available through this approach. Few subgroup differences were found. Notably, sexually experienced participants were significantly more likely than others both to support this approach (85% vs. 63%) and to be interested in obtaining oral contraceptives this way (77% vs. 48%). Participants understood an average of 7.1 of eight key concepts that the prototype product label was intended to convey; no significant differences were found among subgroups. Over-the-counter access may be a promising approach for providing oral contraceptives to teenagers. Additional research is needed to evaluate whether teenagers can screen themselves for contraindications to oral contraceptive use and correctly use oral contraceptives obtained over the counter. Copyright © 2015 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  9. Adolescent girls in Denmark use oral contraceptives at an increasingly young age, and with more pauses and shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Nielsen, Anne Kristine

    2014-01-01

    , adolescent girls have more pauses and shifts between types of hormonal contraceptives. Since 2010 there has been a shift toward use of second generation oral contraceptives away from third and fourth generation contraceptives. CONCLUSION: Adolescent girls tend to initiate their use of oral contraceptives...... at a younger age than the older cohorts do. Furthermore, they have more pauses and shift between products more frequently than older cohorts. The type of oral contraceptive used has shifted since 2010 towards older products with second generation progestins. FUNDING: The study was funded by salaries from North......INTRODUCTION: Use of hormonal contraceptives for birth control is commonplace in the Western World. In Europe, there is considerable variety in the frequency of use of hormonal contraceptives and in the age at which these contraceptives are initiated. The purpose of the present study...

  10. Carbohydrate metabolism after one year of using a gestodene containing monophasic oral contraceptive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Yıldırım

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To prospectively evaluate the effects of an oral contraceptive containing the progestin gestodene on carbohydrate metabolism in ordinary Turkish women Material / Method: Carbohydrate metabolism was prospectively evaluated in 53 normal women prior to and during their use of monophasic oral contraceptive containing the progestin gestodene plus ethinyl estradiol for one year. The women had a two hour oral glucose tolerance test using 75 gram glucose load, measuring serum glucose and insulin level, performed at the beginning of the contraceptive therapy and after one year. Results: The results demonstrate no significant changes in either of carbohydrate metabolic indices between the two tests.  Conclusion: The progestin containing contraceptive pill can be safely used in consideration of the carbohydrate metabolism.

  11. Oral contraceptives, Chlamydia trachomatis infection, and pelvic inflammatory disease. A word of caution about protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, A E; Gove, S; Schachter, J; Sweet, R L

    1985-04-19

    Management of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and decisions about contraception are being influenced by reports that oral contraceptives decrease the risk of PID. To evaluate the validity of this association, we have examined published epidemiologic evidence and reviewed relevant information from other disciplines. Current information does not permit the generalization that oral contraceptives protect against all forms of PID. Most studies conducted (1) have been limited to hospitalized women, who represent less than 25% of all PID cases and are likely to have relatively severe forms of the disease, and (2) have failed to distinguish between gonococcal and nongonococcal PID. While oral contraceptives may provide some protection against gonococcal PID, no basis exists for assuming similar protection is provided against chlamydial PID. In fact, epidemiologic and biologic evidence suggests that infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading cause of nongonococcal PID, is enhanced by oral contraceptives. We judge the conclusion that oral contraceptives protect against all PID to be premature, and urge caution in its application in health policy and clinical decisions.

  12. DOCTOR'S PERCEPTION AND PRESCRIPTION OF ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES: A SOCIAL MARKETING STUDY IN BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ziaulhaq Mamun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Doctor's perception of oral contraceptive products is very important for social marketing. Though the obvious and important use of oral contraceptives is to prevent unwanted pregnancy, it is also found that awareness regarding non-contraceptive health benefit use of oral contraceptives is increasing. As oral contraceptives have a lot of side effects, normally doctors go for low dose pills to avoid inconvenience and risk when prescribing a patient. In many cases, doctors give their own judgment on the basis of a number of factors in defining low dose pills. It is evident that Nordette 28 and Marvelon are considered to be almost near considering the attributes – less side effect, low dose, reasonable price and patient's preference. Femicon is separated from the rest of the group due to its low price and is perceived by the doctors as the least quality oral contraceptive. Doctors usually like to prescribe Ovostat and Marvelon to those patients who have more purchasing ability and considers price as a quality factor.

  13. Factors affecting riboflavin requirements of oral contraceptive users and nonusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, D A; Bogusz, S; Sheu, J; McCormick, D B

    1982-03-01

    Riboflavin depletion has been identified in women on oral contraceptives (OC) but change in riboflavin nutriture has not been consistently demonstrated in all OC user groups studied. Discrepant findings in reports have been attributed to differences of pill formulation or riboflavin intake. Aims of this study were to compare the riboflavin requirements of healthy OC users and nonusers on diets prepared in a metabolic unit. A single daily menu and meal pattern was used. The basic diet providing riboflavin at a level of 0.6 mg/1000 kcal was used in the period of acclimation and period 1. In periods 2 and 3, the riboflavin content of the diet was increased to 0.8 and 1.0 mg/1000 kcal, respectively. The riboflavin status of subjects was monitored by erythrocyte glutathione reductase assay and urinary riboflavin excretion. Eight women on OC and 10 nonusers participated. Erythrocyte glutathione reductase assay values and urinary riboflavin excretion showed intersubject and interperiod differences but no significant group differences (OC versus non-OC) in erythrocyte glutathione reductase values or in urinary riboflavin per g creatinine. It was concluded that when dietary intake is controlled, OC do not significantly influence riboflavin status. Riboflavin needs were related to energy requirements of the subjects.

  14. Effect of oral contraceptive progestins on serum copper concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, G; Kohlmeier, L; Brenner, H

    1998-10-01

    High serum copper concentration--a well-known effect of oral contraceptive (OC) use--has been linked to increased mortality from cardiovascular disease. The influence of OCs containing newer progestins has not been investigated, however. This concern was addressed in a 1987-88 cross-sectional epidemiologic study of 610 nonpregnant, nonlactating West German women 18-44 years of age. 195 women (32.1%) were current OC users, but only 152 of these women were able to cite the name of the formulation they were taking. In 70% of cases, the OC contained less than 45 mcg of ethylestradiol (median dose, 32.4 mcg). The most common progestin components were desogestrel (41%) and levonorgestrel (30%). Mean serum copper concentration was higher among users of all types of OCs than among non-users, but this concentration varied more strongly according to the OC's progestin compound than its estrogen content. The greatest increase in serum copper (55% compared with non-users) was recorded in users of OCs containing anti-androgen progestins, followed by desogestrel (46%), norethisterone/lynestrenol (42%), and levonorgestrel (34%). The increase in serum copper was more pronounced in women taking OCs containing 45 mcg or less of ethylestradiol than in users of OCs with a high estrogen dose. In the regression models, the different progestin compounds alone explained 28% of the total variance in serum copper concentration. Further investigation of OC-induced increases in serum copper concentration and their impact on cardiovascular risk are warranted.

  15. Inconsistent use of oral contraceptives in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Asaduzzaman; Trottier, Dorace A; Islam, M Ataharul

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore predictors of inconsistent use of oral contraceptives (OCs) in rural Bangladesh. A total of 801 rural OC users were included in the study, about half of them (49%) missed one or more active pill(s) during the 6 months before the survey.Multivariate analysis revealed that Muslim women were 60% more likely to be inconsistent OC users compared to their non-Muslim counterparts. Women who lacked knowledge about contraindications were 60% more likely to take the pill inconsistently than were women who had the knowledge. Women who were not visited by family planning workers or did not have access to mass media were 40% more likely to be inconsistent OC users.OC users need increased information about correct OC use, which could be provided via improved access to mass media with specific messages on how to use OCs properly. Better access to the community clinics could improve the pill-taking behaviors of rural Bangladeshi women.

  16. Clinical comparison of monophasic oral contraceptive preparations of gestodene/ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel/ethinyl estradiol. Latin American Oral Contraceptive Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The efficacy, cycle control, subjective complaints, and safety of monophasic preparations of the oral contraceptives containing gestodene 75 mcg plus ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg versus desogestrel 150 mcg plus ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg were compared in a 6-cycle, open-label, parallel, randomized, multicenter phase IV clinical study in Latin America. Of a total of 176 women in each group, 163 in the gestodene group and 160 in the desogestrel group completed 6 cycles, providing data for 1,015 and 1,006 cycles, respectively. Subject compliance was excellent; pills were missed during only 6.9% of the cycles in each group. No woman became pregnant during the study. Gestodene group exhibited significantly better cycle control as evidenced by the lower incidence of breakthrough bleeding and spotting. Spotting in some cycles was reported by 11.9% of women taking the gestodene-combination compared with 21% of women taking the desogestrel-combination. Based on number of women, 86.4% of the gestodene group reported all cycles were normal (no BTB) compared with 76.7% of the desogestrel group. Also, the women in the gestodene group reported a significantly lower incidence of nuisance side effects during treatment cycles. No amenorrhea was observed for either group. There were no clinically significant differences between groups with respect to body weight, blood pressure, or laboratory evaluations. Seven women withdrew from the gestodene group and 8 women withdrew from the desogestrel group because of adverse reactions. The results of this study indicate that, although both OCs provided effective contraception, in comparison to the desogestrel-combination, the gestodene-containing OC is associated with better cycle control, less bleeding, and fewer subjective complaints.

  17. Effects of oral contraceptives on glucoregulatory responses to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Catherine M; Ben-Ezra, Vic; Gozansky, Wendolyn S; Scheaffer, Suzanne E

    2004-03-01

    Some of the effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) to alter glucoregulation may be ameliorated by exercise. To test this premise, the effects of acute aerobic exercise on postprandial glucose, insulin, and C-peptide responses (area under the curve [AUC]) were measured in 8 users of low-dose estrogen and progestin OCs (OC(+)) and 10 women not using OCs (OC(-)). They completed 2 randomly ordered intervention trials: (1) aerobic exercise on 3 consecutive days with a 2.5-hour, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on day 4, and (2) no exercise for 3 days prior to the OGTT (control trial). The exercise was 50 minutes of treadmill walking at 70% (.-)VO(2max). The groups were similar in age (27 +/- 3 years), waist-to-hip ratio (0.74 +/- 0.01), and cardiorespiratory fitness (32.5 +/- 1.6 mL x kg body mass(-1) x min(-1)). Fasting plasma glucose, C-peptide, and insulin levels were similar (P >.05) between groups in the control trial. In both trials, glucose(AUC) was significantly greater (13%, P <.05) in OC(+). Exercise resulted in a significant (P <.05) decrease in fasting plasma glucose and insulin, insulin(AUC), glucose(AUC) x insulin(AUC), and C-peptide(AUC) in both groups, suggesting enhanced insulin action and/or reduced pancreatic insulin secretion. Hepatic insulin extraction ([C-peptide(AUC) - insulin(AUC)())]/C-peptide(AUC)) was increased following exercise only in OC(+). Thus, insulin action was enhanced in response to exercise in young sedentary women independent of OC use. The mechanisms for the acute exercise effect on insulin action may be different in OC users compared with normally menstruating women.

  18. 口服避孕药联合中药治疗剖宫产术后子宫切口憩室56例临床分析%Clinical Analysis of Oral Contraceptives Combined with Traditional Chinese Medicine in Treatment of 56 Cases of Uterine Incision Diverticulum after Cesarean Section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庆红; 徐明翠

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the treatment method of cesarean section uterine incision diverticulum. Method:Our hospitai found and treated 56 patients with cutting cesarean section uterine incision diverticulum from 2007 to 2013,according to different treatment groups,the treatment group 28 cases,the control group 28 cases,the treatment group were given oral contraceptive(menstruation of mom rich grand day 5)with traditional chinese medicine therapy,the control group patients were given simple hemostatic drugs.Result:28 cases in treatment group,oral contraceptives with traditional chinese midicine therapy,menstruai period shorten the different level,effect was better than the control group.Conclusion:Oral contraceptives,combined traditional chinese medicine treatment of uterine incision diverticulum after cesarean section is effective.%目的:探讨剖宫产术后子宫切口憩室的治疗方法。方法:本院2007-2013年发现并治疗56例剖宫产术后子宫切口憩室,按治疗方法不同分组,治疗组28例,对照组28例,治疗组给予口服避孕药妈富隆(月经第5天)联合中药治疗,对照组给予单纯的止血药物治疗。结果:治疗组患者经期均有不同程度缩短,效果明显优于对照组。结论:口服避孕药联合中药治疗剖宫产术后子宫切口憩室有显著效果。

  19. Lack of interaction between orlistat and oral contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, D.; Güzelhan, C.; Zuiderwijk, P.B.M.; Odink, J.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: Orlistat, a potent and selective inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases, is designed for the treatment of obesity. A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover study investigated the possible influence of orlistat on the ovulation-suppressing action of combination oral

  20. Lack of interaction between orlistat and oral contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, D.; Güzelhan, C.; Zuiderwijk, P.B.M.; Odink, J.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: Orlistat, a potent and selective inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases, is designed for the treatment of obesity. A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover study investigated the possible influence of orlistat on the ovulation-suppressing action of combination oral

  1. Oral contraceptive use before and after the latest pill scare in the Netherlands - Changes in oral contraceptive use and how users change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, CS; van den Berg, PB; de Jong-vandenBerg, LTW

    1998-01-01

    In October 1995, a "pill scare" developed in Europe. In the Netherlands, the recommendations given were 1) to not alarm women without risk for deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and 2) to be reserved in prescribing third generation oral contraceptives (OC) for young women who were beginning OC use. To dete

  2. Oral contraceptive use before and after the latest pill scare in the Netherlands - Changes in oral contraceptive use and how users change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, CS; van den Berg, PB; de Jong-vandenBerg, LTW

    1998-01-01

    In October 1995, a "pill scare" developed in Europe. In the Netherlands, the recommendations given were 1) to not alarm women without risk for deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and 2) to be reserved in prescribing third generation oral contraceptives (OC) for young women who were beginning OC use. To dete

  3. Side effects and discontinuation of oral contraceptive use in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowitz, B; Kane, T T; Arruda, J M; Covington, D L; Morris, L

    1986-07-01

    Oral contraceptives have many advantages, but sometimes also have side effects which can cause users to switch appropriately or inappropriately to less effective methods or abandon contraception. In Brazil, 2/3 of married women of childbearing age were using contraception in 1981, and 1/2 of these were using orals. Contraceptive behavior following reported side effects in users of oral contraceptives in Southern Brazil is examined in this study, in relation to diverse factors. Among 2904 currently-married women, aged 15-44, almost 75% reported that they had used the pill at some time, and of these, 45.6% were still doing so. Data on perceived side effects were gathered for all women. There was no independent medical evaluation of the effects, so the data did not necessarily represent actual prevalence of pill related problems. Women who reported problems with the pill were less likely to be current users (25%) than women who did not (65%). However, overall contraceptive prevalence was about the same in both groups (66.2% and 67.0% respectively), indicating that women who stop using oral contraceptives usually switch to another method. However, they are more likely to be using traditional methods than women in the general population, especially if they want more children. Termination of pill use varies little according to the type of problem reported. Women with problems who sought medical attention were more likely to stop using the pill, and 82.4% of women advised to stop by their physician did so, but the major factor affecting discontinuation was the reported experience of a problem. The most frequently reported problems were headaches (38.1%), nausea (34.1%), nervousness (27.9%), and vertigo (18.3%). Physician intervention should help to avoid women's abandoning oral contraceptives unnecessarily.

  4. Barrier versus oral contraceptive use: a study of female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, S M; Joffe, A; Gall, M J

    1991-09-01

    Although they provide birth control and are easier to use, oral contraceptives (OCPs) are not the preferred approach to preventing sexually transmitted disease (STD). Do the knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of oral contraceptive users place them at greater risk for STDs than those who employ barrier methods? This study examined differences between sexually active female college students (ie, those who reported ever having had vaginal intercourse) who used OCPs and those who employed barrier methods of contraception at the time of their most recent intercourse. The authors analyzed HIV- and other STD-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors from three consecutive annual health surveys of young women about to begin their first year of college. Findings showed barrier and OCP users to be comparable in knowledge about the effectiveness of various contraceptive methods in protecting them against STDs, perceived personal susceptibility to HIV, and experiences with alcohol before sexual intercourse. Oral contraceptive users, compared with those in the group who used barrier methods, reported a greater number of recent partners (p less than .03) and greater perceived vulnerability to STDs (p less than .03). Student healthcare providers must develop creative educational strategies to encourage simultaneous use of both oral contraceptives and barrier methods to protect students against STDs and pregnancy.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of gestodene and ethinylestradiol in 14 women during three months of treatment with a new tri-step combination oral contraceptive: serum protein binding of gestodene and influence of treatment on free and total testosterone levels in the serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnz, W; Baumann, A; Staks, T; Dibbelt, L; Knuppen, R; Jütting, G

    1993-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of gestodene (GEST) and ethinylestradiol (EE2) were determined in 14 healthy women (age 18 to 32 years) during a treatment period of three months with a new tri-step combination oral contraceptive (Milvane). Prior to this treatment period, the same women received a single administration of a coated tablet containing 0.1 mg GEST together with 0.03 mg EE2. There was a wash-out phase of one week between both treatments. Following single dose administration, a mean terminal half-life of 18 h was observed for GEST. The total clearance was 0.9 ml x min-1 x kg-1 and the volume of distribution was 84 l. During a treatment cycle, GEST levels in the serum accumulated by a factor of 8 as compared to single dose administration. Steady-state drug levels were reached during the second half of each cycle. As compared to single dose administration, the following changes were observed for GEST at the end of treatment cycles one and three: prolonged terminal half-life (20 to 22 h), reduced total (0.16 ml x min-1 x kg-1) and free clearance (ca. 27 ml x min-1 x kg-1), reduced volume of distribution (ca. 18 l). A concomitant EE2-induced increase in the SHBG concentrations by a factor of three as compared to pretreatment values was observed during a treatment cycle and appeared to be mainly responsible for the changes in the pharmacokinetics of GEST. Marked changes were also seen for the serum protein binding of GEST. After single dose administration, the free fraction of GEST was 1.3% and the fractions bound to SHBG and albumin were 69.4% and 29.3%, respectively. At the end of cycle one, the free fraction was only 0.6% and the fractions bound to SHBG and albumin were 81.4% and 18.0%, respectively. There was no difference in corresponding pharmacokinetic parameters and in the serum protein binding of GEST at the end of cycles one and three. On the last day of treatment cycles one and three, the AUC(0-4h) values of EE2 were 299.2 and 278.1 pg x ml-1 x h, respectively

  6. The effects of oral contraceptives on well-being and sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, J; Sartorius, N

    1990-01-01

    The extent to which the high discontinuation rate for oral contraceptives is due to adverse effects of mood, well-being and sexuality is explored, taking into account early studies on high dose combined and sequential pills, recent studies on low-dose combined and triphasics, experimental design factors, effects of OCs on free androgen levels, psychosocial factors and reasons for choosing or stopping pills, effects on depressive illness, premenstrual syndrome, sexuality, and possible mechanisms for direct effects of steroids on mood and sexuality. Study design is complicated by selection of early or late oral contraceptive users, types of controls, and unknown confounding factors such as reason for choice of pills, effect of a reliable contraceptive on the sexual relationship, prior history of depression and premenstrual tension. Furthermore virtually all topics reviewed here resulted in inconsistent or contradictory findings, making a case for individual variation and subgroups of women with different responses regarding the end point being examined. Examples include whether progestogen alter female sexual desire or male attraction; and whether rising or falling free testosterone levels affect sexual response. Factors affecting experimental design include culture, language, life-cycle, type of relationship, personal qualities affecting contraceptive choice, manner of eliciting reports of side effects, steroid dose, whether ovulation was blocked, initial or established pill-use, possibility of missed pills, and type of controls. Current pill users seem to discontinue for depression and low libido less frequently than did users of higher dose pills, and severity scores of adverse effects are lower. Premenstrual and other cyclic events may be altered in timing, and premenstrual symptoms are relieved in most women, but worsened in some who take pills. It is likely that women with depressive and premenstrual complaints tend to discontinue pills, leaving the remaining

  7. Do oral contraceptives increase risk of contracting HIV?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    Some clinicians claim that the potential association between oral contraceptive (OC) use and HIV infection is cause for concern. A study of prostitutes conducted in Kenya showed OC use to be the single most common cofactor in sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus infection. A similar study conducted in the US was unable to confirm an association. In the Kenya study, 123 HIV seronegative prostitutes in Nairobi were followed for 54 months and assessed for seroconversion to HIV and occurrence of sexually transmitted diseases. 91% of the women who seroconverted were using OCs; 73% of the women who remained seronegative were using OCs. Demographic features, sexual behavior, number of daily sex partners, and parenteral exposure were not related to seroconversion. No significant associations were found between HIV infection and sexual activity and condom use. Independent associations were found between seroconversion and OC use, genital ulcer disease (GUD), and chlamydia trachomatis infections. It is possible that OCs increase the risk of acquiring chlamydia because cervical ectropion creates a greater exposure of columnar epithelium to infecting agents. The multicenter, cross-sectional, collaborative study of 638 prostitutes in 8 areas of the US found that HIV infection was totally unrelated to OC use. Prostitutes with no evidence of intravenous drug use were studied. 5% of the women were found to be infected with HIV. The most common variables associated with HIV infection were seromarkers for hepatitis B and syphilis and sex with "nonpaying partners." About 80% of the prostitutes reported using condoms regularly with clients; only 16% used condoms with their boyfriends or husbands. About 30% (194) of the prostitutes reported they had used OCs for at least 1 month out of the past 5 years. 9 of those women (4.6%) were positive for HIV. Of 444 prostitutes who had never used OC during the past 5 years, 21 or 4.73% were HIV positive.

  8. The influence of humidity, temperature, and oral contraceptive in tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Raul A. R. C.; Ribeiro, Tânia L. C.; Moreira, Sandra M. B.; Baptista, António M. G.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study is to ascertain whether the quantity and quality of tear and eye subjective comfort are influenced by the temperature, humidity and oral Contraceptives Taking or Non-taking (CTNT). Forty-one students, females, from the University of Minho, Braga, Portugal, aged (mean+/-1standard deviation) of 21.51+/-1.85 years, ranging from 20 to 30 years, participated in this study. The McMonnies Questionnaire (MMQ), Break Up Time (BUT) and Phenol Red Test (PRT) were accessed between 14-17 hours in four sets of visits throughout the year: Visit 1, Visit 2, Visit 3 and Visit 4. The PRT and BUT values (mean+/-1standard deviation) for Visit 1, Visit 2, Visit 3 and Visit 4 were respectively 23.88+/-6.50mm, 22.29+/-8.00mm, 23.61+/-6.75mm, 22.88+/-7.00mm and 6.02+/-1.58s, 5.62+/-1.22s, 5.23+/-0.88s, 5.53+/-1. 42s. The MMQ scores for Visit 1, Visit 2, Visit 3 and Visit 4 ranged from 2-13, 2-15, 1-14 and 2-14 with medians of 6, 7, 6 and 6, respectively. The influence of temperature, humidity and CTNT on PRT, BUT and MMQ were evaluated using generalized linear mixed model. For BUT and MMQ statistical significant effects were found regarding temperature and humidity. The temperature and humidity influenced the tear quality and subjective comfort but did not influence the tear quantity. The CTNT did not influence tear quantity, quality or subjective eye comfort.

  9. Heparanase procoagulant activity is elevated in women using oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matan, Moshe; Axelman, Elena; Brenner, Benjamin; Nadir, Yona

    2013-09-01

    What is the effect of estrogen on heparanase procogulant activity? Estrogen increases heparanase procoagulant activity. Estrogen therapy increases the risk of thrombosis and was previously found to up-regulate heparanase expression. Heparanase is involved in angiogenesis and metastasis, and has been shown to form a complex with tissue factor (TF) and also shown to enhance the generation of factor Xa. A case-control study. Thirty-four healthy women using oral contraceptives (OC) and 41 women not using hormonal therapy and not pregnant per history were enrolled, over a 5-month period, at the Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel. In vitro, estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and -negative (MDA-231) cell lines were incubated with estrogen, tamoxifen and ICI-182.780 a pure estrogen receptor antagonist. The cell medium was evaluated for TF/heparanase complex activity, TF activity and heparanase procoagulant activity by chromogenic substrate. Exclusion criteria included age set, the odds ratio was 131 (P tamoxifen increased heparanase procoagulant activity in the medium of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) cells. The main limitation of the current study is that the two estrogens given to the women and cell cultures, ethinyl estradiol (EE) and 17-β-estradiol (E2), respectively, may have different effects on the coagulation system, although an increase in heparanase procoagulant activity was demonstrated in both of them. Although the sample size of the study group was limited, significant differences in the activation of the extrinsic coagulation pathway were demonstrated. The clinical relevance of the heparanase procoagulant activity assay as a screening tool in thrombophilia work-up should further be elucidated.

  10. Ovarian Reserve Assessment in Users of Oral Contraception Seeking Fertility Advice on their Reproductive Lifespan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K. Birch; Hvidman, H. W.; Forman, J. L.;

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: To what extent does oral contraception (OC) impair ovarian reserve parameters in women who seek fertility assessment and counselling to get advice on whether their remaining reproductive lifespan is reduced? SUMMARY ANSWER: Ovarian reserve parameters defined by anti...... and the contraceptive vaginal ring). Non-users included women with an intrauterine device (IUD) or no hormonal contraception. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: Of the 887 women, 244 (27.5%) used OC. In a linear regression analyses adjusted for age, ovarian volume was 50% lower (95% CI 45.1-53.7%), AMH was 19% lower...

  11. Ovarian reserve assessment in users of oral contraception seeking fertility advice on their reproductive lifespan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch Petersen, K; Hvidman, H W; Forman, J L;

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: To what extent does oral contraception (OC) impair ovarian reserve parameters in women who seek fertility assessment and counselling to get advice on whether their remaining reproductive lifespan is reduced? SUMMARY ANSWER: Ovarian reserve parameters defined by anti...... and the contraceptive vaginal ring). Non-users included women with an intrauterine device (IUD) or no hormonal contraception. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: Of the 887 women, 244 (27.5%) used OC. In a linear regression analyses adjusted for age, ovarian volume was 50% lower (95% CI 45.1-53.7%), AMH was 19% lower...

  12. Relationship satisfaction and outcome in women who meet their partner while using oral contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, S Craig; Klapilová, Kateřina; Anthony C. Little; Robert P Burriss; Jones, Benedict C.; DeBruine, Lisa M.; Petrie, Marion; Havlíček, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Hormonal variation over the menstrual cycle alters women's preferences for phenotypic indicators of men's genetic or parental quality. Hormonal contraceptives suppress these shifts, inducing different mate preference patterns among users and non-users. This raises the possibility that women using oral contraception (OC) choose different partners than they would do otherwise but, to date, we know neither whether these laboratory-measured effects are sufficient to exert real-world consequences,...

  13. A chewable low-dose oral contraceptive: a new birth control option?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weisberg E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Edith Weisberg1,21Sydney Centre for Reproductive Health Research, Research Division of Family Planning NSW, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen Elizabeth II Research Institute for Mothers and Infants, University of Sydney, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: A new chewable combined oral contraceptive pill containing ethinyl estradiol (EE 0.025 mg and norethindrone (NE 0.8 mg in a 24/4 regimen was approved for marketing in December 2010. Each of the four inactive tablets contains 75 mg ferrous fumarate, which has no therapeutic benefit. The tablet can be taken with food but not water as this affects the absorption of EE. The Pearl index based on intention to treat women aged 18–35 years has been reported at 2.01 (confidence interval [CI] 1.21, 3.14 and for the whole population 1.65 (CI 1.01, 2.55. The effect of a body mass index of >35 was not studied. Regular withdrawal bleeding occurred for 78.6% of women in Cycle 1, but by Cycle 13 almost half the women failed to have a withdrawal bleed. This new formulation provides an intermediate dose of an EE/NE combination that will be useful for women experiencing breakthrough bleeding on the lower-dose EE/NE pill. The convenience of a low-dose pill, which can be chewed without the need for water, will be useful to enable women who have forgotten a pill to take one whenever they remember, provided they carry it with them. The advantage of a 24/4 regimen is better suppression of follicular development in the pill-free interval and may be beneficial for women who experience menstrual cycle-related problems, such as heavy bleeding or dysmenorrhea.Keywords: combined oral contraceptive, low dose, ethinyl estradiol, norethindrone

  14. Impact of a women's counselling programme on combined hormonal contraception in Portugal--the IMAGINE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana Rosa R; Palma, Fátima; Sá, José Luís; Vicente, Lisa; Bombas, Teresa; Nogueira, Ana Maria; Rocha, Pedro

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this health education project was to measure the impact of counselling about combined hormonal contraceptive (CHC) methods on the subsequent choice of method by Portuguese women. This was a multi-centre study with a representative population, at the national and regional levels, of 2951 Portuguese women≥16 years of age visiting the gynaecologist. Counselling on available CHC methods was provided using a single leaflet, and their CHC choice was assessed before and after counselling. A combined oral contraceptive (COC) was the method preferred by the majority of the women prior to counselling. After counselling, 35% of women who initially had chosen the pill, switched to either the vaginal ring or the transdermal patch, and the difference was statistically significant. Ease of use was the major reason for choosing the COC, while a lower probability of omission was the reason for choosing the vaginal ring and the patch. The implementation of a counselling programme significantly affected contraceptive choices leading in a number of cases to the selection of alternatives better suited to women's lifestyle. Age and educational level are socio-demographic factors which play an important role.

  15. Cycle-Related Changes in Mood, Sexual Desire, and Sexual Activity in Oral Contraception-Using and Nonhormonal-Contraception-Using Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaut, Els; Buysse, Ann; De Sutter, Petra; Gerris, Jan; De Cuypere, Griet; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Findings on women's sexuality across the menstrual cycle are inconsistent. One relatively consistent finding is a midcycle and premenstrual peak in sexual desire in freely cycling women. Results on the cycle-related effects on sexual behavior are less clear. Large proportions of reproductive-aged women use combined oral contraception (COC), but studies on potential cycle-related shifts in sexual desire and behavior are sparse. A prospective diary study assessed sexual desire, sexual behavior, and mood in 89 heterosexual couples. Women were using one of four contraceptive methods: (1) nonhormonal contraception, (2) low-dose COC containing 20 mcg ethinylestradiol and 75 mcg gestoden or desogestrel, (3) COC containing 35 mcg ethinylestradiol and 2 mg cyproteronacetate, and (4) COC containing 30 mcg ethinylestradiol and 3 mg drospirenone. No cycle effects of sexual desire were established in the COC group, but frequency of sexual intercourse declined in the last days of active pill taking. These results were similar in both female and male partners. Negative affect did not covary with sexual desire.

  16. Pulmonary embolism in a healthy woman using the oral contraceptives containing desogestrel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is well known as one of the rare but serious adverse effects of combined oral contraceptives (COCs). The COCs with third and fourth generation progestogens were found to have higher risk of venous thrombosis than those with second generation progestogens. We present a case of pulmonary embolism in a 23-year-old nulligravid woman who was using COCs containing the third generation progestogen (desogestrel). At the time of presentation of the adverse effect, she had been using the COCs for 4 months. She had no additional risk factors for thrombosis such as smoking, surgery, tumor as well as genetic factors. This case demonstrates even young women in otherwise good health may be at risk of venous thromboembolism from low-dose formulations of COCs as an over-the-counter drug. We describe this case with a brief review of literatures. PMID:28344968

  17. Oral contraceptive use and prevalence of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinghorn, G R; Waugh, M A

    1981-06-01

    One thousand eight non-pregnant women aged 16-34 years, presenting for the first time at a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases (STD), were examined and screened for infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Candida species. The respective prevalence rates were 21.1%, 20.7%, 13.4%, and 27.8%. Isolation rates for C trachomatis, either occurring alone or in association with other genital infections, were significantly greater in women using oral contraceptive agents. This was not because oral contraceptive users were more promiscuous. The findings strengthen the case for providing a routine chlamydial culture service for women attending STD clinics. They also indicate that the likelihood of chlamydial infection in women taking oral contraceptives is increased.

  18. A study of the influence of a gestodene-containing triphasic oral contraceptive on endometrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, T; Leppien, G; Fossman, W G; Hessing, C; Vladescú, E; Runnebaum, B

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate histological changes in the endometrium in 20 volunteers treated with a low-dose, gestodene-containing triphasic oral contraceptive. Endometrial biopsy specimens were taken before, during a 6-month period of oral contraceptive use and in a post-treatment period. These specimens were evaluated using light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, ultrasound examinations of the uterus, endometrial thickness and ovaries were performed. The low-dose, gestodene-containing triphasic oral contraceptive had no adverse effects on the endometrium (e.g. no proliferation, no polyps, no inflammatory processes), was well tolerated and showed a low side-effect profile. The inhibition of endometrial transformation was demonstrated both by endometrial morphology as well as by endometrial thickness, as measured by transvaginal ultrasound examination.

  19. Relieving the Impacts of Oral Contraceptives on Lipids Profile by Taking Pills in a Novel Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-juan YANG; Si-tian LIU; Xue-zhe WU; E-xiang ZHENG; Jie YANG; You-lun GUI; Chang-hai HE

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore whether the changes on lipids profile induced by oral contraceptives could be reduced through alternatively administering two oral contraceptives of different formulations (either predominant in progestogen or estrogen) Materials & Methods A total of 59 women aged 25~45 were divided into two treatment groups. The subjects in Group A received oral contraceptive A (OcA: NET 0.600 mg + EE 0.035 mg) and B (OcB: LNG 0.15 mg + EE0.03 mg) alternatively during 12 treatment cycles. Each contraceptive was administrated for three cycles consecutively with starting from OcA. The subjects in the B group received OcB only during 12 treatment cycles. Fasting blood were drawn before treatment, at the end of each trimester treatment and at the end of one cycle after stopping treatment respectively. The concentrations of lipids and apolipoproteins were measured. Results OcA increased the levels of triglyceride(TG), total cholesterol(TC), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol(HDL-c), and apolipoprotein AI (apo AI) with statistical significance, whereas OcB significantly decreased all parameters above. As compared with the control group, the overall mean of variation in the study group was much less than that of the control group.Conclusion It indicates that the impacts of oral contraceptives on lipids profile could be moderated by means of alternatively administering Ocs of two different formulations, with estrogen-dominant or progestogen-dominant.

  20. Does hormone replacement therapy and use of oral contraceptives increase the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch-Johansen, Fatima; Jensen, Allan; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women.......We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women....

  1. Partner choice, relationship satisfaction, and oral contraception: the congruency hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S Craig; Little, Anthony C; Burriss, Robert P; Cobey, Kelly D; Klapilová, Kateřina; Havlíček, Jan; Jones, Benedict C; DeBruine, Lisa; Petrie, Marion

    2014-07-01

    Hormonal fluctuation across the menstrual cycle explains temporal variation in women's judgment of the attractiveness of members of the opposite sex. Use of hormonal contraceptives could therefore influence both initial partner choice and, if contraceptive use subsequently changes, intrapair dynamics. Associations between hormonal contraceptive use and relationship satisfaction may thus be best understood by considering whether current use is congruent with use when relationships formed, rather than by considering current use alone. In the study reported here, we tested this congruency hypothesis in a survey of 365 couples. Controlling for potential confounds (including relationship duration, age, parenthood, and income), we found that congruency in current and previous hormonal contraceptive use, but not current use alone, predicted women's sexual satisfaction with their partners. Congruency was not associated with women's nonsexual satisfaction or with the satisfaction of their male partners. Our results provide empirical support for the congruency hypothesis and suggest that women's sexual satisfaction is influenced by changes in partner preference associated with change in hormonal contraceptive use.

  2. Estimating systemic exposure to levonorgestrel from an oral contraceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaraba, Cale N; Westhoff, Carolyn L; Pike, Malcolm C; Nandakumar, Renu; Cremers, Serge

    2017-04-01

    The gold standard for measuring oral contraceptive (OC) pharmacokinetics is the 24-h steady-state area under the curve (AUC). We conducted this study to assess whether limited sampling at steady state or measurements following use of one or two OCs could provide an adequate proxy in epidemiological studies for the progestin 24-h steady-state AUC of a particular OC. We conducted a 13-sample, 24-h pharmacokinetic study on both day 1 and day 21 of the first cycle of a monophasic OC containing 30-mcg ethinyl estradiol and 150-mcg levonorgestrel (LNG) in 17 normal-weight healthy White women and a single-dose 9-sample study of the same OC after a 1-month washout. We compared the 13-sample steady-state results with several steady-state and single-dose results calculated using parsimonious sampling schemes. The 13-sample steady-state 24-h LNG AUC was highly correlated with the steady-state 24-h trough value [r=0.95; 95% confidence interval (0.85, 0.98)] and with the steady-state 6-, 8-, 12- and 16-h values (0.92≤r≤0.95). The trough values after one or two doses were moderately correlated with the steady-state 24-h AUC value [r=0.70; 95% CI (0.27, 0.90) and 0.77; 95% CI (0.40, 0.92), respectively]. Single time-point concentrations at steady state and after administration of one or two OCs gave highly to moderately correlated estimates of steady-state LNG AUC. Using such measures could facilitate prospective pharmaco-epidemiologic studies of the OC and its side effects. A single time-point LNG concentration at steady state is an excellent proxy for complete and resource-intensive steady-state AUC measurement. The trough level after two single doses is a fair proxy for steady-state AUC. These results provide practical tools to facilitate large studies to investigate the relationship between systemic LNG exposure and side effects in a real-life setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral Contraception for Younger Woman: The Benefits of the Low-Dose Pill

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Oral contraceptives provide the woman under 35 with the most effective and safest reversible method of birth control. As the estrogen content of oral contraceptives has gradually been lowered during the past 20 years, there has been a lessening of the side-effects first reported by the Royal College of General Practice in 1967. The research of two decades has brought about changes in “the pill”. The most recent change has been the introduction of biphasic and triphasic pills with lower hormon...

  4. Oral Contraception for Younger Woman: The Benefits of the Low-Dose Pill

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Marion

    1986-01-01

    Oral contraceptives provide the woman under 35 with the most effective and safest reversible method of birth control. As the estrogen content of oral contraceptives has gradually been lowered during the past 20 years, there has been a lessening of the side-effects first reported by the Royal College of General Practice in 1967. The research of two decades has brought about changes in “the pill”. The most recent change has been the introduction of biphasic and triphasic pills with lower hormon...

  5. A case-series study of cerebral venous thrombosis in women using short course oral contraceptive

    OpenAIRE

    Payam Khomand; Kambiz Hassanzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: We report a case series of cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT) in women who used oral contraceptive pill (OCP) in the Muslims Ramadan and fasting month.Methods: This study was a retrospective case series of 9 patients with diagnosis of CVT, who admitted in the neurology ward of Tohid Hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, in July-August 2014-2015.Results: Patients had no history of thrombosis before. They were treated with oral contraceptive more than 1 month to be able to fast during Ramadan. Th...

  6. Timing of oral contraceptive use and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Lubinski, Jan; Moller, Pal; Lynch, Henry T; Singer, Christian F; Eng, Charis; Neuhausen, Susan L; Karlan, Beth; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; McCuaig, Jeanna; Senter, Leigha; Tung, Nadine; Ghadirian, Parviz; Eisen, Andrea; Gilchrist, Dawna; Blum, Joanne L; Zakalik, Dana; Pal, Tuya; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2014-02-01

    It is not clear if early oral contraceptive use increases the risk of breast cancer among young women with a breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) mutation. Given the benefit of oral contraceptives for the prevention of ovarian cancer, estimating age-specific risk ratios for oral contraceptive use and breast cancer is important. We conducted a case-control study of 2,492 matched pairs of women with a deleterious BRCA1 mutation. Breast cancer cases and unaffected controls were matched on year of birth and country of residence. Detailed information about oral contraceptive use was collected from a routinely administered questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for the association between oral contraceptive and breast cancer, by age at first use and by age at diagnosis. Among BRCA1 mutation carriers, oral contraceptive use was significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer for women who started the pill prior to age 20 (OR 1.45; 95 % CI 1.20-1.75; P = 0.0001) and possibly between ages 20 and 25 as well (OR 1.19; 95 % CI 0.99-1.42; P = 0.06). The effect was limited to breast cancers diagnosed before age 40 (OR 1.40; 95 % CI 1.14-1.70; P = 0.001); the risk of early-onset breast cancer increased by 11 % with each additional year of pill use when initiated prior to age 20 (OR 1.11; 95 % CI 1.03-1.20; P = 0.008). There was no observed increase for women diagnosed at or after the age of 40 (OR 0.97; 95 % CI 0.79-1.20; P = 0.81). Oral contraceptive use before age 25 increases the risk of early-onset breast cancer among women with a BRCA1 mutation and the risk increases with duration of use. Caution should be taken when advising women with a BRCA1 mutation to take an oral contraceptive prior to age 25.

  7. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer risk in the international BRCA1/2 carrier cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohet, Richard M; Goldgar, David E; Easton, Douglas F

    2007-01-01

    oral contraceptive use and risk of breast cancer among BRCA1/2 carriers. PATIENTS AND METHODS In the International BRCA1/2 Carrier Cohort study (IBCCS), a retrospective cohort of 1,593 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers was analyzed with a weighted Cox regression analysis. Results We found an increased risk...... was found among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers that current use of oral contraceptives is associated with risk of breast cancer more strongly than is past use, as is found in the general population. However, duration of use, especially before first full-term pregnancy, may be associated with an increasing risk...

  8. Lipids, cardiovascular disease, and oral contraceptives: a practical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, G V

    1990-01-01

    Figure 9 is an attempt to summate the influences of life-style on lipid parameters. Based on the work of Nikkila, it shows the source of the production of HDL and LDL, the factors that can affect these lipoprotein levels, and where in the cascade of lipoprotein metabolism these factors exert influence. The source of HDL production is the liver and the intestine. At this stage, diet, exercise, hormones, genetics, drugs, and certain disease states can affect HDL levels. Lecithin-cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) esterifies HDL-free cholesterol in plasma, and HDL3 is formed that in turn is transformed to HDL2. At the same time, VLDL from the gut and the liver will be converted, under the influence of LPL, to HDL2 and LDL. Thus HDL2 is being formed by the breakdown of VLDL and from the transformation of HDL3 to HDL2. Insulin, exercise, alcohol, fats, drugs, and diet affect lipoprotein lipase and consequently influence levels of LDL and HDL2 indirectly. Progestogens increase and estrogens decrease hepatic endothelial lipase, thus affecting the HDL2 concentration. It is at this point that combination OCs influence HDL2. The balance between estrogen and progestogen in a given contraceptive determines the extent and direction of HDL2 concentration. A separate pathway in the liver also catabolizes HDL2 and HDL3. LDL is generated partly from catabolism of VLDL and is partly secreted from the liver. The removal of LDL is mediated by receptors in both the liver and peripheral tissues. It is here that the Brown-Goldstein theory plays a major role. If LDL receptors are present in an insufficient number or are defective, then the C will accumulate and atherosclerosis may follow. Thus two key enzymes, LCAT and LPL, control the production of HDL2 and LDL, whereas a third enzyme, hepatic endothelial lipase, catabolizes HDL2.

  9. A consumer intercept study of oral contraceptive users in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, E C

    1988-01-01

    Purchasers of a low-cost oral contraceptive were intercepted and interviewed in a sample of Santo Domingo pharmacies that represented the highest sales of the product, yet also reflected the socioeconomic profile of the city's entire population. Users of the contraceptive were later interviewed in greater depth in their homes. The survey of users showed that the Dominican Republic's social marketing program, implemented by PROFAMILIA, was reaching an appropriate target market--that is, younger, lower-middle-class women of low parity. The program was, in addition, successful in attracting first-time adopters, and it was also expanding the overall commercial market for all contraceptives. The marketing campaign was successful in part because a mass audience was reached, through brief television spots. Program impact on contraceptive prevalence can be assessed from sales data.

  10. [Postcoital contraception using a desogestrel-ethinyl estradiol combination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alovisi, C; Pacilli, L

    1988-02-01

    Post-coital contraception or rather interception, a term suggested here since it is non-preventive, per definition is applied after the hypothetical time of contraception. Various methods have been proposed for "day after" interventions among which the administration of estro-progestins are the simplest, least expensive and least likely to cause serious side effects. In order to reduce side effects, a trial involving 35 women was conducted at the hospital in Avigliana. A biphasic combination of .150 mg desogestrel + .030 mg ethinyl estradiol was administered in the form of 2 pills within a period of 12 hours or 24 hours after intercourse. 6 tables display age, educational level, occupation, motive, day during menstrual cycle, time after intercourse that treatment was begun. 65.7% of the women were less than 30, 8% less than 20 years old. Almost 80% were treated during their mid-cycles, where the chance of becoming pregnant is greatest, i.e., 20%. Not one pregnancy was observed. It is impossible to ascertain how many conceptions actually did occur due to the nonexistence of methods for determining avoided pregnancies. The only side effects reported were nausea and vomiting of short duration. Menstruation reoccurred within 21 days of treatment for 98%. A small possibility of ectopic pregnancy, however, does exist. Fetal damage from the steroids seems excludable, due to the extremely early period of administration. An increased demand for post-coital interception has been registered for the youngest users, especially among students and employees, which indicate a high or medium high level of education, but it is probably also due to erratic, occasional and inexperienced sexual behavioral patterns, and a lack of knowledge concerning the choice of the right kind of contraception.

  11. Forgettable contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, David A

    2009-12-01

    The term "forgettable contraception" has received less attention in family planning than has "long-acting reversible contraception." Defined here as a method requiring attention no more often than every 3 years, forgettable contraception includes sterilization (female or male), intrauterine devices, and implants. Five principal factors determine contraceptive effectiveness: efficacy, compliance, continuation, fecundity, and the timing of coitus. Of these, compliance and continuation dominate; the key determinants of contraceptive effectiveness are human, not pharmacological. Human nature undermines methods with high theoretical efficacy, such as oral contraceptives and injectable contraceptives. By obviating the need to think about contraception for long intervals, forgettable contraception can help overcome our human fallibility. As a result, all forgettable contraception methods provide first-tier effectiveness (contraceptives today with exclusively first-tier effectiveness is the one that can be started -- and then forgotten for years.

  12. Comparison of two oral contraceptives containing either drospirenone or cyproterone acetate in the treatment of hirsutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batukan, Cem; Muderris, Iptisam Ipek; Ozcelik, Bulent; Ozturk, Ahmet

    2007-01-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are considered the first-line treatment for women with hirsutism. They diminish androgen release from the ovary and decrease plasma free testosterone levels by increasing sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations. COCs containing cyproterone acetate (CPA) and drospirenone (DRSP) have been proved effective for the treatment of acne and facial hirsutism. This study prospectively compared the clinical and biochemical efficacy of 3 mg DRSP/30 microg ethinyl estradiol (EE) and 2 mg CPA/35 microg EE combinations in a total of 91 patients with hirsutism. Individuals randomly received a cyclic combination of either DRSP/EE (n=48) or CPA/EE (n=43) for 12 months. Basal serum total testosterone, free testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and SHBG levels, as well as Ferriman-Gallwey scores, were determined before and after treatment. Both COCs achieved a similar effect on clinical hirsutism scores, in addition to serum androgen and SHBG levels, after completion of therapy. The percentage reductions in total hirsutism score (median % (min-max)) during therapy were 0.70 (0-0.58) vs. 0.57 (0.10-1.00) at 6 months (p = 0.028) and 0.80 (0-0.42) vs. 0.81 (0-0.75) at 12 months (p = 0.6) in the DRSP/EE and CPA/EE groups, respectively. In conclusion, the DRSP/EE combination is at least as effective as the CPA/EE combination in improving hirsutism scores.

  13. Contraception-related venous thromboembolism in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2014-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a rare but serious complication of combined hormonal contraception. While the absolute risk of VTE is low in adolescents, thrombotic events in contraception users younger than the age of 20 years account for 5 to 10% of total contraception-related VTE events in population studies, because of the high frequency of contraception use in adolescents. An increased risk of VTE exists not only with oral contraceptives, but also the contraceptive patch and vaginal ring. Most adolescents who experience contraception-related VTE have additional transient or inherited thrombotic risk factors at the time of VTE. Although the presence of inherited thrombophilia impacts the risk of contraception-related VTE, thrombophilia screening before contraception prescribing should be targeted only to high-risk populations. Pediatric institutions, caregivers, and young women need to be aware of the risk of VTE with estrogen-containing contraception, and maintain a high index of suspicion for this complication in women using these agents.

  14. New developments in oral contraception: clinical utility of estradiol valerate/dienogest (Natazia® for contraception and for treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding: patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson AL

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anita L NelsonObstetrics and Gynecology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Harbor UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California, USAAbstract: Natazia® is a new oral contraceptive with estradiol valerate and dienogest in a unique multiphasic formulation that includes a shortened hormone-free interval. This new formulation has been approved for both contraception and also as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding in women who desire to use oral contraceptives as their method of birth control. It is marketed in the US as Natazia® and elsewhere as Qlaira®. This article will review the properties of each of the major new features of this pill: estradiol used in place of ethinyl estradiol, dienogest as the progestin, and the unique dosing pattern of this product. It will also summarize the results of the pivotal clinical trials of contraceptive effectiveness, bleeding patterns, safety and tolerability. The lessons learned from the clinical trials about the effectiveness of this formulation in the treatment of excessive menstrual bleeding will be summarized. Also, results of trials comparing this new pill to other popular formulations for "menstrually-related" symptoms and for potential female sexual dysfunction related to use of oral contraceptives will be presented. This review will suggest how all this information might be used to counsel women about how to use this pill most successfully.Keywords: oral contraceptives, estradiol valerate, dienogest, heavy menstrual bleeding, menorrhagia, dynamic dosing

  15. [Objective and perceived knowledge of oral contraceptive methods among adolescent mothers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Michelle Chintia Rodrigues de; Gomes, Keila Rejane Oliveira

    2009-03-01

    The high rate of early pregnancy in Brazil and particularly in Teresina (21.5%), Piauí State, motivated the current study, the aim of which was to identify levels of objective and perceived knowledge on oral contraceptives, as well as predictive reproductive and socio-demographic variables for high knowledge. A cross-sectional study was performed including 278 teenage mothers (15-19 years), with their childbearing history, admitted to four maternity hospitals in Teresina in 2006. Logistic regression provided the basis for the statistical analysis. Nearly 98% of the adolescent mothers showed low objective and perceived knowledge of oral contraceptives. High parity was the only predictor of increased objective knowledge on oral contraceptives. The adolescents' low level of objective and perceived knowledge on use of oral contraceptives emphasized their susceptibility to risky sexual behavior. The findings emphasize the need for a more interactive approach with adolescents concerning their level of objective and perceived knowledge, to reduce the occurrence and repetition of unwanted teenage pregnancy and its negative consequences for the lives of these young mothers and their children.

  16. Risk of venous thrombosis: obesity and its joint effect with oral contraceptive use and prothrombotic mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, Elisabeth R.; le Cessie, Saskia; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2007-01-01

    In the Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis (MEGA study), body weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were evaluated as risk factors. Additionally, the joint effect of obesity together with oral contraceptive use and prothrombotic mutations on the

  17. Diminished nap effects on memory consolidation are seen under oral contraceptive use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genzel, L.; Baurle, A.; Potyka, A.; Wehrle, R.; Adamczyk, M.; Friess, E.; Steiger, A.; Dresler, M.

    2014-01-01

    Many young females take exogenous hormones as oral contraceptive (OC), a condition rarely controlled for in studies on sleep and memory consolidation even though sex hormones influence consolidation. This study investigated the effects of OCs on sleep-related consolidation of a motor and declarative

  18. Oral contraceptives and rheumatoid arthritis : Further evidence for a preventive effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenbroucke, J.P.; Boersma, J.W.; Festen, J.J.M.; Valkenburg, H.A.; Cats, A.; Huber-Bruning, O.; Rasker, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate a reported negative association between the use of oral contraceptives (OC) and the development of rheumatoid arthritis, a case-control study was undertaken to compare the histories of OC use between 228 women with a diagnosis of probable or definite rheumatoid arthritis and 302 women

  19. Menstrual and oral contraceptive use patterns among deployed military women by race and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuster, Patricia A; Powell-Dunford, Nicole; Crago, Mark S; Cuda, Amanda S

    2011-01-01

    Menstrual cycle patterns and concerns and oral contraceptive use in the combat environment were examined in Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic, and African American women to guide the development of educational resources for women soldiers. An anonymous, questionnaire was completed by 455 U.S. Army women-Caucasian (CA: n = 141); Asian (AS: n = 67); Hispanic (HIS: n = 67); and African American (AA: n = 184) to compare menstrual patterns and concerns, dysmenorrhea, and oral contraceptive patterns. Total menstrual concerns were significantly lower among African Americans relative to Caucasians, Asians, or Hispanics; Asians and Hispanics reported the greatest concern. Overall, secondary amenorrhea was noted by 14.9% of women. Severe dysmenorrhea rates were significantly lower in African American (6.1%) compared to Caucasian (11.6%), Asian (20.9%) and Hispanic (19.7%) women. Asian women reported missing less work-only 9.3% with moderate to severe dysmenorrhea missed work compared to 25.1% of all other women. Only 9.2% of women with mild, compared to 25.8% with moderate to severe (OR = 3.44; p ≤ 0.0001) dysmenorrhea sought health care. Less than 50% of women took oral contraceptive, and less than half of those women took oral contraceptive continuously. African Americans seemed to experience menstruation as less bothersome than others, despite no difference in the proportion with menstrual irregularities, mean duration of menses, and/or mean time between cycles.

  20. Effects of allopregnanolone on sedation in men, and in women on oral contraceptives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhoven, F. van; Backstrom, T.; Luijtelaar, G. van; Buitelaar, J.K.; Smits, P.; Verkes, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Allopregnanolone is a known GABA(A) receptor agonist not previously given to men, or to women using oral contraceptives (OC). The effects of metabolites of sex hormones on the GABA(A) receptor are different between men and women. OC are known to change GABA(A) receptor subunit composition. These fac

  1. Factor V Leiden: should we screen oral contraceptive users and pregnant women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, J. P.; van der Meer, F. J.; Helmerhorst, F. M.; Rosendaal, F. R.

    1996-01-01

    The factor V Leiden mutation is the most common genetic risk factor for deep vein thrombosis: it is present in about 5% of the white population. The risk of deep vein thrombosis among women who use oral contraceptives is greatly increased by the presence of the mutation. The same seems to be true of the risk of postpartum thrombosis. Several authors have called for all women to be screened before prescription of oral contraceptives and during pregnancy. Such a policy might deny effective contraception to a substantial number of women while preventing only a small number of deaths due to pulmonary emboli. Moreover, in pregnancy the ensuing use of oral anticoagulation prophylaxis might carry a penalty of fatal bleeding that is equal to or exceeds the risk of death due to postpartum thrombosis. It might pay, however, to take a personal and family history of deep vein thrombosis when prescribing oral contraceptives or at a first antenatal visit to detect women from families with a tendency to multiple thrombosis. Images p1129-a PMID:8916702

  2. Risk of venous thrombosis: obesity and its joint effect with oral contraceptive use and prothrombotic mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, Elisabeth R.; Cessie, le Saskia; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Doggen, Carine J.M.

    2007-01-01

    In the Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis (MEGA study), body weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were evaluated as risk factors. Additionally, the joint effect of obesity together with oral contraceptive use and prothrombotic mutations on the ris

  3. Menarche, oral contraceptives, pregnancy and progression of disability in relapsing onset and progressive onset multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'hooghe, M. B.; Haentjens, P.; Nagels, G.; D'Hooghe, T.; De Keyser, J.

    2012-01-01

    Female gender and hormones have been associated with disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated age at menarche, use of oral contraceptives and pregnancy in relation to progression of disability in relapsing onset and progressive onset MS. We conducted a cross-sectional survey amon

  4. Diminished nap effects on memory consolidation are seen under oral contraceptive use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genzel, L.; Baurle, A.; Potyka, A.; Wehrle, R.; Adamczyk, M.; Friess, E.; Steiger, A.; Dresler, M.

    2014-01-01

    Many young females take exogenous hormones as oral contraceptive (OC), a condition rarely controlled for in studies on sleep and memory consolidation even though sex hormones influence consolidation. This study investigated the effects of OCs on sleep-related consolidation of a motor and declarative

  5. Agreement between oral contraceptive users and prescribers: implications for case-control studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E. van Leeuwen; C.M. van Duijn (Cock); M.H. Camps; B.A. Kempers; M.F. Mentjens; H.B. Mulder; E.G. Schouten (Evert); R.M.L. Zwijsen; M.A. Rookus (Matti)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractCase-control studies examining the effects of oral contraceptives (OC) are prone to misclassification bias due to errors in assessment of OC use. Concern about inaccurate exposure histories has increased since current studies require women to recall OC use over prolonged periods of time.

  6. [Withdrawal of high estrogen containing oral contraceptives and the demand for medical service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamper-Jorgensen, F; Albertsen, J; Almind, G; Andersen, K; Braae, M; Dybkjaer, L; Frolund, F; Granlie, K; Hald, E; Hald, J; Hector, O; Jacobsen, K; Kaltoft, S; Kjaerulff, E; Mabeck, C D; Magnusson, B; Nielsen, A; Novella, P; Olsen, O M; Pedersen, P A; Rasmussen, I; Strunk, K; Traeden, J B; Veje, J O

    1975-03-24

    The results of a survey are presented conerning the effectiveness of mass media publicity with the public. After oral contraceptives containing high levels of estrogen were prohibited in Denmark, a telephone survey of 23 doctors was taken to determine the fluctuation in demand for medical information from patients, and the reason for the fluctuation. The reasons were divided into 3 groups: 1) resulting from mass media publicity, 2) resulting from the unavailability of a particular contraceptive, and 3) other. 3 surveys were conducted of the frequency of demand for information on the high estrogen contraceptives, 1 for each of the 2 weeks after the prohibition and withdrawal of the contraceptives took place, and 1 1 month after the prohibition. 2-3% of the inquiries received by the doctors concerned the prohibited contraceptives, and half of these could be attributed directly to the mass media publicity. The number of requests in categories 1 and 2 dropped sharply in the 2nd and 3rd surveys, indicating that the effect of the mass meida publicity and the withdrawal of the contraceptive from the market had only a very immediate effect. It is also shown that the telephone can be used successfully to ascertain the effects of a short-term social phenomenon on the public.

  7. Measuring perceptions of synergistic circulatory disease risk due to smoking and the oral contraceptive pill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, David P; Gayton, Emma L; Burton, Jessica; Thorogood, Margaret; Marteau, Theresa M

    2002-12-01

    There is evidence that the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) and smoking contribute independently to risk of circulatory disease. There is mixed evidence that the combined risk may be greater than the sum of these factors operating in isolation. Little is known about how the general population views the risks from OCP use, singly and in combination with smoking. Previous attempts at assessing whether the public views risks as operating synergistically have generally found evidence for subadditive models, where the combined risk is less than the sum of factors operating in isolation. However, concerns have been expressed over the validity of the measures of risk perception used. Therefore, this study used three distinct methods of measurement to assess the extent to which 241 undergraduate students perceive the risks of smoking and the OCP separately and combined, for circulatory disease. For all three methods, respondents read each of four vignettes describing information about a woman's risk factors (with high and low levels of both OCP and smoking), and then estimated risk of circulatory disease using one of the three risk measures. The three measures produced similar ratings. Consistent with the epidemiological evidence, information about smoking had more impact on estimates of overall risk than did information about the OCP For all three measures, responses were consistent with an additive model of risk from smoking and the OCP. This convergence of results from different methods suggests that all three methods of measurement employed, which all had a large number of response options, may be valid.

  8. Oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy, reproductive history and risk of colorectal cancer in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Miller, Anthony B; Rohan, Thomas E

    2008-02-01

    Evidence from epidemiologic studies suggests a possible role of exogenous and endogenous hormones in colorectal carcinogenesis in women. However, with respect to exogenous hormones, in contrast to hormone replacement therapy, few cohort studies have examined oral contraceptive use in relation to colorectal cancer risk. We used data from a large cohort study of Canadian women enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of breast cancer screening to assess the association of oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy and reproductive factors with risk of colorectal cancer, overall and by subsite within the colorectum. Cancer incidence and mortality were ascertained by linkage to national databases. Among 89,835 women aged 40-59 at enrollment and followed for an average of 16.4 years, we identified 1,142 incident colorectal cancer cases. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate the associations between the exposures of interest and risk of colorectal cancer. Ever use of oral contraceptives at baseline was associated with a modest reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer (hazard ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.73-0.94), with similar effects for different subsites within the colorectum. No trend was seen in the hazard ratios with increasing duration of oral contraceptive use. No associations were seen with use of hormone replacement therapy (ever use or duration of use) or reproductive factors. Our results are suggestive of an inverse association between oral contraceptive use and colorectal carcinogenesis. However, given the lack of a dose-response relationship and the potential for confounding, studies with more complete assessment of exogenous hormone use throughout the life course are needed to clarify this association. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Exercise per se masks oral contraceptive-induced postprandial lipid mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isacco, Laurie; Thivel, David; Meddahi-Pelle, Anne; Lemoine-Morel, Sophie; Duclos, Martine; Boisseau, Nathalie

    2014-11-01

    Because of their hormonal content, oral contraceptives may alter lipolytic activity under resting or exercise conditions in women. The aim of the present study was to compare lipid mobilization in a postprandial state at rest and during exercise in oral contraceptive users (OC+) versus nonusers (OC-). The metabolic (glucose, glycerol, free fatty acids) and hormonal (insulin, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and catecholamines) concentrations were determined in 11 OC+ (monophasic low-dose oral contraceptives) and 10 OC- during a resting and an exercise session (45 min at 65% maximal oxygen consumption). Results were expressed as plasma concentrations and area under the concentration versus time curve values. ANP concentrations were higher in OC+ compared with OC- women at baseline (p = 0.04). Plasma concentrations of glycerol (p = 0.04), free fatty acids (p = 0.04), ANP (p = 0.02), and noradrenaline (p = 0.04) were higher in OC+ compared with OC- when both sessions were pooled. The plasma growth hormone, IGF-1, and adrenaline concentrations were not significantly different between the 2 groups. When the effect of exercise was isolated to overcome food intake and daytime variations (exercise per se using the area under the curve), no difference was observed between groups for all metabolic and hormonal variables. Overall, oral contraceptives increased lipid mobilization in the postprandial state, but this effect was blunted when lipolytic activity was stimulated by exercise per se. Oral contraceptive-induced greater lipolytic mobilization could be partly explained by greater ANP levels in OC users.

  10. Evaluating the practice of Iranian community pharmacists regarding oral contraceptive pills using simulated patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan, Nazanin; Dabaghzadeh, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: As oral contraceptive pills are available over the counter in pharmacies, pharmacists are professionally responsible for checking and informing patients about every aspect of taking these drugs. Simulated patient method is a new and robust way to evaluate professional performance of pharmacists. Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacy practice of Iranian pharmacists regarding over-the-counter use of oral contraceptive pills using simulated patient method. Methods: Simulated patients visited pharmacy with a prescription containing ciprofloxacin and asked for oral contraceptive pills. The pharmacist was expected to ask important questions for using these drugs and to inform the patient about them properly. Moreover, the Pharmacists should advise patients in regard to the possible interaction. Results: Ninety four pharmacists participated in this study. In 24 (25.3%) visits, the liable pharmacist was not present at the time of purchase. Furthermore, In 13 (18.57 %) visits by the simulated patients, the liable pharmacists did not pay any attention to the simulated patients even when they asked for consultation. Twenty nine (41.43%) pharmacists did not ask any question during dispensing. Nausea was the most frequent described side effect by pharmacists (27 (38.57%)). Yet important adverse effects of oral contraceptive pills were not mentioned by the pharmacists except for few ones. Only twelve (17.14%) pharmacists mentioned the possible interaction. There was a significant relation between the pharmacists’ gender and detection of possible interaction (p value= 0.048). Conclusion: The quality of the pharmacists’ consultations regarding the over the counter use of oral contraceptive pills was not satisfactory and required improvement. PMID:28042350

  11. [The statement of Polish Gynecological Society experts on oral use of contraceptive 75 microg desogestrel minipill in different clinical cases--state of art in 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debski, Romuald; Kotarski, Jan; Paszkowski, Tomasz; Pawelczyk, Leszek; Skrzypulec, Violetta; Tomaszewski, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies indicate that use of combined oral contraception is associated with a increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease (venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction and stroke). The risk of cardiovascular disease is strongly related to estrogen dose, progestogen type and other factors for example thrombogenic mutations and cigarette smoking among female over age 35. The progestogen only contraception is safe alternative to combined hormonal contraception. Progestogen only pill (POP) has different levels of action (local and/or central) which may vary from one drug to another. As for the cardiovascular disease risk, progestogens are not considered to be risk factors. Desogestrel containing POP is advised in the following cases: bad tolerance of exogenous oestrogens; in order to counteract an endogenous hyperoestrogenosis; medical, metabolic or cardiovascular contraindications to estroprogestogen contraception. Lastly, POP should be used as a prime contraception in some particular situations (breast feeding, endometriosis, adenomyosis, cigarette smoking, contraception for older women). These recommendations present the actual system of care in that population of women in Poland.

  12. Influence of a new oral contraceptive with drospirenone on lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Phupong, Vorapong

    2007-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of an oral contraception formulation with drospirenone (Yasmin) on lipid metabolism. An open-label, non-comparative clinical trial was conducted. One hundred women, who desired oral contraception for at least 6 months, were recruited. The subjects received a blister pack which contained 21 tablets of 3 mg drospirenone/30 mug ethinyl estradiol for the first four cycles (1 cycle = 28 days). Cycle 5 and 6 blister packs were dispensed during the next visit in cycle 4. Serum from each subject was collected and analyzed for lipid profile levels at baseline and at cycle 6. The mean differences in lipid profile levels at cycle 6 compared with baseline were assessed. Of the total 100 subjects, 92 (92%) completed the study. There was no significant change in total cholesterol. At cycle 6, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides increased significantly by 25.7% and 42.0%, respectively, compared with baseline. However, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) decreased significantly by 9.9% at cycle 6 compared with baseline. Our results show that the new oral contraception formulation with drospirenone (Yasmin) is well tolerated and has good contraceptive efficacy. The observed favorable changes in HDL-C and LDL-C suggest a potential cardioprotective benefit.

  13. Prevalence of smoking and oral contraception in a sample of Danish young women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeune, B; Wielandt, H

    1991-01-01

    A representative sample of 286 Danish females aged 16-20 years were interviewed during the period April 1984--February 1985. The response rate was 75%. Both use of oral contraception (OC) and smoking were common; 46.6% used OC, 34.2% smoked and 19.6% combined smoking and OC. The prevalence...... of smoking was significantly higher (42.0%) among OC-users than among non-users (27.2%). The combination of smoking and OC was especially prevalent among young women with sexual debut before 16 years (36.8%). The association between smoking and the use of OC was significant both when tested unstratified (p...... less than 0.05) and stratified by age at sexual debut (p less than 0.01). Smoking was also associated with early debut of intercourse (p less than 0.001). It has been reported that the combination of these two factors in adult women increase the risk for cardiovascular mortality. However, the health...

  14. Measuring oral contraceptive adherence using self-report versus pharmacy claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Hallie N; Borrero, Sonya; Lehman, Erik; Velott, Diana L; Chuang, Cynthia H

    2017-09-04

    Proportion of Days Covered (PDC) is a measure of medication adherence that uses prescription claims data to describe the proportion of days that the patient possessed medication. The objective of this study is to compare PDC and self-report as measures of oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) adherence and to identify individual-level predictors of adherence. In a sample of 384 OCP users, self-report was compared with PDC as measures of adherence over the past 3 months. Patient-level variables were examined for associations with adherence using multivariable logistic regression models. High adherence, defined as missing ≤1 pill per month, was 76%, 68% and 54% as measured by self-report, PDC and both measures, respectively. Younger women (ages 18-25 and 26-33 years) were significantly less likely to have high adherence on both measures than women in the 34-40 age group [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.51 and adjusted OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.11-0.62, respectively). Other predictors of high adherence on both self-report and PDC measures included being in a relationship (adjusted OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.14-4.64, compared with unpartnered women), Protestant religion (adjusted OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.07-4.06, compared with women with no religious affiliation) and higher contraceptive self-efficacy (adjusted OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.03-2.58). PDC derived from pharmacy claims, or a combination of PDC and self-report measures, may be an alternative to self-report alone for measuring OCP adherence. PDC may be a potential tool for measuring women's adherence to OCPs and should be validated in future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of Menstrual Cycle and Oral Contraceptive Phase on Spinal Excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Ellen; Reese, Maria; Okafor, Ezi; Chun, Danielle; Gagnon, Christine; Nigl, Franz; Dhaher, Yasin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of musculoskeletal injury differ substantially between the genders, with females more likely to experience conditions such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than males in the same sports. Emerging evidence suggests a significant hormonal contribution. Most research has focused solely on how hormonal fluctuations affect connective tissue, but a direct link between hormonal shifts, ligamentous laxity, and ACL injury has not been borne out. There is also evidence to suggest that sex hormones can modulate the central nervous system, but how this affects neuromuscular control is not well understood. Objective To determine whether changes in sex hormone concentrations would alter spinal excitability, measured across the menstrual and oral contraceptive pill cycle. We hypothesized that spinal excitability would fluctuate across the menstrual cycle (with increased excitability during the periovulatory phase due to peak estradiol concentration), but that there would be no fluctuation in oral contraceptive users. Design This was a prospective cohort study. Setting The study took place at a biomechanics laboratory at a rehabilitation hospital. Participants A total of 30 healthy women aged 18–35 who were similar in age, body composition, and exercise-training status were included. Fifteen of the women were eumenorrheic and nonusers of oral contraceptives (nonusers), and 15 of the women were taking oral contraceptives (users). Main Outcome Measures H-reflex (Hmax/Mmax ratio), serum estradiol, and progesterone concentrations were measured at 3 time points during the menstrual and contraceptive pill cycle. Results The H-reflex (Hmax/Mmax ratio) remained stable across the menstrual and contraceptive pill cycle. Spinal excitability was lower in the users compared with the nonusers across all testing sessions, but this was not statistically significant. Conclusions Our results suggest that acute fluctuations of endogenous estradiol and progesterone do

  16. The association between current low-dose oral contraceptive pills and periodontal health: a matched-case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerian-Ardakani, Ahmad; Moeintaghavi, Amir; Talebi-Ardakani, Mahammadreza Reza; Sohrabi, Keyvan; Bahmani, Shahin; Dargahi, Maede

    2010-05-01

    This study assessed the influence of current oral contraceptive pills on periodontal health in young females. Seventy women ranging in age from 17 to 35 years (mean 24 years) had a comprehensive periodontal examination. Their current and previous oral contraceptive pill use was assessed by a questionnaire. A periodontal assessment was performed that included recording the following: plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, and attachment level at six sites per tooth. The periodontal health of women taking birth control pills for at least two years was compared to that of women not taking an oral contraceptive. The control and test groups were matched for socioeconomic status, age, oral habits, occupation, and educational levels. Although there was no difference in plaque index levels between the two groups, current oral contraceptive pill users had higher levels of gingival inflammation and bleeding on probing. However, no significant differences were found regarding mean probing depths and attachment loss between the two groups. As birth control policies are advocated by most countries, and because oral contraceptives are the most widely used method for birth control, a need exists to assess the effects of oral contraceptives on the periodontal health of young women. Although additional studies are needed to better understand the mechanism of OC-induced gingivitis, female patients should be informed of the oral and periodontal side effects of OCs and the need for meticulous home care and compliance with periodontal maintenance.

  17. Combined hormonal contraception use in reproductive-age women with contraindications to estrogen use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauring, Julianne R; Lehman, Erik B; Deimling, Timothy A; Legro, Richard S; Chuang, Cynthia H

    2016-09-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's US Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use recommends that combined hormonal contraceptives (ie, birth control pills, contraceptive patch, vaginal ring) should be avoided in women with specific medical conditions because of the increased risk of cardiovascular events associated with estrogen use. Whether women with category 3 (theoretical or proven risk usually outweigh the advantages) or category 4 (unacceptable health risk) contraindications are appropriately avoiding estrogen-containing combined hormonal contraceptives is unknown. We describe the prevalence of combined hormonal contraceptive use among a sample of reproductive-age women with medical contraindications to estrogen use. Our hypothesis was that women with categories 3 and 4 contraindications would use estrogen-containing contraception less often than women without medical contraindications. We also explored whether inappropriate estrogen-containing contraceptive use is related to contraceptive provider characteristics. Data are from the baseline survey of the MyNewOptions study, which included privately insured women residing in Pennsylvania aged 18-40 years, who were sexually active and not intending pregnancy in the next year. Women were surveyed about their medical conditions, contraceptive use, and characteristics of their contraceptive provider. Women were considered to have a contraindication to combined hormonal contraceptives if they reported a category 3 or category 4 contraindication: hypertension, smokers older than age 35 years, a history of venous thromboembolism, diabetes with complications, coronary artery disease, systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid antibodies, breast cancer, or migraine headaches with aura. χ(2) tests for general association were used to compare combined hormonal contraceptives use, contraceptive health provider characteristics, and sociodemographic data in women with and without

  18. [Contraception and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amate, P; Luton, D; Davitian, C

    2013-06-01

    The mean age of first sexual intercourse is still around 17 in France, but a lot of teenagers are concerned by contraception before, with approximately 25% of sexually active 15-year-old girls. The contraceptive method must take into consideration some typical features of this population, as sporadic and non-planned sexual activity, with several sexual partners in a short period of time. In 2004, the "Haute Autorité de santé" has recommended, as first-line method, combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills, in association with male condoms. Copper-containing intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and etonogestrel-containing subcutaneous implant have been suggested but not recommended. However, oral contraceptive pill, as a user-based method, carries an important typical-use failure rate, because remembering taking a daily pill, and dealing with stop periods, may be challenging. Some easier-to-use method should be kept in mind, as 28-day COC packs, transdermal contraceptive patches, and vaginal contraceptive rings. Moreover, American studies have shown that long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), i.e. IUCD and implant, have many advantages for teenagers: very effective, safe, invisible. They seem well-fitted for this population, with high satisfaction and continuation rates, as long as side effects are well explained. Thus, LARC methods should be proposed more widely to teenagers. Anyway, before prescribing a contraceptive method, it is important to determine the specific situation of every teenager, to let them choose the method that they consider as appropriate in their own case, and to think about the availability of the chosen method. It is necessary to explain how to handle mistakes or misses with user-based contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception can be anticipated and prescribed in advanced provision. The use of male condoms should be encouraged for adolescents, with another effective contraceptive method, in order to reduce the high risk

  19. Contraceptive Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troen, Philip; And Others

    This report provides an overview of research activities and needs in the area of contraceptive development. In a review of the present state, discussions are offered on the effectiveness and drawbacks of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices, barrier methods, natural family planning, and sterilization. Methods of contraception that are in the…

  20. [Thyroid function in women: problems created by oral contraceptives, pregnancy and menopause (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letonturier, P

    1983-01-01

    Thyroid anomalies are more frequent in women than men. Variations in estrogen levels as observed during pregnancy and oral contraception using combined pills may vitiate the results of certain types of thyroid hormone analysis. Consequently, as a result of an increase in thyroxine carrier proteine levels, the total thyroxine levels will be falsely higher whereas the results of the Hamolsky test will be falsely lower. However, the free thyroxine index obtained by combining the results of the 2 tests is not altered by the fluctuations of carrier proteins induced by estrogen overcharge. Although estrogen fluctuations modify thyroxine carrier proteine levels, they hardly influence thyroid function, particularly if hyperthyroidea occurs in menopause. It is simply coincidental. In the same way, thyroidal pathology actually interferes very little with ovarian function. As for the treatment of thyroid problems in pregnant women, difficulties may occur in the case of hyperthyroidea, since theoretically the usual treatments (lugol, beta-blockers, synthetic antithyroidals, radioactive iodine, or surgery on evolutive hyperthyroidea) cannot be applied. In practice, the best solution is to prescribe mild doses of synthetic antithroidals in order to decrease the basic problem without inducing hypothryoidea. (author's)

  1. Study on the association of oral contraceptives,angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and the risk of stroke in women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志征

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the associations of oral contraceptives(OC) exposure,angiotensinogen(AGT) gene polymorphism and joint effects on the risk of stroke inChinese women.Methods On the basis of a prospective

  2. Transdermal delivery of combined hormonal contraception: a review of the current literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galzote RM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rosanna M Galzote,1 Sally Rafie,2 Rachel Teal,1 Sheila K Mody1 1Section of Family Planning, Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 2Department of Pharmacy, UC San Diego Health, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: The transdermal patch provides an effective and convenient option for hormonal contraception. The patch currently on the US market contains 150 µg norelgestromin and 35 µg ethinylestradiol (EE. The 20 cm2 patch is applied once weekly for 3 weeks, followed by a patch-free week, for a 21–7 cycle. Typical failure rates are similar to that of combined oral contraceptives (COCs. Transdermal delivery results in less peaks and troughs of estrogen, but a higher total estrogen exposure compared with COCs. Though studies show mixed results, the risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE is about twice as high with the patch as with COCs; however, the absolute risk of VTE remains low. The side effect profile is similar to that of COCs, with slightly higher rates of breast tenderness plus a unique adverse effect of application site reactions. Two new patches have been developed, one containing gestodene and EE in Europe and another containing levonorgestrel and EE. Overall, the patch provides an alternative to COCs for women who want autonomy and the benefit of not needing to take a pill daily, with similar efficacy and tolerability. Keywords: contraceptive patch, Ortho-Evra, transdermal, levonorgestrel patch, gestodene patch, hormonal patch 

  3. [Long-term use of combined hormonal contraception--myths and reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotná, M; Huvar, I; Bláha, O

    2002-09-01

    To assess relationship of long-term use of combined oral contraception (COC) and women health, discussion about myths connected with use of COC. Review of literature. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hospital of Merciful Brothers, Brno, Czech Republic. Identification of studies able to address the topic using Medline database search. Besides reliable control of fertility COC protect women against dysmenorrhea, iron deficiency anemia, ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids. COC plays very important role in gynecologic endocrinology suppressing effectively hyperandrogenism, which has not only cosmetic effect but brings also improvement in cardiovascular health of affected perimenopausal women. Premenopausal using of COC could help preserve bone mineral density and can reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. The most important feature is protective effect against endometrial (by 70%) and ovarian (by 50%) cancer which increases with duration of COC use and is long lasting and may be observed 15 to 20 years after stopping use. Association of use COC with increased risk neither of cervical cancer nor breast cancer has not been confirmed. Controversy still persists over the association of long-term (longer than 8 years) COC use by young nulliparas and breast cancer. The risk in this group of users is probably slightly increased. But no authorities recommended any restriction of COC's prescription. Some studies have suggested an inverse relationship between use of COC and risk of colorectal cancer. The only established evidence of direct association between OC use and cancer risk is the increased risk for hepatocellular carcinoma in the absence of hepatitis B (but maximum by 4 cases per 1,000,000 users per year). Most non-contraceptive health benefits of COC are still not widely appreciated in spite of much evidence. The final decision of contraception method is upon well and adequate informed user by well educated doctor.

  4. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy.

  5. Acceptability of emergency contraception in Brazil, Chile, and Mexico: 1 - Perceptions of emergency oral contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Soledad

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a study on the acceptability of emergency contraception (EC in Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. Opinions of potential users and possible providers were obtained through discussion groups and those of authorities and policy-makers through semi-structured interviews. Most participants had a positive opinion of EC, based on the view that it can help reduce unplanned pregnancy, adolescent pregnancy, and unsafe abortion. Several interviewees felt that all women should be informed about EC, while others viewed it as a method for special situations such as rape and unprotected first sexual intercourse. Concern was expressed that its introduction might be associated with a decrease in condom use, increase in sexually transmitted diseases, and irresponsible or promiscuous sexual behavior among adolescents. The need for EC was clearly perceived by most participants, leading to the conclusion that health authorities have the responsibility of implementing programs for its introduction. Training of health care personnel should include the discussion of reproductive health problems that could be prevented by EC.

  6. Effects of a phasic oral contraceptive containing desogestrel on facial seborrhea and acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prilepskaya, V N; Serov, V N; Zharov, E V; Golousenko, I J; Mejevitinova, E A; Gogaeva, E V; Yaglov, V V; Golubeva, O N

    2003-10-01

    The combined oral contraceptive containing ethinylestradiol and the selective progestogen, desogestrel, in a phasic regimen (DSG-OC, Tri-merci) has been shown to reduce facial oiliness. This study was designed to evaluate further the effects of this OC on the skin of women with facial seborrhea and mild or moderate acne. This was an open, noncomparative, bicenter study in 60 healthy Russian women, aged 18-30 years, with facial seborrhea and mild or moderate facial acne, who wished to use oral contraception. All women received the OC containing desogestrel (50/100/150 microg) and ethinylestradiol (35/30/30 microg) for three phases of 7 days followed by a 7-day pill-free interval, for six cycles. Seborrhea was assessed using the Sebutape technique, in which strips of adhesive microporous polymeric film pressed onto facial sites are used to assess sebaceous activity. Acne was assessed by counting facial lesions. Subjective evaluations of skin and hair condition, patients' feelings to them and satisfaction with the OC were made using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Assessments were made at baseline, and after one, three and six treatment cycles. Sebutape assessments of seborrhea were significantly improved, on the right and left cheeks, after one treatment cycle, and on the forehead after three treatment cycles. These improvements increased steadily and were much larger at the end of Cycle 6. Acne grades were significantly improved after three and six treatment cycles. VAS scores in response to questions dealing with self-esteem and self-confidence were significantly improved after three cycles and in some cases after just one cycle. The women's views of their skin and hair (greasiness) were correspondingly significantly improved. Subjective assessments indicated that after one, three and six cycles, 69%, 93% and 98%, respectively, of women were satisfied or very satisfied with the DSG-OC. In women with facial seborrhea and mild or moderate acne, the use of DSG

  7. Effects of the oral contraceptive pill cycle on physiological responses to hypoxic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Darleen A.; Matt, Kathleen S.

    2003-01-01

    To test whether the oral contraceptive pill cycle affects endocrine and metabolic responses to hypoxic (fraction of inspired oxygen = 13%, P(IO2): 95 mmHg; H) versus normoxic (P(IO2):153 mmHg; N) exercise, we examined eight women (28 +/- 1.2 yr) during the third (PILL) and placebo (PLA) weeks of their monthly oral contraceptive pill cycle. Cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and neuroendocrine measurements were taken before, during, and after three 5-min consecutive workloads at 30%, 45%, and 60% of normoxic V(O2peak) in H and N trials. Heart rate response to exercise was greater in H versus N, but was not different between PILL and PLA. Lactate levels were significantly greater during exercise, and both lactate and glucose levels were significantly greater for 30 min after exercise in H versus N (p exercise (p exercise.

  8. Effect of synthetic oestrogens and progestagens in oral contraceptives on bile lipid composition.

    OpenAIRE

    Down, R H; Whiting, M J; Watts, J. M.; Jones, W.

    1983-01-01

    The prevalence of cholesterol gall stones in young women has increased since the introduction of oral contraceptives. The synthetic female sex hormones used in these preparations, increase the degree of cholesterol saturation in bile. To determine whether oestrogens, progestagens, or both, are responsible for the change in biliary cholesterol saturation index, a prospective randomised, controlled study was performed. A significant increase in the cholesterol saturation index of bile was obser...

  9. Clinical comparison of monophasic oral contraceptive preparations of gestodene/ ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel/ethinyl estradiol

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, Luis Fernando; Aldrighi, Jose Mendes; Andrade, Rosires Pereira de.; Barbosa, Ione Cristina; Barreto, Cristina Maria Vasconcellos

    1994-01-01

    Texto completo: acesso restrito. p.201–214 The efficacy, cycle control, subjective complaints, and safety of monophasic preparations of the oral contraceptives containing gestodene 75 mcg plus ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg versus desogestrel 150 mcg plus ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg were compared in a 6-cycle, open-label, parallel, randomized, multicenter phase IV clinical study in Latin America. Of a total of 176 women in each group, 163 in the gestodene group and 160 in the desogestrel group comp...

  10. Strategies to improve compliance among oral contraceptive pill users: a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Choi A; Dempsey A

    2014-01-01

    Angela Choi, Angela DempseyDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) remain the most commonly used reversible birth control method. Failure to adhere to daily pill taking and gaps in use are common and contribute to the risk of unintended pregnancy among OCP users. OCP compliance is influenced by a complex interplay of cognitive, behavioral, logistic, clinical, and social factors. This review out...

  11. Design Features of Drug-Drug Interaction Trials Between Antivirals and Oral Contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Ruben C; Arya, Vikram; Younis, Islam R

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the major design features of drug-drug interaction trials between antiviral medications (AVs) and oral contraceptives (OCs). Information on these trials (n = 27) was collected from approved drug labels and clinical pharmacology reviews conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The primary objective of all trials was to evaluate changes in OC exposure following the coadministration of AVs. In addition, an evaluation of potential pharmacodynamic interaction was performed in 10 of these trials. Twenty-two trials were open label with a fixed-sequence design, and 5 trials used a double-blind crossover design. The trials were conducted using one, two, or three 28-day ovulatory cycles in 10, 8, and 9 trials, respectively. Only 1 trial enrolled HIV-infected women. The median number of women in a trial was 20 (range, 12 to 52). Norethindrone/ethinyl estradiol (EE) combination was the most commonly used OC (n = 16, 59%) followed by norgestimate/EE (n = 9, 33%). Labeling recommendations were based on exposure changes in 25 cases and on safety observations in the trial in 2 cases. In conclusion, a wide variety of trial designs was used, and there is no preferred design. The answer to the exposure question can be achieved using multiple designs.

  12. Effect of low-dose oral contraceptives on androgenic markers and acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorneycroft, I H; Stanczyk, F Z; Bradshaw, K D; Ballagh, S A; Nichols, M; Weber, M E

    1999-11-01

    Oral contraceptives (OC) suppress excess androgen production; however, different progestins in combination with low-dose estrogens produce divergent effects on sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and testosterone that may influence clinical outcomes. This multicenter, open-label, randomized study compared biochemical androgen profiles and clinical outcomes associated with two OC containing the same amounts of ethinyl estradiol (EE, 20 micrograms) but different progestins, levonorgestrel (LNG, 100 micrograms), and norethindrone acetate (NETA, 1000 micrograms). Fifty-eight healthy women (18-28 years old) received three cycles of treatment with LNG/EE (n = 30) or NETA/EE (n = 28). The results showed that LNG reduced androgen levels in three compartments--adrenal, ovarian, and peripheral. NETA reduced only adrenal and peripheral androgens. Despite a 2.2-fold greater relative increase in SHBG with NETA than LNG, bioavailable testosterone (T) was reduced by the same amount with LNG and NETA. Both treatments improved acne and were well tolerated. Low-dose OC (EE, 20 micrograms) are effective in reducing circulating androgens and acne lesions without causing weight gain. Although LNG and NETA affected secondary markers differently, both OC formulations produced an equivalent decrease in bioavailable.

  13. Toward a new concept of "natural balance" in oral estroprogestin contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie; Gerris, Jan; Jamin, Christian; Lello, Stefano; Lete, Inaki; Lobo, Paloma; Nappi, Rossella E; Pintiaux, Axelle

    2013-10-01

    The Pill has undergone many changes since its first appearance some 50 years ago. Key developments included the reduction of ethinylestradiol doses and the synthesis of new progestins in order to increase safety, compliance and efficiency. Low-dose combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are currently the preferred option for millions of women. Due to this widespread use, it has been argued that the safety of COCs should be even better, raising the threshold for excellence. Yet in spite of major improvements, there is still an associated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The next step in COCs' evolution should take total estrogenicity and hepatic estro-androgenic balance into account. The focus on the estrogen component--which has not changed in 50 years--has yielded a new class of natural estrogen pills. Following the introduction of a first quadriphasic pill, a monophasic estradiol pill based on the concept of "natural balance" was subsequently made available. These recent achievements could represent a step forward in the evolution of COCs and pave the way for better safety.

  14. The interaction of alcohol consumption and oral contraceptive use on lipids and lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszon-Moran, D; Burkman, R T; Kimball, A W; Bachorik, P S; Gold, E B

    1988-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) use and alcohol consumption have been shown to alter the levels of lipids and lipoproteins in the blood. The effect of alcohol consumption on levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-B, Apo-A1, the ratio of HDL cholesterol/total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol/LDL cholesterol, and the ratio of LDL cholesterol/LDL-B among normal healthy young women before initiation of oral contraceptives and after six months of oral contraceptive use are both described. Of primary interest is the mediating effect of alcohol consumption on the association between steroid usage and blood lipid values. At baseline, ethanol consumption was found to be positively associated with triglycerides, HDL-C, and Apo-A1 and negatively associated with LDL-C/LDL-B. After adjustment for several covariables, alcohol consumption was found to be positively associated with the increases in triglycerides and in Apo-A1 observed at 3 and 6 months after initiation of OCs. Since these two parameters are believed to have opposite relationships to cardiovascular disease, the effect of alcohol consumption remains uncertain.

  15. Interactive Effects of the Carbon Paper, Sodium Bicarbonate and Oral Contraceptive Pills on Morphine Urine Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solhi, H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: A major problem for labs. esp. medicolegal centers is drug test false positive and negative results. Using carbonpaper, sodium bicarbonate or oral contraceptive pills (OCP are commonamong addict people to make the results negative. Therefore, we decidedto evaluate the effect of carbon paper, sodium bicarbonate or OCP onmorphine urine test.Material and Methods: We performed this pre-experimental study onthe urine samples of all people referred to narcotic drug laboratory ofMarkazi province during May of 2005. Of 2110 urine samples, theMorphine Rapid Test of 208 samples was positive. Then by means ofTLC method, we confirmed the presence of morphine metabolites in 150urine samples. After that, we divided these samples into three equalgroups for adding carbon paper, sodium bicarbonate or OCP.Results: The results show that in carbon paper group, 41 cases arepositive and nine cases unclear. In sodium bicarbonate group, 45 samplesare positive and 5 cases unclear. In estrogen conjugate group, all 50samples are positive.Conclusion: According to this study, adding carbon paper, sodiumbicarbonate or oral contraceptive pills cannot make negative theMorphine Rapid Test result.Key words: Morphine Rapid Test, Carbon paper, Sodium bicarbonate,Oral contraceptive pill.

  16. Life threatening pulmonary embolus in a factor V Leiden carrier on oral contraceptives: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, M W; Volpe, B T; Dailey, M; Tsongalis, G J

    1997-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a serious, potentially lethal health problem affecting one per 1,000 people annually. Major surgery, the use of oral contraceptives, complicated pregnancy, fractures, and immobilization increase the risk of thrombosis. In addition to these factors, thrombosis is associated with inherited deficiencies of antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S. Together these do not account for more than five to 10% of the cases. Hereditary activated protein C resistance has been recognized as a basis for a majority of cases of familial thrombosis. It accounted for more than a 10 times higher number than that of other known genetic defects. We describe a case of a young female who presented with a pulmonary embolism and was discovered to have activated protein C resistance. This patient had a heterozygous mutation for factor V Leiden and was taking oral contraceptives. This report underlines: 1) increased risk of venous thrombosis in oral contraceptive users who carry factor V Leiden mutation associated with functional resistance to the normal anticoagulation activities of protein C; 2) most episodes occurring in the young are minor, but pulmonary embolus can occur; 3) the importance of identifying other affected members of the family; and 4) the importance of anticoagulation prophylaxis at times of enhanced risk, particularly during pregnancy, postpartum, and major surgery.

  17. Deep vein thrombosis and the oestrogen content in oral contraceptives. An epidemiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, A

    1985-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have pointed to a correlation between the oestrogen content of oral contraceptives and the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The correlation has been strongest in studies which partially consisted of adverse drug reaction reports to the Swedish Adverse Drug Reaction Advisory Committee (SADRAC). The present study analyzes the epidemiological basis of the adverse drug reaction reports on DVT in women on oral contraceptives to SADRAC. It verifies the reported correlation between the oestrogen content of the pills and the risk of DVT but it also demonstrates that this correlation probably was secondary to differences in the diagnostic standard of DVT, to differences in reporting policies to SADRAC and to an age difference between women on low-oestrogen-pills and those on high-oestrogen pills and is thus due to bias. It is concluded that adverse drug reaction reporting on oral contraceptives has been very unreliable, for which reason it cannot support any epidemiological conclusion concerning the relative thrombogenicity of high-oestrogen pills compared with that of low-oestrogen pills.

  18. Bioavailability of the Yuzpe and levonorgestrel regimens of emergency contraception: vaginal vs. oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kives, Sari; Hahn, Philip M; White, Emily; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Reid, Robert L

    2005-03-01

    Separate crossover studies compared the bioavailability of oral vs. vaginal routes of administration for the Yuzpe (n=5) and levonorgestrel regimens (n=4) of emergency contraception. Twice the standard dose of the Yuzpe regimen (200 microg of ethinyl estradiol, 1000 microg of levonorgestrel) or the levonorgestrel regimen (1500 microg of levonorgestrel) was self-administered vaginally. One week later, each subject received orally the standard dose of the assigned medication. Serial blood samples were collected over 24 h and assayed for levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (for the Yuzpe regimen only). Paired t tests were used to compare oral vs. vaginal administration for maximum concentration (Cmax), time to maximum concentration (Tmax) and area under the curve over 24 h (AUC0-24). Relative bioavailability (vaginal/oral) was derived from AUC0-24. Vaginal administration of double the standard dose of the Yuzpe regimen resulted in a lower Cmax (vaginal=5.4 vs. oral=14.6 ng/mL, p=.038) and a later Tmax (5.9 vs. 2.0 h, p=.066) for levonorgestrel, compared to oral administration. Corresponding ethinyl estradiol concentrations were higher (786 vs. 391 pg/mL, p=.039) and peaked later (4.0 vs. 1.9 hr, p=.154) with vaginal administration. Relative bioavailabilities for levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol were 58% and 175%, respectively. Similarly, vaginal administration of the levonorgestrel regimen resulted in a lower Cmax (vaginal=5.4 vs. oral=15.2 ng/mL, p=.006) and a later Tmax (7.4 vs. 1.3 h, p=.037) for levonorgestel, compared to oral administration. The relative bioavailability was 62%. Our preliminary data suggest that vaginal administration of these emergency contraception regimens appears to require at least three times the standard oral dose to achieve equivalent systemic levonorgestrel concentrations.

  19. Why Iranian married women use withdrawal instead of oral contraceptives? A qualitative study from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazemnejad Anoushiravan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Withdrawal as a method of birth control is still used in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore married women's perspectives and attitudes on withdrawal use instead of oral contraceptive (OC in Tehran, Iran. Methods This was a qualitative study. Participants were 50 married women, not currently pregnant, not desiring pregnancy and who had been using withdrawal for contraception. Face-to face interviews were conducted to collect data. Content analysis was performed to analyze the data. Results Four major themes were extracted from the interviews: advantages, disadvantages, barriers for OC use, and husband-related factors. Advantages of withdrawal use were identified as: easy to use, convenient, ease of access, natural. Even those participants who had experienced unwanted pregnancy while using withdrawal, relied on withdrawal as their contraceptive method. Disadvantages of OC included concerns about side effects. Barriers related to use of OC included the need for medical advice, vaginal examination and daily use. Husband-related factors included: the husband wanted to be the primary decision maker on the number of children and that he preferred withdrawal. Conclusion Health providers should address misunderstandings that exist about OC and highlight the non-contraceptive health benefits of OC to balance the information provided for women. We suggest that not only women but also their spouses be advised in family planning programs.

  20. Supplementation with Vitamin B6 Reduces Side Effects in Cambodian Women Using Oral Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chivorn Var

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal contraceptives may produce side effects that deter women from their use as a method of family planning. In nutritionally vulnerable populations these effects may be more pronounced due to micronutrient deficiencies and health status. Previous studies have been unable to resolve whether micronutrient supplementation may reduce such side effects. Aim: In a longitudinal study, 1011 women obtaining oral contraception through the public health system in rural Cambodia were allocated to either intervention or control groups, receiving either daily Vitamin B6 supplement or care as usual (without placebo. Results: The intervention participants (n = 577 reported fewer side effects in three categories: nausea/no appetite, headache, and depression compared with control group participants (n = 434. Conclusion: Women taking Vitamin B6 supplement were less likely to report side effects in a nutritionally vulnerable population. Underlying nutrition status should be considered by clinicians and reproductive health policy makers in the context of providing contraceptive services. Further investigation into micronutrient supplementation, particularly with B6, in reproductive-aged women using hormonal contraception should be conducted in other settings to determine the potential for widespread adoption.

  1. The safety and efficacy issues of progestin-only oral contraceptives--an epidemiologic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, I

    1993-01-01

    Progestogen-only oral contraceptives (POCs) are generally considered a good contraceptive choice for brestfeeding women and for women who want to use an oral form of contraception, but are not suited for, or cannot tolerate the side effects of, estrogen-containing preparations. However, a number of POCs' safety, efficacy and other related issues remain to be addressed. This paper reviews recent literature and evaluates these issues from an epidemiologic perspective. The small number of users imposes severe limitations in designing epidemiologic studies to address POCs' long-term safety issues, but available information suggests POCs are at least as safe as, if not safer than, COCs. Compared to COCs, POCs are more likely to cause menstrual disturbances which, in turn, could affect their acceptability and lead to poor compliance and hence higher pregnancy rates. POCs' efficacy has been estimated to be between 1.4 and 4.3 pregnancies per 100 woman-years of use. Lower pregnancy rates approaching those of COCs have been reported in centers with good counseling. POCs' benefits outweigh their risks. However, more studies are needed to further address POCs' safety and efficacy issues.

  2. The effect of pycnogenol on patients with dysmenorrhea using low-dose oral contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Hugo; Haddad, Clarice; Casoy, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Objective Menstrual symptoms such as dysmenorrhea usually occur during the hormone-free interval in oral contraceptive users. Progestin withdrawal activates NF-κB transcription factor, which upregulates both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Cox-2 expression in the endometrium. The use of natural NF-κB inhibitors such as pycnogenol may block this response, improving dysmenorrhea. Patients and methods Twenty-four patients with severe dysmenorrhea were allocated to one of two treatment groups. In Group A (n=13), women were treated with an oral contraceptive containing 15 μg of ethinyl estradiol and 60 mg of gestodene (Adoless®) in a 24/4 regimen for three consecutive cycles. Women in Group B (n=11) used the same contraceptive regimen together with 100 mg of pycnogenol (Flebon®) continuously for 3 months. Pain scores were graded using a visual analog scale (VAS) before and during the hormone-free interval at the end of the third treatment cycle. Results Before treatment, VAS pain scores for dysmenorrhea were 8 and 9 in Groups A and B, respectively. However, by the end of the third treatment cycle, pain scores had decreased significantly (Pgestodene. PMID:25525393

  3. The effect evaluation of oral contraceptives and IUDs%常用口服避孕药及宫内节育器效果评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶晓玲; 王燕; 郎雁; 熊俊

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the combined effect of oral contraceptives and intrauterine devices (IUD) , and to study the most appropriate contraceptive measures. Methods: The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, the contraceptive effectiveness, adverse reactions and non - pregnant out of hope were analyzed in the two groups. Results: Pearl index was 0. 62, incidence of adverse reactions was 7. 0% , discontinuation rates of non - pregnancy out of hope was 4. 5% in the oral contraceptive group; Pearl index was 2. 63 , incidence of adverse reactions was 13. 5% , discontinuation rates of non - pregnancy out of hope was 9. 5% in the IUD group. Conclusion: Oral contraceptives and intrauterine devices have their advantages and disadvantages, oral contraceptives is better than IUD; different species in same category are quite different, clinical results of Yasmin oral contraceptive and Jeanne ring are the best.%目的:评估口服避孕药及宫内节育器(IUD)的综合效果,探讨最合适的避孕措施.方法:将研究对象随机分为两组各200例,评估分析两组的避孕效果、不良反应及非希望妊娠停用情况.结果:口服避孕药组珍珠指数0.62,不良反应发生率7.0%,非希望妊娠停用率4.5%;IUD组珍珠指数2.63,不良反应发生率13.5%,非希望妊娠停用率9.0%.结论:口服避孕药及宫内节育器各有利弊,整体评估口服避孕药优于IUD;同类不同品种效果也存在较大差异,口服避孕药以优思明、IUD以吉妮环的临床效果最佳.

  4. Pill power: oral contraceptives hold top spot in family planning arsenal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Results of the 1998 "Contraceptive Technology Update" Pill Survey indicate that oral contraceptives (OCs) remain the top birth control choice for US women. More than 70% of providers who responded to the survey reported that at least 50 women leave their offices each month with an OC prescription. When asked to cite their first OC choice, for a 21-year-old nonsmoking woman, Ortho Tri-Cyclen was selected by 43.6% of providers. This OC is considered an excellent choice for young women because of its ease of use, good cycle control, and beneficial effect on acne. The top choices for a 42-year-old nonsmoking woman were Loestrin (26.5%) and Alesse (21.1%), both of which have low estrogen doses. 25% of providers indicated they had prescribed OCs specifically to decrease the ovarian cancer risk in genetically predisposed women.

  5. [Contraception and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobert, M; Pigeyre, M; Gronier, H; Catteau-Jonard, S; Robin, G

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing massively over several decades in industrialized countries. Obese women are sexually active but they use fewer contraceptive methods and are at high risk of unintended pregnancy. In addition, obesity is an important risk factor for venous thromboembolism events and arterial thrombosis (myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke). All of these data are to be considered in choosing a contraceptive method for obese women. Except depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection, the progestin-only contraceptives (progestin only pills and etonogestrel subdermal implant) and the intra-uterine devices are the preferred contraceptive methods in obese women. The combined estrogen-progestin contraceptives (pill, patch and vaginal ring) may be proposed in very strict conditions (no other associated vascular risk factor). Obesity does not increase the risk of failure of most contraceptive methods. Bariatric surgery is a complex situation. It requires to program a possible pregnancy and contraception is needed for several months. Some bariatric surgical techniques such as by-pass can induce gastrointestinal malabsorption. In this situation, all oral contraceptives are not recommended because of a higher risk of failure.

  6. How does Intimate Partner Violence Affect Condom and Oral Contraceptive Use in the United States? A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Julie N.; Stockman, Jamila K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intimate partner violence (IPV) is estimated to affect 25% of adult women in the US alone. IPV directly impacts women’s ability to use contraception, resulting in many of unintended pregnancies and STIs. This review examines the relationship between IPV and condom and oral contraceptive use within the United States at two levels: the female victim’s perspective on barriers to condom and oral contraceptive use, in conjunction with experiencing IPV (Aim 1) and the male perpetrator’s perspective regarding condom and oral contraceptive use (Aim 2). STUDY DESIGN We systematically reviewed and synthesized all publications meeting the study criteria published since 1997. We aimed to categorize the results by emerging themes related to each study aim. RESULTS We identified 42 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We found 37 studies that addressed Aim 1. Within this we identified three themes: violence resulting in reduced condom or oral contraceptive use (n=15); condom or oral contraceptive use negotiation (n=15); which we further categorized as IPV due to condom or oral contraceptive request, perceived violence (or fear) of IPV resulting in decreased condom or oral contraceptive use, and sexual relationship power imbalances decreasing the ability to use condoms or oral contraceptives; and reproductive coercion (n=7). We found 5 studies that addressed Aim 2. Most studies were cross-sectional, limiting the ability to determine causality between IPV and condom or oral contraceptive use; however, most studies did find a positive relationship between IPV and decreased condom or oral contraceptive use. CONCLUSIONS Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research has demonstrated the linkages between female IPV victimization/male IPV perpetration and condom or oral contraceptive use. However, additional qualitative and longitudinal research is needed to improve the understanding of dynamics in relationships with IPV and determine causality between IPV

  7. Effect of oral contraceptive with and without associated estriol on ultrasound measurements of breast fibroadenoma: randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Augusto Fernandes Estevão

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Fibroadenomas are the most common benign tumors of the female breast. The aim of this study was to evaluate the proliferative activity of breast fibroadenoma as shown by ultrasound measurements, following administration of oral contraceptives with and without associated estriol. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial carried out in the Mastology Sector, Department of Gynecology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: We studied 33 women with fibroadenomas. Ten were placed in group 1 and took an oral contraceptive consisting of levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol together with placebo material in the same capsule, for four consecutive cycles with a seven-day interval between them. The other 23 patients constituted group 2 and took the oral contraceptive as above together with estriol in the same capsule, in the same way as done by the group 1 patients. We took ultrasound measurements of their tumors (in three dimensions before and after the intake of medication. At the end of the study, all the patients had their tumors removed by surgery. RESULTS: We observed decreased fibroadenoma width among the users of oral contraceptives with placebo, and this decrease was statistically significant. In the other group, we did not observe any changes (in width, length or height. CONCLUSION: The results confirm that estriol may block the protective effect of oral contraceptives on fibroadenomas, since we observed decreased fibroadenoma width among the group 1 patients but not the group 2 patients.

  8. Effects of menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptives on alertness, cognitive performance, and circadian rhythms during sleep deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K. P. Jr; Badia, P.; Czeisler, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The influence of menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptive use on neurobehavioral function and circadian rhythms were studied in healthy young women (n = 25) using a modified constant routine procedure during 24 h of sleep deprivation. Alertness and performance worsened across sleep deprivation and also varied with circadian phase. Entrained circadian rhythms of melatonin and body temperature were evident in women regardless of menstrual phase or oral contraceptive use. No significant difference in melatonin levels, duration, or phase was observed between women in the luteal and follicular phases, whereas oral contraceptives appeared to increase melatonin levels. Temperature levels were higher in the luteal phase and in oral contraceptive users compared to women in the follicular phase. Alertness on the maintenance of wakefulness test and some tests of cognitive performance were poorest for women in the follicular phase especially near the circadian trough of body temperature. These observations suggest that hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle and the use of oral contraceptives contribute to changes in nighttime waking neurobehavioral function and temperature level whereas these factors do not appear to affect circadian phase.

  9. Effects of menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptives on alertness, cognitive performance, and circadian rhythms during sleep deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K. P. Jr; Badia, P.; Czeisler, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The influence of menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptive use on neurobehavioral function and circadian rhythms were studied in healthy young women (n = 25) using a modified constant routine procedure during 24 h of sleep deprivation. Alertness and performance worsened across sleep deprivation and also varied with circadian phase. Entrained circadian rhythms of melatonin and body temperature were evident in women regardless of menstrual phase or oral contraceptive use. No significant difference in melatonin levels, duration, or phase was observed between women in the luteal and follicular phases, whereas oral contraceptives appeared to increase melatonin levels. Temperature levels were higher in the luteal phase and in oral contraceptive users compared to women in the follicular phase. Alertness on the maintenance of wakefulness test and some tests of cognitive performance were poorest for women in the follicular phase especially near the circadian trough of body temperature. These observations suggest that hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle and the use of oral contraceptives contribute to changes in nighttime waking neurobehavioral function and temperature level whereas these factors do not appear to affect circadian phase.

  10. Oral contraception and energy intake in women: impact on substrate oxidation during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isacco, Laurie; Thivel, David; Pelle, Anne Meddahi; Zouhal, Hassane; Duclos, Martine; Duche, Pascale; Boisseau, Nathalie

    2012-08-01

    Oral contraception (OC) and energy intake may play a role in fuel selection during exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of OCs (OC+ vs. OC-) in fed and fasting conditions on substrate oxidation and metabolic and hormonal responses in women during exercise. Substrate oxidation (respiratory exchange ratio and lipid and carbohydrates oxidation rates), metabolic (glycerol, free fatty acids (FFA), and glucose), and hormonal (insulin, adrenaline, and noradrenaline) responses were determined in 21 women: 10 regularly menstruating women (OC-) and 11 women using OCs (OC+: low-dose monophasic pill; ethinyl estradiol ≤ 30 µg) during 45 min at 65% of maximal oxygen consumption in fasting and postprandial states. At rest, OC+ presented higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride plasma concentrations as compared with OC-. OC status had no influence on substrate oxidation and metabolic and hormonal responses during exercise. In the fasting state, whatever the OC status, women exhibited greater reliance on fat than in postprandial condition. This occurred in the presence of lower plasma insulin concentrations and higher plasma FFA and glycerol levels. The results indicated that the use of low-dose monophasic combined with OCs did not modify fuel selection and metabolic and hormonal responses during exercise in women. The fasting condition, compared with the fed condition, decreased carbohydrate oxidation during exercise, leading to a greater lipid mobilization and utilization whatever the OC status. Thus, in women, the realization of an exercise in either the fed or fasting conditions had a greater impact on substrate oxidation than OC status.

  11. Irritable bowel syndrome and drospirenone-containing oral contraceptives; a comparative-safety study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Steven T; Liu, Wei; Brophy, James M; Bressler, Brian; Delaney, Joseph A C; Etminan, Mahyar

    2012-02-01

    Mineralocorticoids are thought to play a role in tissue repair, including fibrous tissue formation. The antimineralocorticoid activity of spironolactone has been linked to an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Drospirenone is a synthetic progestin approved in combination with ethinyl-estradiol as an oral contraceptive (OC). It is a spironolactone-derivative, and its antimineralocorticoid effects could irritate the gastrointestinal tract leading to symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A retrospective cohort study was conducted evaluating women 18-46 years of age in the IMS claims-database. New-users of progestin-based OCs were identified between 1997-2009. Ninety days of OC therapy and one year of prior enrollment with no prior diagnosis of IBS were required for inclusion. Cases were identified using a previously validated method for the diagnosis of IBS. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for developing IBS with the different OC formulations using levonorgestrel as a reference. The cohort included 939,281 women, averaging 29.1 years of age and 247 days of OC therapy. 3,050 incident cases of IBS were detected. The annualized incidence for IBS with drospirenone was 0.77% (1083 cases) while that for levonorgestrel was 0.46% (483 cases). The crude HR for development of IBS with drospirenone compared to levonorgestrel was 1.70 (95%CI 1.53-1.90), while the adjusted HR was 1.63 (95%CI 1.46-1.82). Multiple sensitivity analyses confirmed this association. Other OCs were unassociated with IBS. Our study found a positive association between drospirenone and a diagnosis of IBS that was not observed with other OCs.

  12. Central Retinal Artery Occlusion- A rare complication of oral contraceptive pills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Pancholi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To propose a hypothesis of causal association between central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO and oral contraceptive pills (OCPCase Summary:A case report-A 22 yr old, female presented with sudden painless loss of vision in OS [Right Eye] for 1 day. VA [Visual Activity] in OS was PL PR [Perception of Light and Projection of Rays] Faulty with RAPD [Relative Afferent Papillary Defect] with normal for fifteen minutes, given five hundred mg of acetazolamide orally stat, 0.4 ml of anterior chamber paracentesis done, 5400 IU LMW [Low Molecular Weight] heparin given SC[Subcutaneous] with carbogen inhalation. Retrospectively she was on oral contraceptives(Mala D for 1 month. She was not hypertensive or diabetic with normal blood, coagulation profile & carotid Doppler. She was evaluated by an intern to find the cause of coagulation disorder and was found to be normal. On first day FFA [Fundus Florescien Angiography] showed no blockage with normal cilioretinal artery perfusion established. Visual fields after one week showed central tubular vision and OCT [Ocular Coherent Tomography] showed normal fovea. After 2 weeks vision was 20/80 with persistent RAPD papilla macular bundle being perfused.

  13. Strategies to improve compliance among oral contraceptive pill users: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Angela Choi, Angela DempseyDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs remain the most commonly used reversible birth control method. Failure to adhere to daily pill taking and gaps in use are common and contribute to the risk of unintended pregnancy among OCP users. OCP compliance is influenced by a complex interplay of cognitive, behavioral, logistic, clinical, and social factors. This review outlines the evidence base for strategies that have been studied for their impact on OCP compliance.Keywords: adherence, continuation, unintended pregnancy, reminder system

  14. [Automatic assay of circulating immune complexes induced by oral contraceptives (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxtorf, J C; Lemort, N

    1981-01-01

    The authors describe an automatic method to assay circulating immune complexes induced by OC (oral contraception). The method is simple, quick, and cheap; it consists of detecting the immune complexes precipitating by ammonium sulphate at 25% saturation, as in the manual method. In the automatic method the procedure is done on an Auto Analyzer apparatus, which allows direct reading of the floculation, and does not require washing of the precipitate. Results obtained for 164 sera tested automatically were compared with results obtained by the manual method; the correlation was very significant. The same method can be used for screening other immune complexes.

  15. Procoagulant changes induced by oral contraceptives are balanced by an increased fibrinolytic tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, I J; Campbell, S; Gallimore, M; Robinson, G; Machin, S J

    1992-01-01

    Oral contraceptives caused increased fibrinogen, FVII, FX, and fibrinolysis. The latter was associated with elevated FXII and PKK, while C1-INH was decreased, ATIII and alpha 2M were unchanged; it could not be accounted for by changes in t-PA, u-PA, PAI, plasminogen, alpha 2-AP, proteins C or S. HCII and alpha 1-PI were increased and may regulate the availability of thrombin and FXIa. The increased FXII/PKK dependent fibrinolytic potential and HCII may offset any increase in thrombin generation, while alpha 1-PI limits intrinsic coagulation.

  16. Empowering Women: A Feminist Argument for Over-the-Counter Sale of Oral Contraceptives

    OpenAIRE

    Prieto-Gonzalez, Mayelin

    2005-01-01

    The oral contraceptive pill, having been on the market for 45 years, should be sold over-the-counter. There is no longer any valid reason for FDA to maintain the prescription status of the drug. First, numerous studies over the past few decades have shown that the pill is safe for the vast majority of women, with current risk to users estimated to be less than the risks associated with pregnancy. In addition, the pill is effective and easy to use. Studies have shown that the pill also confers...

  17. Effects of monophasic low-dose oral contraceptives on fibrin formation and resolution in young women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K R; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Skouby, S O

    1993-01-01

    of fibrinogen and Factor VIIc increased, and the capacity of coagulation inhibition was affected by increased protein C and decreased protein S levels. Increased fibrinolytic capacity was indicated by elevated activity and reduced antigen levels of tissue plasminogen activator and by reduced activity......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine key variables in the regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis during intake of low-dose oral contraceptives containing newly developed progestogens. STUDY DESIGN: Thirty-four healthy young women were allocated to 12 consecutive cycles...

  18. Relationship satisfaction and outcome in women who meet their partner while using oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S Craig; Klapilová, Katerina; Little, Anthony C; Burriss, Robert P; Jones, Benedict C; DeBruine, Lisa M; Petrie, Marion; Havlícek, Jan

    2012-04-07

    Hormonal variation over the menstrual cycle alters women's preferences for phenotypic indicators of men's genetic or parental quality. Hormonal contraceptives suppress these shifts, inducing different mate preference patterns among users and non-users. This raises the possibility that women using oral contraception (OC) choose different partners than they would do otherwise but, to date, we know neither whether these laboratory-measured effects are sufficient to exert real-world consequences, nor what these consequences would be. Here, we test for differences in relationship quality and survival between women who were using or not using OC when they chose the partner who fathered their first child. Women who used OC scored lower on measures of sexual satisfaction and partner attraction, experienced increasing sexual dissatisfaction during the relationship, and were more likely to be the one to initiate an eventual separation if it occurred. However, the same women were more satisfied with their partner's paternal provision, and thus had longer relationships and were less likely to separate. These effects are congruent with evolutionary predictions based on cyclical preference shifts. Our results demonstrate that widespread use of hormonal contraception may contribute to relationship outcome, with implications for human reproductive behaviour, family cohesion and quality of life.

  19. Plasma factor VII-activating protease is increased by oral contraceptives and induces factor VII activation in-vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, Johannes J; Skouby, Sven O; Kluft, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) use influences the hemostatic system significantly and is a risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) has potential effects on hemostasis. The 1601GA genotype of the 1601G/A polymorphism in the FSAP gene expresses a FSAP...... alloenzyme with reduced pro-fibrinolytic activity. Presently, we address whether OC use and OC formulation affect FSAP measures in human blood. Healthy women (n=588) were allocated to six cycles of OCs with estrogen contents of 20µg (n=158), 30µg (n=284), 35µg (n=79) or 50µg (n=67) combined with various...... progestins. FSAP genotypes, FSAP and factor VII (FVII) plasma measures were assessed at baseline and after 6 cycles of OC. The 1601GA genotype was present in 49 (8.3%) of the women and was associated with significantly reduced levels of FSAP (P=0.001). OC use increased FSAP antigen by 25% and FSAP activity...

  20. The effect of the oral contraceptive pill on the passive stiffness of the human gastrocnemius muscle in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, C I; Spencer, J; Hussain, A W; Onambele, G L

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of sustained monophasic oral contraceptive pill (MOCP) use on the in vivo passive stiffness of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle-tendon unit. Twenty four females volunteered for this study (age range 20-25 yrs); twelve participants had been taking the combined MOCP for a minimum of 12 months, and twelve participants, who had never taken the MOCP, formed a control group. Distal displacement of the GM myotendinous junction (MTJ) was measured during passive dorsiflexion at 2 Nm increments to 20 Nm, and at end range of motion using ultrasonography. In addition, GM MTJ displacement was measured at passive torques equivalent to 5, 10 and 15% of plantarflexion maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque, and relative to GM length. MOCP users had significantly greater GM MTJ displacement at all passive torques (PMTJ displacement, passive muscle stiffness is less in MOCP using females, compared to non-pill users.

  1. [Angiodysplasia of moya-moya type disclosed by choreic unvoluntary abnormal movements during oral contraception. Apropos of 2 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J; Cabanot, C; Lévrier, O; Thuillier, J N; Chérif, A A

    1997-07-01

    Two seventeen year-old women, developed acute onset left choreic movements following two months and two weeks use of oral contraceptives. Left hemiparesia appeared a few days later, while involuntary movements discontinued. Cranial CT scan and MRI showed bilateral ischemic lesion in the frontal region for the first case and isolated lesion in the right centrum ovale for the second. Angiography showed nearly complete obstruction of the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery with an outline Moya-Moya network. After discontinuing oral contraceptives, there has been no relapse of neurologic dysfunction for more than three years for the first case and twelve months for the second one. The role of perfusion insufficiency in limb-shaking carotid transient ischemic attack is discussed and the possible relations between oral contraceptives, chorea and angiographic features resembling Moya-Moya disease are evaluated.

  2. Parental gender equality and use of oral contraceptives among young women: A longitudinal, population-based study in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamunur Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little is known about how parental gender equality early in their children lives can influence daughters′ decision to use contraceptive pills. Aim: The study aimed at exploring whether maternal working time and paternity leave in Sweden during the first two years of their daughters′ lives is associated with the use of oral contraceptives when they are adolescents or young adults. Materials and Methods: The study population was selected from a cohort of all Swedish fathers and mothers who had their first child together between 1988 and 1989 (n = 57,520 family units. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the association. Results: Mothers′ longer working time was mildly associated with daughters′ oral contraceptive pill use, though no clear trend was observed. Longer paternity leave periods (>30 days were not associated with use of oral contraceptives among their daughters, but 1-30 day periods showed a mild positive association. Conclusion: For maternal working time, there seems to be an association, but trends by working hours are not clear. There is no clear association between paternity leave during the first two years of their daughters′ life and the use of oral contraceptives when they are adolescents and young adults.

  3. The underrated benefits of oral contraception: consequences of pregnancy and induced abortion in teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, R

    1992-01-01

    If complications occur within a pregnancy planned and brought to term, they often can be dealt with and accepted. They are even more traumatic when they occur in an unwanted pregnancy that could have been prevented through contraception. Teenagers, because of their physical and psychological immaturity and also because of their social environment, seem to suffer with undue frequency from the complications of induced abortion. Its result, for the teenager, is a handicapped future in comparison to other women. Hence, access to contraception is important for all women, and especially for teenagers, in order to avoid such prejudicial situations. It is important, then, to prescribe oral contraception for its efficacy and its short- and long-term innocuousness. Because of her immaturity, the pregnant teenager is at risk: of spontaneous abortion, pre-eclampsia, anemia, hemorrhage, and prematurity. She is also at risk because of the social difficulties she will be facing. This is particularly true in families from developing countries. From birth, the child is also at risk: of low birth weight for the term, mortality in the first year of life, and all risks linked to abandonment, or education by a third party. In a proportion of 13 to 30% in western countries and in a proportion of 3% in East Asia or in Northwest Africa (Maghreb), induced abortions are a reflection of the following: early sexual activity without contraception even if fertility is still low in very young teenagers, absence of social protection or social independence, refusal of forced marriage, and presence or absence of liberal legislation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. The vitamin B6 requirement in oral contraceptive users. II. Assessment by tryptophan metabolites, vitamin B6, and pyridoxic acid levels in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, E A; Bossé, T R

    1979-05-01

    The requirement for vitamin B6 in oral contraceptive users was studied in 8 college-age women who used combined (7) or sequential (1) oral contraceptives. The subjects and 8 controls consumed a basal diet supplemented to result in daily intake of 2.06 mg pyridoxine hydrochloride for 10 days (predepletion) and then containing only .36 mg of vitamin B6 for 32 days. After the depletion period, the diet was supplemented with pyridoxine hydrochloride to increase the intake of B6 to .96, 1.56, and 5.06 mg for 8, 9, and 7 days respectively. Complete 14-hour urine collections were analyzed for xanthurenic acid, kynurenic acids, kynurenine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine after administration of a l load-dose of 2 gm L-trytophan on days 2, 11, 18, 25, 32, 39, 43, 50 , 59, and 66 for the subjects and days 2 and 10 for the controls. Pretryptophan urine was analyzed for vitamin B6. Posttryptophan urine was analyzed for 4-pyridoxic acid. It was found that during the depletion phase the excretion of tryptophan metabolites increased significantly. Excretion dropped significantly upon supplementation with 1.56 or 5.06 mg of vitamin B6, returning values to normal. Levels of vitamin B6 and 4-pyridoxic acid in the urine decreased during depletion to be restored to normal upon supplementation with 1.56 mg/day. Since an intake of 5.0 mg vitamin B6 caused a loss of the vitamin in the urine and all levels were returned to normal with an intake of 1.56 mg, it is suggested that 1.5 mg of vitamin B6 is sufficient to meet the needs of most oral contraceptive users and that there is no significant difference in the vitamin B6 requirement of oral contraceptive users and nonusers.

  5. Association between sex hormone-binding globulin levels and activated protein C resistance in explaining the risk of thrombosis in users of oral contraceptives containing different progestogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Huib A.A.M.; Frolich, Marijke; Christella, M.; Thomassen, L.G.D.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rosing, Jan; Helmerhorst, Frans M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have shown that both the estrogen dose and progestogen type of oral contraceptives contribute to the increased risk of thrombosis in oral contraceptive users. Thrombin generation-based activated protein C (APC) sensitivity is a global test for the net

  6. The venous thrombotic risk of oral contraceptives, effects of oestrogen dose and progestogen type: results of the MEGA case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hylckama Vlieg, van A.; Helmerhorst, F.M.; Vandenbroucke, J.P.; Doggen, C.J.M.; Rosendaal, F.R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the thrombotic risk associated with oral contraceptive use with a focus on dose of oestrogen and type of progestogen of oral contraceptives available in the Netherlands. Design Population based case-control study. Setting Six participating anticoagulation clinics in the Nethe

  7. Association between sex hormone-binding globulin levels and activated protein C resistance in explaining the risk of thrombosis in users of oral contraceptives containing different progestogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van Huib A.A.M.; Frolich, Marijke; Christella, M.; Thomassen, L.G.D.; Doggen, Carine J.M.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rosing, Jan; Helmerhorst, Frans M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have shown that both the estrogen dose and progestogen type of oral contraceptives contribute to the increased risk of thrombosis in oral contraceptive users. Thrombin generation-based activated protein C (APC) sensitivity is a global test for the net prothromboti

  8. The effect of pycnogenol on patients with dysmenorrhea using low-dose oral contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Jr H

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hugo Maia Jr, Clarice Haddad, Julio Casoy Centro de Pesquisa e Assistência em Reprodução Humana (CEPARH, Salvador, Bahia, BrazilObjective: Menstrual symptoms such as dysmenorrhea usually occur during the hormone-free interval in oral contraceptive users. Progestin withdrawal activates NF-κB transcription factor, which upregulates both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and Cox-2 expression in the endometrium. The use of natural NF-κB inhibitors such as pycnogenol may block this response, improving dysmenorrhea.Patients and methods: Twenty-four patients with severe dysmenorrhea were allocated to one of two treatment groups. In Group A (n=13, women were treated with an oral contraceptive containing 15 µg of ethinyl estradiol and 60 mg of gestodene (Adoless® in a 24/4 regimen for three consecutive cycles. Women in Group B (n=11 used the same contraceptive regimen together with 100 mg of pycnogenol (Flebon® continuously for 3 months. Pain scores were graded using a visual analog scale (VAS before and during the hormone-free interval at the end of the third treatment cycle.Results: Before treatment, VAS pain scores for dysmenorrhea were 8 and 9 in Groups A and B, respectively. However, by the end of the third treatment cycle, pain scores had decreased significantly (P<0.05 both in groups A and B. The final pain scores were 6 in Group A and 2 in Group B, a difference that was statistically significant (P<0.0001. In Group B, 27% of the patients became pain-free, while in Group A, none of the women reported complete disappearance of this symptom. The number of bleeding days was also lower in Group B.Discussion: Pycnogenol effectively decreased pain scores and the number of bleeding days when administered concomitantly with a low-dose 24/4 oral contraceptive containing gestodene.Keywords: gestodene, hormone-free interval, pain

  9. Venous Thromboembolism Due to Oral Contraceptive Intake and Spending Nights in a Vehicle -A Case from the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueta, Daisuke; Akahoshi, Rika; Okamura, Yoshinori; Kojima, Sunao; Ikemoto, Tomokazu; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Tsujita, Kenichi; Kaikita, Koichi; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Hokimoto, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman experiencing sudden dyspnea went to her personal doctor for advice. She was previously diagnosed with endometriosis and prescribed oral contraceptives for treatment. During earthquakes, she spent 7 nights sleeping in a vehicle. The patient had swelling and pain in her left leg and high D-dimer concentration levels. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan revealed a contrast deficit in the bilateral pulmonary artery and in the left lower extremity. She was diagnosed with pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE), and anticoagulation therapy was initiated. This present case is the first report of PTE attributed to the use of oral contraceptives after earthquakes.

  10. Effects of switching from oral to transdermal or transvaginal contraception on markers of thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jeffrey T.; Burke, Anne E.; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Tillotson, Carrie; Messerle-Forbes, Marci; Peters, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Background The study was conducted to determine the impact of switching from oral to transdermal patch or vaginal ring contraception on biomarkers of thrombosis. Study Design Current healthy oral contraceptive (OC) users were randomized to switch to either a contraceptive ring (CR) or patch (CP) and underwent phlebotomy to measure surrogate biomarkers of thrombosis (sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), free protein S, and activated protein C-resistance (APC-r)) before switching, and during the 4th cycle of use of the new method. Results Of 142 reproductive age women enrolled, 120 sample pairs were available for analysis. SHBG increased significantly from baseline in CP users (mean change (95% CI) +29.9 nM (9.6, 50) but not in CR users −1.6 (−16.6, 13.5). Protein S decreased significantly from baseline in CP users (mean change −7.1% (−12.1, −2.1), but increased significantly in CR users +5.3% (1.1, 9.6). The APC-r ratio did not undergo a significant change from baseline in either group [CP +0.06 (−0.06, 0.18), CR +0.02 (−0.10, 0.14)] Compared to CR users, subjects using the CP had significantly higher SHBG (187.5 (167.0, 208), 146 (132.6,159.4), p = 0.012), significantly lower protein S (81.8 (76.8, 86.8), 93.6 (89.1, 98.1), p = 0.001), and similar APC-r ratios (2.99 (2.85,3.14), 3.09 (2.96, 3.22), p = 0.3) at the cycle 4 visit. Conclusion OC users who switch to the ring exhibit beneficial changes in biomarkers of thrombosis while those switching to the patch display a shift favoring clot formation. PMID:19014790

  11. Contraceptive use in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindh, Ingela; Skjeldestad, Finn E; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to compare contraceptive use in the Nordic countries and to assess compliance with recommendations from the European Medicines Agency regarding the use of combined oral contraception containing low-dose estrogen and levonorgestrel, norethisterone or norgestimate. MATERIA...

  12. Modification of corporal weight, body fat distribution, blood lipids and glucose levels in oral contraceptive users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza-Lira, S; Bueno Fontal, J P

    2000-01-01

    The association between oral contraceptives and the modification of corporal weight and body fat distribution is controversial. The characteristics of the menstrual cycle, lipids and glucose levels were also analyzed. Thirty women who received ethinylestradiol 0.035 mg and norethindrone 0.400 mg for one year were studied. The following variables were analyzed every 3 months: weight, body mass index (BMI), hip perimeter, waist perimeter, waist-hip ratio (WHR), duration of menstrual cycle, quantity of uterine bleeding, as well as blood levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. Waist and hip perimeters increased during the third evaluation; as well as the BMI starting from the second evaluation. The triglycerides levels rose from the first evaluation. No modifications were found in the WHR, glucose and cholesterol levels and the duration of the menstrual cycle, but the quantity of uterine bleeding decreased from the third month. The oral contraceptive significantly increased BMI and triglycerides level, but no changes were detected in body fat distribution, cholesterol and glucose levels. Uterine bleeding decreased from the first evaluation.

  13. The role of oral contraceptive (OCP use in symptomatic gallstone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimian SF

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available To examine the relation between oral contraceptive (OCPs use, body mass index, parity, familial history of gallstone disease, history of diabetes, history of hyperlipidemia and gallstone disease in women, we have undertaken a case-control study. The study population comparison 80 hospital patients with diagnosed acute gallstone disease as case group and 200 controls who were patients in hospital with no history of gallstone disease. The data were analyzed by Chi-square and T-student test. The results revealed that: The use of OCPs in case group is higher than that of control group. But there is no significant difference between them. No relation was found between gallstone disease and body mass index, parity, history of diabetes, familial history of gallstone disease, use of OCPs of different types and duration of use. While there was a significant difference between the 2 groups regarding history of hyperlipidemia (P<0.05. Finally we found no correlation between the history of use, types and duration of use of OCPs and symptomatic gallstone disease. There was no indication of any interaction between oral contraceptive use and other risk factors and duration of OCP use and other risk factors in the production of disease.

  14. Oral contraceptive pills: A risk factor for retinal vascular occlusion in in-vitro fertilization patients

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    Rohina S Aggarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vascular occlusion is the most common cause of retinopathy leading to severe visual loss in all age groups. Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO is usually seen in older age group and is often associated with systemic vascular diseases. Although the exact cause and effect relationship has not been proven, central retinal vein occlusion has been associated with various systemic pathological conditions, hence a direct review of systems toward the various systemic and local factors predisposing the central retinal vein occlusion is advocated. We describe the development of central retinal venous occlusion with associated cystoid macular edema (CME in two healthy infertile women who were recruited for in vitro fertilization cycle for infertility. Predisposing risk factors associated with central retinal vein occlusion are obesity, sedentary life style, smoking, and some systemic diseases such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, associated autoimmune disorders e.g., antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, lupus, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, bleeding or clotting disorders, vasculitis, closed-head trauma, alcohol consumption, primary open-angle glaucoma or angle-closure glaucoma.In our patients, they were ruled out afterdoing allpertaining investigations. The cases were managed with further avoidance of oral contraceptives and intra-vitreal injections of Bevacizumab (Avastin, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF drug and Triamcinolone acetonide (a long acting synthetic steroid. Hence, even if no systemic diseases are detected. Physical examinations are recommended periodically for young women on oral contraceptive pills.

  15. Oral contraceptives and their influence on porphyrin concentrations in erythrocytes and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansky, A; Gregorc, J; Pavlic, M

    1978-01-01

    In 15 females who have never before taken oral contraceptives, the porphyrin concentration in erythrocytes and in urine were investigated. The laboratory assays were performed before and after being on the oral contraceptive Stediril during 5 months (2 women took Stediril during only 3 months). The mean PP concentration in the erythrocytes increased from 16.4 microgram (before) to 24.1 microgram/100 ml of erythrocytes after taking Stediril regularly for 5 months. A statistical evaluation with the Student's test showed that at the level of 2%, the t(exp) = 2.58 was larger than the theoretical t(0.02) = 2.47. The difference of the mean CP concentration in the erythrocytes before and after taking Stediril was not statistically significant at the level of 5%. The mean concentration of CP in urine increased from 119.2 to 137.1 microgram in 1,000 ml. This difference was, however, not statistically significant at the level of 5% when assayed with the same test. There was no increase in UP concentration in urine.

  16. Effects of the oral contraceptive pill cycle on physiological responses to hypoxic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Darleen A.; Matt, Kathleen S.

    2003-01-01

    To test whether the oral contraceptive pill cycle affects endocrine and metabolic responses to hypoxic (fraction of inspired oxygen = 13%, P(IO2): 95 mmHg; H) versus normoxic (P(IO2):153 mmHg; N) exercise, we examined eight women (28 +/- 1.2 yr) during the third (PILL) and placebo (PLA) weeks of their monthly oral contraceptive pill cycle. Cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and neuroendocrine measurements were taken before, during, and after three 5-min consecutive workloads at 30%, 45%, and 60% of normoxic V(O2peak) in H and N trials. Heart rate response to exercise was greater in H versus N, but was not different between PILL and PLA. Lactate levels were significantly greater during exercise, and both lactate and glucose levels were significantly greater for 30 min after exercise in H versus N (p PILL versus PLA, but glucose was greater in PILL versus PLA (p PILL versus PLA (p PILL phase reduces glucose and lactate responses to hypoxic exercise.

  17. Early onset vulvar Lichen Sclerosus in premenopausal women and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günthert, Andreas R; Faber, Melanie; Knappe, Gabriele; Hellriegel, Simin; Emons, Günter

    2008-03-01

    For vulvar Lichen sclerosus (LS) immunological factors, genetic predisposition, and decreased 5 alpha-reductase activity have been discussed as aetiological factors. During the last decade an increase of LS in young women has been suspected. Aim of this study was to evaluate data of premenopausal women with early onset LS to find potential risk factors focussing on the use of oral contraceptives. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 40 premenopausal patients with early onset LS regarding use of oral contraceptives (OCPs), and first occurrence of LS. To compare these data in a case-control study we analyzed a matched control group of 110 healthy women. All our LS patients were using OCPs compared to 73 women (66.4%) in the control group. OCPs with anti-androgenic activity (chlormadinone acetate, cyproterone acetate, dienogest, and drospirenone) were used by 28 (70%) of the LS patients and by 35 (47.9%) of the 73 women using OCPs in the control group. Thus, the odds ratio for early onset LS for women using anti-androgenic OCPs was 2.53 (95% CI: 1.12-5.75). Our data suggest that disturbance of the androgen dependent growth of the vulvar skin by OCPs and especially by OCPs with anti-androgenic properties might trigger the early onset of LS in a subgroup of susceptible young women.

  18. EFFECT OF ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES (LD AND CILEST ON CLOTTING FACTORS VIII AND IX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. Sadeghipour Roudsari

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on epidemiologic data, women who take oral contraceptives seem to have an increased risk of developing thromboembollic disease. The thrombotic effects of oral contraceptive (OC are probably mediated, at least partly through their effects on the coagulation system. Plasma levels of several clotting factors have been shown to be elevated in OC users, and this increase is graduated according to the dose of estrogen. In this study, fifty healthy and non smoking women, aged 18-35 years, were randomly assigned to treatment with 2 different OCs: a monophasic pill containing 30 pg of ethinyl estradiol plus 150µg levonorgestrel (LD and a monophasic pill containing 35µg ethinylestradiol plus 250pg norgestimate (Cilest. Factor VIII plasma values were significantly decreased (P<0.05 only in women treated with the preparation LD, but the levels of factor VIII were not significantly different in the group treated with Cilest. Factor IX plasma values were significantly increased (P<0.05 only in women treated with the preparation Cilest, but the levels of factor Ix were not significantly different in the group treated with LD. In LD and cilest users factors VIII and IX were not significantly changed (P<0.05 in overweight and obese subjects in comparison to normal weight.

  19. Bromazepam pharmacokinetics: influence of age, gender, oral contraceptives, cimetidine, and propranolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, H R; Greenblatt, D J; Friedman, H; Burstein, E S; Locniskar, A; Harmatz, J S; Shader, R I

    1987-05-01

    Pharmacokinetics of the benzodiazepine bromazepam were evaluated in volunteer subjects who received single 6 mg oral doses followed by blood sampling during the next 48 hours. Age and gender effects were studied in 32 subjects, divided into young (aged 21 to 29 years) and elderly (aged 60 to 81 years) groups. Compared with young subjects, the elderly had significantly higher peak serum bromazepam concentrations (132 vs. 82 ng/ml), smaller volume of distribution (0.88 vs. 1.44 L/kg), lower oral clearance (0.41 vs. 0.76 ml/min/kg), and increased serum free fraction (34.8% vs. 28.8% unbound). However, gender had no significant influence on bromazepam kinetics. In 11 young female users of oral contraceptive steroids, compared with seven age- and weight-matched control women not using oral contraceptives, no differences in bromazepam kinetics were observed. Coadministration of cimetidine (1.2 gm daily) significantly reduced bromazepam clearance (0.41 vs. 0.82 ml/min/kg) and prolonged elimination half-life (29 vs. 23 hours). Propranolol (160 mg daily) significantly prolonged bromazepam half-life (28 vs. 23 hours), but the reduction in clearance associated with propranolol (0.65 vs. 0.82 ml/min/kg) did not reach significance. Bromazepam has the pharmacokinetic characteristics of benzodiazepines with half-life values between 20 and 30 hours. Consistent with its biotransformation pathway by hepatic microsomal oxidation, bromazepam clearance is significantly impaired in elderly individuals, by coadministration of cimetidine and possibly propranolol.

  20. Nomegestrol acetate/estradiol hormonal oral contraceptive and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pup, Lino; Berretta, Massimiliano; Di Francia, Raffaele; Cavaliere, Carla; Di Napoli, Marilena; Facchini, Gaetano; Fiorica, Francesco; Mileto, Mario; Schindler, Adolf E

    2014-08-01

    Combined hormonal contraceptives (CHCs) contain estrogen and progestin, which can stimulate estrogen-sensitive and/or progesterone-sensitive breast cancer growth. Until recently, ethinylestradiol had been almost the only estrogen used for decades, and its dose has been greatly reduced over time. The first generations of birth control pills contained approximately five times more estrogen and four times more progestin than the latest contraceptives. Newer CHCs also contain steroids that more closely mimic the physiological estradiol (E2) and progesterone effects. The newer CHC formulations are thus expected to have less influence on the breast, although it is very difficult to demonstrate any difference among the recent available preparations in human studies. Recently, nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC), a neutral, nonandrogenic, progesterone-like profile progestin, has become available in combination with the 'natural' estrogen, E2. According to the literature, NOMAC/E2 is expected to have either a lesser stimulating effect or a neutral effect on estrogen-sensitive breast cancers. We performed an analysis of the available studies and a bibliographical review. The endocrine and metabolic effects of NOMAC/E2 formulation might lead to a lesser breast tissue stimulation. The data reported, confirmed through clinical studies, should be considered when choosing a hormonal contraceptive, especially when breast stimulation is a concern.

  1. The Risk of Venous Thromboembolism with Different Generation of Oral Contraceptives; a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Alireza Baratloo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral contraceptives (OCs are considered as one of the most common risk factor of venous thromboembolism (VTE in child bearing age. Some of the recent researches indicate that the odds of VTE may be even higher with newer generations of OCs. The present meta-analysis was designed to evaluate the effect of different generation of OCs on the occurrence of VTE. Methods: Two researchers independently ran a thorough search in Pubmed, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, CINAHL and Scopus databases regarding study keywords including thromboembolic event, thromboembolism, embolism, thromboembolic, thrombotic and thrombosis, combined with oral contraceptive. The outcomes were the incidence of diagnosed thromboembolism, such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and cerebral venous thrombosis. Based on the heterogeneity of the studies, random effect model was used and pooled odds ratio was reported. Results: Three cohort and 17 case-control studies with 13,265,228 subjects were entered into meta-analysis. Analysis showed that the odds of VTE in women taking OCs are more than three-fold (OR=3.13; 95% CI: 2.61-3.65. The risk of VTE in women taking first-, second- and third-generation OCs are 3.5 fold (OR=3.48; 95% CI: 2.01-4.94, 3 fold (OR=3.08; 95% CI: 2.43-3.74 and 4.3 fold (OR=4.35; CI: 3.69‒5.01, respectively. Conclusion: It seems that the risk of VTE is not same between different generations of OCs, so that third-generation has highest risk. Taking second and third-generation OCs increases the risk of VTE up to 3 and 4.3 fold, respectively. The researchers of the present study suggest that more clinical trials be designed in relation to the effect of newer generations of OCs in different communities. 

  2. Contraception: traditional and religious attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, J G; Rabenou, V

    1993-04-01

    Humans have tried to control fertility for centuries. Primitive, preliterate societies practiced infanticide and abortion. When primitive women understood the advantages of conception control, they tried, when possible, to use contraception. In the 4th century B.C., Plato and Aristotle advocated a one-child family. Greek medical literature reported a hollow tube inserted through the cervix into the uterus and a potion as contraceptives. Islamic physicians had much knowledge about conception control. The attitudes toward contraception. In the 5th century B.C., Saint Augustine condemned contraception, even among married couples. The condom emerged in the early modern period. Yet, they were usually worn to protect against disease, e.g., bilharzia in Egypt and syphilis in Europe. The cervical cap and the diaphragm are examples of occlusive pessaries. By 1880, contraceptives and spermicides were advertised. In 1928, the IUD joined the existing contraceptives. Today we have combined oral contraceptives. Judaic law requires husbands to fulfill their wives sexual needs, separate from their duty to procreate. It also calls men, not women, to procreate and forbids men from masturbating, thus Judaic law does not forbid women from practicing contraception. The Roman Catholic church forbids contraceptive use because it is a sin against nature. Some Protestant denominations have allowed contraceptive use. Islamic law states that children are gifts from Allah. Some Moslems believe that they must have many children, but Allah and the Prophet state that children have rights to education and future security. These rights allow couples to prevent pregnancy. Neither Hinduism nor Buddhism prohibit contraceptive use. Differences in husband-wife communication, sex roles, access to contraceptives, and traditional family values will have more of an effect on contraceptive use and fertility than theological barriers or the social class of religious groups.

  3. Contraception - Update and Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabe T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fertility control in the future will focus on the improvement of existing methods (efficacy, side effects, easy use, duration of action, manufacturing process, costs, on new approaches (mode of action bringing additional health benefits, and on new targets for nonhormonal contraception. Counselling of women in view to contraceptive choices based on the individual risk (e. g. cardiovascular disease, thrombophilia, family risk of breast cancer, sexually transmitted diseases will gain more and more importance. Only a few companies can afford research in contraception such as Bayer-Schering-Pharma, and MSD. Female contraception: Ovulation inhibition: preselection of patients to minimize the individual risk. New oral contraceptive (OC regimen, OC with new progestins, OC with estradiol or estradiol esters, new ovulation inhibitors with new progestins and new regimen including long cycles and continuous delivery of steroidal contraceptives, new contraceptive patches, vaginal rings andsprayon contraceptives. Recently identified genes involved in the ovulation process as new targets for ovulation inhibitors. Fertilisation inhibition: new intrauterine systems have been developed: a smaller Mirena intrauterine system releasing levonorgestrel (LNG and a new frameless progestinreleasing intrauterine systems (IUS. Various new contraceptive barriers have been introduced. Research is ongoing on substances acting both as spermicide and as microbicides as a dualprotection method reducing both the risk of unwanted pregnancy and the risk of sexually transmitted diseases. New implantable systems and improved injectables (with improved pharmacokinetic profile, decreased side effects and a safer delivery system have been made available recently. Various new approaches in female sterilisation include non invasive method of tubal occlusion Immunocontraception for the female will not be available in the near future. Implantation inhibition: selective progesterone

  4. Effects of oral contraceptives or a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist on ovarian carcinogenesis in genetically engineered mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Iris L; Gordon, Ilyssa O; Jagadeeswaran, Sujatha; Mui, Keeley L; Lee, Woo Seok; Dinulescu, Daniela M; Krausz, Thomas N; Kim, Helen H; Gilliam, Melissa L; Lengyel, Ernst

    2009-09-01

    Although epidemiologic evidence for the ability of combined oral contraception (OC) to reduce the risk of ovarian cancer (OvCa) is convincing, the biological mechanisms underlying this effect are largely unknown. We conducted the present study to determine if OC also influences ovarian carcinogenesis in a genetic mouse model and, if so, to investigate the mechanism underlying the protective effect. LSL-K-ras(G12D/+)Pten(loxP/loxP) mice were treated with ethinyl estradiol plus norethindrone, contraceptive hormones commonly used in combined OC, or norethindrone alone, or a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist. The combined OC had a 29% reduction in mean total tumor weight compared with placebo (epithelial tumor weight, -80%). Norethindrone alone reduced mean total tumor weight by 42% (epithelial tumor weight, -46%), and the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist increased mean total tumor weight by 71% (epithelial tumor weight, +150%). Large variations in tumor size affected the P values for these changes, which were not statistically significant. Nonetheless, the OC reductions are consistent with the epidemiologic data indicating a protective effect of OC. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity was decreased in association with OC, indicating that OC may affect ovarian carcinogenesis by decreasing proteolytic activity, an important early event in the pathogenesis of OvCa. In contrast, OC increased invasion in a K-ras/Pten OvCa cell line established from the mouse tumors, suggesting that OC hormones, particularly estrogen, may have a detrimental effect after the disease process is under way. Our study results support further investigation of OC effects and mechanisms for OvCa prevention.

  5. Contraceptive Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquitt, Charlie W; Martin, Tonya S

    2017-02-01

    The prevention of pregnancy remains an important part of the practice of medicine. Contraception can occur at a number of points in the basic reproductive biological process and through a number of contraceptive product options. Pharmacists are health care providers appropriately positioned to assist patients in suitable contraceptive product selection based on their personal situations and lifestyles. This article provides an overview of available products for prevention of pregnancy and associated risks and benefits. Contraceptive products are categorized by their hormonal content and method of action. Hormonal options include oral contraceptive pills, contraceptive patch, implants, injection, intravaginal, and intrauterine devices. Barrier products prevent pregnancy by creating a physical obstacle to the successful fertilization of an egg by sperm. All products and methods are associated with benefits and potential complications that must be considered as patients, and health care providers select the most satisfactory option.

  6. Safety, efficacy and patient acceptability of the combined estrogen and progestin transdermal contraceptive patch: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Graziottin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Alessandra GraziottinCenter of Gynecology and Medical Sexology, H San Raffaele Resnati, Via Santa Croce 10/a, 20123 Milano, ItalyAbstract: The worldwide introduction of the first, unique patch for hormonal contraception (ethinyl estradiol/norelgestromin, EE/NGMN patch was widely recognized as a significant event in the development of drug delivery systems. This innovation offers a number of advantages over the oral route, and extensive clinical trials have proved its safety, efficacy, effectiveness, and tolerability. The weekly administration and ease of use/simplicity of the EE/NGMN patch contribute to its acceptability, and help to resolve the two main problems of non-adherence, namely early discontinuation and inconsistent use. The patch offers additional benefits to adolescents (improvement of dysmenorrhea and acne, adults (improvement in emotional and physical well-being, premenstrual syndrome, and menstrual irregularities, and perimenopausal women (correction of hormonal imbalance, modulation of premenopausal symptoms, thus providing high satisfaction rates (in nearly 90% of users. Since its introduction, the transdermal contraceptive patch has proved to be a useful choice for women who seek a convenient formulation which is easy to use, with additional, non-contraceptive tailored benefits for all the ages.Keywords: transdermal, hormonal contraceptive, patient satisfaction, patient adherence

  7. Overdose of oral contraceptive pills as a means of intentional self-poisoning amongst young women in Sri Lanka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weerasinghe, Manjula; Konradsen, Flemming; Eddleston, Michael

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) are one of the most popular family planning methods in Sri Lanka. As part of two hospital-based studies on self-harm, the use of OCPs was identified, from yet unpublished results, as a means of intentional self-poisoning. To inform future guidelines...

  8. [Efficacy of oral contraceptives on acne. Apropos of a comparative study of Varnoline vs Diane in 69 women with acne].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrier, M; Degrelle, H; Bestaux, Y; Bourry-Moreno, M; Brun, J P; Sailly, F

    1988-01-01

    The authors conducted a comparative study of the effect of two oral contraceptives Varnoline and Diane in the treatment of androgenic manifestations: acne and hirsutism. The two products tested seem to have a similar efficacy on this type of clinical manifestations.

  9. Effect of administration of oral contraceptives on the synthesis and breakdown of myofibrillar proteins in young women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Langberg, H.; Holm, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) treatment has an inhibiting effect on protein synthesis in tendon and muscle connective tissue. We aimed to investigate whether OC influence myofibrillar protein turnover in young women. OC-users (24±2 years; Lindynette® n=7, Cilest® n=4) and non-OC-users (controls, 24...

  10. Knowledge-attitude-practice survey among Portuguese gynaecologists regarding combined hormonal contraceptives methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombas, Teresa; Costa, Ana Rosa; Palma, Fátima; Vicente, Lisa; Sá, José Luís; Nogueira, Ana Maria; Andrade, Sofia

    2012-04-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate knowledge, attitude and practices of Portuguese gynaecologists regarding combined hormonal contraceptives. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 303 gynaecologists. Results Ninety percent of the gynaecologists considered that deciding on contraceptive methods is a process wherein the woman has her say. Efficacy, safety and the woman's preference were the major factors influencing gynaecologists, while efficacy, tolerability and ease of use were the major factors perceived by the specialists to influence the women's choice. Gynaecologists believed that only 2% of women taking the pill were 100% compliant compared to 48% of those using the patch and 75% of those using the ring. The lower risk of omission was the strong point for the latter methods. Side effects were the main reason to change to another method. Vaginal manipulation was the most difficult topic to discuss. Conclusions Most gynaecologists decided with the woman on the contraceptive method. The main reasons for the gynaecologist's recommendation of a given contraceptive method and the women's choice were different. Counselling implies an open discussion and topics related to sexuality were considered difficult to discuss. Improving communication skills and understanding women's requirements are critical for contraceptive counselling.

  11. Combined hormonal contraception and risk of venous thromboembolism within the first year following pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jesper Friis; Bergholt, T; Nielsen, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    throughout the follow-up year. After childbirth, individuals that used combined hormonal contraceptives were more likely than non-users to experience VTE depicted by crude incidence ratios; however, the difference was only significant after 14 weeks. This implied that the numbers needed to harm were lower...

  12. Metabolic profile of six oral contraceptives containing norgestimate, gestodene, and desogestrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, A

    1995-01-01

    The alterations in lipid metabolism that occur with the use of oral contraceptives (OCs) have aroused considerable concern that OCs might increase the risk of premature atherosclerosis. However, most studies examining the role of OCs in atherogenesis were performed using earlier-generation preparations employing larger doses of sex hormones than present formulation. Therefore, we undertook a comparative and standardized determination of the effects on lipid metabolism of six modern, low-dose OCs. This open, randomized, comparative study included patients recruited at 21 study centers throughout Europe. Four hundred sixty-six women, aged 18-38 years, participated. They were randomly assigned to the following OC formulations:(1) norgestimate 250 micrograms + ethinyl estradiol (EE) 35 micrograms (Cilest); (2) norgestimate 180/215/250 micrograms + EE 35 micrograms (Tricilest); (3) desogestrel 150 micrograms + EE 20 micrograms = (Marvelon); (4) desogestrel 150 micrograms + EE 30 micrograms (Mercilon); (5) gestodene 75 micrograms + EE 30 micrograms (Femovan); and (6) gestodene 50/70/100 micrograms + EE 30/40/30 micrograms (Trifemovan). There were three parallel studies with six parallel patient groups. Fasting blood samples were drawn at baseline (between days 24 and 28) and on days 18-22 of cycle 6, and cycle 12. Sample were analyzed for total cholesterol,high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, HDL2 cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein (apo)A1, and apoB at one central laboratory. Two hundred eighty-two women completed all 12 cycles and were included in the final evaluation. As expected, triglyceride and total cholesterol concentrations increased in all study groups but to lesser levels with the formulations containing gestodene. All OCs, except the monophasic gestodene preparation, slightly but significantly increased HDL. The HDL2 subfraction did ot change significantly except in the group using the monophasic

  13. Latin american experience with two low-dose oral contraceptives containing 30 microg ethinylestradiol/75 microg gestodene and 20 microg ethinylestradiol/150 microg desogestrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassol, S; Alvarado, A; Celis, C; Cravioto, M C; Peralta, O; Montaño, R; Novelli, J; Albornoz, H; Kesseru, E; Soares, A; Petracco, A; Isaia, B; Mendes, J; Bahamondes, L; de Melo, N R; Reyes-Marquez, R; Albrecht, G

    2000-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare cycle control, efficacy and tolerance of an oral contraceptive containing 20 microg ethinylestradiol and 150 microg desogestrel with a preparation containing 30 microg ethinylestradiol combined with 75 microg gestodene. This study involved 342 women and 4104 cycles use in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. Contraceptive efficacy was good with both formulations. Two pregnancies occurred in the desogestrel group but were not due to method failure. With respect to cycle control, the incidence of intermenstrual bleeding was higher during the first 3 cycles in the desogestrel group; it was significant (p gestodene group (8.5%). Adverse events were similar in all the countries with headache, breast tension, and nausea, the most frequently reported symptoms. The range of mean increase in body weight varied from 0.2 kg in the Argentine group to 2.6 kg in the Chilean group (95% confidence limit, +/- 2.51) in the gestodene group, and 0.2 kg in the Argentine group to 2.5 kg in Brazilian group (95% confidence limit, +/- 2.36) in the desogestrel group. Fifteen women discontinued because of headache, but there were no significant differences between the groups regarding discontinuation for this and other medical or non-medical reasons. Both oral contraceptive preparations are reliable and well tolerated, and both have favorable effects on control cycle.

  14. Association of oral contraceptive and metformin did not improve insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth Chiharu Iwata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: Objective: to compare clinical and laboratory parameters in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS using metformin or combined oral contraceptive (COC after 6 months. Methods: retrospective study analyzing records of patients with PCOS using the Androgen Excess and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (AE-PCOS Society criteria. The groups were: I-COC (21 tablets, pause of 7 days; n=16; II-metformin (850mg 12/12h, n=16; III-COC plus metformin (n=9. Body mass index (BMI, acne (% of improvement, modified Ferriman-Gallway index and menstrual cycle index (MCI, luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, total testosterone (TT, androstenedione (A and homeostasis model assessment: insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index were assessed Results: isolated use of COC compared to metformin was better regarding to acne, Ferriman index, MCI, LH, TT and A levels. On the other hand, metformin was better in the HOMA-IR index (4.44 and 1.67 respectively, p=0.0007. The association COC plus metformin, compared to metformin alone shows the maintenance of improvement of acne, Ferriman index, MCI, and testosterone levels. The HOMA-IR index remained lower in the metformin alone group (4.19 and 1.67, respectively; p=0,046. The comparison between COC plus metformin and COC alone, in turn, shows no difference in the improvement of acne, Ferriman index, MCI, LH, TT and A levels, indicating that the inclusion of metformin did not lead to additional benefits in these parameters. Still, the HOMA-IR index was similar in both groups (4.19 and 4.44 respectively; p=0.75, showing that the use of metformin associated with COC may not improve insulin resistance as much as it does if used alone. Conclusion: our data suggest that the combination of metformin and contraceptive does not improve insulin resistance as observed with metformin alone.

  15. The use of low dose oral contraceptives for the management of acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, A; Langley, R G

    2002-12-01

    There is compelling evidence that oral contraceptives (OCs) are effective in the management of mild-moderate acne vulgaris, as well as cumulative evidence that elevated levels of androgens in acne patients, relative to appropriate controls, are an underlying pathophysiological factor in acne. All low dose OCs reduce serum free testosterone (T) to a similar extent, which is contrary to the traditional concept that a patient who has acne should not use an OC containing a progestin with androgenic properties. The efficacy of various OCs to improve acne has been reported in transverse, cohort and comparative studies, and more recently in multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trials. Recently, an ultra-low dose OC (Alesse, Wyeth) was shown to effectively reduce non-inflammatory and inflammatory lesions in mild-to-moderate acne, while having a profile of side-effects similar to that of a placebo. Besides its contraceptive efficacy, an ultra-low dose OC represents an attractive alternative as a single or associated medication in the management of acne.

  16. Parity, infertility, oral contraceptives, and hormone replacement therapy and the risk of ovarian serous borderline tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Emma L Kaderly; Hannibal, Charlotte Gerd; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Few studies have examined the risk of an ovarian serous borderline tumor (SBT) associated with parity, infertility, oral contraceptives (OCs), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), which was the study aim. METHODS: This nationwide case-control study included all women with an SBT...... diagnosis in Denmark, 1978-2002. SBTs were confirmed by centralized expert pathology review. For each case, 15 age-matched female controls were randomly selected using risk-set sampling. Cases and controls with previous cancer (except for non-melanoma skin cancer) and controls with bilateral oophorectomy...... birth also decreased the SBT risk (p=0.03). An increased SBT risk was associated with infertility (OR=3.31; 95% CI: 2.44-4.49), which was present both among parous and nulliparous women. HRT use increased the SBT risk (OR=1.32; 95% CI: 1.02-1.72), whereas OC use decreased the risk (OR=0.40; 95% CI: 0...

  17. [Oral contraceptive use and prevalence of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis in women (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinghorn, G R; Waugh, M A

    1983-05-01

    1080 nonpregnant women ages 16-34 years, presenting for the 1st time at a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases (STD), were examined and screened for infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrheae, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Candida species. The respective prevalence rates were 21.1%, 20.7%, 13.4%, and 27.8%. Isolation rates for Chlamydia trachomatis, either occurring alone or in association with other genital infections, were significantly greater in women using oral contraceptives (OCs). This was not because OC users were more promiscuous. The findings strengthen the case for providing a routine chlamydial culture service for women attending STD clinics. They also indicate that the likelihood of chlamydial infection in women taking OCs is greater. (author's)

  18. Antiepileptic drugs: are women aware of interactions with oral contraceptives and potential teratogenicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Alison M; Davis, Anne R; Kritzer, Jordana; Yoon, Ava; Camus, Adela

    2009-04-01

    Women with epilepsy (WWE)'s knowledge of the interaction between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and oral contraceptives (OCs) and the potential teratogenicity of AEDs has received limited study. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire study (English or Spanish) among young WWE (18-44 years) to assess demographic characteristics, current AED use, and knowledge of AED interactions with OCs and teratogenicity. We used the Food and Drug Administration's classification system to categorize each AED's teratogenic potential. Participants (n=148) had a mean age of 32 years (SD 8); 32% spoke Spanish and described themselves as Hispanic. Among women prescribed a cytochrome p450-inducing AED, 65% were unaware of decreased OC efficacy. Forty percent of those prescribed Category D AEDs were unaware of potential teratogenic effects. WWE have limited knowledge of the potential interaction between AEDs and OCs and the teratogenic effects of AEDs. Educational efforts should highlight the reproductive health effects of AEDs in WWE.

  19. Occurrence, fate and removal of synthetic oral contraceptives (SOCs) in the natural environment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze-hua; Ogejo, Jactone Arogo; Pruden, Amy; Knowlton, Katharine F

    2011-11-15

    Synthetic oral contraceptives (SOCs) are a group of compounds with progestagenic and/or androgenic activities, with some also possessing estrogenic activities. Recent research has documented that some of these emerging contaminants have adverse effects on aquatic organisms at very low concentrations. To facilitate the evaluation of their latent risks, published works on their occurrence and fate in the environment are reviewed. Androgenic/progestagenic relative potencies or relative binding affinity of these SOCs as well as their physicochemical properties and toxicity are summarized. Appropriate analytical methods are outlined for various environmental sample types, including methods of sample preparation and limit of detection/quantification (LOD/LOQ). Finally results on their occurrence and fate in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and other environments are critically examined.

  20. Hypertensive Crisis and Left Ventricular Thrombi after an Upper Respiratory Infection during the Long-term Use of Oral Contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Natsuko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Mizuno, Tomofumi; Kato, Yukari; Suga, Norihiro; Yoshino, Masabumi; Miura, Naoto; Banno, Shogo; Imai, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman who had been using oral contraceptives for 10 years developed hypertensive crisis with papilloedema after an upper respiratory infection. Laboratory data showed hyperreninemic hyperaldosteronism and elevated levels of fibrinogen, fibrin, and fibrinogen degradation products. Echocardiography demonstrated two masses (18 mm) in the left ventricle. On the fourth hospital day, cerebral infarction, renal infarction, and upper mesenteric artery occlusion suddenly occurred despite the blood pressure being well-controlled using anti-hypertensive drugs. Echocardiography revealed the disappearance of the left ventricular masses, which suggested left ventricular thrombi. Cessation of the contraceptives and administration of heparin, warfarin, and anti-platelets drugs improved her general condition.

  1. Contraceptive vaginal ring (NuvaRing)-a novel, convenient and effective contraceptive option

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wei-lin; Fan Guang-sheng

    2011-01-01

    Contraceptive vaginal ring (NuvaRing) is a new combined hormonal contraceptive method.Each ring contains 2.7mg ethinyl estradiol (EE) and 11.7mg etonogestrel.The ring is characteristic with its ease of use,lower EE systemic exposure and excellent cycle control.Studies have demonstrated that the efficacy and safety of the ring are equivalent to combined oral contraceptive (COC).The side effects of the ring are fewer and the biocompatibility is good.Recent studies have proved that the NuvaRing is a new,effective hormonal contraceptive option for women.

  2. Managing adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman Barr, Nancy

    2010-12-15

    Adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives usually diminish with continued use of the same method. Often, physi- cians only need to reassure patients that these symptoms will likely resolve within three to five months. Long-acting injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is the only hormonal contraceptive that is consistently associated with weight gain; other hormonal methods are unlikely to increase weight independent of lifestyle choices. Switching com- bined oral contraceptives is not effective in treating headaches, nor is the use of multivitamins or diuretics. There are no significant differences among various combined oral contraceptives in terms of breast tenderness, mood changes, and nausea. Breakthrough bleeding is common in the first months of combined oral contraceptive use. If significant abnormal bleeding persists beyond three months, other methods can be considered, and the patient may need to be evaluated for other causes. Studies of adverse sexual effects in women using hormonal contraceptives are inconsistent, and the pharmacologic basis for these symptoms is unclear. If acne develops or worsens with progestin-only contra- ceptives, the patient should be switched to a combination method if she is medically eligible. There is insufficient evidence of any effect of hormonal contraceptives on breast milk quantity and quality. Patient education should be encouraged to decrease the chance of unanticipated adverse effects. Women can also be assessed for medical eligibility before and during the use of hormonal contraceptives.

  3. [Male contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, A

    1984-04-01

    Among the reasons why male hormonal contraception has lagged behind female methods are the necessity of preserving virility, the fact that spermatogenesis is a continuous process, the need to control secondary effects and toxicity, and the requirement that modes of administration be acceptable to both partners. Among currently available reversible mehtods, withdrawal is undoubtedly the most ancient. It is still widespread but cannot be recommended because of its limited effectiveness. The condom is used by about 10% of couples worldwide as a principal or temporary method, but its inter-ference with sensation has limited its acceptance. Condoms are nevertheless highly effective when used with a spermicide. Various androgens are currently under investigation. High doses of testosterone can induce azoospermia without affecting libido but their side effects may be serious. The use of combinations of steroids permits doses to be reduced and offers promise for the future. The combination of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate and percutaneous testosterone is one of the better approaches; the combination is effective and nontoxic but has the disadvantage of percutaneous administration. Gossypol, a pigment extracted from the cotton plant, has been used as a contraceptive in China with a reported efficacy of 99.89%, recovery of fertility within 3 months, and no effect on future fertility. However, its toxicity appears to be significant in the animal and its reversibility is uncertain. A search is on for analogs which would preserve the contraceptive effects while eliminating toxic effects. Several gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs under investigation for their interference with spermatogenesis have given promising results. Several chemicals tested for contraceptive effects have had unacceptably high toxicity. Chinese investigators have reported good results with various physical methods of interfering with sperm production, but their reversibility and innocuity

  4. Emergency Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemzell-Danielsson K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous attempts to control fertility after unprotected sexual intercourse. From very bizarre methods like the vaginal application of Coca Cola to the more serious attempts using calcium antagonists influencing fertility parameters in sperm to hormonal methods or intrauterine devices. So far, hormonal methods preventing or delaying ovulation have proved to be the most popular starting with the combination of ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel, known as the Yuzpe regimen. The first dose had to be taken within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse, a second one 12 hours later. Later on, levonorgestrel alone, at first in a regimen similar to the Yuzpe method (2 × 0.75 mg 12 hours apart showed to be more successful, eventually resulting in the development of a 1.5 mg levonorgestrel pill that combined good efficacy with a high ease of use. It has become the standard method used up to this day in most countries. Since the mid 1970s copper IUDs have been used for emergency contraception, which show a high efficacy. Their disadvantages lie in the fact that emergency contraception is considered an off label use and that they might not be acceptable for every patient. Mifepristone in doses of 10 or 25 mg is being used successfully as an emergency contraceptive in China, but has never received any significant consideration in Western countries. The most recent development is the approval of the selective progesterone receptor modulator ulipristal acetate in the dosage of 30 mg for emergency contraception up to 5 days after unprotected intercourse, combining the safe and easy application of the single dose levonorgestrel pill with an even higher efficacy. Several efficacious and easy to use methods for emergency contraception are available on the market today with the most widely spread being levonorgestrel in a single dose of 1.5 mg (given as one tablet of 1.5 mg or 2 tablets of 0.75 mg each for administration up to 3 days after

  5. HelpDesk answers: do hormonal contraceptives lead to weight gain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Maria; Rani, Saira; Gavagan, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    It depends. Weight doesn't appear to increase with combined oral contraception (OC) compared with nonhormonal contraception, but percent body fat may increase slightly. Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate injection (DMPA) users experience weight gain compared with OC and nonhormonal contraception (NH) users.

  6. Contraceptive Efficacy of Oral and Transdermal Hormones When Co-Administered With Protease Inhibitors in HIV-1–Infected Women: Pharmacokinetic Results of ACTG Trial A5188

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Mary A.; Patterson, Kristine; Kamemoto, Lori; Park, Jeong-Gun; Watts, Heather; Aweeka, Francesca; Klingman, Karin L.; Cohn, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) and transdermally delivered ethinyl estradiol (EE) and norelgestromin (NGMN) are unknown. Methods Using a standard noncompartmental PK analysis, we compared EE area under the time–concentration curve (AUC) and NGMN AUC during transdermal contraceptive patch administration in HIV-1–infected women on stable LPV/r to a control group of women not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In addition, EE AUC after a single dose of a combination oral contraceptive pill including EE and norethindrone was measured before patch placement and was compared with patch EE AUC in both groups. Contraceptive effects on LPV/r PKs were estimated by measuring LPV/r AUC at baseline and during week 3 of patch administration. Results Eight women on LPV/r, and 24 women in the control group were enrolled. Patch EE median AUC0–168 h was 45% lower at 6010.36 pg·h·mL−1 in those on LPV/r versus 10911.42 pg·h·mL−1 in those on no HAART (P = 0.064). Pill EE median AUC0–48 hours was similarly 55% lower at 344.67 pg·h·mL−1 in those on LPV/r versus 765.38 pg·h·mL−1 in those on no HAART (P = 0.003). Patch NGMN AUC0–168 h however, was 138.39 ng·h·mL−1, 83% higher in the LPV/r group compared with the control AUC of 75.63 ng·h·mL−1 (P = 0.036). After 3 weeks on the patch, LPVAUC0–8 h decreased by 19%, (P = 0.156). Conclusions Although PKs of contraceptive EE and NGMN are significantly altered with LPV/r, the contraceptive efficacy of the patch is likely to be maintained. Larger studies are indicated to fully assess contraceptive efficacy versus risks of the transdermal contraceptive patch when co-administered with protease inhibitors. PMID:20842042

  7. Efficacy and safety of an oral contraceptive containing ethinylestradiol 20 µg/drospirenone 3 mg (24/4 regimen in three indications in the People's Republic of China: a comparison with international studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marr J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Joachim Marr,1 Zirong Huang,2 Baoxi Wang,3 Hongyan Zhang,4 Katrin Roth1 1Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany; 2Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, 3Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 4Peking University Sixth Hospital, Peking University Institute of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: While combined oral contraceptives are a popular choice in developed Western countries, they are used by only 1% of women who are married or in a relationship in the People's Republic of China. The purpose of this review is to describe the efficacy and safety of the combined oral contraceptive containing ethinylestradiol (EE 20 µg/drospirenone 3 mg taken in a 24/4 regimen (YAZ®; Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Berlin, Germany by Chinese women and to compare these results with those in women assessed in the international studies. Studies of EE 20 µg/drospirenone 3 mg in three different indications (contraception, acne, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder [PMDD] have been conducted in Chinese women. The results of these three studies indicate that the EE 20 µg/drospirenone 3 mg combined oral contraceptive is a good long-term contraceptive option in Chinese women, providing 99% contraceptive protection over the observed 1-year treatment period, and additionally had a favorable effect on moderate acne vulgaris and relieved the symptoms of PMDD. The contraceptive efficacy, improvement in acne, and relief from PMDD symptoms observed in these studies did not differ from the effects observed in other international studies of EE 20 µg/drospirenone 3 mg, indicating that EE 20 µg/drospirenone 3 mg is as effective in Chinese women as in other ethnicities. Further, EE 20 µg/drospirenone 3 mg demonstrated a similar safety and tolerability profile in women enrolled in the Chinese and international trials, with no unexpected adverse

  8. Oral contraceptives and venous thromboembolic disease. Analyses of the UK General Practice Research Database and the UK Mediplus database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, R D; Lawrenson, R A; Todd, J C; Williams, T J; MacRae, K

    1999-01-01

    The results of three independent studies of venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) and oral contraceptives are reviewed together with two further cohort/case-control studies which we conducted using the MediPlus and General Practice Research Database (GPRD) databases. These latter studies jointly involved 395 cases and uniquely examined the association between VTE and individual combined oral contraceptive (COC) formulations. The two studies yielded very similar results. Crude incidence rates for idiopathic VTE of 4.6 and 3.8 were found per 10,000 exposed woman-years (EWY), in the MediPlus and GPRD studies respectively. Incidence rates increased markedly with age, and in both databases the rates amongst users of levonorgestrel products were lower than those amongst users of desogestrel and gestodene products. A case fatality rate of 3% and a mortality rate of 10 per million EWY were estimated. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated for confounding variables and different COC formulations. Both database studies indicated an excess of current smokers and women with high body mass indices amongst cases. There were significantly more cases with asthma in the GPRD study and cases who had been using their COC for less than a year. No statistically significant differences between COC formulations were found in the analyses where controls were matched to cases by practice and year of birth in both the MediPlus and GPRD studies. In the GPRD study we also ran a study where controls were matched by practice and within 5 year age bands. In this study the OR were consistently higher for the newer or 'third generation' products than when controls were matched by year of birth. However only the acne formulation/OC containing cyproterone acetate and 35 microg ethinyloestradiol yielded a significant OR of 2.3. It may be concluded that improvements in prescribing are paramount as the results strongly indicate that overweight women and those who smoke are at a greater risk of VTE. Further

  9. Contraception in perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Dusitsin, Nikorn

    2003-06-01

    Women in their forties are still potentially fertile, and pregnancy in this age group is attended with increased maternal mortality, spontaneous abortion, fetal anomalies and perinatal mortality. Contraception for women in this age group has special risks and benefits; both should be balanced to choose between the different options available. Recent epidemiological and clinical pharmacology studies have indicated the safety of extending the use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) beyond the age of 35 years and up to menopause. Women who have reasons for avoiding COCs can use progestogen-only contraceptives like pills, depot injectables and implants. Implant combines high efficacy and long-term effect. Both copper-releasing and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine contraceptive device (LNG-IUD) combine the advantages of high efficacy and long-term effect. The reduced fecundity above the age of forty can allow extending the use beyond the accepted term, and up to one or two years beyond the menopause without the need for replacement. The levonorgestrel IUD has the advantage of reducing the amount of menstrual bleeding. The condom has the added benefit of protection against sexual transmitted diseases (STDs). Male or female sterilization is an excellent contraceptive option, provided that this approach is culturally acceptable and available at reasonable cost and low risk.

  10. [Prolactin and thyrotropin after stimulation by thyrotropin releasing hormone a study under long-term administration of oral contraceptives (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmann, O; Bröschen-Zywietz, C; Fichte, K

    1978-02-22

    The longtime application of oral contraceptives is assumed to elevate serum prolactin levels under non-stimulated conditions. We therefore examined whether oral contraceptives also will augment prolactin secretion after stimulation, e.g. by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). After TRH stimulation the time sequence of secretion both of prolactin (HPRL) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was determined. Three groups of women were tested in a non-randomized study: group 1 without any hormonal medication (= controls), group 2 taking an oral contraceptives containing cyproterone acetate, group 3 using an oral contraceptive containing d-norgestrel. HPRL secretion was similar in all three groups, the same held true for TSH. A possible correlation between the secretion of HPRL and TSH was examined in the control group. No such correlation was found. The secretion patterns of both hormones also were different. In addition, the basic levels of both HPRL and TSH did not seem to influence the response after stimulation.

  11. Ovarian cancer and oral contraceptives: collaborative reanalysis of data from 45 epidemiological studies including 23,257 women with ovarian cancer and 87,303 controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancer, Collaborative Group on Epidemiological Studies of Ovarian; Beral, V.; Doll, R.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral contraceptives were introduced almost 50 years ago, and over 100 million women currently use them. Oral contraceptives can reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, but the eventual public-health effects of this reduction will depend on how long the protection lasts after use ceases. We...... aimed to assess these effects. METHODS: Individual data for 23,257 women with ovarian cancer (cases) and 87,303 without ovarian cancer (controls) from 45 epidemiological studies in 21 countries were checked and analysed centrally. The relative risk of ovarian cancer in relation to oral contraceptive use...... was estimated, stratifying by study, age, parity, and hysterectomy. FINDINGS: Overall 7308 (31%) cases and 32,717 (37%) controls had ever used oral contraceptives, for average durations among users of 4.4 and 5.0 years, respectively. The median year of cancer diagnosis was 1993, when cases were aged an average...

  12. The state of hormonal contraception today: established and emerging noncontraceptive health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Karla; Westhoff, Carolyn

    2011-10-01

    In the 50 years since the advent of combined oral contraceptives the amount of estrogen in oral contraceptives dropped from over 100 mcg to less than 30 mcg. Many noncontraceptive health benefits have emerged that decrease mortality and improve quality of life. Some of the immediate benefits include improvement of menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea, reduction in premenstrual dysphoric disorder symptoms, and decreased acne. As an effective birth control method oral contraceptives also decrease pregnancy-related deaths by preventing pregnancy. After the reproductive years, previous use of oral contraceptives continues to be beneficial, reducing the risk of death from ovarian and endometrial cancer. All these benefits have held up over time whereas cardiovascular risks have lessened because of the decrease in oral contraceptive pill dosage. Decreased ovarian cyst formation is an example of benefit with higher-dose oral contraceptive formulations that no longer holds true with low-dose pills. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adherence to the oral contraceptive pill: a cross-sectional survey of modifiable behavioural determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molloy Gerard J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor adherence to the oral contraceptive pill (OCP is reported as one of the main causes of unintended pregnancy in women that rely on this form of contraception. This study aims to estimate the associations between a range of well-established modifiable psychological factors and adherence to OCP. Method A cross-sectional survey of 130 female University students currently using OCP (Mean age: 20.46 SD: 3.01, range 17–36 was conducted. An OCP specific Medication Adherence Report Scale was used to assess non-adherence. Psychological predictor measures included necessity and concern beliefs about OCP, intentions, perceived behavioural control (pbc, anticipated regret and action and coping planning. Multiple linear regression was used to analyse the data. Results Fifty-two per cent of participants reported missing their OCP once or more per month and 14% twice or more per month. In bivariate analysis intentions (r = −0.25, perceived behavioural control (r= −0.66, anticipated regret (r=0.20, concerns about OCP (r =0.31, and action (r= −0.25 and coping (r= −0.28 planning were all significantly associated with adherence to OCP in the predicted direction. In a multivariate model almost half (48% of the variation in OCP adherence could be explained. The strongest and only statistically significant predictors in this model were perceived behavioural control (β=−0.62, p Conclusion The present data point to a number of key modifiable psychological determinants of OCP use. Future work will establish whether changing these variables results in better adherence to the OCP.

  14. Emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Look, P F; von Hertzen, H

    1993-01-01

    The term 'emergency contraception', as employed in this paper, refers to methods that are used as emergency procedures to prevent pregnancy following unprotected intercourse. Alternative, less appropriate, terms are postcoital and 'morning-after' contraception. References to postcoital preparations can be found as far back as 1500 BC in Egyptian papyri, but it was not until fairly recently that contraceptive research has been able to at least partially fulfill that need. The development of hormonal methods of emergency contraception goes back to the 1960s when the first human trials of postcoitally administered high-dose oestrogens were undertaken. Combined oestrogen- progestogen combination therapy (the so-called Yuzpe regimen) was introduced in the early 1970s, while the postcoital insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) for emergency contraception was first reported in 1976. Other compounds that have been tested more recently include levonorgestrel, the antiprogestogen mifepristone, and danazol. Although there is some debate about the magnitude of the protective effect, few people question the important role that emergency contraception can play in preventing unwanted pregnancy and hence maternal mortality and morbidity resulting from unsafe abortion. Given that the most often used methods of emergency contraception, namely the Yuzpe regimen and postcoital insertion of an IUD, rely on technology that has been available for some 30 years, family planning programmes that claim to be concerned with improving women's reproductive health, cannot really be excused if they do not provide emergency contraception as part of their routine services.

  15. An overview of four studies of a continuous oral contraceptive (levonorgestrel 90 mcg/ethinyl estradiol 20 mcg) on premenstrual dysphoric disorder and premenstrual syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freeman, Ellen W; Halbreich, Uriel; Grubb, Gary S

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of four studies that evaluated a continuous oral contraceptive (OC) containing levonorgestrel (90 mcg) and ethinyl estradiol (20 mcg; LNG/EE) for managing premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS).......This article presents an overview of four studies that evaluated a continuous oral contraceptive (OC) containing levonorgestrel (90 mcg) and ethinyl estradiol (20 mcg; LNG/EE) for managing premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS)....

  16. Adolescent contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A L

    1996-12-01

    By age 19, the average North American man has had sex with 5.11 people. Almost two thirds of high-school senior-aged women have had sex. While the rates of sexual activity among teens in the US are not substantially different from rates in other developed western countries, adolescent pregnancy rates in the US are several times higher than in most other countries. These high rates of adolescent pregnancy are partly due to the collective reluctance among adults in the US to discuss sexuality issues with adolescents and provide them with contraception. Effective communication is the key to providing contraception to teens. Studies have clearly shown that teens are interested in sexuality and would like to discuss the issue with their physicians. The author notes that any successful program to reduce unwanted pregnancies among teens will understand that teens are often concrete thinkers focused upon their physical appearance and dedicated to taking risks. Oral contraception, long-acting progestin methods, condoms, and other options are discussed. However, emergency contraception with birth control pills is the one most important contraceptive option which can be provided to teens. The approach has recently been approved by the FDA Advisory Board for both safety and efficacy. Recent studies, however, show that less than 10% of US clinicians informed their patients of the availability of emergency contraception. Information on providers of emergency contraception can be obtained by dialing Princeton University's Office of Population Research's toll-free emergency contraception hotline at (800) 584-9911.

  17. A case-series study of cerebral venous thrombosis in women using short course oralcontraceptive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Khomand

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report a case series of cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT in women who used oral contraceptive pill (OCP in the Muslims Ramadan and fasting month.Methods: This study was a retrospective case series of 9 patients with diagnosis of CVT, who admitted in the neurology ward of Tohid Hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, in July-August 2014-2015.Results: Patients had no history of thrombosis before. They were treated with oral contraceptive more than 1 month to be able to fast during Ramadan. They did not have other possible risk factors for CVT. A headache was the most common in 9/9 patients (100% followed by vomiting and vertigo.Conclusion: We found that high rate of CVT in female population during Ramadan indicates that it needs be considered as a specific risk factor and should be considered by healthcare system.

  18. [Contraception in perimenopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merki-Feld, G S

    2000-10-01

    Perimenopausal women are still potentially fertile and pregnancy is attended with increased maternal and perinatal mortality. Several contraceptive methods can be used therapeutic for the treatment of climacteric symptoms like menstrual irregularities, flushes and vaginal dryness. Low-dose oral contraceptives (OC) prevent climacteric symptoms and additionally protect from perimenopausal bone loss. However, the individual cardiovascular risk increases with age and is even higher in perimenopausal women using OCs. Therefore for women with cardiovascular risk factors sterilization, barrier methods, progestin-only methods and intrauterine devices (IUD) are the better choice. Prolonged and heavy menses can be treated with the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD or injectable progestogens. If estrogen replacement is necessary, a low-dose treatment with natural estrogens can be combined with barrier methods, the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD and injectable progestogens. The variety of contraceptive options available to perimenopausal women allows individual counseling and thus may enhance compliance.

  19. Extended-cycle oral contraceptive pills with 10 microg ethinyl estradiol pills in place of placebo pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Anita L

    2007-09-01

    The elimination of monthly withdrawal bleeding with use of extended-cycle (84 pills) monophasic birth-control pills has modernized oral contraceptives. The use of ethinyl estradiol 10 microg pills in place of the seven placebo pills addresses the problems posed by 21/7 formulations of low-dose birth-control pills, which allow early stimulation of ovarian follicles, and of the early 84/7 formulations, which had higher rates of unscheduled bleeding and spotting.

  20. Plasma factor VII-activating protease is increased by oral contraceptives and induces factor VII activation in-vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Skouby, Sven O.; Kluft, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) use influences the hemostatic system significantly and is a risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) has potential effects on hemostasis. The 1601GA genotype of the 1601G/A polymorphism in the FSAP gene expresses a FSAP...... alloenzyme with reduced pro-fibrinolytic activity. Presently, we address whether OC use and OC formulation affect FSAP measures in human blood. Healthy women (n=588) were allocated to six cycles of OCs with estrogen contents of 20μg (n=158), 30μg (n=284), 35μg (n=79) or 50μg (n=67) combined with various...... progestins. FSAP genotypes, FSAP and factor VII (FVII) plasma measures were assessed at baseline and after 6 cycles of OC. The 1601GA genotype was present in 49 (8.3%) of the women and was associated with significantly reduced levels of FSAP (P≤0.001). OC use increased FSAP antigen by 25% and FSAP activity...

  1. Emergency contraception in Wisconsin: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Laura; Schrager, Sarina

    2006-07-01

    Emergency contraception is used to prevent pregnancy in the event of unprotected sexual intercourse. The most common methods of emergency contraception are combination and progestin-only oral contraceptive pills. They are effective, safe, and have few side effects. Most physicians are aware of emergency contraception, yet it is not widely prescribed or used. The American Medical Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend providing information and access to emergency contraceptive pills at routine gynecologic visits. Evidence has shown that women provided with advance supplies of emergency contraceptive pills were more likely to use them. There is no evidence of increased sexual risk-taking behavior or reduction in use of regular birth control methods. It is estimated that with wider use of emergency contraceptive, nearly half of unplanned pregnancies and abortions could be prevented. Access and knowledge of emergency contraception are the biggest barriers to use. Many emergency departments in Wisconsin do not prescribe emergency contraception, making access for women in rural areas difficult. By increasing use of emergency contraceptive pills by improving access and improving patient knowledge, unplanned pregnancies and abortions may be reduced.

  2. An open-label, two-period comparative study on pharmacokinetics and safety of a combined ethinylestradiol/gestodene transdermal contraceptive patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chao Zhang,1 Haiyan Li,2 Xin Xiong,1 Suodi Zhai,1 Yudong Wei,2 Shuang Zhang,2 Yuanyuan Zhang,1 Lin Xu,2 Li Liu1 1Department of Pharmacy, 2Institute of Clinical Trial, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: We investigated the pharmacokinetics and safety profiles of a newly developed combined ethinylestradiol (EE/gestodene (GSD transdermal contraceptive patch after a single-dose administration and compared with the market available tablet formulation in healthy adult subjects. An open-label, two-period comparative study was conducted in 12 healthy women volunteers. A single dose of the study combined EE/GE transdermal contraceptive patch and oral tablet (Milunet® were administered. Blood samples at different time points after dose were collected, and concentrations were analyzed. A reliable, highly sensitive and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS assay method was developed in this study to determine the plasma concentrations of EE and GSD. Compared to the tablet, the study patch had a significantly decreased maximum plasma concentration (Cmax, extended time to reach the Cmax and half-life, as well as increased clearance and apparent volume of distribution. The half-lives of EE and GSD of the patch were 3.3 and 2.2 times, respectively, than the half-life of the tablet. The areas under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUCs of EE and GSD of the patch were 8.0 and 16.2 times, respectively, than the AUC of the tablet. No severe adverse event was observed during the whole study, and the general safety was acceptable. In conclusion, compared to the oral tablet Milunet, the study contraceptive patch was well tolerated and showed potent drug exposure, significant extended half-life and stable drug concentrations. Keywords: pharmacokinetics, safety, ethinylestradiol/gestodene, transdermal contraceptive patch

  3. Salivary SIgA responses to acute moderate-vigorous exercise in monophasic oral contraceptive users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Harumi; Dolan, Nicola J; Hounsome, Charlotte; Alajmi, Nawal; Bishop, Nicolette C

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of oral contraceptive (OC) use on salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) levels at rest and in response to an acute bout of moderate-vigorous exercise during 2 phases of the 4-week OC cycle corresponding to different phases of the synthetic menstrual cycle. Ten healthy active females completed a cycling at 70% peak oxygen uptake for 45 min at 2 time points of an OC cycle: during the equivalent in time to the mid-follicular phase (day 8 ± 2) and the mid-luteal phase (day 20 ± 2). Timed unstimulated saliva samples were obtained before, immediately postexercise, and 1 h postexercise and analyzed for salivary SIgA. Salivary SIgA secretion rate was 26% (95% confidence limits (CI) 6-46) lower at postexercise compared with pre-exercise during the synthetic follicular phase (p = 0.019) but no differences were observed during the synthetic luteal trial. Saliva flow rate was 11% (95% CI, 8-30) lower at postexercise compared with pre-exercise (main effect for time; p = 0.025). In conclusion, the pattern of salivary SIgA secretion rate response to moderate-vigorous exercise varies across the early and late phases of a monophasic OC cycle, with a transient reduction in salivary SIgA responses during the synthetic follicular phase. These findings indicate that monophasic OC use should be considered when assessing mucosal immune responses to acute exercise.

  4. Oral contraceptive usage alters the effects of cortisol on implicit fear learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Christian Josef; Tabbert, Katharina; Schweckendiek, Jan; Klucken, Tim; Vaitl, Dieter; Stark, Rudolf; Wolf, Oliver Tobias

    2012-09-01

    An important feature of the human defense system comprises fear learning, which stress hormones can crucially modulate. However, stress hormones might influence men and women differently, in part because of interactions with sex hormones. In women, distinct stages of the menstrual cycle or the intake of oral contraceptives (OC) affect sex hormone levels. In this study, we used a differential fear conditioning paradigm with electrical stimulation as unconditioned stimulus (UCS) following one neutral stimulus (conditioned stimulus, CS+), but not another (CS-).To investigate implicit fear learning, participants were distracted from detecting the contingencies between CS and UCS. To address interaction effects of sex and stress hormones, 32 men, 30 women in the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (FO), 30 women in the luteal phase (LU), and 30 OC women received either 30 mg cortisol or a placebo. In the contrast CS+ minus CS-, an interaction between cortisol administration and sex hormone status emerged in the anterior parahippocampal gyrus and the hippocampus. Cortisol reduced fear learning in men, FO, and LU women, but enhanced it in OC women. Additionally, cortisol attenuated differential amygdala activation in the entire group. These results demonstrate that OC usage substantially modifies cortisol effects on emotional learning in women, particularly in memory-related medial temporal lobe regions. Further, a high dose of cortisol reduces amygdala differentiation pointing to a lowered learning ability of the defense system under high cortisol concentrations, irrespective of current sex hormone availability.

  5. Thrombin generation during collection of blood from donors taking oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjønsberg, O H; Kierulf, P; Engebretsen, L F; Gjønnes, G; Godal, H C

    1987-01-01

    Thrombin generation, as evidenced by plasma fibrinopeptide A (FPA) concentrations, was studied during blood collection from donors taking oral contraceptives (OC). 450 ml blood were drawn into Fenwal PVC bags from 26 OC users and 28 nonusers. Blood samples for determination of FPA, beta-thromboglobulin (BTG), thrombotest (TT), prekallikrein (PKK), antithrombin-III (AT-III) and factor VIII procoagulant activity (FVIII:C) were drawn from the bags immediately after ending blood donation and following storage for 24 h at 4 degrees C. The FPA concentrations following donation were significantly higher in the OC than in the control group (p less than 0.05). The levels of PKK were also higher in blood obtained from OC users (p less than 0.001), as was the FVIII:C level, the latter difference, however, was not significant (p = 0.06). No cold-promoted activation of factor VII, as evidenced from TT, was detected following storage at 4 degrees C, neither was any change observed in the FPA, PKK and AT-III levels. The BTG concentrations increased significantly during storage, most pronounced in the control group (p less than 0.05). The decay of FVIII:C was similar in the two groups, averaging 24.7%. No correlation was observed between the FPA levels and the other parameters determined. We conclude that thrombin generation is more pronounced during routine blood collection from donors taking OC.

  6. Thrombotic microangiopathy caused by oral contraceptives in a kidney transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Hiroyuki; Yashima, Jun; Tojimbara, Tamotsu; Honda, Kazuho

    2016-07-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) after kidney transplantation has various aetiologies, including acute antibody-mediated rejection, bacterial or viral infection and immunosuppressive drugs, particularly calcineurin inhibitors. We present the case of a 28-year-old woman who developed TMA 30 months after the transplantation of an ABO-incompatible kidney from a living unrelated donor. The patient developed a sudden onset of allograft renal dysfunction and became uremic. She was transferred to our institution from a community hospital with strongly suspected acute allograft rejection. Intensive treatments for both T- and B-cell mediated acute rejection, including steroid pulse therapy, double-filtration plasmapheresis, antithymocyte globulin (1.5 mg/kg × 14 days) and rituximab (100 mg), were initiated during haemodialysis. However, her renal allograft function did not improve. Histopathological analysis 8 days after the treatment indicated TMA, despite the absence of apparent acute T-cell- or acute antibody-mediated rejection. There were no symptoms of infectious diseases, such as intestinal haemorrhagic colitis or viral infection. We concluded that the use of oral contraceptives, which had been initiated 3 weeks before TMA onset for the treatment of irregular vaginal bleeding, was the aetiologic agent.

  7. Is the oral contraceptive or hormone replacement therapy a risk factor for cholelithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siqi; Wang, Yuqiong; Xu, Jinming; Chen, Yuxin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Association between exogenous estrogen intake and cholelithiasis risk has been reported in several epidemiological studies, including oral contraceptive (OC) and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), while the results were controversial. This study aimed to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis of this issue. Methods: PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane library database were searched up to October 2016. Two reviewers independently extracted data from eligible studies, relative risks (RRs), and/or odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the highest versus lowest categories of intake were adopted. Either a fixed- or a random-effects model was adopted to estimate overall RRs or ORs. Besides, subgroup and publication bias analyses were applied to explain the heterogeneity. An original study was also conducted to verify our conclusion. Results: A total of 19 studies with approximately 556,620 participants were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled RR of cholelithiasis for the highest versus the lowest categories was 1.59 (95% CI: 1.44–1.75), indicating that exogenous estrogen was positive associated with the intake of exogenous estrogen. However, the pooled RR of OC intake and cholelithiasis risk was 1.19 (95% CI: 0.97–1.45), and the RR for HRT was 1.79 (95% CI: 1.61–2.00). Conclusion: The HRT was positively associated with the cholelithiasis risk, and the OC will not increase the risk of cholelithiasis. PMID:28383429

  8. Do different brands of oral contraceptives differ in their effects on cardiovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, D

    1997-05-01

    In response to unpublished data revealing a doubling of venous thromboembolism risk with oral contraceptives (OCs) containing desogestrel or gestodene compared with levonorgestrel, the UK Committee on Safety of Medicines advised physicians that women taking these third-generation OCs should be switched to another formulation. There are indications, however, that the studies on which this recommendation was based were flawed by prescriber bias and confounding. In addition, laboratory measures of thrombosis and fibrinolysis do not indicate a shift toward a thrombotic state associated with the newer progestogens. Moreover, desogestrel and gestodene OCs have been associated with a reduced risk of arterial disease when compared to levonorgestrel-containing OCs. Since the mortality associated with acute myocardial infarction is almost 50%, compared with 1-2% for venous thromboembolism, this information should be considered when counseling OC users about their risk of cardiovascular disease. Although the European Union Committee on Proprietary Medicinal Products has taken the position that all OCs are contraindicated in women with current or past cardiovascular disease, unlike the UK Committee, it has not made any specific recommendations about the suitability or non-suitability of the third-generation OCs.

  9. Feasibility study of the use of a daily electronic mail reminder to improve oral contraceptive compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Michelle C; Creinin, Mitchell D; Murthy, Amitasrigowri S; Harwood, Bryna; Reid, Lynn M

    2003-11-01

    Women who ingest their oral contraceptive pill (OCP) as part of a daily routine are more likely use their OCPs correctly. This trial examines the feasibility of an electronic-mail (e-mail) reminder system to improve OCP compliance. An e-mail reminder was sent to 50 new OCP users daily for 3 months. Subjects sent an e-mail reply to confirm receipt. OCP compliance was recorded on diaries. Four subjects were discontinued for not checking their e-mail. Active participants missed a median of 18% of the e-mail reminders (range: 0-65%). A follow-up visit was scheduled after completion of three OCP cycles. Of the 40 subjects returning completed diaries, 50% missed no active pills at all and 20% missed at least one in each cycle. Most found the daily e-mail somewhat (65%) or very helpful (19%) for OCP compliance. Of those continuing OCPs, 64% wanted to continue receiving e-mail reminders at the completion of the study. Because inconsistent OCP use is a significant cause of unplanned conception, the use of e-mail to improve OCP compliance has the potential to decrease unintended pregnancies.

  10. Early History of Oral Contraceptive Pill in Finland: The Diffusion of the New Contraceptive and Fertility Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Pasila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The 1960s is often characterized as a decade of outstanding social and demographic changes in Western societies. The introduction of the contraceptive pill is assumed to have contributed to these changes. Yet the social as well as the demographic significance of the pill is ambiguous. This article has two aims: 1 to describe the early history of the pill in Finland in the 1960s and in the early 1970s and 2 to explore relationships between fertility and the pill. Surveys, pharmaceutical market data, and estimations are used to depict the diffusion of the pill. Based on calculated user percentages, the pill was adopted neither instantly nor extremely widely in Finland during the period under study. The results show that the diffusion coincided with fertility decline and other changes in fertility patterns. However, a causal connection of any kind cannot be established due to a lack of sufficient data.

  11. [Chlamydia trachomatis infection in women and the use of oral contraceptives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Voorst Vader, P C; Lier, J G; Posma, A L; Schröder, F P; Schirm, J; Kauer, F M

    1991-02-23

    We determined the prevalence of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection in women who visited a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and the influence of the number of partners and the use of oral contraceptives (OC), with special attention to the recognition of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and to the results of therapy. Of 217 women, with a mean age of 26 years (range 14-56), who visited the STD clinic of the University Hospital of Groningen from July 1985 until November 1987, anamnestic data were collected as well as the results of swabs from cervix and urethra taken for culture and direct immunofluorescence test of C. trachomatis and for gonococcal culture. The influence of the number of partners (1 versus greater than 1) and OC on the prevalence of C. trachomatis infection was evaluated by logistic regression analysis. PID was excluded in coöperation with the department of gynaecology. C. trachomatis-infected women were treated by doxycycline orally (day 1 2 x 100 mg, day 2-7 1 x 100 mg) according to the dosage scheme advised by the Dutch Health Council in 1986. A control culture was taken 2-3 weeks after treatment. C. trachomatis was detected in 72/217 (33%) women by culture and (or) direct IF test and in 22/41 (54%) women with gonorrhoea. In connection with the number of partners in the year preceding the examination, the following prevalences were found: 18/74 (24%) (1 partner), 43/108 (40%) (2-5 partners) and 10/27 (greater than 5 partners).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. 产后口服避孕药对内分泌的影响%The effect of oral contraceptive after parturition on endocrine system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆品红; 刘嘉茵

    2012-01-01

    为评估口服避孕药对产妇内分泌的影响,我们对一些相关文献进行了综述.多数研究认为单孕激素类口服避孕药(oral contraceptive,OC)对泌乳没有影响,而复合型避孕药(combination-type oral contraceptive,COC)可能会减少泌乳量或者缩短泌乳时间;大部分研究提示OC对婴儿的生长发育没有影响,而有些数据表明OC影响婴儿发育;对于何时开始使用OC的时间存在争议.故我们认为目前有限的临床资料不足以证明OC对泌乳持续时间和婴儿健康有无影响,世界卫生组织(World Health Organization,WHO)和美国妇产科医师学会(American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists,ACOG)推荐最早产后6周才能开始使用雌孕激素复合型避孕药.

  13. Effects of the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive coverage requirement on the utilization and out-of-pocket costs of prescribed oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Hyo; Look, Kevin A

    2017-06-17

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandated that private health insurance plans cover prescribed contraceptive services for women, including oral contraceptives (OCs), without charging a patient any cost-sharing beginning in August 2012. To evaluate the effects of the ACA's contraceptive coverage requirement on the utilization and out-of-pocket costs of prescribed OCs after two years of implementation. A retrospective, cross-sectional study was designed using data from the 2010 to 2014 waves of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The sample consisted of reproductive-aged women who have either private health insurance or Medicaid. Utilization of OCs was evaluated using 1) the proportion of women who purchased any OCs and 2) the mean annual number of cycles prescribed per woman. Out-of-pocket costs for OCs were evaluated using 1) the proportion of women who had any OC purchase with $0 out-of-pocket costs, 2) the mean annual out-of-pocket costs per woman, and 3) the mean out-of-pocket costs per cycle. Descriptive analyses and a difference-in-difference linear regression approach were used. No substantial changes were seen in the utilization of OCs after the ACA requirement became effective. The difference-in-difference regression showed that the proportion of women who had any OC purchase with $0 out-of-pocket costs increased significantly by 54.0 percentage points after the ACA requirement in the private insurance group relative to the Medicaid group. Mean annual out-of-pocket costs in the private insurance group dropped by 37% in the first year and an additional 52% decrease was found in the second year of the policy. Mean out-of-pocket costs per cycle also decreased substantially in the private insurance group by 39% in the first year and an additional decrease of 44% was seen in the second year. The ACA's contraceptive coverage requirement markedly reduced out-of-pocket costs of prescribed OCs for women with private health insurance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  14. The mechanism of action of hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, R; Yacobson, I; Grimes, D

    1999-11-01

    Modern hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices have multiple biologic effects. Some of them may be the primary mechanism of contraceptive action, whereas others are secondary. For combined oral contraceptives and progestin-only methods, the main mechanisms are ovulation inhibition and changes in the cervical mucus that inhibit sperm penetration. The hormonal methods, particularly the low-dose progestin-only products and emergency contraceptive pills, have effects on the endometrium that, theoretically, could affect implantation. However, no scientific evidence indicates that prevention of implantation actually results from the use of these methods. Once pregnancy begins, none of these methods has an abortifacient action. The precise mechanism of intrauterine contraceptive devices is unclear. Current evidence indicates they exert their primary effect before fertilization, reducing the opportunity of sperm to fertilize an ovum.

  15. Biotransformation of oral contraceptive ethynodiol diacetate with microbial and plant cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Salman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biotransformation by using microbial and plant cell cultures has been applied effectively for the production of fine chemicals on large scale. Inspired by the wealth of literature available on the biotransformation of steroids, we decided to investigate the biotransformation of ethynodiol diacetate (1 by using plant and microbial cultures. Results The biotransformation of ethynodiol diacetate (1 with Cunninghamella elegans and plant cell suspension cultures of Ocimum basilicum and Azadirachta indica is being reported here for the first time. Biotransformation of 1 with Cunninghamella elegans yielded three new hydroxylated compounds, characterized as 17α-ethynylestr-4-en-3β,17β-diacetoxy-6α-ol (2, 17α-ethynylestr-4-en-3β,17β-diacetoxy-6β-ol (3, and 17α-ethynylestr-4-en-3β,17β-diacetoxy-10β-ol (4 and a known metabolite, 17α-ethynyl-17β-acetoxyestr-4-en-3-one (5. The biotransformation of 1 with Ocimum basilicum included hydrolysis of the ester group, oxidation of alcohol into ketone, and rearrangement of the hydroxyl group. Thus four major known metabolites were characterized as 17α-ethynyl-17β-acetoxyestr-4-en-3-one (5, 17α-ethynyl-17β-hydroxyestr-4-en-3-one (6, 17α-ethynyl-3 β-hydroxy-17β-acetoxyestr-4-ene (7 and 17α-ethynyl-5α,17β-dihydroxyestr-3-ene (8. Biotransformation of 1 with Azadirachta indica culture yielded compounds 5 and 6. Spectroscopic data of compound 8 is being reported for the first time. Structure of compound 6 was unambiguously deduced through single-crystal x-ray diffraction studies. Conclusion Biotransformation of an oral contraceptive, ethynodiol diacetate (1, by using microbial and plant cell cultures provides an efficient route to the synthesis of a library of new steroids with potential contraceptive properties. These methods can be employed in the production of such compounds with high stereoselectivity.

  16. Current challenges in contraception in adolescents and young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Ariana

    2013-03-01

    Although developing countries have made much progress in expanding the availability and use of family planning services, the need for effective contraception is large, and growing because the largest cohorts in human history are entering their reproductive years. Not only regarding developing countries but also in developed countries, where the usual contraceptive methods, such as the oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices (IUDs) and condoms, have been available for decades, there have been many new advances in contraceptive technology in the last several years. New formulations of oral contraceptives, extended and continuous use of oral contraceptives and long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) may have a wider role in contraception and their increased implementation could help to reduce unintended pregnancy. Today's oral contraceptive regimens are safer and more tolerable, with equal or improved efficacy as compared to early formulations. Incremental decreases in the estrogen dosage have helped to alleviate some of the unwanted estrogenic side effects of combined hormonal contraceptives. Progestogens have also been controversial in connection with findings of increased venous thromboembolism risks but they have evolved over time, and, in general, newer generations of progestins have minimal side effects. Currently available 'LARC' methods, such as IUDs, the intrauterine system, injectable contraceptives and implants require administration less than once per cycle or month. They are more cost effective than the combined oral contraceptive pill even at 1 year of use. Increasing the access and availability of new formulations of oral contraceptives and LARC methods will reduce the number of unintended pregnancies. Evidence-based guidelines about the safety of contraceptive methods among women with comorbid medical conditions can help guide providers in determining the best method of contraception for each woman, depending on whether they are in their

  17. Immediate start of hormonal contraceptives for contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Laureen M; Newmann, Sara J; Grimes, David A; Nanda, Kavita; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2012-12-12

    Health care providers often tell women to wait until the next menses to begin hormonal contraception. The intent is to avoid contraceptive use during an undetected pregnancy. An alternative is to start hormonal contraception immediately with back-up birth control for the first seven days. Immediate initiation was introduced with combined oral contraceptives (COCs), and has expanded to other hormonal contraceptives. At the time of the initial review, how immediate start compared to conventional menses-dependent start was unclear regarding effectiveness, continuation, and acceptability. The immediate-start approach may improve women's access to, and continuation of, hormonal contraception. This review examined randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of immediate-start hormonal contraception for differences in effectiveness, continuation, and acceptability. In August 2012, we searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, POPLINE, LILACS, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP for trials of immediate-start hormonal contraceptives. We contacted researchers to find other studies. Earlier searches also included EMBASE. We included RCTs that compared immediate start to conventional start of hormonal contraception. Also included were trials that compared immediate start of different hormonal contraceptive methods with each other. Data were abstracted by two authors and entered into RevMan. The Peto odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Five studies were included. No new eligible studies have been found since the review was initially conducted. Method discontinuation was similar between groups in all trials. Bleeding patterns and side effects were similar in trials that compared immediate with conventional start. In a study of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), immediate start of DMPA showed fewer pregnancies than a 'bridge' method before DMPA (OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.84). Further, more women in the immediate-DMPA group were very satisfied versus those with a 'bridge

  18. The 1998 Canadian Contraception Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A.; Boroditsky, Richard; Bridges, Martha L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the 1998 Canadian Contraception Study, a mailed survey which asked women about contraceptive practices past, present, and future (including use of oral contraceptives, condoms, and sterilization); familiarity with and opinion about different contraception methods; and general sexual and reproductive health. The paper also examines…

  19. Review of newer contraceptive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, M; Attaran, M

    1999-06-01

    Advances in contraceptive technology have made birth control more effective, convenient, and safe. We review the newer products and some under development, including the latest oral contraceptives, injectable progesterone, subdermal progestin implants, progesterone-releasing IUDs, emergency contraception, and male contraception.

  20. Inappropriate use of combined hormonal contraceptives for birth control among women of reproductive age in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingbo; Hu, X Henry

    2013-07-01

    To describe the extent of inappropriate use of combined hormonal contraceptives (CHC) according to the United States Medical Eligibility Criteria (U.S. MEC). We analyzed Kantar Health's 2010 U.S. National Health and Wellness Survey data, which is an annual population-based survey of 75,000 U.S. adults via internet. A stratified random sampling framework was used to construct a sample that reflects the U.S. census by age, gender, and ethnicity. The analysis included nonpregnant females aged 18-44 years who used CHC, including oral, patch, or vaginal rings in the past 6 months. Women classified into category 3 (theoretical or proven risks usually outweigh the advantages of using the method) or 4 (unacceptable health risk) according to the U.S. MEC were defined as having high-risk conditions, or inappropriate CHC use. The proportions of women who had inappropriate CHC use were then projected to the U.S. population by diseases/conditions and demographic characteristics incorporating sampling weights. We identified 2963 adult females of reproductive age (mean 29.3±6.0) (i.e., 20.4% of all adult females of reproductive age in the database) as being CHC users. Among them, 23.7% (95% CI: 22.8%-24.5%) had at least one high-risk condition and 9.3% (95% CI: 9.2%-9.4%) had at least one condition of unacceptable risk. The three most common high-risk conditions were migraine (12.7%), multiple risk factors for arterial cardiovascular disease (9.3%), and hypertension (6.1%). Women with relatively higher proportions of inappropriate CHC use were age ≥35, not finished college, and Medicaid recipients. A large portion of women used CHC inappropriately. Hormone-free and progestin-only contraceptives are available options with potentially less risk for them.

  1. A comparison of cycle control, efficacy, and side effects among healthy Thai women between two low-dose oral contraceptives containing 20 microg ethinylestradio1/75 microg gestodene (Meliane) and 30 microg ethinylestradio1/75 microg gestodene (Gynera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneepanichskul, S; Kriengsinyot, R; Jaisamrarn, U

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cycle control, efficacy and side effects of an oral contraceptive containing 20 microg ethinylestradiol and 75 microg gestodene, with a reference preparation containing 30 microg ethinylestradiol combined with 75 microg gestodene. From the study, it was demonstrated that the two regimens had no difference in cycle control, efficacy, and side effects. The occurrence of spotting and breakthrough bleeding was low and was not different between these two preparations. The most common adverse events in both treatment groups were nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and chloasma. There were no statistically significant change in body weight and blood pressure in both groups at the end of study. It is concluded that both preparations are good cycle control, reliable and low side effects oral contraceptives.

  2. Oral contraceptives and survival in breast cancer patients aged 20 to 54 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivers, Katrina F; Gammon, Marilie D; Abrahamson, Page E; Lund, Mary Jo; Flagg, Elaine W; Moorman, Patricia G; Kaufman, Jay S; Cai, Jianwen; Porter, Peggy L; Brinton, Louise A; Eley, J William; Coates, Ralph J

    2007-09-01

    Recent oral contraceptive (OC) use is associated with modestly higher breast cancer incidence among younger women, but its impact on survival is unclear. This study examined the relationship between OC use before breast cancer diagnosis and survival. A population-based sample of 1,264 women aged 20 to 54 years with a first primary invasive breast cancer during 1990 to 1992 were followed up for 8 to 10 years. OC and covariate data were obtained by interviews conducted shortly after diagnosis and from medial records. All-cause mortality was ascertained through the National Death Index (n = 292 deaths). Age- and income-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by Cox regression methods. All-cause mortality was not associated with ever use of OCs or duration of use. Compared with nonusers, mortality estimates were elevated among women who were using OCs at diagnosis or stopped use in the previous year (HR, 1.57; 95% CI, 0.95-2.61). The HR for use of high-dose estrogen pills within 5 years before diagnosis was double that of nonusers (HR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.29-4.41) or, if the most recent pill included the progestin levonorgestrel, compared with nonusers (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.03-3.91). Because subgroup estimates were based on small numbers of OC users, these results should be cautiously interpreted. Overall, most aspects of OC use did not seem to influence survival, although there is limited evidence that OC use just before diagnosis, particularly use of some pill types, may negatively impact survival in breast cancer patients aged 20 to 54 years.

  3. Breast cancer and specific types of oral contraceptives: a large Norwegian cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumeaux, Vanessa; Alsaker, Elin; Lund, Eiliv

    2003-07-20

    The aim of our study was to examine the risk of breast cancer according to specific types of estrogens and progestagens in oral contraceptives (OCs) based on the prospective Norwegian Women and Cancer study (NOWAC). Between 1991-97 women aged 30-70 years were drawn at random from the central person register and mailed an invitation and a questionnaire. Women (102,443) were enrolled with follow-up information collected throughout 1999 by linkage with national registries of cancer, mortality and emigration based on the unique national identification number. Among the 96,362 women included in the present analysis 851 invasive breast cancer were diagnosed. The adjusted risk of breast cancer increased with 25% for ever use of OCs and the risk increased with increasing duration of use (test for trend: p = 0.007). No association between time since last use and breast cancer risk was found after stratification on duration of use. Positive trend was still found for total duration of use among women who used OCs more than 5 years ago. Second generation of OCs had an increased risk with increasing duration of use. Classifying progestagens according to chemical groups, the relative risk increased significantly with increasing cumulative dose of levonorgestrel progestagen. It was difficult to conclude for the other groups due to lack of power. In a multivariate analysis the cumulative dose for all progestagen groups were non-significant, although we observed a significant increased risk with increasing milligram-months of estrogen exposure (p = 0.002). In conclusion, the increased risk of breast cancer related with OC formulations could be due mostly to estrogen component.

  4. Omitting the first oral contraceptive pills of the cycle does not automatically lead to ovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elomaa, K; Rolland, R; Brosens, I; Moorrees, M; Deprest, J; Tuominen, J; Lähteenmäki, P

    1998-07-01

    The hypothesis that omission of the first three pills of the oral contraceptive (OC) cycle leads to ovulation by extending further the pill-free period was investigated in 107 healthy women 18-35 years of age recruited from family planning programs in Finland, the Netherlands, and Belgium. Study participants were randomly allocated to one of the following treatment groups: 1) monophasic gestodene--75 mcg of gestodene and 30 mcg of ethinyl estradiol; 2) triphasic gestodene--6 days of 50 mcg gestodene and 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol, 5 days of 70 mcg gestodene and 40 mcg ethinyl estradiol, and 10 days of 100 mcg gestodene and 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol; or 3) monophasic desogestrel--150 mcg desogestrel and 20 mcg ethinyl estradiol. Noncompliance with OC taking was simulated by extending the pill-free period from 7 to 10 days. During or after the extended pill-free interval, follicular growth exceeding 18 mm occurred in 24% of women in the monophasic gestodene group, 24% in the triphasic gestodene group, and 40% in the monophasic desogestrel group. Follicle-stimulating hormone reached a maximum serum concentration in most women during the first 7 pill-free days, indicating complete pituitary recovery. No normal ovulation was observed after either a 7- or 10-day pill-free period as evaluated by ultrasonography of follicles and serum progesterone assays. Since normal ovulation did not occur when pill omissions were limited to 3 days, OC users who forget to take these three tablets can be safely advised to start the pill cycle on day 11.

  5. Heart rate variability across the menstrual cycle in young women taking oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, André L; Ramos, Plínio S; Vianna, Lauro C; Ricardo, Djalma R

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that resting heart rate variability (HRV) is modified by different phases of the menstrual cycle in nonusers of oral contraceptive pills (OCP); however, the effect of OCP on autonomic control of the heart remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate HRV during the low hormone (LH-not taking OCP) and during the high hormone (HH-active OCP use) phases of the menstrual cycle in young women. Seventeen healthy women (19-31 years) taking OCP for at least 6 consecutive months were enrolled in this study. Plasma estradiol and progesterone were verified at each visit. HRV was assessed by using one-lead electrocardiography in time and frequency domains, in which participants rested in the supine position for a 20-min period with a breathing rate of 15 cycles/min. In addition, resting heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were obtained. Both plasma estradiol (LH: 19.8 ± 4.2 pg/mL vs. HH: 12.4 ± 1.5 pg/mL; p > .05) and progesterone (LH: 0.247 ± 0.58 ng/mL vs. HH: 0.371 ± 0.08 ng/mL; p > .05) (mean ± SE) levels were similar in both phases. No significant difference was obtained for any component of HRV, heart rate, or blood pressure between the LH and HH phases (p > .05). These results provide preliminary evidence that use of OCP does not affect HRV during the menstrual cycle in healthy women.

  6. An assessment of the quality of advice provided by patent medicine vendors to users of oral contraceptive pills in urban Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujuju C

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chinazo Ujuju,1 Samson B Adebayo,2 Jennifer Anyanti,3 Obi Oluigbo,3 Fatima Muhammad,4 Augustine Ankomah5 1Research and Evaluation Division, Society for Family Health, Abuja, Nigeria; 2Planning, Research and Statistics Directorate, National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control, Abuja, Nigeria; 3Technical Services Directorate, Society for Family Health, Abuja, Nigeria; 4Family Planning Directorate, Society for Family Health, Abuja, Nigeria; 5Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana Introduction: In Nigeria about 50% of oral contraceptive pill users obtain their products from proprietary patent medicine vendors (PPMVs. This group of service providers are poorly trained and have very limited knowledge about contraception. This paper investigated the nature of the advice offered to simulated current and potential users of oral contraceptive pills. The main objective was to assess the nature and quality of advice provided by PPMVs to pill users. Method: This study is based on findings from a 'mystery client' approach in which three scenarios related to contraceptive pill use were simulated. Each of the 12 mystery clients simulated one of the following three scenarios: new pill users (new to family planning or switching from condom to pills; user seeking a resupply of pills; and dissatisfied pill users intending to discontinue use. Simple random sampling was used to select 410 PPMVs from a total of 1,826 in four states in Nigeria. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews was also conducted. Results: A majority of the PPMVs had pills in stock on the day of the survey and resupplied pills to the clients. PPMVs also understood the reason and importance of referring clients who were new adopters of oral contraceptive methods to a health facility; 30% of the PPMVs referred new adopters to a health facility. However, demand from clients who do not want to go

  7. A twelve-month comparative clinical investigation of two low-dose oral contraceptives containing 20 micrograms ethinylestradiol/75 micrograms gestodene and 20 micrograms ethinylestradiol/150 micrograms desogestrel, with respect to efficacy, cycle control and tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrikat, J; Jaques, M A; Mayerhofer, M; Pelissier, C; Müller, U; Düsterberg, B

    1995-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare contraceptive reliability, cycle control and tolerance of an oral contraceptive containing 20 micrograms ethinylestradiol and 75 micrograms gestodene, with a reference preparation containing the same dose of estrogen combined with 150 micrograms desogestrel. This article presents interim data from centers in France and Austria, involving a total of 479 women and 4,991 cycles. Contraceptive reliability was good with both preparations. Two pregnancies occurred in the gestodene group, but neither were due to method failure. In the desogestrel group there were also two pregnancies, of which one was due to method failure. With respect to cycle control, there is a trend towards a lower incidence of intermenstrual bleeding in the gestodene group. The incidence of spotting (scanty bleeding) during the important first three cycles was 3.5% lower in the gestodene group, and over the first six cycles, it was 7.6% lower. Amenorrhea was similar in both groups, but the incidence of dysmenorrhea was significantly lower in the gestodene group (p=0.001). Adverse events were similar in both groups, with headache, breast tension and nausea the most frequently reported symptoms. Body weight remained relatively constant during treatment in both groups, and no hypertension was reported for any woman during the course of the study. In each treatment group, 19 women discontinued because of adverse events. It is concluded that both preparation are reliable and well tolerated oral contraceptives are reliable and well tolerated oral contraceptives; however, there is a more favourable effect on dysmenorrhea by the gestodene formulation.

  8. Mifepristone in Combination with Misoprostol vs. Low Dose Mifepristone Alone in Emergency Contraception: a Multi-center Double-blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness and side effects of various low dose ofMi fepristone in combination with Misoprostol and low doses Mi fepristone alone in emer-gency contraceptionMaterials & Methods This is a multi-center double-blind randomized controlled clini-cal trial. A total of 899 healthy women were allocated into this study and were ran-domly divided into 3 groups. They were orally administrated with different emergen-cy contraceptives with 120 h after unprotected intercourse. Group Ⅰ (n = 300) was giv-en 25 mg Mifepristone plus 0. 2 mg Misoprostol after 24 h. Group Ⅱ (n = 299) wasgiven 10 mg Mifepristone plus 0. 2 mg Misoprostol after 24 h. Group Ⅲ (n = 300)was administrated with 10 mg Mifepristone alone. The effective rates in differentgroups were calculated with Dixon method.Results Altogether 11 pregnancies occurred, among which 2 cases were in Group Ⅰ, 2cases in Group Ⅱ, and 7 cases were in Grout Ⅲ. After correction with method fail-ure, there was only one case in Group Ⅰ, 0 case in Group Ⅱ, and 5 cases in Group Ⅲ.The contraceptive effectiveness in these groups was 95. 5%, 100% and 76. 9% respec-tively. The pregnancy rate was significantly lower in Group Ⅰ and Group Ⅱ than thatof Group Ⅲ (P< 0. 01). The side effects were slight and tolerable, and there was nosignificant difference between di fferent groups (P> 0. 05).Conclusion Use of low dose Mi fepristone (25 mg or 10 mg ) in combination with 0. 2mg Misoprostol was an effective, low side effects and safe treatment regimen foremergency contraception.

  9. Contraception in women with epilepsy: pharmacokinetic interactions, contraceptive options, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Caryn; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Contraceptive counseling is a critical component of the management of the female patient with epilepsy because of the increased risk of pregnancy associated with epilepsy and the multitude of interactions between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and hormonal contraception. Steroid hormones and many of the AEDs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, in particular, the 3A4 isoenzyme. As a result, concomitant use of hormonal contraceptives and AEDs may pose a risk for unexpected pregnancy, seizures, and drug-related adverse effects. The risk of combined oral contraceptive (COC) failure is slightly increased in the presence of cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme-inducing AEDs. Several AEDs induce the production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) to which the progestins are tightly bound, resulting in lower concentrations of free progestin that may also lead to COC failure. There is no increase in the risk of COC failure in women taking nonenzyme-inducing AEDs. Oral contraceptives significantly increase the metabolism of lamotrigine, posing a risk of seizures when hormonal agents are initiated and/or toxicity during pill-free weeks. There is no evidence that COCs increase seizures in women with epilepsy. While higher dose COCs are one contraceptive option for women on enzyme-inducing AEDs, a variety of other options are available. Injectable contraception (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate) appears effective with AED use, but the potential for bone mineral density loss is a concern. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) and barrier methods do not rely on hormonal components for contraceptive efficacy, and are therefore appropriate to recommend for use in women using enzyme-inducing medications. This chapter reviews the evidence regarding the pharmacokinetic interaction between AEDs and oral contraceptive hormones, the known or potential interactions with alternative contraceptive methods, and provides practical advice for management of contraceptive needs in reproductive

  10. Risk of bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida albicans infection among new users of combined hormonal contraception vs LNG-IUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezk, Mohamed; Sayyed, Tarek; Masood, Alaa; Dawood, Ragab

    2017-08-29

    The study assessed the risk of bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida albicans infection among new users of either a combined oral contraceptive pill (COC) or the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). This prospective observational study included 430 women, without active vaginitis at inclusion, who were divided into two groups according to their chosen method of contraception: COC group (n = 236) and LNG-IUS group (n = 194). Participants were examined for bacterial vaginosis, T. vaginalis and C. albicans infection initially and then at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after the start of contraceptive use. Data were collected and statistically analysed. The rates of acquisition of bacterial vaginosis, T. vaginalis and C. albicans infection during follow-up were significantly increased and comparable between the groups (p bacterial vaginosis among COC users (Nugent score) were 24.6, 18.6 and 15.2% and among LNG-IUS users 20.6, 13.5 and 9.3% at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months, respectively (p 25 kg/m(2), history of bacterial vaginosis, history of sexually transmitted infection, vaginal douching more than five times per week and coital frequency more than five times per week were strong risk factors for acquisition of bacterial vaginosis during the follow-up period (p bacterial vaginosis, T. vaginalis and C. albicans infections, which is greatest during initial use of the method but which improves over time.

  11. The effect of prior eccentric exercise on heavy-intensity cycling: the role of gender and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Sarah; Sabapathy, Surendran; Bulmer, Andrew C; Minahan, Clare

    2014-05-01

    To determine if gender and/or the use of oral contraceptives alter cycling performance with exercise-induced muscle damage (EiMD). Nine male adults (MEN), nine normally menstruating female adults (WomenNM), and nine female adults using oral contraceptives (WomenOC) participated. Gas exchange and time to exhaustion were measured during continuous cycling performed at three distinct power outputs before (pre) and 48 h after (post) 240 maximal effort eccentric contractions of the quadriceps muscles designed to induce muscle damage (i.e., EiMD). The change in muscle damage (i.e., range of motion about the knee joint and serum creatine kinase activity) from pre- compared to post-EiMD was greater in MEN and WomenOC compared to the WomenNM. Time to exhaustion decreased after EiMD in MEN (5.19 ± 4.58 min, p = 0.01) and in WomenOC (2.86 ± 2.83 min, p = 0.02) but did not change in WomenNM (0.98 ± 2.28 min, p = 0.43). Accordingly, the slow component of O2 uptake, expressed relative to time to exhaustion (i.e., % min(-1)), was greater in post- compared to pre-EiMD for MEN (p = 0.02) and the WomenOC (p = 0.03), but not for the WomenNM (p = 0.12). The preservation of exercise tolerance during heavy-intensity cycling performed after intense eccentric exercise is improved in women compared to men. Furthermore, the preservation of exercise tolerance is exclusive to 17β-estradiol and cannot be replicated with an exogenous synthetic estrogen replacement delivered in an oral contraceptive.

  12. Comparison of Postprandial Lipemia between Women who are on Oral Contraceptive Methods and Those who are not

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Petto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postprandial Lipemia (PPL is a physiological process that reflects the ability of the body to metabolize lipids. Even though the influence of oral contraceptives (OC on PPL is not known, it is a known fact that their use increases fasting lipid values. Objective: To compare the PPL between women who are on OC and those who are not. Methods: A prospective analytical study which assessed eutrophic women, aged between 18 and 28 years old, who were irregularly active and with fasting triglycerides ≤150 mg/dL. They were divided into two groups: oral contraceptive group (COG and non-oral contraceptive group (NCOG. Volunteers were submitted to the PPL test, in which blood samples were collected in time 0 (12-hour fasting and after the intake of lipids in times 180 and 240 minutes. In order to compare the triglyceride deltas, which reflect PPL, the two-tailed Mann-Whitney test was used for independent samples between fasting collections and 180 minutes (Δ1 and between fasting and 240 minutes (Δ2. Results: Forty women were assessed and equally divided between groups. In the fasting lipid profile, it was observed that HDL did not present significant differences and that triglycerides in COG were twice as high in comparison to NCOG. Medians of Δ1 and Δ2 presented significant differences in both comparisons (p ≤0.05. Conclusion: The results point out that women who are irregularly active and use OC present more PPL in relation to those who do not use OC, which suggests that in this population, its chronic use increases the risk of heart conditions.

  13. The Role of Oral Contraceptive Pills on Increased Risk of Breast Cancer in Iranian Populations: A Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroush, Ali; Farshchian, Negin; Komasi, Saeid; Izadi, Neda; Amirifard, Nasrin; Shahmohammadi, Afshar

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the main public health issues in the world. Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer among women. It is also the second cause of mortality in women. The association between the use of oral contraceptive pills and breast cancer is controversial and a main issue in public health. Some findings have shown that taking these pills does not have a significant effect in increasing the risk of breast cancer, while others have confirmed the carcinogenic effect of these products. These contradictory findings necessitated this meta-analysis, through of all correlated studies in Iran. Methods All published studies were considered from June 2000 until June 2015, using reliable Latin databases like PubMed, Google Scholar, Google search, Scopus, and Science Direct, and Persian database like SID, Irandoc, IranMedex, and Magiran. Finally, 26 papers were selected: 24 studies were case control while two were population based studies. A total of 26 papers with 46,260 participants were assessed since 2001. Results Overall estimate of OR for the effect of oral contraceptive pills on breast cancer is 1.521 (CI = 1.25–1.85), which shows that the intervention group had more chance (52%) compared to the control group (P = 0.001). Using these pills increased the risk of breast cancer up to 1.52 times. Conclusions Because of directly increasing levels of estrogen and the role of estrogen in gaining weight indirectly, oral contraceptive pills can stimulate the occurrence of breast cancer. More studies should be conducted for controlling the period of pill use. PMID:28053965

  14. Metformin, oral contraceptives or both to manage oligo-amenorrhea in adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome? A clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Stefano; Materazzo, Caterina; Falbo, Angela; Orio, Francesco; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Sultan, Charles

    2014-05-01

    The management of oligo-amenorrhea in adolescent patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) represents an important and difficult challenge. Metformin and/or oral contraceptives (OCs) are different strategies widely proposed in these patients. The objective of the current review was to provide an overview on the use of metformin and/or OCs for the management of oligo-amenorrhea in adolescents with PCOS underlining their potential risks and benefits in order to help the clinician to choose the best patients' tailored treatment.

  15. Effect of oral contraceptives and/or metformin on GLP-1 secretion and reactive hypoglycemia in PCOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Mumm, Hanne; Holst, Jens Juul

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may increase the risk of reactive hypoglycaemia (RH) and decrease glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. The possible effects of treatment with oral contraceptives (OCP) and/or metformin on GLP-1 secretion and risk of RH in PCOS...... significantly lower in obese vs. lean patients and were inversely associated with BMI. CONCLUSIONS: AUC GLP-1 levels were unchanged during treatment. Increased risk of hypoglycemia during metformin +OCP could be associated with increased insulin secretion....

  16. Meeting rural demand: a case for combining community-based distribution and social marketing of injectable contraceptives in Tigray, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Ndola; Weidert, Karen; Fraser, Ashley; Gessessew, Amanuel

    2013-01-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, policy changes have begun to pave the way for community distribution of injectable contraceptives but sustaining such efforts remains challenging. Combining social marketing with community-based distribution provides an opportunity to recover some program costs and compensate workers with proceeds from contraceptive sales. This paper proposes a model for increasing access to injectable contraceptives in rural settings by using community-based distributers as social marketing agents and incorporating financing systems to improve sustainability. This intervention was implemented in three districts of the Central Zone of Tigray, Ethiopia and program data has been collected from November 2011 through October 2012. A total of 137 Community Based Reproductive Health Agents (CBRHAs) were trained to provide injectable contraceptives and were provided with a loan of 25 injectable contraceptives from a drug revolving fund, created with project funds. The price of a single dose credited to a CBRHA was 3 birr ($0.17) and they provide injections to women for 5 birr ($0.29), determined with willingness-to-pay data. Social marketing was used to create awareness and generate demand. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to examine important feasibility aspects of the intervention. Forty-four percent of CBRHAs were providing family planning methods at the time of the training and 96% believed providing injectable contraceptives would improve their services. By October 2012, 137 CBRHAs had successfully completed training and provided 2541 injections. Of total injections, 47% were provided to new users of injectable contraceptives. Approximately 31% of injections were given for free to the poorest women, including adolescents. Insights gained from the first year of implementation of the model provide a framework for further expansion in Tigray, Ethiopia. Our experience highlights how program planners can tailor interventions to match family

  17. Meeting rural demand: a case for combining community-based distribution and social marketing of injectable contraceptives in Tigray, Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndola Prata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Sub-Saharan Africa, policy changes have begun to pave the way for community distribution of injectable contraceptives but sustaining such efforts remains challenging. Combining social marketing with community-based distribution provides an opportunity to recover some program costs and compensate workers with proceeds from contraceptive sales. This paper proposes a model for increasing access to injectable contraceptives in rural settings by using community-based distributers as social marketing agents and incorporating financing systems to improve sustainability. METHODS: This intervention was implemented in three districts of the Central Zone of Tigray, Ethiopia and program data has been collected from November 2011 through October 2012. A total of 137 Community Based Reproductive Health Agents (CBRHAs were trained to provide injectable contraceptives and were provided with a loan of 25 injectable contraceptives from a drug revolving fund, created with project funds. The price of a single dose credited to a CBRHA was 3 birr ($0.17 and they provide injections to women for 5 birr ($0.29, determined with willingness-to-pay data. Social marketing was used to create awareness and generate demand. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to examine important feasibility aspects of the intervention. RESULTS: Forty-four percent of CBRHAs were providing family planning methods at the time of the training and 96% believed providing injectable contraceptives would improve their services. By October 2012, 137 CBRHAs had successfully completed training and provided 2541 injections. Of total injections, 47% were provided to new users of injectable contraceptives. Approximately 31% of injections were given for free to the poorest women, including adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: Insights gained from the first year of implementation of the model provide a framework for further expansion in Tigray, Ethiopia. Our experience highlights how

  18. Meeting Rural Demand: A Case for Combining Community-Based Distribution and Social Marketing of Injectable Contraceptives in Tigray, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Ndola; Weidert, Karen; Fraser, Ashley; Gessessew, Amanuel

    2013-01-01

    Background In Sub-Saharan Africa, policy changes have begun to pave the way for community distribution of injectable contraceptives but sustaining such efforts remains challenging. Combining social marketing with community-based distribution provides an opportunity to recover some program costs and compensate workers with proceeds from contraceptive sales. This paper proposes a model for increasing access to injectable contraceptives in rural settings by using community-based distributers as social marketing agents and incorporating financing systems to improve sustainability. Methods This intervention was implemented in three districts of the Central Zone of Tigray, Ethiopia and program data has been collected from November 2011 through October 2012. A total of 137 Community Based Reproductive Health Agents (CBRHAs) were trained to provide injectable contraceptives and were provided with a loan of 25 injectable contraceptives from a drug revolving fund, created with project funds. The price of a single dose credited to a CBRHA was 3 birr ($0.17) and they provide injections to women for 5 birr ($0.29), determined with willingness-to-pay data. Social marketing was used to create awareness and generate demand. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to examine important feasibility aspects of the intervention. Results Forty-four percent of CBRHAs were providing family planning methods at the time of the training and 96% believed providing injectable contraceptives would improve their services. By October 2012, 137 CBRHAs had successfully completed training and provided 2541 injections. Of total injections, 47% were provided to new users of injectable contraceptives. Approximately 31% of injections were given for free to the poorest women, including adolescents. Conclusions Insights gained from the first year of implementation of the model provide a framework for further expansion in Tigray, Ethiopia. Our experience highlights how program planners can

  19. Drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Kavita; Stuart, Gretchen S.; Robinson, Jennifer; Gray, Andrew L.; Tepper, Naomi K.; Gaffield, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To summarize published evidence on drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals. Design: Systematic review of the published literature. Methods: We searched PubMed, POPLINE, and EMBASE for peer-reviewed publications of studies (in any language) from inception to 21 September 2015. We included studies of women using hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals concurrently. Outcomes of interest were effectiveness of either therapy, toxicity, or pharmacokinetics. We used standard abstraction forms to summarize and assess strengths and weaknesses. Results: Fifty reports from 46 studies were included. Most antiretrovirals whether used for therapy or prevention, have limited interactions with hormonal contraceptive methods, with the exception of efavirenz. Although depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is not affected, limited data on implants and combined oral contraceptive pills suggest that efavirenz-containing combination antiretroviral therapy may compromise contraceptive effectiveness of these methods. However, implants remain very effective despite such drug interactions. Antiretroviral plasma concentrations and effectiveness are generally not affected by hormonal contraceptives. Conclusion: Women taking antiretrovirals, for treatment or prevention, should not be denied access to the full range of hormonal contraceptive options, but should be counseled on the expected rates of unplanned pregnancy associated with all contraceptive methods, in order to make their own informed choices. PMID:28060009

  20. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome prevention strategies: oral contraceptive pills-dual gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist suppression with step-down gonadotropin protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damario, Mark A

    2010-11-01

    The identification of patients at high risk for excessive responses to ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer is essential in the tailoring of safe and effective treatment strategies. Known factors associated with increased sensitivity to gonadotropins include polycystic ovary syndrome, young age, prior ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), high baseline antral follicle count, and high baseline ovarian volume. Although several treatment strategies have been proposed for these patients, this report describes the experience using the dual suppression with gonadotropin step-down protocol. This protocol uses oral contraceptive pretreatment in combination with a long gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist followed by a programmed step-down in gonadotropin dosing. Hormonal characteristics of dual suppression include an improved luteinizing hormone-to-follicle-stimulating hormone ratio and lower serum androgens, particularly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Clinical characteristics of the protocol include a lower cancellation rate and favorable clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates per initiated cycle while mitigating the risk of OHSS.

  1. Contraceptive strategies for young women in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruusuvaara, L; Johansson, E D

    1999-12-01

    Safe, effective and affordable contraceptives have been available for a few decades, yet, in many countries, the struggle for reproductive rights continues. Children, still, are forced to give birth to children in many nations. In most industrialized countries, where contraceptive counselling and abortions have been options, fertility rates have reached all time lows. Effective contraception improves health and well-being as well and may be used for conditions other than birth control. Young girls often initially take oral contraceptives primarily to reduce menstrual pain and blood loss; they also welcome a contraceptive that eliminates menstrual bleeding. Women using oral contraceptives and Norplant experience about 50% reduction in menstrual blood; 90% reduction in blood loss is achieved with the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (Mirena). Teenagers and their parents are often misinformed about the side-effects of oral contraceptives and birth control in general, which may adversely affect compliance. Adequate, user-friendly and supportive information about contraception is necessary to ensure proper use of the pill and other birth control methods. In addition, emergency contraceptives should be easily accessible. The mortality and morbidity of young women would be dramatically reduced by the global use of medical abortion as well. Only a combined effort by policy makers, educators, parents and health-care providers can enhance the reproductive (and future!) health of both young females and males.

  2. An open-label, two-period comparative study on pharmacokinetics and safety of a combined ethinylestradiol/gestodene transdermal contraceptive patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Haiyan; Xiong, Xin; Zhai, Suodi; Wei, Yudong; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Lin; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the pharmacokinetics and safety profiles of a newly developed combined ethinylestradiol (EE)/gestodene (GSD) transdermal contraceptive patch after a single-dose administration and compared with the market available tablet formulation in healthy adult subjects. An open-label, two-period comparative study was conducted in 12 healthy women volunteers. A single dose of the study combined EE/GE transdermal contraceptive patch and oral tablet (Milunet(®)) were administered. Blood samples at different time points after dose were collected, and concentrations were analyzed. A reliable, highly sensitive and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) assay method was developed in this study to determine the plasma concentrations of EE and GSD. Compared to the tablet, the study patch had a significantly decreased maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), extended time to reach the Cmax and half-life, as well as increased clearance and apparent volume of distribution. The half-lives of EE and GSD of the patch were 3.3 and 2.2 times, respectively, than the half-life of the tablet. The areas under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUCs) of EE and GSD of the patch were 8.0 and 16.2 times, respectively, than the AUC of the tablet. No severe adverse event was observed during the whole study, and the general safety was acceptable. In conclusion, compared to the oral tablet Milunet, the study contraceptive patch was well tolerated and showed potent drug exposure, significant extended half-life and stable drug concentrations.

  3. An open-label, two-period comparative study on pharmacokinetics and safety of a combined ethinylestradiol/gestodene transdermal contraceptive patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Haiyan; Xiong, Xin; Zhai, Suodi; Wei, Yudong; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Lin; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the pharmacokinetics and safety profiles of a newly developed combined ethinylestradiol (EE)/gestodene (GSD) transdermal contraceptive patch after a single-dose administration and compared with the market available tablet formulation in healthy adult subjects. An open-label, two-period comparative study was conducted in 12 healthy women volunteers. A single dose of the study combined EE/GE transdermal contraceptive patch and oral tablet (Milunet®) were administered. Blood samples at different time points after dose were collected, and concentrations were analyzed. A reliable, highly sensitive and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) assay method was developed in this study to determine the plasma concentrations of EE and GSD. Compared to the tablet, the study patch had a significantly decreased maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), extended time to reach the Cmax and half-life, as well as increased clearance and apparent volume of distribution. The half-lives of EE and GSD of the patch were 3.3 and 2.2 times, respectively, than the half-life of the tablet. The areas under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUCs) of EE and GSD of the patch were 8.0 and 16.2 times, respectively, than the AUC of the tablet. No severe adverse event was observed during the whole study, and the general safety was acceptable. In conclusion, compared to the oral tablet Milunet, the study contraceptive patch was well tolerated and showed potent drug exposure, significant extended half-life and stable drug concentrations.

  4. 口服避孕药中雌激素的应用和进展*%Application and Progress of Estrogen Oral Contraceptives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骁(综述); 熊承良(审校)

    2013-01-01

    The combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are the main methods with steroidal hormones for birth control at present. For half a century,the more safe,reliable and effective COCs were continuously developed. The chemical composition of estrogen in COCs have also been improved. This article summarized the early process of modern COCs and the development of estrogen,as well as the contraceptive mechanism of ethinylestradiol and mestranol. The two developing areas of estrogen in COCs are as follows:to reduce its dose to achieve an optimal concentration for the body′s sensitivity and compliance,to find some better estrogens than ethinyl estradiol.%  复方口服避孕药(combined oral contraceptives,COCs)是目前甾体激素控制生育的主要方法。半个世纪以来,国内外的学者们不断地研制出更安全、可靠、有效的COCs,其主要成分雌激素在化学组成上更是经历了发展变化。综述现代COCs的早期开发和雌激素的发展进程。阐述炔雌醇和美雌醇2种雌激素的避孕机制。目前COCs中雌激素的主要研究方向是降低其剂量,使人体对药物的敏感性和依从性达到一个最适效应浓度,同时也在寻找一种比炔雌醇更优越的雌激素。

  5. A 1-year study to compare the hemostatic effects of oral contraceptive containing 20 microg of ethinylestradiol and 100 microg of levonorgestrel with 30 microg of ethinylestradiol and 100 microg of levonorgestrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jørgen; Endrikat, Jan; Düsterberg, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To comparatively evaluate the impact of a balanced one-third dose-reduced oral contraceptive on hemostatic variables. METHODS: In an open-label, randomized study, a dose-reduced oral contraceptive containing 20 microg of ethinylestradiol (EE) and 100 microg of levonorgestrel (LNG...

  6. Mesigyna once-a-month combined injectable contraceptive: experience in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassol, S; Cravioto, M C; Durand, M; Bailon, R; Carranza, S; Fugarolas, J; Gaona, R; Parada, L M; Celis, C; Santoyo, S; Garza-Flores, J; Vazquez, L; Lopez, C; Gurucharri, C; Novelli, J; Carneiro de Oliveira, H; Mendez, J; de Andrade, M E; de Mello, N R; de Melo, K; Chada, E; Yassle, M E; Castañeda, A; Gomez, P; Arboleda, C; Trujillo, L; Bucheli, R; Hidalgo, I; Olavide, R; Parejarios, J; Succar, J; Reyes-Marquez, R; Albrecht, G

    2000-05-01

    A phase III clinical study was carried out among 534 fertile Latin American women to evaluate cycle control, side effects, and contraceptive efficacy of a once-a-month combined injectable, Mesigyna, consisting of 50 mg norethisterone enanthate and 5 mg estradiol valerate. The pregnancy rate at 1 year was 0 per 100 woman-years for a total experience of 4688 woman-months. The overall discontinuation rate at one year was 17.9%. Discontinuation rate for bleeding problems was 5.1%. The Colombian women had a significant increase (p <0.001) in bleeding problems compared to other countries. The discontinuation rate for amenorrhea was 1.1%. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding discontinuation for other medical or non-medical reasons. Mean weight gain after one year of use was 1.02 kg. Mesigyna is an appropiate once-a-month injectable contraceptive for Latin American women since it is highly effective and its perception of normal menstrual bleeding is of importance in the Latin American population.

  7. [Digestive complications of oral contraceptives: a case of extensive digestive necrosis in a young woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, E; Dufour, C; Baud, F; Contamin, C; Dupré, A; Carpentier, F; Guignier, M

    1984-05-01

    A case of acute intestinal vascular necrosis in a 19-year-old user of oral contraceptives (OCs) is described, and hypotheses explaining the digestive complications of synthetic estrogens are reviewed. The patient had originally presented with a violent gastric pain that subsequently spread to the entire abdomen. An abrupt worsening of her condition involved cardiovascular collapse associated with a peritoneal syndrome, vomiting and dehydration, and hyperleukocytosis. Emergency opening of the peritoneum was followed by evacuation of a large quantity of fetid gas and alimentary debris, and observation of a completely necrosed stomach. A careful lavage of the entire intestinal cavity led to temporary improvement, but it became clear during an attempt at gastrectomy that further treatment would be unavailing and the patient died shortly thereafter. Estrogens were believed to be responsible for the digestive necrosis because it occurred in a young woman who had used an estrogen-rich OC for 3 years and who smoked; a hapatic biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. No traces of other risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, neoplasia, or obesity were observed. Recent publications indicate that OCs are responsible for a certain number of digestive problems, which may include acceleration of intestinal transit, severe diarrhea, rectorrhagia, ischemic or ulcerative colitis, intestinal infarct which is usually localized, and hepatocellular problems ranging from moderate hepatic insufficiency to malignant tumor and Budd-Chiari syndrome. OCs do not modify hemodynamic regimes, but they may cause elevation of fibrinogen and thrombin, diminution of antithrombin III acitivty, increased platelet adhesivity, and decreased fibrinolysis leading to hypercoagulability. These modifications in hemostasis occur in all OC users and are not statistically correlated with occurence of thrombotic accidents. OCs are probably responsible for parietal vascular lesions; experimental

  8. Contraceptive considerations in overweight teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshiro, Bliss; Edelman, Alison

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the efficacy and safety of contraceptives in overweight adolescents. There are few studies exploring hormonal contraceptive efficacy and safety in overweight and obese adults and almost none addressing these issues in adolescents. Luckily for teens, in terms of safety, many of the comorbidities associated with obesity are yet to transpire and their options for contraception remain relatively unrestricted. Studies of the combined oral contraceptive pill and patch in adults suggest that efficacy may be decreased in overweight adolescents. There is no evidence to suggest that the efficacy of the contraceptive implant or intrauterine device (IUD) is decreased in overweight adolescents. Indeed, these long-acting reversible methods will be the best choice for many adolescents because of their high efficacy. Although the literature is not definitive, there is probably a subset of adolescents who are susceptible to weight gain with use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate. Although there is little research regarding contraceptive efficacy in overweight adolescents, IUDs and implants will be the best methods for many adolescents because of their high efficacy, reversibility, and safety. (C) 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  9. Laparoscopy Combined with Gestrinone or Oral Contraceptive Pills for Infertile Women with Minimal-mild Endometriosis%腹腔镜联合药物治疗轻度子宫内膜异位症合并不孕的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冬; 宋豪; 郭春; 刘尧芳; 肖丽; 黄薇

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨腹腔镜手术联合不同药物治疗轻度子宫内膜异位症(内异症)合并不孕的疗效.方法 回顾性分析2004年1月~2009年12月110例腹腔镜诊断轻度内异症(r-AFS Ⅰ~Ⅱ期)合并不孕患者的临床资料,按术后使用药物情况分为2组:避孕药组53例,服用口服避孕