WorldWideScience

Sample records for combined computing readiness

  1. CMS results in the Combined Computing Readiness Challenge CCRC'08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonacorsi, D.; Bauerdick, L.

    2009-01-01

    During February and May 2008, CMS participated to the Combined Computing Readiness Challenge (CCRC'08) together with all other LHC experiments. The purpose of this worldwide exercise was to check the readiness of the Computing infrastructure for LHC data taking. Another set of major CMS tests called Computing, Software and Analysis challenge (CSA'08) - as well as CMS cosmic runs - were also running at the same time: CCRC augmented the load on computing with additional tests to validate and stress-test all CMS computing workflows at full data taking scale, also extending this to the global WLCG community. CMS exercised most aspects of the CMS computing model, with very comprehensive tests. During May 2008, CMS moved more than 3.6 Petabytes among more than 300 links in the complex Grid topology. CMS demonstrated that is able to safely move data out of CERN to the Tier-1 sites, sustaining more than 600 MB/s as a daily average for more than seven days in a row, with enough headroom and with hourly peaks of up to 1.7 GB/s. CMS ran hundreds of simultaneous jobs at each Tier-1 site, re-reconstructing and skimming hundreds of millions of events. After re-reconstruction the fresh AOD (Analysis Object Data) has to be synchronized between Tier-1 centers: CMS demonstrated that the required inter-Tier-1 transfers are achievable within a few days. CMS also showed that skimmed analysis data sets can be transferred to Tier-2 sites for analysis at sufficient rate, regionally as well as inter-regionally, achieving all goals in about 90% of >200 links. Simultaneously, CMS also ran a large Tier-2 analysis exercise, where realistic analysis jobs were submitted to a large set of Tier-2 sites by a large number of people to produce a chaotic workload across the systems, and with more than 400 analysis users in May. Taken all together, CMS routinely achieved submissions of 100k jobs/day, with peaks up to 200k jobs/day. The achieved results in CCRC'08 - focussing on the distributed

  2. Ready To Buy a Computer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Martha; Rourke, Patrick

    1974-01-01

    The school district business manager can make sound, cost-conscious decisions in the purchase of computer equipment by developing a list of cost-justified applications for automation, considering the software, writing performance specifications for bidding or negotiating a contract, and choosing the vendor wisely prior to the purchase; and by…

  3. Computer Skills Training and Readiness to Work with Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnon Hershkovitz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In today’s job market, computer skills are part of the prerequisites for many jobs. In this paper, we report on a study of readiness to work with computers (the dependent variable among unemployed women (N=54 after participating in a unique, web-supported training focused on computer skills and empowerment. Overall, the level of participants’ readiness to work with computers was much higher at the end of the course than it was at its begin-ning. During the analysis, we explored associations between this variable and variables from four categories: log-based (describing the online activity; computer literacy and experience; job-seeking motivation and practice; and training satisfaction. Only two variables were associated with the dependent variable: knowledge post-test duration and satisfaction with content. After building a prediction model for the dependent variable, another log-based variable was highlighted: total number of actions in the course website along the course. Overall, our analyses shed light on the predominance of log-based variables over variables from other categories. These findings might hint at the need of developing new assessment tools for learners and trainees that take into consideration human-computer interaction when measuring self-efficacy variables.

  4. Computer-Based Assessment of School Readiness and Early Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapó, Beno; Molnár, Gyöngyvér; Nagy, József

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the potential of using online tests for the assessment of school readiness and for monitoring early reasoning. Four tests of a face-to-face-administered school readiness test battery (speech sound discrimination, relational reasoning, counting and basic numeracy, and deductive reasoning) and a paper-and-pencil inductive…

  5. Internet Shop Users: Computer Practices and Its Relationship to E-Learning Readiness

    OpenAIRE

    Jasper Vincent Q. Alontaga

    2018-01-01

    Access to computer technology is essential in developing 21st century skills. One venue that serves to bridge the gap in terms of access is internet shops (also known cybercafés or internet cafés). As such, it is important to examine the type of activities internet shop users engage in and how they develop and relate to their e-learning readiness. This study examined the profile, computer practices and e-learning readiness of seventy one (71) internet shop users. A researcher-made internet sh...

  6. CMS Software and Computing Ready for Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Bloom, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    In Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider, software and computing was a strategic strength of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment. The timely processing of data and simulation samples and the excellent performance of the reconstruction algorithms played an important role in the preparation of the full suite of searches used for the observation of the Higgs boson in 2012. In Run 2, the LHC will run at higher intensities and CMS will record data at a higher trigger rate. These new running conditions will provide new challenges for the software and computing systems. Over the two years of Long Shutdown 1, CMS has built upon the successes of Run 1 to improve the software and computing to meet these challenges. In this presentation we will describe the new features in software and computing that will once again put CMS in a position of physics leadership.

  7. Characterization of a new computer-ready photon counting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andor, Gyorgy

    1998-08-01

    The photon-counting system seems to be the best solution for extremely low optical power measurements. The Hamamatsu HC135 photon counting module has a built-in high-voltage power supply amplifier, discriminator, micro-controller with an RS232 serial output. It requires only a +5V supply voltage and an IBM PC or compatible computer to run. The system is supplied with an application software. This talk is about the testing of the device.

  8. Research on Digital Forensic Readiness Design in a Cloud Computing-Based Smart Work Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangho Park

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the work environments of organizations have been in the process of transitioning into smart work environments by applying cloud computing technology in the existing work environment. The smart work environment has the characteristic of being able to access information assets inside the company from outside the company through cloud computing technology, share information without restrictions on location by using mobile terminals, and provide a work environment where work can be conducted effectively in various locations and mobile environments. Thus, in the cloud computing-based smart work environment, changes are occurring in terms of security risks, such as an increase in the leakage risk of an organization’s information assets through mobile terminals which have a high risk of loss and theft and increase the hacking risk of wireless networks in mobile environments. According to these changes in security risk, the reactive digital forensic method, which investigates digital evidence after the occurrence of security incidents, appears to have a limit which has led to a rise in the necessity of proactive digital forensic approaches wherein security incidents can be addressed preemptively. Accordingly, in this research, we design a digital forensic readiness model at the level of preemptive prevention by considering changes in the cloud computing-based smart work environment. Firstly, we investigate previous research related to the cloud computing-based smart work environment and digital forensic readiness and analyze a total of 50 components of digital forensic readiness. In addition, through the analysis of the corresponding preceding research, we design seven detailed areas, namely, outside the organization environment, within the organization guideline, system information, terminal information, user information, usage information, and additional function. Then, we design a draft of the digital forensic readiness model in the cloud

  9. Sterilization of ready-to-cook Bibimbap by combined treatment with gamma irradiation for space food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Nam; Song, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Jong-il; Sung, Nak-Yun; Han, In-Jun; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2012-08-01

    Bibimbap, Korean traditional cooked rice mixed with various kinds of vegetables, together with mushrooms and a ground meat, and seasoned with red pepper paste, was developed as a ready-to-cook food by combined treatment with irradiation for the use in space. By gamma irradiation of 25 kGy, the total aerobic bacteria of Bibimbap that was initial by 6.3 log CFU/g decreased to below detection limit, but its sensory qualities were drastically decreased. To enhance the sensory quality, the effects of antioxidant in Bibimbap were evaluated. A treatment with 0.1% of vitamin C, vacuum packaging and gamma-irradiated at 25 kGy and -70 °C showed higher sensory scores than only the irradiation process. This result indicates that the radiation technology may be useful to produce a variety of space foods with high quality of taste and flavor, when combined with other methods.

  10. Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    We make the case for developing a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology to inform the analysis of the function and evolution of the human brain. First, we update the mirror system hypothesis on the evolution of the language-ready brain by (i) modeling action and action recognition and opportunistic scheduling of macaque brains to hypothesize the nature of the last common ancestor of macaque and human (LCA-m); and then we (ii) introduce dynamic brain modeling to show how apes could acquire gesture through ontogenetic ritualization, hypothesizing the nature of evolution from LCA-m to the last common ancestor of chimpanzee and human (LCA-c). We then (iii) hypothesize the role of imitation, pantomime, protosign and protospeech in biological and cultural evolution from LCA-c to Homo sapiens with a language-ready brain. Second, we suggest how cultural evolution in Homo sapiens led from protolanguages to full languages with grammar and compositional semantics. Third, we assess the similarities and differences between the dorsal and ventral streams in audition and vision as the basis for presenting and comparing two models of language processing in the human brain: A model of (i) the auditory dorsal and ventral streams in sentence comprehension; and (ii) the visual dorsal and ventral streams in defining ;what language is about; in both production and perception of utterances related to visual scenes provide the basis for (iii) a first step towards a synthesis and a look at challenges for further research.

  11. OT-Combiners Via Secure Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harnik, Danny; Ishai, Yuval; Kushilevitz, Eyal

    2008-01-01

    of faulty candidates (t = Ω(n)). Previous OT-combiners required either ω(n) or poly(k) calls to the n candidates, where k is a security parameter, and produced only a single secure OT. We demonstrate the usefulness of the latter result by presenting several applications that are of independent interest......An OT-combiner implements a secure oblivious transfer (OT) protocol using oracle access to n OT-candidates of which at most t may be faulty. We introduce a new general approach for combining OTs by making a simple and modular use of protocols for secure computation. Specifically, we obtain an OT......, strengthen the security, and improve the efficiency of previous OT-combiners. In particular, we obtain the first constant-rate OT-combiners in which the number of secure OTs being produced is a constant fraction of the total number of calls to the OT-candidates, while still tolerating a constant fraction...

  12. Assessing Learners' Perceived Readiness for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL): A Study on Initial Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yao; So, Hyo-Jeong; Toh, Yancy

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop an instrument that assesses university students' perceived readiness for computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Assessment in CSCL research had predominantly focused on measuring "after-collaboration" outcomes and "during-collaboration" behaviors while…

  13. Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    We make the case for developing a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology to inform the analysis of the function and evolution of the human brain. First, we update the mirror system hypothesis on the evolution of the language-ready brain by (i) modeling action and action recognition and opportunistic scheduling of macaque brains to hypothesize the nature of the last common ancestor of macaque and human (LCA-m); and then we (ii) introduce dynamic brain modeling to show how apes could acquire gesture through ontogenetic ritualization, hypothesizing the nature of evolution from LCA-m to the last common ancestor of chimpanzee and human (LCA-c). We then (iii) hypothesize the role of imitation, pantomime, protosign and protospeech in biological and cultural evolution from LCA-c to Homo sapiens with a language-ready brain. Second, we suggest how cultural evolution in Homo sapiens led from protolanguages to full languages with grammar and compositional semantics. Third, we assess the similarities and differences between the dorsal and ventral streams in audition and vision as the basis for presenting and comparing two models of language processing in the human brain: A model of (i) the auditory dorsal and ventral streams in sentence comprehension; and (ii) the visual dorsal and ventral streams in defining "what language is about" in both production and perception of utterances related to visual scenes provide the basis for (iii) a first step towards a synthesis and a look at challenges for further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ready…, Set, Go!. Comment on "Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain" by Michael A. Arbib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriki, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    ;Language-READY brain; in the title of this article [1] seems to be the expression that the author prefers to use to illustrate his theoretical framework. The usage of the term ;READY; appears to be of extremely deep connotation, for three reasons. Firstly, of course it needs a ;principle; - the depth and the width of the computational theory depicted here is as expected from the author's reputation. However, ;readiness; implies that it is much more than just ;a theory;. That is, such a principle is not static, but it rather has dynamic properties, which are ready to gradually proceed to flourish once brains are put in adequate conditions to make time progressions - namely, evolution and development. So the second major connotation is that this article brought in the perspectives of the comparative primatology as a tool to relativise the language-realizing human brains among other animal species, primates in particular, in the context of evolutionary time scale. The tertiary connotation lies in the context of the developmental time scale. The author claims that it is the interaction of the newborn with its care takers, namely its mother and other family or social members in its ecological conditions, that brings the brain mechanism subserving language faculty to really mature to its final completion. Taken together, this article proposes computational theories and mechanisms of Evo-Devo-Eco interactions for language acquisition in the human brains.

  15. Using a Computer Simulation to Improve Psychological Readiness for Job Interviewing in Unemployed Individuals of Pre-Retirement Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aysina, Rimma M; Efremova, Galina I; Maksimenko, Zhanna A; Nikiforov, Mikhail V

    2017-05-01

    Unemployed individuals of pre-retirement age face significant challenges in finding a new job. This may be partly due to their lack of psychological readiness to go through a job interview. We view psychological readiness as one of the psychological attitude components. It is an active conscious readiness to interact with a certain aspect of reality, based on previously acquired experience. It includes a persons' special competence to manage their activities and cope with anxiety. We created Job Interview Simulation Training (JIST) - a computer-based simulator, which allowed unemployed job seekers to practice interviewing repeatedly in a stress-free environment. We hypothesized that completion of JIST would be related to increase in pre-retirement job seekers' psychological readiness for job interviewing in real life. Participants were randomized into control (n = 18) and experimental (n = 21) conditions. Both groups completed pre- and post-intervention job interview role-plays and self-reporting forms of psychological readiness for job interviewing. JIST consisted of 5 sessions of a simulated job interview, and the experimental group found it easy to use and navigate as well as helpful to prepare for interviewing. After finishing JIST-sessions the experimental group had significant decrease in heart rate during the post-intervention role-play and demonstrated significant increase in their self-rated psychological readiness, whereas the control group did not have changes in these variables. Future research may help clarify whether JIST is related to an increase in re-employment of pre-retirement job seekers.

  16. Assessing self-efficacy and college readiness level among new undergraduate students in computer science using metacognitive awareness inventory (MAI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Wan Nor Afiqah Wan; Abdullah, Aziman

    2018-04-01

    This preliminary study was conducted to address the issue of academic planning skills among new university student. Due to lack of proper measurement mechanism for awareness and readiness among students, this study proposes Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI) to assess the connection between student self-efficacy and college readiness. Qualitative and quantitative approach were used by provide an online self-assessment for new student of Faculty of Computer Systems & Software Engineering (FSKKP) and analyse the data respectively. The possible relationships between MAI and College Readiness Item (CRI) in self-assessment has been evaluated. The sample size of 368 respondents from UMP are responding to the online self-assessment. The initial finding shows most student (71%) of the respondent lack of skills in planning. We manage to use Pearson Product-moment correlation coefficient to find the significant relationship between MAI and CRI. Thus, we found that College Readiness provide sufficient evidence that there is a significant correlation with most of MAI items. The findings also indicated not much difference was found between gender in terms of self-efficacy level. This paper suggests the MAI and CRI is a reliable and valid scale to respond the planning skills issues among new university students.

  17. Drinking norms, readiness to change, and gender as moderators of a combined alcohol intervention for first-year college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossbard, Joel R; Mastroleo, Nadine R; Geisner, Irene Markman; Atkins, David; Ray, Anne E; Kilmer, Jason R; Mallett, Kimberly; Larimer, Mary E; Turrisi, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol interventions targeting college students and their parents have been shown to be efficacious. Little research has examined moderators of intervention efficacy to help tailor interventions for subgroups of students. This study is a secondary data analysis of readiness to change, drinking norms, and gender as moderators of an efficacious peer- and parent-based intervention (Turrisi et al., 2009). Students (n=680) were randomized to the combined peer and parent intervention (n=342) or assessment-only control (n=338). The combined intervention reduced peak blood alcohol content (BAC) compared to control. Gender and norms did not moderate the relationship between the intervention and drinking. Significant interactions were found between gender, precontemplation, and intervention. Students in the combined condition with higher precontemplation had lower weekly drinking compared to those with lower precontemplation. This pattern was also found among men for peak BAC and alcohol-related consequences but not among women, indicating a three-way interaction. Interventions may need to consider readiness to change and gender to optimize effectiveness. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Effects of Home and School Computer Use on School Readiness and Cognitive Development among Head Start Children: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Atkins, Melissa S.; Stanton, Bonita

    2006-01-01

    Data from 122 Head Start children were analyzed to examine the impact of computer use on school readiness and psychomotor skills. Children in the experimental group were given the opportunity to work on a computer for 15-20 minutes per day with their choice of developmentally appropriate educational software, while the control group received a…

  19. Flaxseed gum in combination with lemongrass essential oil as an effective edible coating for ready-to-eat pomegranate arils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Basharat; Srivastava, Abhaya Kumar

    2017-11-01

    Flaxseed gum (FSG) in combination with lemongrass essential oil (LGEO) was investigated for coating of ready-to-eat pomegranate arils. FSG was used at 0.3% and 0.6% concentrations and with both concentrations LGEO was incorporated at levels of 0ppm, 200ppm, 500ppm and 800ppm. Changes in headspace gases, physicochemical, microbiological and sensory attributes of pomegranate arils stored at 5°C were studied on different days of analysis during the 12day storage period. Coatings containing LGEO were effective in reducing total plate count and yeast and mold populations. Increasing LGEO concentrations in the coatings resulted in more decline in microbial populations. Reduced weight loss occurred in coated samples as compared to uncoated (control) sample. Coated samples showed a gradual decrease in ripening index in contrast with control where a significantly higher decline was observed. Total soluble solids, pH and titratable acidity significantly varied over the storage period. Color change (ΔE) for control increased steeply over the storage time in comparison to coated samples. Furthermore, chroma decreased while as hue angle increased over time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The emergence of grammar in a language-ready brain. Comment on "Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain" by Michael A. Arbib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, John A.

    2016-03-01

    Arbib makes the interesting proposal [3, §1.6] that the first Homo sapiens could have been ;language-ready;, without possessing the kind of rich lexicon, grammar and compositional semantics that we see in the world's languages today. This early language readiness would have consisted of a set of ;protolanguage; abilities, which he enumerates (1-7 in §1.6), supported by brain mechanisms unique to humans. The transition to full ;language; (properties 8-11 in §1.6 and §3) would have required no changes in the genome, he argues, but could have resulted from cultural evolution plus some measure of Baldwinian evolution favoring offspring with greater linguistic skill. The full picture is set out in [1].

  1. Radiation doses to patients in computed tomography including a ready reckoner for dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szendroe, G.; Axelsson, B.; Leitz, W.

    1995-11-01

    The radiation burden from CT-examinations is still growing in most countries and has reached a considerable part of the total from medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. Efforts for avoiding excess radiation doses are therefore especially well motivated within this field. A survey of CT-examination techniques practised in Sweden showed that standard settings for the exposure variables are used for the vast majority of examinations. Virtually no adjustments to the patient's differences in anatomy have been performed - even for infants and children on average the same settings have been used. The adjustment of the exposure variables to the individual anatomy offers a large potential of dose savings. Amongst the imaging parameters, a change of the radiation dose will primarily influence the noise. As a starting point it is assumed that, irrespective of the patient's anatomy, the same level of noise can be accepted for a certain diagnostic task. To a large extent the noise level is determined by the number of photons that are registered in the detector. Hence, for different patient size and anatomy, the exposure should be adjusted so that the same transmitted photon fluence is achieved. An appendix with a ready reckoner for dose estimation for CT-scanners used in Sweden is attached. 7 refs, 5 figs, 8 tabs

  2. Computer aided system for parametric design of combination die

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranje, Vishal G.; Hussein, H. M. A.; Kumar, S.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a computer aided system for parametric design of combination dies is presented. The system is developed using knowledge based system technique of artificial intelligence. The system is capable to design combination dies for production of sheet metal parts having punching and cupping operations. The system is coded in Visual Basic and interfaced with AutoCAD software. The low cost of the proposed system will help die designers of small and medium scale sheet metal industries for design of combination dies for similar type of products. The proposed system is capable to reduce design time and efforts of die designers for design of combination dies.

  3. Microscopes and computers combined for analysis of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. W.; Butler, M. K.; Stroud, A. N.

    1969-01-01

    Scanning machine CHLOE, developed for photographic use, is combined with a digital computer to obtain quantitative and statistically significant data on chromosome shapes, distribution, density, and pairing. CHLOE permits data acquisition about a chromosome complement to be obtained two times faster than by manual pairing.

  4. STADIC: a computer code for combining probability distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, J.J.; Fleming, K.N.

    1977-03-01

    The STADIC computer code uses a Monte Carlo simulation technique for combining probability distributions. The specific function for combination of the input distribution is defined by the user by introducing the appropriate FORTRAN statements to the appropriate subroutine. The code generates a Monte Carlo sampling from each of the input distributions and combines these according to the user-supplied function to provide, in essence, a random sampling of the combined distribution. When the desired number of samples is obtained, the output routine calculates the mean, standard deviation, and confidence limits for the resultant distribution. This method of combining probability distributions is particularly useful in cases where analytical approaches are either too difficult or undefined

  5. Computer and internet use in vascular outpatients--ready for interactive applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J G; Schneider, M; Klein-Weigel, P

    2009-11-01

    Exploring patients' computer and internet use, their expectations and attitudes is mandatory for successful introduction of interactive online health-care applications in Angiology. We included 165 outpatients suffering from peripheral arterial disease (PAD; n = 62) and chronic venous and / or lymphatic disease (CVLD; n = 103) in a cross-sectional-study. Patients answered a paper-based questionnaire. Patients were predominantly female (54.5%). 142 (86.1%) reported regular computer use for 9.7 +/- 5.8 years and 134 (81.2 %) used the internet for 6.2 +/- 3.6 years. CVLD-patients and internet-user were younger and higher educated, resulting in a significant difference in computer and internet use between the disease groups (p internet users without significant differences between the groups. The topics retrieved from the internet covered a wide spectrum and searches for health information were mentioned by 41.2 %. Although confidence in the internet (3.3 +/- 1.1 on a 1-6 Likert scale) and reliability in information retrieved from the internet (3.1 +/- 1.1) were relatively low, health-related issues were of high actual and future interest. 42.8% of the patients were even interested in interactive applications like health educational programs, 37.4% in self-reported assessments and outcome questionnaires and 26.9% in chatforums; 50% demanded access to their medical data on an Internetserver. Compared to older participants those internet more often for shopping, chatting, and e-mailing, but not for health information retrieval and interactive applications. Computers are commonly used and the internet has been adopted as an important source of information by patients suffering from PAD and CVLD. Besides, the internet offers great potentials and new opportunities for interactive disease (self-)management in angiology. To increase confidence and reliability in the medium a careful introduction and evaluation of these new online applications is mandatory.

  6. Automated Generation of User Guidance by Combining Computation and Deduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther Neuper

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Herewith, a fairly old concept is published for the first time and named "Lucas Interpretation". This has been implemented in a prototype, which has been proved useful in educational practice and has gained academic relevance with an emerging generation of educational mathematics assistants (EMA based on Computer Theorem Proving (CTP. Automated Theorem Proving (ATP, i.e. deduction, is the most reliable technology used to check user input. However ATP is inherently weak in automatically generating solutions for arbitrary problems in applied mathematics. This weakness is crucial for EMAs: when ATP checks user input as incorrect and the learner gets stuck then the system should be able to suggest possible next steps. The key idea of Lucas Interpretation is to compute the steps of a calculation following a program written in a novel CTP-based programming language, i.e. computation provides the next steps. User guidance is generated by combining deduction and computation: the latter is performed by a specific language interpreter, which works like a debugger and hands over control to the learner at breakpoints, i.e. tactics generating the steps of calculation. The interpreter also builds up logical contexts providing ATP with the data required for checking user input, thus combining computation and deduction. The paper describes the concepts underlying Lucas Interpretation so that open questions can adequately be addressed, and prerequisites for further work are provided.

  7. Combined effect of gamma irradiation and rosemary extract on the shelf-life of refrigerated ready-to-cook chicken sausages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, S.S.; EL-Kabbany, H.M.; Atia, A.E.; Sallam, M.H.; Aly, S.M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Combined treatment of gamma irradiation and rosemary extract as natural anti-microbial and anti-oxidative food flavouring was used in the formulation of ready-to-cook chicken sausage for shelf-life extension and improvement of its microbiological quality. Sausages were treated with 500 ppm of rosemary extract, gamma irradiation with doses of 6 and 8 KGy and stored at 5 ± 1 degree C for 30 days.From the microbiological aspects, 8 KGy irradiation was sufficient to inactivate the microbial load during storage period. Addition of the antioxidant rosemary extract modulated releasing of thiobarbituric acid (TBA) and total volatile bases nitrogen (TVBN) occurred during storage. Sensory and textural evaluation results were significantly different in groups supplied with rosemary extract.Fresh ready-to-cook chicken sausage with rosemary exposed to 8 KGy were microbiologically safe and well acceptable for consumers when stored at 5± 1 degree C up to 30 days

  8. Hydra-Ring: a computational framework to combine failure probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diermanse, Ferdinand; Roscoe, Kathryn; IJmker, Janneke; Mens, Marjolein; Bouwer, Laurens

    2013-04-01

    This presentation discusses the development of a new computational framework for the safety assessment of flood defence systems: Hydra-Ring. Hydra-Ring computes the failure probability of a flood defence system, which is composed of a number of elements (e.g., dike segments, dune segments or hydraulic structures), taking all relevant uncertainties explicitly into account. This is a major step forward in comparison with the current Dutch practice in which the safety assessment is done separately per individual flood defence section. The main advantage of the new approach is that it will result in a more balanced prioratization of required mitigating measures ('more value for money'). Failure of the flood defence system occurs if any element within the system fails. Hydra-Ring thus computes and combines failure probabilities of the following elements: - Failure mechanisms: A flood defence system can fail due to different failure mechanisms. - Time periods: failure probabilities are first computed for relatively small time scales (assessment of flood defense systems, Hydra-Ring can also be used to derive fragility curves, to asses the efficiency of flood mitigating measures, and to quantify the impact of climate change and land subsidence on flood risk. Hydra-Ring is being developed in the context of the Dutch situation. However, the computational concept is generic and the model is set up in such a way that it can be applied to other areas as well. The presentation will focus on the model concept and probabilistic computation techniques.

  9. Confidence Level Computation for Combining Searches with Small Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Junk, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    This article describes an efficient procedure for computing approximate confidence levels for searches for new particles where the expected signal and background levels are small enough to require the use of Poisson statistics. The results of many independent searches for the same particle may be combined easily, regardless of the discriminating variables which may be measured for the candidate events. The effects of systematic uncertainty in the signal and background models are incorporated ...

  10. Investigating readiness in the Iranian steel industry through six sigma combined with fuzzy delphi and fuzzy DANP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Barzegar Keliji

    2018-09-01

    Full Text Available In today's competitive world, Six Sigma can serve as a corporate strategy to improve quality and reduce costs. Six Sigma is a comprehensive and flexible system for achieving, maintaining and maximizing organizational success, through an improved performance of processes. However, this tool can only be successful in organizations which are already prepared for Six Sigma implementation. This study investigated the readiness of an Iranian company, Tabarestan Steel Co., in terms of Six Sigma projects. In doing so, the study proposed a model designed for assessing the readiness of Six Sigma in organizations. To this end, primarily Six Sigma readiness indicators were identified through Fuzzy Delphi, by recourse to the experts’ opinions. Next the interrelationships between the indicators were examined through the Fuzzy DEMATEL method. The internal links between the indicators were determined after the examination, and the degree of importance and the weights of the indicators were decided. Ultimately, three highly important dimensions were discovered that had a significant function in Six Sigma implementation (leadership and perspective, corporate strategy, and focus on the customer.

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  12. Interactive Rhythm Learning System by Combining Tablet Computers and Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsing Chou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a percussion learning device that combines tablet computers and robots. This device comprises two systems: a rhythm teaching system, in which users can compose and practice rhythms by using a tablet computer, and a robot performance system. First, teachers compose the rhythm training contents on the tablet computer. Then, the learners practice these percussion exercises by using the tablet computer and a small drum set. The teaching system provides a new and user-friendly score editing interface for composing a rhythm exercise. It also provides a rhythm rating function to facilitate percussion training for children and improve the stability of rhythmic beating. To encourage children to practice percussion exercises, a robotic performance system is used to interact with the children; this system can perform percussion exercises for students to listen to and then help them practice the exercise. This interaction enhances children’s interest and motivation to learn and practice rhythm exercises. The results of experimental course and field trials reveal that the proposed system not only increases students’ interest and efficiency in learning but also helps them in understanding musical rhythms through interaction and composing simple rhythms.

  13. Cognitive Readiness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrison, John

    2002-01-01

    Cognitive readiness is described as the mental preparation an individual needs to establish and sustain competent performance in the complex and unpredictable environment of modern military operations...

  14. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  15. Helicopter fuselage drag - combined computational fluid dynamics and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batrakov, A.; Kusyumov, A.; Mikhailov, S.; Pakhov, V.; Sungatullin, A.; Valeev, M.; Zherekhov, V.; Barakos, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, wind tunnel experiments are combined with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) aiming to analyze the aerodynamics of realistic fuselage configurations. A development model of the ANSAT aircraft and an early model of the AKTAI light helicopter were employed. Both models were tested at the subsonic wind tunnel of KNRTU-KAI for a range of Reynolds numbers and pitch and yaw angles. The force balance measurements were complemented by particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigations for the cases where the experimental force measurements showed substantial unsteadiness. The CFD results were found to be in fair agreement with the test data and revealed some flow separation at the rear of the fuselages. Once confidence on the CFD method was established, further modifications were introduced to the ANSAT-like fuselage model to demonstrate drag reduction via small shape changes.

  16. Evaluating mobile centric readiness of students: A case of computer science students in open-distance learning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chipangura, B

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available and Education]: Distance learning Keywords Mobile centric services, mobile information access, mobile readiness 1. INTRODUCTION As the mobile phone market matures in terms of penetration rate, subscription rate, handsets functionality and mobile centric..., this reflects a ratio of one mobile phone per person. High mobile phone penetration has made it possible for digitally alienated communities in developing countries to have improved access to business, health, education and social services. Indeed, this has...

  17. Efficacy of Combined Sous Vide-Microwave Cooking for Foodborne Pathogen Inactivation in Ready-to-Eat Chicory Stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renna, Massimiliano; Gonnella, Maria; de Candia, Silvia; Serio, Francesco; Baruzzi, Federico

    2017-07-01

    There is a variety of different food processing methods, which can be used to prepare ready-to-eat foods. However, the need to preserve the freshness and nutritional qualities leads to the application of mild technologies which may be insufficient to inactivate microbial pathogens. In this work, fresh chicory stems were packed under a vacuum in films, which were transparent to microwaves. These were then exposed to microwaves for different periods of time. The application of sous vide microwave cooking (SV-MW, 900 W, 2450 MHz), controlled naturally occurring mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds for up to 30 d when vacuum-packed vegetables were stored at 4 °C. In addition, the process lethality of the SV-MW 90 s cooking was experimentally validated. This treatment led to 6.07 ± 0.7 and 4.92 ± 0.65 log cfu/g reduction of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated over the chicory stems (100 g), respectively. With an initial load of 9 log cfu/g for both pathogens, less than 10 cfu/g of surviving cells were found after 90 s cooking. This shows that short-time microwave cooking can be used to effectively pasteurize vacuum-packed chicory stems, achieving >5 log cfu/g reduction of E. coli and L. monocytogenes. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  18. Combined effects of gamma irradiation and rosemary extract on the shelf-life of a ready-to-eat hamburger steak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.W.Ju-Woon; Park, K.S.Kyung-Sook; Kim, J.G.Jong-Goon; Oh, S.H.Sang-Hee; Lee, Y.S.You-Seok; Kim, J.H.Jang-Ho; Byun, M.W.Myung-Woo. E-mail: mwbyun@nanum.kaeri.re.krmwbyun@kaeri.re.kr

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the combined treatment of gamma irradiation and rosemary extract powder (rosemary) for improving the quality of a ready-to-eat hamburger steak by changing the storage condition from frozen (-20 deg. C) to a chilled temperature (4 deg. C), an accelerated storage test was carried out. The hamburger steak was prepared with 200 or 500 ppm of rosemary, or 200 ppm of butylated hydroxyanisole by a commercially used recipe, gamma irradiated at absorbed doses of 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 kGy, and stored at 30 deg. C. From the microbiological aspect, irradiation at 20 kGy or a higher dose was needed to inactivate the normal microflora. Little effect of the antioxidant was, if any, observed. Thiobarbituric acid values were not very different during storage regardless of the irradiation dose and the addition of the antioxidant. Textural and sensory results were also not significantly different in all the samples.

  19. Combined effects of gamma irradiation and rosemary extract on the shelf-life of a ready-to-eat hamburger steak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.W.Ju-Woon; Park, K.S.Kyung-Sook; Kim, J.G.Jong-Goon; Oh, S.H.Sang-Hee; Lee, Y.S.You-Seok; Kim, J.H.Jang-Ho; Byun, M.W.Myung-Woo.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the combined treatment of gamma irradiation and rosemary extract powder (rosemary) for improving the quality of a ready-to-eat hamburger steak by changing the storage condition from frozen (-20 deg. C) to a chilled temperature (4 deg. C), an accelerated storage test was carried out. The hamburger steak was prepared with 200 or 500 ppm of rosemary, or 200 ppm of butylated hydroxyanisole by a commercially used recipe, gamma irradiated at absorbed doses of 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 kGy, and stored at 30 deg. C. From the microbiological aspect, irradiation at 20 kGy or a higher dose was needed to inactivate the normal microflora. Little effect of the antioxidant was, if any, observed. Thiobarbituric acid values were not very different during storage regardless of the irradiation dose and the addition of the antioxidant. Textural and sensory results were also not significantly different in all the samples

  20. A trial to combine heterogeneous computer systems in NIFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emoto, M.; Watanabe, K.; Ohdachi, S.; Matsunami, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Sudo, S.; Okumura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Several computer systems in NIFS (the National Institute for Fusion Science) are involved in the operation of the LHD (Large Helical Device) for plasma experiments. Because these systems are independent of each other, it is burdensome to the programmers and the researchers to use several of them for one project. Currently, the programmers must write low-level data access routines for each system, then the researchers, after having learned these routines, can install the applications to retrieve the data on each system. In order to improve this situation, we have been developing a new system. This system employs two technologies, the signed applet and HORB, to combine the independent systems. These technologies were chosen for the following reasons: (1) The signed applet is an applet free from the general restrictions of applets, and can connect to any server and save the retrieved data to client machines; and (2) HORB is the Java-based ORB (Object Request Broker), the use of which makes it easy to build a Java-based, distributed environment. When the system is completed, it will allow users to obtain data from the above independent systems by means of ordinary Web browsers, without having to install additional applications

  1. The combination of quantitative PCR and western blot detecting CP4-EPSPS component in Roundup Ready soy plant tissues and commercial soy-related foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Wu, Honghong; Zhou, Xinghu; Xu, Sheng; He, Jian; Shen, Wenbiao; Zhou, Guanghong; Huang, Ming

    2012-06-01

    With the widespread use of Roundup Ready soy (event 40-3-2) (RRS), the comprehensive detection of genetically modified component in foodstuffs is of significant interest, but few protein-based approaches have been found useful in processed foods. In this report, the combination of quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blot was used to detect cp4-epsps gene and its protein product in different RRS plant tissues and commercial soy-containing foodstuffs. The foods included those of plant origin produced by different processing procedures and also some products containing both meat and plant protein concentrates. The validity of the 2 methods was confirmed first. We also showed that the CP4-EPSPS protein existed in different RRS plant tissues. In certain cases, the results from the western blot and the qPCR were not consistent. To be specific, at least 2 degraded fragments of CP4-EPSPS protein (35.5 and 24.6 kDa) were observed. For dried bean curd crust and deep-fried bean curd, a degraded protein fragment with the size of 24.6 kDa appeared, while cp4-epsps gene could not be traced by qPCR. In contrast, we found a signal of cp4-epsps DNA in 3 foodstuffs, including soy-containing ham cutlet product, meat ball, and sausage by qPCR, while CP4-EPSPS protein could not be detected by western blot in such samples. Our study therefore concluded that the combination of DNA- and protein-based methods would compensate each other, thus resulting in a more comprehensive detection from nucleic acid and protein levels. The combination of quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blot was used to detect cp4-epsps gene and its protein product in different Roundup Ready soy (event 40-3-2) plant tissues and commercial soy-containing foodstuffs. The foods included those of plant origin produced by different processing procedures and also some products containing a combination of both meat and plant protein concentrates. This study indicated that the combination of DNA- and protein-based methods

  2. Effect of combination processing on the microbial, chemical and sensory quality of ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetable pulav

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; George, Johnsy; Rajamanickam, R.; Nataraju, S.; Sabhapathy, S.N.; Bawa, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Effect of irradiation in combination with retort processing on the shelf life and safety aspects of an ethnic Indian food product like vegetable pulav was investigated. Gamma irradiation of RTE vegetable pulav was carried out at different dosage rates with 60 Co followed by retort processing. The combination processed samples were analysed for microbiological, chemical and sensory characteristics. Microbiological analysis indicated that irradiation in combination with retort processing has significantly reduced the microbial loads whereas the chemical and sensory analysis proved that this combination processing is effective in retaining the properties even after storage for one year at ambient conditions. The results also indicated that a minimum irradiation dosage at 4.0 kGy along with retort processing at an F 0 value of 2.0 is needed to achieve the desired shelf life with improved organoleptic qualities. - Highlights: → A combination processing involving gamma irradiation and retort processing. → Combination processing reduced microbial loads. → Minimum dose of 4.0 kGy together with retort processing at F 0 -2.0 is required to achieve commercial sterility.

  3. Effect of combination processing on the microbial, chemical and sensory quality of ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetable pulav

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R., E-mail: kumardfrl@gmail.com [Defence Food Research Laboratory, Mysore, Karnataka 570011 (India); George, Johnsy; Rajamanickam, R.; Nataraju, S.; Sabhapathy, S.N.; Bawa, A.S. [Defence Food Research Laboratory, Mysore, Karnataka 570011 (India)

    2011-12-15

    Effect of irradiation in combination with retort processing on the shelf life and safety aspects of an ethnic Indian food product like vegetable pulav was investigated. Gamma irradiation of RTE vegetable pulav was carried out at different dosage rates with {sup 60}Co followed by retort processing. The combination processed samples were analysed for microbiological, chemical and sensory characteristics. Microbiological analysis indicated that irradiation in combination with retort processing has significantly reduced the microbial loads whereas the chemical and sensory analysis proved that this combination processing is effective in retaining the properties even after storage for one year at ambient conditions. The results also indicated that a minimum irradiation dosage at 4.0 kGy along with retort processing at an F{sub 0} value of 2.0 is needed to achieve the desired shelf life with improved organoleptic qualities. - Highlights: > A combination processing involving gamma irradiation and retort processing. > Combination processing reduced microbial loads. > Minimum dose of 4.0 kGy together with retort processing at F{sub 0}-2.0 is required to achieve commercial sterility.

  4. Toward computational cumulative biology by combining models of biological datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Ali; Peltonen, Jaakko; Georgii, Elisabeth; Rung, Johan; Kaski, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    A main challenge of data-driven sciences is how to make maximal use of the progressively expanding databases of experimental datasets in order to keep research cumulative. We introduce the idea of a modeling-based dataset retrieval engine designed for relating a researcher's experimental dataset to earlier work in the field. The search is (i) data-driven to enable new findings, going beyond the state of the art of keyword searches in annotations, (ii) modeling-driven, to include both biological knowledge and insights learned from data, and (iii) scalable, as it is accomplished without building one unified grand model of all data. Assuming each dataset has been modeled beforehand, by the researchers or automatically by database managers, we apply a rapidly computable and optimizable combination model to decompose a new dataset into contributions from earlier relevant models. By using the data-driven decomposition, we identify a network of interrelated datasets from a large annotated human gene expression atlas. While tissue type and disease were major driving forces for determining relevant datasets, the found relationships were richer, and the model-based search was more accurate than the keyword search; moreover, it recovered biologically meaningful relationships that are not straightforwardly visible from annotations-for instance, between cells in different developmental stages such as thymocytes and T-cells. Data-driven links and citations matched to a large extent; the data-driven links even uncovered corrections to the publication data, as two of the most linked datasets were not highly cited and turned out to have wrong publication entries in the database.

  5. Personal computer versus personal computer/mobile device combination users' preclinical laboratory e-learning activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Haruka; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Naoki; Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Yamaga, Yoshiro; Ono, Takahiro

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify differences between personal computer (PC)/mobile device combination and PC-only user patterns. We analyzed access frequency and time spent on a complete denture preclinical website in order to maximize website effectiveness. Fourth-year undergraduate students (N=41) in the preclinical complete denture laboratory course were invited to participate in this survey during the final week of the course to track login data. Students accessed video demonstrations and quizzes via our e-learning site/course program, and were instructed to view online demonstrations before classes. When the course concluded, participating students filled out a questionnaire about the program, their opinions, and devices they had used to access the site. Combination user access was significantly more frequent than PC-only during supplementary learning time, indicating that students with mobile devices studied during lunch breaks and before morning classes. Most students had favorable opinions of the e-learning site, but a few combination users commented that some videos were too long and that descriptive answers were difficult on smartphones. These results imply that mobile devices' increased accessibility encouraged learning by enabling more efficient time use between classes. They also suggest that e-learning system improvements should cater to mobile device users by reducing video length and including more short-answer questions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Elimination of Listeria inoculated in ready-to-eat carrots by combination of antimicrobial coating and γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgis, Mélanie; Millette, Mathieu; Salmieri, Stéphane; Lacroix, Monique

    2012-01-01

    A combined treatment of an edible coating composed of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TCN; 0.5% p/p) with γ-irradiation was investigated against Listeria inoculated in peeled mini-carrots. First, the D 10 value (γ-irradiation dose required to eliminate 90% of the bacterial population) of TCN was evaluated under air. This treatment resulted in a 3.66-fold increase in relative bacterial radiosensitivity (RBR) as compared to the control without antimicrobial coating. Secondly, the shelf life of mini-carrots during 21 day of storage at 4 °C was studied. Antimicrobial coating containing TCN was assayed in combination with two irradiation doses (0.25 and 0.5 kGy). Results suggested that the inactive coating did not have any antimicrobial effect against Listeria while the coating containing TCN resulted in a 1.29 log reduction in carrots packed under air after 21 days of storage. Hence, these observations indicated that the combination of irradiation with antimicrobial coating played an important role in enhancing the radiosensitization of Listeria to γ-irradiation. - Highlights: ► Synergistic effect of essential oils and γ-radiation against food pathogens. ► Reducing any undesirable organoleptic impact due to high concentration of EOs. ► Potential in controlling food pathogens and food spoilage bacteria in food. ► Elimination of Listeria monocytogenes in the carrots during the storage.

  7. Peroxidase activity and sensory quality of ready to cook mixed vegetables for soup: combined effect of biopreservatives and refrigerated storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Victoria Alvarez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic senescence processes and browning of fresh cut vegetables negatively affect their sensory properties and nutritional value and finally result in the rejection of affected products by consumers. In order to prevent quality decay, the combined effects of natural antioxidants and storage temperature on peroxidase activity and sensory attributes (overall visual quality, browning and odor of individual and mixed vegetables for soup (butternut squash, leek and celery were evaluated. Fresh cut vegetables were treated with antioxidant solutions as tea tree essential oil (15 μl/mL, propolis extract (15 μl/mL and gallic acid (2 mg/mL and stored at optimal (5 °C and abusive (15 °C temperature for a maximum of 14 days. The application of natural preservatives, plus optimal storage conditions, exerted significant inhibitory effects in peroxidase activity of squash, celery and mixed vegetables throughout the storage. Furthermore, propolis treatment applied on mixed vegetables retarded browning appearance and preserved the visual quality for a longer period when compared to untreated product.

  8. Combining dynamical decoupling with fault-tolerant quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Hui Khoon; Preskill, John; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    We study how dynamical decoupling (DD) pulse sequences can improve the reliability of quantum computers. We prove upper bounds on the accuracy of DD-protected quantum gates and derive sufficient conditions for DD-protected gates to outperform unprotected gates. Under suitable conditions, fault-tolerant quantum circuits constructed from DD-protected gates can tolerate stronger noise and have a lower overhead cost than fault-tolerant circuits constructed from unprotected gates. Our accuracy estimates depend on the dynamics of the bath that couples to the quantum computer and can be expressed either in terms of the operator norm of the bath's Hamiltonian or in terms of the power spectrum of bath correlations; we explain in particular how the performance of recursively generated concatenated pulse sequences can be analyzed from either viewpoint. Our results apply to Hamiltonian noise models with limited spatial correlations.

  9. Contention Bounds for Combinations of Computation Graphs and Network Topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-08

    notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does...Google, Nokia , NVIDIA, Oracle, MathWorks and Samsung. Also funded by U.S. DOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research...communicate is at least Wproc(P,M,N) = Ω ( n3 PM1/2 ) . Note that the local memory size M appears in the denom- inator of the expression above, which is why

  10. CERN readies world's biggest science grid The computing network now encompasses more than 100 sites in 31 countries

    CERN Multimedia

    Niccolai, James

    2005-01-01

    If the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is to yield miraculous discoveries in particle physics, it may also require a small miracle in grid computing. By a lack of suitable tools from commercial vendors, engineers at the famed Geneva laboratory are hard at work building a giant grid to store and process the vast amount of data the collider is expected to produce when it begins operations in mid-2007 (2 pages)

  11. A Hybrid Computational Intelligence Approach Combining Genetic Programming And Heuristic Classification for Pap-Smear Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakonas, Athanasios; Dounias, Georgios; Jantzen, Jan

    2001-01-01

    The paper suggests the combined use of different computational intelligence (CI) techniques in a hybrid scheme, as an effective approach to medical diagnosis. Getting to know the advantages and disadvantages of each computational intelligence technique in the recent years, the time has come...

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  13. Readiness for Solving Story Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, William F.

    1982-01-01

    Readiness activities are described which are designed to help learning disabled (LD) students learn to perform computations in story problems. Activities proceed from concrete objects to numbers and involve the students in devising story problems. The language experience approach is incorporated with the enactive, iconic, and symbolic levels of…

  14. Primates, computation, and the path to language. Reply to comments on "Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    The target article [6], henceforth TA, had as its main title Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology. This unpacks into three claims: Comparative Primatology: If one wishes to understand the behavior of any one primate species (whether monkey, ape or human - TA did not discuss, e.g., lemurs but that study could well be of interest), one will gain new insight by comparing behaviors across species, sharpening one's analysis of one class of behaviors by analyzing similarities and differences between two or more species.

  15. Computational Replication of the Primary Isotope Dependence of Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effects in Solution Hydride-Transfer Reactions: Supporting the Isotopically Different Tunneling Ready State Conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshani-Molayousefi, Mortaza; Kashefolgheta, Sadra; Eilers, James E; Lu, Yun

    2016-06-30

    We recently reported a study of the steric effect on the 1° isotope dependence of 2° KIEs for several hydride-transfer reactions in solution (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 6653). The unusual 2° KIEs decrease as the 1° isotope changes from H to D, and more in the sterically hindered systems. These were explained in terms of a more crowded tunneling ready state (TRS) conformation in D-tunneling, which has a shorter donor-acceptor distance (DAD) than in H-tunneling. To examine the isotopic DAD difference explanation, in this paper, following an activated motion-assisted H-tunneling model that requires a shorter DAD in a heavier isotope transfer process, we computed the 2° KIEs at various H/D positions at different DADs (2.9 Å to 3.5 Å) for the hydride-transfer reactions from 2-propanol to the xanthylium and thioxanthylium ions (Xn(+) and TXn(+)) and their 9-phenyl substituted derivatives (Ph(T)Xn(+)). The calculated 2° KIEs match the experiments and the calculated DAD effect on the 2° KIEs fits the observed 1° isotope effect on the 2° KIEs. These support the motion-assisted H-tunneling model and the isotopically different TRS conformations. Furthermore, it was found that the TRS of the sterically hindered Ph(T)Xn(+) system does not possess a longer DAD than that of the (T)Xn(+) system. This predicts a no larger 1° KIE in the former system than in the latter. The observed 1° KIE order is, however, contrary to the prediction. This implicates the stronger DAD-compression vibrations coupled to the bulky Ph(T)Xn(+) reaction coordinate.

  16. Providing full point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, Charles J.; Faraj, Daniel A.; Inglett, Todd A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.

    2018-01-30

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for providing full point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer, each compute node connected to each adjacent compute node in the global combining network through a link, that include: receiving a network packet in a compute node, the network packet specifying a destination compute node; selecting, in dependence upon the destination compute node, at least one of the links for the compute node along which to forward the network packet toward the destination compute node; and forwarding the network packet along the selected link to the adjacent compute node connected to the compute node through the selected link.

  17. Combined experimental and computational modelling studies of the solubility of nickel in strontium titanate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beale, A.M.; Paul, M.; Sankar, G.; Oldman, R.J.; Catlow, R.A.; French, S.; Fowles, M.

    2009-01-01

    A combination of X-ray techniques and atomistic computational modelling has been used to study the solubility of Ni in SrTiO3 in relation to the application of this material for the catalytic partial oxidation of methane. The experiments have demonstrated that low temperature, hydrothermal synthesis

  18. A City Parking Integration System Combined with Cloud Computing Technologies and Smart Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Her-Tyan; Chen, Bing-Chang; Wang, Bo-Xun

    2016-01-01

    The current study applied cloud computing technology and smart mobile devices combined with a streaming server for parking lots to plan a city parking integration system. It is also equipped with a parking search system, parking navigation system, parking reservation service, and car retrieval service. With this system, users can quickly find…

  19. Combining Self-Explaining with Computer Architecture Diagrams to Enhance the Learning of Assembly Language Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Y.-C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of combining self explaining (SE) with computer architecture diagrams to help novice students learn assembly language programming. Pre- and post-test scores for the experimental and control groups were compared and subjected to covariance (ANCOVA) statistical analysis. Results indicate that the SE-plus-diagram…

  20. Antibacterial activity of Rosmarinus officinalis L. and Thymus vulgaris L. essential oils and their combination against food-borne pathogens and spoilage bacteria in ready-to-eat vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseppi, Ramona; Sabia, Carla; de Niederhäusern, Simona; Pellati, Federica; Benvenuti, Stefania; Tardugno, Roberta; Bondi, Moreno; Messi, Patrizia

    2018-06-06

    The antibacterial activity of Rosmarinus officinalis L. and Thymus vulgaris L. essential oils (EOs), and their combination against food-borne and spoilage bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enteritidis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas spp.) was determined. The EOs inhibitory effect was evaluated both in vitro by using the disk diffusion assay and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination, and on food by using an artificially contaminated ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetables. The results showed that the lowest MIC values were obtained with R. officinalis and T. vulgaris EOs against E. coli (4 and 8 μL/mL, respectively). The incorporation of the EOs alone or their combination in RTE vegetables reduced the viable counts of all the tested strains. Lastly, in the on food study we simulated the worst hygienic conditions, obtaining results that can be considered a warranty of safety.

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  2. Heat Transfer Computations of Internal Duct Flows With Combined Hydraulic and Thermal Developing Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Towne, C. E.; Hippensteele, S. A.; Poinsatte, P. E.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the Navier-Stokes computations of the surface heat transfer coefficients of a transition duct flow. A transition duct from an axisymmetric cross section to a non-axisymmetric cross section, is usually used to connect the turbine exit to the nozzle. As the gas turbine inlet temperature increases, the transition duct is subjected to the high temperature at the gas turbine exit. The transition duct flow has combined development of hydraulic and thermal entry length. The design of the transition duct required accurate surface heat transfer coefficients. The Navier-Stokes computational method could be used to predict the surface heat transfer coefficients of a transition duct flow. The Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical computational code was used in this study. The code was first studied for the computations of the turbulent developing flow properties within a circular duct and a square duct. The code was then used to compute the turbulent flow properties of a transition duct flow. The computational results of the surface pressure, the skin friction factor, and the surface heat transfer coefficient were described and compared with their values obtained from theoretical analyses or experiments. The comparison showed that the Navier-Stokes computation could predict approximately the surface heat transfer coefficients of a transition duct flow.

  3. Combining Acceleration Techniques for Low-Dose X-Ray Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, image quality in low-dose computed tomography has been greatly improved by various compressive sensing- (CS-) based reconstruction methods. However, these methods have some disadvantages including high computational cost and slow convergence rate. Many different speed-up techniques for CS-based reconstruction algorithms have been developed. The purpose of this paper is to propose a fast reconstruction framework that combines a CS-based reconstruction algorithm with several speed-up techniques. First, total difference minimization (TDM) was implemented using the soft-threshold filtering (STF). Second, we combined TDM-STF with the ordered subsets transmission (OSTR) algorithm for accelerating the convergence. To further speed up the convergence of the proposed method, we applied the power factor and the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm to OSTR and TDM-STF, respectively. Results obtained from simulation and phantom studies showed that many speed-up techniques could be combined to greatly improve the convergence speed of a CS-based reconstruction algorithm. More importantly, the increased computation time (≤10%) was minor as compared to the acceleration provided by the proposed method. In this paper, we have presented a CS-based reconstruction framework that combines several acceleration techniques. Both simulation and phantom studies provide evidence that the proposed method has the potential to satisfy the requirement of fast image reconstruction in practical CT.

  4. [Computational fluid dynamics simulation of different impeller combinations in high viscosity fermentation and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuhao; Zhu, Ping; Xu, Xiaoying; Li, Sha; Jiang, Yongxiang; Xu, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Agitator is one of the essential factors to realize high efficient fermentation for high aerobic and viscous microorganisms, and the influence of different impeller combination on the fermentation process is very important. Welan gum is a microbial exopolysaccharide produced by Alcaligenes sp. under high aerobic and high viscos conditions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulation was used for analyzing the distribution of velocity, shear rate and gas holdup in the welan fermentation reactor under six different impeller combinations. The best three combinations of impellers were applied to the fermentation of welan. By analyzing the fermentation performance, the MB-4-6 combination had better effect on dissolved oxygen and velocity. The content of welan was increased by 13%. Furthermore, the viscosity of production were also increased.

  5. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The first data taking period of November produced a first scientific paper, and this is a very satisfactory step for Computing. It also gave the invaluable opportunity to learn and debrief from this first, intense period, and make the necessary adaptations. The alarm procedures between different groups (DAQ, Physics, T0 processing, Alignment/calibration, T1 and T2 communications) have been reinforced. A major effort has also been invested into remodeling and optimizing operator tasks in all activities in Computing, in parallel with the recruitment of new Cat A operators. The teams are being completed and by mid year the new tasks will have been assigned. CRB (Computing Resource Board) The Board met twice since last CMS week. In December it reviewed the experience of the November data-taking period and could measure the positive improvements made for the site readiness. It also reviewed the policy under which Tier-2 are associated with Physics Groups. Such associations are decided twice per ye...

  8. An online hybrid brain-computer interface combining multiple physiological signals for webpage browse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long Chen; Zhongpeng Wang; Feng He; Jiajia Yang; Hongzhi Qi; Peng Zhou; Baikun Wan; Dong Ming

    2015-08-01

    The hybrid brain computer interface (hBCI) could provide higher information transfer rate than did the classical BCIs. It included more than one brain-computer or human-machine interact paradigms, such as the combination of the P300 and SSVEP paradigms. Research firstly constructed independent subsystems of three different paradigms and tested each of them with online experiments. Then we constructed a serial hybrid BCI system which combined these paradigms to achieve the functions of typing letters, moving and clicking cursor, and switching among them for the purpose of browsing webpages. Five subjects were involved in this study. They all successfully realized these functions in the online tests. The subjects could achieve an accuracy above 90% after training, which met the requirement in operating the system efficiently. The results demonstrated that it was an efficient system capable of robustness, which provided an approach for the clinic application.

  9. Realization of the Evristic Combination Methods by Means of Computer Graphics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Novoselov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the ways of enhancing and stimulating the creative activity and initiative of pedagogic students – the prospective specialists called for educating and upbringing socially and professionally competent, originally thinking, versatile personalities. For developing their creative abilities the author recommends introducing the heuristic combination methods, applied for engineering creativity facilitation; associative-synectic technology; and computer graphics tools. The paper contains the comparative analysis of the main heuristic method operations and the computer graphics redactor in creating a visual composition. The examples of implementing the heuristic combination methods are described along with the extracts of the laboratory classes designed for creativity and its motivation developments. The approbation of the given method in the several universities confirms the prospects of enhancing the students’ learning and creative activities. 

  10. Combined computational and experimental approach to improve the assessment of mitral regurgitation by echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Simon J; Li, Wei; Becker, Michael; Kaestner, Wiebke; Büsen, Martin R; Marx, Nikolaus; Merhof, Dorit; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most frequent valvular heart diseases. To assess MR severity, color Doppler imaging (CDI) is the clinical standard. However, inadequate reliability, poor reproducibility and heavy user-dependence are known limitations. A novel approach combining computational and experimental methods is currently under development aiming to improve the quantification. A flow chamber for a circulatory flow loop was developed. Three different orifices were used to mimic variations of MR. The flow field was recorded simultaneously by a 2D Doppler ultrasound transducer and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted using the same geometry and boundary conditions. The resulting computed velocity field was used to simulate synthetic Doppler signals. Comparison between PIV and CFD shows a high level of agreement. The simulated CDI exhibits the same characteristics as the recorded color Doppler images. The feasibility of the proposed combination of experimental and computational methods for the investigation of MR is shown and the numerical methods are successfully validated against the experiments. Furthermore, it is discussed how the approach can be used in the long run as a platform to improve the assessment of MR quantification.

  11. Computational Identification of Potential Multi-drug Combinations for Reduction of Microglial Inflammation in Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Anastasio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Like other neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer Disease (AD has a prominent inflammatory component mediated by brain microglia. Reducing microglial inflammation could potentially halt or at least slow the neurodegenerative process. A major challenge in the development of treatments targeting brain inflammation is the sheer complexity of the molecular mechanisms that determine whether microglia become inflammatory or take on a more neuroprotective phenotype. The process is highly multifactorial, raising the possibility that a multi-target/multi-drug strategy could be more effective than conventional monotherapy. This study takes a computational approach in finding combinations of approved drugs that are potentially more effective than single drugs in reducing microglial inflammation in AD. This novel approach exploits the distinct advantages of two different computer programming languages, one imperative and the other declarative. Existing programs written in both languages implement the same model of microglial behavior, and the input/output relationships of both programs agree with each other and with data on microglia over an extensive test battery. Here the imperative program is used efficiently to screen the model for the most efficacious combinations of 10 drugs, while the declarative program is used to analyze in detail the mechanisms of action of the most efficacious combinations. Of the 1024 possible drug combinations, the simulated screen identifies only 7 that are able to move simulated microglia at least 50% of the way from a neurotoxic to a neuroprotective phenotype. Subsequent analysis shows that of the 7 most efficacious combinations, 2 stand out as superior both in strength and reliability. The model offers many experimentally testable and therapeutically relevant predictions concerning effective drug combinations and their mechanisms of action.

  12. Computational identification of potential multi-drug combinations for reduction of microglial inflammation in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Like other neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer Disease (AD) has a prominent inflammatory component mediated by brain microglia. Reducing microglial inflammation could potentially halt or at least slow the neurodegenerative process. A major challenge in the development of treatments targeting brain inflammation is the sheer complexity of the molecular mechanisms that determine whether microglia become inflammatory or take on a more neuroprotective phenotype. The process is highly multifactorial, raising the possibility that a multi-target/multi-drug strategy could be more effective than conventional monotherapy. This study takes a computational approach in finding combinations of approved drugs that are potentially more effective than single drugs in reducing microglial inflammation in AD. This novel approach exploits the distinct advantages of two different computer programming languages, one imperative and the other declarative. Existing programs written in both languages implement the same model of microglial behavior, and the input/output relationships of both programs agree with each other and with data on microglia over an extensive test battery. Here the imperative program is used efficiently to screen the model for the most efficacious combinations of 10 drugs, while the declarative program is used to analyze in detail the mechanisms of action of the most efficacious combinations. Of the 1024 possible drug combinations, the simulated screen identifies only 7 that are able to move simulated microglia at least 50% of the way from a neurotoxic to a neuroprotective phenotype. Subsequent analysis shows that of the 7 most efficacious combinations, 2 stand out as superior both in strength and reliability. The model offers many experimentally testable and therapeutically relevant predictions concerning effective drug combinations and their mechanisms of action.

  13. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  14. Computational Combination of the Optical Properties of Fenestration Layers at High Directional Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Oliver Grobe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex fenestration systems typically comprise co-planar, clear and scattering layers. As there are many ways to combine layers in fenestration systems, a common approach in building simulation is to store optical properties separate for each layer. System properties are then computed employing a fast matrix formalism, often based on a directional basis devised by JHKlems comprising 145 incident and 145 outgoing directions. While this low directional resolution is found sufficient to predict illuminance and solar gains, it is too coarse to replicate the effects of directionality in the generation of imagery. For increased accuracy, a modification of the matrix formalism is proposed. The tensor-tree format of RADIANCE, employing an algorithm subdividing the hemisphere at variable resolutions, replaces the directional basis. The utilization of the tensor-tree with interfaces to simulation software allows sharing and re-use of data. The light scattering properties of two exemplary fenestration systems as computed employing the matrix formalism at variable resolution show good accordance with the results of ray-tracing. Computation times are reduced to 0.4% to 2.5% compared to ray-tracing through co-planar layers. Imagery computed employing the method illustrates the effect of directional resolution. The method is supposed to foster research in the field of daylighting, as well as applications in planning and design.

  15. Readiness for Living Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peronard, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a comparative analysis between workers in healthcare with high and low degree of readiness for living technology such as robotics. To explore the differences among workers’ readiness for robotics in healthcare, statistical analysis was conducted in the data set obtained from 200...

  16. Combining Archetypes, Ontologies and Formalization Enables Automated Computation of Quality Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaz-García, María Del Carmen; Dentler, Kathrin; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Cornet, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    ArchMS is a framework that represents clinical information and knowledge using ontologies in OWL, which facilitates semantic interoperability and thereby the exploitation and secondary use of clinical data. However, it does not yet support the automated assessment of quality of care. CLIF is a stepwise method to formalize quality indicators. The method has been implemented in the CLIF tool which supports its users in generating computable queries based on a patient data model which can be based on archetypes. To enable the automated computation of quality indicators using ontologies and archetypes, we tested whether ArchMS and the CLIF tool can be integrated. We successfully automated the process of generating SPARQL queries from quality indicators that have been formalized with CLIF and integrated them into ArchMS. Hence, ontologies and archetypes can be combined for the execution of formalized quality indicators.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engine Flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daines, Russell L.; Merkle, Charles L.

    1994-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic techniques are used to study the flowfield of a fixed geometry Rocket Based Combined Cycle engine operating in rocket ejector mode. Heat addition resulting from the combustion of injected fuel causes the subsonic engine flow to choke and go supersonic in the slightly divergent combustor-mixer section. Reacting flow computations are undertaken to predict the characteristics of solutions where the heat addition is determined by the flowfield. Here, adaptive gridding is used to improve resolution in the shear layers. Results show that the sonic speed is reached in the unheated portions of the flow first, while the heated portions become supersonic later. Comparison with results from another code show reasonable agreement. The coupled solutions show that the character of the combustion-based thermal choking phenomenon can be controlled reasonably well such that there is opportunity to optimize the length and expansion ratio of the combustor-mixer.

  18. Computed tomography diagnosis of neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy combined with intracranial hemorrhage and clinical nursing treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Zhang, J L; Li, Y

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), one of the common causes of newborn invalidism, is likely to induce nervous system-associated sequelae and even intracranial hemorrhage in severe cases. The incidence rate of HIE has been rising in recent years. In order to study the clinical nursing effect for HIE combined with intracranial hemorrhage, 76 newborns diagnosed with HIE combined with intracranial hemorrhage by spiral computed tomography (CT) from the of Binzhou People’s Hospital, Shandong, China were selected. They were divided into a control group and an intervention group. The control group received routine nursing, while the intervention group received comprehensive nursing intervention. The experimental results suggested that the mental developmental index (MDI) value and the psychomotor developmental index (PDI) value of patients in the intervention group were much higher than those of the control group and the difference was significant (phemorrhage recover more effectively, therefore is worth applying.

  19. Simulation of computational fluid dynamics and comparison of cephalosporin C fermentation performance with different impeller combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Shengbing; Ni, Weijia; Luo, Hongzhen; Shi, Zhongping; Liu, Fan; Yuan, Guoqiang; Zhao, Yanli

    2013-01-01

    Cephalosporin C (CPC) fermentation by Acremonium chrysogenum is an extremely high oxygen-consuming process and oxygen transfer rate in a bioreactor directly affects fermentation performance. In this study, fluid dynamics and oxygen transfer in a 7 L bioreactor with different impellers combinations were simulated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Based on the simulation results, two impeller combinations with higher oxygen transfer rate (K_La) were selected to conduct CPC fermentations, aiming at achieving high CPC concentration and low accumulation of major by-product, deacetoxycephalosporin (DAOC). It was found that an impeller combination with a higher K_La and moderate shear force is the prerequisite for efficient CPC production in a stirred bioreactor. The best impeller combination, which installed a six-bladed turbine and a four-pitched-blade turbine at bottom and upper layers but with a shortened impellers inter-distance, produced the highest CPC concentration of 35.77 g/L and lowest DAOC/CPC ratio of 0.5%

  20. Simulation of computational fluid dynamics and comparison of cephalosporin C fermentation performance with different impeller combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Shengbing; Ni, Weijia; Luo, Hongzhen; Shi, Zhongping; Liu, Fan [Jiangnan University, Wuxi (China); Yuan, Guoqiang; Zhao, Yanli [CSPC Hebei Zhongrun Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Shijiazhuang (China)

    2013-05-15

    Cephalosporin C (CPC) fermentation by Acremonium chrysogenum is an extremely high oxygen-consuming process and oxygen transfer rate in a bioreactor directly affects fermentation performance. In this study, fluid dynamics and oxygen transfer in a 7 L bioreactor with different impellers combinations were simulated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Based on the simulation results, two impeller combinations with higher oxygen transfer rate (K{sub L}a) were selected to conduct CPC fermentations, aiming at achieving high CPC concentration and low accumulation of major by-product, deacetoxycephalosporin (DAOC). It was found that an impeller combination with a higher K{sub L}a and moderate shear force is the prerequisite for efficient CPC production in a stirred bioreactor. The best impeller combination, which installed a six-bladed turbine and a four-pitched-blade turbine at bottom and upper layers but with a shortened impellers inter-distance, produced the highest CPC concentration of 35.77 g/L and lowest DAOC/CPC ratio of 0.5%.

  1. Optimal steel thickness combined with computed radiography for portal imaging of nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shixiu; Jin Xiance; Xie Congying; Cao Guoquan

    2005-01-01

    The poor image quality of conventional metal screen-film portal imaging system has long been of concern, and various methods have been investigated in an attempt to enhance the quality of portal images. Computed radiography (CR) used in combination with a steel plate displays image enhancement. The optimal thickness of the steel plate had been studied by measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) characteristics. Portal images of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were taken by both a conventional metal screen-film system and this optimal steel and CR plate combination system. Compared with a conventional metal screen-film system, the CR-metal screen system achieves a much higher image contrast. The measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the CR combination is greater than conventional film-screen portal imaging systems and also results in superior image performance, as demonstrated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. This optimal combination steel CR plate portal imaging system is capable of producing high contrast portal images conveniently

  2. Exploring combinations of auditory and visual stimuli for gaze-independent brain-computer interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei An

    Full Text Available For Brain-Computer Interface (BCI systems that are designed for users with severe impairments of the oculomotor system, an appropriate mode of presenting stimuli to the user is crucial. To investigate whether multi-sensory integration can be exploited in the gaze-independent event-related potentials (ERP speller and to enhance BCI performance, we designed a visual-auditory speller. We investigate the possibility to enhance stimulus presentation by combining visual and auditory stimuli within gaze-independent spellers. In this study with N = 15 healthy users, two different ways of combining the two sensory modalities are proposed: simultaneous redundant streams (Combined-Speller and interleaved independent streams (Parallel-Speller. Unimodal stimuli were applied as control conditions. The workload, ERP components, classification accuracy and resulting spelling speed were analyzed for each condition. The Combined-speller showed a lower workload than uni-modal paradigms, without the sacrifice of spelling performance. Besides, shorter latencies, lower amplitudes, as well as a shift of the temporal and spatial distribution of discriminative information were observed for Combined-speller. These results are important and are inspirations for future studies to search the reason for these differences. For the more innovative and demanding Parallel-Speller, where the auditory and visual domains are independent from each other, a proof of concept was obtained: fifteen users could spell online with a mean accuracy of 87.7% (chance level <3% showing a competitive average speed of 1.65 symbols per minute. The fact that it requires only one selection period per symbol makes it a good candidate for a fast communication channel. It brings a new insight into the true multisensory stimuli paradigms. Novel approaches for combining two sensory modalities were designed here, which are valuable for the development of ERP-based BCI paradigms.

  3. Efficient Discovery of Novel Multicomponent Mixtures for Hydrogen Storage: A Combined Computational/Experimental Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolverton, Christopher [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Ozolins, Vidvuds [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Kung, Harold H. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Yang, Jun [Ford Scientific Research Lab., Dearborn, MI (United States); Hwang, Sonjong [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Shore, Sheldon [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2016-11-28

    The objective of the proposed program is to discover novel mixed hydrides for hydrogen storage, which enable the DOE 2010 system-level goals. Our goal is to find a material that desorbs 8.5 wt.% H2 or more at temperatures below 85°C. The research program will combine first-principles calculations of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics with material and catalyst synthesis, testing, and characterization. We will combine materials from distinct categories (e.g., chemical and complex hydrides) to form novel multicomponent reactions. Systems to be studied include mixtures of complex hydrides and chemical hydrides [e.g. LiNH2+NH3BH3] and nitrogen-hydrogen based borohydrides [e.g. Al(BH4)3(NH3)3]. The 2010 and 2015 FreedomCAR/DOE targets for hydrogen storage systems are very challenging, and cannot be met with existing materials. The vast majority of the work to date has delineated materials into various classes, e.g., complex and metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents. However, very recent studies indicate that mixtures of storage materials, particularly mixtures between various classes, hold promise to achieve technological attributes that materials within an individual class cannot reach. Our project involves a systematic, rational approach to designing novel multicomponent mixtures of materials with fast hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics and favorable thermodynamics using a combination of state-of-the-art scientific computing and experimentation. We will use the accurate predictive power of first-principles modeling to understand the thermodynamic and microscopic kinetic processes involved in hydrogen release and uptake and to design new material/catalyst systems with improved properties. Detailed characterization and atomic-scale catalysis experiments will elucidate the effect of dopants and nanoscale catalysts in achieving fast kinetics and reversibility. And

  4. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronau, Greta; Krishnaji, Sreevidhya T; Kinahan, Michelle E; Giesa, Tristan; Wong, Joyce Y; Kaplan, David L; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-11-01

    Tailored biomaterials with tunable functional properties are desirable for many applications ranging from drug delivery to regenerative medicine. To improve the predictability of biopolymer materials functionality, multiple design parameters need to be considered, along with appropriate models. In this article we review the state of the art of synthesis and processing related to the design of biopolymers, with an emphasis on the integration of bottom-up computational modeling in the design process. We consider three prominent examples of well-studied biopolymer materials - elastin, silk, and collagen - and assess their hierarchical structure, intriguing functional properties and categorize existing approaches to study these materials. We find that an integrated design approach in which both experiments and computational modeling are used has rarely been applied for these materials due to difficulties in relating insights gained on different length- and time-scales. In this context, multiscale engineering offers a powerful means to accelerate the biomaterials design process for the development of tailored materials that suit the needs posed by the various applications. The combined use of experimental and computational tools has a very broad applicability not only in the field of biopolymers, but can be exploited to tailor the properties of other polymers and composite materials in general. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure–process–property relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronau, Greta; Krishnaji, Sreevidhya T.; Kinahan, Michelle E.; Giesa, Tristan; Wong, Joyce Y.; Kaplan, David L.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-01-01

    Tailored biomaterials with tunable functional properties are desirable for many applications ranging from drug delivery to regenerative medicine. To improve the predictability of biopolymer materials functionality, multiple design parameters need to be considered, along with appropriate models. In this article we review the state of the art of synthesis and processing related to the design of biopolymers, with an emphasis on the integration of bottom-up computational modeling in the design process. We consider three prominent examples of well-studied biopolymer materials – elastin, silk, and collagen – and assess their hierarchical structure, intriguing functional properties and categorize existing approaches to study these materials. We find that an integrated design approach in which both experiments and computational modeling are used has rarely been applied for these materials due to difficulties in relating insights gained on different length- and time-scales. In this context, multiscale engineering offers a powerful means to accelerate the biomaterials design process for the development of tailored materials that suit the needs posed by the various applications. The combined use of experimental and computational tools has a very broad applicability not only in the field of biopolymers, but can be exploited to tailor the properties of other polymers and composite materials in general. PMID:22938765

  6. Combining Fog Computing with Sensor Mote Machine Learning for Industrial IoT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavassani, Mehrzad; Forsström, Stefan; Jennehag, Ulf; Zhang, Tingting

    2018-05-12

    Digitalization is a global trend becoming ever more important to our connected and sustainable society. This trend also affects industry where the Industrial Internet of Things is an important part, and there is a need to conserve spectrum as well as energy when communicating data to a fog or cloud back-end system. In this paper we investigate the benefits of fog computing by proposing a novel distributed learning model on the sensor device and simulating the data stream in the fog, instead of transmitting all raw sensor values to the cloud back-end. To save energy and to communicate as few packets as possible, the updated parameters of the learned model at the sensor device are communicated in longer time intervals to a fog computing system. The proposed framework is implemented and tested in a real world testbed in order to make quantitative measurements and evaluate the system. Our results show that the proposed model can achieve a 98% decrease in the number of packets sent over the wireless link, and the fog node can still simulate the data stream with an acceptable accuracy of 97%. We also observe an end-to-end delay of 180 ms in our proposed three-layer framework. Hence, the framework shows that a combination of fog and cloud computing with a distributed data modeling at the sensor device for wireless sensor networks can be beneficial for Industrial Internet of Things applications.

  7. Combining Brain–Computer Interfaces and Assistive Technologies: State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, J. d. R.; Rupp, R.; Müller-Putz, G. R.; Murray-Smith, R.; Giugliemma, C.; Tangermann, M.; Vidaurre, C.; Cincotti, F.; Kübler, A.; Leeb, R.; Neuper, C.; Müller, K.-R.; Mattia, D.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, new research has brought the field of electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain–computer interfacing (BCI) out of its infancy and into a phase of relative maturity through many demonstrated prototypes such as brain-controlled wheelchairs, keyboards, and computer games. With this proof-of-concept phase in the past, the time is now ripe to focus on the development of practical BCI technologies that can be brought out of the lab and into real-world applications. In particular, we focus on the prospect of improving the lives of countless disabled individuals through a combination of BCI technology with existing assistive technologies (AT). In pursuit of more practical BCIs for use outside of the lab, in this paper, we identify four application areas where disabled individuals could greatly benefit from advancements in BCI technology, namely, “Communication and Control”, “Motor Substitution”, “Entertainment”, and “Motor Recovery”. We review the current state of the art and possible future developments, while discussing the main research issues in these four areas. In particular, we expect the most progress in the development of technologies such as hybrid BCI architectures, user–machine adaptation algorithms, the exploitation of users’ mental states for BCI reliability and confidence measures, the incorporation of principles in human–computer interaction (HCI) to improve BCI usability, and the development of novel BCI technology including better EEG devices. PMID:20877434

  8. Combining computer modelling and cardiac imaging to understand right ventricular pump function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, John; van Everdingen, Wouter; Cramer, Maarten J; Prinzen, Frits W; Delhaas, Tammo; Lumens, Joost

    2017-10-01

    Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction is a strong predictor of outcome in heart failure and is a key determinant of exercise capacity. Despite these crucial findings, the RV remains understudied in the clinical, experimental, and computer modelling literature. This review outlines how recent advances in using computer modelling and cardiac imaging synergistically help to understand RV function in health and disease. We begin by highlighting the complexity of interactions that make modelling the RV both challenging and necessary, and then summarize the multiscale modelling approaches used to date to simulate RV pump function in the context of these interactions. We go on to demonstrate how these modelling approaches in combination with cardiac imaging have improved understanding of RV pump function in pulmonary arterial hypertension, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, dyssynchronous heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and repaired tetralogy of Fallot. We conclude with a perspective on key issues to be addressed by computational models of the RV in the near future. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Combining Topological Hardware and Topological Software: Color-Code Quantum Computing with Topological Superconductor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litinski, Daniel; Kesselring, Markus S.; Eisert, Jens; von Oppen, Felix

    2017-07-01

    We present a scalable architecture for fault-tolerant topological quantum computation using networks of voltage-controlled Majorana Cooper pair boxes and topological color codes for error correction. Color codes have a set of transversal gates which coincides with the set of topologically protected gates in Majorana-based systems, namely, the Clifford gates. In this way, we establish color codes as providing a natural setting in which advantages offered by topological hardware can be combined with those arising from topological error-correcting software for full-fledged fault-tolerant quantum computing. We provide a complete description of our architecture, including the underlying physical ingredients. We start by showing that in topological superconductor networks, hexagonal cells can be employed to serve as physical qubits for universal quantum computation, and we present protocols for realizing topologically protected Clifford gates. These hexagonal-cell qubits allow for a direct implementation of open-boundary color codes with ancilla-free syndrome read-out and logical T gates via magic-state distillation. For concreteness, we describe how the necessary operations can be implemented using networks of Majorana Cooper pair boxes, and we give a feasibility estimate for error correction in this architecture. Our approach is motivated by nanowire-based networks of topological superconductors, but it could also be realized in alternative settings such as quantum-Hall-superconductor hybrids.

  10. Combining Topological Hardware and Topological Software: Color-Code Quantum Computing with Topological Superconductor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Litinski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a scalable architecture for fault-tolerant topological quantum computation using networks of voltage-controlled Majorana Cooper pair boxes and topological color codes for error correction. Color codes have a set of transversal gates which coincides with the set of topologically protected gates in Majorana-based systems, namely, the Clifford gates. In this way, we establish color codes as providing a natural setting in which advantages offered by topological hardware can be combined with those arising from topological error-correcting software for full-fledged fault-tolerant quantum computing. We provide a complete description of our architecture, including the underlying physical ingredients. We start by showing that in topological superconductor networks, hexagonal cells can be employed to serve as physical qubits for universal quantum computation, and we present protocols for realizing topologically protected Clifford gates. These hexagonal-cell qubits allow for a direct implementation of open-boundary color codes with ancilla-free syndrome read-out and logical T gates via magic-state distillation. For concreteness, we describe how the necessary operations can be implemented using networks of Majorana Cooper pair boxes, and we give a feasibility estimate for error correction in this architecture. Our approach is motivated by nanowire-based networks of topological superconductors, but it could also be realized in alternative settings such as quantum-Hall–superconductor hybrids.

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CMS relies on a well functioning, distributed computing infrastructure. The Site Availability Monitoring (SAM) and the Job Robot submission have been very instrumental for site commissioning in order to increase availability of more sites such that they are available to participate in CSA07 and are ready to be used for analysis. The commissioning process has been further developed, including "lessons learned" documentation via the CMS twiki. Recently the visualization, presentation and summarizing of SAM tests for sites has been redesigned, it is now developed by the central ARDA project of WLCG. Work to test the new gLite Workload Management System was performed; a 4 times increase in throughput with respect to LCG Resource Broker is observed. CMS has designed and launched a new-generation traffic load generator called "LoadTest" to commission and to keep exercised all data transfer routes in the CMS PhE-DEx topology. Since mid-February, a transfer volume of about 12 P...

  12. Cardiac single-photon emission-computed tomography using combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, Grant T.; Zeng, Gengsheng L.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to increase system sensitivity in cardiac single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) studies without increasing patient imaging time. For imaging the heart, convergent collimation offers the potential of increased sensitivity over that of parallel-hole collimation. However, if a cone-beam collimated gamma camera is rotated in a planar orbit, the projection data obtained are not complete. Two cone-beam collimators and one fan-beam collimator are used with a three-detector SPECT system. The combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation provides a complete set of data for image reconstruction. The imaging geometry is evaluated using data acquired from phantom and patient studies. For the Jaszazck cardiac torso phantom experiment, the combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation provided 1.7 times greater sensitivity than standard parallel-hole collimation (low-energy high-resolution collimators). Also, phantom and patient comparison studies showed improved image quality. The combined cone-beam/fan-beam imaging geometry with appropriate weighting of the two data sets provides improved system sensitivity while measuring sufficient data for artifact free cardiac images

  13. Technology Readiness Level Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This guidebook provides the necessary information for conducting a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Assessment. TRL Assessments are a tool for determining the maturity of technologies and identifying next steps in the research process. This guidebook...

  14. Enhanced inactivation of food-borne pathogens in ready-to-eat sliced ham by near-infrared heating combined with UV-C irradiation and mechanism of the synergistic bactericidal action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jae-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study described in this article was, first, to investigate the effect of the simultaneous application of near-infrared (NIR) heating and UV irradiation on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) sliced ham and as well as its effect on product quality and, second, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of the synergistic bactericidal action of NIR heating and UV irradiation. With the inoculation amounts used, simultaneous NIR-UV combined treatment for 70 s achieved 3.62, 4.17, and 3.43 log CFU reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. For all three pathogens, the simultaneous application of both technologies resulted in an additional log unit reduction as a result of their synergism compared to the sum of the reductions obtained after the individual treatments. To investigate the mechanisms of NIR-UV synergistic injury for a particular microorganism in a food base, we evaluated the effect of four types of metabolic inhibitors using the overlay method and confirmed that damage to cellular membranes and the inability of cells to repair these structures due to ribosomal damage were the primary factors related to the synergistic lethal effect. Additionally, NIR-UV combined treatment for a maximum of 70 s did not alter the color values or texture parameters of ham slices significantly (P > 0.05). These results suggest that a NIR-UV combined process could be an innovative antimicrobial intervention for RTE meat products. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Maintenance of safety and quality of refrigerated ready-to-cook seasoned ground beef product (meatball) by combining gamma irradiation with modified atmosphere packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Gurbuz; Ozturk, Aylin; Yilmaz, Neriman; Ozcelik, Beraat

    2011-08-01

    Meatballs were prepared by mixing ground beef and spices and inoculated with E. coli O157:H7, L. monocytogenes, and S. enteritidis before packaged in modified atmosphere (3% O₂ + 50% CO₂ + 47% N₂) or aerobic conditions. The packaged samples were irradiated at 0.75, 1.5, and 3 kGy doses and stored at 4 °C for 21 d. Survival of the pathogens, total plate count, lipid oxidation, color change, and sensory quality were analyzed during storage. Irradiation at 3 kGy inactivated all the inoculated (approximately 10⁶ CFU/g) S. enteritidis and L. monocytogenes cells in the samples. The inoculated (approximately 10⁶ CFU/g) E. coli O157:H7 cells were totally inactivated by 1.5 kGy irradiation. D¹⁰-values for E. coli O157:H7, S. enteritidis, and L. monocytogenes were 0.24, 0.43, and 0.41 kGy in MAP and 0.22, 0.39, and 0.39 kGy in aerobic packages, respectively. Irradiation at 1.5 and 3 kGy resulted in 0.13 and 0.36 mg MDA/kg increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) reaching 1.02 and 1.49 MDA/kg, respectively, on day 1. Irradiation also caused significant loss of color and sensory quality in aerobic packages. However, MAP effectively inhibited the irradiation-induced quality degradations during 21-d storage. Thus, combining irradiation (3 kGy) and MAP (3% O₂ + 50% CO₂ + 47% N₂) controlled the safety risk due to the potential pathogens and maintained qualities of meatballs during 21-d refrigerated storage. Combined use of gamma irradiation and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) can maintain quality and safety of seasoned ground beef (meatball). Seasoned ground beef can be irradiated at 3 kGy and packaged in MAP with 3% O₂ + 50% CO₂ + 47% N₂ gas mixture in a high barrier packaging materials. These treatments can significantly decrease risk due to potential pathogens including E. coli O157:H7, L. monocytogenes, and S. enteritidis in the product. The MAP would reduce the undesirable effects of

  16. Concrete Plant Operations Optimization Using Combined Simulation and Genetic Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Ming; Lu, Ming; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a new approach for concrete plant operations optimization by combining a ready mixed concrete (RMC) production simulation tool (called HKCONSIM) with a genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization procedure. A revamped HKCONSIM computer system can be used to automate the simulation

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis Method Developed for Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Engine Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Renewed interest in hypersonic propulsion systems has led to research programs investigating combined cycle engines that are designed to operate efficiently across the flight regime. The Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Engine is a propulsion system under development at the NASA Lewis Research Center. This engine integrates a high specific impulse, low thrust-to-weight, airbreathing engine with a low-impulse, high thrust-to-weight rocket. From takeoff to Mach 2.5, the engine operates as an air-augmented rocket. At Mach 2.5, the engine becomes a dual-mode ramjet; and beyond Mach 8, the rocket is turned back on. One Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Engine variation known as the "Strut-Jet" concept is being investigated jointly by NASA Lewis, the U.S. Air Force, Gencorp Aerojet, General Applied Science Labs (GASL), and Lockheed Martin Corporation. Work thus far has included wind tunnel experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) investigations with the NPARC code. The CFD method was initiated by modeling the geometry of the Strut-Jet with the GRIDGEN structured grid generator. Grids representing a subscale inlet model and the full-scale demonstrator geometry were constructed. These grids modeled one-half of the symmetric inlet flow path, including the precompression plate, diverter, center duct, side duct, and combustor. After the grid generation, full Navier-Stokes flow simulations were conducted with the NPARC Navier-Stokes code. The Chien low-Reynolds-number k-e turbulence model was employed to simulate the high-speed turbulent flow. Finally, the CFD solutions were postprocessed with a Fortran code. This code provided wall static pressure distributions, pitot pressure distributions, mass flow rates, and internal drag. These results were compared with experimental data from a subscale inlet test for code validation; then they were used to help evaluate the demonstrator engine net thrust.

  18. Combined X-ray fluorescence and absorption computed tomography using a synchrotron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, C

    2013-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) and fluorescence X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) using synchrotron sources are both useful tools in biomedical imaging research. Synchrotron CT (SRCT) in its various forms is considered an important technique for biomedical imaging since the phase coherence of SR beams can be exploited to obtain images with high contrast resolution. Using a synchrotron as the source for FXCT ensures a fluorescence signal that is optimally detectable by exploiting the beam monochromaticity and polarisation. The ability to combine these techniques so that SRCT and FXCT images are collected simultaneously, would bring distinct benefits to certain biomedical experiments. Simultaneous image acquisition would alleviate some of the registration difficulties which comes from collecting separate data, and it would provide increased information about the sample: functional X-ray images from the FXCT, with the morphological information from the SRCT. A method is presented for generating simultaneous SRCT and FXCT images. Proof of principle modelling has been used to show that it is possible to recover a fluorescence image of a point-like source from an SRCT apparatus by suitably modulating the illuminating planar X-ray beam. The projection image can be successfully used for reconstruction by removing the static modulation from the sinogram in the normal flat and dark field processing. Detection of the modulated fluorescence signal using an energy resolving detector allows the position of a fluorescent marker to be obtained using inverse reconstruction techniques. A discussion is made of particular reconstruction methods which might be applied by utilising both the CT and FXCT data.

  19. Is the "Net Generation" Ready for Digital Citizenship? Perspectives from the IEA International Computer and Information Literacy Study 2013. Policy Brief No. 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ryan; Engel, Laura C.; Hastedt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The rise of digital information and communication technologies (ICT) has made the acquisition of computer and information literacy (CIL) a leading factor in creating an engaged, informed, and employable citizenry. However, are young people, often described as "digital natives" or the "net generation," developing the necessary…

  20. Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography for diagnosis of synchronous and metachronous tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatareva, D.; Garcheva, M.; Hadjiiska, V.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Positron emission tomography combined computed tomography (PET/CT) has proved to be the method of choice in oncology for diagnosis and staging, planning and determining the effect of treatment. Aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic capabilities of PET/CT for the detection of synchronous and metachronous tumors. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted with 18F FDG on Discovery, GE Healthcare under standard protocol. 18F FDG is dosed per kg body weight applying before a meal in blood sugar within reference values. The survey was conducted 60 min after application, in addition to visual assessment using quantitative indicators. For a period of a year (2012) 1408 patients were studied. In 11 (2 men, 9 women) of them synchronous and metachronous unsuspected tumors were found. Results: The most common as the second tumors are found processes in the head and neck, followed by lung cancer and colorectal cancer. In four of the cases operational or histological verification was made. In others cases due to refusal or advanced disease indications for systemic therapy the verification wasn't made. Diagnosis of the second tumor has changed the approach to patients as the therapeutic effect was detected at 3 patients over a period of nine months by repeated PET/CT study. Conclusion: The hybrid PET/CT, combining information about structural changes (CT) and metabolic changes (PET) plays an important role in the diagnosis of synchronous and metachronous tumors. This can significantly change the therapeutic management and prognosis of patients

  1. Capture ready study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minchener, A.

    2007-07-15

    There are a large number of ways in which the capture of carbon as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) can be integrated into fossil fuel power stations, most being applicable for both gas and coal feedstocks. To add to the choice of technology is the question of whether an existing plant should be retrofitted for capture, or whether it is more attractive to build totally new. This miscellany of choices adds considerably to the commercial risk of investing in a large power station. An intermediate stage between the non-capture and full capture state would be advantageous in helping to determine the best way forward and hence reduce those risks. In recent years the term 'carbon capture ready' or 'capture ready' has been coined to describe such an intermediate stage plant and is now widely used. However a detailed and all-encompassing definition of this term has never been published. All fossil fuel consuming plant produce a carbon dioxide gas byproduct. There is a possibility of scrubbing it with an appropriate CO{sub 2} solvent. Hence it could be said that all fossil fuel plant is in a condition for removal of its CO{sub 2} effluent and therefore already in a 'capture ready' state. Evidently, the practical reality of solvent scrubbing could cost more than the rewards offered by such as the ETS (European Trading Scheme). In which case, it can be said that although the possibility exists of capturing CO{sub 2}, it is not a commercially viable option and therefore the plant could not be described as ready for CO{sub 2} capture. The boundary between a capture ready and a non-capture ready condition using this definition cannot be determined in an objective and therefore universally acceptable way and criteria must be found which are less onerous and less potentially contentious to assess. 16 refs., 2 annexes.

  2. Challenges and insights for situated language processing: Comment on "Towards a computational comparative neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain" by Michael A. Arbib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeferle, Pia

    2016-03-01

    In his review article [19], Arbib outlines an ambitious research agenda: to accommodate within a unified framework the evolution, the development, and the processing of language in natural settings (implicating other systems such as vision). He does so with neuro-computationally explicit modeling in mind [1,2] and inspired by research on the mirror neuron system in primates. Similar research questions have received substantial attention also among other scientists [3,4,12].

  3. Bioremediation in marine ecosystems: a computational study combining ecological modelling and flux balance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna eTaffi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The pressure to search effective bioremediation methodologies for contaminated ecosystems has led to the large-scale identification of microbial species and metabolic degradation pathways. However, minor attention has been paid to the study of bioremediation in marine food webs and to the definition of integrated strategies for reducing bioaccumulation in species. We propose a novel computational framework for analysing the multiscale effects of bioremediation at the ecosystem level, based on coupling food web bioaccumulation models and metabolic models of degrading bacteria. The combination of techniques from synthetic biology and ecological network analysis allows the specification of arbitrary scenarios of contaminant removal and the evaluation of strategies based on natural or synthetic microbial strains.In this study, we derive a bioaccumulation model of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs in the Adriatic food web, and we extend a metabolic reconstruction of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (iJN746 with the aerobic pathway of PCBs degradation. We assess the effectiveness of different bioremediation scenarios in reducing PCBs concentration in species and we study indices of species centrality to measure their importance in the contaminant diffusion via feeding links.The analysis of the Adriatic sea case study suggests that our framework could represent a practical tool in the design of effective remediation strategies, providing at the same time insights into the ecological role of microbial communities within food webs.

  4. Computer-Aided Grading of Gliomas Combining Automatic Segmentation and Radiomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors, and the objective grading is of great importance for treatment. This paper presents an automatic computer-aided diagnosis of gliomas that combines automatic segmentation and radiomics, which can improve the diagnostic ability. The MRI data containing 220 high-grade gliomas and 54 low-grade gliomas are used to evaluate our system. A multiscale 3D convolutional neural network is trained to segment whole tumor regions. A wide range of radiomic features including first-order features, shape features, and texture features is extracted. By using support vector machines with recursive feature elimination for feature selection, a CAD system that has an extreme gradient boosting classifier with a 5-fold cross-validation is constructed for the grading of gliomas. Our CAD system is highly effective for the grading of gliomas with an accuracy of 91.27%, a weighted macroprecision of 91.27%, a weighted macrorecall of 91.27%, and a weighted macro-F1 score of 90.64%. This demonstrates that the proposed CAD system can assist radiologists for high accurate grading of gliomas and has the potential for clinical applications.

  5. Efficient computation of the elastography inverse problem by combining variational mesh adaption and a clustering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Alexander; Bruhns, Otto T; Reichling, Stefan; Mosler, Joern

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with an efficient implementation suitable for the elastography inverse problem. More precisely, the novel algorithm allows us to compute the unknown stiffness distribution in soft tissue by means of the measured displacement field by considerably reducing the numerical cost compared to previous approaches. This is realized by combining and further elaborating variational mesh adaption with a clustering technique similar to those known from digital image compression. Within the variational mesh adaption, the underlying finite element discretization is only locally refined if this leads to a considerable improvement of the numerical solution. Additionally, the numerical complexity is reduced by the aforementioned clustering technique, in which the parameters describing the stiffness of the respective soft tissue are sorted according to a predefined number of intervals. By doing so, the number of unknowns associated with the elastography inverse problem can be chosen explicitly. A positive side effect of this method is the reduction of artificial noise in the data (smoothing of the solution). The performance and the rate of convergence of the resulting numerical formulation are critically analyzed by numerical examples.

  6. Combined multi-kernel head computed tomography images optimized for depicting both brain parenchyma and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Satoshi; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Kita, Tamotsu; Hayashi, Katsumi; Sanada, Shigeru; Koike, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid convolution kernel technique for computed tomography (CT) is known to enable the depiction of an image set using different window settings. Our purpose was to decrease the number of artifacts in the hybrid convolution kernel technique for head CT and to determine whether our improved combined multi-kernel head CT images enabled diagnosis as a substitute for both brain (low-pass kernel-reconstructed) and bone (high-pass kernel-reconstructed) images. Forty-four patients with nondisplaced skull fractures were included. Our improved multi-kernel images were generated so that pixels of >100 Hounsfield unit in both brain and bone images were composed of CT values of bone images and other pixels were composed of CT values of brain images. Three radiologists compared the improved multi-kernel images with bone images. The improved multi-kernel images and brain images were identically displayed on the brain window settings. All three radiologists agreed that the improved multi-kernel images on the bone window settings were sufficient for diagnosing skull fractures in all patients. This improved multi-kernel technique has a simple algorithm and is practical for clinical use. Thus, simplified head CT examinations and fewer images that need to be stored can be expected.

  7. Diagnostic performance of combined noninvasive coronary angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging using 320 row detector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavere, Andrea L; Simon, Gregory G; George, Richard T

    2013-01-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a promising modality for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high diagnostic accuracy as found in previous studies using 64 to 320 simultaneous detector rows. It is, however, limited in its ability...... to detect myocardial ischemia. In this article, we describe the design of the CORE320 study ("Combined coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial perfusion evaluation using 320 detector row computed tomography"). This prospective, multicenter, multinational study is unique in that it is designed to assess...... the diagnostic performance of combined 320-row CTA and myocardial CT perfusion imaging (CTP) in comparison with the combination of invasive coronary angiography and single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI). The trial is being performed at 16 medical centers located in 8...

  8. Combination of artificial intelligence and procedural language programs in a computer application system supporting nuclear reactor operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Town, G.G.; Stratton, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    A computer application system is described which provides nuclear reactor power plant operators with an improved decision support system. This system combines traditional computer applications such as graphics display with artificial intelligence methodologies such as reasoning and diagnosis so as to improve plant operability. This paper discusses the issues, and a solution, involved with the system integration of applications developed using traditional and artificial intelligence languages

  9. Combination of artificial intelligence and procedural language programs in a computer application system supporting nuclear reactor operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, R.C.; Town, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    A computer application system is described which provides nuclear reactor power plant operators with an improved decision support system. This system combines traditional computer applications such as graphics display with artifical intelligence methodologies such as reasoning and diagnosis so as to improve plant operability. This paper discusses the issues, and a solution, involved with the system integration of applications developed using traditional and artificial intelligence languages

  10. School Readiness Factor Analyzed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Anton; Scott, Leland H.

    This paper is an empirical statistical analysis and interpretation of data relating to school readiness previously examined and reported on a theoretical basis. A total of 118 white, middle class children from six consecutive kindergarten groups in Dearborn, Michigan were tested with seven instruments, evaluated in terms of achievement, ability,…

  11. GIS Readiness Survey 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Lise; Hvingel, Line Træholt; Hansen, Henning Sten

    2014-01-01

    The GIS Readiness Survey 2014 is a follow-up to the corresponding survey that was carried out among public institutions in Denmark in 2009. The present survey thus provides an updated image of status and challenges in relation to the use of spatial information, the construction of the com- mon...

  12. Reprint of: Energetics of 2- and 3-coumaranone isomers: A combined calorimetric and computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Clara C.S.; Matos, M. Agostinha R.; Santos, Luís M.N.B.F.; Morais, Victor M.F.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental standard molar enthalpies of formation, sublimation of 2- and 3-coumaranone. • Mini-bomb combustion calorimetry, sublimation Calvet microcalorimetry. • DFT methods and high level composite ab initio calculations. • Theoretical estimate of the enthalpy of formation of isobenzofuranone. • Chemical shift (NICS) and the relative stability of the isomers. - Abstract: Condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation for 2-coumaranone and 3-coumaranone were derived from the standard molar enthalpies of combustion, in oxygen, at T = 298.15 K, measured by mini-bomb combustion calorimetry. Standard molar enthalpies of sublimation of both isomers were determined by Calvet microcalorimetry. These results were combined to derive the standard molar enthalpies of formation of the compounds, in gas phase, at T = 298.15 K. Additionally, accurate quantum chemical calculations have been performed using DFT methods and high level composite ab initio calculations. Theoretical estimates of the enthalpies of formation of the compounds are in good agreement with the experimental values thus supporting the predictions of the same parameters for isobenzofuranone, an isomer which has not been experimentally studied. The relative stability of these isomers has been evaluated by experimental and computational results. The importance of some stabilizing electronic intramolecular interactions has been studied and quantitatively evaluated through Natural Bonding Orbital (NBO) analysis of the wave functions and the nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS) of the studied systems have been calculated in order to study and establish the effect of electronic delocalization upon the relative stability of the isomers

  13. A combined experimental and computational thermodynamic study of fluorene-9-methanol and fluorene-9-carboxylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Juliana A.S.A.; Calvinho, Maria M.; Notario, R.; Monte, Manuel J.S.; Ribeiro da Silva, Maria D.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic study of two fluorene derivatives is presented. • Vapour pressures and energies of combustion were measured. • Enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs energy of sublimation were derived. • Enthalpy and Gibbs energy of formation in crystal and gas phases were calculated. • Gas phase enthalpy of formation was also estimated by quantum chemical calculations. -- Abstract: This work reports an experimental and computational thermodynamic study performed on two 9-fluorene derivatives: fluorene-9-methanol and fluorene-9-carboxylic acid. The standard (p o = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation in the crystalline phase of these compounds were derived from the standard molar energies of combustion, in oxygen, at T = 298.15 K, measured by static bomb combustion calorimetry. A static method, based on a capacitance diaphragm gauge, and a Knudsen effusion method were used to perform the vapour pressure study of the referred compounds, yielding accurate determination of the standard molar enthalpies and entropies of sublimation and vaporisation. For fluorene-9-carboxylic acid, the enthalpy of sublimation was also determined using Calvet microcalorimetry. The enthalpy of fusion of both compounds was derived indirectly from vapour pressure results and directly from DSC experiments. Combining the thermodynamic parameters of the compounds studied, the standard Gibbs energy of formation in crystalline and gaseous phases were derived as well as the standard molar enthalpy of formation in the gaseous phase. A theoretical study at the G3 and G4 levels has been carried out, and the calculated enthalpies of formation have been compared with the experimental values

  14. Energetics of 2- and 3-coumaranone isomers: A combined calorimetric and computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Clara C.S.; Matos, M. Agostinha R.; Santos, Luís M.N.B.F.; Morais, Victor M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental standard molar enthalpies of formation, sublimation of 2- and 3-coumaranone. • Mini-bomb combustion calorimetry, sublimation Calvet microcalorimetry. • DFT methods and high level composite ab initio calculations. • Theoretical estimate of the enthalpy of formation of isobenzofuranone. • Chemical shift (NICS) and the relative stability of the isomers. -- Abstract: Condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation for 2-coumaranone and 3-coumaranone were derived from the standard molar enthalpies of combustion, in oxygen, at T = 298.15 K, measured by mini-bomb combustion calorimetry. Standard molar enthalpies of sublimation of both isomers were determined by Calvet microcalorimetry. These results were combined to derive the standard molar enthalpies of formation of the compounds, in gas phase, at T = 298.15 K. Additionally, accurate quantum chemical calculations have been performed using DFT methods and high level composite ab initio calculations. Theoretical estimates of the enthalpies of formation of the compounds are in good agreement with the experimental values thus supporting the predictions of the same parameters for isobenzofuranone, an isomer which has not been experimentally studied. The relative stability of these isomers has been evaluated by experimental and computational results. The importance of some stabilizing electronic intramolecular interactions has been studied and quantitatively evaluated through Natural Bonding Orbital (NBO) analysis of the wave functions and the nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS) of the studied systems have been calculated in order to study and establish the effect of electronic delocalization upon the relative stability of the isomers

  15. An EGS4-ready tomographic computational model of a 14-year-old female torso for calculating organ doses from CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, M.; School of Physics and Electronic Systems Engineering, University of South Australia, The Levels Campus, Mawson Lakes, South Australia, 5095; Pattison, J.

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-four consecutive CT scans have been used to construct a tomographic computational model of a 14-year-old female torso suitable for the determination of organ doses from CT. The model, known as ADELAIDE, is in the form of an input file compatible with user codes based on XYZDOS.MOR from the readily available EGS4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. ADELAIDE's dimensions are close to the Australian averages for her age so the model is representative of a 14-year-old girl. The realistic anatomy in the model differs considerably from that in Cristy's 15-year-old mathematical computational model by having realistically shaped organs that are appropriately located within a real external contour. Average absorbed dose to organs from simulated CT examinations of the chest and abdomen have been calculated for ADELAIDE using EGS4 within a geometry specific to the General Electric Hi-Speed Advantage CT scanner and using an x-ray spectrum calculated using data from the scanner's x-ray tube. The simulations include the scanner's beam shaping filter and patient table. It is suggested that the resulting values have fewer possible sources of uncertainty than organ doses derived from dose coefficients calculated for a MIRD style model with mathematical anatomy and a spectrum that may not match that of the scanner. The organ doses were normalized using the scanner's CTDI measured free-in-air and an EGS4 simulation of the CTDI measurement. Effective dose to the torso from 26-slice chest and 24-slice abdomen examinations (at 120 kV, 200 mAs, 7 mm slices) is 4.6±0.1mSv and 4.3±0.1mSv respectively. (author)

  16. T and D-Bench--Innovative Combined Support for Education and Research in Computer Architecture and Embedded Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, S. N.; Wagner, F. R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching and Design Workbench (T&D-Bench) is a framework aimed at education and research in the areas of computer architecture and embedded systems. It includes a set of features not found in other educational environments. This set of features is the result of an original combination of design requirements for T&D-Bench: that the…

  17. Dual-Modality Imaging of the Human Finger Joint Systems by Using Combined Multispectral Photoacoustic Computed Tomography and Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a homemade dual-modality imaging system that combines multispectral photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound computed tomography for reconstructing the structural and functional information of human finger joint systems. The fused multispectral photoacoustic-ultrasound computed tomography (MPAUCT system was examined by the phantom and in vivo experimental tests. The imaging results indicate that the hard tissues such as the bones and the soft tissues including the blood vessels, the tendon, the skins, and the subcutaneous tissues in the finger joints systems can be effectively recovered by using our multimodality MPAUCT system. The developed MPAUCT system is able to provide us with more comprehensive information of the human finger joints, which shows its potential for characterization and diagnosis of bone or joint diseases.

  18. Information Assurance and Forensic Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangalos, Georgios; Katos, Vasilios

    Egalitarianism and justice are amongst the core attributes of a democratic regime and should be also secured in an e-democratic setting. As such, the rise of computer related offenses pose a threat to the fundamental aspects of e-democracy and e-governance. Digital forensics are a key component for protecting and enabling the underlying (e-)democratic values and therefore forensic readiness should be considered in an e-democratic setting. This position paper commences from the observation that the density of compliance and potential litigation activities is monotonically increasing in modern organizations, as rules, legislative regulations and policies are being constantly added to the corporate environment. Forensic practices seem to be departing from the niche of law enforcement and are becoming a business function and infrastructural component, posing new challenges to the security professionals. Having no a priori knowledge on whether a security related event or corporate policy violation will lead to litigation, we advocate that computer forensics need to be applied to all investigatory, monitoring and auditing activities. This would result into an inflation of the responsibilities of the Information Security Officer. After exploring some commonalities and differences between IS audit and computer forensics, we present a list of strategic challenges the organization and, in effect, the IS security and audit practitioner will face.

  19. Managing Military Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    These metrics contain critical information and have their place in readiness management. However, they have never been sufficient to fully...demand signals along with simultaneity assumptions form the es- sence of the operational requirements in national strategy. This section briefly... places demands on the capability and capacity of the Air Force that consume its resources in today’s fight and exceed our capacity to address

  20. K-Reactor readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    This document describes some of the more significant accomplishments in the reactor restart program and details the magnitude and extent of the work completed to bring K-Reactor to a state of restart readiness. The discussion of restart achievements is organized into the three major categories of personnel, programs, and plant. Also presented is information on the scope and extent of internal and external oversight of the efforts, as well as some details on the startup plan

  1. Effectiveness of intensive smoking reduction counselling plus combination nicotine replacement therapy in promoting long-term abstinence in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease not ready to quit smoking: Protocol of the REDUQ trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagens, Petra; Pieterse, Marcel E.; van der Valk, Paul; van der Palen, Job

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Limited tobacco dependence treatment resources exist for smoking COPD patients not ready to quit. Smoking reduction may be a viable treatment approach if it prompts quit attempts and subsequent abstinence. This article describes the protocol of the REDUQ (REDUce and Quit) study, which

  2. Structural analysis of magnetic fusion energy systems in a combined interactive/batch computer environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.E.; Singhal, M.K.; Walls, J.C.; Gray, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    A system of computer programs has been developed to aid in the preparation of input data for and the evaluation of output data from finite element structural analyses of magnetic fusion energy devices. The system utilizes the NASTRAN structural analysis computer program and a special set of interactive pre- and post-processor computer programs, and has been designed for use in an environment wherein a time-share computer system is linked to a batch computer system. In such an environment, the analyst must only enter, review and/or manipulate data through interactive terminals linked to the time-share computer system. The primary pre-processor programs include NASDAT, NASERR and TORMAC. NASDAT and TORMAC are used to generate NASTRAN input data. NASERR performs routine error checks on this data. The NASTRAN program is run on a batch computer system using data generated by NASDAT and TORMAC. The primary post-processing programs include NASCMP and NASPOP. NASCMP is used to compress the data initially stored on magnetic tape by NASTRAN so as to facilitate interactive use of the data. NASPOP reads the data stored by NASCMP and reproduces NASTRAN output for selected grid points, elements and/or data types

  3. Comparison of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography, hydro-stomach computed tomography, and their combination for detecting primary gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hye Young; Chung, Woo Suk; Song, E Rang; Kim, Jin Suk [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Konyang University Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    To retrospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy for detecting primary gastric cancer on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and hydro-stomach CT (S-CT) and determine whether the combination of the two techniques improves diagnostic performance. A total of 253 patients with pathologically proven primary gastric cancer underwent PET/CT and S-CT for the preoperative evaluation. Two radiologists independently reviewed the three sets (PET/CT set, S-CT set, and the combined set) of PET/CT and S-CT in a random order. They graded the likelihood for the presence of primary gastric cancer based on a 4-point scale. The diagnostic accuracy of the PET/CT set, the S-CT set, and the combined set were determined by the area under the alternative-free receiver operating characteristic curve, and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and NPV for detecting all gastric cancers and early gastric cancers (EGCs) were significantly higher with the combined set than those with the PET/CT and S-CT sets. Specificity and PPV were significantly higher with the PET/CT set than those with the combined and S-CT set for detecting all gastric cancers and EGCs. The combination of PET/CT and S-CT is more accurate than S-CT alone, particularly for detecting EGCs.

  4. Comparison of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography, hydro-stomach computed tomography, and their combination for detecting primary gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Hye Young; Chung, Woo Suk; Song, E Rang; Kim, Jin Suk

    2015-01-01

    To retrospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy for detecting primary gastric cancer on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and hydro-stomach CT (S-CT) and determine whether the combination of the two techniques improves diagnostic performance. A total of 253 patients with pathologically proven primary gastric cancer underwent PET/CT and S-CT for the preoperative evaluation. Two radiologists independently reviewed the three sets (PET/CT set, S-CT set, and the combined set) of PET/CT and S-CT in a random order. They graded the likelihood for the presence of primary gastric cancer based on a 4-point scale. The diagnostic accuracy of the PET/CT set, the S-CT set, and the combined set were determined by the area under the alternative-free receiver operating characteristic curve, and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and NPV for detecting all gastric cancers and early gastric cancers (EGCs) were significantly higher with the combined set than those with the PET/CT and S-CT sets. Specificity and PPV were significantly higher with the PET/CT set than those with the combined and S-CT set for detecting all gastric cancers and EGCs. The combination of PET/CT and S-CT is more accurate than S-CT alone, particularly for detecting EGCs.

  5. A Computer-Aided Diagnosis System for Breast Cancer Combining Digital Mammography and Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    Huang, "Breast cancer diagnosis using self-organizing map for sonography." Ultrasound Med. Biol. 26, 405 (2000). 20 K. Horsch, M.L. Giger, L.A. Venta ...L.A. Venta , "Performance of computer-aided diagnosis in the interpretation of lesions on breast sonography." Acad Radiol 11, 272 (2004). 22 W. Chen...418. 27. Horsch K, Giger ML, Vyborny CJ, Venta LA. Performance of computer-aided diagnosis in the interpretation of lesions on breast sonography

  6. Diagnostic performance of combined single photon emission computed tomographic scintimammography and ultrasonography based on computer-aided diagnosis for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Choi, Duck Joo; Choe, Won Sick; Lee, Jun Gu; Kim, Jong Hyo; Lee, Hyung Ji; Om, Kyong Sik; Lee, Byeong Il

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the diagnostic performance of SPECT scintimammography (SMM) can be improved by adding computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of ultrasonography (US). We reviewed breast SPECT SMM images and corresponding US images from 40 patients with breast masses (21 malignant and 19 benign tumors.) The quantitative data of SPECT SMM were obtained as the uptake ratio of lesion to contralateral normal breast. The morphologic features of the breast lesions on US were extracted and quantitated using the automated CAD software program. The diagnostic performance of SPECT SMM and CAD of US alone was determined using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The best discriminating parameter (D-value) combining SPECT SMM and the CAD of US was created. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of combined two diagnostic modalities were compared to those of a single one. Both SPECT SMM and CAD of US showed a relatively good diagnostic performance (area under curve=0.846 and 0.831, respectively). Combining the results of SPECT SMM and CAD of US resulted in improved diagnostic performance (area under curve=0.860), but there was no statistical difference in sensitivity, specificity and accuracy between the combined method and a single modality. It seems that combining the results of SPECT SMM and CAD of breast US do not significantly improve the diagnostic performance for diagnosis of breast cancer, compared with that of SPECT SMM alone. However, SPECT SMM and CAD of US may complement each other in differential diagnosis of breast cancer

  7. A combined experimental and computational investigation of excess molar enthalpies of (nitrobenzene + alkanol) mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neyband, Razieh Sadat; Zarei, Hosseinali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Excess molar enthalpies for the binary mixtures of nitrobenzene + alkanols mixtures were measured. • The infinite dilution excess partial molar enthalpies were calculated using the ab initio methods. • The PCM calculations were performed. • The computed excess partial molar enthalpies at infinite dilution were compared to experimental results. - Abstract: Excess molar enthalpies (H m E ) for the binary mixtures of {(nitrobenzene + ethanol), 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol and 2-butanol} have been measured over the entire composition range at ambient pressure (81.5 kPa) and temperature 298 K using a Parr 1455 solution calorimeter. From the experimental results, the excess partial molar enthalpies (H i E ) and excess partial molar enthalpies at infinite dilution (H i E,∞ ) were calculated. The excess molar enthalpies (H m E ) are positive for all {nitrobenzene (1) + alkanol (2)} mixtures over the entire composition range. A state-of-the-art computational strategy for the evaluation of excess partial molar enthalpies at infinite dilution was followed at the M05-2X/6-311++G ∗∗ level of theory with the PCM model. The experimental excess partial molar enthalpies at infinite dilution have been compared to the computational data of the ab initio in liquid phase. Integrated experimental and computational results help to clarify the nature of the intermolecular interactions in {nitrobenzene (1) + alkanol (2)} mixtures. The experimental and computational work which was done in this study complements and extends the general research on the computation of excess partial molar enthalpy at infinite dilution of binary mixtures

  8. Computer aided molecular design with combined molecular modeling and group contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harper, Peter Mathias; Gani, Rafiqul; Kolar, Petr

    1999-01-01

    Computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) provides a means for determining molecules or mixtures of molecules (CAMMD) having a desirable set of physicochemical properties. The application range of CAMD is restricted due to limitations on the complexity of the generated molecular structures and on th......Computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) provides a means for determining molecules or mixtures of molecules (CAMMD) having a desirable set of physicochemical properties. The application range of CAMD is restricted due to limitations on the complexity of the generated molecular structures...

  9. Combined computational and experimental study of Ar beam induced defect formation in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregler, Sharon K.; Hayakawa, Tetsuichiro; Yasumatsu, Hisato; Kondow, Tamotsu; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation of graphite, commonly used in nuclear power plants, is known to produce structural damage. Here, experimental and computational methods are used to study defect formation in graphite during Ar irradiation at incident energies of 50 eV. The experimental samples are analyzed with scanning tunneling microscopy to quantify the size distribution of the defects that form. The computational approach is classical molecular dynamic simulations that illustrate the mechanisms by which the defects are produced. The results indicate that defects in graphite grow in concentrated areas and are nucleated by the presence of existing defects

  10. A Computer-Aided Diagnosis System for Breast Cancer Combining Mammography and Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    for sonography,” Ultrasound Med. Biol. 26, 405-411 2000. 20K. Horsch, M. L. Giger, L. A. Venta , and C. J. Vyborny, “Computerized diagnosis of breast...lesions on ultrasound,” Med. Phys. 29, 157-164 2002. 21K. Horsch, M. L. Giger, C. J. Vyborny, and L. A. Venta , “Performance of computer-aided...Horsch K, Giger ML, Vyborny CJ, Venta LA. Performance of computer-aided diagnosis in the interpretation of lesions on breast sonography. Acad Radiol

  11. Career Readiness: Has Its Time Finally Come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) released a "What Is Career Ready?" definition. As the career-readiness definition explains, there is much overlap between "college readiness" and "career readiness," but academic preparedness for college alone is not enough to be truly career-ready.…

  12. On Combining Multiple-Instance Learning and Active Learning for Computer-Aided Detection of Tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melendez Rodriguez, J.C.; Ginneken, B. van; Maduskar, P.; Philipsen, R.H.H.M.; Ayles, H.; Sanchez, C.I.

    2016-01-01

    The major advantage of multiple-instance learning (MIL) applied to a computer-aided detection (CAD) system is that it allows optimizing the latter with case-level labels instead of accurate lesion outlines as traditionally required for a supervised approach. As shown in previous work, a MIL-based

  13. Computational studies of a cut-wire pair and combined metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Thanh Tung; Lievens, Peter; Lee, Young Pak; Vu, Dinh Lam

    2011-01-01

    The transfer-matrix method and finite-integration simulations show how the transmission properties of combined metamaterials, which consist of metallic cut-wire pairs and continuous wires, are affected by geometric parameters. The corresponding effective permittivity and permeability are retrieved from the complex scattering parameters using the standard retrieval procedure. The electromagnetic properties of the cut-wire pair as well as the left-handed behavior of the combined structure are understood by the effective medium theory. In addition, the dimensional dependence of transmission properties, the shapes of cut-wire pairs and continuous wire, and the impact of dielectric spacer are both examined. Finally, by expanding the results of previous research (Koschny et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 016608), we generalize the transmission picture of combined structures in terms of the correlation between electric and magnetic responses. (review)

  14. PV ready roofing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The integration of PV technology into roofs of houses has become very popular in the United States, Japan, Germany and The Netherlands. There could be a considerable market in the UK for these systems, given the large number of houses that are projected to be built in the next 10 years, and taking account of increased awareness of energy issues. A significant proportion of the market share of annual installed PV is for solar PV systems installed into homes (currently 15%), this is expected to rise to 23% (900MW) by 2010. The grid connected roof and building mounted facade systems represent the fastest growing market for PV systems in Europe. In conclusion, therefore, innovative approached for fixing PV technology onto roofs have been identified for both domestic roofs and for the commercial sector. With reference to production methodologies within the roofing industry, both approaches should be capable of being designed with PV-ready connections suitable for fixing PV modules at a later date. This will help overcome the key barriers of cost of installation, skills required and the lack of retrofit potential. Based on the results of this project, Sustainable Energy together with PV Systems are keen to take forward the full research and development of PV-ready systems for both the domestic and commercial sectors.

  15. First results from a combined analysis of CERN computing infrastructure metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellmann, Dirk; Nieke, Christian

    2017-10-01

    The IT Analysis Working Group (AWG) has been formed at CERN across individual computing units and the experiments to attempt a cross cutting analysis of computing infrastructure and application metrics. In this presentation we will describe the first results obtained using medium/long term data (1 months — 1 year) correlating box level metrics, job level metrics from LSF and HTCondor, IO metrics from the physics analysis disk pools (EOS) and networking and application level metrics from the experiment dashboards. We will cover in particular the measurement of hardware performance and prediction of job duration, the latency sensitivity of different job types and a search for bottlenecks with the production job mix in the current infrastructure. The presentation will conclude with the proposal of a small set of metrics to simplify drawing conclusions also in the more constrained environment of public cloud deployments.

  16. Brain readiness and the nature of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Denis

    2015-01-01

    To identify the neural components that make a brain ready for language, it is important to have well defined linguistic phenotypes, to know precisely what language is. There are two central features to language: the capacity to form signs (words), and the capacity to combine them into complex structures. We must determine how the human brain enables these capacities. A sign is a link between a perceptual form and a conceptual meaning. Acoustic elements and content elements, are already brain-internal in non-human animals, but as categorical systems linked with brain-external elements. Being indexically tied to objects of the world, they cannot freely link to form signs. A crucial property of a language-ready brain is the capacity to process perceptual forms and contents offline, detached from any brain-external phenomena, so their "representations" may be linked into signs. These brain systems appear to have pleiotropic effects on a variety of phenotypic traits and not to be specifically designed for language. Syntax combines signs, so the combination of two signs operates simultaneously on their meaning and form. The operation combining the meanings long antedates its function in language: the primitive mode of predication operative in representing some information about an object. The combination of the forms is enabled by the capacity of the brain to segment vocal and visual information into discrete elements. Discrete temporal units have order and juxtaposition, and vocal units have intonation, length, and stress. These are primitive combinatorial processes. So the prior properties of the physical and conceptual elements of the sign introduce combinatoriality into the linguistic system, and from these primitive combinatorial systems derive concatenation in phonology and combination in morphosyntax. Given the nature of language, a key feature to our understanding of the language-ready brain is to be found in the mechanisms in human brains that enable the unique

  17. Brain readiness and the nature of language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis eBouchard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To identify the neural components that make a brain ready for language, it is important to have well defined linguistic phenotypes, to know precisely what language is. There are two central features to language: the capacity to form signs (words, and the capacity to combine them into complex structures. We must determine how the human brain enables these capacities.A sign is a link between a perceptual form and a conceptual meaning. Acoustic elements and content elements, are already brain-internal in non-human animals, but as categorical systems linked with brain-external elements. Being indexically tied to objects of the world, they cannot freely link to form signs. A crucial property of a language-ready brain is the capacity to process perceptual forms and contents offline, detached from any brain-external phenomena, so their representations may be linked into signs. These brain systems appear to have pleiotropic effects on a variety of phenotypic traits and not to be specifically designed for language.Syntax combines signs, so the combination of two signs operates simultaneously on their meaning and form. The operation combining the meanings long antedates its function in language: the primitive mode of predication operative in representing some information about an object. The combination of the forms is enabled by the capacity of the brain to segment vocal and visual information into discrete elements. Discrete temporal units have order and juxtaposition, and vocal units have intonation, length, and stress. These are primitive combinatorial processes. So the prior properties of the physical and conceptual elements of the sign introduce combinatoriality into the linguistic system, and from these primitive combinatorial systems derive concatenation in phonology and combination in morphosyntax.Given the nature of language, a key feature to our understanding of the language-ready brain is to be found in the mechanisms in human brains that

  18. A combined mechanistic and computational study of the gold(I)-catalyzed formation of substituted indenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nun, Pierrick; Gaillard, Sylvain; Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi; Nolan, Steven P

    2011-01-07

    Substituted indenes can be prepared after a sequence [1,3] O-acyl shift-hydroarylation-[1,3] O-acyl shift. Each step is catalyzed by a cationic NHC-Gold(I) species generated in situ after reaction between [(IPr)AuOH] and HBF(4)·OEt(2). This interesting silver-free way is fully supported by a computational study justifying the formation of each intermediate.

  19. Objective definition of rosette shape variation using a combined computer vision and data mining approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anyela Camargo

    Full Text Available Computer-vision based measurements of phenotypic variation have implications for crop improvement and food security because they are intrinsically objective. It should be possible therefore to use such approaches to select robust genotypes. However, plants are morphologically complex and identification of meaningful traits from automatically acquired image data is not straightforward. Bespoke algorithms can be designed to capture and/or quantitate specific features but this approach is inflexible and is not generally applicable to a wide range of traits. In this paper, we have used industry-standard computer vision techniques to extract a wide range of features from images of genetically diverse Arabidopsis rosettes growing under non-stimulated conditions, and then used statistical analysis to identify those features that provide good discrimination between ecotypes. This analysis indicates that almost all the observed shape variation can be described by 5 principal components. We describe an easily implemented pipeline including image segmentation, feature extraction and statistical analysis. This pipeline provides a cost-effective and inherently scalable method to parameterise and analyse variation in rosette shape. The acquisition of images does not require any specialised equipment and the computer routines for image processing and data analysis have been implemented using open source software. Source code for data analysis is written using the R package. The equations to calculate image descriptors have been also provided.

  20. Quantitative analysis of bowel gas by plain abdominal radiograph combined with computer image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yan; Peng Kewen; Zhang Houde; Shen Bixian; Xiao Hanxin; Cai Juan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To establish a method for quantitative analysis of bowel gas by plain abdominal radiograph and computer graphics. Methods: Plain abdominal radiographs in supine position from 25 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 20 health controls were studied. A gastroenterologist and a radiologist independently conducted the following procedure on each radiograph. After the outline of bowel gas was traced by axe pen, the radiograph was digitized by a digital camera and transmitted to the computer with Histogram software. The total gas area was determined as the pixel value on images. The ratio of the bowel gas quantity to the pixel value in the region surrounded by a horizontal line tangential to the superior pubic symphysis margin, a horizontal line tangential to the tenth dorsal vertebra inferior margin, and the lateral line tangential to the right and left anteriosuperior iliac crest, was defined as the gas volume score (GVS). To examine the sequential reproducibility, a second plain abdominal radiograph was performed in 5 normal controls 1 week later, and the GVS were compared. Results: Bowel gas was easily identified on the plain abdominal radiograph. Both large and small intestine located in the selected region. Both observers could finish one radiographic measurement in less than 10 mins. The correlation coefficient between the two observers was 0.986. There was no statistical difference on GVS between the two sequential radiographs in 5 health controls. Conclusion: Quantification of bowel gas based on plain abdominal radiograph and computer is simple, rapid, and reliable

  1. Combining a Novel Computer Vision Sensor with a Cleaning Robot to Achieve Autonomous Pig House Cleaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nils Axel; Braithwaite, Ian David; Blanke, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    condition based cleaning. This paper describes how a novel sensor, developed for the purpose, and algorithms for classification and learning are combined with a commercial robot to obtain an autonomous system which meets the necessary quality attributes. These include features to make selective cleaning...

  2. Combining computational models for landslide hazard assessment of Guantánamo province, Cuba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos Abella, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the Cuban system for landslide disaster management, a methodology was developed for regional scale landslide hazard assessment, which is a combination of different models. The method was applied in Guantánamo province at 1:100 000 scale. The analysis started with an extensive aerial

  3. The use of combined single photon emission computed tomography and X-ray computed tomography to assess the fate of inhaled aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, John; Conway, Joy; Majoral, Caroline; Tossici-Bolt, Livia; Katz, Ira; Caillibotte, Georges; Perchet, Diane; Pichelin, Marine; Muellinger, Bernhard; Martonen, Ted; Kroneberg, Philipp; Apiou-Sbirlea, Gabriela

    2011-02-01

    Gamma camera imaging is widely used to assess pulmonary aerosol deposition. Conventional planar imaging provides limited information on its regional distribution. In this study, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was used to describe deposition in three dimensions (3D) and combined with X-ray computed tomography (CT) to relate this to lung anatomy. Its performance was compared to planar imaging. Ten SPECT/CT studies were performed on five healthy subjects following carefully controlled inhalation of radioaerosol from a nebulizer, using a variety of inhalation regimes. The 3D spatial distribution was assessed using a central-to-peripheral ratio (C/P) normalized to lung volume and for the right lung was compared to planar C/P analysis. The deposition by airway generation was calculated for each lung and the conducting airways deposition fraction compared to 24-h clearance. The 3D normalized C/P ratio correlated more closely with 24-h clearance than the 2D ratio for the right lung [coefficient of variation (COV), 9% compared to 15% p computer analysis is a useful approach for applications requiring regional information on deposition.

  4. Monitoring of facial stress during space flight: Optical computer recognition combining discriminative and generative methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinges, David F.; Venkataraman, Sundara; McGlinchey, Eleanor L.; Metaxas, Dimitris N.

    2007-02-01

    Astronauts are required to perform mission-critical tasks at a high level of functional capability throughout spaceflight. Stressors can compromise their ability to do so, making early objective detection of neurobehavioral problems in spaceflight a priority. Computer optical approaches offer a completely unobtrusive way to detect distress during critical operations in space flight. A methodology was developed and a study completed to determine whether optical computer recognition algorithms could be used to discriminate facial expressions during stress induced by performance demands. Stress recognition from a facial image sequence is a subject that has not received much attention although it is an important problem for many applications beyond space flight (security, human-computer interaction, etc.). This paper proposes a comprehensive method to detect stress from facial image sequences by using a model-based tracker. The image sequences were captured as subjects underwent a battery of psychological tests under high- and low-stress conditions. A cue integration-based tracking system accurately captured the rigid and non-rigid parameters of different parts of the face (eyebrows, lips). The labeled sequences were used to train the recognition system, which consisted of generative (hidden Markov model) and discriminative (support vector machine) parts that yield results superior to using either approach individually. The current optical algorithm methods performed at a 68% accuracy rate in an experimental study of 60 healthy adults undergoing periods of high-stress versus low-stress performance demands. Accuracy and practical feasibility of the technique is being improved further with automatic multi-resolution selection for the discretization of the mask, and automated face detection and mask initialization algorithms.

  5. Computing the dynamics of biomembranes by combining conservative level set and adaptive finite element methods

    OpenAIRE

    Laadhari , Aymen; Saramito , Pierre; Misbah , Chaouqi

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The numerical simulation of the deformation of vesicle membranes under simple shear external fluid flow is considered in this paper. A new saddle-point approach is proposed for the imposition of the fluid incompressibility and the membrane inextensibility constraints, through Lagrange multipliers defined in the fluid and on the membrane respectively. Using a level set formulation, the problem is approximated by mixed finite elements combined with an automatic adaptive ...

  6. An automated tuberculosis screening strategy combining X-ray-based computer-aided detection and clinical information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Jaime; Sánchez, Clara I.; Philipsen, Rick H. H. M.; Maduskar, Pragnya; Dawson, Rodney; Theron, Grant; Dheda, Keertan; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-04-01

    Lack of human resources and radiological interpretation expertise impair tuberculosis (TB) screening programmes in TB-endemic countries. Computer-aided detection (CAD) constitutes a viable alternative for chest radiograph (CXR) reading. However, no automated techniques that exploit the additional clinical information typically available during screening exist. To address this issue and optimally exploit this information, a machine learning-based combination framework is introduced. We have evaluated this framework on a database containing 392 patient records from suspected TB subjects prospectively recruited in Cape Town, South Africa. Each record comprised a CAD score, automatically computed from a CXR, and 12 clinical features. Comparisons with strategies relying on either CAD scores or clinical information alone were performed. Our results indicate that the combination framework outperforms the individual strategies in terms of the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (0.84 versus 0.78 and 0.72), specificity at 95% sensitivity (49% versus 24% and 31%) and negative predictive value (98% versus 95% and 96%). Thus, it is believed that combining CAD and clinical information to estimate the risk of active disease is a promising tool for TB screening.

  7. Combined diagnostic performance of coronary computed tomography angiography and computed tomography derived fractional flow reserve for the evaluation of myocardial ischemia: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiao Wei; Zheng, Qishi; Shi, Luming; Gao, Fei; Allen, John Carson; Coenen, Adriaan; Baumann, Stefan; Schoepf, U Joseph; Kassab, Ghassan S; Lim, Soo Teik; Wong, Aaron Sung Lung; Tan, Jack Wei Chieh; Yeo, Khung Keong; Chin, Chee Tang; Ho, Kay Woon; Tan, Swee Yaw; Chua, Terrance Siang Jin; Chan, Edwin Shih Yen; Tan, Ru San; Zhong, Liang

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the combined diagnostic accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and computed tomography derived fractional flow reserve (FFRct) in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD). PubMed, The Cochrane library, Embase and OpenGray were searched to identify studies comparing diagnostic accuracy of CCTA and FFRct. Diagnostic test measurements of FFRct were either extracted directly from the published papers or calculated from provided information. Bivariate models were conducted to synthesize the diagnostic performance of combined CCTA and FFRct at both "per-vessel" and "per-patient" levels. 7 articles were included for analysis. The combined diagnostic outcomes from "both positive" strategy, i.e. a subject was considered as "positive" only when both CCTA and FFRct were "positive", demonstrated relative high specificity (per-vessel: 0.91; per-patient: 0.81), high positive likelihood ratio (LR+, per-vessel: 7.93; per-patient: 4.26), high negative likelihood ratio (LR-, per-vessel: 0.30; per patient: 0.24) and high accuracy (per-vessel: 0.91; per-patient: 0.81) while "either positive" strategy, i.e. a subject was considered as "positive" when either CCTA or FFRct was "positive", demonstrated relative high sensitivity (per-vessel: 0.97; per-patient: 0.98), low LR+ (per-vessel: 1.50; per-patient: 1.17), low LR- (per-vessel: 0.07; per-patient: 0.09) and low accuracy (per-vessel: 0.57; per-patient: 0.54). "Both positive" strategy showed better diagnostic performance to rule in patients with non-significant stenosis compared to "either positive" strategy, as it efficiently reduces the proportion of testing false positive subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Computational Model of Primary Visual Cortex Combining Visual Attention for Action Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Shu

    Full Text Available Humans can easily understand other people's actions through visual systems, while computers cannot. Therefore, a new bio-inspired computational model is proposed in this paper aiming for automatic action recognition. The model focuses on dynamic properties of neurons and neural networks in the primary visual cortex (V1, and simulates the procedure of information processing in V1, which consists of visual perception, visual attention and representation of human action. In our model, a family of the three-dimensional spatial-temporal correlative Gabor filters is used to model the dynamic properties of the classical receptive field of V1 simple cell tuned to different speeds and orientations in time for detection of spatiotemporal information from video sequences. Based on the inhibitory effect of stimuli outside the classical receptive field caused by lateral connections of spiking neuron networks in V1, we propose surround suppressive operator to further process spatiotemporal information. Visual attention model based on perceptual grouping is integrated into our model to filter and group different regions. Moreover, in order to represent the human action, we consider the characteristic of the neural code: mean motion map based on analysis of spike trains generated by spiking neurons. The experimental evaluation on some publicly available action datasets and comparison with the state-of-the-art approaches demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed model.

  9. O2: A novel combined online and offline computing system for the ALICE Experiment after 2018

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananya; Agrawal, N; Avasthi, A; Suaide, A Alarcon Do Passo; Prado, C Alves Garcia; Alt, T; Bach, M; Breitner, T; Aphecetche, L; Bala, R; Bhasin, A; Barnafoldi, G; Belikov, J; Bellini, F; Betev, L; Buncic, P; Carena, F; Carena, W; Chapeland, S; Barroso, V Chibante

    2014-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a detector dedicated to the studies with heavy ion collisions exploring the physics of strongly interacting nuclear matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). After the second long shutdown of the LHC, the ALICE Experiment will be upgraded to make high precision measurements of rare probes at low pT, which cannot be selected with a trigger, and therefore require a very large sample of events recorded on tape. The online computing system will be completely redesigned to address the major challenge of sampling the full 50 kHz Pb-Pb interaction rate increasing the present limit by a factor of 100. This upgrade will also include the continuous un-triggered read-out of two detectors: ITS (Inner Tracking System) and TPC (Time Projection Chamber)) producing a sustained throughput of 1 TB/s. This unprecedented data rate will be reduced by adopting an entirely new strategy where calibration and reconstruction are performed online, and only the reconstruction results are stored while the raw data are discarded. This system, already demonstrated in production on the TPC data since 2011, will be optimized for the online usage of reconstruction algorithms. This implies much tighter coupling between online and offline computing systems. An R and D program has been set up to meet this huge challenge. The object of this paper is to present this program and its first results.

  10. Process operational readiness and operational readiness follow-on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nertney, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    The first document in the System Safety Development Center (SSDC) series deals with the subject of Occupancy-Use Readiness. The material included in that manual provided the basis for development of the SSDC workshop in Operational Readiness. The original Occupancy Readiness Manual, however, deals only generally with the subject of process safety; i.e., the safety of overall ''processes'' such as solar collection systems, nuclear reactors, and coal fired electrical plants. The manual also fails to detail the considerations involved in maintaining the state of readiness on a continuing basis. Both of the latter subjects are dealt with in some detail in the SSDC's Operational Readiness Workshop. The purpose of this document is to provide additional documentary material dealing with subjects introduced in SSDC-1 Occupancy-Use Readiness Manual, and SSDC-12, Safety Considerations in Evaluation of Maintenance Programs. In augmenting SSDC-1, Part I of this manual provides additional material related to process safety; in the case of SSDC-12, the subject of safety considerations in evaluation of maintenance programs is broadened in Part II to include maintenance of personnel systems and procedural systems as well as hardware. ''Maintenance'' is related more directly to the concept of operational readiness and an alternative analytical tree is provided for hardware maintenance program evaluation

  11. A new in silico classification model for ready biodegradability, based on molecular fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Anna; Pizzo, Fabiola; Benfenati, Emilio; Manganaro, Alberto; Ferrari, Thomas; Gini, Giuseppina

    2014-08-01

    Regulations such as the European REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of Chemicals) often require chemicals to be evaluated for ready biodegradability, to assess the potential risk for environmental and human health. Because not all chemicals can be tested, there is an increasing demand for tools for quick and inexpensive biodegradability screening, such as computer-based (in silico) theoretical models. We developed an in silico model starting from a dataset of 728 chemicals with ready biodegradability data (MITI-test Ministry of International Trade and Industry). We used the novel software SARpy to automatically extract, through a structural fragmentation process, a set of substructures statistically related to ready biodegradability. Then, we analysed these substructures in order to build some general rules. The model consists of a rule-set made up of the combination of the statistically relevant fragments and of the expert-based rules. The model gives good statistical performance with 92%, 82% and 76% accuracy on the training, test and external set respectively. These results are comparable with other in silico models like BIOWIN developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); moreover this new model includes an easily understandable explanation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Multimorbidity Cluster Analysis Tool: Identifying Combinations and Permutations of Multiple Chronic Diseases Using a Record-Level Computational Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Nicholson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multimorbidity, or the co-occurrence of multiple chronic health conditions within an individual, is an increasingly dominant presence and burden in modern health care systems.  To fully capture its complexity, further research is needed to uncover the patterns and consequences of these co-occurring health states.  As such, the Multimorbidity Cluster Analysis Tool and the accompanying Multimorbidity Cluster Analysis Toolkit have been created to allow researchers to identify distinct clusters that exist within a sample of participants or patients living with multimorbidity.  Development: The Tool and Toolkit were developed at Western University in London, Ontario, Canada.  This open-access computational program (JAVA code and executable file was developed and tested to support an analysis of thousands of individual records and up to 100 disease diagnoses or categories.  Application: The computational program can be adapted to the methodological elements of a research project, including type of data, type of chronic disease reporting, measurement of multimorbidity, sample size and research setting.  The computational program will identify all existing, and mutually exclusive, combinations and permutations within the dataset.  An application of this computational program is provided as an example, in which more than 75,000 individual records and 20 chronic disease categories resulted in the detection of 10,411 unique combinations and 24,647 unique permutations among female and male patients.  Discussion: The Tool and Toolkit are now available for use by researchers interested in exploring the complexities of multimorbidity.  Its careful use, and the comparison between results, will be valuable additions to the nuanced understanding of multimorbidity.

  13. A computer-based training system combining virtual reality and multimedia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stansfield, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Training new users of complex machines is often an expensive and time-consuming process. This is particularly true for special purpose systems, such as those frequently encountered in DOE applications. This paper presents a computer-based training system intended as a partial solution to this problem. The system extends the basic virtual reality (VR) training paradigm by adding a multimedia component which may be accessed during interaction with the virtual environment: The 3D model used to create the virtual reality is also used as the primary navigation tool through the associated multimedia. This method exploits the natural mapping between a virtual world and the real world that it represents to provide a more intuitive way for the student to interact with all forms of information about the system

  14. Combined tangential-normal vector elements for computing electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, S.; Cendes, Z.J.

    1993-01-01

    A direct method for computing electric and magnetic fields in two dimensions is developed. This method determines both the fields and fluxes directly from Maxwell's curl and divergence equations without introducing potential functions. This allows both the curl and the divergence of the field to be set independently in all elements. The technique is based on a new type of vector finite element that simultaneously interpolates to the tangential component of the electric or the magnetic field and the normal component of the electric or magnetic flux. Continuity conditions are imposed across element edges simply by setting like variables to be the same across element edges. This guarantees the continuity of the field and flux at the mid-point of each edge and that for all edges the average value of the tangential component of the field and of the normal component of the flux is identical

  15. Combining Distance and Face-To Teaching and Learning in Spatial Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulland, E.-K.; Schut, A. G. T.; Veenendaal, B.

    2011-09-01

    Retention and passing rates as well as student engagement in computer programming and problem solving units are a major concern in tertiary spatial science courses. A number of initiatives were implemented to improve this. A pilot study reviews the changes made to the teaching and learning environment, including the addition of new resources and modifications to assessments, and investigates their effectiveness. In particular, the study focuses on the differences between students studying in traditional, oncampus mode and distance, e-learning mode. Student results and retention rates from 2009-2011, data from in-lecture clicker response units and two anonymous surveys collected in 2011 were analysed. Early results indicate that grades improved for engaged students but pass rates or grades of the struggling cohort of students did not improve significantly.

  16. Improving Wind Turbine Drivetrain Reliability Using a Combined Experimental, Computational, and Analytical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Y.; van Dam, J.; Bergua, R.; Jove, J.; Campbell, J.

    2015-03-01

    Nontorque loads induced by the wind turbine rotor overhang weight and aerodynamic forces can greatly affect drivetrain loads and responses. If not addressed properly, these loads can result in a decrease in gearbox component life. This work uses analytical modeling, computational modeling, and experimental data to evaluate a unique drivetrain design that minimizes the effects of nontorque loads on gearbox reliability: the Pure Torque(R) drivetrain developed by Alstom. The drivetrain has a hub-support configuration that transmits nontorque loads directly into the tower rather than through the gearbox as in other design approaches. An analytical model of Alstom's Pure Torque drivetrain provides insight into the relationships among turbine component weights, aerodynamic forces, and the resulting drivetrain loads. Main shaft bending loads are orders of magnitude lower than the rated torque and are hardly affected by wind conditions and turbine operations.

  17. Combined use of computational chemistry and chemoinformatics methods for chemical discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Manabu, E-mail: sugimoto@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1, Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Institute for Molecular Science, 38 Nishigo-Naka, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Ideo, Toshihiro; Iwane, Ryo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1, Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    Data analysis on numerical data by the computational chemistry calculations is carried out to obtain knowledge information of molecules. A molecular database is developed to systematically store chemical, electronic-structure, and knowledge-based information. The database is used to find molecules related to a keyword of “cancer”. Then the electronic-structure calculations are performed to quantitatively evaluate quantum chemical similarity of the molecules. Among the 377 compounds registered in the database, 24 molecules are found to be “cancer”-related. This set of molecules includes both carcinogens and anticancer drugs. The quantum chemical similarity analysis, which is carried out by using numerical results of the density-functional theory calculations, shows that, when some energy spectra are referred to, carcinogens are reasonably distinguished from the anticancer drugs. Therefore these spectral properties are considered of as important measures for classification.

  18. Experiment and computation: a combined approach to study the van der Waals complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surin L.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent results on the millimetre-wave spectroscopy of weakly bound van der Waals complexes, mostly those which contain H2 and He, is presented. In our work, we compared the experimental spectra to the theoretical bound state results, thus providing a critical test of the quality of the M–H2 and M–He potential energy surfaces (PESs which are a key issue for reliable computations of the collisional excitation and de-excitation of molecules (M = CO, NH3, H2O in the dense interstellar medium. The intermolecular interactions with He and H2 play also an important role for high resolution spectroscopy of helium or para-hydrogen clusters doped by a probe molecule (CO, HCN. Such experiments are directed on the detection of superfluid response of molecular rotation in the He and p-H2 clusters.

  19. The Readiness of Sorsogon State College Faculty for Teaching with ICT: Basis for a Faculty Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. De Castro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies (ICT such as computers, multimedia systems, productivity software, and the Internet have greatly improved the performance of different organizations and influenced higher learning institutions like Sorsogon State College (SSC to develop and implement innovative teaching and learning methods. However, despite the many benefits of ICT when used in education, there are still faculty members who do not use these technologies for teaching. Hence, this research was conducted to assess their readiness for teaching with ICT. Findings revealed that most of the surveyed respondents were above forty-five years old, have 1-10 years of government service, and have specialization in the field of education. In terms of readiness to teach with ICT, the results disclosed that they were fairly ready along human-resource readiness, ready along technological skill readiness, and much ready along equipment readiness. Their age was not significantly related to their human resource readiness but significantly related to their technological skill and equipment readiness. The respondents’ number of years in the government was significantly related to their readiness to teach with ICT in terms of human resource, technological skill, and equipment readiness. Their field of specialization was not significantly related to their readiness to teach with ICT. Among the most identified factors why some of them do not use ICT resources were unavailability of ICT resources, lack of knowledge and lack of familiarity to ICT. The output of this research is a faculty training program to enhance their know

  20. Novel diode-based laser system for combined transcutaneous monitoring and computer-controlled intermittent treatment of jaundiced neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Mostafa; El-Ahl, Mohammad H. S.; Hamza, Ahmad M.

    2001-06-01

    The high efficacy of laser phototherapy combined with transcutaneous monitoring of serum bilirubin provides optimum safety for jaundiced infants from the risk of bilirubin encephalopathy. In this paper the authors introduce the design and operating principles of a new laser system that can provide simultaneous monitoring and treatment of several jaundiced babies at one time. The new system incorporates diode-based laser sources oscillating at selected wavelengths to achieve both transcutaneous differential absorption measurements of bilirubin concentration in addition to the computer controlled intermittent laser therapy through a network of optical fibers. The detailed description and operating characteristics of this system are presented.

  1. Microstructural characterization of dental zinc phosphate cements using combined small angle neutron scattering and microfocus X-ray computed tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Kumpová, Ivana; Mancini, L.; Appavou, M.-S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2017), s. 402-417 ISSN 0109-5641 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : zinc phosphate cements * small angle neutron scattering * X-ray micro-computed tomography * X-ray powder diffraction * zinc oxide * acid-base cements Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 4.070, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0109564116305127

  2. A combined brain-computer interface based on P300 potentials and motion-onset visual evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Allison, Brendan Z; Wang, Xingyu; Neuper, Christa

    2012-04-15

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow users to communicate via brain activity alone. Many BCIs rely on the P300 and other event-related potentials (ERPs) that are elicited when target stimuli flash. Although there have been considerable research exploring ways to improve P300 BCIs, surprisingly little work has focused on new ways to change visual stimuli to elicit more recognizable ERPs. In this paper, we introduce a "combined" BCI based on P300 potentials and motion-onset visual evoked potentials (M-VEPs) and compare it with BCIs based on each simple approach (P300 and M-VEP). Offline data suggested that performance would be best in the combined paradigm. Online tests with adaptive BCIs confirmed that our combined approach is practical in an online BCI, and yielded better performance than the other two approaches (P<0.05) without annoying or overburdening the subject. The highest mean classification accuracy (96%) and practical bit rate (26.7bit/s) were obtained from the combined condition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Advantages of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography in detecting post cardiac surgery infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjtoutah, Djamel; Azhari, Alaa; Larabi, Youcef; Dorigo, Enrica; Merlin, Charles; Marcaggi, Xavier; Nana, Armel Simplice; Camilleri, Lionel; Azarnoush, Kasra

    2014-01-01

    The 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) offers an excellent negative predictive value. Consequently, it is a reliable tool for excluding an infectious phenomenon in case of negativity. In case of persistent fever of unknown origin after cardiac surgery and in combination with other bacteriological examinations and medical imaging, we can rely on FDG-PET/CT to confirm or eliminate deep infections and prosthetic endocarditis. For this reason, FDG-PET/CT should be considered among the examinations to be performed in case of suspected infection after cardiac surgery. We have reported the case of a 76-year-old man who presented with a fever of unknown origin and recurrent septic shocks after a biological Bentall procedure combined with left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery revascularization by the left internal thoracic artery. We performed a FDG-PET/CT which showed external iliac vein and right common femoral vein hyperfixation with infiltration of adjacent soft tissues, highly suspected to be an infectious process. The aim of this case report is to show that FDG-PET/CT, in combination with other bacteriological examinations and medical imaging, can be extremely helpful in detecting deep infectious sources, even during the early postoperative period.

  4. Combined rTMS and virtual reality brain-computer interface training for motor recovery after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, N. N.; Carey, J.; Edelman, B. J.; Doud, A.; Grande, A.; Lakshminarayan, K.; He, B.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with brain-computer interface (BCI) training can address motor impairment after stroke by down-regulating exaggerated inhibition from the contralesional hemisphere and encouraging ipsilesional activation. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI, compared to sham rTMS  +  BCI, on motor recovery after stroke in subjects with lasting motor paresis. Approach. Three stroke subjects approximately one year post-stroke participated in three weeks of combined rTMS (real or sham) and BCI, followed by three weeks of BCI alone. Behavioral and electrophysiological differences were evaluated at baseline, after three weeks, and after six weeks of treatment. Main results. Motor improvements were observed in both real rTMS  +  BCI and sham groups, but only the former showed significant alterations in inter-hemispheric inhibition in the desired direction and increased relative ipsilesional cortical activation from fMRI. In addition, significant improvements in BCI performance over time and adequate control of the virtual reality BCI paradigm were observed only in the former group. Significance. When combined, the results highlight the feasibility and efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI for motor recovery, demonstrated by increased ipsilesional motor activity and improvements in behavioral function for the real rTMS  +  BCI condition in particular. Our findings also demonstrate the utility of BCI training alone, as shown by behavioral improvements for the sham rTMS  +  BCI condition. This study is the first to evaluate combined rTMS and BCI training for motor rehabilitation and provides a foundation for continued work to evaluate the potential of both rTMS and virtual reality BCI training for motor recovery after stroke.

  5. Y2K compliance readiness and contingency planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, S; Cohan, D

    1999-09-01

    As the millennium approaches, discussion of "Y2K compliance" will shift to discussion of "Y2K readiness." While "compliance" focuses on the technological functioning of one's own computers, "readiness" focuses on the operational planning required in a world of interdependence, in which the functionality of one's own computers is only part of the story. "Readiness" includes the ability to cope with potential Y2K failures of vendors, suppliers, staff, banks, utility companies, and others. Administrators must apply their traditional skills of analysis, inquiry and diligence to the manifold imaginable challenges which Y2K will thrust upon their facilities. The SPICE template can be used as a systematic tool to guide planning for this historic event.

  6. Measuring Africa's E-Readiness in the Global Networked Economy: A Nine-Country Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifinedo, Princely

    2005-01-01

    This paper assesses the integration of Africa into the global economy by computing the e-readiness for nine African countries. The measuring tool used is simple and incorporates a variety of indicators used by comparable tools. Overall, the mean e-readiness of Africa is poor in comparison to other economies. Particularly, Sub-Saharan Africa…

  7. Synthesis and characterization of sulfolane-based amino alcohols: A combined experimental and computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchykov, Vitalii A.; Zarovnaya, Iryna S.; Tretiakov, Serhii V.; Reshetnyak, Alyona V.; Omelchenko, Iryna V.; Shishkin, Oleg V.; Okovytyy, Sergiy I.

    2018-04-01

    Aminolysis of 3,4-epoxysulfolane in aqueous media leads to a very complex mixture of products with unresolved stereochemistry. Herein, we report a detailed theoretical and experimental mechanistic investigation of this reaction along with extensive spectroscopic characterization of the resulting amino alcohols, using 1D and 2D NMR techniques (1H, 13C, NOE, NOESY, COSY, HSQC, HMBC) as well as XRD analysis. In addition to simple amines such as ammonia and benzylamine, our study also employed the more sterically hindered endo-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-en-2-ylmethanamine. The mechanism of the aminolysis of 3,4-epoxysulfolane by aqueous ammonia was studied in more detail using quantum chemical calculations at the M06-2X/6-31++G** level of theory. The computational results led us to conclude that the most probable way of initial epoxide transformation is base-catalyzed rearrangement to a corresponding allylic alcohol. Subsequent formation of vicinal amino alcohols and diols proceeds via addition of ammonia or hydroxy-anions to activated double Cdbnd C bond with some preference of a cis-attack. Detailed analytical data obtained in the course of our work will be useful for the stereochemical identification of new sulfolane derivatives.

  8. Uncovering stability mechanisms in microbial ecosystems - combining microcosm experiments, computational modelling and ecological theory in a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrich, Anja; König, Sara; Banitz, Thomas; Centler, Florian; Frank, Karin; Kästner, Matthias; Miltner, Anja; Thullner, Martin; Wick, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Although bacterial degraders in soil are commonly exposed to fluctuating environmental conditions, the functional performance of the biodegradation processes can often be maintained by resistance and resilience mechanisms. However, there is still a gap in the mechanistic understanding of key factors contributing to the stability of such an ecosystem service. Therefore we developed an integrated approach combining microcosm experiments, simulation models and ecological theory to directly make use of the strengths of these disciplines. In a continuous interplay process, data, hypotheses, and central questions are exchanged between disciplines to initiate new experiments and models to ultimately identify buffer mechanisms and factors providing functional stability. We focus on drying and rewetting-cycles in soil ecosystems, which are a major abiotic driver for bacterial activity. Functional recovery of the system was found to depend on different spatial processes in the computational model. In particular, bacterial motility is a prerequisite for biodegradation if either bacteria or substrate are heterogeneously distributed. Hence, laboratory experiments focussing on bacterial dispersal processes were conducted and confirmed this finding also for functional resistance. Obtained results will be incorporated into the model in the next step. Overall, the combination of computational modelling and laboratory experiments identified spatial processes as the main driving force for functional stability in the considered system, and has proved a powerful methodological approach.

  9. Steroid Hydroxylation by Basidiomycete Peroxygenases: a Combined Experimental and Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babot, Esteban D.; del Río, José C.; Cañellas, Marina; Sancho, Ferran; Lucas, Fátima; Guallar, Víctor; Kalum, Lisbeth; Lund, Henrik; Gröbe, Glenn; Scheibner, Katrin; Ullrich, René; Hofrichter, Martin; Martínez, Angel T.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is the selective oxyfunctionalization of steroids under mild and environmentally friendly conditions using fungal enzymes. With this purpose, peroxygenases from three basidiomycete species were tested for the hydroxylation of a variety of steroidal compounds, using H2O2 as the only cosubstrate. Two of them are wild-type enzymes from Agrocybe aegerita and Marasmius rotula, and the third one is a recombinant enzyme from Coprinopsis cinerea. The enzymatic reactions on free and esterified sterols, steroid hydrocarbons, and ketones were monitored by gas chromatography, and the products were identified by mass spectrometry. Hydroxylation at the side chain over the steroidal rings was preferred, with the 25-hydroxyderivatives predominating. Interestingly, antiviral and other biological activities of 25-hydroxycholesterol have been reported recently (M. Blanc et al., Immunity 38:106–118, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2012.11.004). However, hydroxylation in the ring moiety and terminal hydroxylation at the side chain also was observed in some steroids, the former favored by the absence of oxygenated groups at C-3 and by the presence of conjugated double bonds in the rings. To understand the yield and selectivity differences between the different steroids, a computational study was performed using Protein Energy Landscape Exploration (PELE) software for dynamic ligand diffusion. These simulations showed that the active-site geometry and hydrophobicity favors the entrance of the steroid side chain, while the entrance of the ring is energetically penalized. Also, a direct correlation between the conversion rate and the side chain entrance ratio could be established that explains the various reaction yields observed. PMID:25862224

  10. Electronic nature of zwitterionic alkali metal methanides, silanides and germanides - a combined experimental and computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Aquino, A J A; Cordes, D B; Hase, W L; Krempner, C

    2017-02-01

    Zwitterionic group 14 complexes of the alkali metals of formula [C(SiMe 2 OCH 2 CH 2 OMe) 3 M], (M- 1 ), [Si(SiMe 2 OCH 2 CH 2 OMe) 3 M], (M- 2 ), [Ge(SiMe 2 OCH 2 CH 2 OMe) 3 M], (M- 3 ), where M = Li, Na or K, have been prepared, structurally characterized and their electronic nature was investigated by computational methods. Zwitterions M- 2 and M- 3 were synthesized via reactions of [Si(SiMe 2 OCH 2 CH 2 OMe) 4 ] ( 2 ) and [Ge(SiMe 2 OCH 2 CH 2 OMe) 4 ] ( 3 ) with MOBu t (M = Li, Na or K), resp., in almost quantitative yields, while M- 1 were prepared from deprotonation of [HC(SiMe 2 OCH 2 CH 2 OMe) 3 ] ( 1 ) with LiBu t , NaCH 2 Ph and KCH 2 Ph, resp. X-ray crystallographic studies and DFT calculations in the gas-phase, including calculations of the NPA charges confirm the zwitterionic nature of these compounds, with the alkali metal cations being rigidly locked and charge separated from the anion by the internal OCH 2 CH 2 OMe donor groups. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the second order perturbation theory analysis of the NBOs reveal significant hyperconjugative interactions in M- 1 -M- 3 , primarily between the lone pair and the antibonding Si-O orbitals, the extent of which decreases in the order M- 1 > M- 2 > M- 3 . The experimental basicities and the calculated gas-phase basicities of M- 1 -M- 3 reveal the zwitterionic alkali metal methanides M- 1 to be significantly stronger bases than the analogous silanides M- 2 and germanium M- 3 .

  11. A Combined Experimental and Computational Approach to Subject-Specific Analysis of Knee Joint Laxity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael D.; Cyr, Adam J.; Ali, Azhar A.; Fitzpatrick, Clare K.; Rullkoetter, Paul J.; Maletsky, Lorin P.; Shelburne, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling complex knee biomechanics is a continual challenge, which has resulted in many models of varying levels of quality, complexity, and validation. Beyond modeling healthy knees, accurately mimicking pathologic knee mechanics, such as after cruciate rupture or meniscectomy, is difficult. Experimental tests of knee laxity can provide important information about ligament engagement and overall contributions to knee stability for development of subject-specific models to accurately simulate knee motion and loading. Our objective was to provide combined experimental tests and finite-element (FE) models of natural knee laxity that are subject-specific, have one-to-one experiment to model calibration, simulate ligament engagement in agreement with literature, and are adaptable for a variety of biomechanical investigations (e.g., cartilage contact, ligament strain, in vivo kinematics). Calibration involved perturbing ligament stiffness, initial ligament strain, and attachment location until model-predicted kinematics and ligament engagement matched experimental reports. Errors between model-predicted and experimental kinematics averaged ligaments agreed with literature descriptions. These results demonstrate the ability of our constraint models to be customized for multiple individuals and simultaneously call attention to the need to verify that ligament engagement is in good general agreement with literature. To facilitate further investigations of subject-specific or population based knee joint biomechanics, data collected during the experimental and modeling phases of this study are available for download by the research community. PMID:27306137

  12. Implementation of combined SVM-algorithm and computer-aided perception feedback for pulmonary nodule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Rannou, Didier; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2012-02-01

    This pilot study examines the effect of a novel decision support system in medical image interpretation. This system is based on combining image spatial frequency properties and eye-tracking data in order to recognize over and under calling errors. Thus, before it can be implemented as a detection aided schema, training is required during which SVMbased algorithm learns to recognize FP from all reported outcomes, and, FN from all unreported prolonged dwelled regions. Eight radiologists inspected 50 PA chest radiographs with the specific task of identifying lung nodules. Twentyfive cases contained CT proven subtle malignant lesions (5-20mm), but prevalence was not known by the subjects, who took part in two sequential reading sessions, the second, without and with support system feedback. MCMR ROC DBM and JAFROC analyses were conducted and demonstrated significantly higher scores following feedback with p values of 0.04, and 0.03 respectively, highlighting significant improvements in radiology performance once feedback was used. This positive effect on radiologists' performance might have important implications for future CAD-system development.

  13. Optimizing computed tomography pulmonary angiography using right atrium bolus monitoring combined with spontaneous respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Wang; Jian, Li; Rui, Zhai [Jining No. 1 People' s Hospital, Department of Computed Tomography, Jining City, ShanDong Province (China); Wen, Li [Jining No. 1 People' s Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Jining, ShanDong (China); Dai, Lun-Hou [Shandong Chest Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jinan, ShanDong (China)

    2015-09-15

    CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) aims to provide pulmonary arterial opacification in the absence of significant pulmonary venous filling. This requires accurate timing of the imaging acquisition to ensure synchronization with the peak pulmonary artery contrast concentration. This study was designed to test the utility of right atrium (RA) monitoring in ensuring optimal timing of CTPA acquisition. Sixty patients referred for CTPA were divided into two groups. Group A (n = 30): CTPA was performed using bolus triggering from the pulmonary trunk, suspended respiration and 70 ml of contrast agent (CA). Group B (n = 30): CTPA image acquisition was triggered using RA monitoring with spontaneous respiration and 40 ml of CA. Image quality was compared. Subjective image quality, average CT values of pulmonary arteries and density difference between artery and vein pairs were significantly higher whereas CT values of pulmonary veins were significantly lower in group B (all P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the groups in the proportion of subjects where sixth grade pulmonary arteries were opacified (P > 0.05). RA monitoring combined with spontaneous respiration to trigger image acquisition in CTPA produces optimal contrast enhancement in pulmonary arterial structures with minimal venous filling even with reduced doses of CA. (orig.)

  14. Predicting Short-Term Electricity Demand by Combining the Advantages of ARMA and XGBoost in Fog Computing Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanbin Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of IoT, the disadvantages of Cloud framework have been exposed, such as high latency, network congestion, and low reliability. Therefore, the Fog Computing framework has emerged, with an extended Fog Layer between the Cloud and terminals. In order to address the real-time prediction on electricity demand, we propose an approach based on XGBoost and ARMA in Fog Computing environment. By taking the advantages of Fog Computing framework, we first propose a prototype-based clustering algorithm to divide enterprise users into several categories based on their total electricity consumption; we then propose a model selection approach by analyzing users’ historical records of electricity consumption and identifying the most important features. Generally speaking, if the historical records pass the test of stationarity and white noise, ARMA is used to model the user’s electricity consumption in time sequence; otherwise, if the historical records do not pass the test, and some discrete features are the most important, such as weather and whether it is weekend, XGBoost will be used. The experiment results show that our proposed approach by combining the advantage of ARMA and XGBoost is more accurate than the classical models.

  15. The Raman spectrum of CaCO{sub 3} polymorphs calcite and aragonite: A combined experimental and computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De La Pierre, Marco, E-mail: cedric.carteret@univ-lorraine.fr, E-mail: marco.delapierre@unito.it; Maschio, Lorenzo; Orlando, Roberto; Dovesi, Roberto [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Torino and NIS (Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces) Centre of Excellence, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Carteret, Cédric, E-mail: cedric.carteret@univ-lorraine.fr, E-mail: marco.delapierre@unito.it; André, Erwan [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l’Environnement (LCPME), UMR 7564, Université de Lorraine-CNRS, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54601 Villers-lès-Nancy (France)

    2014-04-28

    Powder and single crystal Raman spectra of the two most common phases of calcium carbonate are calculated with ab initio techniques (using a “hybrid” functional and a Gaussian-type basis set) and measured both at 80 K and room temperature. Frequencies of the Raman modes are in very good agreement between calculations and experiments: the mean absolute deviation at 80 K is 4 and 8 cm{sup −1} for calcite and aragonite, respectively. As regards intensities, the agreement is in general good, although the computed values overestimate the measured ones in many cases. The combined analysis permits to identify almost all the fundamental experimental Raman peaks of the two compounds, with the exception of either modes with zero computed intensity or modes overlapping with more intense peaks. Additional peaks have been identified in both calcite and aragonite, which have been assigned to {sup 18}O satellite modes or overtones. The agreement between the computed and measured spectra is quite satisfactory; in particular, simulation permits to clearly distinguish between calcite and aragonite in the case of powder spectra, and among different polarization directions of each compound in the case of single crystal spectra.

  16. Combined Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Variability for Computational Network Design with Application to Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni, Tina; Tidor, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems are inherently variable, with their dynamics influenced by intrinsic and extrinsic sources. These systems are often only partially characterized, with large uncertainties about specific sources of extrinsic variability and biochemical properties. Moreover, it is not yet well understood how different sources of variability combine and affect biological systems in concert. To successfully design biomedical therapies or synthetic circuits with robust performance, it is crucial to account for uncertainty and effects of variability. Here we introduce an efficient modeling and simulation framework to study systems that are simultaneously subject to multiple sources of variability, and apply it to make design decisions on small genetic networks that play a role of basic design elements of synthetic circuits. Specifically, the framework was used to explore the effect of transcriptional and post-transcriptional autoregulation on fluctuations in protein expression in simple genetic networks. We found that autoregulation could either suppress or increase the output variability, depending on specific noise sources and network parameters. We showed that transcriptional autoregulation was more successful than post-transcriptional in suppressing variability across a wide range of intrinsic and extrinsic magnitudes and sources. We derived the following design principles to guide the design of circuits that best suppress variability: (i) high protein cooperativity and low miRNA cooperativity, (ii) imperfect complementarity between miRNA and mRNA was preferred to perfect complementarity, and (iii) correlated expression of mRNA and miRNA – for example, on the same transcript – was best for suppression of protein variability. Results further showed that correlations in kinetic parameters between cells affected the ability to suppress variability, and that variability in transient states did not necessarily follow the same principles as variability in the steady

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of combined coronary angiography and adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging using 320-detector computed tomography: pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasis, Arthur; Ko, Brian S.; Leung, Michael C.; Antonis, Paul R.; Wong, Dennis T.; Kyi, Leo; Cameron, James D.; Meredith, Ian T.; Seneviratne, Sujith K. [Southern Health and Monash University, Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Monash Heart, Department of Medicine Monash Medical Centre (MMC), Melbourne (Australia); Nandurkar, Dee; Troupis, John M. [MMC, Southern Health, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Melbourne (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of combined 320-detector row computed tomography coronary angiography (CTA) and adenosine stress CT myocardial perfusion imaging (CTP) in detecting perfusion abnormalities caused by obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty patients with suspected CAD who underwent initial investigation with single-photon-emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI) were recruited and underwent prospectively-gated 320-detector CTA/CTP and invasive angiography. Two blinded cardiologists evaluated invasive angiography images quantitatively (QCA). A blinded nuclear physician analysed SPECT-MPI images for fixed and reversible perfusion defects. Two blinded cardiologists assessed CTA/CTP studies qualitatively. Vessels/territories with both >50 % stenosis on QCA and corresponding perfusion defect on SPECT-MPI were defined as ischaemic and formed the reference standard. All patients completed the CTA/CTP protocol with diagnostic image quality. Of 60 vessels/territories, 17 (28 %) were ischaemic according to QCA/SPECT-MPI criteria. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and area under the ROC curve for CTA/CTP was 94 %, 98 %, 94 %, 98 % and 0.96 (P < 0.001) on a per-vessel/territory basis. Mean CTA/CTP radiation dose was 9.2 {+-} 7.4 mSv compared with 13.2 {+-} 2.2 mSv for SPECT-MPI (P < 0.001). Combined 320-detector CTA/CTP is accurate in identifying obstructive CAD causing perfusion abnormalities compared with combined QCA/SPECT-MPI, achieved with lower radiation dose than SPECT-MPI. (orig.)

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of combined coronary angiography and adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging using 320-detector computed tomography: pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasis, Arthur; Ko, Brian S.; Leung, Michael C.; Antonis, Paul R.; Wong, Dennis T.; Kyi, Leo; Cameron, James D.; Meredith, Ian T.; Seneviratne, Sujith K.; Nandurkar, Dee; Troupis, John M.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of combined 320-detector row computed tomography coronary angiography (CTA) and adenosine stress CT myocardial perfusion imaging (CTP) in detecting perfusion abnormalities caused by obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty patients with suspected CAD who underwent initial investigation with single-photon-emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI) were recruited and underwent prospectively-gated 320-detector CTA/CTP and invasive angiography. Two blinded cardiologists evaluated invasive angiography images quantitatively (QCA). A blinded nuclear physician analysed SPECT-MPI images for fixed and reversible perfusion defects. Two blinded cardiologists assessed CTA/CTP studies qualitatively. Vessels/territories with both >50 % stenosis on QCA and corresponding perfusion defect on SPECT-MPI were defined as ischaemic and formed the reference standard. All patients completed the CTA/CTP protocol with diagnostic image quality. Of 60 vessels/territories, 17 (28 %) were ischaemic according to QCA/SPECT-MPI criteria. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and area under the ROC curve for CTA/CTP was 94 %, 98 %, 94 %, 98 % and 0.96 (P < 0.001) on a per-vessel/territory basis. Mean CTA/CTP radiation dose was 9.2 ± 7.4 mSv compared with 13.2 ± 2.2 mSv for SPECT-MPI (P < 0.001). Combined 320-detector CTA/CTP is accurate in identifying obstructive CAD causing perfusion abnormalities compared with combined QCA/SPECT-MPI, achieved with lower radiation dose than SPECT-MPI. (orig.)

  19. LHCf: ready to go

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    Reinstalled in the tunnel at the end of 2014, the two detectors of the LHCf experiment are now ready for operation. The first data should be taken in May.   LHCf’s Arm1 detector. The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf) experiment measures neutral particles emitted at nearly zero degrees from the proton beam direction. Because these "very forward" particles carry a large fraction of the collision energy, they are important for understanding the development of atmospheric air-shower phenomena produced by high-energy cosmic rays. To measure these particles, two detectors, Arm1 and Arm2, sit along the LHC beamline, at 140 metres either side of the ATLAS collision point. In July 2010, after a 9-month operation, the LHCf collaboration removed the two detectors from the tunnel to avoid severe radiation damage. The Arm2 detector was reinstalled in the tunnel for data-taking with proton–lead collisions in 2013, while Arm1 was being upgraded to be a radiation-ha...

  20. Change readiness research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høstgaard, Anna Marie Balling

    2006-01-01

    the ”Basic Structure for The Electronic Health Record” (B-EHR) using prototypes. http://medinfo.dk/epj/proj/gepka/). In the Gepka project the participation varied from 33.3% to 78.9%. The objective of this study is to set out themes by which this variation can be studied. A qualitative explorative research...... of participation – it is to suggest a qualitative relationship between the two. Neither does this study try to generalize the results, as further research on more wards would be needed to do so. This study does, however, set out themes that can be a useful tool in future CRR projects in order to maximize......The Change readiness research method (CRR) has become a wellknown method in Denmark to identify issues needed to be discussed on a hospital ward before implementation of a new IT-system and to start a dialogue. A precondition for a constructive dialogue, however, is a high degree of participation...

  1. Smoke Ready Toolbox for Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    This site provides an online Smoke Ready Toolbox for Wildfires, which lists resources and tools that provide information on health impacts from smoke exposure, current fire conditions and forecasts and strategies to reduce exposure to smoke.

  2. Checklist for clinical readiness published

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists from NCI, together with collaborators from outside academic centers, have developed a checklist of criteria to evaluate the readiness of complex molecular tests that will guide decisions made during clinical trials. The checklist focuses on tes

  3. Thermodynamic properties of alkyl 1H-indole carboxylate derivatives: A combined experimental and computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Tânia M.T.; Amaral, Luísa M.P.F.; Morais, Victor M.F.; Ribeiro da Silva, Maria D.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Combustion of methyl 1H-indole-3-carboxylate and ethyl 1H-indole-2-carboxylate by static bomb calorimetry. • The Knudsen mass-loss effusion technique was used to measure the vapour pressures of compounds at different temperatures. • Enthalpies of sublimation of methyl 1H-indole-3-carboxylate and ethyl 1H-indole-2-carboxylate. • Gas-phase enthalpies of formation of methyl 1H-indole-3-carboxylate and ethyl 1H-indole-2-carboxylate have been derived. • Gas-phase enthalpies of formation estimated from G3(MP2) calculations. - Abstract: The standard (p"o = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation, in the crystalline phase, of methyl 1H-indole-3-carboxylate and ethyl 1H-indole-2-carboxylate, at T = 298.15 K, were derived from measurements of the standard massic energies of combustion using a static bomb combustion calorimeter. The Knudsen effusion technique was used to measure the vapour pressures as a function of the temperature, which allowed determining the standard molar enthalpies of sublimation of these compounds. The standard (p"o = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation, in the gaseous phase, at T = 298.15 K, were calculated by combining, for each compound, the standard molar enthalpy of formation, in the crystalline phase, and the standard molar enthalpy of sublimation, yielding −(207.6 ± 3.6) kJ·mol"−"1 and −(234.4 ± 2.4) kJ·mol"−"1, for methyl 1H-indole-3-carboxylate and ethyl 1H-indole-2-carboxylate, respectively. Quantum chemical studies were also conducted, in order to complement the experimental study. The gas-phase enthalpies of formation were estimated from high level ab initio molecular orbital calculations, at the G3(MP2) level, for the compounds studied experimentally, extending the study to the methyl 1H-indole-2-carboxylate and ethyl 1H-indole-3-carboxylate. The results obtained were compared with the experimental data and were also analysed in terms of structural enthalpic group contributions.

  4. Combining Human Computing and Machine Learning to Make Sense of Big (Aerial) Data for Disaster Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofli, Ferda; Meier, Patrick; Imran, Muhammad; Castillo, Carlos; Tuia, Devis; Rey, Nicolas; Briant, Julien; Millet, Pauline; Reinhard, Friedrich; Parkan, Matthew; Joost, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    results suggest that the platform we have developed to combine crowdsourcing and machine learning to make sense of large volumes of aerial images can be used for disaster response.

  5. Protein thermal stability enhancement by designing salt bridges: a combined computational and experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wen Lee

    Full Text Available Protein thermal stability is an important factor considered in medical and industrial applications. Many structural characteristics related to protein thermal stability have been elucidated, and increasing salt bridges is considered as one of the most efficient strategies to increase protein thermal stability. However, the accurate simulation of salt bridges remains difficult. In this study, a novel method for salt-bridge design was proposed based on the statistical analysis of 10,556 surface salt bridges on 6,493 X-ray protein structures. These salt bridges were first categorized based on pairing residues, secondary structure locations, and Cα-Cα distances. Pairing preferences generalized from statistical analysis were used to construct a salt-bridge pair index and utilized in a weighted electrostatic attraction model to find the effective pairings for designing salt bridges. The model was also coupled with B-factor, weighted contact number, relative solvent accessibility, and conservation prescreening to determine the residues appropriate for the thermal adaptive design of salt bridges. According to our method, eight putative salt-bridges were designed on a mesophilic β-glucosidase and 24 variants were constructed to verify the predictions. Six putative salt-bridges leaded to the increase of the enzyme thermal stability. A significant increase in melting temperature of 8.8, 4.8, 3.7, 1.3, 1.2, and 0.7°C of the putative salt-bridges N437K-D49, E96R-D28, E96K-D28, S440K-E70, T231K-D388, and Q277E-D282 was detected, respectively. Reversing the polarity of T231K-D388 to T231D-D388K resulted in a further increase in melting temperatures by 3.6°C, which may be caused by the transformation of an intra-subunit electrostatic interaction into an inter-subunit one depending on the local environment. The combination of the thermostable variants (N437K, E96R, T231D and D388K generated a melting temperature increase of 15.7°C. Thus, this study

  6. Welding. Module 8 of the Vocational Education Readiness Test (VERT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Edward L., Comp.

    Focusing on welding, this module is one of eight included in the Vocational Education Readiness Tests (VERT). The module begins by listing the objectives of the module and describing tools and equipment needed. The remainder of the module contains sections on manipulative skills, trade vocabulary, tool identification, trade computational skills,…

  7. Operational readiness review phase-1 final report for WRAP-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-27

    This report documents the Operational Readiness Review for WRAP-1 Phase-1 operations. The report includes all criteria, lines of inquiry with resulting Findings and Observations. The review included assessing operational capability of the organization and the computer controlled process and facility systems.

  8. Concealed nuclear material identification via combined fast-neutron/γ-ray computed tomography (FNGCT): a Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, M.; Joyce, M. J.

    2018-02-01

    The potential of a combined and simultaneous fast-neutron/γ-ray computed tomography technique using Monte Carlo simulations is described. This technique is applied on the basis of a hypothetical tomography system comprising an isotopic radiation source (americium-beryllium) and a number (13) of organic scintillation detectors for the production and detection of both fast neutrons and γ rays, respectively. Via a combination of γ-ray and fast neutron tomography the potential is demonstrated to discern nuclear materials, such as compounds comprising plutonium and uranium, from substances that are used widely for neutron moderation and shielding. This discrimination is achieved on the basis of the difference in the attenuation characteristics of these substances. Discrimination of a variety of nuclear material compounds from shielding/moderating substances (the latter comprising lead or polyethylene for example) is shown to be challenging when using either γ-ray or neutron tomography in isolation of one another. Much-improved contrast is obtained for a combination of these tomographic modalities. This method has potential applications for in-situ, non-destructive assessments in nuclear security, safeguards, waste management and related requirements in the nuclear industry.

  9. Preoperative computed tomography for determining nodal status combined with histologic grading as a prognostic factor for patients with tongue carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Ichiro; Kurabayashi, Tohru; Amagasa, Teruo; Iwaki, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Takehito

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of preoperative neck computed tomography (CT) in combination with histologic grading as a prognostic factor for patients with tongue carcinoma. Fifty-five patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue were examined by CT prior to radical neck dissection. The locoregional failure and survival rates of these patients were analyzed in relation to their clinical characteristics, histologic grading (World Health Organization, WHO) based on tongue biopsy, and imaging diagnoses prior to surgery. Logistic multivariate regression analysis showed that both histologic grading and number of metastatic lymph nodes on CT were significant and independent prognostic factors in locoregional failure (p=0.009 and p=0.009, respectively). When the numebr of metastatic lymph nodes detected on preoperative neck CT were combined with the histologic grading for the evaluation, the five-year overall survival rates of A group (0 node with any Grade, or 1 node with Grade I-II) and B group (1 node with Grade III, or 2 or more nodes with any Grade) were 74.5% and 37.5%, respectively (p=0.001). The difference was more significant than histologic grading alone or the number of metastatic lymph nodes seen on CT alone. The combination of preoperative neck CT with histologic grading of the primary tumor is useful as a prognostic indicator for patients with tongue carcinoma. (author)

  10. Elements of Success: WorkReady Philadelphia Program Year 2011-2012 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philadelphia Youth Network, 2012

    2012-01-01

    What does it take to deliver WorkReady Philadelphia's high-quality career-connected programming? In short, it's all about the "elements"--those essential components of the system that combine to produce success for young people. This 2011-12 WorkReady report reinforces this theme by using visual aspects of the "Periodic Table of…

  11. A comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework for pre-clinical wear simulation of total knee replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgaied, A; Fisher, J; Jennings, L M

    2018-02-01

    A more robust pre-clinical wear simulation framework is required in order to simulate wider and higher ranges of activities, observed in different patient populations such as younger more active patients. Such a framework will help to understand and address the reported higher failure rates for younger and more active patients (National_Joint_Registry, 2016). The current study has developed and validated a comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework for pre-clinical wear simulation of total knee replacements (TKR). The input mechanical (elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio) and wear parameters of the moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearing material were independently measured from experimental studies under realistic test conditions, similar to the loading conditions found in the total knee replacements. The wear predictions from the computational wear simulation were validated against the direct experimental wear measurements for size 3 Sigma curved total knee replacements (DePuy, UK) in an independent experimental wear simulation study under three different daily activities; walking, deep squat, and stairs ascending kinematic conditions. The measured compressive mechanical properties of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE material were more than 20% lower than that reported in the literature under tensile test conditions. The pin-on-plate wear coefficient of moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was significantly dependant of the contact stress and the degree of cross-shear at the articulating surfaces. The computational wear predictions for the TKR from the current framework were consistent and in a good agreement with the independent full TKR experimental wear simulation measurements, with 0.94 coefficient of determination of the framework. In addition, the comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework was able to explain the complex experimental wear trends from the three different daily

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  13. Regularized iterative integration combined with non-linear diffusion filtering for phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Karin; Koehler, Thomas; Chabior, Michael; Allner, Sebastian; Marschner, Mathias; Fehringer, Andreas; Willner, Marian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter

    2014-12-29

    Phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography has a high potential to become clinically implemented because of its complementarity to conventional absorption-contrast.In this study, we investigate noise-reducing but resolution-preserving analytical reconstruction methods to improve differential phase-contrast imaging. We apply the non-linear Perona-Malik filter on phase-contrast data prior or post filtered backprojected reconstruction. Secondly, the Hilbert kernel is replaced by regularized iterative integration followed by ramp filtered backprojection as used for absorption-contrast imaging. Combining the Perona-Malik filter with this integration algorithm allows to successfully reveal relevant sample features, quantitatively confirmed by significantly increased structural similarity indices and contrast-to-noise ratios. With this concept, phase-contrast imaging can be performed at considerably lower dose.

  14. Three-dimensional SPECT [single photon emission computed tomography] reconstruction of combined cone beam and parallel beam data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.; Jianying Li; Huili Wang; Coleman, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using cone beam (CB) collimation exhibits increased sensitivity compared with acquisition geometries using parallel (P) hole collimation. However, CB collimation has a smaller field-of-view which may result in truncated projections and image artifacts. A primary objective of this work is to investigate maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) methods to reconstruct simultaneously acquired parallel and cone beam (P and CB) SPECT data. Simultaneous P and CB acquisition can be performed with commercially available triple camera systems by using two cone-beam collimators and a single parallel-hole collimator. The loss in overall sensitivity (relative to the use of three CB collimators) is about 15 to 20%. The authors have developed three methods to combine P and CB data using modified ML-EM algorithms. (author)

  15. Computer modelling of the combined effects of plant conditions and coal quality on burnout in utility furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Stephenson [RWE npower Engineering, Swindon (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    The aim of this paper is to describe the latest steps in the development of a computer model to predict the combined effects of plant conditions and coal quality on burnout. The work was conducted as part of RWE's contribution to the recent ECSC project 'Development of a carbon-in-ash notification system (CARNO)'. A burnout predictor code has been developed and validated; it includes both coal and plant effects and includes a burnout model based closely on CBK8. The agreement between predicted C-in-ash and plant data is encouraging, but further improvements are still desirable. The predictions obtained from the burnout predictor show that the calculated sensitivities to changes in plant condition can be very dependent on state of plant. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Xin; Xie, Jun; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Lili, Li; Wang, Jing [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Xu, Guang-Hua [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710054 (China)

    2015-03-10

    This study presents a new steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm for brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The goal of this study is to increase the number of targets using fewer stimulation high frequencies, with diminishing subject’s fatigue and reducing the risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures. The new paradigm is High-Frequency Combination Coding-Based High-Frequency Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (HFCC-SSVEP).Firstly, we studied SSVEP high frequency(beyond 25 Hz)response of SSVEP, whose paradigm is presented on the LED. The SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of high frequency(beyond 40 Hz) response is very low, which is been unable to be distinguished through the traditional analysis method; Secondly we investigated the HFCC-SSVEP response (beyond 25 Hz) for 3 frequencies (25Hz, 33.33Hz, and 40Hz), HFCC-SSVEP produces n{sup n} with n high stimulation frequencies through Frequence Combination Code. Further, Animproved Hilbert-huang transform (IHHT)-based variable frequency EEG feature extraction method and a local spectrum extreme target identification algorithmare adopted to extract time-frequency feature of the proposed HFCC-SSVEP response.Linear predictions and fixed sifting (iterating) 10 time is used to overcome the shortage of end effect and stopping criterion,generalized zero-crossing (GZC) is used to compute the instantaneous frequency of the proposed SSVEP respondent signals, the improved HHT-based feature extraction method for the proposed SSVEP paradigm in this study increases recognition efficiency, so as to improve ITR and to increase the stability of the BCI system. what is more, SSVEPs evoked by high-frequency stimuli (beyond 25Hz) minimally diminish subject’s fatigue and prevent safety hazards linked to photo-induced epileptic seizures, So as to ensure the system efficiency and undamaging.This study tests three subjects in order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method.

  17. High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Xin; Xie, Jun; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Lili, Li; Wang, Jing; Xu, Guang-Hua

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a new steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm for brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The goal of this study is to increase the number of targets using fewer stimulation high frequencies, with diminishing subject’s fatigue and reducing the risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures. The new paradigm is High-Frequency Combination Coding-Based High-Frequency Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (HFCC-SSVEP).Firstly, we studied SSVEP high frequency(beyond 25 Hz)response of SSVEP, whose paradigm is presented on the LED. The SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of high frequency(beyond 40 Hz) response is very low, which is been unable to be distinguished through the traditional analysis method; Secondly we investigated the HFCC-SSVEP response (beyond 25 Hz) for 3 frequencies (25Hz, 33.33Hz, and 40Hz), HFCC-SSVEP produces n n with n high stimulation frequencies through Frequence Combination Code. Further, Animproved Hilbert-huang transform (IHHT)-based variable frequency EEG feature extraction method and a local spectrum extreme target identification algorithmare adopted to extract time-frequency feature of the proposed HFCC-SSVEP response.Linear predictions and fixed sifting (iterating) 10 time is used to overcome the shortage of end effect and stopping criterion,generalized zero-crossing (GZC) is used to compute the instantaneous frequency of the proposed SSVEP respondent signals, the improved HHT-based feature extraction method for the proposed SSVEP paradigm in this study increases recognition efficiency, so as to improve ITR and to increase the stability of the BCI system. what is more, SSVEPs evoked by high-frequency stimuli (beyond 25Hz) minimally diminish subject’s fatigue and prevent safety hazards linked to photo-induced epileptic seizures, So as to ensure the system efficiency and undamaging.This study tests three subjects in order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method

  18. Accurate prediction of stability changes in protein mutants by combining machine learning with structure based computational mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masso, Majid; Vaisman, Iosif I

    2008-09-15

    Accurate predictive models for the impact of single amino acid substitutions on protein stability provide insight into protein structure and function. Such models are also valuable for the design and engineering of new proteins. Previously described methods have utilized properties of protein sequence or structure to predict the free energy change of mutants due to thermal (DeltaDeltaG) and denaturant (DeltaDeltaG(H2O)) denaturations, as well as mutant thermal stability (DeltaT(m)), through the application of either computational energy-based approaches or machine learning techniques. However, accuracy associated with applying these methods separately is frequently far from optimal. We detail a computational mutagenesis technique based on a four-body, knowledge-based, statistical contact potential. For any mutation due to a single amino acid replacement in a protein, the method provides an empirical normalized measure of the ensuing environmental perturbation occurring at every residue position. A feature vector is generated for the mutant by considering perturbations at the mutated position and it's ordered six nearest neighbors in the 3-dimensional (3D) protein structure. These predictors of stability change are evaluated by applying machine learning tools to large training sets of mutants derived from diverse proteins that have been experimentally studied and described. Predictive models based on our combined approach are either comparable to, or in many cases significantly outperform, previously published results. A web server with supporting documentation is available at http://proteins.gmu.edu/automute.

  19. The stress and stress intensity factors computation by BEM and FEM combination for nozzle junction under pressure and thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Q.; Cen, Z.; Zhu, H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports linear elastic fracture analysis based upon the stress intensity factor evaluation successfully applied to safety assessments of cracked structures. The nozzle junction are usually subjected to high pressure and thermal loads simultaneously. In validity of linear elastic fracture analysis, K can be decomposed into K P (caused by mechanic loads) and K τ (caused by thermal loads). Under thermal transient loading, explicit analysis (say by the FEM or BEM) of K tracing an entire history respectively for a range of crack depth may be much more time consuming. The techniques of weight function provide efficient means for transforming the problem into the stress computation of the uncracked structure and generation of influence function (for the given structure and size of crack). In this paper, a combination of BE-FEM has been used for the analysis of the cracked nozzle structure by techniques of weight function. The influence functions are obtained by coupled BE-FEM and the uncracked structure stress are computed by finite element methods

  20. Predicting Transport of 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-Pyridinol Into Saliva Using a Combination Experimental and Computational Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jordan Ned; Carver, Zana A.; Weber, Thomas J.; Timchalk, Charles

    2017-04-11

    A combination experimental and computational approach was developed to predict chemical transport into saliva. A serous-acinar chemical transport assay was established to measure chemical transport with non-physiological (standard cell culture medium) and physiological (using surrogate plasma and saliva medium) conditions using 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) a metabolite of the pesticide chlorpyrifos. High levels of TCPy protein binding was observed in cell culture medium and rat plasma resulting in different TCPy transport behaviors in the two experimental conditions. In the non-physiological transport experiment, TCPy reached equilibrium at equivalent concentrations in apical and basolateral chambers. At higher TCPy doses, increased unbound TCPy was observed, and TCPy concentrations in apical and basolateral chambers reached equilibrium faster than lower doses, suggesting only unbound TCPy is able to cross the cellular monolayer. In the physiological experiment, TCPy transport was slower than non-physiological conditions, and equilibrium was achieved at different concentrations in apical and basolateral chambers at a comparable ratio (0.034) to what was previously measured in rats dosed with TCPy (saliva:blood ratio: 0.049). A cellular transport computational model was developed based on TCPy protein binding kinetics and accurately simulated all transport experiments using different permeability coefficients for the two experimental conditions (1.4 vs 0.4 cm/hr for non-physiological and physiological experiments, respectively). The computational model was integrated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and accurately predicted TCPy concentrations in saliva of rats dosed with TCPy. Overall, this study demonstrates an approach to predict chemical transport in saliva potentially increasing the utility of salivary biomonitoring in the future.

  1. Predicting Transport of 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-Pyridinol Into Saliva Using a Combination Experimental and Computational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jordan Ned; Carver, Zana A; Weber, Thomas J; Timchalk, Charles

    2017-06-01

    A combination experimental and computational approach was developed to predict chemical transport into saliva. A serous-acinar chemical transport assay was established to measure chemical transport with nonphysiological (standard cell culture medium) and physiological (using surrogate plasma and saliva medium) conditions using 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) a metabolite of the pesticide chlorpyrifos. High levels of TCPy protein binding were observed in cell culture medium and rat plasma resulting in different TCPy transport behaviors in the 2 experimental conditions. In the nonphysiological transport experiment, TCPy reached equilibrium at equivalent concentrations in apical and basolateral chambers. At higher TCPy doses, increased unbound TCPy was observed, and TCPy concentrations in apical and basolateral chambers reached equilibrium faster than lower doses, suggesting only unbound TCPy is able to cross the cellular monolayer. In the physiological experiment, TCPy transport was slower than nonphysiological conditions, and equilibrium was achieved at different concentrations in apical and basolateral chambers at a comparable ratio (0.034) to what was previously measured in rats dosed with TCPy (saliva:blood ratio: 0.049). A cellular transport computational model was developed based on TCPy protein binding kinetics and simulated all transport experiments reasonably well using different permeability coefficients for the 2 experimental conditions (1.14 vs 0.4 cm/h for nonphysiological and physiological experiments, respectively). The computational model was integrated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and accurately predicted TCPy concentrations in saliva of rats dosed with TCPy. Overall, this study demonstrates an approach to predict chemical transport in saliva, potentially increasing the utility of salivary biomonitoring in the future. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  5. Brain-computer interface game applications for combined neurofeedback and biofeedback treatment for children on the autism spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth V C Friedrich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD show deficits in social and communicative skills, including imitation, empathy, and shared attention, as well as restricted interests and repetitive patterns of behaviors. Evidence for and against the idea that dysfunctions in the mirror neuron system are involved in imitation and could be one underlying cause for ASD is discussed in this review. Neurofeedback interventions have reduced symptoms in children with ASD by self-regulation of brain rhythms. However, cortical deficiencies are not the only cause of these symptoms. Peripheral physiological activity, such as the heart rate, is closely linked to neurophysiological signals and associated with social engagement. Therefore, a combined approach targeting the interplay between brain, body and behavior could be more effective. Brain-computer interface applications for combined neurofeedback and biofeedback treatment for children with ASD are currently nonexistent. To facilitate their use, we have designed an innovative game that includes social interactions and provides neural- and body-based feedback that corresponds directly to the underlying significance of the trained signals as well as to the behavior that is reinforced.

  6. Automated Extraction of Cranial Landmarks from Computed Tomography Data using a Combined Method of Knowledge and Pattern Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan N. RAJAPAKSE

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of anatomical structures from medical imaging data is a significant and critical function in the medical domain. Past studies in this context have mainly utilized two main approaches, the knowledge and learning methodologies based methods. Further, most of previous reported studies have focused on identification of landmarks from lateral X-ray Computed Tomography (CT data, particularly in the field of orthodontics. However, this study focused on extracting cranial landmarks from large sets of cross sectional CT slices using a combined method of the two aforementioned approaches. The proposed method of this study is centered mainly on template data sets, which were created using the actual contour patterns extracted from CT cases for each of the landmarks in consideration. Firstly, these templates were used to devise rules which are a characteristic of the knowledge based method. Secondly, the same template sets were employed to perform template matching related to the learning methodologies approach. The proposed method was tested on two landmarks, the Dorsum sellae and the Pterygoid plate, using CT cases of 5 subjects. The results indicate that, out of the 10 tests, the output images were within the expected range (desired accuracy in 7 instances and acceptable range (near accuracy for 2 instances, thus verifying the effectiveness of the combined template sets centric approach proposed in this study.

  7. Combination of brain-computer interface training and goal-directed physical therapy in chronic stroke: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broetz, Doris; Braun, Christoph; Weber, Cornelia; Soekadar, Surjo R; Caria, Andrea; Birbaumer, Niels

    2010-09-01

    There is no accepted and efficient rehabilitation strategy to reduce focal impairments for patients with chronic stroke who lack residual movements. A 67-year-old hemiplegic patient with no active finger extension was trained with a brain-computer interface (BCI) combined with a specific daily life-oriented physiotherapy. The BCI used electrical brain activity (EEG) and magnetic brain activity (MEG) to drive an orthosis and a robot affixed to the patient's affected upper extremity, which enabled him to move the paralyzed arm and hand driven by voluntary modulation of micro-rhythm activity. In addition, the patient practiced goal-directed physiotherapy training. Over 1 year, he completed 3 training blocks. Arm motor function, gait capacities (using Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Wolf Motor Function Test, Modified Ashworth Scale, 10-m walk speed, and goal attainment score), and brain reorganization (functional MRI, MEG) were repeatedly assessed. The ability of hand and arm movements as well as speed and safety of gait improved significantly (mean 46.6%). Improvement of motor function was associated with increased micro-oscillations in the ipsilesional motor cortex. This proof-of-principle study suggests that the combination of BCI training with goal-directed, active physical therapy may improve the motor abilities of chronic stroke patients despite apparent initial paralysis.

  8. Brain-computer interface game applications for combined neurofeedback and biofeedback treatment for children on the autism spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Elisabeth V C; Suttie, Neil; Sivanathan, Aparajithan; Lim, Theodore; Louchart, Sandy; Pineda, Jaime A

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show deficits in social and communicative skills, including imitation, empathy, and shared attention, as well as restricted interests and repetitive patterns of behaviors. Evidence for and against the idea that dysfunctions in the mirror neuron system are involved in imitation and could be one underlying cause for ASD is discussed in this review. Neurofeedback interventions have reduced symptoms in children with ASD by self-regulation of brain rhythms. However, cortical deficiencies are not the only cause of these symptoms. Peripheral physiological activity, such as the heart rate and its variability, is closely linked to neurophysiological signals and associated with social engagement. Therefore, a combined approach targeting the interplay between brain, body, and behavior could be more effective. Brain-computer interface applications for combined neurofeedback and biofeedback treatment for children with ASD are currently nonexistent. To facilitate their use, we have designed an innovative game that includes social interactions and provides neural- and body-based feedback that corresponds directly to the underlying significance of the trained signals as well as to the behavior that is reinforced.

  9. Factors of children's school readiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Marjanovič Umek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of preschool on children's school readiness in connection with their intellectual abilities, language competence, and parents' education. The sample included 219 children who were 68 to 83 months old and were attending the first year of primary school. Children were differentiated by whether or not they had attended preschool before starting school. Children's intellectual ability was determined using Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM; Raven, Raven, & Court, 1999, language competence using the Lestvice splošnega govornegarazvoja–LJ (LSGR–LJ, Scales of General Language Development; Marjanovič Umek, Kranjc, Fekonja in Bajc, 2004, and school readiness with the Preizkus pripravljenosti za šolo (PPŠ, Test of School Readiness; Toličič, 1986. The results indicate that children's intellectual ability and language competence have a high predictive value for the school readiness — they explained 51% of the variance in children's scores on the PPŠ. Preschool enrollment has a positive effect on school readiness for children whose parents have a low level of education, but not for those whose parents are highly educated.

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  11. Magnetic fusion: Environmental Readiness Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    Environmental Readiness Documents are prepared periodically to review and evaluate the environmental status of an energy technology during the several phases of development of that technology. Through these documents, the Office of Environment within the Department of Energy provides an independent and objective assessment of the environmental risks and potential impacts associated with the progression of the technology to the next stage of development and with future extensive use of the technology. This Environmental Readiness Document was prepared to assist the Department of Energy in evaluating the readiness of magnetic fusion technology with respect to environmental issues. An effort has been made to identify potential environmental problems that may be encountered based upon current knowledge, proposed and possible new environmental regulations, and the uncertainties inherent in planned environmental research

  12. Operational readiness of EFAD systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabat, M.J.

    1992-02-01

    An assessment of the operational readiness of the Emergency Filtered Air Discharge (EFAD) systems, installed in Canadian CANDU multi-unit nuclear power plants, was performed in this project. Relevant Canadian and foreign standards and regulatory requirements have been reviewed and documentation on EFAD system design, operation, testing and maintenance have been assessed to identify likely causes and potential failures of EFAD systems and their components under both standby and accident conditions. Recommendations have also been provided in this report for revisions which are needed to achieve and maintain appropriate operational readiness of EFAD systems

  13. Optimisation of the energy efficiency of bread-baking ovens using a combined experimental and computational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatir, Zinedine; Paton, Joe; Thompson, Harvey; Kapur, Nik; Toropov, Vassili

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A scientific framework for optimising oven operating conditions is presented. ► Experiments measuring local convective heat transfer coefficient are undertaken. ► An energy efficiency model is developed with experimentally calibrated CFD analysis. ► Designing ovens with optimum heat transfer coefficients reduces energy use. ► Results demonstrate a strong case to design and manufacture energy optimised ovens. - Abstract: Changing legislation and rising energy costs are bringing the need for efficient baking processes into much sharper focus. High-speed air impingement bread-baking ovens are complex systems using air flow to transfer heat to the product. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is combined with experimental analysis to develop a rigorous scientific framework for the rapid generation of forced convection oven designs. A design parameterisation of a three-dimensional generic oven model is carried out for a wide range of oven sizes and flow conditions to optimise desirable features such as temperature uniformity throughout the oven, energy efficiency and manufacturability. Coupled with the computational model, a series of experiments measuring the local convective heat transfer coefficient (h c ) are undertaken. The facility used for the heat transfer experiments is representative of a scaled-down production oven where the air temperature and velocity as well as important physical constraints such as nozzle dimensions and nozzle-to-surface distance can be varied. An efficient energy model is developed using a CFD analysis calibrated using experimentally determined inputs. Results from a range of oven designs are presented together with ensuing energy usage and savings

  14. Corrosion chemistry closing comments: opportunities in corrosion science facilitated by operando experimental characterization combined with multi-scale computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in characterization tools, computational capabilities, and theories have created opportunities for advancement in understanding of solid-fluid interfaces at the nanoscale in corroding metallic systems. The Faraday Discussion on Corrosion Chemistry in 2015 highlighted some of the current needs, gaps and opportunities in corrosion science. Themes were organized into several hierarchical categories that provide an organizational framework for corrosion. Opportunities to develop fundamental physical and chemical data which will enable further progress in thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of corrosion were discussed. These will enable new and better understanding of unit processes that govern corrosion at the nanoscale. Additional topics discussed included scales, films and oxides, fluid-surface and molecular-surface interactions, selected topics in corrosion science and engineering as well as corrosion control. Corrosion science and engineering topics included complex alloy dissolution, local corrosion, and modelling of specific corrosion processes that are made up of collections of temporally and spatially varying unit processes such as oxidation, ion transport, and competitive adsorption. Corrosion control and mitigation topics covered some new insights on coatings and inhibitors. Further advances in operando or in situ experimental characterization strategies at the nanoscale combined with computational modelling will enhance progress in the field, especially if coupling across length and time scales can be achieved incorporating the various phenomena encountered in corrosion. Readers are encouraged to not only to use this ad hoc organizational scheme to guide their immersion into the current opportunities in corrosion chemistry, but also to find value in the information presented in their own ways.

  15. Flow velocity-driven differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells in silk fibroin scaffolds: A combined experimental and computational approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanda Rita Vetsch

    Full Text Available Mechanical loading plays a major role in bone remodeling and fracture healing. Mimicking the concept of mechanical loading of bone has been widely studied in bone tissue engineering by perfusion cultures. Nevertheless, there is still debate regarding the in-vitro mechanical stimulation regime. This study aims at investigating the effect of two different flow rates (vlow = 0.001m/s and vhigh = 0.061m/s on the growth of mineralized tissue produced by human mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on 3-D silk fibroin scaffolds. The flow rates applied were chosen to mimic the mechanical environment during early fracture healing or during bone remodeling, respectively. Scaffolds cultured under static conditions served as a control. Time-lapsed micro-computed tomography showed that mineralized extracellular matrix formation was completely inhibited at vlow compared to vhigh and the static group. Biochemical assays and histology confirmed these results and showed enhanced osteogenic differentiation at vhigh whereas the amount of DNA was increased at vlow. The biological response at vlow might correspond to the early stage of fracture healing, where cell proliferation and matrix production is prominent. Visual mapping of shear stresses, simulated by computational fluid dynamics, to 3-D micro-computed tomography data revealed that shear stresses up to 0.39mPa induced a higher DNA amount and shear stresses between 0.55mPa and 24mPa induced osteogenic differentiation. This study demonstrates the feasibility to drive cell behavior of human mesenchymal stromal cells by the flow velocity applied in agreement with mechanical loading mimicking early fracture healing (vlow or bone remodeling (vhigh. These results can be used in the future to tightly control the behavior of human mesenchymal stromal cells towards proliferation or differentiation. Additionally, the combination of experiment and simulation presented is a strong tool to link biological responses to

  16. Clinical application of low-dose CT combined with computer-aided detection in lung cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zushan; Hou Hongjun; Xu Yan; Ma Daqing

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of chest low-dose CT (LDCT) combined with computer-aided detection (CAD) system for lung cancer screening in high risk population. Methods: Two hundred and nineteen healthy candidates underwent 64-slice LDCT scan. All images were reviewed in consensus by two radiologists with 15 years of thoracic CT diagnosis experience. Then the image data were analyzed with CAD alone. Finally images were reviewed by two radiologists with 5 years of CT diagnosis experience with and without CT Viewer software. The sensitivity, false positive rate of CAD for pulmonary nodule detection were calculated. SPSS 11.5 software and Chi-square test were used for the statistics. Results: Of 219 candidates ,104(47.5% ) were detected with lung nodules. There were 366 true nodules confirmed by the senior radiologists. The CAD system detected 271 (74.0%) true nodules and 424 false-positive nodules. The false-positive rate was 1.94/per case. The two junior radiologists indentifid 292 (79.8%), 286(78.1%) nodules without CAD and 336 (91.8%), 333 (91.0%) nodules with CAD respectively. There were significant differences for radiologists in indentifying nodules with or without CAD system (P<0.01). Conclusions: CAD is more sensitive than radiologists for indentifying the nodules in the central area or in the hilar region of the lung. While radiologists are more sensitive for the peripheral and sub-pleural nodules,or ground glass opacity nodules, or nodules smaller than 4 mm. CAD can not be used alone. The detection rate can be improved with the combination of radiologist and CAD in LDCT screen. (authors)

  17. Rapid estimation of the vertebral body volume: a combination of the Cavalieri principle and computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odaci, Ersan; Sahin, Buenyamin; Sonmez, Osman Fikret; Kaplan, Sueleyman; Bas, Orhan; Bilgic, Sait; Bek, Yueksel; Erguer, Hayati

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The exact volume of the vertebral body is necessary for the evaluation, treatment and surgical application of related vertebral body. Thereby, the volume changes of the vertebral body are monitored, such as infectious diseases of vertebra and traumatic or non-traumatic fractures and deformities of the spine. Several studies have been conducted for the assessment of the vertebral body size based on the evaluation of the different criteria of the spine using different techniques. However, we have not found any detailed study in the literature describing the combination of the Cavalieri principle and vertebral body volume estimation. Materials and methods: In the present study we describe a rapid, simple, accurate and practical technique for estimating the volume of vertebral body. Two specimens were taken from the cadavers including ten lumbar vertebras and were scanned in axial, sagittal and coronal section planes by a computed tomography (CT) machine. The consecutive sections in 5 and 3 mm thicknesses were used to estimate the total volume of the vertebral bodies by means of the Cavalieri principle. Furthermore, to evaluate inter-observer differences the volume estimations were carried out by three performers. Results: There were no significant differences between the performers' estimates and real volumes of the vertebral bodies (P>0.05) and also between the performers' volume estimates (P>0.05). The section thickness and the section plains did not affect the accuracy of the estimates (P>0.05). A high correlation was seen between the estimates of performers and the real volumes of the vertebral bodies (r=0.881). Conclusion: We concluded that the combination of CT scanning with the Cavalieri principle is a direct and accurate technique that can be safely applied to estimate the volume of the vertebral body with the mean of 5 min and 11 s workload per vertebra

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  20. [Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography in the initial evaluation and response assessment in primary central nervous system lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadal, Santiago; Cortés-Romera, Montserrat; Vélez, Patricia; Climent, Fina; Gámez, Cristina; González-Barca, Eva

    2015-06-08

    To evaluate the role of positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) in the initial evaluation and response assessment in primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Fourteen patients (8 males) with a median age 59.5 years diagnosed of PCNSL. A brain PET-CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in the initial evaluation. In 7 patients a PET-CT after treatment was performed. PET-CT showed at diagnosis 31 hypermetabolic focuses and MRI showed 47 lesions, with a good grade of concordance between both (k = 0.61; P = .005). In the response assessment, correlation between both techniques was good, and PET-CT was helpful in the appreciation of residual MRI lesions. Overall survival at 2 years of negative vs. positive PET-CT at the end of treatment was 100 vs. 37.5%, respectively (P = .045). PET-CT can be useful in the initial evaluation of PCNSL, and especially in the assessment of response. Despite the fact that PET-CT detects less small lesions than MRI, a good correlation between MRI and PET-CT was observed. It is effective in the evaluation of residual lesions. Prospective studies are needed to confirm their possible prognostic value. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoletti, Michele; Tumietto, Fabio; Fasulo, Giovanni; Giannella, Maddalena; Cristini, Francesco; Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Raumer, Luigi; Nanni, Cristina; Sanfilippo, Silvia; Di Eusanio, Marco; Scotton, Pier Giorgio; Graziosi, Maddalena; Rapezzi, Claudio; Fanti, Stefano; Viale, Pierluigi

    2014-01-13

    The diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis is challenging. The gold standard for prosthetic valve endocarditis diagnosis is trans-esophageal echocardiography. However, trans-esophageal echocardiography may result in negative findings or yield images difficult to differentiate from thrombus in patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis. Combined computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is a potentially promising diagnostic tool for several infectious conditions and it has also been employed in patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis but data are still scant. We reviewed the charts of 6 patients with prosthetic aortic valves evaluated for suspicion of prosthetic valve endocarditis, at two different hospital, over a 3-year period. We found 3 patients with early-onset PVE cases and blood cultures yielding Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus lugdunensis, respectively; and 3 late-onset cases in the remaining 3 patients with isolation in the blood of Streptococcus bovis, Candida albicans and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Initial trans-esophageal echocardiography was negative in all the patients, while fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed images suspicious for prosthetic valve endocarditis. In 4 out of 6 patients valve replacement was done with histology confirming the prosthetic valve endocarditis diagnosis. After an adequate course of antibiotic therapy fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed resolution of prosthetic valve endocarditis in all the patients. Our experience confirms the potential role of fluoroseoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnosis and follow-up of prosthetic valve endocarditis.

  2. The Medical Case for a Positron Emission Tomography and X-ray Computed Tomography Combined Service in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bulushi, Naima K; Bailey, Dale; Mariani, Giuliano

    2013-11-01

    The value of a positron emission tomography and X-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) combined service in terms of diagnostic accuracy, cost-effectiveness and impact on clinical decision-making is well-documented in the literature. Its role in the management of patients presenting with cancer is shifting from early staging and restaging to the early assessment of the treatment response. Currently, the application of PET/CT has extended to non-oncological specialties-mainly neurology, cardiology and rheumatology. A further emerging application for PET/CT is the imaging of infection/inflammation. This article illustrates some of the PET/CT applications in both oncological and non-oncological disorders. In view of the absence of this modality in Oman, this article aims to increase the awareness of the importance of these imaging modalities and their significant impact on diagnosis and management in both oncological and non-oncological specialties for patients of all age groups as well as the decision-makers.

  3. A Combined Thermodynamics & Computational Method to Assess Lithium Composition in Anode and Cathode of Lithium Ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenyu; Jiang, Lianlian; Van Durmen, Pauline; Saadat, Somaye; Yazami, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    With aim to address the open question of accurate determination of lithium composition in anode and cathode at a defined state of charge (SOC) of lithium ion batteries (LIB), we developed a method combining electrochemical thermodynamic measurements (ETM) and computational data fitting protocol. It is a common knowledge that in a lithium ion battery the SOC of anode and cathode differ from the SOC of the full-cell. Differences are in large part due to irreversible lithium losses within cell and to electrode mass unbalance. This implies that the lithium composition range in anode and in cathode during full charge and discharge cycle in full-cell is different from the composition range achieved in lithium half-cells of anode and cathode over their respective full SOC ranges. To the authors knowledge there is no unequivocal and practical method to determine the actual lithium composition of electrodes in a LIB, hence their SOC. Yet, accurate lithium composition assessment is fundamental not only for understanding the physics of electrodes but also for optimizing cell performances, particularly energy density and cycle life.

  4. Acid-base properties of the N3 ruthenium(II) solar cell sensitizer: a combined experimental and computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzoli, Giuliano; Lobello, Maria Grazia; Carlotti, Benedetta; Elisei, Fausto; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad K; Vitillaro, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Filippo

    2012-10-14

    We report a combined spectro-photometric and computational investigation of the acid-base equilibria of the N3 solar cell sensitizer [Ru(dcbpyH(2))(2)(NCS)(2)] (dcbpyH(2) = 4,4'-dicarboxyl-2,2' bipyridine) in aqueous/ethanol solutions. The absorption spectra of N3 recorded at various pH values were analyzed by Single Value Decomposition techniques, followed by Global Fitting procedures, allowing us to identify four separate acid-base equilibria and their corresponding ground state pK(a) values. DFT/TDDFT calculations were performed for the N3 dye in solution, investigating the possible relevant species obtained by sequential deprotonation of the four dye carboxylic groups. TDDFT excited state calculations provided UV-vis absorption spectra which nicely agree with the experimental spectral shapes at various pH values. The calculated pK(a) values are also in good agreement with experimental data, within <1 pK(a) unit. Based on the calculated energy differences a tentative assignment of the N3 deprotonation pathway is reported.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Simulation of Hypersonic Turbine-Based Combined-Cycle (TBCC) Inlet Mode Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, John W.; Saunders, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Methods of computational fluid dynamics were applied to simulate the aerodynamics within the turbine flowpath of a turbine-based combined-cycle propulsion system during inlet mode transition at Mach 4. Inlet mode transition involved the rotation of a splitter cowl to close the turbine flowpath to allow the full operation of a parallel dual-mode ramjet/scramjet flowpath. Steady-state simulations were performed at splitter cowl positions of 0deg, -2deg, -4deg, and -5.7deg, at which the turbine flowpath was closed half way. The simulations satisfied one objective of providing a greater understanding of the flow during inlet mode transition. Comparisons of the simulation results with wind-tunnel test data addressed another objective of assessing the applicability of the simulation methods for simulating inlet mode transition. The simulations showed that inlet mode transition could occur in a stable manner and that accurate modeling of the interactions among the shock waves, boundary layers, and porous bleed regions was critical for evaluating the inlet static and total pressures, bleed flow rates, and bleed plenum pressures. The simulations compared well with some of the wind-tunnel data, but uncertainties in both the windtunnel data and simulations prevented a formal evaluation of the accuracy of the simulation methods.

  6. The Social Context of Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Regena Fails

    This study examined how kindergarten teachers' views of readiness (maturational, learning, or school) are influenced by students from urban, suburban, and rural areas; by minority and non-minority students; and by students from lower and middle class backgrounds. The framework for the study was the social constructivist theory, the theory that all…

  7. Consequence Management - Ready or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-07

    Defense will have sufficient capability and be ready to respond to a Weapons of Mass Destruction/ Effects attack. An effective consequence management...Defense adopts the National Military Strategy and its consequence management approach, it must identify Weapons of Mass Destruction/ Effects threats...that the Department of Defense: develop Weapons of Mass Destruction/ Effects performance standards for response assets; implement a consequence

  8. Onderzoek online readiness modezaken 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boels, Han; Weltevreden, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    In dit onderzoek is de online readiness van modezaken in 2012 in kaart gebracht. In totaal hebben 124 (voornamelijk zelfstandige) modezaken deelgenomen aan het onderzoek. Het onderzoek is uitgevoerd door het lectoraat Online Ondernemen samen met studenten van de minor Marketing Tomorrow van de

  9. Onderzoek online readiness rijscholen 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weltevreden, Jesse; Boels, Han

    2013-01-01

    In dit onderzoek is de online readiness van rijscholen in 2013 in kaart gebracht. In totaal hebben 115 rijscholen deelgenomen aan het onderzoek. Het onderzoek is uitgevoerd door het lectoraat Online Ondernemen samen met studenten van de minor Marketing Tomorrow van de Hogeschool van Amsterdam.

  10. Workplace Readiness for Communicating Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Clive

    1996-01-01

    Proposes a model for communicating change about diversity using a workplace-readiness approach. Discusses ways organizational change agents can assess the company's current interpersonal and social dynamics, use appropriate influence strategies, and create effective messages that will appeal to employees and help to achieve the desired acceptance…

  11. Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Donna E.

    2006-01-01

    "Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators" presents a set of baseline measurements that gauge how well a statewide system of school readiness supports is addressing issues that affect Arizona children's readiness for school. The Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) measure the system, rather…

  12. Solar Ready: An Overview of Implementation Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.; Guidice, L.; Lisell, L.; Doris, L.; Busche, S.

    2012-01-01

    This report explores three mechanisms for encouraging solar ready building design and construction: solar ready legislation, certification programs for solar ready design and construction, and stakeholder education. These methods are not mutually exclusive, and all, if implemented well, could contribute to more solar ready construction. Solar ready itself does not reduce energy use or create clean energy. Nevertheless, solar ready building practices are needed to reach the full potential of solar deployment. Without forethought on incorporating solar into design, buildings may be incompatible with solar due to roof structure or excessive shading. In these cases, retrofitting the roof or removing shading elements is cost prohibitive. Furthermore, higher up-front costs due to structural adaptations and production losses caused by less than optimal roof orientation, roof equipment, or shading will lengthen payback periods, making solar more expensive. With millions of new buildings constructed each year in the United States, solar ready can remove installation barriers and increase the potential for widespread solar adoption. There are many approaches to promoting solar ready, including solar ready legislation, certification programs, and education of stakeholders. Federal, state, and local governments have the potential to implement programs that encourage solar ready and in turn reduce barriers to solar deployment. With the guidance in this document and the examples of jurisdictions and organizations already working to promote solar ready building practices, federal, state, and local governments can guide the market toward solar ready implementation.

  13. Ready for the plunge!

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Herman Ten Kate, Project Leader for the ATLAS magnet system, standing in front of the truck transporting the magnet across the Route de Meyrin.Every time any part of the ATLAS detector is moved, it’s quite a spectacle! On Tuesday 29 May, the first end-cap of the ATLAS toroid magnet left Building 180, bound for Point 1. The 240-ton behemoth covered the two short kilometres in no less than five hours. Traffic was interrupted on the Route de Meyrin while the exceptional load was wheeled to its final destination. One of the technical challenges was to keep the magnet horizontal throughout the operation and, to achieve this, computers permanently monitored the magnet’s angles of displacement and hydraulic jacks rectified any tilt. But the most hazardous part of operation remains the 80-m plunge into the ATLAS cavern.

  14. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  15. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  20. Creating the computer player: an engaging and collaborative approach to introduce computational thinking by combining ‘unplugged’ activities with visual programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gardeli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing research is being conducted on appropriate course design, practices and teacher interventions for improving the efficiency of computer science and programming courses in K-12 education. The trend is towards a more constructivist problem-based learning approach. Computational thinking, which refers to formulating and solving problems in a form that can be efficiently processed by a computer, raises an important educational challenge. Our research aims to explore possible ways of enriching computer science teaching with a focus on development of computational thinking. We have prepared and evaluated a learning intervention for introducing computer programming to children between 10 and 14 years old; this involves students working in groups to program the behavior of the computer player of a well-known game. The programming process is split into two parts. First, students design a high-level version of their algorithm during an ‘unplugged’ pen & paper phase, and then they encode their solution as an executable program in a visual programming environment. Encouraging evaluation results have been achieved regarding the educational and motivational value of the proposed approach.

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  2. Rapid identification of pearl powder from Hyriopsis cumingii by Tri-step infrared spectroscopy combined with computer vision technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siqi; Wei, Wei; Bai, Zhiyi; Wang, Xichang; Li, Xiaohong; Wang, Chuanxian; Liu, Xia; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Changhua

    2018-01-01

    Pearl powder, an important raw material in cosmetics and Chinese patent medicines, is commonly uneven in quality and frequently adulterated with low-cost shell powder in the market. The aim of this study is to establish an adequate approach based on Tri-step infrared spectroscopy with enhancing resolution combined with chemometrics for qualitative identification of pearl powder originated from three different quality grades of pearls and quantitative prediction of the proportions of shell powder adulterated in pearl powder. Additionally, computer vision technology (E-eyes) can investigate the color difference among different pearl powders and make it traceable to the pearl quality trait-visual color categories. Though the different grades of pearl powder or adulterated pearl powder have almost identical IR spectra, SD-IR peak intensity at about 861 cm- 1 (v2 band) exhibited regular enhancement with the increasing quality grade of pearls, while the 1082 cm- 1 (v1 band), 712 cm- 1 and 699 cm- 1 (v4 band) were just the reverse. Contrastly, only the peak intensity at 862 cm- 1 was enhanced regularly with the increasing concentration of shell powder. Thus, the bands in the ranges of (1550-1350 cm- 1, 730-680 cm- 1) and (830-880 cm- 1, 690-725 cm- 1) could be exclusive ranges to discriminate three distinct pearl powders and identify adulteration, respectively. For massive sample analysis, a qualitative classification model and a quantitative prediction model based on IR spectra was established successfully by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS), respectively. The developed method demonstrated great potential for pearl powder quality control and authenticity identification in a direct, holistic manner.

  3. Getting Ready for the Human Phenome Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oetting, William S; Robinson, Peter N; Greenblatt, Marc S

    2013-01-01

    A forum of the Human Variome Project (HVP) was held as a satellite to the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics in San Francisco, California. The theme of this meeting was "Getting Ready for the Human Phenome Project". Understanding the genetic contribution to both rare si...... for studies attempting to identify novel disease genes or causative genetic variants. Improved systems and tools that enhance the collection of phenotype data from clinicians are urgently needed. This meeting begins the HVP's effort towards this important goal....... the impact of genetic variation on disease. To this end, there needs to be a greater sharing of phenotype and genotype data. For this to occur, the many databases that currently exist will need to become interoperable to allow for the combining of cohorts with similar phenotypes to increase statistical power...

  4. Use of a fast incremental plotter combined with a mini-computer programmed in BASIC for the routine analysis of gammagraphic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigne, J.P.; Aristote, A.

    The system described is built around a Hewlett-Packard mini-computer (H.P. 2116 B) of 24 16-bit words, with peripherals consisting of a teleprinter, a fast reader, a fast perforator, an IBM compatible band unit, a cathode-ray tube with memory, a Benson incremental plotter and two high-speed HP analogue digital convertors. Data processing is carried out exclusively in BASIC, a conversational language very easy to use, written in common English, which can be modified at a moment's notice to meet special requirements. It is considered that this type of system, which certain constructors are beginning to offer in the form of a ready-to-use apparatus micro-programmed in BASIC, is destined to take the place of fixed systems which are hardly less expensive. It enables the laboratory which acquires such an instrument to perform all kinds of scientific calculations and as the case may be to manage physiological transducers or medical records [fr

  5. Nuclear explosives testing readiness evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valk, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    This readiness evaluation considers hole selection and characterization, verification, containment issues, nuclear explosive safety studies, test authorities, event operations planning, canister-rack preparation, site preparation, diagnostic equipment setup, device assembly facilities and processes, device delivery and insertion, emplacement, stemming, control room activities, readiness briefing, arming and firing, test execution, emergency response and reentry, and post event analysis to include device diagnostics, nuclear chemistry, and containment. This survey concludes that the LLNL program and its supporting contractors could execute an event within six months of notification, and a second event within the following six months, given the NET group`s evaluation and the following three restraints: (1) FY94 (and subsequent year) funding is essentially constant with FY93, (2) Preliminary work for the initial event is completed to the historical sic months status, (3) Critical personnel, currently working in dual use technologies, would be recallable as needed.

  6. GRENADA. Renewables Readiness Assessment 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Grenada, like many Caribbean islands, is dependent on costly oil imports for its energy needs, including the generation of electricity. The transition to renewable energy could potentially support price reductions and improve the overall competitiveness of key sectors of the economy, particularly tourism. This report provides facts and analysis to support the country's discussion on ways to move forward with the renewable energy agenda. IRENA is ready to provide support in the implementation of the actions identified in this report.

  7. Using Positive Behavior Support Procedures in Head Start Classrooms to Improve School Readiness: A Group Training and Behavioral Coaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, Edward G.; Walker, Hill; Severson, Herbert; Golly, Annemieke; Seeley, John R.; Small, Jason W.

    2009-01-01

    Social-emotional competence is an important determinant of school readiness. School readiness, in turn, sets the stage for school success. There is clear longitudinal evidence that school success, attachment and bonding to the schooling process, and full engagement of schooling can, in combination, operate as a protective factor against a host of…

  8. Evidence based practice readiness: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jessica D; Welton, John M

    2018-01-15

    To analyse and define the concept "evidence based practice readiness" in nurses. Evidence based practice readiness is a term commonly used in health literature, but without a clear understanding of what readiness means. Concept analysis is needed to define the meaning of evidence based practice readiness. A concept analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's method to clarify the defining attributes of evidence based practice readiness as well as antecedents and consequences. A Boolean search of PubMed and Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted and limited to those published after the year 2000. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Evidence based practice readiness incorporates personal and organisational readiness. Antecedents include the ability to recognize the need for evidence based practice, ability to access and interpret evidence based practice, and a supportive environment. The concept analysis demonstrates the complexity of the concept and its implications for nursing practice. The four pillars of evidence based practice readiness: nursing, training, equipping and leadership support are necessary to achieve evidence based practice readiness. Nurse managers are in the position to address all elements of evidence based practice readiness. Creating an environment that fosters evidence based practice can improve patient outcomes, decreased health care cost, increase nurses' job satisfaction and decrease nursing turnover. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The concept of readiness to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Cindy C; Gottlieb, Laurie N

    2003-04-01

    Readiness is associated with change, yet there is little understanding of this construct. The purpose of this study was to examine readiness; its referents, associated factors and the resulting consequences. In the course of nursing five clients living with multiple sclerosis over a 7-month period using a Reflective Practice Model, data were systematically gathered using open-ended and then more focused questioning. Data collected during 42 client encounters (28 face-to-face encounters; 14 telephone contacts) were analysed using Chinn and Kramer's concept analysis technique. Findings. The concept of readiness was inductively derived. Readiness is both a state and a process. Before clients can create change they need to become ready to change. A number of factors trigger readiness. These include when: (a) clients perceive that a health concern is not going to resolve, (b) a change in a client's physical condition takes on new significance, (c) clients feel better able to manage their stress, (d) clients have sufficient energy, (e) clients perceive that they have adequate support in undertaking change. When one or more of these factors is present clients become ready to consider change. The process of readiness involves recognizing the need to change, weighing the costs and benefits and, when benefits outweigh costs, planning for change. The desire to change and to take action determines clients' degree of readiness. When they experience a high degree of readiness they report less anger, less depression, and view their condition in a more positive light. In contrast, when they experience a low degree of readiness they report feeling depressed, afraid and vulnerable in the face of change. Nursing has an important role to play in creating conditions to support change. To fulfil this role, nurses need to be able to assess readiness for change and the factors that enable it and then to intervene in ways that facilitate readiness.

  10. Decommissioning project readiness reviews at the Department of Energy's Hanford, Washington, Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speer, D.R.; Holmes, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Two Hanford Site contractors independently formulated readiness review methods to prepare for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) projects. One readiness review method provided an independent management review process. The other method provided a review by personnel directly involved in the project and concise documentation procedures. A unified system is now used at Hanford which combines the best aspects of both readiness review methods. The unified method assigns category levels based on certain job characteristics. The category assigned to the project then indicates the required level of management review prior to proceeding with the D and D project. In addition, the concise documentation procedures are now used for all category levels

  11. Computationally Modeling Interpersonal Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Joo eLee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a computational model capable of predicting—above human accuracy—the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind’s readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our prior work using human-subjects experiments, when incorporated into the feature engineering process, permits a computational model to outperform both human predictions and a baseline model built in naivete' of this domain knowledge. We then present the construction of hidden Markov models to incorporate temporal relationships among the trust-related nonverbal cues. By interpreting the resulting learned structure, we observe that models built to emulate different levels of trust exhibit different sequences of nonverbal cues. From this observation, we derived sequence-based temporal features that further improve the accuracy of our computational model. Our multi-step research process presented in this paper combines the strength of experimental manipulation and machine learning to not only design a computational trust model but also to further our understanding of the dynamics of interpersonal trust.

  12. Computation of beam quality parameters for Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, Rh/Rh, and W/Al target/filter combinations in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharrati, Hedi; Zarrad, Boubaker

    2003-01-01

    A computer program was implemented to predict mammography x-ray beam parameters in the range 20-40 kV for Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, Rh/Rh, and W/Al target/filter combinations. The computation method used to simulate mammography x-ray spectra is based on the Boone et al. model. The beam quality parameters such as the half-value layer (HVL), the homogeneity coefficient (HC), and the average photon energy were computed by simulating the interaction of the spectrum photons with matter. The checking of this computation was done using a comparison of the results with published data and measured values obtained at the Netherlands Metrology Institute Van Swinden Laboratorium, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and International Atomic Energy Agency. The predicted values with a mean deviation of 3.3% of HVL, 3.7% of HC, and 1.5% of average photon energy show acceptable agreement with published data and measurements for all target/filter combinations in the 23-40 kV range. The accuracy of this computation can be considered clinically acceptable and can allow an appreciable estimation for the beam quality parameters

  13. Dynamic modelling of an adsorption storage tank using a hybrid approach combining computational fluid dynamics and process simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, J.P.B.; Esteves, I.A.A.C.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package has been coupled with the dynamic process simulator of an adsorption storage tank for methane fuelled vehicles. The two solvers run as independent processes and handle non-overlapping portions of the computational domain. The codes exchange data on the boundary interface of the two domains to ensure continuity of the solution and of its gradient. A software interface was developed to dynamically suspend and activate each process as necessary, and be responsible for data exchange and process synchronization. This hybrid computational tool has been successfully employed to accurately simulate the discharge of a new tank design and evaluate its performance. The case study presented here shows that CFD and process simulation are highly complementary computational tools, and that there are clear benefits to be gained from a close integration of the two. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 5 CFR 591.221 - How does OPM compute the consumer expenditure weights it uses to combine price indexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Cost-of-Living Allowance and Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.221 How does OPM compute...

  15. Readiness to change criminal women and men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Biel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The readiness of offenders to social rehabilitation is a new category in our country. Meanwhile, the research conducted in many countries indicates its usefulness in the diagnosis and selection of participants of rehabilitation programmes. This entails more effective interaction with convicted persons and greater responsibility on the part of convicted people for their own social rehabilitation process. The aim of this article is to present the main assumptions and models of readiness for change and their usefulness in social rehabilitation practice and to present pilot studies of readiness for change among criminal women and men in Kraków. Application of the Polish adaptation of the CVTRQ questionnaire made it possible to determine the level of convicted persons’ readiness, taking into account deficits in particular scales of the questionnaire and variables differentiating the group of ready and not ready people. At the end, guidelines for further research will be presented.

  16. Librarian readiness for research partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazure, Emily S; Alpi, Kristine M

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated health sciences librarians' knowledge and skill-based readiness to partner on sponsored research involving human participants. The authors developed and deployed, at two time points, a web-based survey on nine indicators of research activities with response choices reflecting the transtheoretical model of stages of behavior change. Librarians with research experience or membership in the Medical Library Association Research Section reported higher levels of having completed indicators. Our results suggest that creating awareness in precontemplation responders could encourage skill development. Mentoring and continuing education could support librarians who are contemplating or preparing to perform indicator activities.

  17. NASA Technology Readiness Level Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnamara, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation will cover the basic Technology Readiness Level (TRL) definitions used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and their specific wording. We will discuss how they are used in the NASA Project Life Cycle and their effectiveness in practice. We'll also discuss the recent efforts by the International Standards Organization (ISO) to develop a broadly acceptable set of TRL definitions for the international space community and some of the issues brought to light. This information will provide input for further discussion of the use of the TRL scale in manufacturing.

  18. Readiness for banking technologies in developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Professor in the Department of Marketing Management, University of Johannesburg. ... From the organisation's perspective, it has been suggested ... technological readiness of developing countries' consumers, in an urban environment,.

  19. Ready or Not...? Teen Sexuality and the Troubling Discourse of Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I explore how talk about being "ready" or "not ready" for sex shapes teen and adult understandings of sexuality. I argue that this "discourse of readiness" poses serious threats to teens' identity development, sexual decision making, and educators efforts to help them through these processes. To illustrate, I draw from my…

  20. Probing Stereoselectivity in Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization Mediated by Cyclometalated Ruthenium-Based Catalysts: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rosebrugh, L. E.; Ahmed, T. S.; Marx, V. M.; Hartung, J.; Liu, P.; López, J. G.; Houk, K. N.; Grubbs, R. H.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructures of polymers produced by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) with cyclometalated Ru-carbene metathesis catalysts were investigated. A strong bias for a cis,syndiotactic microstructure with minimal head-to-tail bias was observed. In instances where trans errors were introduced, it was determined that these regions were also syndiotactic. Furthermore, hypothetical reaction intermediates and transition structures were analyzed computationally. Combined experimental a...

  1. A combined vector potential-scalar potential method for FE computation of 3D magnetic fields in electrical devices with iron cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential based finite-element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based formulations for computation of three-dimensional magnetostatic fields is introduced. In this method, the curl-component of the magnetic field intensity is computed by a reduced magnetic vector potential. This field intensity forms the basic of a forcing function for a global magnetic scalar potential solution over the entire volume of the region. This method allows one to include iron portions sandwiched in between conductors within partitioned current-carrying subregions. The method is most suited for large-scale global-type 3-D magnetostatic field computations in electrical devices, and in particular rotating electric machinery.

  2. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  3. Energy Consumption and Indoor Environment Predicted by a Combination of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2003-01-01

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution is introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment.The article describes a calculation...

  4. Combined experimental and computational studies of pyrazinamide and nicotinamide in the context of crystal engineering and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Hoser, Anna Agnieszka; Kamiński, Radosław

    2014-01-01

    and computational analysis of the β form of pyrazinamide and α form of nicotinamide. Static electron density distribution is obtained through application of Hansen and Coppens multipolar formalism, and further analyzed via Baders quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Geometrical and electron density...

  5. Combination of inquiry learning model and computer simulation to improve mastery concept and the correlation with critical thinking skills (CTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Muhamad Gina; Kaniawati, Ida; Rusdiana, Dadi; Kirana, Kartika Hajar

    2016-02-01

    Among the purposes of physics learning at high school is to master the physics concepts and cultivate scientific attitude (including critical attitude), develop inductive and deductive reasoning skills. According to Ennis et al., inductive and deductive reasoning skills are part of critical thinking. Based on preliminary studies, both of the competence are lack achieved, it is seen from student learning outcomes is low and learning processes that are not conducive to cultivate critical thinking (teacher-centered learning). One of learning model that predicted can increase mastery concepts and train CTS is inquiry learning model aided computer simulations. In this model, students were given the opportunity to be actively involved in the experiment and also get a good explanation with the computer simulations. From research with randomized control group pretest-posttest design, we found that the inquiry learning model aided computer simulations can significantly improve students' mastery concepts than the conventional (teacher-centered) method. With inquiry learning model aided computer simulations, 20% of students have high CTS, 63.3% were medium and 16.7% were low. CTS greatly contribute to the students' mastery concept with a correlation coefficient of 0.697 and quite contribute to the enhancement mastery concept with a correlation coefficient of 0.603.

  6. Mobile computing with special reference to readability task under the impact of vibration, colour combination and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Zulquernain; Siddiquee, Arshad Noor; Haleem, Abid

    2008-12-01

    The last 20 years have seen a tremendous growth in the field of computing with special reference to mobile computing. Ergonomic issues pertaining to this theme remains unexplored. With special reference to readability in mobile computing, an experimental research was conducted to study the gender effect on human performance under the impact of vibration in a human computer interaction environment. Fourteen subjects (7 males and 7 females) participated in the study. Three independent variables, namely gender, level of vibration and screen text/background colour, were selected for the experimental investigation while the dependent variable was the number of characters read per minute. The data collected were analyzed statistically through an experimental design for repeated measures. Results indicated that gender as an organismic variable, the level of vibration and screen text/background colour revealed statistically significant differences. However, the second order interaction was found to be statistically non-significant. These findings are discussed in light of the previous studies undertaken on the topic.

  7. Automated, computer interpreted radioimmunoassay results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.C.; Nagle, C.E.; Dworkin, H.J.; Fink-Bennett, D.; Freitas, J.E.; Wetzel, R.; Sawyer, N.; Ferry, D.; Hershberger, D.

    1984-01-01

    90,000 Radioimmunoassay results have been interpreted and transcribed automatically using software developed for use on a Hewlett Packard Model 1000 mini-computer system with conventional dot matrix printers. The computer program correlates the results of a combination of assays, interprets them and prints a report ready for physician review and signature within minutes of completion of the assay. The authors designed and wrote a computer program to query their patient data base for radioassay laboratory results and to produce a computer generated interpretation of these results using an algorithm that produces normal and abnormal interpretives. Their laboratory assays 50,000 patient samples each year using 28 different radioassays. Of these 85% have been interpreted using our computer program. Allowances are made for drug and patient history and individualized reports are generated with regard to the patients age and sex. Finalization of reports is still subject to change by the nuclear physician at the time of final review. Automated, computerized interpretations have realized cost savings through reduced personnel and personnel time and provided uniformity of the interpretations among the five physicians. Prior to computerization of interpretations, all radioassay results had to be dictated and reviewed for signing by one of the resident or staff physicians. Turn around times for reports prior to the automated computer program generally were two to three days. Whereas, the computerized interpret system allows reports to generally be issued the day assays are completed

  8. From Readiness to Action: How Motivation Works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruglanski Arie W.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new theoretical construct labeled motivational readiness. It is defined as the inclination, whether or not ultimately implemented, to satisfy a desire. A general model of readiness is described which builds on the work of prior theories, including animal learning models and personality approaches, and which aims to integrate a variety of research findings across different domains of motivational research. Components of this model include the Want state (that is, an individual’s currently active desire, and the Expectancy of being able to satisfy that Want. We maintain that the Want concept is the critical ingredient in motivational readiness: without it, readiness cannot exist. In contrast, some motivational readiness can exist without Expectancy. We also discuss the role of incentive in motivational readiness. Incentive is presently conceived of in terms of a Match between a Want and a Perceived Situational Affordance. Whereas in classic models incentive was portrayed as a first order determinant of motivational readiness, here we describe it as a second order factor which affects readiness by influencing Want, Expectancy, or both. The new model’s relation to its theoretical predecessors, and its implications for future research, also are discussed.

  9. Universal School Readiness Screening at Kindergarten Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Matthew; Dowdy, Erin; Dever, Bridget; Carnazzo, Katherine; Bolton, Courtney

    2018-01-01

    Researchers examined the concurrent and predictive validity of a brief (12-item) teacher-rated school readiness screener, the Kindergarten Student Entrance Profile (KSEP), using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to examine associations between (N = 78) children's social-emotional (SE) and cognitive (COG) readiness with…

  10. Overview: Texas College and Career Readiness Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Texas College and Career Readiness Standards define what students should know and be able to accomplish in order to succeed in entry-level college courses or skilled workforce opportunities upon graduation from high school. This paper answers the following questions: (1) Who developed the Texas College and Career Readiness Standards?; (2) What…

  11. Understanding Early Educators' Readiness to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Shira M.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers in the fields of humanistic psychology, counseling, organizational change, and implementation science have been asking a question that is at the heart of today's early care and education quality improvement efforts: When it comes to changing one's behavior, what makes a person ready to change? Although the concept of readiness to…

  12. Assessing Readiness for En Pointe in Young Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jeffrey C; Kruse, David W

    2016-01-01

    Children begin ballet lessons as young as age 2 years. The graceful movements of classical ballet require a combination of artistry, flexibility, and strength to perform. During the training and development of a young ballerina, the transition to dancing en pointe ("on the toes") represents a significant milestone and traditionally begins around age 11 or 12 years, assuming the proper training background and dance aspirations. However, current dance medicine literature describes factors such as maturity, proper technique, strength, and postural control as the more significant factors in determining pointe readiness. An in-office evaluation of these factors can be performed by the clinician to assist dancers, their family, and their dance instructor(s) determine pointe readiness. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Combining discrete equations method and upwind downwind-controlled splitting for non-reacting and reacting two-fluid computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, K.

    2012-01-01

    When numerically investigating multiphase phenomena during severe accidents in a reactor system, characteristic lengths of the multi-fluid zone (non-reactive and reactive) are found to be much smaller than the volume of the reactor containment, which makes the direct modeling of the configuration hardly achievable. Alternatively, we propose to consider the physical multiphase mixture zone as an infinitely thin interface. Then, the reactive Riemann solver is inserted into the Reactive Discrete Equations Method (RDEM) to compute high speed combustion waves represented by discontinuous interfaces. An anti-diffusive approach is also coupled with RDEM to accurately simulate reactive interfaces. Increased robustness and efficiency when computing both multiphase interfaces and reacting flows are achieved thanks to an original upwind downwind-controlled splitting method (UDCS). UDCS is capable of accurately solving interfaces on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes, including reacting fronts for both deflagration and detonation configurations. (author)

  14. Combining on-chip synthesis of a focused combinatorial library with computational target prediction reveals imidazopyridine GPCR ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutlinger, Michael; Rodrigues, Tiago; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-01-07

    Using the example of the Ugi three-component reaction we report a fast and efficient microfluidic-assisted entry into the imidazopyridine scaffold, where building block prioritization was coupled to a new computational method for predicting ligand-target associations. We identified an innovative GPCR-modulating combinatorial chemotype featuring ligand-efficient adenosine A1/2B and adrenergic α1A/B receptor antagonists. Our results suggest the tight integration of microfluidics-assisted synthesis with computer-based target prediction as a viable approach to rapidly generate bioactivity-focused combinatorial compound libraries with high success rates. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Comprehensive computational model for combining fluid hydrodynamics, light transport and biomass growth in a Taylor vortex algal photobioreactor: Lagrangian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xi; Kong, Bo; Vigil, R Dennis

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive quantitative model incorporating the effects of fluid flow patterns, light distribution, and algal growth kinetics on biomass growth rate is developed in order to predict the performance of a Taylor vortex algal photobioreactor for culturing Chlorella vulgaris. A commonly used Lagrangian strategy for coupling the various factors influencing algal growth was employed whereby results from computational fluid dynamics and radiation transport simulations were used to compute numerous microorganism light exposure histories, and this information in turn was used to estimate the global biomass specific growth rate. The simulations provide good quantitative agreement with experimental data and correctly predict the trend in reactor performance as a key reactor operating parameter is varied (inner cylinder rotation speed). However, biomass growth curves are consistently over-predicted and potential causes for these over-predictions and drawbacks of the Lagrangian approach are addressed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Betting on the fastest horse: Using computer simulation to design a combination HIV intervention for future projects in Maharashtra, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly V Ruggles

    Full Text Available To inform the design of a combination intervention strategy targeting HIV-infected unhealthy alcohol users in Maharashtra, India, that could be tested in future randomized control trials.Using probabilistic compartmental simulation modeling we compared intervention strategies targeting HIV-infected unhealthy alcohol users on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Maharashtra, India. We tested interventions targeting four behaviors (unhealthy alcohol consumption, risky sexual behavior, depression and antiretroviral adherence, in three formats (individual, group based, community and two durations (shorter versus longer. A total of 5,386 possible intervention combinations were tested across the population for a 20-year time horizon and intervention bundles were narrowed down based on incremental cost-effectiveness analysis using a two-step probabilistic uncertainty analysis approach.Taking into account uncertainty in transmission variables and intervention cost and effectiveness values, we were able to reduce the number of possible intervention combinations to be used in a randomized control trial from over 5,000 to less than 5. The most robust intervention bundle identified was a combination of three interventions: long individual alcohol counseling; weekly Short Message Service (SMS adherence counseling; and brief sex risk group counseling.In addition to guiding policy design, simulation modeling of HIV transmission can be used as a preparatory step to trial design, offering a method for intervention pre-selection at a reduced cost.

  17. Betting on the fastest horse: Using computer simulation to design a combination HIV intervention for future projects in Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Kelly V; Patel, Anik R; Schensul, Stephen; Schensul, Jean; Nucifora, Kimberly; Zhou, Qinlian; Bryant, Kendall; Braithwaite, R Scott

    2017-01-01

    To inform the design of a combination intervention strategy targeting HIV-infected unhealthy alcohol users in Maharashtra, India, that could be tested in future randomized control trials. Using probabilistic compartmental simulation modeling we compared intervention strategies targeting HIV-infected unhealthy alcohol users on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Maharashtra, India. We tested interventions targeting four behaviors (unhealthy alcohol consumption, risky sexual behavior, depression and antiretroviral adherence), in three formats (individual, group based, community) and two durations (shorter versus longer). A total of 5,386 possible intervention combinations were tested across the population for a 20-year time horizon and intervention bundles were narrowed down based on incremental cost-effectiveness analysis using a two-step probabilistic uncertainty analysis approach. Taking into account uncertainty in transmission variables and intervention cost and effectiveness values, we were able to reduce the number of possible intervention combinations to be used in a randomized control trial from over 5,000 to less than 5. The most robust intervention bundle identified was a combination of three interventions: long individual alcohol counseling; weekly Short Message Service (SMS) adherence counseling; and brief sex risk group counseling. In addition to guiding policy design, simulation modeling of HIV transmission can be used as a preparatory step to trial design, offering a method for intervention pre-selection at a reduced cost.

  18. Lightning Arrestor Connectors Production Readiness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, Steve; Linder, Kim; Emmons, Jim; Gomez, Antonio; Hasam, Dawud; Maurer, Michelle

    2008-10-20

    The Lightning Arrestor Connector (LAC), part “M”, presented opportunities to improve the processes used to fabricate LACs. The A## LACs were the first production LACs produced at the KCP, after the product was transferred from Pinnellas. The new LAC relied on the lessons learned from the A## LACs; however, additional improvements were needed to meet the required budget, yield, and schedule requirements. Improvement projects completed since 2001 include Hermetic Connector Sealing Improvement, Contact Assembly molding Improvement, development of a second vendor for LAC shells, general process improvement, tooling improvement, reduction of the LAC production cycle time, and documention of the LAC granule fabrication process. This report summarizes the accomplishments achieved in improving the LAC Production Readiness.

  19. Teenage employment and career readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kaylin M; Staff, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Most American youth hold a job at some point during adolescence, but should they work? This article presents a broad overview of teenage employment in the United States. It begins by describing which teenagers work and for how long and then focuses attention on the consequences (both good and bad) of paid work in adolescence. It then presents recent nationally representative data from the Monitoring the Future Study suggesting that limited hours of paid work do not crowd out developmentally appropriate after-school activities. A review of the literature also supports the idea that employment for limited hours in good jobs can promote career readiness and positive development. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of youth work for practitioners and policymakers who are delivering career-related programming. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  20. Systems security and functional readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckner, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    In Protective Programming Planning, it is important that every facility or installation be configured to support the basic functions and mission of the using organization. This paper addresses the process of identifying the key functional operations of our facilities in Europe and providing the security necessary to keep them operating in natural and man-made threat environments. Functional Readiness is important since many of our existing facilities in Europe were not constructed to meet the demands of today's requirements. There are increased requirements for real-time systems with classified terminals and stringent access control, tempest and other electronic protection devices. One must prioritize the operations of these systems so that essential functions are provided even when the facilities are affected by overt or covert hostile activities

  1. MIBS breadboard ready for testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijtens, Johan; de Goeij, Bryan; Boslooper, Erik

    2017-11-01

    MIBS is a spectrometer operating in the thermal infrared wavelength region, designed in frame of the phase A study for the ESA EarthCARE mission as part of the multispectral Imaging instrument MSI, which uses a 2D microbolometer array detector in stead of the more common MCT detectors. Utilization of a microbolometer and using an integrated calibration system, results in a sensor with a size and mass reduction of at least an order of magnitude when compared to currently flying instruments with similar spectral resolution. In order to demonstrate feasiblity a breadboard has been designed, which will be build and aligned in 2006 and will be ready for testing the forth quarter of 2006.

  2. Defense Treaty Inspection Readiness Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin, J.J.; Kohen, M.D.; Rivers, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Defense Treaty Inspection Readiness Program (DTIRP) was established by the Department of Defense in 1990 to assist defense facilities in preparing for treaty verification activities. Led by the On-Site Inspection Agency (OSIA), an element of the Department of Defense, DTIRP''s membership includes representatives from other Department of Defense agencies, the Department of Energy (DOE), the Central Intelligence Agency, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Commerce, and others. The Office of Safeguards and Security has a significant interest in this program, due to the number of national defense facilities within its purview that are candidates for future inspections. As a result, the Office of Safeguards and Security has taken a very active role in DTIRP. This paper discusses the Office of Safeguards and Security''s increasing involvement in various elements of the DTIRP, ranging from facility assessments to training development and implementation

  3. Utility shopping: are consumers ready?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrados, A.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides an overview of public readiness to deal with deregulation of the electric power industry , based on an analysis of public reaction to the deregulation of the transportation, telecommunications and natural gas industries which already have taken place. The report also examines the reasons why residential consumers have reason to be wary of deregulation. These include the likelihood of slow development of the intended competition, the consequent limits on consumer choices, the possibility of increased prices, decreased quality of service and erosion of social values such as affordability and accessibility. The report concludes with a number of recommendations aimed at ensuring the existence of workable competition for residential consumers, that reliable and meaningful information is available as competition in deregulated markets gets underway, that independent sources of information are widely available, and that basic consumer protection against deceptive and borderline marketing practices, a regulatory oversight mechanism and public reporting mechanisms are in place before competition begins. 33 refs

  4. Solar Sail Propulsion Technology Readiness Level Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Charles L.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Projects Office has been sponsoring 2 solar sail system design and development hardware demonstration activities over the past 20 months. Able Engineering Company (AEC) of Goleta, CA is leading one team and L Garde, Inc. of Tustin, CA is leading the other team. Component, subsystem and system fabrication and testing has been completed successfully. The goal of these activities is to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of solar sail propulsion from 3 towards 6 by 2006. These activities will culminate in the deployment and testing of 20-meter solar sail system ground demonstration hardware in the 30 meter diameter thermal-vacuum chamber at NASA Glenn Plum Brook in 2005. This paper will describe the features of a computer database system that documents the results of the solar sail development activities to-date. Illustrations of the hardware components and systems, test results, analytical models, relevant space environment definition and current TRL assessment, as stored and manipulated within the database are presented. This database could serve as a central repository for all data related to the advancement of solar sail technology sponsored by the ISPT, providing an up-to-date assessment of the TRL of this technology. Current plans are to eventually make the database available to the Solar Sail community through the Space Transportation Information Network (STIN).

  5. The combined use of computer-guided, minimally invasive, flapless corticotomy and clear aligners as a novel approach to moderate crowding: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, Michele; Altieri, Federica; Pandolfi, Stefano; Giansanti, Matteo

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe an innovative orthodontic treatment method that combined surgical and orthodontic techniques. The novel method was used to achieve a positive result in a case of moderate crowding by employing a computer-guided piezocision procedure followed by the use of clear aligners. A 23-year-old woman had a malocclusion with moderate crowding. Her periodontal indices, oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), and treatment time were evaluated. The treatment included interproximal corticotomy cuts extending through the entire thickness of the cortical layer, without a full-thickness flap reflection. This was achieved with a three-dimensionally printed surgical guide using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing. Orthodontic force was applied to the teeth immediately after surgery by using clear appliances for better control of tooth movement. The total treatment time was 8 months. The periodontal indices improved after crowding correction, but the oral health impact profile showed a slight deterioration of OHRQoL during the 3 days following surgery. At the 2-year retention follow-up, the stability of treatment was excellent. The reduction in surgical time and patient discomfort, increased periodontal safety and patient acceptability, and accurate control of orthodontic movement without the risk of losing anchorage may encourage the use of this combined technique in appropriate cases.

  6. Rationalization of the Color Properties of Fluorescein in the Solid State: A Combined Computational and Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhangelskis, Mihails; Eddleston, Mark D; Reid, David G; Day, Graeme M; Bučar, Dejan-Krešimir; Morris, Andrew J; Jones, William

    2016-07-11

    Fluorescein is known to exist in three tautomeric forms defined as quinoid, zwitterionic, and lactoid. In the solid state, the quinoid and zwitterionic forms give rise to red and yellow materials, respectively. The lactoid form has not been crystallized pure, although its cocrystal and solvate forms exhibit colors ranging from yellow to green. An explanation for the observed colors of the crystals is found using a combination of UV/Vis spectroscopy and plane-wave DFT calculations. The role of cocrystal coformers in modifying crystal color is also established. Several new crystal structures are determined using a combination of X-ray and electron diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and crystal structure prediction (CSP). The protocol presented herein may be used to predict color properties of materials prior to their synthesis. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. Betting on the fastest horse: Using computer simulation to design a combination HIV intervention for future projects in Maharashtra, India

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggles, Kelly V.; Patel, Anik R.; Schensul, Stephen; Schensul, Jean; Nucifora, Kimberly; Zhou, Qinlian; Bryant, Kendall; Braithwaite, R. Scott

    2017-01-01

    Objective To inform the design of a combination intervention strategy targeting HIV-infected unhealthy alcohol users in Maharashtra, India, that could be tested in future randomized control trials. Methods Using probabilistic compartmental simulation modeling we compared intervention strategies targeting HIV-infected unhealthy alcohol users on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Maharashtra, India. We tested interventions targeting four behaviors (unhealthy alcohol consumption, risky sexual behav...

  8. Computer Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Perry R.

    This chapter covers algorithms, technologies, computer languages, and systems for computer music. Computer music involves the application of computers and other digital/electronic technologies to music composition, performance, theory, history, and the study of perception. The field combines digital signal processing, computational algorithms, computer languages, hardware and software systems, acoustics, psychoacoustics (low-level perception of sounds from the raw acoustic signal), and music cognition (higher-level perception of musical style, form, emotion, etc.).

  9. A flowsheet model of a coal-fired MHD/steam combined electricity generating cycle, using the access computer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, J.E.; Eldershaw, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document forms the final report on a study of a coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)/steam electric power generation system carried out by British Coal Corporation for the Commission of the European Communities. The study objective was to provide mass and energy balances and overall plant efficiency predictions for MHD to assist the Commission in their evaluation of advanced power generation technologies. In early 1990 the British Coal Corporation completed a study for the Commission in which a computer flowsheet modelling package was used to predict the performance of a conceptual air blown MHD plant. Since that study was carried out increasing emphasis has been placed on the possible need to reduce CO 2 emissions to counter the so-called greenhouse effect. Air blown MHD could greatly reduce CO 2 emissions per KWh by virtue of its high thermal efficiency. However, if even greater reductions in CO 2 emissions were required the CO 2 produced by coal combustion may have to be disposed of, for example into the deep ocean or underground caverns. To achieve this at minimum cost a concentrated CO 2 flue gas would be required. This could be achieved in an MHD plant by using a mixture of high purity oxygen and recycled CO 2 flue gas in the combustor. To assess this plant concept the European Commission awarded British Coal a contract to produce performance predictions using the access computer program

  10. Radiation dose reduction through combining positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and diagnostic CT in children and young adults with lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Zhihua; Gates, Erica L.; Trout, Andrew T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); O' Brien, Maureen M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Oncology, Cancer and Blood Disease Institute, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2018-02-15

    Both [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and diagnostic CT are at times required for lymphoma staging. This means some body segments are exposed twice to X-rays for generation of CT data (diagnostic CT + localization CT). To describe a combined PET/diagnostic CT approach that modulates CT tube current along the z-axis, providing diagnostic CT of some body segments and localization CT of the remaining body segments, thereby reducing patient radiation dose. We retrospectively compared total patient radiation dose between combined PET/diagnostic CT and separately acquired PET/CT and diagnostic CT exams. When available, we calculated effective doses for both approaches in the same patient; otherwise, we used data from patients of similar size. To confirm image quality, we compared image noise (Hounsfield unit [HU] standard deviation) as measured in the liver on both combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT images. We used t-tests for dose comparisons and two one-sided tests for image-quality equivalence testing. Mean total effective dose for the CT component of the combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT exams were 6.20±2.69 and 8.17±2.61 mSv, respectively (P<0.0001). Average dose savings with the combined approach was 24.8±17.8% (2.60±2.51 mSv [range: 0.32-4.72 mSv]) of total CT effective dose. Image noise was not statistically significantly different between approaches (12.2±1.8 HU vs. 11.7±1.5 HU for the combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT images, respectively). A combined PET/diagnostic CT approach as described offers dose savings at similar image quality for children and young adults with lymphoma who have indications for both PET and diagnostic CT examinations. (orig.)

  11. Radiation dose reduction through combining positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and diagnostic CT in children and young adults with lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Zhihua; Gates, Erica L.; Trout, Andrew T.; O'Brien, Maureen M.

    2018-01-01

    Both [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) and diagnostic CT are at times required for lymphoma staging. This means some body segments are exposed twice to X-rays for generation of CT data (diagnostic CT + localization CT). To describe a combined PET/diagnostic CT approach that modulates CT tube current along the z-axis, providing diagnostic CT of some body segments and localization CT of the remaining body segments, thereby reducing patient radiation dose. We retrospectively compared total patient radiation dose between combined PET/diagnostic CT and separately acquired PET/CT and diagnostic CT exams. When available, we calculated effective doses for both approaches in the same patient; otherwise, we used data from patients of similar size. To confirm image quality, we compared image noise (Hounsfield unit [HU] standard deviation) as measured in the liver on both combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT images. We used t-tests for dose comparisons and two one-sided tests for image-quality equivalence testing. Mean total effective dose for the CT component of the combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT exams were 6.20±2.69 and 8.17±2.61 mSv, respectively (P<0.0001). Average dose savings with the combined approach was 24.8±17.8% (2.60±2.51 mSv [range: 0.32-4.72 mSv]) of total CT effective dose. Image noise was not statistically significantly different between approaches (12.2±1.8 HU vs. 11.7±1.5 HU for the combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT images, respectively). A combined PET/diagnostic CT approach as described offers dose savings at similar image quality for children and young adults with lymphoma who have indications for both PET and diagnostic CT examinations. (orig.)

  12. Readiness for hospital discharge: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Eileen Catherine; Wills, Teresa; Coffey, Alice

    2017-11-01

    To report on an analysis on the concept of 'readiness for hospital discharge'. No uniform operational definition of 'readiness for hospital discharge' exists in the literature; therefore, a concept analysis is required to clarify the concept and identify an up-to-date understanding of readiness for hospital discharge. Clarity of the concept will identify all uses of the concept; provide conceptual clarity, an operational definition and direction for further research. Literature review and concept analysis. A review of literature was conducted in 2016. Databases searched were: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus with Full Text, PsycARTICLES, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Full Text (H.W. Wilson) and SocINDEX with Full Text. No date limits were applied. Identification of the attributes, antecedents and consequences of readiness for hospital discharge led to an operational definition of the concept. The following attributes belonging to 'readiness for hospital discharge' were extracted from the literature: physical stability, adequate support, psychological ability, and adequate information and knowledge. This analysis contributes to the advancement of knowledge in the area of hospital discharge, by proposing an operational definition of readiness for hospital discharge, derived from the literature. A better understanding of the phenomenon will assist healthcare professionals to recognize, measure and implement interventions where necessary, to ensure patients are ready for hospital discharge and assist in the advancement of knowledge for all professionals involved in patient discharge from hospital. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Maintenance-Ready Web Application Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper tackles the subject of developing maintenance-ready web applications. Maintenance is presented as a core stage in a web application’s lifecycle. The concept of maintenance-ready is defined in the context of web application development. Web application maintenance tasks types are enunciated and suitable task types are identified for further analysis. The research hypothesis is formulated based on a direct link between tackling maintenance in the development stage and reducing overall maintenance costs. A live maintenance-ready web application is presented and maintenance related aspects are highlighted. The web application’s features, that render it maintenance-ready, are emphasize. The cost of designing and building the web-application to be maintenance-ready are disclosed. The savings in maintenance development effort facilitated by maintenance ready features are also disclosed. Maintenance data is collected from 40 projects implemented by a web development company. Homogeneity and diversity of collected data is evaluated. A data sample is presented and the size and comprehensive nature of the entire dataset is depicted. Research hypothesis are validated and conclusions are formulated on the topic of developing maintenance-ready web applications. The limits of the research process which represented the basis for the current paper are enunciated. Future research topics are submitted for debate.

  14. Three dimensional magnetic fields in extra high speed modified Lundell alternators computed by a combined vector-scalar magnetic potential finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerdash, N. A.; Wang, R.; Secunde, R.

    1992-01-01

    A 3D finite element (FE) approach was developed and implemented for computation of global magnetic fields in a 14.3 kVA modified Lundell alternator. The essence of the new method is the combined use of magnetic vector and scalar potential formulations in 3D FEs. This approach makes it practical, using state of the art supercomputer resources, to globally analyze magnetic fields and operating performances of rotating machines which have truly 3D magnetic flux patterns. The 3D FE-computed fields and machine inductances as well as various machine performance simulations of the 14.3 kVA machine are presented in this paper and its two companion papers.

  15. Achieving Business Excellence by Optimizing Corporate Forensic Readiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gojko Grubor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve their business excellence, all organizations, despite their size (small, medium or large one should manage their risk of fraud. Fraud, in today’s world, is often committed by using computers and can only be revealed by digital forensic investigator. Not even small or medium-sized companies are secure from fraud. In the light of recent financial scandals that literary demolished not just economies of specific countries but entire world economy, we propose in this paper an optimal model of corporative computer incident digital forensic investigation (CCIDFI by using adopted mathematic model of the greed MCDM – multi-criteria decision-making method and the Expert Choice software tool for multi-criteria optimization of the CCIDFI readiness. Proposed model can, first of all, help managers of small and medium-sized companies to justify their decisions to employ digital forensic investigators and include them in their information security teams in order to choose the optimal CCIDFI model and improve forensic readiness in the computer incident management process that will result with minimization of potential losses of company in the future and improve its business quality.

  16. Combining X-ray computed tomography and visible near-infrared spectroscopy for prediction of soil structural properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Hermansen, Cecilie; Knadel, Maria

    2018-01-01

    agricultural fields within Denmark with a wide range of textural properties and organic C (OC) contents were studied. Macroporosity (>1.2 mm in diameter) and CTmatrix (the density of the field-moist soil matrix devoid of large macropores and stones) were determined from X-ray CT scans of undisturbed soil cores...... (19 by 20 cm). Both macroporosity and CTmatix are soil structural properties that affect the degree of preferential transport. Bulk soils from the 127 sampling locations were scanned with a vis-NIR spectrometer (400–2500 nm). Macroporosity and CTmatrix were statistically predicted with partial least......Soil structure is a key soil property affecting a soil’s flow and transport behavior. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is increasingly used to quantify soil structure. However, the availability, cost, time, and skills required for processing are still limiting the number of soils studied. Visible...

  17. Multidetector computed tomography findings of mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus combined with torsion of wandering spleen: A case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, In Kyung; Ku, Young Mi; Lee, Su Lim

    2016-01-01

    Gastric volvulus, defined as an abnormal rotation of stomach, may be idiopathic or secondary to abnormal fixation of intraperitoneal visceral ligaments. Wandering spleen is a movable spleen resulting from absence or underdevelopment of the splenic supporting ligaments that suspend the spleen to its normal position in the left part of the supramesocolic compartment of the abdomen. Wandering spleen increases the risk of splenic torsion. Both gastric volvulus and splenic torsion are potentially life-threatening if not urgently managed with surgery. Prompt and accurate diagnosis based on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is crucial to prevent unforeseen complications. Gastric volvulus and coexistent torsion of wandering spleen is a very rare condition. Herein, we described a case of gastric volvulus associated with wandering spleen and intestinal non-rotation in a 15-year-old girl focusing on MDCT findings

  18. Multidetector computed tomography findings of mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus combined with torsion of wandering spleen: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, In Kyung; Ku, Young Mi; Lee, Su Lim [Dept. of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Gastric volvulus, defined as an abnormal rotation of stomach, may be idiopathic or secondary to abnormal fixation of intraperitoneal visceral ligaments. Wandering spleen is a movable spleen resulting from absence or underdevelopment of the splenic supporting ligaments that suspend the spleen to its normal position in the left part of the supramesocolic compartment of the abdomen. Wandering spleen increases the risk of splenic torsion. Both gastric volvulus and splenic torsion are potentially life-threatening if not urgently managed with surgery. Prompt and accurate diagnosis based on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is crucial to prevent unforeseen complications. Gastric volvulus and coexistent torsion of wandering spleen is a very rare condition. Herein, we described a case of gastric volvulus associated with wandering spleen and intestinal non-rotation in a 15-year-old girl focusing on MDCT findings.

  19. Metal-Free Catalytic Asymmetric Fluorination of Keto Esters Using a Combination of Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) and Oxidant: Experiment and Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Pluta, Roman

    2018-02-09

    A chiral iodoarene organocatalyst for the catalytic asymmetric fluorination has been developed. The catalyst was used in the asymmetric fluorination of carbonyl compounds, providing the products with a quaternary stereocenter with high enantioselectivities. Chiral hypervalent iodine difluoride intermediates were generated in situ by treatment of the catalyst with an oxidant and hydrogen fluoride as fluoride source. As such, the α-fluorination of a carbonyl compound was achieved with a nucleophilic fluorine source. A combined computational and experimental approach provided insight into the reaction mechanism and the origin of enantioselectivity.

  20. Metal-Free Catalytic Asymmetric Fluorination of Keto Esters Using a Combination of Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) and Oxidant: Experiment and Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Pluta, Roman; Krach, Patricia E.; Cavallo, Luigi; Falivene, Laura; Rueping, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    A chiral iodoarene organocatalyst for the catalytic asymmetric fluorination has been developed. The catalyst was used in the asymmetric fluorination of carbonyl compounds, providing the products with a quaternary stereocenter with high enantioselectivities. Chiral hypervalent iodine difluoride intermediates were generated in situ by treatment of the catalyst with an oxidant and hydrogen fluoride as fluoride source. As such, the α-fluorination of a carbonyl compound was achieved with a nucleophilic fluorine source. A combined computational and experimental approach provided insight into the reaction mechanism and the origin of enantioselectivity.

  1. A theory of organizational readiness for change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiner Bryan J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Change management experts have emphasized the importance of establishing organizational readiness for change and recommended various strategies for creating it. Although the advice seems reasonable, the scientific basis for it is limited. Unlike individual readiness for change, organizational readiness for change has not been subject to extensive theoretical development or empirical study. In this article, I conceptually define organizational readiness for change and develop a theory of its determinants and outcomes. I focus on the organizational level of analysis because many promising approaches to improving healthcare delivery entail collective behavior change in the form of systems redesign--that is, multiple, simultaneous changes in staffing, work flow, decision making, communication, and reward systems. Discussion Organizational readiness for change is a multi-level, multi-faceted construct. As an organization-level construct, readiness for change refers to organizational members' shared resolve to implement a change (change commitment and shared belief in their collective capability to do so (change efficacy. Organizational readiness for change varies as a function of how much organizational members value the change and how favorably they appraise three key determinants of implementation capability: task demands, resource availability, and situational factors. When organizational readiness for change is high, organizational members are more likely to initiate change, exert greater effort, exhibit greater persistence, and display more cooperative behavior. The result is more effective implementation. Summary The theory described in this article treats organizational readiness as a shared psychological state in which organizational members feel committed to implementing an organizational change and confident in their collective abilities to do so. This way of thinking about organizational readiness is best suited for

  2. Differential Control of Heme Reactivity in Alpha and Beta Subunits of Hemoglobin: A Combined Raman Spectroscopic and Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The use of hybrid hemoglobin (Hb), with mesoheme substituted for protoheme, allows separate monitoring of the α or β hemes along the allosteric pathway. Using resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy in silica gel, which greatly slows protein motions, we have observed that the Fe–histidine stretching frequency, νFeHis, which is a monitor of heme reactivity, evolves between frequencies characteristic of the R and T states, for both α or β chains, prior to the quaternary R–T and T–R shifts. Computation of νFeHis, using QM/MM and the conformational search program PELE, produced remarkable agreement with experiment. Analysis of the PELE structures showed that the νFeHis shifts resulted from heme distortion and, in the α chain, Fe–His bond tilting. These results support the tertiary two-state model of ligand binding (Henry et al., Biophys. Chem.2002, 98, 149). Experimentally, the νFeHis evolution is faster for β than for α chains, and pump–probe rR spectroscopy in solution reveals an inflection in the νFeHis time course at 3 μs for β but not for α hemes, an interval previously shown to be the first step in the R–T transition. In the α chain νFeHis dropped sharply at 20 μs, the final step in the R–T transition. The time courses are fully consistent with recent computational mapping of the R–T transition via conjugate peak refinement by Karplus and co-workers (Fischer et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A.2011, 108, 5608). The effector molecule IHP was found to lower νFeHis selectively for α chains within the R state, and a binding site in the α1α2 cleft is suggested. PMID:24991732

  3. A new surrogate modeling technique combining Kriging and polynomial chaos expansions – Application to uncertainty analysis in computational dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersaudy, Pierric, E-mail: pierric.kersaudy@orange.com [Orange Labs, 38 avenue du Général Leclerc, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); Whist Lab, 38 avenue du Général Leclerc, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); ESYCOM, Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée, 5 boulevard Descartes, 77700 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Sudret, Bruno [ETH Zürich, Chair of Risk, Safety and Uncertainty Quantification, Stefano-Franscini-Platz 5, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Varsier, Nadège [Orange Labs, 38 avenue du Général Leclerc, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); Whist Lab, 38 avenue du Général Leclerc, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); Picon, Odile [ESYCOM, Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée, 5 boulevard Descartes, 77700 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Wiart, Joe [Orange Labs, 38 avenue du Général Leclerc, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); Whist Lab, 38 avenue du Général Leclerc, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2015-04-01

    In numerical dosimetry, the recent advances in high performance computing led to a strong reduction of the required computational time to assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) characterizing the human exposure to electromagnetic waves. However, this procedure remains time-consuming and a single simulation can request several hours. As a consequence, the influence of uncertain input parameters on the SAR cannot be analyzed using crude Monte Carlo simulation. The solution presented here to perform such an analysis is surrogate modeling. This paper proposes a novel approach to build such a surrogate model from a design of experiments. Considering a sparse representation of the polynomial chaos expansions using least-angle regression as a selection algorithm to retain the most influential polynomials, this paper proposes to use the selected polynomials as regression functions for the universal Kriging model. The leave-one-out cross validation is used to select the optimal number of polynomials in the deterministic part of the Kriging model. The proposed approach, called LARS-Kriging-PC modeling, is applied to three benchmark examples and then to a full-scale metamodeling problem involving the exposure of a numerical fetus model to a femtocell device. The performances of the LARS-Kriging-PC are compared to an ordinary Kriging model and to a classical sparse polynomial chaos expansion. The LARS-Kriging-PC appears to have better performances than the two other approaches. A significant accuracy improvement is observed compared to the ordinary Kriging or to the sparse polynomial chaos depending on the studied case. This approach seems to be an optimal solution between the two other classical approaches. A global sensitivity analysis is finally performed on the LARS-Kriging-PC model of the fetus exposure problem.

  4. Is the bipyridyl thorium metallocene a low-valent thorium complex? A combined experimental and computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Wenshan; Lukens, Wayne W.; Zi, Guofu; Maron, Laurent; Walter, Marc D.

    2012-01-12

    Bipyridyl thorium metallocenes [5-1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2Th(bipy) (1) and [5-1,3-(Me3C)2C5H3]2Th(bipy) (2) have been investigated by magnetic susceptibility and computational studies. The magnetic susceptibility data reveal that 1 and 2 are not diamagnetic, but they behave as temperature independent paramagnets (TIPs). To rationalize this observation, density functional theory (DFT) and complete active space SCF (CASSCF) calculations have been undertaken, which indicated that Cp2Th(bipy) has indeed a Th(IV)(bipy2-) ground state (f0d0 2, S = 0), but the open-shell singlet (f0d1 1, S = 0) (almost degenerate with its triplet congener) is lying only 9.2 kcal/mol higher in energy. Complexes 1 and 2 react cleanly with Ph2CS to give [ 5-1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2Th[(bipy)(SCPh2)] (3) and [ 5-1,3-(Me3C)2C5H3]2Th[(bipy)(SCPh2)] (4), respectively, in quantitative conversions. Since no intermediates were observed experimentally, this reaction was also studied computationally. Coordination of Ph2CS to 2 in its S = 0 ground state is not possible, but Ph2CS can coordinate to 2 in its triplet state (S = 1) upon which a single electron transfer (SET) from the (bipy2-) fragment to Ph2CS followed by C-C coupling takes place.

  5. Copernicus POD Service: Ready for Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, H.; Fernández, J.; Escobar, D.; Féménias, P.; Flohrer, C.; Otten, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Copernicus POD Service is part of the Copernicus PDGS Ground Segment of the Sentinel missions. A GMV-led consortium is operating the Copernicus POD Service being in charge of generating precise orbital products and auxiliary data files for their use as part of the processing chains of the respective Sentinel PDGS. The Sentinel-1, -2 & -3 missions have different but very demanding requirements in terms of orbital accuracy and timeliness. Orbital products in Near Real Time (latency: 30 min), Short Time Critical (1.5 days) and Non-time Critical (20-30 days) are required. The accuracy requirements are very challenging, targeting 5 cm in 3D for Sentinel-1 and 2-3 cm in radial direction for Sentinel-3. Sentinel-3A carries, in addition to a GPS receiver a laser retro reflector and a DORIS receiver. On the one hand, the three different techniques GPS, SLR and DORIS make POD more complex but, on the other hand, it is very helpful to have independent techniques available for validation of the orbit results. The successful POD processing for Sentinel-1A is a good preparation for Sentinel-3A due to the similar demanding orbit accuracy requirements. The Copernicus POD Service is ready for Sentinel-3A and the service will process GPS and SLR data routinely and has the capacity to process DORIS in NTC and reprocessing campaigns. The three independent orbit determination techniques on Sentinel-3 offer big potential for scientific exploitation. Carrying all three techniques together makes the satellite, e.g., very useful for combining all the techniques on observation level as it could only be done for Jason-2 until now. The Sentinel POD Quality Working Group strongly supporting the CPOD Service delivers additional orbit solutions to validate the CPOD results independently. The recommendations from this body guarantee that the CPOD Service is updated following state-of-the-art algorithms, models and conventions. The QWG also focuses on the scientific exploitation of the

  6. Turning the Page on Pen-and-Paper Questionnaires: Combining Ecological Momentary Assessment and Computer Adaptive Testing to Transform Psychological Assessment in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Chris J

    2016-01-01

    The current paper describes new opportunities for patient-centred assessment methods which have come about by the increased adoption of affordable smart technologies in biopsychosocial research and medical care. In this commentary, we review modern assessment methods including item response theory (IRT), computer adaptive testing (CAT), and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) and explain how these methods may be combined to improve psychological assessment. We demonstrate both how a 'naïve' selection of a small group of items in an EMA can lead to unacceptably unreliable assessments and how IRT can provide detailed information on the individual information that each item gives thus allowing short form assessments to be selected with acceptable reliability. The combination of CAT and IRT can ensure assessments are precise, efficient, and well targeted to the individual; allowing EMAs to be both brief and accurate.

  7. Minimally invasive computer-navigated total hip arthroplasty, following the concept of femur first and combined anteversion: design of a blinded randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woerner Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impingement can be a serious complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA, and is one of the major causes of postoperative pain, dislocation, aseptic loosening, and implant breakage. Minimally invasive THA and computer-navigated surgery were introduced several years ago. We have developed a novel, computer-assisted operation method for THA following the concept of "femur first"/"combined anteversion", which incorporates various aspects of performing a functional optimization of the cup position, and comprehensively addresses range of motion (ROM as well as cup containment and alignment parameters. Hence, the purpose of this study is to assess whether the artificial joint's ROM can be improved by this computer-assisted operation method. Second, the clinical and radiological outcome will be evaluated. Methods/Design A registered patient- and observer-blinded randomized controlled trial will be conducted. Patients between the ages of 50 and 75 admitted for primary unilateral THA will be included. Patients will be randomly allocated to either receive minimally invasive computer-navigated "femur first" THA or the conventional minimally invasive THA procedure. Self-reported functional status and health-related quality of life (questionnaires will be assessed both preoperatively and postoperatively. Perioperative complications will be registered. Radiographic evaluation will take place up to 6 weeks postoperatively with a computed tomography (CT scan. Component position will be evaluated by an independent external institute on a 3D reconstruction of the femur/pelvis using image-processing software. Postoperative ROM will be calculated by an algorithm which automatically determines bony and prosthetic impingements. Discussion In the past, computer navigation has improved the accuracy of component positioning. So far, there are only few objective data quantifying the risks and benefits of computer navigated THA. Therefore, this

  8. Radiation dose reduction through combining positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and diagnostic CT in children and young adults with lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhihua; Gates, Erica L; O'Brien, Maureen M; Trout, Andrew T

    2018-02-01

    Both [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) and diagnostic CT are at times required for lymphoma staging. This means some body segments are exposed twice to X-rays for generation of CT data (diagnostic CT + localization CT). To describe a combined PET/diagnostic CT approach that modulates CT tube current along the z-axis, providing diagnostic CT of some body segments and localization CT of the remaining body segments, thereby reducing patient radiation dose. We retrospectively compared total patient radiation dose between combined PET/diagnostic CT and separately acquired PET/CT and diagnostic CT exams. When available, we calculated effective doses for both approaches in the same patient; otherwise, we used data from patients of similar size. To confirm image quality, we compared image noise (Hounsfield unit [HU] standard deviation) as measured in the liver on both combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT images. We used t-tests for dose comparisons and two one-sided tests for image-quality equivalence testing. Mean total effective dose for the CT component of the combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT exams were 6.20±2.69 and 8.17±2.61 mSv, respectively (PCT effective dose. Image noise was not statistically significantly different between approaches (12.2±1.8 HU vs. 11.7±1.5 HU for the combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT images, respectively). A combined PET/diagnostic CT approach as described offers dose savings at similar image quality for children and young adults with lymphoma who have indications for both PET and diagnostic CT examinations.

  9. Cloud Computing Security Model with Combination of Data Encryption Standard Algorithm (DES) and Least Significant Bit (LSB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, M.; Mawengkang, H.; Zamzami, E. M.

    2018-03-01

    Limitations of storage sources is one option to switch to cloud storage. Confidentiality and security of data stored on the cloud is very important. To keep up the confidentiality and security of such data can be done one of them by using cryptography techniques. Data Encryption Standard (DES) is one of the block cipher algorithms used as standard symmetric encryption algorithm. This DES will produce 8 blocks of ciphers combined into one ciphertext, but the ciphertext are weak against brute force attacks. Therefore, the last 8 block cipher will be converted into 8 random images using Least Significant Bit (LSB) algorithm which later draws the result of cipher of DES algorithm to be merged into one.

  10. Charge Transport in 4 nm Molecular Wires with Interrupted Conjugation: Combined Experimental and Computational Evidence for Thermally Assisted Polaron Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherinia, Davood; Smith, Christopher E; Ghosh, Soumen; Odoh, Samuel O; Balhorn, Luke; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2016-04-26

    We report the synthesis, transport measurements, and electronic structure of conjugation-broken oligophenyleneimine (CB-OPI 6) molecular wires with lengths of ∼4 nm. The wires were grown from Au surfaces using stepwise aryl imine condensation reactions between 1,4-diaminobenzene and terephthalaldehyde (1,4-benzenedicarbaldehyde). Saturated spacers (conjugation breakers) were introduced into the molecular backbone by replacing the aromatic diamine with trans-1,4-diaminocyclohexane at specific steps during the growth processes. FT-IR and ellipsometry were used to follow the imination reactions on Au surfaces. Surface coverages (∼4 molecules/nm(2)) and electronic structures of the wires were determined by cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis spectroscopy, respectively. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the wires were acquired using conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) in which an Au-coated AFM probe was brought into contact with the wires to form metal-molecule-metal junctions with contact areas of ∼50 nm(2). The low bias resistance increased with the number of saturated spacers, but was not sensitive to the position of the spacer within the wire. Temperature dependent measurements of resistance were consistent with a localized charge (polaron) hopping mechanism in all of the wires. Activation energies were in the range of 0.18-0.26 eV (4.2-6.0 kcal/mol) with the highest belonging to the fully conjugated OPI 6 wire and the lowest to the CB3,5-OPI 6 wire (the wire with two saturated spacers). For the two other wires with a single conjugation breaker, CB3-OPI 6 and CB5-OPI 6, activation energies of 0.20 eV (4.6 kcal/mol) and 0.21 eV (4.8 kcal/mol) were found, respectively. Computational studies using density functional theory confirmed the polaronic nature of charge carriers but predicted that the semiclassical activation energy of hopping should be higher for CB-OPI molecular wires than for the OPI 6 wire. To reconcile the experimental and

  11. On the role of emerging voluntary control of vocalization in language evolution. Comment on "Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain" by Michael A. Arbib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudé, Gino

    2016-03-01

    This comment will be focused on the role of monkey vocal control in the evolution of language. I will essentially reiterate the observations expressed in a commentary [1] about the book ;How the brain got language: the mirror system hypothesis;, written by Arbib [2]. I will hopefully clarify our suggestion that non-human primates vocal communication, in conjunction with gestures, could have had an active role in the emergence of the first voluntary forms of utterances that will later shape protospeech. This suggestion is mainly rooted in neurophysiological data about vocal control in monkey. I will very briefly summarize how neurophysiological data allowed us to suggest a possible role for monkey vocalization in language evolution. We conducted a study [3] in which we recorded from ventral premotor cortex (PMv) of macaques trained to emit vocalizations (i.e. coo-calls). The results showed that the rostro-lateral part of PMv contains neurons that fire during conditioned vocalization. The involvement of PMv in vocalization production was further supported by electrical microstimulation of the cortical sector where some of the vocalization neurons were found. Microstimulation elicited in some cases a combination of jaw, tongue and larynx movements. To us, the evolutionary implications of those results were obvious: a partial voluntary vocal control was already taking place in the primate PMv cortex some 25 million years ago.

  12. Readiness of healthcare providers for eHealth: the case from primary healthcare centers in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Shadi; Khodor, Rawya; Alameddine, Mohamad; Baroud, Maysa

    2016-11-10

    eHealth can positively impact the efficiency and quality of healthcare services. Its potential benefits extend to the patient, healthcare provider, and organization. Primary healthcare (PHC) settings may particularly benefit from eHealth. In these settings, healthcare provider readiness is key to successful eHealth implementation. Accordingly, it is necessary to explore the potential readiness of providers to use eHealth tools. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the readiness of healthcare providers working in PHC centers in Lebanon to use eHealth tools. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess participants' socio-demographics, computer use, literacy, and access, and participants' readiness for eHealth implementation (appropriateness, management support, change efficacy, personal beneficence). The study included primary healthcare providers (physicians, nurses, other providers) working in 22 PHC centers distributed across Lebanon. Descriptive and bivariate analyses (ANOVA, independent t-test, Kruskal Wallis, Tamhane's T2) were used to compare participant characteristics to the level of readiness for the implementation of eHealth. Of the 541 questionnaires, 213 were completed (response rate: 39.4 %). The majority of participants were physicians (46.9 %), and nurses (26.8 %). Most physicians (54.0 %), nurses (61.4 %), and other providers (50.9 %) felt comfortable using computers, and had access to computers at their PHC center (physicians: 77.0 %, nurses: 87.7 %, others: 92.5 %). Frequency of computer use varied. The study found a significant difference for personal beneficence, management support, and change efficacy among different healthcare providers, and relative to participants' level of comfort using computers. There was a significant difference by level of comfort using computers and appropriateness. A significant difference was also found between those with access to computers in relation to personal beneficence and

  13. Parental Learning and School Readiness in the Gearing Up for Kindergarten Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Query

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Entering kindergarten is a key moment in a young child’s life, and parents are a child’s first teacher. What can guide parents as they assist children with school readiness? Gearing Up for Kindergarten is an intensive parent education and school readiness program designed to help parents and children prepare for school. Gearing Up for Kindergarten is a parent education program that combines early learning opportunities for pre-kindergarten children with parent education opportunities for adults. This study presents findings from evaluation efforts conducted with 59 Gearing Up for Kindergarten adult participants during the 2006-2007 school year. Participants in the program demonstrated (1 high satisfaction with program quality and experiences, (2 impacts on parental knowledge and confidence, and (3 significant and positive changes in parental practices related to school readiness. Implications for parent education and programs intended to strengthen school readiness among pre-kindergarten children are explored. Parent education on school readiness can provide a substantive resource as parents help their children develop and become ready for the school years.

  14. Military Readiness: DODs Readiness Rebuilding Efforts May Be at Risk without a Comprehensive Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    specific elements that are to be in strategic plans. 8Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Guide 3401D, CJCS Guide to the Chairman’s Readiness ...all its major functions and operations. DOD strategic guidance makes it clear that rebuilding readiness is a priority that supports the... readiness recovery efforts. Evaluations of the plan to monitor goals and objectives Assessments, through objective measurement and systematic

  15. Smoking-related interstitial fibrosis combined with pulmonary emphysema: computed tomography-pathologic correlative study using lobectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Hideji; Tanaka, Tomonori; Murata, Kiyoshi; Fukuoka, Junya; Nitta, Norihisa; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Sonoda, Akinaga; Takahashi, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence and pathologic correlation of thin-section computed tomography (TSCT) findings in smoking-related interstitial fibrosis (SRIF) with pulmonary emphysema. Our study included 172 consecutive patients who underwent TSCT and subsequent lobectomy. TSCT findings including clustered cysts with visible walls (CCVW) and ground-glass attenuation with/without reticulation (GGAR) were evaluated and compared in nonsmokers and smokers and among lung locations. TSCT findings, especially CCVW, were also compared with histological findings using lobectomy specimens. The incidence of CCVW and GGAR was significantly higher in smokers than in nonsmokers (34.1% and 40.7%, respectively, vs 2.0% and 12.2%). CCVW and GGAR were frequently found in the lower and peripheral zones. Histologically, CCVW corresponded more often with SRIF with emphysema than usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, 63.3% vs 30%). CCVW of irregular size and shape were seen in 19 of 20 SRIF with emphysema and in seven of nine UIP-manifested areas with similar round cysts. A less-involved subpleural parenchyma was observed more frequently in SRIF with emphysema. SRIF with emphysema is a more frequent pathological finding than UIP in patients with CCVW on TSCT. The irregular size and shape of CCVW and a less-involved subpleural parenchyma may be a clue suggesting the presence of SRIF with emphysema.

  16. Large-Scale Compute-Intensive Analysis via a Combined In-situ and Co-scheduling Workflow Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Sewell, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Heitmann, Katrin [ORNL; Finkel, Dr. Hal J [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Fasel, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Zagaris, George [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Pope, Adrian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Habib, Salman [ORNL; Parete-Koon, Suzanne T [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale simulations can produce tens of terabytes of data per analysis cycle, complicating and limiting the efficiency of workflows. Traditionally, outputs are stored on the file system and analyzed in post-processing. With the rapidly increasing size and complexity of simulations, this approach faces an uncertain future. Trending techniques consist of performing the analysis in situ, utilizing the same resources as the simulation, and/or off-loading subsets of the data to a compute-intensive analysis system. We introduce an analysis framework developed for HACC, a cosmological N-body code, that uses both in situ and co-scheduling approaches for handling Petabyte-size outputs. An initial in situ step is used to reduce the amount of data to be analyzed, and to separate out the data-intensive tasks handled off-line. The analysis routines are implemented using the PISTON/VTK-m framework, allowing a single implementation of an algorithm that simultaneously targets a variety of GPU, multi-core, and many-core architectures.

  17. Development of the protocol for purification of artemisinin based on combination of commercial and computationally designed adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piletska, Elena V; Karim, Kal; Cutler, Malcolm; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2013-01-01

    A polymeric adsorbent for extraction of the antimalarial drug artemisinin from Artemisia annua L. was computationally designed. This polymer demonstrated a high capacity for artemisinin (120 mg g(-1) ), quantitative recovery (87%) and was found to be an effective material for purification of artemisinin from complex plant matrix. The artemisinin quantification was conducted using an optimised HPLC-MS protocol, which was characterised by high precision and linearity in the concentration range between 0.05 and 2 μg mL(-1) . Optimisation of the purification protocol also involved screening of commercial adsorbents for the removal of waxes and other interfering natural compounds, which inhibit the crystallisation of artemisinin. As a result of a two step-purification protocol crystals of artemisinin were obtained, and artemisinin purity was evaluated as 75%. By performing the second stage of purification twice, the purity of artemisinin can be further improved to 99%. The developed protocol produced high-purity artemisinin using only a few purification steps that makes it suitable for large scale industrial manufacturing process. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The structural flexibility of the human copper chaperone Atox1: Insights from combined pulsed EPR studies and computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Ariel R; Turgeman, Meital; Gevorkyan-Aiapetov, Lada; Ruthstein, Sharon

    2017-08-01

    Metallochaperones are responsible for shuttling metal ions to target proteins. Thus, a metallochaperone's structure must be sufficiently flexible both to hold onto its ion while traversing the cytoplasm and to transfer the ion to or from a partner protein. Here, we sought to shed light on the structure of Atox1, a metallochaperone involved in the human copper regulation system. Atox1 shuttles copper ions from the main copper transporter, Ctr1, to the ATP7b transporter in the Golgi apparatus. Conventional biophysical tools such as X-ray or NMR cannot always target the various conformational states of metallochaperones, owing to a requirement for crystallography or low sensitivity and resolution. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has recently emerged as a powerful tool for resolving biological reactions and mechanisms in solution. When coupled with computational methods, EPR with site-directed spin labeling and nanoscale distance measurements can provide structural information on a protein or protein complex in solution. We use these methods to show that Atox1 can accommodate at least four different conformations in the apo state (unbound to copper), and two different conformations in the holo state (bound to copper). We also demonstrate that the structure of Atox1 in the holo form is more compact than in the apo form. Our data provide insight regarding the structural mechanisms through which Atox1 can fulfill its dual role of copper binding and transfer. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  19. Electricity market readiness plan : Ontario Energy Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    This document informs electric power market participants of the Ontario Energy Board's newly developed market readiness plan and target timelines that local distribution companies (LDCs) must meet for retail marketing. The Ontario Energy Board's plan incorporates relevant independent market operator (IMO)-administered market milestones with retail market readiness targeted for September 2001. The market readiness framework involves a self-certification process for LDCs by August 10, 2001, through which the Board will be able to monitor progress and assess the feasibility of meeting the target timelines. For retail market readiness, all LDCs will have to calculate settlement costs, produce unbundled bills, provide standard supply service, change suppliers and accommodate retail transactions. LDCs must be either authorized participants in the IMO-administered market or become retail customers of their host LDC. Unbundled bills will include itemized charges for energy price, transmission, distribution and debt retirement charge. 1 tab., 1 fig

  20. Enhancing Mental Readiness in Military Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Megan M; McCreary, Donald R

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we explore how the psychological literature on stress and coping might inform military training programs to enhance "mental readiness" as a method to develop the baseline psychological...

  1. Some Thoughts on Systematic Reading Readiness Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palardy, J. Michael

    1984-01-01

    Examines four specific areas of reading readiness--visual discrimination, visual memory, auditory discrimination, and auditory comprehension--and reviews teaching strategies in each of the four areas. (FL)

  2. Readiness Assessment Plan, Hanford 200 areas treated effluent disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmer, F.J.

    1995-01-01

    This Readiness Assessment Plan documents Liquid Effluent Facilities review process used to establish the scope of review, documentation requirements, performance assessment, and plant readiness to begin operation of the Treated Effluent Disposal system in accordance with DOE-RLID-5480.31, Startup and Restart of Facilities Operational Readiness Review and Readiness Assessments

  3. An object-oriented computational model for combined cycle cogeneration analysis; Um modelo computacional para analise de ciclos combinados para projetos de sistemas de cogeracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alexandre M. da; Balestieri, Jose A.P.; Magalhaes Filho, Paulo [UNESP, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Energia]. E-mails: amarcial@uol.com.br; perella@feg.unesp.br; pfilho@feg.unesp.br

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the use of computational resources in a simulation procedure to predict the performance of combined cycle cogeneration systems in which energetic analysis is used in the modeling. Thermal demand of a consuming process are used as the main entrance data and, associated to the performance characteristics of each component of the system, it is evaluated the influence of some parameters of the system such as thermal efficiency and global efficiency. The computational language is Visual Basic for Applications associated to an electronic sheet. Two combined cycle cogeneration schemes are pre-defined: one is composed of a gas turbine, heat recovery steam generator and a back pressure steam turbine with one extraction, in which both are connected to the different pressure level process plant; the other scheme has a difference a two extraction-condensing steam turbine instead of the back pressure one. Some illustrative graphics are generated for allowing comparison of the appraised systems. The strategy of the system simulation is obtained by carefully linking the information of various components according to the flow diagrams. (author)

  4. University Research Initiative Program for Combat Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    microscope image of one of the lenses. This array was selected for testing because it is fabricated in a relatively inexpensive polyacrylic material, the...potent analogues of the potassium -sparing diuretic, amiloride. However, our results 179 University Reasearch Initiative for Combat Readiness Annual Report...for Combat Readiness Annual Report for the period June 1, 1998 - June 30, 1999 Roger H. Sawyer University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208 May

  5. Solar Training Network and Solar Ready Vets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalstrom, Tenley Ann

    2016-09-14

    In 2016, the White House announced the Solar Ready Vets program, funded under DOE's SunShot initiative would be administered by The Solar Foundation to connect transitioning military personnel to solar training and employment as they separate from service. This presentation is geared to informing and recruiting employer partners for the Solar Ready Vets program, and the Solar Training Network. It describes the programs, and the benefits to employers that choose to connect to the programs.

  6. Making Technology Ready: Integrated Systems Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Oliver, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper identifies work needed by developers to make integrated system health management (ISHM) technology ready and by programs to make mission infrastructure ready for this technology. This paper examines perceptions of ISHM technologies and experience in legacy programs. Study methods included literature review and interviews with representatives of stakeholder groups. Recommendations address 1) development of ISHM technology, 2) development of ISHM engineering processes and methods, and 3) program organization and infrastructure for ISHM technology evolution, infusion and migration.

  7. Year 2000 Readiness Kit: A Compilation of Y2K Resources for Schools, Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This kit was developed to assist the postsecondary education community's efforts to resolve the Year 2000 (Y2K) computer problem. The kit includes a description of the Y2K problem, an assessment of the readiness of colleges and universities, a checklist for institutions, a Y2K communications strategy, articles on addressing the problem in academic…

  8. Measuring E-Learning Readiness among EFL Teachers in Intermediate Public Schools in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Furaydi, Ahmed Ajab

    2013-01-01

    This study will determine their readiness level for the e-learning in several aspects such as attitude toward e-learning, and computer literacy also this study attempt to investigate the main the barriers that EFL teachers have to overcome while incorporating e-learning into their teaching. The theory upon which the study was technology acceptance…

  9. libNeuroML and PyLEMS: using Python to combine procedural and declarative modeling approaches in computational neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Michael; Cannon, Robert C; Crook, Sharon; Davison, Andrew P; Ganapathy, Gautham; Robinson, Hugh P C; Silver, R Angus; Gleeson, Padraig

    2014-01-01

    NeuroML is an XML-based model description language, which provides a powerful common data format for defining and exchanging models of neurons and neuronal networks. In the latest version of NeuroML, the structure and behavior of ion channel, synapse, cell, and network model descriptions are based on underlying definitions provided in LEMS, a domain-independent language for expressing hierarchical mathematical models of physical entities. While declarative approaches for describing models have led to greater exchange of model elements among software tools in computational neuroscience, a frequent criticism of XML-based languages is that they are difficult to work with directly. Here we describe two Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) written in Python (http://www.python.org), which simplify the process of developing and modifying models expressed in NeuroML and LEMS. The libNeuroML API provides a Python object model with a direct mapping to all NeuroML concepts defined by the NeuroML Schema, which facilitates reading and writing the XML equivalents. In addition, it offers a memory-efficient, array-based internal representation, which is useful for handling large-scale connectomics data. The libNeuroML API also includes support for performing common operations that are required when working with NeuroML documents. Access to the LEMS data model is provided by the PyLEMS API, which provides a Python implementation of the LEMS language, including the ability to simulate most models expressed in LEMS. Together, libNeuroML and PyLEMS provide a comprehensive solution for interacting with NeuroML models in a Python environment.

  10. libNeuroML and PyLEMS: using Python to combine imperative and declarative modelling approaches in computational neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eVella

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available NeuroML is an XML-based model description language, which provides a powerful common data format for defining and exchanging models of neurons and neuronal networks. In the latest version of NeuroML, the structure and behavior of ion channel, synapse, cell,and network model descriptions are based on underlying definitions provided in LEMS, a domain-independent language for expressing hierarchical mathematical models of physical entities. While declarative approaches for describing models have led to greater exchange of model elements among software tools in computational neuroscience, a frequent criticism of XML-based languages is that they are difficult to work with directly. Here we describe two APIs (Application Programming Interfaces written in Python (http://www.python.org, which simplify the process of developing and modifying models expressed in NeuroML and LEMS. The libNeuroML API provides a Python object model with a direct mapping to all NeuroML concepts defined by the NeuroML Schema, which facilitates reading and writing the XML equivalents. In addition, it offers a memory-efficient, array-based internal representation, which is useful for handling large-scale connectomics data. The libNeuroML API also includes support for performing common operations that are required when working with NeuroML documents. Access to the LEMS data model is provided by the PyLEMS API, which provides a Python implementation of the LEMS language, including the ability to simulate most models expressed in LEMS. Together, libNeuroML and PyLEMS provide a comprehensive solution for interacting with NeuroML models in a Python environment.

  11. Fast method to compute scattering by a buried object under a randomly rough surface: PILE combined with FB-SA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlier, Christophe; Kubické, Gildas; Déchamps, Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    A fast, exact numerical method based on the method of moments (MM) is developed to calculate the scattering from an object below a randomly rough surface. Déchamps et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A23, 359 (2006)] have recently developed the PILE (propagation-inside-layer expansion) method for a stack of two one-dimensional rough interfaces separating homogeneous media. From the inversion of the impedance matrix by block (in which two impedance matrices of each interface and two coupling matrices are involved), this method allows one to calculate separately and exactly the multiple-scattering contributions inside the layer in which the inverses of the impedance matrices of each interface are involved. Our purpose here is to apply this method for an object below a rough surface. In addition, to invert a matrix of large size, the forward-backward spectral acceleration (FB-SA) approach of complexity O(N) (N is the number of unknowns on the interface) proposed by Chou and Johnson [Radio Sci.33, 1277 (1998)] is applied. The new method, PILE combined with FB-SA, is tested on perfectly conducting circular and elliptic cylinders located below a dielectric rough interface obeying a Gaussian process with Gaussian and exponential height autocorrelation functions.

  12. Combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for clinical oncology: technical aspects and acquisition protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, T.

    2004-01-01

    Combined PET/CT imaging is a non-invasive means of reviewing both, the anatomy and the molecular pathways of a patient during a quasi-simultaneous examination. Since the introduction of the prototype PET/CT in 1998 a rapid development of this imaging technology is being witnessed. The incorporation of fast PET detector technology into PET/CT designs and the routine use of the CT transmission images for attenuation correction of the PET allow for anato-metabolic whole-body examinations to be completed in less than 30 min. Thus, PET/CT imaging offers a logistical advantage to both, the patient and the clinicians since the two complementary exams - whenever clinically indicated - can be performed almost at the same time and a single integrated report can be created. Nevertheless, a number of pit-falls, primarily from the use of CT-based attenuation correction, have been identified and are being addressed through optimized acquisition protocols. It is fair to say, that PET/CT has been integrated in the diagnostic imaging arena, and in many cases has led to a close collaboration between different, yet complementary diagnostic and therapeutic medical disciplines. (orig.)

  13. Preoperative differentiation between T1a and ≥T1b gallbladder cancer: combined interpretation of high-resolution ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Ijin; Baek, Jee Hyun; Kim, Jung Hoon; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Hee Sun

    2014-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic value of combined interpretation of high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for preoperative differentiation between T1a and ≥T1b gallbladder (GB) cancer. Eighty-seven patients with pathologically confirmed GB cancers (T1a, n = 15; ≥T1b, n = 72), who preoperatively underwent both HRUS and MDCT, were included in this retrospective study. Two reviewers independently determined the T-stages of the GB cancers on HRUS and MDCT using a five-point confidence scale (5, definitely T1a; 1, definitely ≥T1b). For individual modality interpretation, the lesions with scores ≥4 were classified as T1a, and, for combined modality interpretation, the lesions with all scores ≥4 in both modalities were classified as T1a. The McNemar test was used to compare diagnostic performance. The diagnostic accuracy of differentiation between T1a and ≥T1b GB cancer was higher using combined interpretation (90.8 % and 88.5 % for reviewers 1 and 2, respectively) than individual interpretation of HRUS (82.8 % and 83.9 %) or MDCT (74.7 % and 82.8 %) (P < 0.05, reviewer 1). Combined interpretations demonstrated 100 % specificity for both reviewers, which was significantly higher than individual interpretations (P < 0.05, both reviewers). Combined HRUS and MDCT interpretation may improve the diagnostic accuracy and specificity for differentiating between T1a and ≥T1b GB cancers. circle Differentiating between T1a and ≥T1b gallbladder cancer can help surgical planning. (orig.)

  14. Using Combined X-ray Computed Tomography and Acoustic Resonance to Understand Supercritical CO2 Behavior in Fractured Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.

    2015-12-01

    Distribution of supercritical (sc) CO2 has a large impact on its flow behavior as well as on the properties of seismic waves used for monitoring. Simultaneous imaging of scCO2 distribution in a rock core using X-ray computed tomography (CT) and measurements of seismic waves in the laboratory can help understand how the distribution evolves as scCO2 invades through rock, and the resulting seismic signatures. To this end, we performed a series of laboratory scCO2 core-flood experiments in intact and fractured anisotropic Carbon Tan sandstone samples. In these experiments, we monitored changes in the CO2 saturation distribution and sonic-frequency acoustic resonances (yielding both seismic velocity and attenuation) over the course of the floods. A short-core resonant bar test system (Split-Hopkinson Resonant Bar Apparatus) custom fit into a long X-ray transparent pressure vessel was used for the seismic measurements, and a modified General Electric medical CT scanner was used to acquire X-ray CT data from which scCO2 saturation distributions were determined. The focus of the experiments was on the impact of single fractures on the scCO2 distribution and the seismic properties. For this reason, we examined several cases including 1. intact, 2. a closely mated fracture along the core axis, 3. a sheared fracture along the core axis (both vertical and horizontal for examining the buoyancy effect), and 4. a sheared fracture perpendicular to the core axis. For the intact and closely mated fractured cores, Young's modulus declined with increasing CO2 saturation, and attenuation increased up to about 15% CO2 saturation after which attenuation declined. For cores having wide axial fractures, the Young's modulus was lower than for the intact and closely mated cases, however did not change much with CO2 pore saturation. Much lower CO2 pore saturations were achieved in these cases. Attenuation increased more rapidly however than for the intact sample. For the core

  15. Haemodynamic imaging of thoracic stent-grafts by computational fluid dynamics (CFD): presentation of a patient-specific method combining magnetic resonance imaging and numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midulla, Marco; Moreno, Ramiro; Baali, Adil; Chau, Ming; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Nicoud, Franck; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Haulon, Stephan; Rousseau, Hervé

    2012-10-01

    In the last decade, there was been increasing interest in finding imaging techniques able to provide a functional vascular imaging of the thoracic aorta. The purpose of this paper is to present an imaging method combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to obtain a patient-specific haemodynamic analysis of patients treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). MRI was used to obtain boundary conditions. MR angiography (MRA) was followed by cardiac-gated cine sequences which covered the whole thoracic aorta. Phase contrast imaging provided the inlet and outlet profiles. A CFD mesh generator was used to model the arterial morphology, and wall movements were imposed according to the cine imaging. CFD runs were processed using the finite volume (FV) method assuming blood as a homogeneous Newtonian fluid. Twenty patients (14 men; mean age 62.2 years) with different aortic lesions were evaluated. Four-dimensional mapping of velocity and wall shear stress were obtained, depicting different patterns of flow (laminar, turbulent, stenosis-like) and local alterations of parietal stress in-stent and along the native aorta. A computational method using a combined approach with MRI appears feasible and seems promising to provide detailed functional analysis of thoracic aorta after stent-graft implantation. • Functional vascular imaging of the thoracic aorta offers new diagnostic opportunities • CFD can model vascular haemodynamics for clinical aortic problems • Combining CFD with MRI offers patient specific method of aortic analysis • Haemodynamic analysis of stent-grafts could improve clinical management and follow-up.

  16. Recent achievements in real-time computational seismology in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Liang, W.; Huang, B.

    2012-12-01

    Real-time computational seismology is currently possible to be achieved which needs highly connection between seismic database and high performance computing. We have developed a real-time moment tensor monitoring system (RMT) by using continuous BATS records and moment tensor inversion (CMT) technique. The real-time online earthquake simulation service is also ready to open for researchers and public earthquake science education (ROS). Combine RMT with ROS, the earthquake report based on computational seismology can provide within 5 minutes after an earthquake occurred (RMT obtains point source information ROS completes a 3D simulation real-time now. For more information, welcome to visit real-time computational seismology earthquake report webpage (RCS).

  17. Simulation study on the operating characteristics of the heat pipe for combined evaporative cooling of computer room air-conditioning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Zongwei; Zhang, Yanqing; Meng, Xin; Liu, Qiankun; Li, Weiliang; Han, Yu; Zhang, Yanhong

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the energy efficiency of air conditioning systems in computer rooms, this paper proposed a new concept of integrating evaporative cooling air-conditioning system with heat pipes. Based on a computer room in Shenyang, China, a mathematical model was built to perform transient simulations of the new system. The annual dynamical performance of the new system was then compared with a typical conventional computer room air-conditioning system. The result showed that the new integrated air-conditioning system had better energy efficiency, i.e. 31.31% reduction in energy consumption and 29.49% increase in COP (coefficient of performance), due to the adoption of evaporative condenser and the separate type heat pipe technology. Further study also revealed that the incorporated heat pipes enabled a 36.88% of decrease in the operation duration of the vapor compressor, and a 53.86% of reduction for the activation times of the compressor, which could lead to a longer lifespan of the compressor. The new integrated evaporative cooling air-conditioning system was also tested in different climate regions. It showed that the energy saving of the new system was greatly affected by climate, and it had the best effect in cold and dry regions like Shenyang with up to 31.31% energy saving. In some warm and humid climate regions like Guangzhou, the energy saving could be achieved up to 13.66%. - Highlights: • A novel combined air-conditioning system of computer room is constructed. • The performance of the system and conventional system is simulated and compared. • The applicability of the system in different climate regions is investigated.

  18. ACR: Licensing and design readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text The Canadian nuclear technology has a long history dating back to the 1940s. In this regard, Canada is in a unique situation, shared only by a very few countries, where original nuclear power technology has been invented and further developed. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), then called AECB, was established in 1946. CNSC focuses on nuclear security, nuclear safety, establishing health and safety regulations, and has also played an instrumental role in the formation of the IAEA. CNSC has provided assistance to the establishment of regulatory authorities in AECL's client countries such as Korea, Argentina, China and Romania. AECL has developed the Gen III+ ACR 1000 as evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6 reactor. ACR-1000 has evolved from AECL's in depth experience with CANDU systems, components, and materials, as well as the feedback received from owners and operators of CANDU plants. The ACR-1000 design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. It also features major improvements in economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance. ACR-1000 has completed its Basic Engineering, has advanced in the licensing process in Canada, and is ready for deployment in Canadian and world markets. EC6 is an evolution of CANDU 6 and is a Gen III natural uranium fuelled reactor. Its medium size and potential for fuel localization and advanced fuel cycles is an optimal strategic solution in many markets.AECL's reactor products are shown to be compliant with a variety of licensing and regulatory requirements. These include the new CNSC DRD-337, IAEA NS-R1, and EUR. This allows the countries interested in CANDU reactor products to be confident of its licensing in their own regulatory regimes.

  19. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

    2008-09-29

    This work focuses on (1) searching/summarizing published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron catalysts with/without potassium/platinum promoters; (3) measurement of H{sub 2} and CO adsorption/dissociation kinetics on iron catalysts using transient methods; (3) analysis of the transient rate data to calculate kinetic parameters of early elementary steps in FTS; (4) construction of a microkinetic model of FTS on iron, and (5) validation of the model from collection of steady-state rate data for FTS on iron catalysts. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by non-aqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2} and thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. Kinetic parameters for CO adsorption, CO dissociation, and surface carbon hydrogenation on these catalysts were determined from temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO and temperature programmed surface hydrogenation (TPSR), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), and isothermal, transient hydrogenation (ITH). A microkinetic model was constructed for the early steps in FTS on polycrystalline iron from the kinetic parameters of elementary steps determined experimentally in this work and from literature values. Steady-state rate data were collected in a Berty reactor and used for validation of the microkinetic model. These rate data were fitted to 'smart' Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expressions derived from a sequence of elementary steps and using a combination of fitted steady-state parameters and parameters specified from the transient

  20. Accurate calculation of mutational effects on the thermodynamics of inhibitor binding to p38α MAP kinase: a combined computational and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shun; Travis, Sue M; Elcock, Adrian H

    2013-07-09

    A major current challenge for drug design efforts focused on protein kinases is the development of drug resistance caused by spontaneous mutations in the kinase catalytic domain. The ubiquity of this problem means that it would be advantageous to develop fast, effective computational methods that could be used to determine the effects of potential resistance-causing mutations before they arise in a clinical setting. With this long-term goal in mind, we have conducted a combined experimental and computational study of the thermodynamic effects of active-site mutations on a well-characterized and high-affinity interaction between a protein kinase and a small-molecule inhibitor. Specifically, we developed a fluorescence-based assay to measure the binding free energy of the small-molecule inhibitor, SB203580, to the p38α MAP kinase and used it measure the inhibitor's affinity for five different kinase mutants involving two residues (Val38 and Ala51) that contact the inhibitor in the crystal structure of the inhibitor-kinase complex. We then conducted long, explicit-solvent thermodynamic integration (TI) simulations in an attempt to reproduce the experimental relative binding affinities of the inhibitor for the five mutants; in total, a combined simulation time of 18.5 μs was obtained. Two widely used force fields - OPLS-AA/L and Amber ff99SB-ILDN - were tested in the TI simulations. Both force fields produced excellent agreement with experiment for three of the five mutants; simulations performed with the OPLS-AA/L force field, however, produced qualitatively incorrect results for the constructs that contained an A51V mutation. Interestingly, the discrepancies with the OPLS-AA/L force field could be rectified by the imposition of position restraints on the atoms of the protein backbone and the inhibitor without destroying the agreement for other mutations; the ability to reproduce experiment depended, however, upon the strength of the restraints' force constant

  1. Beyond College Eligibility: A New Framework for Promoting College Readiness. College Readiness Indicator Systems Resource Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The College Readiness Indicator Systems (CRIS) initiative was developed in response to a troubling pattern: More students than ever are enrolling in college after high school, but many of them are not college ready, as evidenced by persistently low rates of college completion. The sense of urgency to close the gap between college eligibility and…

  2. First Responder Readiness: A Systems Approach to Readiness Assessment Using Model Based Vulnerability Analysis Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    to come—if it be not to come, it will be now—if it be not now, yet it will come—the readiness is all. . .” --- Shakespeare , Hamlet , 5.2.215-219...BLANK 1 I. READINESS OVERVIEW A. INTRODUCTION “ Hamlet : . . . There is a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now ‘tis not

  3. Pathways to School Readiness: Executive Functioning Predicts Academic and Social-Emotional Aspects of School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Trisha D.; Hund, Alycia M.; Hesson-McInnis, Matthew S.; Roman, Zachary J.

    2017-01-01

    The current study specified the extent to which hot and cool aspects of executive functioning predicted academic and social-emotional indicators of school readiness. It was unique in focusing on positive aspects of social-emotional readiness, rather than problem behaviors. One hundred four 3-5-year-old children completed tasks measuring executive…

  4. Determining transition readiness in congenital heart disease: Assessing the utility of the Transition Readiness Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Transition Readiness Assessment Questionnaire (TRAQ) is a tool commonly used to assess transition readiness in adolescents with chronic diseases. It was previously validated in youth with special health care needs (YSHCN), but no patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) were included in the ...

  5. Performance evaluation of a motor-imagery-based EEG-Brain computer interface using a combined cue with heterogeneous training data in BCI-Naive subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Youngbum

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subjects in EEG-Brain computer interface (BCI system experience difficulties when attempting to obtain the consistent performance of the actual movement by motor imagery alone. It is necessary to find the optimal conditions and stimuli combinations that affect the performance factors of the EEG-BCI system to guarantee equipment safety and trust through the performance evaluation of using motor imagery characteristics that can be utilized in the EEG-BCI testing environment. Methods The experiment was carried out with 10 experienced subjects and 32 naive subjects on an EEG-BCI system. There were 3 experiments: The experienced homogeneous experiment, the naive homogeneous experiment and the naive heterogeneous experiment. Each experiment was compared in terms of the six audio-visual cue combinations and consisted of 50 trials. The EEG data was classified using the least square linear classifier in case of the naive subjects through the common spatial pattern filter. The accuracy was calculated using the training and test data set. The p-value of the accuracy was obtained through the statistical significance test. Results In the case in which a naive subject was trained by a heterogeneous combined cue and tested by a visual cue, the result was not only the highest accuracy (p Conclusions We propose the use of this measuring methodology of a heterogeneous combined cue for training data and a visual cue for test data by the typical EEG-BCI algorithm on the EEG-BCI system to achieve effectiveness in terms of consistence, stability, cost, time, and resources management without the need for a trial and error process.

  6. Computer modeling of the optical properties and heating of spherical gold and silica-gold nanoparticles for laser combined imaging and photothermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovalov, V; Astafyeva, L; Jean, B

    2009-01-01

    Recently, several groups of investigators (Anderson, Halas, Zharov, El-Sayed and their co-workers (Pitsillides et al 2003 Biophys. J. 84 4023-31, Zharov et al 2003 Appl. Phys. Lett. 83 4897-9, Zharov et al 2004 Proc. SPIE 5319 291-9, Loo et al 2005 Nano Lett. 5 709-11, Gobin et al 2007 Nano Lett. 7 1929-34, Fu et al 2008 Nanotechnology 19 045103, Huang et al 2006 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128 2115-20, Jain et al 2006 J. Phys. Chem. B 110 7238-48, Jain et al 2007 Nano Today 2 18-29)) demonstrated, through pioneering results, the great potential of laser thermal therapy of cells and tissues conjugated with gold nanoparticles. It was also proposed to use combined diagnostics and therapy on the basis of nanoparticle selection for achievement of efficient contrast for laser imaging applications, as well as for photothermal therapy. However, the current understanding of the relationship between optical properties (absorption, backscattering) of nanoparticles, the efficiency of nanoparticle heating and the possibility to use them for combined imaging and therapy is limited. Here, we report the results of computer modeling of optical absorption and backscattering properties and laser heating of gold and silica-gold spherical nanoparticles for laser combined imaging and photothermal treatment of cells and tissues conjugated with nanoparticles. The efficiencies of nanoparticle heating and backscattering by nanoparticles, depending upon their radii, structure and optical properties of the metal, were investigated. This paper focuses on the analysis and determination of appropriate ranges of nanoparticle sizes for the purposes of laser combined imaging and photothermal treatment. The possibility to use spherical gold and silica-gold nanoparticles in determined ranges of radii for these purposes for laser wavelengths 532 and 800 nm is investigated.

  7. Comparison of computed tomographic urography, magnetic resonance urography and the combination of diffusion weighted imaging in diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guang-yu; Lu, Qing; Wu, Lian-ming [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Zhang, Jin [Department of Urinary Surgery, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Chen, Xiao-xi [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Xu, Jian-rong, E-mail: renjixujr@163.com [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of computed tomographic urography (CTU), static-fluid magnetic resonance urography (static-fluid MRU) and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Material and Methods: Between January 2010 and June 2011, patients with suspected UUT cancer underwent CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) within a 1-week period. The diagnostic performances of CTU, static-fluid MRU and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI for upper urinary tract cancer were prospectively evaluated. The ureteroscopic and histopathologic findings were compared with the imaging findings. Results: Compared to static-fluid MRU alone (sensitivity: 76/75%, reader 1/reader 2), combining DWI with MRI can increase the sensitivity (sensitivity: 84/84%, p = 0.031/p = 0.016) of upper urinary tract cancer diagnosis. CTU had greater sensitivity (95/94%) and accuracy (92/91%) than both static-fluid MRU (sensitivity: p < 0.001/p < 0.001 and accuracy: 83/81%, p = 0.001/p < 0.001) and static-fluid MRU with DWI (sensitivity: p = 0.023/p = 0.039 and accuracy: 87/85%, p = 0.042/p = 0.049) for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancers. Compared with CTU alone, CTU with DWI did not significantly increase sensitivity, specificity or accuracy. However, the diagnostic confidence was improved when the combined technique was used (p = 0.031/p = 0.024). Moreover, there was no significant change in sensitivity, specificity, accuracy or diagnostic confidence when static-fluid MRU was used in combination with CTU and DWI. Conclusion: Although there is a potential role for static-fluid MRU and static-fluid MRU with DWI in urinary tract imaging, CTU is still the better choice for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Combining DWI with CTU can help improve confidence in upper urinary tract cancer diagnoses.

  8. Impacts of the Boston Prekindergarten Program on the School Readiness of Young Children with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Theory and empirical work suggest inclusion preschool improves the school readiness of young children with special needs, but only 2 studies of the model have used rigorous designs that could identify causality. The present study examined the impacts of the Boston Public prekindergarten program-which combined proven language, literacy, and…

  9. Combine TV-L1 model with guided image filtering for wide and faint ring artifacts correction of in-line x-ray phase contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Dongjiang; Qu, Gangrong; Hu, Chunhong; Zhao, Yuqing; Chen, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    In practice, mis-calibrated detector pixels give rise to wide and faint ring artifacts in the reconstruction image of the In-line phase-contrast computed tomography (IL-PC-CT). Ring artifacts correction is essential in IL-PC-CT. In this study, a novel method of wide and faint ring artifacts correction was presented based on combining TV-L1 model with guided image filtering (GIF) in the reconstruction image domain. The new correction method includes two main steps namely, the GIF step and the TV-L1 step. To validate the performance of this method, simulation data and real experimental synchrotron data are provided. The results demonstrate that TV-L1 model with GIF step can effectively correct the wide and faint ring artifacts for IL-PC-CT.

  10. A synchrotron-based local computed tomography combined with data-constrained modelling approach for quantitative analysis of anthracite coal microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wen Hao; Yang, Sam Y. S.; Xiao, Ti Qiao; Mayo, Sherry C.; Wang, Yu Dan; Wang, Hai Peng

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative local computed tomography combined with data-constrained modelling has been developed. The method could improve distinctly the spatial resolution and the composition resolution in a sample larger than the field of view, for quantitative characterization of three-dimensional distributions of material compositions and void. Quantifying three-dimensional spatial distributions of pores and material compositions in samples is a key materials characterization challenge, particularly in samples where compositions are distributed across a range of length scales, and where such compositions have similar X-ray absorption properties, such as in coal. Consequently, obtaining detailed information within sub-regions of a multi-length-scale sample by conventional approaches may not provide the resolution and level of detail one might desire. Herein, an approach for quantitative high-definition determination of material compositions from X-ray local computed tomography combined with a data-constrained modelling method is proposed. The approach is capable of dramatically improving the spatial resolution and enabling finer details within a region of interest of a sample larger than the field of view to be revealed than by using conventional techniques. A coal sample containing distributions of porosity and several mineral compositions is employed to demonstrate the approach. The optimal experimental parameters are pre-analyzed. The quantitative results demonstrated that the approach can reveal significantly finer details of compositional distributions in the sample region of interest. The elevated spatial resolution is crucial for coal-bed methane reservoir evaluation and understanding the transformation of the minerals during coal processing. The method is generic and can be applied for three-dimensional compositional characterization of other materials

  11. Assessing the attractive/repulsive force balance in axial cyclohexane C-Hax ···Yax contacts: A combined computational analysis in monosubstituted cyclohexanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Lopez, Carlos; Nieto Faza, Olalla; De Proft, Frank; Kolocouris, Antonios

    2016-11-15

    The interactions of axial substituents in monosubstituted cyclohexane rings are studied in this work using an array of different computational techniques. Additionally, the anomalous axial preference for some bulky substituents is related to stabilizing dispersion interactions. We find that the C-H ax ···Y ax contacts for various substituents with distances ranging from 2 to ∼5 Å may include attractive dispersion forces that can affect the conformational equilibrium; these forces co-exist with Pauli repulsive forces effected by Y ax group due to van der Waals sphere penetration. At distances between 2 and 3 Å stabilizing electron transfer interactions were calculated and the combination of natural bond orbital and QTAIM analysis showed that, in certain cases, Y ax  =  t Bu, C ax -O or C ax  = O or S ax  = O or C ax  = S this interaction can be characterized as an improper H-bond. DFT-D3 and non-covalent interactions calculations (NCIs) in cyclohexane derivatives with Y ax  = SiOR 3 including H Yax ···H cy surfaces at distances ranging between 4 and 6 Å suggest that dispersion has a clear effect on the experimentally observed stabilization of the axial conformer. NCIs computed from the reduced density gradient help to visually identify and analyze these interactions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Computationally efficient video restoration for Nyquist sampled imaging sensors combining an affine-motion-based temporal Kalman filter and adaptive Wiener filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucci, Michael; Hardie, Russell C; Barnard, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient video restoration algorithm to address both blur and noise for a Nyquist sampled imaging system. The proposed method utilizes a temporal Kalman filter followed by a correlation-model based spatial adaptive Wiener filter (AWF). The Kalman filter employs an affine background motion model and novel process-noise variance estimate. We also propose and demonstrate a new multidelay temporal Kalman filter designed to more robustly treat local motion. The AWF is a spatial operation that performs deconvolution and adapts to the spatially varying residual noise left in the Kalman filter stage. In image areas where the temporal Kalman filter is able to provide significant noise reduction, the AWF can be aggressive in its deconvolution. In other areas, where less noise reduction is achieved with the Kalman filter, the AWF balances the deconvolution with spatial noise reduction. In this way, the Kalman filter and AWF work together effectively, but without the computational burden of full joint spatiotemporal processing. We also propose a novel hybrid system that combines a temporal Kalman filter and BM3D processing. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed methods, we test the algorithms on both simulated imagery and video collected with a visible camera.

  13. Prediction of intramuscular fat content and shear force in Texel lamb loins using combinations of different X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clelland, N; Bunger, L; McLean, K A; Knott, S; Matthews, K R; Lambe, N R

    2018-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) parameters, including spiral computed tomography scanning (SCTS) parameters, intramuscular fat (IMF) and mechanically measured shear force were derived from two previously published studies. Purebred Texel (n = 377) of both sexes, females (n = 206) and intact males (n = 171) were used to investigate the prediction of IMF and shear force in the loin. Two and three dimensional CT density information was available. Accuracies in the prediction of shear force and IMF ranged from R 2 0.02 to R 2 0.13 and R 2 0.51 to R 2 0.71 respectively, using combinations of SCTS and CT scan information. The prediction of mechanical shear force could not be achieved at an acceptable level of accuracy employing SCTS information. However, the prediction of IMF in the loin employing information from SCTS and additional information from standard CT scans was successful, providing evidence that the prediction of IMF and related meat eating quality (MEQ) traits for Texel lambs in vivo can be achieved. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Combination of radiological and gray level co-occurrence matrix textural features used to distinguish solitary pulmonary nodules by computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haifeng; Sun, Tao; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Xia; Wang, Wei; Huo, Da; Lv, Pingxin; He, Wen; Wang, Keyang; Guo, Xiuhua

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the method of the combination of radiological and textural features for the differentiation of malignant from benign solitary pulmonary nodules by computed tomography. Features including 13 gray level co-occurrence matrix textural features and 12 radiological features were extracted from 2,117 CT slices, which came from 202 (116 malignant and 86 benign) patients. Lasso-type regularization to a nonlinear regression model was applied to select predictive features and a BP artificial neural network was used to build the diagnostic model. Eight radiological and two textural features were obtained after the Lasso-type regularization procedure. Twelve radiological features alone could reach an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.84 in differentiating between malignant and benign lesions. The 10 selected characters improved the AUC to 0.91. The evaluation results showed that the method of selecting radiological and textural features appears to yield more effective in the distinction of malignant from benign solitary pulmonary nodules by computed tomography.

  15. Computing UV/vis spectra using a combined molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry approach: bis-triazin-pyridine (BTP) ligands studied in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfener, Sebastian; Trumm, Michael; Koke, Carsten; Heuser, Johannes; Ekström, Ulf; Skerencak-Frech, Andrej; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Panak, Petra J

    2016-03-21

    We report a combined computational and experimental study to investigate the UV/vis spectra of 2,6-bis(5,6-dialkyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (BTP) ligands in solution. In order to study molecules in solution using theoretical methods, force-field parameters for the ligand-water interaction are adjusted to ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Based on these parameters, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out from which snapshots are extracted as input to quantum chemical excitation-energy calculations to obtain UV/vis spectra of BTP ligands in solution using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) employing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The range-separated CAM-B3LYP functional is used to avoid large errors for charge-transfer states occurring in the electronic spectra. In order to study environment effects with theoretical methods, the frozen-density embedding scheme is applied. This computational procedure allows to obtain electronic spectra calculated at the (range-separated) DFT level of theory in solution, revealing solvatochromic shifts upon solvation of up to about 0.6 eV. Comparison to experimental data shows a significantly improved agreement compared to vacuum calculations and enables the analysis of relevant excitations for the line shape in solution.

  16. SU-G-JeP1-01: A Combination of Real Time Electromagnetic Localization and Tracking with Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralidhar, K Raja; Pangam, Suresh; Ponaganti, Srinivas; Krishna, Jayarama; Sujana, Kolla V; Komanduri, Priya K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: 1. online verification of patient position during treatment using calypso electromagnetic localization and tracking system. 2. Verification and comparison of positional accuracy between cone beam computed tomography and calypso system. 3. Presenting the advantage of continuation localization in Stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. Methods: Ten brain tumor cases were taken for this study. Patients with head mask were under gone Computed Tomography (CT). Before scanning, mask was cut on the fore head area to keep surface beacons on the skin. Slice thickness of 0.65 mm were taken for this study. x, y, z coordinates of these beacons in TPS were entered into tracking station. Varian True Beam accelerator, equipped with On Board Imager was used to take Cone beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) to localize the patient. Simultaneously Surface beacons were used to localize and track the patient throughout the treatment. The localization values were compared in both systems. For localization CBCT considered as reference. Tracking was done throughout the treatment using Calypso tracking system using electromagnetic array. This array was in tracking position during imaging and treatment. Flattening Filter free beams of 6MV photons along with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy was used for the treatment. The patient movement was observed throughout the treatment ranging from 2 min to 4 min. Results: The average variation observed between calypso system and CBCT localization was less than 0.5 mm. These variations were due to manual errors while keeping beacon on the patient. Less than 0.05 cm intra-fraction motion was observed throughout the treatment with the help of continuous tracking. Conclusion: Calypso target localization system is one of the finest tools to perform radiosurgery in combination with CBCT. This non radiographic method of tracking is a real beneficial method to treat patients confidently while observing real-time motion information of the patient.

  17. SU-G-JeP1-01: A Combination of Real Time Electromagnetic Localization and Tracking with Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidhar, K Raja; Pangam, Suresh; Ponaganti, Srinivas; Krishna, Jayarama; Sujana, Kolla V; Komanduri, Priya K [American Oncology Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: 1. online verification of patient position during treatment using calypso electromagnetic localization and tracking system. 2. Verification and comparison of positional accuracy between cone beam computed tomography and calypso system. 3. Presenting the advantage of continuation localization in Stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. Methods: Ten brain tumor cases were taken for this study. Patients with head mask were under gone Computed Tomography (CT). Before scanning, mask was cut on the fore head area to keep surface beacons on the skin. Slice thickness of 0.65 mm were taken for this study. x, y, z coordinates of these beacons in TPS were entered into tracking station. Varian True Beam accelerator, equipped with On Board Imager was used to take Cone beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) to localize the patient. Simultaneously Surface beacons were used to localize and track the patient throughout the treatment. The localization values were compared in both systems. For localization CBCT considered as reference. Tracking was done throughout the treatment using Calypso tracking system using electromagnetic array. This array was in tracking position during imaging and treatment. Flattening Filter free beams of 6MV photons along with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy was used for the treatment. The patient movement was observed throughout the treatment ranging from 2 min to 4 min. Results: The average variation observed between calypso system and CBCT localization was less than 0.5 mm. These variations were due to manual errors while keeping beacon on the patient. Less than 0.05 cm intra-fraction motion was observed throughout the treatment with the help of continuous tracking. Conclusion: Calypso target localization system is one of the finest tools to perform radiosurgery in combination with CBCT. This non radiographic method of tracking is a real beneficial method to treat patients confidently while observing real-time motion information of the patient.

  18. Effect of a combination of flip and zooming stimuli on the performance of a visual brain-computer interface for spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiao; Jin, Jing; Daly, Ian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Bei; Wang, Xingyu; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2018-02-13

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems can allow their users to communicate with the external world by recognizing intention directly from their brain activity without the assistance of the peripheral motor nervous system. The P300-speller is one of the most widely used visual BCI applications. In previous studies, a flip stimulus (rotating the background area of the character) that was based on apparent motion, suffered from less refractory effects. However, its performance was not improved significantly. In addition, a presentation paradigm that used a "zooming" action (changing the size of the symbol) has been shown to evoke relatively higher P300 amplitudes and obtain a better BCI performance. To extend this method of stimuli presentation within a BCI and, consequently, to improve BCI performance, we present a new paradigm combining both the flip stimulus with a zooming action. This new presentation modality allowed BCI users to focus their attention more easily. We investigated whether such an action could combine the advantages of both types of stimuli presentation to bring a significant improvement in performance compared to the conventional flip stimulus. The experimental results showed that the proposed paradigm could obtain significantly higher classification accuracies and bit rates than the conventional flip paradigm (p<0.01).

  19. Accuracy of Combined Computed Tomography Colonography and Dual Energy Iiodine Map Imaging for Detecting Colorectal masses using High-pitch Dual-source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Han, Ruijuan; Han, Yang; Shi, Xuesen; Hu, Jiang; Lu, Bin

    2018-02-28

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of combined computed tomography colonography (CTC) and dual-energy iodine map imaging for detecting colorectal masses using high-pitch dual-source CT, compared with optical colonography (OC) and histopathologic findings. Twenty-eight consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients were underwent contrast-enhanced CTC acquisition using dual-energy mode and OC and pathologic examination. The size of the space-occupied mass, the CT value after contrast enhancement, and the iodine value were measured and statistically compared. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy rate, and positive predictive and negative predictive values of dual-energy contrast-enhanced CTC were calculated and compared between conventional CTC and dual-energy iodine images. The iodine value of stool was significantly lower than the colonic neoplasia (P dual-energy iodine maps imaging was 95.6% (95% CI = 77.9%-99.2%). The specificity of the two methods was 42.8% (95% CI = 15.4%-93.5%) and 100% (95% CI = 47.9%-100%; P = 0.02), respectively. Compared with optical colonography and histopathology, combined CTC and dual-energy iodine maps imaging can distinguish stool and colonic neoplasia, distinguish between benign and malignant tumors initially and improve the diagnostic accuracy of CTC for colorectal cancer screening.

  20. The Association of Readiness for Interprofessional Learning with empathy, motivation and professional identity development in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Cora L F; Wilschut, Janneke A; Isik, Ulviye; van der Burgt, Stéphanie M E; Croiset, Gerda; Kusurkar, Rashmi A

    2018-06-07

    The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale is among the first scales developed for measurement of attitude towards interprofessional learning (IPL). However, the conceptual framework of the RIPLS still lacks clarity. We investigated the association of the RIPLS with professional identity, empathy and motivation, with the intention of relating RIPLS to other well-known concepts in healthcare education, in an attempt to clarify the concept of readiness. Readiness for interprofessional learning, professional identity development, empathy and motivation of students for medical school, were measured in all 6 years of the medical curriculum. The association of professional identity development, empathy and motivation with readiness was analyzed using linear regression. Empathy and motivation significantly explained the variance in RIPLS subscale Teamwork & Collaboration. Gender and belonging to the first study year had a unique positive contribution in explaining the variance of the RIPLS subscales Positive and Negative Professional Identity, whereas motivation had no contribution. More compassionate care, as an affective component of empathy, seemed to diminish readiness for IPL. Professional Identity, measured as affirmation or denial of the identification with a professional group, had no contribution in the explanation of the variance in readiness. The RIPLS is a suboptimal instrument, which does not clarify the 'what' and 'how' of IPL in a curriculum. This study suggests that students' readiness for IPE may benefit from a combination with the cognitive component of empathy ('Perspective taking') and elements in the curriculum that promote autonomous motivation.

  1. Concept of economic readiness levels assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuniaristanto, Sutopo, W.; Widiyanto, A.; Putri, A. S.

    2017-11-01

    This research aims to build a concept of Economic Readiness Level (ERL) assessment for incubation center. ERL concept is arranged by considering both market and business aspects. Every aspect is divided into four phases and each of them consists of some indicators. Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) is used to develop the ERL in calculating the weight of every single aspect and indicator. Interval scale between 0 and 4 is also applied in indicator assessment. In order to calculate ERL, score in every indicator and the weight of both the aspect and indicator are considered. ERL value is able to show in detail the innovative product readiness level from economic sight, market and business aspect. There are four levels in Economic Readiness Level scheme which are investigation, feasibility, planning and introduction.

  2. Ready for kindergarten: Are intelligence skills enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Fitzpatrick

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated how different profiles of kindergarten readiness in terms of student intellectual ability, academic skills and classroom engagement relate to future academic performance. Participants are French-Canadian children followed in the context of the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (N = 670. Trained examiners measured number knowledge, receptive vocabulary and fluid intelligence when children were in kindergarten. Teachers rated kindergarten classroom engagement. Outcomes included fourth-grade teacherrated achievement and directly assessed mathematical skills. Latent class analyses revealed three kindergarten readiness profiles: high (57%, moderate (34% and low (9.3% readiness. Using multiple regression, we found that a more favourable kindergarten profile predicted better fourth-grade academic performance. Identifying children at risk of academic difficulty is an important step for preventing underachievement and dropout. These results suggest the importance of promoting a variety of cognitive, academic and behavioural skills to enhance later achievement in at-risk learners.

  3. Organizational readiness in specialty mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison B; Cohen, Amy N; Young, Alexander S

    2010-01-01

    Implementing quality improvement efforts in clinics is challenging. Assessment of organizational "readiness" for change can set the stage for implementation by providing information regarding existing strengths and deficiencies, thereby increasing the chance of a successful improvement effort. This paper discusses organizational assessment in specialty mental health, in preparation for improving care for individuals with schizophrenia. To assess organizational readiness for change in specialty mental health in order to facilitate locally tailored implementation strategies. EQUIP-2 is a site-level controlled trial at nine VA medical centers (four intervention, five control). Providers at all sites completed an organizational readiness for change (ORC) measure, and key stakeholders at the intervention sites completed a semi-structured interview at baseline. At the four intervention sites, 16 administrators and 43 clinical staff completed the ORC, and 38 key stakeholders were interviewed. The readiness domains of training needs, communication, and change were the domains with lower mean scores (i.e., potential deficiencies) ranging from a low of 23.8 to a high of 36.2 on a scale of 10-50, while staff attributes of growth and adaptability had higher mean scores (i.e., potential strengths) ranging from a low of 35.4 to a high of 41.1. Semi-structured interviews revealed that staff perceptions and experiences of change and decision-making are affected by larger structural factors such as change mandates from VA headquarters. Motivation for change, organizational climate, staff perceptions and beliefs, and prior experience with change efforts contribute to readiness for change in specialty mental health. Sites with less readiness for change may require more flexibility in the implementation of a quality improvement intervention. We suggest that uptake of evidence-based practices can be enhanced by tailoring implementation efforts to the strengths and deficiencies of the

  4. Computational composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna K. A.; Redström, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Computational composite is introduced as a new type of composite material. Arguing that this is not just a metaphorical maneuver, we provide an analysis of computational technology as material in design, which shows how computers share important characteristics with other materials used in design...... and architecture. We argue that the notion of computational composites provides a precise understanding of the computer as material, and of how computations need to be combined with other materials to come to expression as material. Besides working as an analysis of computers from a designer’s point of view......, the notion of computational composites may also provide a link for computer science and human-computer interaction to an increasingly rapid development and use of new materials in design and architecture....

  5. Validating Acquisition IS Integration Readiness with Drills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wynne, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    To companies, mergers and acquisitions are important strategic tools, yet they often fail to deliver their expected value. Studies have shown the integration of information systems is a significant roadblock to the realisation of acquisition benefits, and for an IT department to be ready......), to understand how an IT department can use them to validate their integration plans. The paper presents a case study of two drills used to validate an IT department’s readiness to carry out acquisition IS integration, and suggests seven acquisition IS integration drill characteristics others could utilise when...

  6. NHI Component Technical Readiness Evaluation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, S.; Wilson, Dane F.; Pawel, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    A decision process for evaluating the technical readiness or maturity of components (i.e., heat exchangers, chemical reactors, valves, etc.) for use by the U.S. DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative is described. This system is used by the DOE NHI to assess individual components in relation to their readiness for pilot-scale and larger-scale deployment and to drive the research and development work needed to attain technical maturity. A description of the evaluation system is provided, and examples are given to illustrate how it is used to assist in component R and D decisions.

  7. Smoking Cessation for Smokers Not Ready to Quit: Meta-analysis and Cost-effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ayesha; Kaplan, Cameron M; Derefinko, Karen J; Klesges, Robert C

    2018-06-11

    To provide a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis on smoking interventions targeting smokers not ready to quit, a population that makes up approximately 32% of current smokers. Twenty-two studies on pharmacological, behavioral, and combination smoking-cessation interventions targeting smokers not ready to quit (defined as those who reported they were not ready to quit at the time of the study) published between 2000 and 2017 were analyzed. The effectiveness (measured by the number needed to treat) and cost effectiveness (measured by costs per quit) of interventions were calculated. All data collection and analyses were performed in 2017. Smoking interventions targeting smokers not ready to quit can be as effective as similar interventions for smokers ready to quit; however, costs of intervening on this group may be higher for some intervention types. The most cost-effective interventions identified for this group were those using varenicline and those using behavioral interventions. Updating clinical recommendations to provide cessation interventions for this group is recommended. Further research on development of cost-effective treatments and effective strategies for recruitment and outreach for this group are needed. Additional studies may allow for more nuanced comparisons of treatment types among this group. Copyright © 2018 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life - A scoping literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Tiina; Eklöf, Niina; Salminen, Leena

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this scoping literature review was to identify the factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life. The literature search was carried out in autumn 2017 in PubMed and CINAHL databases. The studies selected for this review (n = 17) were analyzed thematically with inductive content analysis. Four subthemes that were combined into two main factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life were found. The main factors found were 1) educational factors and 2) personal factors. Educational factors consisted of professional competence and clinical practice, while personal factors consisted of nursing students' background and feelings. Some nursing students tend to feel insecure about entering working life as a newly graduated nurse. This literature review also supports the importance of clinical practice periods in nursing education and for readiness for working life. Nurse education needs to ensure clinical practice periods which support nursing students' professional growth. Further research is needed on how the factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life correlate with each other. Particularly, the association between competence, readiness and positive feelings towards graduation needs further investigation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Information Warfare: Issues Associated with the Defense of DOD Computers and Computer Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Franklin, Derek

    2002-01-01

    ... that may threaten the critical information pathways of the armed forces An analysis of the history of computer information warfare reveals that there was an embarrassing lack of readiness and defense...

  10. Technology and Manufacturing Readiness of Early Market Motive and Non-Motive Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-06-16

    PNNL’s objective in this report is to provide DOE with a technology and manufacturing readiness assessment to identify hydrogen storage technologies’ maturity levels for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. PNNL’s Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies in varying levels of development. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. The TRA report documents the process used to conduct the TRA, reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings.

  11. A Proposed Conceptual Model of Military Medical Readiness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Hall, Brian M

    2007-01-01

    .... The purpose of this research is to consolidate existing literature on the latent variable of medical readiness, and to propose a composite theoretical model of medical readiness that may provide...

  12. Individual Ready Reserve: It's Relevance in Supporting the Long War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chisholm, Shelley A

    2008-01-01

    ... in sustaining personnel readiness while supporting on going operations. In response to meeting these personnel readiness concerns, the Army Reserve will require the call-up of Soldiers currently serving in the IRR...

  13. e-Learning readiness amongst nursing students at the Durban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    e-Learning readiness amongst nursing students at the Durban University of ... make the shift from traditional learning to the technological culture of e-Learning at a ... equipment and technological readiness for the change in learning method.

  14. PENGARUH TECHNOLOGY READINESS TERHADAP PENERIMAAN TEKNOLOGI KOMPUTER PADA UMKM DI YOGYAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimin Nur Aisyah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Pengaruh Technology Readiness terhadap Penerimaan Teknologi Komputer pada UMKM di Yogyakarta. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengekplorasi pengaruh kesiapan teknologi terhadap persepsi kemanfaatan sistem dan persepsi kemudahan penggunaan sistem serta pengaruh kedua persepsi terhadap teknologi tersebut terhadap minat menggunakan teknologi komputer dalam membantu proses bisnis pada UMKM di Yogyakarta.  Sampel penelitian ini sejumlah 498 UMKM yang terdaftar di Disperindagkop Yogyakarta. Teknik pengambilan sampel menggunakan teknik simple random sampling. Data diperoleh menggunakan kuesioner. Analisis data dan uji hipotesis menggunakan model Partial-Least-Square (PLS. Penelitian ini menemukan bahwa terdapat pengaruh kesiapan teknologi terhadap persepsi kemanfaatan sistem dan persepsi kemudahan penggunaan sistem, serta terdapat pengaruh persepsi kemanfaatan teknologi dan persepsi kemudahan penggunaan teknologi terhadap minat menggunakan teknologi komputer dalam membantu proses bisnis pada UMKM di Yogyakarta.   Kata kunci: kesiapan teknologi, persepsi kemanfaatan, persepsi kemudahan penggunaan, minat menggunakan, UMKM Abstract: The Effect of Technology Readiness toward Acceptance of Computer Technology on SMEs in Yogyakarta. This research aims to explore the effect of technology readiness to the perceived of usefulness of system and perceived ease of use of the system and the influence of both perceptions of these technologies to the behavioral intention of computer technology in business processes in SMEs in Yogyakarta. The research sample number of 498 SMEs were registered in Disperindagkop Yogyakarta. The sampling technique using simple random sampling technique. The data were obtained using a questionnaire. Data analysis and hypothesis testing using a model of the Partial-Least-Square (PLS. The research found that there are significant technology readiness to the perception of the benefit system and perceived ease of use of the system

  15. Ready a Commodore 64 retrospective

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    How did the Commodore 64 conquer the hearts of millions and become a platform people still actively develop for even today? What made it so special? This book will appeal to both those who like tinkering with old technology as a hobby and nostalgic readers who simply want to enjoy a trip down memory lane. It discusses in a concise but rigorous format the different areas of home gaming and personal computing where the C64 managed to innovate and push forward existing boundaries. Starting from Jack Tramiel's vision of designing computers "for the masses, not the classes," the book introduces the 6510, VIC-II and SID chips that made the C64 unique. It briefly discusses its Basic programming language and then proceeds to illustrate not only many of the games that are still so fondly remembered but also the first generation of game engines that made game development more approachable − among other topics that are often neglected but are necessary to provide a comprehensive overview of how far reaching the C64 in...

  16. Patient-specific scatter correction in clinical cone beam computed tomography imaging made possible by the combination of Monte Carlo simulations and a ray tracing algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thing, Rune S.; Bernchou, Uffe; Brink, Carsten; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality is limited by scattered photons. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations provide the ability of predicting the patient-specific scatter contamination in clinical CBCT imaging. Lengthy simulations prevent MC-based scatter correction from being fully implemented in a clinical setting. This study investigates the combination of using fast MC simulations to predict scatter distributions with a ray tracing algorithm to allow calibration between simulated and clinical CBCT images. Material and methods: An EGSnrc-based user code (egs c bct), was used to perform MC simulations of an Elekta XVI CBCT imaging system. A 60keV x-ray source was used, and air kerma scored at the detector plane. Several variance reduction techniques (VRTs) were used to increase the scatter calculation efficiency. Three patient phantoms based on CT scans were simulated, namely a brain, a thorax and a pelvis scan. A ray tracing algorithm was used to calculate the detector signal due to primary photons. A total of 288 projections were simulated, one for each thread on the computer cluster used for the investigation. Results: Scatter distributions for the brain, thorax and pelvis scan were simulated within 2 % statistical uncertainty in two hours per scan. Within the same time, the ray tracing algorithm provided the primary signal for each of the projections. Thus, all the data needed for MC-based scatter correction in clinical CBCT imaging was obtained within two hours per patient, using a full simulation of the clinical CBCT geometry. Conclusions: This study shows that use of MC-based scatter corrections in CBCT imaging has a great potential to improve CBCT image quality. By use of powerful VRTs to predict scatter distributions and a ray tracing algorithm to calculate the primary signal, it is possible to obtain the necessary data for patient specific MC scatter correction within two hours per patient

  17. Career Readiness: Are We There Yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    ACT is committed to working with career and technical educators in order to prepare students to meet the standards of the high-performance workplace. In short, prepare them to be career- and job-ready. This commitment is a reflection of ACT's mission: "helping people achieve education and workplace success." After devoting more than two decades of…

  18. Weight Loss: Ready to Change Your Habits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calories more than you consume each day — through diet and exercise. You might lose weight more quickly if you ... yourself with regular weigh-ins and tracking your diet and activity, which is ... don't have a positive attitude about losing weight, you might not be ready — ...

  19. Development toward School Readiness: A Holistic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Alan Kibbe

    2015-01-01

    A systemic analysis of early childhood development factors explains the variance in school readiness among representative U.S. 5-year-olds. The underlying theory incorporates a set of causally interactive endogenous variables that are hypothesized to be driven by the effects of three exogenous variables: parental education, immigrant status and…

  20. The Developmental Approach to School Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    In the United States, a psychometric psychology dominates the thinking of educators. For traditional, political, and social reasons, developmental psychology rarely informs educational practices. This is the case even though studies show that the inducing of cognitive learning before a child is ready will reduce the child's learning potential and…

  1. Ready Texas: Stakeholder Convening. Proceedings Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intercultural Development Research Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    With the adoption of substantial changes to Texas high school curricula in 2013 (HB5), a central question for Texas policymakers, education and business leaders, families, and students is whether and how HB5 implementation impacts the state of college readiness and success in Texas. Comprehensive research is needed to understand the implications…

  2. Readiness of Teachers for Change in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakci, Yasar; Beycioglu, Kadir; Sincar, Mehmet; Ugurlu, Celal Teyyar

    2017-01-01

    Theorizing on the role of teacher attitudes in change effectiveness, this study examined the predictive value of context (trust), process (social interaction, participative management and knowledge sharing) and outcome (job satisfaction and workload perception) variables for cognitive, emotional and intentional readiness of teachers for change.…

  3. Child Physical Punishment, Parenting, and School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weegar, Kelly; Guérin-Marion, Camille; Fréchette, Sabrina; Romano, Elisa

    2018-01-01

    This study explored how physical punishment (PP) and other parenting approaches may predict school readiness outcomes. By using the Canada-wide representative data, 5,513 children were followed over a 2-year period. Caregivers reported on their use of PP and other parenting approaches (i.e., literacy and learning activities and other disciplinary…

  4. Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness of Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness of Pregnant Women Attending the Three Levels of Health Facilities in Ife Central Local Government, Nigeria. ... Only 24 (6.0%) had adequate knowledge of obstetric danger signs without prompting. Three hundred and forty (84.8%) and 312 (78.3%) women respectively had ...

  5. Emotional Readiness and Music Therapeutic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossinou-Korea, Maria; Fragkouli, Aspasia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the children's expression with verbal and nonverbal communication in the Autistic spectrum. We study the emotional readiness and the music therapeutic activities which exploit the elements of music. The method followed focused on the research field of special needs education. Assumptions on the parameters…

  6. Readiness to proceed: Characterization planning basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes characterization requirements, data availability, and data acquisition plans in support of the Phase 1 Waste Feed Readiness to Proceed Mid-Level Logic. It summarizes characterization requirements for the following program planning documents: Waste Feed Readiness Mid-Level Logic and Decomposition (in development); Master blue print (not available); Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Operations and Utilization Plan and Privatization Contract; Enabling assumptions (not available); Privatization low-activity waste (LAW) Data Quality Objective (DQO); Privatization high-level waste (HLW) DQO (draft); Problem-specific DQOs (in development); Interface control documents (draft). Section 2.0 defines the primary objectives for this report, Section 3.0 discusses the scope and assumptions, and Section 4.0 identifies general characterization needs and analyte-specific characterization needs or potential needs included in program documents and charts. Section 4.0 also shows the analyses that have been conducted, and the archive samples that are available for additional analyses. Section 5.0 discusses current plans for obtaining additional samples and analyses to meet readiness-to-proceed requirements. Section 6.0 summarizes sampling needs based on preliminary requirements and discusses other potential characterization needs. Many requirements documents are preliminary. In many cases, problem-specific DQOs have not been drafted, and only general assumptions about the document contents could be obtained from the authors. As a result, the readiness-to-proceed characterization requirements provided in this document are evolving and may change

  7. College and Career Readiness in Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Nicole; Bartek, Samantha

    2018-01-01

    This conceptual article will provide an in-depth exploration of the relevant literature focused on college and career readiness interventions in elementary schools. Beginning with a theoretical framework, a rationale is provided for early intervention by elementary school counselors. While professional guidelines and standards exist supporting…

  8. Service Availability and Readiness Assessment of Maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Keywords: Madagascar, Maternal and Child health services, Service availability and readiness assessment, Public health facilities. Résumé ..... Table 2: Percentage of Health Facilities Equipped with Tracer Items for Antenatal Care Services Among Facilities. Providing this ... 32 CSBs, due to its location in a tourist area.

  9. Remedial action and waste disposal project - ERDF readiness evaluation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casbon, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    This Readiness Evaluation Report presents the results of the project readiness evaluation to assess the readiness of the Environmental Restoration and Disposal Facility. The evaluation was conducted at the conclusion of a series of readiness activities that began in January 1996. These activities included completion of the physical plant; preparation, review, and approval of operating procedures; definition and assembly of the necessary project and operational organizations; and activities leading to regulatory approval of the plant and operating plans

  10. Computer modeling of the combined effects of perfusion, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity on tissue heating patterns in radiofrequency tumor ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Liu, Zhengjun; Humphries, Stanley; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2008-11-01

    To use an established computer simulation model of radiofrequency (RF) ablation to characterize the combined effects of varying perfusion, and electrical and thermal conductivity on RF heating. Two-compartment computer simulation of RF heating using 2-D and 3-D finite element analysis (ETherm) was performed in three phases (n = 88 matrices, 144 data points each). In each phase, RF application was systematically modeled on a clinically relevant template of application parameters (i.e., varying tumor and surrounding tissue perfusion: 0-5 kg/m(3)-s) for internally cooled 3 cm single and 2.5 cm cluster electrodes for tumor diameters ranging from 2-5 cm, and RF application times (6-20 min). In the first phase, outer thermal conductivity was changed to reflect three common clinical scenarios: soft tissue, fat, and ascites (0.5, 0.23, and 0.7 W/m- degrees C, respectively). In the second phase, electrical conductivity was changed to reflect different tumor electrical conductivities (0.5 and 4.0 S/m, representing soft tissue and adjuvant saline injection, respectively) and background electrical conductivity representing soft tissue, lung, and kidney (0.5, 0.1, and 3.3 S/m, respectively). In the third phase, the best and worst combinations of electrical and thermal conductivity characteristics were modeled in combination. Tissue heating patterns and the time required to heat the entire tumor +/-a 5 mm margin to >50 degrees C were assessed. Increasing background tissue thermal conductivity increases the time required to achieve a 50 degrees C isotherm for all tumor sizes and electrode types, but enabled ablation of a given tumor size at higher tissue perfusions. An inner thermal conductivity equivalent to soft tissue (0.5 W/m- degrees C) surrounded by fat (0.23 W/m- degrees C) permitted the greatest degree of tumor heating in the shortest time, while soft tissue surrounded by ascites (0.7 W/m- degrees C) took longer to achieve the 50 degrees C isotherm, and complete ablation

  11. A Study of Fleet Surgical Teams Readiness Posture in Amphibious Readiness Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tennyson, Ruby

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes and evaluates Fleet Surgical Teams (FSTs). It examines how Navy Medicine adapted FSTs to changing support requirements associated with the Total Health Care Support Readiness Requirement (THCSRR...

  12. Bone Repair and Military Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    yl) propyl ]trimethoxysilane (3TOSU); and 2-(3,4-epoxycyclohexyl)- ethyltrimethoxysilane (ECHE). SilMix [1:1 combination of bis[2-(3{7- oxabicyclo...dissertation entitled, " Synthesis and Analysis of Siloranes for use as a Biomaterial and Extended Twisted Molecular Ribbons" in December 2013. He was...BCIP (5-bromo-4- chloro-3-indolyl phosphate) in ALP buffer (100 mM sodium chloride , 5 mM magnesium chloride , 100 mM Tris-HCl, pH 9.5) was added to the

  13. Category 3 investigation-derived waste Readiness Evaluation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludowise, J.D.

    1996-08-01

    This Readiness Evaluation Plan presents the methodology used to assess the readiness for loading investigation-derived waste (IDW) drums on trucks for transport to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The scope of this Readiness Evaluation Plan includes an assessment of the organizations, procedures, and regulatory approvals necessary for the handling of IDW containers and the subsequent transportation of materials to ERDF

  14. What Are the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks? Information Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACT, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    The ACT College Readiness Benchmarks are the minimum ACT® college readiness assessment scores required for students to have a high probability of success in credit-bearing college courses--English Composition, social sciences courses, College Algebra, or Biology. This report identifies the College Readiness Benchmarks on the ACT Compass scale…

  15. Instructional Alignment of Workplace Readiness Skills in Marketing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sarah J.; Reed, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined high school marketing education teachers' knowledge of workplace readiness skills and whether that knowledge had an impact on student workplace readiness skill achievement. Further, this study examined the usage of Virginia's 13 Workplace Readiness Skills curriculum and identified the teaching methods and instructional…

  16. Diagnostics of children's school readiness in scientific studies abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarenko V.V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problem of children's school readiness as it is represented in contemporary studies of foreign scholars. It displays a variety of approaches to estimation of school readiness as well as the ways of measuring the levels of child development as relating to school readiness, namely those of them which are in common practice in education.

  17. Academic Training: QCD: are we ready for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 4, 5, 6, 7 December, from 11:00 to 12:00 4, 5, 6 December - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, 7 December - TH Auditorium, bldg. 4 - 3-006 QCD: are we ready for the LHC S. FRIXIONE / INFN, Genoa, Italy The LHC energy regime poses a serious challenge to our capability of predicting QCD reactions to the level of accuracy necessary for a successful programme of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In these lectures, I'll introduce basic concepts in QCD, and present techniques based on perturbation theory, such as fixed-order and resummed computations, and Monte Carlo simulations. I'll discuss applications of these techniques to hadron-hadron processes, concentrating on recent trends in perturbative QCD aimed at improving our understanding of LHC phenomenology.

  18. Electronic remote blood issue combined with a computer-controlled, automated refrigerator for major surgery in operating theatres at a distance from the transfusion service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlicchi, Franco; Pacilli, Pasqua; Bragliani, Arianna; Rapuano, Silvia; Dini, Daniele; Vincenzi, Daniele

    2018-02-01

    The difficulty of supplying red blood cells within an adequate time to patients undergoing surgery is a known problem for transfusion services, particularly if the operating theater is located at some distance from the blood bank. The consequences frequently are that more blood is ordered than required; several units are allocated and issued; and unused units must be returned to the blood bank. Some sparse reports have demonstrated that remote blood issue systems can improve the efficiency of issuing blood. This study describes a computer-controlled, self-service, remote blood-release system, combined with an automated refrigerator, installed in a hospital at which major surgery was performed, located 5 kilometers away from the transfusion service. With this system, red blood cell units were electronically allocated to patients immediately before release, when the units actually were needed. Two 2-year periods, before and after implementation of the system, were compared. After implementation of the system, the ratio of red blood cell units returned to the transfusion service was reduced from 48.9% to 1.6% of the issued units (8852 of 18,090 vs. 182 of 11,152 units; p blood cell units was observed, probably mainly due to changes in the number and complexity of surgical procedures. No transfusion errors occurred in the two periods. The current results demonstrate that the remote blood-release system is safe and useful for improving the efficiency of blood issue for patients in remote operating theatres. © 2017 AABB.

  19. Common spatial pattern combined with kernel linear discriminate and generalized radial basis function for motor imagery-based brain computer interface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmatmanesh, Amin; Jamaloo, Fatemeh; Wu, Huapeng; Handroos, Heikki; Kilpeläinen, Asko

    2018-04-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) can be a challenge for developing of robotic, prosthesis and human-controlled systems. This work focuses on the implementation of a common spatial pattern (CSP) base algorithm to detect event related desynchronization patterns. Utilizing famous previous work in this area, features are extracted by filter bank with common spatial pattern (FBCSP) method, and then weighted by a sensitive learning vector quantization (SLVQ) algorithm. In the current work, application of the radial basis function (RBF) as a mapping kernel of linear discriminant analysis (KLDA) method on the weighted features, allows the transfer of data into a higher dimension for more discriminated data scattering by RBF kernel. Afterwards, support vector machine (SVM) with generalized radial basis function (GRBF) kernel is employed to improve the efficiency and robustness of the classification. Averagely, 89.60% accuracy and 74.19% robustness are achieved. BCI Competition III, Iva data set is used to evaluate the algorithm for detecting right hand and foot imagery movement patterns. Results show that combination of KLDA with SVM-GRBF classifier makes 8.9% and 14.19% improvements in accuracy and robustness, respectively. For all the subjects, it is concluded that mapping the CSP features into a higher dimension by RBF and utilization GRBF as a kernel of SVM, improve the accuracy and reliability of the proposed method.

  20. Low-dose X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a combined low-mAs and sparse-view protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Bian, Zhaoying; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Yunwan; Niu, Shanzhou; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2014-06-16

    To realize low-dose imaging in X-ray computed tomography (CT) examination, lowering milliampere-seconds (low-mAs) or reducing the required number of projection views (sparse-view) per rotation around the body has been widely studied as an easy and effective approach. In this study, we are focusing on low-dose CT image reconstruction from the sinograms acquired with a combined low-mAs and sparse-view protocol and propose a two-step image reconstruction strategy. Specifically, to suppress significant statistical noise in the noisy and insufficient sinograms, an adaptive sinogram restoration (ASR) method is first proposed with consideration of the statistical property of sinogram data, and then to further acquire a high-quality image, a total variation based projection onto convex sets (TV-POCS) method is adopted with a slight modification. For simplicity, the present reconstruction strategy was termed as "ASR-TV-POCS." To evaluate the present ASR-TV-POCS method, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed on a physical phantom. Experimental results have demonstrated that the present ASR-TV-POCS method can achieve promising gains over other existing methods in terms of the noise reduction, contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge detail preservation.

  1. The benefit of combining a deep neural network architecture with ideal ratio mask estimation in computational speech segregation to improve speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentsen, Thomas; May, Tobias; Kressner, Abigail A; Dau, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    Computational speech segregation attempts to automatically separate speech from noise. This is challenging in conditions with interfering talkers and low signal-to-noise ratios. Recent approaches have adopted deep neural networks and successfully demonstrated speech intelligibility improvements. A selection of components may be responsible for the success with these state-of-the-art approaches: the system architecture, a time frame concatenation technique and the learning objective. The aim of this study was to explore the roles and the relative contributions of these components by measuring speech intelligibility in normal-hearing listeners. A substantial improvement of 25.4 percentage points in speech intelligibility scores was found going from a subband-based architecture, in which a Gaussian Mixture Model-based classifier predicts the distributions of speech and noise for each frequency channel, to a state-of-the-art deep neural network-based architecture. Another improvement of 13.9 percentage points was obtained by changing the learning objective from the ideal binary mask, in which individual time-frequency units are labeled as either speech- or noise-dominated, to the ideal ratio mask, where the units are assigned a continuous value between zero and one. Therefore, both components play significant roles and by combining them, speech intelligibility improvements were obtained in a six-talker condition at a low signal-to-noise ratio.

  2. Development of a model for the rational design of molecular imprinted polymer: Computational approach for combined molecular dynamics/quantum mechanics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Cunku; Li Xin; Guo Zechong; Qi Jingyao

    2009-01-01

    A new rational approach for the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based on the combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanics (QM) calculations is described in this work. Before performing molecular modeling, a virtual library of functional monomers was created containing forty frequently used monomers. The MD simulations were first conducted to screen the top three monomers from virtual library in each porogen-acetonitrile, chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. QM simulations were then performed with an aim to select the optimum monomer and progen solvent in which the QM simulations were carried out; the monomers giving the highest binding energies were chosen as the candidate to prepare MIP in its corresponding solvent. The acetochlor, a widely used herbicide, was chosen as the target analyte. According to the theoretical calculation results, the MIP with acetochlor as template was prepared by emulsion polymerization method using N,N-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAAM) as functional monomer and divinylbenzene (DVB) as cross-linker in chloroform. The synthesized MIP was then tested by equilibrium-adsorption method, and the MIP demonstrated high removal efficiency to the acetochlor. Mulliken charge distribution and 1 H NMR spectroscopy of the synthesized MIP provided insight on the nature of recognition during the imprinting process probing the governing interactions for selective binding site formation at a molecular level. We think the computer simulation method first proposed in this paper is a novel and reliable method for the design and synthesis of MIP.

  3. Prediction of the fertility of stallion frozen-thawed semen using a combination of computer-assisted motility analysis, microscopical observation and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battut, I Barrier; Kempfer, A; Lemasson, N; Chevrier, L; Camugli, S

    2017-07-15

    Spermatozoa from some stallions do not maintain an acceptable fertility after freezing and thawing. The selection of frozen ejaculates that would be suitable for insemination is mainly based on post-thaw motility, but the prediction of fertility remains limited. A recent study in our laboratory has enabled the determination of a new protocol for the evaluation of fresh stallion semen, combining microscopical observation, computer-assisted motility analysis and flow cytometry, and providing a high level of fertility prediction. The purpose of the present experiment was to perform similar investigations on frozen semen. A panel of tests evaluating a large number of compartments or functions of the spermatozoa was applied to a population of 42 stallions, 33 of which showing widely differing fertilities (17-67% pregnancy rate per cycle [PRC]). Variability was evaluated by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV=SD/mean) and the intra-class correlation or "repeatability" for each variable. For paired variables, mean within-stallion CV% was significantly lower than between-stallion CV%, which was significantly lower than total CV%. Within-ejaculate repeatability, determined by analysing 6 straws for each of 10 ejaculates, ranged from 0.60 to 0.97. Within-stallion repeatability, determined by analysing at least 5 ejaculates for each of 38 stallions, ranged from 0.12 to 0.95. Principal component regression using a combination of 25 variables, including motility, morphology, viability, oxidation level, acrosome integrity, DNA integrity and hypoosmotic resistance, accounted for 94.5% of the variability regarding fertility, and was used to calculate a prediction of the PRC with a mean standard deviation of 2.2. The difference between the observed PRC and the calculated value ranged from -3.4 to 4.2. The 90% confidence interval (90CI) for the prediction of the PRC for the stallions of unknown fertility ranged from 8 to 30 (mean = 17). The best-fit model using only

  4. Computer Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur AĞAOĞLU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is crucial that gifted and talented students should be supported by different educational methods for their interests and skills. The science and arts centres (gifted centres provide the Supportive Education Program for these students with an interdisciplinary perspective. In line with the program, an ICT lesson entitled “Computer Tree” serves for identifying learner readiness levels, and defining the basic conceptual framework. A language teacher also contributes to the process, since it caters for the creative function of the basic linguistic skills. The teaching technique is applied for 9-11 aged student level. The lesson introduces an evaluation process including basic information, skills, and interests of the target group. Furthermore, it includes an observation process by way of peer assessment. The lesson is considered to be a good sample of planning for any subject, for the unpredicted convergence of visual and technical abilities with linguistic abilities.

  5. The relationship between assessment methods and self-directed learning readiness in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Katherine S

    2016-03-11

    This research explored the assessment of self-directed learning readiness within the comprehensive evaluation of medical students' knowledge and skills and the extent to which several variables predicted participants' self-directed learning readiness prior to their graduation. Five metrics for evaluating medical students were considered in a multiple regression analysis. Fourth-year medical students at a competitive US medical school received an informed consent and an online survey. Participants voluntarily completed a self-directed learning readiness scale that assessed four subsets of self-directed learning readiness and consented to the release of their academic records. The assortment of metrics considered in this study only vaguely captured students' self-directedness. The strongest predictors were faculty evaluations of students' performance on clerkship rotations. Specific clerkship grades were mildly predictive of three subscales. The Pediatrics clerkship modestly predicted critical self-evaluation (r=-.30, p=.01) and the Psychiatry clerkship mildly predicted learning self-efficacy (r =-.30, p=.01), while the Junior Surgery clerkship nominally correlated with participants' effective organization for learning (r=.21, p=.05). Other metrics examined did not contribute to predicting participants' readiness for self-directed learning. Given individual differences among participants for the variables considered, no combination of students' grades and/or test scores overwhelmingly predicted their aptitude for self-directed learning. Considering the importance of fostering medical students' self-directed learning skills, schools need a reliable and pragmatic approach to measure them. This data analysis, however, offered no clear-cut way of documenting students' self-directed learning readiness based on the evaluation metrics included.

  6. Die spacer thickness reproduction for central incisor crown fabrication with combined computer-aided design and 3D printing technology: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Lisa N; Thompson, Geoffrey A; Cho, Seok-Hwan; Berzins, David W; Ahn, Kwang Woo

    2015-05-01

    The inability to control die spacer thickness has been reported. However, little information is available on the congruency between the computer-aided design parameters for die spacer thickness and the actual printout. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the die spacer thickness achieved by combining computer-aided design and 3-dimensional printing technology. An ivorine maxillary central incisor was prepared for a ceramic crown. The prepared tooth was duplicated by using polyvinyl siloxane duplicating silicone, and 80 die-stone models were produced from Type IV dental stone. The dies were randomly divided into 5 groups with assigned die spacer thicknesses of 25 μm, 45 μm, 65 μm, 85 μm, and 105 μm (n=16). The printed resin copings, obtained from a printer (ProJet DP 3000; 3D Systems), were cemented onto their respective die-stone models with self-adhesive resin cement and stored at room temperature until sectioning into halves in a buccolingual direction. The internal gap was measured at 5 defined locations per side of the sectioned die. Images of the printed resin coping/die-stone model internal gap dimensions were obtained with an inverted bright field metallurgical microscope at ×100 magnification. The acquired digital image was calibrated, and measurements were made using image analysis software. Mixed models (α=.05) were used to evaluate accuracy. A false discovery rate at 5% was used to adjust for multiple testing. Coefficient of variation was used to determine the precision for each group and was evaluated statistically with the Wald test (α=.05). The accuracy, expressed in terms of the mean differences between the prescribed die spacer thickness and the measured internal gap (standard deviation), was 50 μm (11) for the 25 μm group simulated die spacer thickness, 30 μm (10) for the 45 μm group, 15 μm (14) for the 65 μm group, 3 μm (23) for the 85 μm group, and -10 μm (32) for the 105 μm group. The

  7. Programa computacional para o dimensionamento de colhedoras considerando a pontualidade na colheita de soja Computer model to select combine harvesters considering the timeliness of soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iackson O. Borges

    2006-04-01

    profit, which is called indirect costs. The problem of selecting the agricultural machinery is the commitment between adjusting the cost of the invested extra capital in the machine capacity in order to finish the work in the optimum date and the cost of losses by delaying the operation, seeking to maximize the net profit. Due to the crop importance and the indirect cost caused by the delay in the harvest, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influences suffered because of the delay in the fleet planning and harvest operation costs. For this purpose, a computer model in Borland Delphi 5.0 language was developed where the characteristics of the agro climatic region, the combine harvesters and the soy cultivars are included in the data entrance. The net profit is the result and it works as the indicator for the indirect cost in the operation for the selected combine harvester. The program was used in order to simulate scenarios in a property of Ponta Grossa (PR region and the values showed that the obtained net profit is below the potential because the combine harvesters of the property work in a lower capacity.

  8. A database application for the Naval Command Physical Readiness Testing Program

    OpenAIRE

    Quinones, Frances M.

    1998-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited 1T21 envisions a Navy with tandardized, state-of-art computer systems. Based on this vision, Naval database management systems will also need to become standardized among Naval commands. Today most commercial off the shelf (COTS) database management systems provide a graphical user interface. Among the many Naval database systems currently in use, the Navy's Physical Readiness Program database has continued to exist at the command leve...

  9. Galaxy CloudMan: delivering cloud compute clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afgan, Enis; Baker, Dannon; Coraor, Nate; Chapman, Brad; Nekrutenko, Anton; Taylor, James

    2010-12-21

    Widespread adoption of high-throughput sequencing has greatly increased the scale and sophistication of computational infrastructure needed to perform genomic research. An alternative to building and maintaining local infrastructure is "cloud computing", which, in principle, offers on demand access to flexible computational infrastructure. However, cloud computing resources are not yet suitable for immediate "as is" use by experimental biologists. We present a cloud resource management system that makes it possible for individual researchers to compose and control an arbitrarily sized compute cluster on Amazon's EC2 cloud infrastructure without any informatics requirements. Within this system, an entire suite of biological tools packaged by the NERC Bio-Linux team (http://nebc.nerc.ac.uk/tools/bio-linux) is available for immediate consumption. The provided solution makes it possible, using only a web browser, to create a completely configured compute cluster ready to perform analysis in less than five minutes. Moreover, we provide an automated method for building custom deployments of cloud resources. This approach promotes reproducibility of results and, if desired, allows individuals and labs to add or customize an otherwise available cloud system to better meet their needs. The expected knowledge and associated effort with deploying a compute cluster in the Amazon EC2 cloud is not trivial. The solution presented in this paper eliminates these barriers, making it possible for researchers to deploy exactly the amount of computing power they need, combined with a wealth of existing analysis software, to handle the ongoing data deluge.

  10. Providing a Framework for E-readiness Assessment and Action for E-Commerce in Ramak Dairy Company in Shiraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to provide a framework to assess the e-readiness of Ramak Company in Shiraz. To that end, after reviewing the related literature in the field of e-readiness and selecting the proper model, the model parameters were distributed among experts in the form of a questionnaire, and with the help of fuzzy screening, 49 indicators were finalized. Then, using the combination method of DEMATEL and Analysis of Network process, weight of the indicators was obtained. Finally, e-readiness of the indicators was investigated through proper statistical tests. The analysis indicated that the company had necessary preparation in the following indicators “market share of company” and “compliance with quality of ICT international standards”, “high bandwidth availability” and “diversity of communication channels available”, “quality of national wide ICT infrastructures” and “obstacles of trade investment” and any other observation. By doing the gap analysis, it was found that the dimensions of external environment readiness, the ICT readiness and external environment readiness, respectively had the highest priorities for enforcement action.

  11. STS-114: Discovery Launch Readiness Press Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Michael Griffin, NASA Administrator; Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Deputy Program Manager; Mike Wetmore, Director of Shuttle Processing; and 1st Lieutenant Mindy Chavez, Launch Weather Officer-United States Air Force 45th Weather Squadron are in attendance for this STS-114 Discovery launch readiness press conference. The discussion begins with Wayne Hale bringing to the table a low level sensor device for everyone to view. He talks in detail about all of the extensive tests that were performed on these sensors and the completion of these ambient tests. Chavez presents her weather forecast for the launch day of July 26th 2005. Michael Griffin and Wayne Hale answer questions from the news media pertaining to the sensors and launch readiness. The video ends with footage of Pilot Jim Kelly and Commander Eileen Collins conducting test flights in a Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) that simulates Space Shuttle landing.

  12. Medical Readiness of the Reserve Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    a public service of the RAND Corporation. CHILDREN AND FAMILIES EDUCATION AND THE ARTS ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE INFRASTRUCTURE...Health and Nutrition Examination Survey showed that from 1999 to 2002, 27 percent of those 20 to 39 years old and 21 percent of those 40 to 59 years old...readiness; these include tests for Glu- cose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase or hemoglobin S (sickle cell disease), but they are not part of the DoD core

  13. The Pediatrician's Role in Optimizing School Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    School readiness includes not only the early academic skills of children but also their physical health, language skills, social and emotional development, motivation to learn, creativity, and general knowledge. Families and communities play a critical role in ensuring children's growth in all of these areas and thus their readiness for school. Schools must be prepared to teach all children when they reach the age of school entry, regardless of their degree of readiness. Research on early brain development emphasizes the effects of early experiences, relationships, and emotions on creating and reinforcing the neural connections that are the basis for learning. Pediatricians, by the nature of their relationships with families and children, may significantly influence school readiness. Pediatricians have a primary role in ensuring children's physical health through the provision of preventive care, treatment of illness, screening for sensory deficits, and monitoring nutrition and growth. They can promote and monitor the social-emotional development of children by providing anticipatory guidance on development and behavior, by encouraging positive parenting practices, by modeling reciprocal and respectful communication with adults and children, by identifying and addressing psychosocial risk factors, and by providing community-based resources and referrals when warranted. Cognitive and language skills are fostered through timely identification of developmental problems and appropriate referrals for services, including early intervention and special education services; guidance regarding safe and stimulating early education and child care programs; and promotion of early literacy by encouraging language-rich activities such as reading together, telling stories, and playing games. Pediatricians are also well positioned to advocate not only for children's access to health care but also for high-quality early childhood education and evidence-based family supports such as

  14. Ready for kindergarten: Are intelligence skills enough?

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Fitzpatrick

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how different profiles of kindergarten readiness in terms of student intellectual ability, academic skills and classroom engagement relate to future academic performance. Participants are French-Canadian children followed in the context of the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (N = 670). Trained examiners measured number knowledge, receptive vocabulary and fluid intelligence when children were in kindergarten. Teachers rated kindergarten classroom engageme...

  15. Technology Readiness for the Smart Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkham, Harold; Marinovici, Maria C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Lindsey, K.; McBride, James; Clark, G. L.

    2013-06-30

    Reluctance to adopt new technology into a utility application is understandable, given the critical nature of the infrastructure and the less-than-ideal experiences of some power companies. The authors of this paper have considered adapting the NASA approach of classifying technology readiness, but find it not quite appropriate because NASA was both the developer and the eventual user of the new technology it was evaluating, whereas a utility is ordinarily in the mode of a customer, acquiring a new product from a manufacturer. Instead of a generic scale of technology readiness, a scale of readiness is proposed specifically for the smart grid, based on the many standards that exist for the relevant technologies. In this paper we present an overall structure for organization those standards. The acceptance of new technology is organized into five SGL (Smart Grid Level) steps, numbered five through 9 to correspond approximately to the last five numbers of the NASA TRL scale. SGL 5 is a certification that the hardware and software of the technology is safe for the system into which is intended to be placed. SGL 6 is documentation that the system is safe for itself, and will have adequate reliability. It is thus clear that the steps differ from NASA’s TRL in that technology development is not required, the transition is more one of documenting already existing system readiness. Since SGL 6 describes a system that is safe for the power system and for itself, it should not be restricted from being in a pilot-scale study, and achieving SGL 7. A larger-scale demonstration in a realistic environment will demonstrate interoperability and achieve SGL 8. Only when systems are installed and operating, and when disposal plans are in place will the designation of fully operable at SGL 9 be granted.

  16. Shelf-Life Specifications for Mission Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    R applies to this item. Arthur D Little t.𔃻.., 4-48 NSN: 7930009353794 Name: Polish , Plastic Description: White lotion with a slight odor Intended...MISSION READINESS TC•T I AR16 19931 Abstract The Navy disposes of tons of hazardous material as hazardous waste due to the expiration of excessively...of hazardous material as hazardous waste due to the expiration of excessively conservati’e shielf-Ihfe terms. In order to reduce this occurrence, the

  17. Human Resource Information System implementation readiness in the Ethiopian health sector: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilu, Eyilachew; Gebreslassie, Measho; Kebede, Mihiretu

    2017-12-20

    Health workforce information systems in low-income countries tend to be defective with poor relationship to information sources. Human Resource Information System (HRIS) is currently in a pilot implementation phase in the Federal Ministry of Health and Regional Health Bureaus of Ethiopia. Before scaling up the implementation, it is important to understand the implementation readiness of hospitals and health departments. The aims of this study were to assess the readiness for HRIS implementation, identify associated factors, and explore the implementation challenges in public hospitals and health departments of the Amhara National Regional State, Ethiopia. An institution-based cross-sectional study supplemented with a qualitative study was conducted from the 15th of February to the 30th of March 2016 in 19 public hospitals and health departments of the Amhara National Regional State, Ethiopia. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. The questionnaire includes items on socio-demographic characteristics and questions measuring technical, personal, and organizational factors adapted from the 32-item questionnaire of the Management Science for Health (MSH) HRIS readiness assessment tool. The data were entered and analyzed with statistical software. Descriptive statistics and bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. Odds ratios with 95% confidence interval were computed to identify the factors statistically associated with readiness of HRIS implementation. In-depth interviews and observation checklists were used to collect qualitative data. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. A total of 246 human resource (HR) employees and 16 key informants have been included in the study. The HR employee's level of readiness for HRIS implementation in this study was 35.8%. Employee's Internet access (AOR = 2.59, 95%CI = 1.19, 5.62), availability of separate HR section (AOR = 8.08, 95%CI

  18. Determining the spill flow discharge of combined sewer overflows using rating curves based on computational fluid dynamics instead of the standard weir equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fach, S; Sitzenfrei, R; Rauch, W

    2009-01-01

    It is state of the art to evaluate and optimise sewer systems with urban drainage models. Since spill flow data is essential in the calibration process of conceptual models it is important to enhance the quality of such data. A wide spread approach is to calculate the spill flow volume by using standard weir equations together with measured water levels. However, these equations are only applicable to combined sewer overflow (CSO) structures, whose weir constructions correspond with the standard weir layout. The objective of this work is to outline an alternative approach to obtain spill flow discharge data based on measurements with a sonic depth finder. The idea is to determine the relation between water level and rate of spill flow by running a detailed 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Two real world CSO structures have been chosen due to their complex structure, especially with respect to the weir construction. In a first step the simulation results were analysed to identify flow conditions for discrete steady states. It will be shown that the flow conditions in the CSO structure change after the spill flow pipe acts as a controlled outflow and therefore the spill flow discharge cannot be described with a standard weir equation. In a second step the CFD results will be used to derive rating curves which can be easily applied in everyday practice. Therefore the rating curves are developed on basis of the standard weir equation and the equation for orifice-type outlets. Because the intersection of both equations is not known, the coefficients of discharge are regressed from CFD simulation results. Furthermore, the regression of the CFD simulation results are compared with the one of the standard weir equation by using historic water levels and hydrographs generated with a hydrodynamic model. The uncertainties resulting of the wide spread use of the standard weir equation are demonstrated.

  19. Impact of Thin-Section Computed Tomography-Determined Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema on Outcomes Among Patients With Resected Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Naozumi; Iwano, Shingo; Kawaguchi, Koji; Fukui, Takayuki; Fukumoto, Koichi; Nakamura, Shota; Mori, Shunsuke; Sakamoto, Koji; Wakai, Kenji; Yokoi, Kohei; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-08-01

    There is only limited information on the clinical impact of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) on postoperative and survival outcomes among patients with resected lung cancer. In a retrospective analysis, data were reviewed from 685 patients with resected lung cancer between 2006 and 2011. The clinical impact of thin-section computed tomography (TSCT)-determined emphysema, fibrosis, and CPFE on postoperative and survival outcomes was evaluated. The emphysema group comprised 32.4% of the study population, the fibrosis group 2.8%, and the CPFE group 8.3%. The CPFE group had a more advanced pathologic stage and higher prevalence of squamous cell carcinoma as compared with the normal group without emphysema or fibrosis findings on TSCT. The incidence of postoperative complications was significantly higher in the CPFE group. Overall, the 30-day mortality in the CPFE group was 5.3%. Cancer recurrence at pathologic stage I and death due to either cancer or other causes were significantly higher in the CPFE group. Survival curves indicated that a finding of CPFE was associated with worse overall survival for patients with any stage disease. Multivariate analysis suggested that pathologic stage and CPFE were independent factors associated with worse overall survival. The adjusted hazard ratio of overall survival for the CPFE group versus the normal group was 2.990 (95% confidence interval: 1.801 to 4.962). Among patients with resected lung cancer, the presence of TSCT-determined CPFE might predict worse postoperative and survival outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Differentiation between malignant and benign solitary pulmonary nodules: Use of volume first-pass perfusion and combined with routine computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Fei, E-mail: shanfeiqz@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, 185, Juqian Road, Changzhou, Zip Code: 213003 (China); Zhang, Zhiyong, E-mail: zhangzy@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University, 180, Fenglin Road, Shanghai, Zip Code: 200032 (China); Xing, Wei, E-mail: suzhxingwei@126.com [Department of Radiology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, 185, Juqian Road, Changzhou, Zip Code: 213003 (China); Qiu, Jianguo, E-mail: step9999@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, 185, Juqian Road, Changzhou, Zip Code: 213003 (China); Yang, Shan, E-mail: yang.shan@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University, 180, Fenglin Road, Shanghai, Zip Code: 200032 (China); Wang, Jian, E-mail: wang.jian@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University, 180, Fenglin Road, Shanghai, Zip Code: 200032 (China); Jiang, Yaping, E-mail: jiang.yaping@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University, 180, Fenglin Road, Shanghai, Zip Code: 200032 (China); Chen, Gang, E-mail: chen.gang@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University, 180, Fenglin Road, Shanghai, Zip Code: 200032 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the capability of first-pass volume perfusion computed tomography (PCT) for differentiation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) and to compare that of combination of PCT and routine CT with CT alone for the differentiation. Materials and methods: Our institutional review board approved this study and informed consent was obtained. With nine excluded, 65 consecutive patients having a SPN with histopathologic proof or follow-up underwent a 30 s PCT using the deconvolution model were evaluated. Kruskal-Wallis tests and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis were underwent. Four radiologists assessed nodules independently and retrospectively. Diagnostic capability was compared for CT alone and PCT plus CT. ROC analysis, McNemar test, and weighted kappa statistics were performed. Results: Significant differences were found in parameters between malignant and benign nodules (p < 0.0001 for blood flow, blood volume, and permeability surface area product), SPNs were more likely to be malignant by using threshold values of more than 55 ml/100 g/min, 2.5 ml/100 g, and 10 ml/100 g/min, respectively. PCT plus CT was significantly better in overall sensitivity (93%, p = 0.004) and accuracy (94%, p = 0.003) compared to CT alone, not specificity (96%). Area under the curve for ROC analyses of PCT plus CT was significantly larger than that of CT alone (p = 0.018). Mean weighted kappa for PCT plus CT was 0.715, that for CT alone was 0.447. Conclusion: Volume first-pass PCT can distinguish SPNs. Using PCT plus routine CT may be more sensitive and accurate for differentiating malignant from benign nodules than CT alone and allows more confidence and constancy.

  1. Human in vitro 3D co-culture model to engineer vascularized bone-mimicking tissues combining computational tools and statistical experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Arrigoni, Chiara; Talò, Giuseppe; Zamai, Moreno; Zagra, Luigi; Caiolfa, Valeria; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The generation of functional, vascularized tissues is a key challenge for both tissue engineering applications and the development of advanced in vitro models analyzing interactions among circulating cells, endothelium and organ-specific microenvironments. Since vascularization is a complex process guided by multiple synergic factors, it is critical to analyze the specific role that different experimental parameters play in the generation of physiological tissues. Our goals were to design a novel meso-scale model bridging the gap between microfluidic and macro-scale studies, and high-throughput screen the effects of multiple variables on the vascularization of bone-mimicking tissues. We investigated the influence of endothelial cell (EC) density (3-5 Mcells/ml), cell ratio among ECs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and osteo-differentiated MSCs (1:1:0, 10:1:0, 10:1:1), culture medium (endothelial, endothelial + angiopoietin-1, 1:1 endothelial/osteo), hydrogel type (100%fibrin, 60%fibrin+40%collagen), tissue geometry (2 × 2 × 2, 2 × 2 × 5 mm(3)). We optimized the geometry and oxygen gradient inside hydrogels through computational simulations and we analyzed microvascular network features including total network length/area and vascular branch number/length. Particularly, we employed the "Design of Experiment" statistical approach to identify key differences among experimental conditions. We combined the generation of 3D functional tissue units with the fine control over the local microenvironment (e.g. oxygen gradients), and developed an effective strategy to enable the high-throughput screening of multiple experimental parameters. Our approach allowed to identify synergic correlations among critical parameters driving microvascular network development within a bone-mimicking environment and could be translated to any vascularized tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Differentiation between malignant and benign solitary pulmonary nodules: Use of volume first-pass perfusion and combined with routine computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Fei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Xing, Wei; Qiu, Jianguo; Yang, Shan; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the capability of first-pass volume perfusion computed tomography (PCT) for differentiation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) and to compare that of combination of PCT and routine CT with CT alone for the differentiation. Materials and methods: Our institutional review board approved this study and informed consent was obtained. With nine excluded, 65 consecutive patients having a SPN with histopathologic proof or follow-up underwent a 30 s PCT using the deconvolution model were evaluated. Kruskal–Wallis tests and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis were underwent. Four radiologists assessed nodules independently and retrospectively. Diagnostic capability was compared for CT alone and PCT plus CT. ROC analysis, McNemar test, and weighted kappa statistics were performed. Results: Significant differences were found in parameters between malignant and benign nodules (p < 0.0001 for blood flow, blood volume, and permeability surface area product), SPNs were more likely to be malignant by using threshold values of more than 55 ml/100 g/min, 2.5 ml/100 g, and 10 ml/100 g/min, respectively. PCT plus CT was significantly better in overall sensitivity (93%, p = 0.004) and accuracy (94%, p = 0.003) compared to CT alone, not specificity (96%). Area under the curve for ROC analyses of PCT plus CT was significantly larger than that of CT alone (p = 0.018). Mean weighted kappa for PCT plus CT was 0.715, that for CT alone was 0.447. Conclusion: Volume first-pass PCT can distinguish SPNs. Using PCT plus routine CT may be more sensitive and accurate for differentiating malignant from benign nodules than CT alone and allows more confidence and constancy.

  3. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with whole-body computed tomographic angiography in critically ill patients with suspected severe sepsis with no definite diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandry, Damien [CHU Nancy, Pole d' imagerie, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM, UMR 947, Nancy (France); Tatopoulos, Alexis; Lemarie, Jeremie; Bollaert, Pierre-Edouard; Gibot, Sebastien [University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); CHU de Nancy - Hopital Central, Service de Reanimation Medicale, Nancy (France); INSERM, UMR 1116, Nancy (France); Chevalier-Mathias, Elodie [CHU Nancy, Pole d' imagerie, Nancy (France); INSERM, UMR 947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep, Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Roch, Veronique [CHU Nancy, Pole d' imagerie, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep, Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Olivier, Pierre [CHU Nancy, Pole d' imagerie, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep, Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHU Nancy, Pole d' imagerie, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM, UMR 1116, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep, Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France)

    2014-10-15

    Timely identification of septic foci is critical in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock of unknown origin. This prospective pilot study aimed to assess {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), combined with whole-body computed tomographic angiography (CTA), in patients with suspected severe sepsis and for whom the prior diagnostic workup had been inconclusive. Patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit with a suspected severe sepsis but no definite diagnosis after 48 h of extensive investigations were prospectively included and referred for a whole body FDG-PET/CTA. Results from FDG-PET/CTA were assessed according to the final diagnosis obtained after follow-up and additional diagnostic workup. Seventeen patients were prospectively included, all on mechanical ventilation and 14 under vasopressor drugs. The FDG-PET/CTA exam 1) was responsible for only one desaturation and one hypotension, both quickly reversible under treatment; 2) led to suspect 16 infectious sites among which 13 (81 %) could be confirmed by further diagnostic procedures; and 3) triggered beneficial changes in the medical management of 12 of the 17 study patients (71 %). The FDG-PET/CTA images showed a single or predominant infectious focus in two cases where CTA was negative and in three cases where CTA exhibited multiple possible foci. Whole-body FDG-PET/CTA appears to be feasible, relatively safe, and provides reliable and useful information, when prospectively planned in patients with suspected severe sepsis and for whom prior diagnostic workup had been inconclusive. The FDG-PET images are particularly helpful when CTA exhibits no or multiple possible sites. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of Combined X-Ray Radiography and Magnetic Resonance (XMR) Imaging-Versus Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for the Evaluation of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acher, Peter; Rhode, Kawal; Morris, Stephen; Gaya, Andrew; Miquel, Marc; Popert, Rick; Tham, Ivan; Nichol, Janette; McLeish, Kate; Deehan, Charles; Dasgupta, Prokar; Beaney, Ronald; Keevil, Stephen F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To present a method for the dosimetric analysis of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants using a combination of stereoscopic X-ray radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (XMR) in an XMR facility, and to compare the clinical results between XMR- and computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Patients who had received nonstranded iodine-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy implants underwent XMR and CT imaging 4 weeks later. Four observers outlined the prostate gland on both sets of images. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were derived, and agreement was compared among the observers and between the modalities. Results: A total of 30 patients were evaluated. Inherent XMR registration based on prior calibration and optical tracking required a further automatic seed registration step that revealed a median root mean square registration error of 4.2 mm (range, 1.6-11.4). The observers agreed significantly more closely on prostate base and apex positions as well as outlining contours on the MR images than on those from CT. Coefficients of variation were significantly higher for observed prostate volumes, D90, and V100 parameters on CT-based dosimetry as opposed to XMR. The XMR-based dosimetry showed little agreement with that from CT for all observers, with D90 95% limits of agreement ranges of 65, 118, 79, and 73 Gy for Observers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions: The study results showed that XMR-based dosimetry offers an alternative to other imaging modalities and registration methods with the advantages of MR-based prostate delineation and confident three-dimensional reconstruction of the implant. The XMR-derived dose-volume histograms differ from the CT-derived values and demonstrate less interobserver variability

  5. DOE Richland readiness review for PUREX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamorski, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    For ten months prior to the November 1983 startup of the Plutonium and URanium EXtraction (PUREX) Plant, the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office conducted an operational readiness review of the facility. This review was performed consistent with DOE and RL Order 5481.1 and in accordance with written plans prepared by the program and safety divisions. It involved personnel from five divisions within the office. The DOE review included two tasks: (1) overview and evaluation of the operating contractor's (Rockwell Hanford) readiness review for PUREX, and (2) independent assessment of 25 significant aspects of the startup effort. The RL reviews were coordinated by the program division and were phased in succession with the contractor's readiness review. As deficiencies or concerns were noted in the course of the review they were documented and required formal response from the contractor. Startup approval was given in three steps as the PUREX Plant began operation. A thorough review was performed and necessary documentation was prepared to support startup authorization in November 1983, before the scheduled startup date

  6. NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

  7. Assessing students' readiness towards e-learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Nasrudin Md; Yusoff, Siti Hawa Mohd; Latif, Shahida Abd

    2014-07-01

    The usage of e-Learning methodology has become a new attraction for potential students as shown by some higher learning institutions in Malaysia. As such, Universiti Selangor (Unisel) should be ready to embark on e-Learning teaching and learning in the near future. The purpose of the study is to gauge the readiness of Unisel's students in e-Learning environment. A sample of 110 students was chosen to participate in this study which was conducted in January 2013. This sample consisted of students from various levels of study that are foundation, diploma and degree program. Using a structured questionnaire, respondents were assessed on their basic Internet skills, access to technology required for e-Learning and their attitude towards characteristics of successful e-Learning student based on study habits, abilities, motivation and time management behaviour. The result showed that respondents did have access to technology that are required for e-Learning environment, and respondents were knowledgeable regarding the basic Internet skills. The finding also showed that respondents' attitude did meet all characteristics of successful e-Learning student. Further analysis showed that there is no significant relationshipeither among gender, level of study or faculty with those characteristics. As a conclusion, the study shows that current Unisel's students are ready to participate in e-Learning environment if the institution decided to embark on e-Learning methodology.

  8. NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian K Castle

    2011-02-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

  9. Irradiation of ready made meals -Lasagne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkia, Ines

    2007-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on the microbiological, nutritional, chemical and sensory quality of chilled ready-made meals was assessed. The ready meals used for this experimental work are lasagne. Following arrival at the semi-industrial Cobalt 60 irradiation facility, the meals were either left unirradiated or irradiated with doses of 2 or 4 kGy after which they were stored for up to 23 days at 3C. Results showed that 2 or 4 kGy doses of gamma irradiation decreased the total counts of mesophilic aerobic bacteria and increased the shelf-life of lasagne. In terms of nutritional quality, it was found that losses of vitamin A and E due to irradiation treatment were considerable at 4 kGy. Total acidity, and p H, were all well within the acceptable limit for up to one week for ready meals treated with 2 and 4 kGy whereas peroxide index showed high values at 4 kGy. Sensory results showed no significant differences between the non-irradiated and irradiated meals at 2 kGy. However, the results were less promising at 4 kGy since differences were significant. (Author). 60 refs

  10. Vogtle Unit 1 readiness review: Assessment of Georgia Power Company readiness review pilot program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, G.

    1987-09-01

    Georgia Power Company (GPC) performed a readiness review at Vogtle Unit 1 as a pilot program. The pilot program was a new and innovative approach for the systematic and disciplined review, with senior management involvement, of GPC's implementation of design, construction, and operational readiness processes. The program's principal objective was to increase the level of assurance that quality programs at Vogtle Unit 1 have been accomplished in accordance with regulatory requirements. This report assesses the effectiveness of the GPC's readiness review pilot program (RRPP) at Vogtle Unit 1. It includes (1) an overview of what was experienced during the program's implementation, (2) an assessment of how well program objectives were met, and (3) lessons learned on the future use of the readiness review concept. Overall, GPC and the NRC staff believe that the RRPP at Vogtle Unit 1 was a success and that the program provided significant added assurance that Vogtle Unit 1 licensing commitments and NRC regulations have been adequately implemented. Although altering the NRC licensing review process for the few plants still in the construction pipeline may not be appropriate, licensees may benefit significantly by performing readiness reviews on their own initiative as GPC did for Vogtle. (7 refs.)

  11. Distributed multiscale computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgdorff, J.

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale models combine knowledge, data, and hypotheses from different scales. Simulating a multiscale model often requires extensive computation. This thesis evaluates distributing these computations, an approach termed distributed multiscale computing (DMC). First, the process of multiscale

  12. Preparing for success: Readiness models for rural telehealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennett P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Readiness is an integral and preliminary step in the successful implementation of telehealth services into existing health systems within rural communities. Methods and Materials: This paper details and critiques published international peer-reviewed studies that have focused on assessing telehealth readiness for rural and remote health. Background specific to readiness and change theories is provided, followed by a critique of identified telehealth readiness models, including a commentary on their readiness assessment tools. Results: Four current readiness models resulted from the search process. The four models varied across settings, such as rural outpatient practices, hospice programs, rural communities, as well as government agencies, national associations, and organizations. All models provided frameworks for readiness tools. Two specifically provided a mechanism by which communities could be categorized by their level of telehealth readiness. Discussion: Common themes across models included: an appreciation of practice context, strong leadership, and a perceived need to improve practice. Broad dissemination of these telehealth readiness models and tools is necessary to promote awareness and assessment of readiness. This will significantly aid organizations to facilitate the implementation of telehealth.

  13. Brain-computer interface training combined with transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with chronic severe hemiparesis: Proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasashima-Shindo, Yuko; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Ushiba, Junichi; Matsushika, Yayoi; Kamatani, Daiki; Oto, Misa; Ono, Takashi; Nishimoto, Atsuko; Shindo, Keiichiro; Kawakami, Michiyuki; Tsuji, Tetsuya; Liu, Meigen

    2015-04-01

    Brain-computer interface technology has been applied to stroke patients to improve their motor function. Event-related desynchronization during motor imagery, which is used as a brain-computer interface trigger, is sometimes difficult to detect in stroke patients. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is known to increase event-related desynchronization. This study investigated the adjunctive effect of anodal tDCS for brain-computer interface training in patients with severe hemiparesis. Eighteen patients with chronic stroke. A non-randomized controlled study. Subjects were divided between a brain-computer interface group and a tDCS- brain-computer interface group and participated in a 10-day brain-computer interface training. Event-related desynchronization was detected in the affected hemisphere during motor imagery of the affected fingers. The tDCS-brain-computer interface group received anodal tDCS before brain-computer interface training. Event-related desynchronization was evaluated before and after the intervention. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment upper extremity motor score (FM-U) was assessed before, immediately after, and 3 months after, the intervention. Event-related desynchronization was significantly increased in the tDCS- brain-computer interface group. The FM-U was significantly increased in both groups. The FM-U improvement was maintained at 3 months in the tDCS-brain-computer interface group. Anodal tDCS can be a conditioning tool for brain-computer interface training in patients with severe hemiparetic stroke.

  14. Guidelines for the Interpretation of Results of Microbiological Testing of Ready-to-Eat Foods Placed on the Market (Revision 2)

    OpenAIRE

    Food Safety Authority of Ireland

    2016-01-01

    This document provides guideline microbiological limits for ready-to-eat foods placed on the market. These guideline limits can be used if legal microbiological criteria (Appendix 1) do not exist for a particular combination of food and microorganism. This Guidance Note is intended to be used by: • Food business operators • Enforcement officers, and • Laboratories performing microbiological testing on ready-to-eat foods Food business operators may also use the limits prese...

  15. Radiation Tolerant, FPGA-based SmallSat Computer System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to mature the technology readiness of a radiation tolerant smallsat computer system for a subsequent orbital flight demonstration. The...

  16. The electronic and solvatochromic properties of [Co(L)(bipyridine)2]+ (L = o-catecholato, o-benzenedithiolato) species: a combined experimental and computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioncoloni, Giacomo; Senn, Hans M; Sproules, Stephen; Wilson, Claire; Symes, Mark D

    2016-10-04

    Complexes of Co(iii) containing mixed chelating diimine and o-quinone ligand sets are of fundamental interest on account of their fascinating magnetic and electronic properties. Whilst complexes of this type containing one diimine and two o-quinone ligands have been studied extensively, those with the reverse stoichiometry (two diimines and one o-quinone) are much rarer. Herein, we describe a ready route to the synthesis of the complex [Co III (o-catecholate) (2,2'-bipyridine) 2 ] + (1), and also report the synthesis of [Co III (o-catecholate)(5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) 2 ] + (2) and [Co III (o-benezenedithiolate)(5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) 2 ] + (3) for the first time. Spectroscopic studies show that complex 2 displays intriguing solvatochromic behaviour as a function of solvent hydrogen bond donation ability, a property of this type of complex which has hitherto not been reported. Time-dependent density function theory (TD-DFT) shows that this effect arises as a result of hydrogen bonding between the solvent and the oxygen atoms of the catecholate ligand. In contrast, the sulfur atoms in the benzenedithiolate analogue 3 are much weaker acceptors of hydrogen bonds from the solvent, meaning that complex 3 is only very weakly solvatochromic. Finally, we show that complex 2 has some potential as a molecular probe that can report on the composition of mixed solvent systems as a function of its absorbance spectrum.

  17. A Model of Feeding Readiness for Preterm Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Pickler, Rita H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of bottle feeding readiness in preterm infants, which hypothesizes relationships between bottle feeding readiness, experience, and outcomes. The synactive theory of development provided the conceptual foundation for the model. The model, which is currently being tested, is designed to establish bottle feeding readiness criteria that will help nurses decide when to offer a bottle to a preterm infant The model may also provide a useful framework for deter...

  18. E-health readiness assessment framework in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, M; Vaezi, R; Nattagh, F

    2012-01-01

    Concept of e-readiness is used in many areas such as e-business, e-commerce, e-government, and e-banking. In terms of healthcare, e-readiness is a rather new concept, and is propounded under the title of E-healthcare. E-health readiness refers to the readiness of communities and healthcare institutions for the expected changes brought by programs related to Information and Communications Technology (lCT). The present research is conducted aiming at designing E-health Readiness Assessment Framework (EHRAF) in Iran. The e-health readiness assessment framework was designed based on reviewing literature on e-readiness assessment models and opinions of ICT and health experts. In the next step, Delphi method was used to develop and test the designed framework. Three questionnaires developed to test and modify the model while determining weights of the indices; afterward they were either sent to experts through email or delivered to them in face. The designed framework approved with 4 dimensions, 11 constituents and 58 indices. Technical readiness had the highest importance coefficient (0.256099), and the other dimensions were of the next levels of coefficient importance: core readiness (0.25520), social communication readiness (0.244658), and engagement readiness (0.244039). The framework presents the movement route and investment priorities in e-health in Iran. The proposed framework is a good instrument for measuring the e-readiness in health centers in Iran, and for identifying strengths and weaknesses of these centers to access ICT and its implementation for more effectiveness and for analyzing digital divide between them, as well.

  19. Child Readiness to Kindergarten in Parents and Pedagogues Sight

    OpenAIRE

    POKORNÁ, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    The bachelor thesis deals with the readiness of 3-4 year old children to enter kindergarten. The theoretical part describes the biological and psychosocial development of the child aged three to four years and highlights the various factors that may affect the child's entry into kindergarten. Describes the family and kindergarten, the issue of adaptation in pre-school and readiness of the child to them. The practical part contains research focused on the perception of the readiness of childre...

  20. E-Health Readiness Assessment Framework in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, M; Vaezi, R; Nattagh, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Concept of e-readiness is used in many areas such as e-business, e-commerce, e-government, and e-banking. In terms of healthcare, e-readiness is a rather new concept, and is propounded under the title of E-healthcare. E-health readiness refers to the readiness of communities and healthcare institutions for the expected changes brought by programs related to Information and Communications Technology (lCT). The present research is conducted aiming at designing E-health Readiness Assessment Framework (EHRAF) in Iran. Methods: The e-health readiness assessment framework was designed based on reviewing literature on e-readiness assessment models and opinions of ICT and health experts. In the next step, Delphi method was used to develop and test the designed framework. Three questionnaires developed to test and modify the model while determining weights of the indices; afterward they were either sent to experts through email or delivered to them in face. Results: The designed framework approved with 4 dimensions, 11 constituents and 58 indices. Technical readiness had the highest importance coefficient (0.256099), and the other dimensions were of the next levels of coefficient importance: core readiness (0.25520), social communication readiness (0.244658), and engagement readiness (0.244039). Conclusion: The framework presents the movement route and investment priorities in e-health in Iran. The proposed framework is a good instrument for measuring the e-readiness in health centers in Iran, and for identifying strengths and weaknesses of these centers to access ICT and its implementation for more effectiveness and for analyzing digital divide between them, as well. PMID:23304661

  1. Smart Grid Technology and Consumer Call Center Readiness

    OpenAIRE

    Schamber, Kelsey L.

    2010-01-01

    The following reasearch project deals with utility call center readiness to address customer concerns and questions about the Smart Grid and smart meter technology. Since consumer engagement is important for the benefits of the Smart Grid to be realized, the readiness and ability of utilities to answer consumer questions is an important issue. Assessing the readiness of utility call centers to address pertinant customer concerns was accomplished by calling utility call centers with Smart Grid...

  2. The readiness of employees for the future society. Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena BĂTĂGAN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The main components of sustainable development – economy, ecology and equity – have a special significance to contemporary cities, given their huge consumption and distribution of goods and services, with an ecological impact exceeding their own location. The sustainability challenge to cities, going hand in hand with the quality of life, makes it necessary to consider a series of social, economic, ecological, cultural, political and institutional measures adapted to both global trends and local characteristics.Based on these overall considerations this paper aims to investigate the implications of smart solutions for sustainable city development and to gauge the readiness of employees for smart solutions. These solutions concentrate on the core area of the city administration, education, health, transportation, etc. With this purpose in view, the framework for a case study is built up employing a quantitative and qualitative research for a mid-sized Romanian city. Exploratory research techniques combined with applying a survey methodology have been used for studying the preparation of employees for the smart solutions. A set of derived procedures have been employed for collecting and analyzing more than 400 observations from a heterogeneous population. They have been correlated with indicators able to characterize the sustainable city development, so as to point out the impact of the smart solutions and the possibilities to use their facilities in this respect. The results show that smart solutions are highly recommended for the future sustainable development and they are almost ready to penetrate the city from a technological perspective but information and understanding of citizens with regard to this new way of evolution are still lacking.

  3. Predicting ready biodegradability of premanufacture notice chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boethling, Robert S; Lynch, David G; Thom, Gary C

    2003-04-01

    Chemical substances other than pesticides, drugs, and food additives are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), but the United States does not require that new substances be tested automatically for such critical properties as biodegradability. The resulting lack of submitted data has fostered the development of estimation methods, and the BioWIN models for predicting biodegradability from chemical structure have played a prominent role in premanufacture notice (PMN) review. Until now, validation efforts have used only the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) test data and have not included all models. To assess BioWIN performance with PMN substances, we assembled a database of PMNs for which ready biodegradation data had been submitted over the period 1995 through 2001. The 305 PMN structures are highly varied and pose major challenges to chemical property estimation. Despite the variability of ready biodegradation tests, the use of at least six different test methods, and widely varying quality of submitted data, accuracy of four of six BioWIN models (MITI linear, MITI nonlinear, survey ultimate, survey primary) was in the 80+% range for predicting ready biodegradability. Greater accuracy (>90%) can be achieved by using model estimates only when the four models agree (true for 3/4 of the PMNs). The BioWIN linear and nonlinear probability models did not perform as well even when classification criteria were optimized. The results suggest that the MITI and survey BioWIN models are suitable for use in screening-level applications.

  4. Chasing a Moving Target: Perceptions of Work Readiness and Graduate Capabilities in Music Higher Research Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Scott; Grant, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Recent efforts to increase workplace readiness in university students have largely centred on undergraduates, with comparatively few strategies or studies focusing on higher research degree candidates. In the discipline of music, a wide diversity of possible career paths combined with rapidly changing career opportunities makes workplace readiness…

  5. Focus on Mentee-Mentor Relationships: The 10th Grade Implementation of iMentor's College Ready Program. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Lisa; Kang, David; Siman, Nina; Soltani, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    The iMentor College Ready Program is a model that combines school-based mentoring with technology and aspects of whole school reform. The program aims to create strong relationships between low-income youth and college-educated mentors--and to leverage these relationships to help students develop the mindsets, skills, and knowledge necessary to…

  6. Development of the PRE-HIT instrument: patient readiness to engage in health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Richelle J; Petroski, Gregory F; Canfield, Shannon M; Stuppy, Julie A; Mehr, David R

    2014-01-28

    Technology-based aids for lifestyle change are becoming more prevalent for chronic conditions. Important "digital divides" remain, as well as concerns about privacy, data security, and lack of motivation. Researchers need a way to characterize participants' readiness to use health technologies. To address this need, we created an instrument to measure patient readiness to engage with health technologies among adult patients with chronic conditions. Initial focus groups to determine domains, followed by item development and refinement, and exploratory factor analysis to determine final items and factor structure. The development sample included 200 patients with chronic conditions from 6 family medicine clinics. From 98 potential items, 53 best candidate items were examined using exploratory factor analysis. Pearson's Correlation for Test/Retest reliability at 3 months. The final instrument had 28 items that sorted into 8 factors with associated Cronbach's alpha: 1) Health Information Need (0.84), 2) Computer/Internet Experience (0.87), 3) Computer Anxiety (0.82), 4) Preferred Mode of Interaction (0.73), 5) Relationship with Doctor (0.65), 6) Cell Phone Expertise (0.75), 7) Internet Privacy (0.71), and 8) No News is Good News (0.57). Test-retest reliability for the 8 subscales ranged from (0.60 to 0.85). The Patient Readiness to Engage in Health Internet Technology (PRE-HIT) instrument has good psychometric properties and will be an aid to researchers investigating technology-based health interventions. Future work will examine predictive validity.

  7. Toward the Language-Ready Brain: Biological Evolution and Primate Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    The approach to language evolution suggested here focuses on three questions: How did the human brain evolve so that humans can develop, use, and acquire languages? How can the evolutionary quest be informed by studying brain, behavior, and social interaction in monkeys, apes, and humans? How can computational modeling advance these studies? I hypothesize that the brain is language ready in that the earliest humans had protolanguages but not languages (i.e., communication systems endowed with rich and open-ended lexicons and grammars supporting a compositional semantics), and that it took cultural evolution to yield societies (a cultural constructed niche) in which language-ready brains could become language-using brains. The mirror system hypothesis is a well-developed example of this approach, but I offer it here not as a closed theory but as an evolving framework for the development and analysis of conflicting subhypotheses in the hope of their eventual integration. I also stress that computational modeling helps us understand the evolving role of mirror neurons, not in and of themselves, but only in their interaction with systems "beyond the mirror." Because a theory of evolution needs a clear characterization of what it is that evolved, I also outline ideas for research in neurolinguistics to complement studies of the evolution of the language-ready brain. A clear challenge is to go beyond models of speech comprehension to include sign language and models of production, and to link language to visuomotor interaction with the physical and social world.

  8. Refinement of an Instrument to Assess Readiness for Knowledge Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailey, Landon C

    2007-01-01

    ... for knowledge management. This study culminates in the development and field-testing of the resultant knowledge management readiness instrument, filling in an important gap in contemporary literature.

  9. Manpower Management: No Tiered Readiness - Enabling The Nation’s Force in Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    readiness. The calculus of effectively pulling resources from the DEP must be driven from the FORCESYNCH, but align to institutional plans. The...physically qualified (medical, dental , panorex) 2,D, D,H,Q Pregnancy (after determination by proper authority) N Postpartum (up to six...months after delivery) Dental Class 3 or 4 Physical Evaluation Board determination R E ADMINISTRATIVE End of active

  10. Computer-assisted preoperative simulation for positioning and fixation of plate in 2-stage procedure combining maxillary advancement by distraction technique and mandibular setback surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Suenaga

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The implementation of the computer-assisted preoperative simulation for the positioning and fixation of plate in 2-stage orthognathic procedure using distraction technique and mandibular setback surgery yielded good results.

  11. Application of single-vial ready-for-use formulation of 111In- or 177Lu-labelled somatostatin analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blois, Erik; Chan, Ho Sze; de Zanger, Rory; Konijnenberg, Mark; Breeman, Wouter A P

    2014-02-01

    For the sake of safety it would be desirable to store and transport the ready-for-use liquid formulation (diagnostics and therapeutics) of radiolabelled peptides. The use of ethanol, in combination with a mixture of gentisic- and ascorbic acid, has superior effects on stabilizing radiolabelled somatostatin analogs. As a consequence, (111)In- and (177)Lu-labelled somatostatin analogs can be stored and transported in a single-vial ready-for-use liquid formulation up to 7 days after radiolabelling. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. The SC gets ready for visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Hall 300, which houses the Synchrocyclotron (SC), CERN’s first accelerator, is getting ready to host a brand-new exhibition. The site will be one of the stops on the new visit itineraries that will be inaugurated for the 2013 CERN Open Day.   The Synchrocyclotron through the years. Just as it did in the late 1950s, when the accelerator was first installed, the gigantic red structure of the Synchrocyclotron's magnet occupies a large part of the 300-square-metre hall. “We have completed the first phase of the project that will give the SC a new lease of life,” says Marco Silari, the project leader and a member of CERN’s Radiation Protection Group. “We have removed all the equipment that was not an integral part of the accelerator. The hall is now ready for the civil-engineering work that will precede the installation of the exhibition.” The SC was witness to a big part of the history of CERN. The accelerator produced ...

  13. 101 ready-to-use Excel formulas

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mr. Spreadsheet has done it again with 101 easy-to-apply Excel formulas 101 Ready-to-Use Excel Formulas is filled with the most commonly-used, real-world Excel formulas that can be repurposed and put into action, saving you time and increasing your productivity. Each segment of this book outlines a common business or analysis problem that needs to be solved and provides the actual Excel formulas to solve the problem-along with detailed explanation of how the formulas work. Written in a user-friendly style that relies on a tips and tricks approach, the book details how to perform everyday Excel tasks with confidence. 101 Ready-to-Use Excel Formulas is sure to become your well-thumbed reference to solve your workplace problems. The recipes in the book are structured to first present the problem, then provide the formula solution, and finally show how it works so that it can be customized to fit your needs. The companion website to the book allows readers to easily test the formulas and provides visual confirmat...

  14. G+ COMMUNITY: MEASURING TEACHERS’ READINESS AND ACCEPTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Faisal Farish Ishak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore teachers’ acceptance and readiness in using the cloud-based community as a platform for professional collaboration related to their teaching and learning. Familiarity with certain social networking platforms has made the preferable collaboration among teachers only limited to using Facebook, WhatsApp or Telegram. However, with time and space constraints in schools, some of the sharing sessions could not be done effectively most of the time. The study focuses on teachers’ acceptance and readiness of having their community in the cloud when they were introduced to the platform during a Continuous Professional Development (CPD course. A total number of 61 teachers used Google Community named as ‘Contemporary Children’s Literature (CCL 2016’ as a platform for their Professional Learning Community (PLC during the course. Descriptive analysis was done using Google Sheets and the findings show that these teachers are receptive towards Google Community in terms of its engagement level, usefulness as well as ease of use. The introduction to Google Community has created a new pathway for their collaboration especially for teaching and learning purposes. In a nutshell, their acceptance towards the cloud-based community indicates that, given the right training channel, teachers are positive and opened to utilising and integrating the cloud-based technology in their current teaching practice.

  15. Measuring readiness for and satisfaction with a hand hygiene e-learning course among healthcare workers in a paediatric oncology centre in Guatemala City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Miriam L; Melgar, Mario; Homsi, Maysam; Shuler, Ana; Antillon-Klussmann, Federico; Matheu, Laura; Ramirez, Marylin; Grant, Michael M; Lowther, Deborah L; Relyea, George; Caniza, Miguela A

    2016-01-01

    E-learning has been widely used in the infection control field and has been recommended for use in hand hygiene (HH) programs by the World Health Organization. Such strategies are effective and efficient for infection control, but factors such as learner readiness for this method should be determined to assure feasibility and suitability in low- to middle-income countries. We developed a tailored, e-learning, Spanish-language HH course based on the WHO guidelines for HH in healthcare settings for the pediatric cancer center in Guatemala City. We aimed to identify e-readiness factors that influenced HH course completion and evaluate HCWs' satisfaction. Pearson's chi-square test of independence was used to retrospectively compare e-readiness factors and course-completion status (completed, non-completed, and never-started). We surveyed 194 HCWs for e-readiness; 116 HCWs self-enrolled in the HH course, and 55 responded to the satisfaction survey. Most e-readiness factors were statistically significant between course-completion groups. Moreover, students were significantly more likely to complete the course if they had a computer with an Internet connection (P=0.001) and self-reported comfort with using a computer several times a week (p=0.001) and communicating through online technologies (p=0.001). Previous online course experience was not a significant factor (p=0.819). E-readiness score averages varied among HCWs, and mean scores for all e-readiness factors were significantly higher among medical doctors than among nurses. Nearly all respondents to the satisfaction survey agreed that e-learning was as effective as the traditional teaching method. Evaluating HCWs' e-readiness is essential while integrating technologies into educational programs in low- to middle-income countries.

  16. Self-directed learning readiness of Asian students: students perspective on a hybrid problem based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatemia, Lukas D; Susilo, Astrid P; van Berkel, Henk

    2016-12-03

    To identify the student's readiness to perform self-directed learning and the underlying factors influencing it on the hybrid problem based learning curriculum. A combination of quantitative and qualitative studies was conducted in five medical schools in Indonesia. In the quantitative study, the Self Directed Learning Readiness Scale was distributed to all students in all batches, who had experience with the hybrid problem based curriculum. They were categorized into low- and high -level based on the score of the questionnaire. Three focus group discussions (low-, high-, and mixed level) were conducted in the qualitative study with six to twelve students chosen randomly from each group to find the factors influencing their self-directed learning readiness. Two researchers analysed the qualitative data as a measure of triangulation. The quantitative study showed only half of the students had a high-level of self-directed learning readiness, and a similar trend also occurred in each batch. The proportion of students with a high level of self-directed learning readiness was lower in the senior students compared to more junior students. The qualitative study showed that problem based learning processes, assessments, learning environment, students' life styles, students' perceptions of the topics, and mood, were factors influencing their self-directed learning. A hybrid problem based curriculum may not fully affect the students' self-directed learning. The curriculum system, teacher's experiences, student's background and cultural factors might contribute to the difficulties for the student's in conducting self-directed learning.

  17. Correction: Cecotti, H. and Rivet, B. Subject Combination and Electrode Selection in Cooperative Brain-Computer Interface Based on Event Related Potentials. Brain Sci. 2014, 4, 335–355

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Cecotti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors wish to make the following correction to this paper (Cecotti, H.; Rivet, B. Subject Combination and Electrode Selection in Cooperative Brain-Computer Interface Based on Event Related Potentials. Brain Sci. 2014, 4, 335–355: Due to an internal error, the reference numbers in the original published paper were not shown, and the error was not due to the authors. The former main text should be replaced as below.

  18. Effects of Preschool Intervention Strategies on School Readiness in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Nelson, Regena F.; Shen, Jianping; Krenn, Huilan Y.

    2015-01-01

    Using hierarchical linear modeling, the present study aimed to examine whether targeted intervention strategies implemented individually during a preschool program exhibited any short-term and long-term effects on children's school readiness in kindergarten, utilizing data gathered through the Supporting Partnerships to Assure Ready Kids (SPARK)…

  19. Emotional Intelligence as a Determinant of Readiness for Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzdar, Muhammad Ayub; Ali, Akhtar; Tariq, Riaz Ul Haq

    2016-01-01

    Students' performance in online learning environments is associated with their readiness to adopt a digital learning approach. Traditional concept of readiness for online learning is connected with students' competencies of using technology for learning purposes. We in this research, however, investigated psychometric aspects of students'…

  20. Development of the Writing Readiness Inventory Tool in Context (WRITIC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hartingsveldt, Margo J.; de Vries, Liesbeth; Cup, Edith HC; de Groot, Imelda JM; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria WG

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Writing Readiness Inventory Tool in Context (WRITIC), a measurement evaluating writing readiness in Dutch kindergarten children (5 and 6 years old). Content validity was established through 10 expert evaluations in three rounds. Construct validity was

  1. Readiness towards Entrepreneurship Education: Students and Malaysian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Norasmah; Hashim, Norashidah; Wahid, Hariyaty Ab

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to observe the readiness of students and the internal environment of Malaysian public universities in the implementation of entrepreneurship education. Design/methodology/approach: The authors employed a quantitative approach and the main instrument used to gauge the entrepreneurship readiness among students…

  2. Can NATO's new Very High Readiness Joint Task Force deter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rynning, Sten; Ringsmose, Jens

    2017-01-01

    ” a distinct strategic rival – Russia. Chief among the Welsh summit initiatives was the decision to set up a new multinational spearhead force – the Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF) – as part of an enhanced NATO Response Force (NRF) and within the framework of a so-called Readiness Action Plan (RAP...

  3. 75 FR 16763 - Ready-to-Learn Television Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION [CFDA Number 84.295A] Ready-to-Learn Television Program AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice inviting applications for new awards for... FR 13515) a notice inviting applications for new awards for FY 2010 for the Ready-to-Learn Television...

  4. 75 FR 18170 - Ready-to-Learn Television Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION [CFDA Number 84.295A] Ready-to-Learn Television Program AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice inviting applications for new awards for... FR 13515) a notice inviting applications for new awards for FY 2010 for the Ready-to-Learn Television...

  5. 75 FR 28594 - Ready-to-Learn Television Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION [CFDA Number 84.295A] Ready-to-Learn Television Program AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice inviting applications for new awards for... INFORMATION CONTACT: The Ready-to-Learn Television Program, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue...

  6. External Factors, Internal Factors and Self-Directed Learning Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Nurjannah; Muljono, Pudji; Afendi, Farit M.

    2018-01-01

    There are many factors which affect the level of self-directed learning readiness. This study aims to investigate the relationship between external factors, internal factors and self-directed learning readiness. This study was carried out by using a census method for fourth year students of medical program of Tadulako University. Data were…

  7. Why Do We Need Future Ready Librarians? That Kid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Mark

    2018-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the need of the Future Ready Librarians (FRL) initiative. The FRL Framework helps define how librarians might lead, teach, and support schools based on the core research-based components defined by Future Ready. The framework and initiative are intended to be ways to change the conversation about school…

  8. 47 CFR 15.118 - Cable ready consumer electronics equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable ready consumer electronics equipment. 15... Unintentional Radiators § 15.118 Cable ready consumer electronics equipment. (a) All consumer electronics TV... provisions of this section. Consumer electronics TV receiving equipment that includes features intended for...

  9. e-Learning readiness amongst nursing students at the Durban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marilynne Coopasami

    c Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching, ML Sultan Campus, Durban University of Technology, Durban ... education, technological and equipment readiness require attention before it can be ... strategy; consider the benefits and disadvantages of e- ... using an appropriate tool to measure e-Learning readiness has.

  10. Rice University: Innovation to Increase Student College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    "College readiness" means that a student can enter a college classroom without remediation and successfully complete entry-level college requirements (Conley, 2012). In order for students to be considered college ready, they must acquire skills, content knowledge, and behaviors before leaving high school. Research on high-school performance…

  11. E-Learning Readiness in Public Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouma, Gordon O.; Awuor, Fredrick M.; Kyambo, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    As e-learning becomes useful to learning institutions worldwide, an assessment of e-learning readiness is essential for the successful implementation of e-learning as a platform for learning. Success in e-learning can be achieved by understanding the level of readiness of e-learning environments. To facilitate schools in Kenya to implement…

  12. Students' Readiness for E-Learning Application in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Atousa; Rahbania, Zahra; Attaran, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this research was to investigate the readiness of art students in applying e-learning. This study adopted a survey research design. From three public Iranian Universities (Alzahra, Tarbiat Modares, and Tehran), 347 students were selected by multistage cluster sampling and via Morgan Table. Their readiness for E-learning…

  13. Replacing Remediation with Readiness. An NCPR Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, David T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper critically examines traditional means of assessing college students' need for remediation and suggests as a replacement an expanded definition of college readiness, where readiness is more complex than rudimentary content knowledge and more multifaceted than a single cut point. The paper presents and explains four dimensions of…

  14. Balancing the Readiness Equation in Early Childhood Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    As policy-makers continue to implement early childhood education reforms that frame the field as a mechanism that is to ready children for elementary school success, questions arise as to how the multiple variables in the readiness equation, such as the child, family, and program, are affected by these policies. The instrumental case study…

  15. Assessing air medical crew real-time readiness to perform critical tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braude, Darren; Goldsmith, Timothy; Weiss, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    Air medical transport has had problems with its safety record, attributed in part to human error. Flight crew members (FCMs) must be able to focus on critical safety tasks in the context of a stressful environment. Flight crew members' cognitive readiness (CR) to perform their jobs may be affected by sleep deprivation, personal problems, high workload, and use of alcohol and drugs. The current study investigated the feasibility of using a computer-based cognitive task to assess FCMs' readiness to perform their job. The FCMs completed a short questionnaire to evaluate their physiologic and psychological state at the beginning and end of each shift. The FCMs then performed 3 minutes of a computer-based cognitive task called synthetic work environment (SYNWIN test battery). Task performance was compared with the questionnaire variables using correlation and regression analysis. Differences between the beginning and end of each shift were matched and compared using a paired Students t test. SYNWIN performance was significantly worse at the end of a shift compared with the beginning of the shift (p = 0.028) primarily because of decrement in the memory component. The SYNWIN composite scores were negatively correlated to degree of irritability felt by the participant, both before (r = -0.25) and after (r = -0.34) a shift and were significantly correlated with amount of sleep (0.22), rest (0.30), and life satisfaction (0.30). Performance by FCMs on a simple, rapid, computer-based psychological test correlates well with self-reported sleep, rest, life satisfaction, and irritability. Although further studies are warranted, these findings suggest that assessment of the performance of FCMs on a simple, rapid, computer-based, multitasking battery is feasible as an approach to determine their readiness to perform critical safety tasks through the SYNWIN task battery.

  16. CRITICAL COMPONENTS OF ONLINE LEARNING READINESS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS WITH LEARNER ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun CIGDEM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the relationship between certain factors of online learning readiness and learners’ end-of-course achievements. The study was conducted at a two-year post-secondary Turkish military school within the scope of the course titled Computer Literacy, which was designed and implemented in a blended way. The data were collected from 155 post-secondary military students through an online questionnaire. Three sub-scales of Hung et al.’s Online Learning Readiness Scale were used to collect the data during the first two weeks of the course. Descriptive and inferential statistics, such as Pearson correlation coefficients and linear regression analyses were performed to analyze the data. The descriptive results of the study indicated that students’ motivation for online learning was higher than both their computer/Internet self-efficacy and their orientations to self-directed learning. The inferential results revealed that the students’ end-of-course grades had significantly positive relationships with their computer/Internet self-efficacy and self-directed learning orientations. Finally, the students’ self-direction towards online learning appeared to be the strongest predictor of their achievements within the course; whereas computer/Internet self-efficacy and motivation for learning did not predict the learner achievement significantly.

  17. Students’ Readiness for E-learning Application in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atousa Rasouli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research was to investigate the readiness of art students in applying e-learning. This study adopted a survey research design. From three public Iranian Universities (Alzahra, Tarbiat Modares, and Tehran, 347 students were selected by multistage cluster sampling and via Morgan Table. Their readiness for E-learning application was assessed by a self-developed questionnaire. Data analysis was done by indexes of descriptive statistics and one sample t-test. Analysis of results found a significant relationship between the readiness of undergraduate students, graduate students, and post-graduate students to apply E-learning, but there was no significant relationship between students’ readiness and gender, university, and subject. Results revealed that Art students were in a moderate level of readiness for applying E-learning.

  18. Analyzing International Readiness of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Hamidizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internationalization has different connotations for different social sciences and its social, economic and cultural impacts have been examined by a number of studies. While firms’ internationalization processes have been understood as being dynamic, the concept of international readiness has rarely been the main focus of research efforts, which until a decade ago, focused principally on explaining sequences of entry modes and choices of markets. The emergence of the study of international entrepreneurship has enhanced the role of readiness. This study reviews the concept of international readiness by experimental and theoretical studies. Axioms in this research are based on content analysis. The framework incorporates measures to evaluate SMEs’ international readiness. The paper concludes with a research agenda as a guide for future work on considering the readiness as a critical phase before the internationalization process.

  19. Measures for Assessing the Readiness of Back-office Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Maheshwari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—Public organizations deploy state-of-the-art technological advancements to facilitate sophisticated services to the citizens, businesses, and employees. The maturity of backoffice staff to adapt, use, and utilize these technological changes at the organizational level is a prerequisite to introduce cutting-edge services. This paper investigates the maturity of backoffice staff and proposes a conceptual framework, measurement constructs, and subsequent measures for the assessment. Methodology/Design/Research—Design methodology focuses on combining research with practice. An initial framework and measurement constructs are developed based on the literature review, which are further investigated by conducting a case study at Inland Revenue, Karachi to test the usability in practice using the directive content analysis qualitative method. Findings—the outcome of measurement reveals that though the proposed framework and measurement constructs i.e. roles; responsibilities; trainings; capacity building; capabilities; and attitude are relevant and useful to assess the back-office staff readiness, the measures to assess the constructs may vary in practice depending on the size, scope, and type of the public organizations. Research limitations/implications—although the proposed measurement constructs and measures proved to be useful for assessing the back-office staff maturity, the relationships among different measures and constructs affecting the staff readiness require further research. Practical implications—the case study was conducted at single public organization, which will be extended to multiple public organizations in practice. The extension will not to allow effective testing of the usability of the proposed conceptual framework and constructs, but will also broaden the benchmarking scope. Originality/Value—back-office staff education is discussed and described in the literature as well practice, but there is hardly any

  20. Measures for Assessing the Readiness of Back-office Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Maheshwari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—Public organizations deploy state-of-the-art technological advancements to facilitate sophisticated services to the citizens, businesses, and employees. The maturity of backoffice staff to adapt, use, and utilize these technological changes at the organizational level is a prerequisite to introduce cutting-edge services. This paper investigates the maturity of backoffice staff and proposes a conceptual framework, measurement constructs, and subsequent measures for the assessment.Methodology/Design/Research—Design methodology focuses on combining research with practice. An initial framework and measurement constructs are developed based on the literature review, which are further investigated by conducting a case study at Inland Revenue, Karachi to test the usability in practice using the directive content analysis qualitative method.Findings—the outcome of measurement reveals that though the proposed framework and measurement constructs i.e. roles; responsibilities; trainings; capacity building; capabilities; and attitude are relevant and useful to assess the back-office staff readiness, the measures to assess the constructs may vary in practice depending on the size, scope, and type of the public organizations.Research limitations/implications—although the proposed measurement constructs and measures proved to be useful for assessing the back-office staff maturity, the relationships among different measures and constructs affecting the staff readiness require further research.Practical implications—the case study was conducted at single public organization, which will be extended to multiple public organizations in practice. The extension will not to allow effective testing of the usability of the proposed conceptual framework and constructs, but will also broaden the benchmarking scope.Originality/Value—back-office staff education is discussed and described in the literature as well practice, but there is hardly any

  1. Computer-assisted preoperative simulation for positioning and fixation of plate in 2-stage procedure combining maxillary advancement by distraction technique and mandibular setback surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Hideyuki; Taniguchi, Asako; Yonenaga, Kazumichi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Computer-assisted preoperative simulation surgery is employed to plan and interact with the 3D images during the orthognathic procedure. It is useful for positioning and fixation of maxilla by a plate. We report a case of maxillary retrusion by a bilateral cleft lip and palate, in which a 2-stage orthognathic procedure (maxillary advancement by distraction technique and mandibular setback surgery) was performed following a computer-assisted preoperative simulation planning to achieve the positioning and fixation of the plate. A high accuracy was achieved in the present case. A 21-year-old male patient presented to our department with a complaint of maxillary retrusion following bilateral cleft lip and palate. Computer-assisted preoperative simulation with 2-stage orthognathic procedure using distraction technique and mandibular setback surgery was planned. The preoperative planning of the procedure resulted in good aesthetic outcomes. The error of the maxillary position was less than 1mm. The implementation of the computer-assisted preoperative simulation for the positioning and fixation of plate in 2-stage orthognathic procedure using distraction technique and mandibular setback surgery yielded good results. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient-specific scatter correction in clinical cone beam computed tomography imaging made possible by the combination of Monte Carlo simulations and a ray tracing algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality is limited by scattered photons. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations provide the ability of predicting the patient-specific scatter contamination in clinical CBCT imaging. Lengthy simulations prevent MC-based scatter correction from...

  3. Assessment of the effective dose in supine, prone, and oblique positions in the maxillofacial region using a novel combined extremity and maxillofacial cone beam computed tomography scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koivisto, J.; Wolff, J.; Järnstedt, J.; Dastidar, P.; Kortesniemi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to assess the organ and effective doses (International Commission on Radiological Protection [ICRP] 103 standard) resulting from supine, prone, and oblique phantom positions in the maxillofacial region using a novel cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)

  4. Using motivational interviewing in the community pharmacy to increase adult immunization readiness: A pilot evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Amber; Butler, Michell; Chapman, Liza

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether the use of motivational interviewing (MI) in the community pharmacy improves immunization readiness and rates for hepatitis B, hepatitis A/B combination, herpes zoster, pneumococcal, and tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis immunizations. Kroger Pharmacy. Grocery store pharmacies located in the Atlanta, GA, metropolitan area offering a variety of patient care services, including medication therapy management and immunizations. Patients were identified during workflow, and MI encounters were initiated to those eligible to receive hepatitis A/B combination, hepatitis B, herpes zoster, pneumococcal and/or tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccines. Following each encounter, pharmacists completed patient demographic information and responses to 5-point Likert scale questions assessing patient readiness to receive immunizations at the beginning and end of the encounter, and if follow-up occurred, 5-point Likert scale questions assessing pharmacists' perception of using MI. Immunization rates at the intervention site did not significantly increase due to the small sample size and other project limitations. Patient readiness to receive immunizations improved from the beginning to the end of the MI encounter and was statistically significant for hepatitis B (P = 0.001) and pneumococcal (P = 0.033) vaccines. Pharmacists agreed MI was an effective tool to discuss immunizations, agreed they could communicate more effectively about immunizations, and agreed MI could be incorporated into the community pharmacy workflow. Motivational interviewing may be a useful tool for community pharmacists to use in discussing immunizations. Larger studies need to be completed to determine the impact MI could have on immunization readiness and rates in the community pharmacy.

  5. Dimensions of community and organizational readiness for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Holscher, Jessica; Mumman, Manpreet K; Salgado, Hugo; Keir, Katherine B; Foster-Fishman, Pennie G; Talavera, Gregory A

    2012-01-01

    Readiness can influence whether health interventions are implemented in, and ultimately integrated into, communities. Although there is significant research interest in readiness and capacity for change, the measurement of these constructs is still in its infancy. The purpose of this review was to integrate existing assessment models of community and organizational readiness. The database PubMed was searched for articles; articles, book chapters, and practitioner guides identified as references cited in the list of core articles. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: (1) Empirical research, (2) identified community or organizational readiness for innovative health programming in the study's title, purpose, research questions, or hypotheses, and (3) identified methods to measure these constructs. Duplicate articles were deleted and measures published before 1995 were excluded. The search yielded 150 studies; 13 met all criteria. This article presents the results of a critical review of 13 community and organizational readiness assessment models, stemming from articles, chapters, and practitioner's guides focusing on assessing, developing, and sustaining community and organizational readiness for innovative public health programs. Readiness is multidimensional and different models place emphasis on different components of readiness, such as (1) community and organizational climate that facilitates change, (2) attitudes and current efforts toward prevention, (3) commitment to change, and (4) capacity to implement change. When initiating the program planning process, it is essential to assess these four domains of readiness to determine how they apply to the nuances across different communities. Thus, community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships, in efforts to focus on public health problems, may consider using readiness assessments as a tool for tailoring intervention efforts to the needs of the community.

  6. Measuring Success: David Conley's College Readiness Framework and the Illinois College and Career Readiness Act. In Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baber, Lorenzo D.; Castro, Erin L.; Bragg, Debra D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this brief is to understand the Illinois College and Career Readiness (CCR) Act in light of David Conley's college readiness model. Although not mentioned specifically by the Illinois statute, evaluation results gathered by the Office of Community College Research and Leadership (OCCRL) show alignment between a number of programs…

  7. Technological readiness of evolutionary water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy has evolved to a mature industry that supplies over 16% of the world's electricity, and it represents an important option for meeting the global energy demands of the coming century in an environmentally acceptable manner. New, evolutionary water cooled reactor designs that build on successful performance of predecessors have been developed; these designs have generally been guided by wishes to reduce cost, to improve availability and reliability, and to meet increasingly stringent safety objectives. These three aspects are important factors in what has been called technological readiness for an expanded deployment of nuclear power; a major increase in utilization of nuclear power will only occur if it is economically competitive, and meets safety expectations. To this end, the industry will also have to maintain or improve the public perception of nuclear power as a benign, economical and reliable energy source. (author)

  8. Achieving year 2000 readiness: basic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    This document provides an approach or addressing safety and operability concerns related to Year 2000 (Y2K). Although it was prepared for nuclear power plants the methods described are applicable to other nuclear installations and to other industrial concerns. The basic goal was to provide a brief but comprehensive approach that may be used to discover, understand and correct the Y2K related problems. The document relies on certain basic expectations of the facility that would apply to any programme: ownership, management, knowledgeable participants, thorough application of the approach, documentation of efforts, quality assurance of products and compliance with all regulatory requirements. The IAEA has and will continue to be involved with Member States to assist them in implementing this document and achieving Y2K Readiness

  9. Ready to regulate small reactors in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herstead, S.; Cook, S.; De Vos, M.; Howden, B.D. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The success of any new build project is reliant upon all stakeholders - applicants, vendors, contractors and regulatory agencies - being ready to do their part. Over the past several years, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has been working to ensure that it has the appropriate regulatory framework and internal processes in place for the timely and efficient licensing of all types of reactor, regardless of size. The CNSC's general nuclear safety objective requires that nuclear facilities be designed and operated in a manner that will protect the health, safety and security of persons and the environment from unreasonable risk, and to implement Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. For smaller facilities, this has traditionally allowed for the use of a graded approach to achieving safety.

  10. Modeling ready biodegradability of fragrance materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriani, Lidia; Papa, Ester; Kovarich, Simona; Boethling, Robert; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, quantitative structure activity relationships were developed for predicting ready biodegradability of approximately 200 heterogeneous fragrance materials. Two classification methods, classification and regression tree (CART) and k-nearest neighbors (kNN), were applied to perform the modeling. The models were validated with multiple external prediction sets, and the structural applicability domain was verified by the leverage approach. The best models had good sensitivity (internal ≥80%; external ≥68%), specificity (internal ≥80%; external 73%), and overall accuracy (≥75%). Results from the comparison with BIOWIN global models, based on group contribution method, show that specific models developed in the present study perform better in prediction than BIOWIN6, in particular for the correct classification of not readily biodegradable fragrance materials. © 2015 SETAC.

  11. Distractor inhibition: Evidence from lateralized readiness potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramme, Lisa; Dierolf, Angelika M; Naumann, Ewald; Frings, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated distractor inhibition on the level of stimulus representation. In a sequential distractor-to-distractor priming task participants had to respond to target letters flanked by distractor digits. Reaction time and stimulus-locked lateralized readiness potentials (S-LRPs) of probe responses were measured. Distractor-target onset asynchrony was varied. For RTs responses to probe targets were faster in the case of prime-distractor repetition compared to distractor changes indicating distractor inhibition. Benefits in RTs and the latency of S-LRP onsets for distractor repetition were also modulated by distractor-target onset asynchrony. For S-LRPs distractor inhibition was only present with a simultaneous onset of distractors and target. The results confirm previous results indicating inhibitory mechanisms of object-based selective attention on the level of distractor representations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Readiness for surgery after axillary block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koscielniak-Nielsen, Z J; Stens-Pedersen, H L; Lippert, F K

    1997-01-01

    required less time for block performance (mean 5.5 min) than multiple injections (mean 9.5 min), P requirement for supplemental nerve blocks was greater, after single injections (33 min and 57%) than after multiple injections (15.5 min and 7......We have assessed prospectively the time to readiness for surgery following axillary block (sum of block performance and latency times) in 80 patients. The brachial plexus was identified using a nerve stimulator, and anaesthetized with 45 mL of mepivacaine 1% with adrenaline 5 micrograms mL-1......%, respectively), P effectiveness was 100% in group 1 and 98% in group 2 (NS). The frequency of adverse effects (vessel puncture or paraesthesia) was similar...

  13. SP-100 space reactor power system readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josloff, A.T.; Matteo, D.N.; Bailey, H.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System which is being developed by GE, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, to provide electrical power in the range of 10's to 100's of kW. The system represents an enabling technology for a wide variety of earth orbital and interplanetary science missions, nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) stages, and lunar/Mars surface power for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). The technology and design is now at a state of readiness to support the definition of early flight demonstration missions. Of particular importance is that SP-100 meets the demanding U.S. safety performance, reliability and life requirements. The system is scalable and flexible and can be configured to provide 10's to 100's of kWe without repeating development work and can meet DoD goals for an early, low-power demonstration flight in the 1996-1997 time frame

  14. Achieving year 2000 readiness: basic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This document provides an approach or addressing safety and operability concerns related to Year 2000 (Y2K). Although it was prepared for nuclear power plants the methods described are applicable to other nuclear installations and to other industrial concerns. The basic goal was to provide a brief but comprehensive approach that may be used to discover, understand and correct the Y2K related problems. The document relies on certain basic expectations of the facility that would apply to any programme: ownership, management, knowledgeable participants, thorough application of the approach, documentation of efforts, quality assurance of products and compliance with all regulatory requirements. The IAEA has and will continue to be involved with Member States to assist them in implementing this document and achieving Y2K Readiness 12 refs, 3 figs

  15. Hospitals’ Readiness to Implement Clinical Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farbod Ebadi Fardazar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Quality of health services is one of the most important factors for delivery of these services. Regarding the importance and vital role of quality in the health sector, a concept known as “Clinical Governance” (CG has been introduced into the health area which aims to enhance quality of health services. Thus, this study aimed to assess private and public hospitals’ readiness to implement CG in Iran. Methods This descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out in 2012. Four hundred thirty participants including doctors, nurses, diagnostic departments personnel, and support staff were chosen randomly from four hospitals (equally divided into private and public hospitals. Clinical Governance Climate Questionnaire (CGCQ was used for data collection. Finally, data were entered into the SPSS 18 and were analyzed using statistical methods. Results Among the CG dimensions, “organizational learning” and “planned and integrated quality improvement program” scored the highest and the lowest respectively for both types of hospitals. Hospitals demonstrated the worst condition with regard to the latter dimension. Furthermore, both types of hospitals had positive picture regarding “training and development opportunities”. Private hospitals scored better than public ones in all dimensions but there was only a significant difference in “proactive risk management” dimension between both types of hospitals (P< 0.05. Conclusion Hospitals’ readiness for CG implementation was “average or weak”. In order to implement CG successfully, it is essential to have a quality-centered culture, a culture specified by less paperwork, more selfsufficiency, and flexibility in hospitals’ affairs as well as centring on shared vision and goals with an emphasis on continuous improvement and innovation.

  16. Is clinical virtual reality ready for primetime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Albert Skip; Koenig, Sebastian Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Since the mid-1990s, a significant scientific literature has evolved regarding the outcomes from the use of what we now refer to as clinical virtual reality (VR). This use of VR simulation technology has produced encouraging results when applied to address cognitive, psychological, motor, and functional impairments across a wide range of clinical health conditions. This article addresses the question, "Is clinical VR ready for primetime?" After a brief description of the various forms of VR technology, we discuss the trajectory of clinical VR over the last 20 years and summarize the basic assets that VR offers for creating clinical applications. The discussion then addresses the question of readiness in terms of the theoretical basis for clinical VR assets, the research to date, the pragmatic factors regarding availability, usability, and costs of clinical VR content/systems, and the ethical issues for the safe use of VR with clinical populations. Our review of the theoretical underpinnings and research findings to date leads to the prediction that clinical VR will have a significant impact on future research and practice. Pragmatic issues that can influence adoption across many areas of psychology also appear favorable, but professional guidelines will be needed to promote its safe and ethical use. Although there is still much research needed to advance the science in this area, we strongly believe that clinical VR applications will become indispensable tools in the toolbox of psychological researchers and practitioners and will only grow in relevance and popularity in the future. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Academic training: QCD: are we ready for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 4, 5, 6, 7 December, from 11:00 to 12:00 4, 5, 6 December - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, 7 December - TH Auditorium, bldg. 4 - 3-006 QCD: are we ready for the LHC S. FRIXIONE / INFN, Genoa, Italy The LHC energy regime poses a serious challenge to our capability of predicting QCD reactions to the level of accuracy necessary for a successful programme of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In these lectures, I'll introduce basic concepts in QCD, and present techniques based on perturbation theory, such as fixed-order and resummed computations, and Monte Carlo simulations. I'll discuss applications of these techniques to hadron-hadron processes, concentrating on recent trends in perturbative QCD aimed at improving our understanding of LHC phenomenology. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply ...

  18. The BERG faculty students readiness for information technologies study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horovèák Pavel

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the reconnaissance of our students’ readiness to study information technologies, its interpretation, comparison with some published data as well as with a completion and evaluation of the reconnaissance. It specifies methods and processes of evaluation, structure, sections and questions of the reconnaissance. The reconnaissance was oriented particularly to the evaluation of knowledge in the information technologies area acquired at secondary schools. It was completed in a classical paper form as a preparation for the realization and utilization of questionnaire in the electronic form. The following is constructed using modern internet and database technologies and presents extensive possibilities of evaluation answers respondents. The results of the reconnaissance are presented in the form distribution (sex, domicile, secondary school, secondary school influence, work with a computer, operating and exploitation of internet technologies, familiarity with operating systems and typical applications software and programming languages as well as the interest in information technologies of respondents. The results are compared with some other published data and future perspectives of completion and its evaluation of completion are outlined.

  19. Managed Readiness Simulator (MARS) V2: Implementation of the Managed Readiness Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    The SRDB architecture is described in detail in [6]. Database VBA VBA Runtime Data Sub run() SQL (“UPDATE Table SET Rank = 5”) Run_query_obj...FilterResources”) Algorithms ( VBA & SQL ) End Sub Arena Process Logic Figure 5: MARS V2 simulation architecture. The MARS managed readiness...database layer below it. Using VBA blocks, the algorithm layer can execute complex data operations on the database layer using SQL and can return

  20. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) Combined with Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and Video-Electroencephalography (VEEG) Have Excellent Diagnostic Value in Preoperative Localization of Epileptic Foci in Children with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gui-Bin; Long, Wei; Li, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Guang-Yin; Lu, Ji-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND To investigate the effect that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has on surgical decision making relative to video-electroencephalography (VEEG) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and if the differences in these variables translates to differences in surgical outcomes. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 166 children with epilepsy undergoing preoperative DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT examinations, surgical resection of epileptic foci, and intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) monitoring were enrolled. All children were followed up for 12 months and grouped by Engles prognostic classification for epilepsy. Based on intraoperative ECoG as gold standard, the diagnostic values of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and combined application of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT in preoperative localization for epileptic foci were evaluated. RESULTS The sensitivity of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 59.64%, 76.51%, and 93.98%, respectively; the accuracy of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, and DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT was 57.58%, 67.72%, 91.03%, 91.23%, and 96.49%, respectively. Localization accuracy rate of the combination of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 98.25% (56/57), which was higher than that of DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and of DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT. No statistical difference was found in the accuracy rate of localization between these three combined techniques. During the 12-month follow-up, children were grouped into Engles grade I (n=106), II (n=31), III (n=21), and IV (n=8) according to postoperative conditions. CONCLUSIONS All DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and PET-CT examinations have excellent accuracy in preoperative localization of epileptic foci and present excellent postoperative efficiency, suggesting that these combined imaging methods are suitable for serving as the