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Sample records for combined chemoradiation therapy

  1. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy in combination with panitumumab for patients with resectable esophageal cancer: the PACT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordes, Sil; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.; Hulshof, Maarten C.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; van der Vliet, Hans J.; Kapiteijn, Ellen; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Richel, Dick J.; Klinkenbijl, Jean H. G.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Wilmink, Johanna W.

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a preoperative CRT

  2. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy in combination with panitumumab for patients with resectable esophageal cancer: the PACT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordes, S.; Berge Henegouwen, M.I. van; Hulshof, M.C.C.; Bergman, J.J.; Vliet, H.J. van der; Kapiteijn, E.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Richel, D.J.; Klinkenbijl, J.H.G.; Meijer, S.L.; Wilmink, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a

  3. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

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    Kumar, Rajiv, E-mail: r.kumar@neu.edu [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Belz, Jodi [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Markovic, Stacey [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niedre, Mark [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sridhar, Srinivas [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    administered systemically. The results demonstrate that these spacers with tailored release profiles have potential in improving the combined therapeutic efficacy of chemoradiation therapy.

  4. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Combination With Panitumumab for Patients With Resectable Esophageal Cancer: The PACT Study

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    Kordes, Sil, E-mail: s.kordes@amc.uva.nl [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bergman, Jacques J.G.H.M. [Department of Gastroenterology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vliet, Hans J. van der [Department of Medical Oncology, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kapiteijn, Ellen [Department of Medical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van; Richel, Dick J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Klinkenbijl, Jean H.G. [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijer, Sybren L. [Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wilmink, Johanna W. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a preoperative CRT regimen with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with resectable esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable cT1N1M0 or cT2-3N0 to -2M0 tumors received preoperative CRT consisting of panitumumab (6 mg/kg) on days 1, 15, and 29, weekly administrations of carboplatin (area under the curve [AUC] = 2), and paclitaxel (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for 5 weeks and concurrent radiation therapy (41.4 Gy in 23 fractions, 5 days per week), followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. We aimed at a pCR rate of more than 40%. Furthermore, we explored the predictive value of biomarkers (EGFR, HER 2, and P53) for pCR. Results: From January 2010 until December 2011, 90 patients were enrolled. Patients were diagnosed predominantly with adenocarcinoma (AC) (80%), T3 disease (89%), and were node positive (81%). Three patients were not resected due to progressive disease. The primary aim was unmet, with a pCR rate of 22%. Patients with AC and squamous cell carcinoma reached a pCR of 14% and 47%, respectively. R0 resection was achieved in 95% of the patients. Main grade 3 toxicities were rash (12%), fatigue (11%), and nonfebrile neutropenia (11%). None of the biomarkers was predictive for response. Conclusions: The addition of panitumumab to CRT with carboplatin and paclitaxel was safe and well tolerated but could not improve pCR rate to the preset criterion of 40%.

  5. Serum Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Change After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy Is Associated With Postoperative Pulmonary Complications in Esophageal Cancer Patients Undergoing Combined Modality Therapy

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    Lu, Shao-Lun; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Wu, Jian-Kuan [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jang-Ming; Huang, Pei-Ming [Department of Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chih-Hung [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason, E-mail: jasoncheng@ntu.edu.tw [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Oncology, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to investigate the association of clinical factors, dosimetric parameters, and biomarkers with postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) in patients with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) treated by neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) under strict pulmonary dose constraints and esophagectomy. Methods and Materials: We prospectively enrolled 112 patients undergoing trimodality treatment (including radiation therapy [40 Gy], concurrent taxane-/5-fluorouracil-based regimens, and radical esophagectomy) for ESCC. A PPC was defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome within 30 days after surgery. Serum samples were collected before and within 1 month after CCRT. The association of serum biomarkers with PPCs was detected by proximity ligation assay (PLA) and verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Associations of clinical factors, lung dosimetric parameters, and biomarkers with PPC were tested statistically. Results: Thirty-three patients (29.5%) had PPCs. None of the dosimetric parameters was associated with PPCs. Preoperative functional vital capacity (FVC) was significantly associated with PPCs (P=.004). Of the 15 PLA-screened biomarkers, posttreatment transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was borderline significantly associated with PPCs (P=.087). Patients with PPCs had significantly larger pre-CCRT to post-CCRT decrease in serum TGF-β1 concentration (−11,310 vs −5332 pg/mL, P=.005) and higher pre-CCRT to post-CCRT percent decline in serum TGF-β1 concentration (−37.4% vs −25.0%, P=.009) than patients without PPCs. On multivariate analysis, preoperative FVC (P=.003) and decrease in TGF-β1 >7040 pg/mL (P=.014) were independent factors associated with PPCs. Conclusions: Preoperative FVC and decrease in serum TGF-β1 level after dose-limited CCRT to the lung are associated with the development of PPCs.

  6. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

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    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@mgh.harvard.edu [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garofalo, Michael C. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bendell, Johanna [Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Berger, Adam C. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E. [North Main Radiation Oncology, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Anne, Pramila Rani [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Perera, Francisco [London Regional Cancer Program/Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Nowlan, Adam [Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); DeNittis, Albert [Main Line Community Clinical Oncology Program, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania (United States); Crane, Christopher [University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  7. Eluation of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for ampullary adenocarcinoma: the Johns Hopkins Hospital - Mayo Clinic collaborative study

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    Zhou Jessica

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for ampullary carcinoma is unknown. Previous literature suggests that certain populations with high risk factors for recurrence may benefit from adjuvant chemoradiation. We combined the experience of two institutions to better delineate which patients may benefit from adjuvant chemoradiation. Methods Patients who underwent curative surgery for ampullary carcinoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (n = 290; 1992-2007 and at the Mayo Clinic (n = 130; 1977-2005 were reviewed. Patients with Results Median overall-survival was 39.9 months with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 62.4% and 39.1%. On univariate analysis, adverse prognostic factors for overall survival included T3/T4 stage disease (RR = 1.86, p = 0.002, node positive status (RR = 3.18, p Conclusions Node-positive patients with resected ampullary adenocarcinoma may benefit from 5-FU based adjuvant chemoradiation. Since a significant proportion of patients develop metastatic disease, there is a need for more effective systemic treatment.

  8. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Failure of odontogenesis after chemo-radiation therapy for rhabdomyosarcoma

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    Choi, Sun Young; Hong, Sung Woo; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-15

    This report details a case of 8-year-old girl showing failure of odontogenesis after chemo-radiation therapy for rhabdomysarcoma at the age of 4. The observed results were as follows: 1. Past history revealed that she had received for a total radiation dose od 4430 cGy, 29 fractions in 6 weeks and chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin D and cytoxan, followed as maintenance phase for 2 years. 2. The patient was symptom-free and appointed for the treatment of multiple dental caries. 3. Oral examination showed hypoplastic enamel on whole erupted permanent teeth and showed retarded eruption. 4. Conventional radiograms showed failure of root development including abrupt cessation of root formation and root agenesis, and microdobtia, missing teeth, irregular enamel, dislocation of the impacted teeth. Additional finding showed good healing bone pattern on the left mandibular ramus and angle area. 5. Cehalometric analysis revealed failure of bite raising due to incomplete eruption of all the first molars and made it possible to suspect entrapped mandibular growth and then Class II tendency growth. 6. There was correlation between the time of chemo-radiation therapy and the damage of the teeth.

  10. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, A. L.; Ploen, J.; Vogelius, I. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we...... estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination...... of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect...

  11. Radiation or chemoradiation: initial utility study of selected therapy for local advanced stadium cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramitasari, D. A.; Gondhowiardjo, S.; Nuranna, L.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare radiation only or chemo radiation treatment of local advanced cervical cancers by examining the initial response of tumors and acute side effects. An initial assessment employed value based medicine (VBM) by obtaining utility values for both types of therapy. The incidences of acute lower gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematology side effects in patients undergoing chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those undergoing radiation alone. Utility values for patients who underwent radiation alone were higher compared to those who underwent chemoradiation. It was concluded that the complete response of patients who underwent chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those who underwent radiation alone.

  12. The CARTS study: Chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer in the distal rectum followed by organ-sparing transanal endoscopic microsurgery

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    Bökkerink Guus MJ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CARTS study is a multicenter feasibility study, investigating the role of rectum saving surgery for distal rectal cancer. Methods/Design Patients with a clinical T1-3 N0 M0 rectal adenocarcinoma below 10 cm from the anal verge will receive neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (25 fractions of 2 Gy with concurrent capecitabine. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEM will be performed 8 - 10 weeks after the end of the preoperative treatment depending on the clinical response. Primary objective is to determine the number of patients with a (near complete pathological response after chemoradiation therapy and TEM. Secondary objectives are the local recurrence rate and quality of life after this combined therapeutic modality. A three-step analysis will be performed after 20, 33 and 55 patients to ensure the feasibility of this treatment protocol. Discussion The CARTS-study is one of the first prospective multicentre trials to investigate the role of a rectum saving treatment modality using chemoradiation therapy and local excision. The CARTS study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01273051

  13. Combined Chemoradiation Therapy With Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin for Organ Preservation in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase 1 Trial

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    Azria, David, E-mail: david.azria@icm.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); INSERM, U896, IRCM, Montpellier (France); Riou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); Rebillard, Xavier [Department of Urology, Clinique Beausoleil, Montpellier (France); Thezenas, Simon [Biostatistics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); Thuret, Rodolphe [Department of Urology, Montpellier University Hospital, Montpellier (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); Pouessel, Damien; Culine, Stephane [Department of Medical Oncology, AP-HP Saint-Louis, Paris (France)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concomitant treatment with radiation therapy and cisplatin (CDDP) remains the gold standard for bladder preservation in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We present the long-term results of a phase 1 clinical trial to assess the association of twice-weekly gemcitabine with CDDP and radiation therapy in this setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with pT2-pT4N0M0 MIBC without hydronephrosis or diffuse carcinoma in situ were enrolled in this study. After maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor, patients received concomitant radiation therapy (63 Gy in 1.8 fractions) and chemotherapy (CDDP 20 mg/m²/day over 4 days every 21 days and gemcitabine twice a week). The starting dose of gemcitabine was 15 mg/m² with dose escalation to 20, 25, and 30 mg/m². The primary endpoint was the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Secondary endpoints included toxicity and tumor control. Results: Fourteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 2 patients treated with 30 mg/m² gemcitabine (grade 4 thrombocytopenia and severe impairment of World Health Organization performance status, respectively). Nine patients received the complete chemoradiation therapy protocol. The recommended dose of gemcitabine was 25 mg/m². The median follow-up time was 53 months, and the overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates were 62% and 77%, respectively. Among the patients who received the complete treatment, bladder-intact survival was 76% at 5 years, and the median overall survival was 69.6 months. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated. The gemcitabine MTD was 25 mg/m². Bladder preservation and disease control were promising. A multicenter phase 2 randomized trial is ongoing.

  14. Results of surgical treatment versus chemoradiation therapy in oropharyngeal early tumors

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    Chedid, Helma Maria

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The epidermoid carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is diagnosed in approximately 40% of the cases of advanced clinical stages. Objective: To evaluate the disease-free interval in patients with clinical stages I and II epidermoid carcinoma who were submitted to surgery or chemoradiation. Method: Retrospective study of the records of 139 patients treated for oropharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma submitted to treatment with curative intent. Among those patients, 38 were classified with early tumors clinical stages I and II. Twenty-seven (71.1% underwent surgical treatment whereas eleven (28.9% were treated with chemoradiation. The mean age was 56.4 years; 31 cases (81.6% were in men and seven (18.4% were in women. Results: Among the eleven patients who were submitted to chemoradiation, 72.7% obtained locoregional control of the disease and their disease-free survival was of 42%. Among the 27 patients operated, 19 remained in Clinical Stages I and II in the histological report and six underwent postoperative radiation therapy. The disease-free interval for two years was of 70%. Conclusion: The patients submitted to the surgery had a better disease-free interval as compared to those submitted to chemoradiation treatment.

  15. Pseudomembranous colitis within radiotherapy field following concurrent chemoradiation therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bing-Jie; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Chou, Yueh-Hung; Tseng, Li-Ming; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Development of nonantibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis has been reported in patients receiving chemotherapy. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy after surgery for stage III pT3N1M0 rectal cancer. After completion of the therapy, the patient presented with a 2-week history of intermittent watery diarrhea (seven to nine times per day). However, the patient was afebrile and laboratory examination revealed no evidence of leukocytosis. Computed tomography disclosed inflammation of the sigmoid colon, infiltrative changes around the anastomotic site, and edematous changes straddling the serosal surface. Colonoscopic examination revealed multiple whitish patches within the radiation field, a finding suggestive of pseudomembranous colitis. No concomitant antibiotics were used during the period of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Empirical oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 hours) was administrated for 2 weeks. At the end of this treatment, stool culture was negative for Clostridium difficile. Physicians should be aware of the potential for the development of pseudomembranous colitis following concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  16. Variable uterine uptake of FDG in adenomyosis during concurrent chemoradiation therapy for cervical cancer

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    Yu, Jeong Il; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Tae Joong; Park, Byung Kwan [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    To avoid improper tumor volume contouring in radiation therapy (RT) and other invasive procedures, we report a case of uterine adenomyosis showing increased 18F-fl uorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) mimicking malignant tumor in a 44-year-old woman during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for uterine cervical cancer. The adenomyosis was not associated with her menstrual cycle or with normal endometrium uptake, and it resolved one month after completion of RT. This case indicates that uterine adenomyosis in a premenopausal woman may show false positive uptake of 18FDG-PET/CT associated with CCRT.

  17. Pseudomembranous colitis within radiotherapy field following concurrent chemoradiation therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen BJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bing-Jie Shen,1 Shih-Chiang Lin,2 Pei-Wei Shueng,1,3 Yueh-Hung Chou,4 Li-Ming Tseng,5 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,6,71Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Anatomical Pathology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Development of nonantibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis has been reported in patients receiving chemotherapy. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy after surgery for stage III pT3N1M0 rectal cancer. After completion of the therapy, the patient presented with a 2-week history of intermittent watery diarrhea (seven to nine times per day. However, the patient was afebrile and laboratory examination revealed no evidence of leukocytosis. Computed tomography disclosed inflammation of the sigmoid colon, infiltrative changes around the anastomotic site, and edematous changes straddling the serosal surface. Colonoscopic examination revealed multiple whitish patches within the radiation field, a finding suggestive of pseudomembranous colitis. No concomitant antibiotics were used during the period of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Empirical oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 hours was administrated for 2 weeks. At the end of this treatment, stool culture was negative for Clostridium difficile. Physicians should be aware of the potential for the development of

  18. The prognostic value of tumour regression grade following neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdul-Jalil, K I

    2014-01-01

    To date, there is no uniform consensus on whether tumour regression grade (TRG) is predictive of outcome in rectal cancer. Furthermore, the lack of standardization of TRG grading is a major source of variability in published studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of TRG in a cohort of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). In addition to the Mandard TRG, we utilized four TRG systems modified from the Mandard TRG system and applied them to the cohort to assess which TRG system is most informative.

  19. Epigenetic therapy and cisplatin chemoradiation in FIGO stage IIIB cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelaria, M; Cetina, L; Pérez-Cárdenas, E; de la Cruz-Hernández, E; González-Fierro, A; Trejo-Becerril, C; Taja-Chayeb, L; Chanona, J; Arias, D; Dueñas-González, A

    2010-01-01

    This trial aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of epigenetic therapy associated with cisplatin chemoradiation in FIGO Stage IIIB patients. Hydralazine containing either 182 mg for rapid-, or 83 mg for slow acetylators and magnesium valproate were administered at 30 mg/kg tid. Both drugs were taken until intracavitary therapy was finished. Pelvic external beam radiation and low-dose rate brachytherapy were administered at a total cumulative dose to point A of at least 85 Gy. Weekly cisplatin at 40 mg/m2 was delivered for six cycles. Twenty-two patients were included and 18 (82%) patients completed treatment. Mean dose to point A was 84.6 + 2.2. Median number of cisplatin cycles was 5.5 (range, 1-6). Brachytherapy was delayed for technical reasons; the mean overall treatment time was 11.8 weeks. Grade 3 anemia, leucopenia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 9%, 45%, 45%, and 9% of patients, respectively. Hydralazine and valproate are well-tolerated and safe when administered with cisplatin chemoradiation. Unfortunately, the suboptimal administration of brachytherapy for technical reasons in this study, precluded assessing the efficacy of epigenetic therapy. However, the tolerability of this regimen administered concurrent to radiation needs to be further tested.

  20. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

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    Nyflot, Matthew J., E-mail: nyflot@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cadence Cancer Center at Delnor Hospital, Geneva, Illinois (United States); Traynor, Anne M. [Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Khuntia, Deepak [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Yang, David T. [Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery-Otolaryngology, H& N Surgery Division, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Wiederholt, Peggy A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Gentry, Lindell R. [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Hoang, Tien [Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Jeraj, Robert [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); and others

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials: All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m{sup 2} and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [{sup 61}Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results: Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions: The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging

  1. Phase II clinical trial of preoperative combined chemoradiation for T3 and T4 resectable rectal cancer: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjandra, J J; Reading, D M; McLachlan, S A; Gunn, I F; Green, M D; McLaughlin, S J; Millar, J L; Pedersen, J S

    2001-08-01

    Although preoperative chemoradiation for high-risk rectal cancer may improve survival and local recurrence rate, its adverse effects are not well defined. This prospective study evaluated the use of preoperative chemoradiation for T3 and T4 resectable rectal cancer, with special emphasis on treatment morbidity, pathologic remission rate, quality of life, and anorectal function. Forty-two patients (30 men, 12 women) were enrolled in the study. Median distance of the distal tumor margin from the anal verge was 6.5 cm. Preoperative staging was based on digital rectal examination, endorectal ultrasound, and computed tomography. None of the patients had distant metastases. All patients had 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/day in 25 fractions) over five weeks, plus 5-fluorouracil (350 mg/m(2)/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m(2)/day) bolus on days 1 to 5 and 29 to 33. Quality of life was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer 30-item quality-of-life questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and its colorectal cancer-specific module (QLQ-CR38) questionnaires. Objective anorectal function was assessed by anorectal manometry and pudendal nerve terminal motor latency. Surgery was performed 46 (range, 24-63) days after completion of adjuvant therapy. Nineteen patients (45 percent) had Grade 3 or 4 chemoradiation-induced toxic reactions. Four patients developed intercurrent distant metastases or intraperitoneal carcinomatosis at completion of chemoradiation. Thirty-eight patients underwent surgical resection: abdominoperineal resection, anterior resection, and Hartmann's procedure were performed in 55 percent, 39 percent (11 of 15 patients had a diverting stoma), and 5 percent, respectively. Major surgical complications occurred in 7 patients (18 percent) and included anastomotic leak (n = 1), pelvic abscess (n = 1), small-bowel obstruction (n = 3), and wound breakdown (n = 2). Final pathology was Stage 0 (no residual disease), I, II, and III in 6 (16 percent), 7 (18 percent), 9

  2. Phase 2 Study of Erlotinib Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiation and Chemotherapy in Patients With Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Fan, Katherine Y.; Wild, Aaron T.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wood, Laura D. [Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Blackford, Amanda L. [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ellsworth, Susannah [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zheng, Lei; Le, Dung T.; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hidalgo, Manuel [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas, Madrid (Spain); Donehower, Ross C. [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Schulick, Richard D.; Edil, Barish H. [Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Choti, Michael A. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hruban, Ralph H. [Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Long-term survival rates for patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have stagnated at 20% for more than a decade, demonstrating the need to develop novel adjuvant therapies. Gemcitabine-erlotinib therapy has demonstrated a survival benefit for patients with metastatic PDAC. Here we report the first phase 2 study of erlotinib in combination with adjuvant chemoradiation and chemotherapy for resected PDAC. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with resected PDAC received adjuvant erlotinib (100 mg daily) and capecitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday-Friday) concurrently with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 50.4 Gy over 28 fractions followed by 4 cycles of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days) and erlotinib (100 mg daily). The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results: The median follow-up time was 18.2 months (interquartile range, 13.8-27.1). Lymph nodes were positive in 85% of patients, and margins were positive in 17%. The median RFS was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4-17.9), and the median overall survival (OS) was 24.4 months (95% CI, 18.9-29.7). Multivariate analysis with adjustment for known prognostic factors showed that tumor diameter >3 cm was predictive for inferior RFS (hazard ratio, 4.01; P=.001) and OS (HR, 4.98; P=.02), and the development of dermatitis was associated with improved RFS (HR, 0.27; P=.009). During CRT and post-CRT chemotherapy, the rates of grade 3/4 toxicity were 31%/2% and 35%/8%, respectively. Conclusion: Erlotinib can be safely administered with adjuvant IMRT-based CRT and chemotherapy. The efficacy of this regimen appears comparable to that of existing adjuvant regimens. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0848 will ultimately determine whether erlotinib produces a survival benefit in patients with resected pancreatic cancer.

  3. Performance of a Nomogram Predicting Disease-Specific Survival After an R0 Resection for Gastric Cancer in Patients Receiving Postoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikken, Johan L. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Coit, Daniel G. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Baser, Raymond E.; Gönen, Mithat [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Brennan, Murray F. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jansen, Edwin P.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boot, Henk [Department of Gastroenterology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de [Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Cats, Annemieke [Department of Gastroenterology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel, E-mail: m.verheij@nki.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The internationally validated Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) gastric carcinoma nomogram was based on patients who underwent curative (R0) gastrectomy, without any other therapy. The purpose of the current study was to assess the performance of this gastric cancer nomogram in patients who received chemoradiation therapy after an R0 resection for gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: In a combined dataset of 76 patients from the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), and 63 patients from MSKCC, who received postoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) after an R0 gastrectomy, the nomogram was validated by means of the concordance index (CI) and a calibration plot. Results: The concordance index for the nomogram was 0.64, which was lower than the CI of the nomogram for patients who received no adjuvant therapy (0.80). In the calibration plot, observed survival was approximately 20% higher than the nomogram-predicted survival for patients receiving postoperative CRT. Conclusions: The MSKCC gastric carcinoma nomogram significantly underpredicted survival for patients in the current study, suggesting an impact of postoperative CRT on survival in patients who underwent an R0 resection for gastric cancer, which has been demonstrated by randomized controlled trials. This analysis stresses the need for updating nomograms with the incorporation of multimodal strategies.

  4. Dysphagia after sequential chemoradiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Laura A; Posner, Marshall R; Norris, Charles M; Tishler, Roy B; Wirth, Lori J; Annino, Donald J; Gagne, Adele; Sullivan, Christopher A; Sammartino, Daniel E; Haddad, Robert I

    2006-06-01

    Assess impact of sequential chemoradiation therapy (SCRT) for advanced head and neck cancer (HNCA) on swallowing, nutrition, and quality of life. Prospective cohort study of 59 patients undergoing SCRT for advanced head and neck cancer. Follow-up median was 47.5 months. Regional Cancer Center. Median time to gastrostomy tube removal was 21 weeks. Eighteen of 23 patients who underwent modified barium swallow demonstrated aspiration; none developed pneumonia. Six of 7 with pharyngoesophageal stricture underwent successful dilatation. Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck Scale questionnaires at median 6 months after treatment revealed "somewhat" satisfaction with swallowing. At the time of analysis, 97% have the gastronomy tube removed and take soft/regular diet. Early after treatment dysphagia adversely affected weight, modified barium swallow results, and quality of life. Diligent swallow therapy, and dilation as needed, allowed nearly all patients to have their gastronomy tubes removed and return to a soft/regular diet. Dysphagia is significant after SCRT but generally slowly recovers 6 to 12 months after SCRT. C-4.

  5. New Perspectives on Predictive Biomarkers of Tumor Response and Their Clinical Application in Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Kyu; Hur, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and can improve local control and survival outcomes. However, the responses of individual tumors to CRT are not uniform and vary widely, from complete response to disease progression. Patients with resistant tumors can be exposed to irradiation and chemotherapy that are both expensive and at times toxic without benefit. In contrast, about 60% of tumors show tumor regression and T and N down-staging. Furthermore, a pathologic complete response (pCR), which is characterized by sterilization of all tumor cells, leads to an excellent prognosis and is observed in approximately 10-30% of cases. This variety in tumor response has lead to an increased need to develop a model predictive of responses to CRT in order to identify patients who will benefit from this multimodal treatment. Endoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, serum carcinoembryonic antigen, and molecular biomarkers analyzed using immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling are the most commonly used predictive models in preoperative CRT. Such modalities guide clinicians in choosing the best possible treatment options and the extent of surgery for each individual patient. However, there are still controversies regarding study outcomes, and a nomogram of combined models of future trends is needed to better predict patient response. The aim of this article was to review currently available tools for predicting tumor response after preoperative CRT in rectal cancer and to explore their applicability in clinical practice for tailored treatment.

  6. PET/CT and Histopathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Charlotte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... of chemoradiation is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography....

  7. Role of Genetic Polymorphisms in NFKB-Mediated Inflammatory Pathways in Response to Primary Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhugashvili, Maia [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, Madrid Oncology Institute (Group IMO), Murcia (Spain); Luengo-Gil, Ginés; García, Teresa; González-Conejero, Rocío [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain); Conesa-Zamora, Pablo [Department of Pathology, University Hospital Santa Lucía, Cartagena (Spain); Escolar, Pedro Pablo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Santa Lucía, Cartagena (Spain); Calvo, Felipe [Department of Radiation Oncology, University General Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Vicente, Vicente [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain); Ayala de la Peña, Francisco, E-mail: frayala@um.es [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether polymorphisms of genes related to inflammation are associated with pathologic response (primary endpoint) in patients with rectal cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (PCRT). Methods and Materials: Genomic DNA of 159 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with PCRT was genotyped for polymorphisms rs28362491 (NFKB1), rs1213266/rs5789 (PTGS1), rs5275 (PTGS2), and rs16944/rs1143627 (IL1B) using TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays. The association between each genotype and pathologic response (poor response vs complete or partial response) was analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: The NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype was associated with pathologic response (odds ratio [OR], 6.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78-52.65; P=.03) after PCRT. No statistically significant associations between other polymorphisms and response to PCRT were observed. Patients with the NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype showed a trend for longer disease-free survival (log-rank test, P=.096) and overall survival (P=.049), which was not significant in a multivariate analysis that included pathologic response. Analysis for 6 polymorphisms showed that patients carrying the haplotype rs28362491-DEL/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G (13.7% of cases) had a higher response rate to PCRT (OR, 8.86; 95% CI, 1.21-64.98; P=.034) than the reference group (rs28362491-INS/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G). Clinically significant (grade ≥2) acute organ toxicity was also more frequent in patients with that same haplotype (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.11-15.36; P=.037). Conclusions: Our results suggest that genetic variation in NFKB-related inflammatory pathways might influence sensitivity to primary chemoradiation for rectal cancer. If confirmed, an inflammation-related radiogenetic profile might be used to select patients with rectal cancer for preoperative combined-modality treatment.

  8. Prognostic value of pre-therapy platelet elevation in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoultz-Henley, Sara; Garden, Adam S.; Mohamed, Abdallah S. R.; Sheu, Tommy; Kroll, Michael H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Hayes, Amos J.; French, Chloe; Eichelberger, Hillary; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Smith, Blaine D.; Phan, Jack; Ayoub, Zeina; Lai, Stephen Y.; Pham, Brian; Kies, Merrill; Gold, Kathryn A.; Sturgis, Erich; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate potential associations between increased platelets and oncologic outcomes in oropharyngeal cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation. 433 oropharyngeal cancer patients (OPC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy between 2002 and 2012 were included under an approved IRB protocol. Complete blood count (CBC) data was extracted. Platelet and hemoglobin from the last phlebotomy (PLTpre-chemoRT, Hgbpre-chemoRT) before start of treatment were identified. Patients were risk-stratified using Dahlstrom-Sturgis criteria and were tested for association with survival and disease-control outcomes. Locoregional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis (FDM) and overall survival (OS) were decreased (ptherapy platelet indices. On Bayesian information criteria analysis, the optimal prognostic model was then used to develop nomograms predicting 3-, 5-, and 10-year OS. In conclusion, pre-treatment platelet elevation is a promising predictor of prognosis, and further work should be done to elucidate the utility of anti-platelets in modifying risk in OPC patients. PMID:26414107

  9. Timing of events during deglutition after chemoradiation therapy for oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Katherine A; Tanner, Kristine; Kosek, Steven R

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if persistent changes in the duration of bolus movement through the pharynx and bolus movement coordination with pharyngeal swallowing gestures occur after treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma with chemoradiation therapy. The timing of bolus movement and coordination with swallowing gestures was evaluated in 30 patients using a modified barium swallowing study at least 1 year after completion of treatment. Patients were recruited irrespective of any swallowing complaints. The mean of each measure from the study subjects was compared to those from a group of age-matched controls. Bolus transit duration in the study population was unchanged compared with normal controls. Unlike normal controls, the patients were found to allow the bolus to arrive in the vallecula before the initiation of swallowing gestures that resulted in a swallow. Earlier opening of the upper esophageal sphincter was found for a 1-cc bolus (p = .004). For the 20 cc bolus size, the onset of hyoid and aryepiglottic fold elevation was delayed (p = .029 and .037, respectively). Gesture timing did not change to accommodate larger bolus sizes, as it normally does, resulting in a delay in airway protection for the 20-cc bolus. Patients are able to move a liquid bolus through the pharynx in a timely manner. However, patients are unable to modify swallowing gestures to safely protect the airway. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The Prediction of Deterioration of Nutritional Status during Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients with Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietveld, Sofia C M; Witvliet-van Nierop, Jill E; Ottens-Oussoren, Karen; van der Peet, Donald L; de van der Schueren, Marian A E

    2018-01-01

    Patients with esophageal cancer are at high risk of developing malnutrition during neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT), which in turn is associated with postoperative morbidity. The aim of the study is to explore whether parameters of a complete pre-treatment nutritional status may predict deterioration of nutritional status during CRT in patients with esophageal cancer. In this prospective cohort study, 101 patients with esophageal cancer treated with CRT were included. Data of patient characteristics, tumor classification, performance score, %weight change, body mass index, fat (free) mass index, phase angle, handgrip strength, energy- and protein intake, and use of (additional) dietary supplements were collected. A prediction model was constructed to identify predictive parameters for deterioration in nutritional status (defined as weight loss of >5% and/or decline in fat free mass of ≥1.4 kg) during CRT. Nutritional status deteriorated in 49 patients (49%) during CRT. The only predictor for deterioration in nutritional status was fat free mass index (OR 1.21 (90% CI: 1.03 - 1.42)). Patients with a higher fat free mass index are at increased risk of deterioration in nutrition status during CRT. Results suggest that all patients should be carefully supervised during CRT, regardless of their nutritional status before start of CRT.

  11. Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chon, Young Eun [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beom Kyung [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jihye [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Kwan, E-mail: kaarma@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Young, E-mail: dyk1025@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

  12. Adjuvant therapy sparing in rectal cancer achieving complete response after chemoradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Albéniz, Xabier; Gallego, Rosa; Hofheinz, Ralf Dieter; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria; Ayuso-Colella, Juan Ramón; Bombí, Josep Antoni; Conill, Carles; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Delgado, Salvadora; Ginés, Angels; Miquel, Rosa; Pagés, Mario; Pineda, Estela; Pereira, Verónica; Sosa, Aarón; Reig, Oscar; Victoria, Iván; Feliz, Luis; María de Lacy, Antonio; Castells, Antoni; Burkholder, Iris; Hochhaus, Andreas; Maurel, Joan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term results of conventional chemoradiotherapy and laparoscopic mesorectal excision in rectal adenocarcinoma patients without adjuvant therapy. METHODS: Patients with biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the rectum staged cT3-T4 by endoscopic ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging received neoadjuvant continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil for five weeks and concomitant radiotherapy. Laparoscopic surgery was planned after 5-8 wk. Patients diagnosed with ypT0N0 stage cancer were not treated with adjuvant therapy according to the protocol. Patients with ypT1-2N0 or ypT3-4 or N+ were offered 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant treatment on an individual basis. An external cohort was used as a reference for the findings. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy six patients were treated with induction chemoradiotherapy and 170 underwent total mesorectal excision. Cancer staging of ypT0N0 was achieved in 26/170 (15.3%) patients. After a median follow-up of 58.3 mo, patients with ypT0N0 had five-year disease-free and overall survival rates of 96% (95%CI: 77-99) and 100%, respectively. We provide evidence about the natural history of patients with localized rectal cancer achieving a complete response after preoperative chemoradiation. The inherent good prognosis of these patients will have implications for clinical trial design and care of patients. CONCLUSION: Withholding adjuvant chemotherapy after complete response following standard neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and laparoscopic mesorectal excision might be safe within an experienced multidisciplinary team. PMID:25400468

  13. Phase 1 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Temozolomide and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Ho; Hong, Yong Sang [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yangsoon; Kim, Jihun [Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyu-pyo; Kim, Sun Young [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-hong; Kim, Jong Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Ja; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Won, E-mail: twkimmd@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) with capecitabine is a standard treatment strategy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Temozolomide improves the survival of patients with glioblastoma with hypermethylated O{sup 6}-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT); MGMT hypermethylation is one of the colorectal carcinogenesis pathways. We aimed to determine the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and recommended dose (RD) of temolozomide in combination with capecitabine-based preoperative CRT for LARC. Methods and Materials: Radiation therapy was delivered with 45 Gy/25 daily fractions with coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy/3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy comprised fixed and escalated doses of capecitabine and temozolomide, respectively. The MGMT hypermethylation was evaluated in pretreatment tumor samples. This trial is registered with (ClinicalTrials.gov) with the number (NCT01781403). Results: Twenty-two patients with LARC of cT3-4N0 or cT{sub any}N1-2 were accrued. Dose level 3 was chosen as the RD because DLT was noticeably absent in 10 patients treated up to dose level 3. An additional 12 patients were recruited in this group. Grade III adverse events were noted, and pathologic complete response (pCR) was observed in 7 patients (31.8%); MGMT hypermethylation was detected in 16. The pCR rate was 37.5% and 16.7% in the hypermethylated and unmethylated MGMT groups, respectively (P=.616). Conclusions: There was a tendency toward higher pCR rates in patients with hypermethylated MGMT. Future randomized studies are therefore warranted.

  14. SU-F-R-55: Early Detection of Treatment Induced Bone Marrow Injury During Chemoradiation Therapy Using Quantitative CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X; Song, Y; Erickson, B; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Acute hematologic toxicity associated with bone marrow injury is a common complication of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pelvic malignancies. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using quantitative CT to detect bone marrow injury during CRT. Methods: Daily CTs were acquired during routine CT-guided radiation therapy using a CT-on-rails for 15 cervical cancer patients. All patients treated with a radiation dose of 45.0 to 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy/fraction along with chemotherapy. For each patient, the contours of bone marrow were generated in L4, L5 and sacrum on the first daily CT and then populated to other daily CTs by rigid registration using MIM (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH) with manual editing if possible. A series of CT texture parameters, including Hunsfield Unit (HU) histogram, mean HU, entropy, energy, in bone marrow contours were calculated using MATLAB on each daily CT and were correlated with the completed blood counts (CBC) collected weekly for each patient. The correlations were analyzed with Pearson correlation tests. Results: For all patient data analyzed, mean HU in bone marrow decreased during CRT delivery. From the first to the last fraction the average mean HU reduction is 58.1 ± 13.6 HU (P<0.01). This decrease can be observed as early as after first 5 fractions and is strongly associated with the changes of most CBC quantities, such as the reductions of white and blood cell counts (r=0.97, P=0.001). The reduction of HU is spatially varied. Conclusion: Chemoradiation induced bone marrow injury can be detected during the delivery of CRT using quantitative CT. Chemoradiation results in reductions in mean HU, which are strongly associated with the change in the pretrial blood cell counts. Early detection of bone marrow injury with commonly available CT opens a door to improve bone marrow sparing, reducing risk of hematologic toxicity.

  15. Focal Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation Improves Overall Survival in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Receiving Induction Chemotherapy and Consolidative Chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Sunil, E-mail: skrishnan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Chadha, Awalpreet S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Suh, Yelin [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Chen, Hsiang-Chun [Department of Biostatistics, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rao, Arvind [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D.; Mahmood, Usama; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Sawakuchi, Gabriel O. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Javle, Milind M.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Wolff, Robert A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To review outcomes of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients treated with dose-escalated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with curative intent. Methods and Materials: A total of 200 patients with LAPC were treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation between 2006 and 2014. Of these, 47 (24%) having tumors >1 cm from the luminal organs were selected for dose-escalated IMRT (biologically effective dose [BED] >70 Gy) using a simultaneous integrated boost technique, inspiration breath hold, and computed tomographic image guidance. Fractionation was optimized for coverage of gross tumor and luminal organ sparing. A 2- to 5-mm margin around the gross tumor volume was treated using a simultaneous integrated boost with a microscopic dose. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), local-regional and distant RFS, and time to local-regional and distant recurrence, calculated from start of chemoradiation, were the outcomes of interest. Results: Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (BED = 59.47 Gy) with a concurrent capecitabine-based (86%) regimen. Patients who received BED >70 Gy had a superior OS (17.8 vs 15.0 months, P=.03), which was preserved throughout the follow-up period, with estimated OS rates at 2 years of 36% versus 19% and at 3 years of 31% versus 9% along with improved local-regional RFS (10.2 vs 6.2 months, P=.05) as compared with those receiving BED ≤70 Gy. Degree of gross tumor volume coverage did not seem to affect outcomes. No additional toxicity was observed in the high-dose group. Higher dose (BED) was the only predictor of improved OS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Radiation dose escalation during consolidative chemoradiation therapy after induction chemotherapy for LAPC patients improves OS and local-regional RFS.

  16. Postoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in High-Risk Cervical Cancer: Re-evaluating the Findings of Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 109 in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Swisher-McClure, Samuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Hegarty, Sarah E. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grover, Surbhi, E-mail: Surbhi.grover@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To review the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to evaluate postoperative high-risk cervical cancer patients for factors associated with a benefit from chemoradiation therapy (CRT) over external beam radiation therapy alone (EBRT). Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Database was queried for women with cervical cancer treated with hysterectomy and adjuvant EBRT from 2002 to 2012. Only patients with pathologic lymph node involvement (LN+), positive surgical margins, and/or parametrial invasion were included in our analysis (on the basis of Peter's criteria). Univariable and multivariable analyses (MVA) were performed, and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to investigate for factors associated with of CRT utilization and overall survival (OS). Results: A total of 3053 patients met inclusion criteria, and 2479 received adjuvant CRT (81%), whereas 574 (19%) received EBRT alone. Factors associated with increased CRT utilization on MVA included age <69 years, year of diagnosis ≥2008, non-adenocarcinoma histology, and LN+. Use of CRT improved OS among the entire cohort on MVA (HR 0.76, CI 0.601-0.962; P=.022). On MVA, CRT improved OS in patients with LN+ as their sole Peter's criteria (HR 0.58, CI 0.413-0.814; P=.002). Chemoradiation therapy did not improve OS in patients with only positive margins (P=.73), only parametrial invasion (P=.95), or any combination of these 2 factors without LN+ (P=.63). Conclusions: The use of adjuvant CRT after hysterectomy improves OS in patients with high-risk cervical cancer compared with EBRT alone, but this benefit seems to be restricted to patients with LN+. The benefits of adjuvant CRT over EBRT alone in patients with parametrial invasion and/or positive margins (without nodal involvement) are unknown.

  17. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin and Cetuximab in Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Study

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    Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Conradi, Lena [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Weiss, Christian [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Sprenger, Thilo [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Middel, Peter [Institute for Pathology, University Medical Center, Göttingen (Germany); Rau, Tillman [Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Dellas, Kathrin [Department of Radiotherapy, Lübeck University (Germany); Kitz, Julia [Institute for Pathology, University Medical Center, Göttingen (Germany); Rödel, Franz [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Sauer, Rolf [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Erlangen (Germany); Rüschoff, Josef [Targos Molecular Pathology, Kassel (Germany); Beissbarth, Tim [Department of Medical Statistics, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Arnold, Dirk [Tumor Biology Center Freiburg, University of Freiburg (Germany); Ghadimi, B. Michael [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Rödel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Liersch, Torsten [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation therapy failed to improve complete response rates (pCR) in rectal cancer. Here we report the long-term results of the cetuximab added to preoperative radiation therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CET-CAPOX-RT) phase 1/2 study that evaluated preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The median follow-up was 63 months (range, 5-73 months). Sixty patients were enrolled; 3 patients were excluded due to protocol violation, and 4 died before surgery. Total mesorectal excision was performed in 53 patients, in 85% (n=45) with curative intention (M0-status). Secondary end points including overall survival (OS) disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were calculated. The prognostic value of KRAS mutation status was also assessed. Results: Histopathological examination confirmed ypUICC stages 0 (n=4; pCR), I (n=17), II (n=10), III (n=14), and IV (n=8). For patients who underwent surgery (n=53), OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.7%, 83%, and 75.5%, respectively, whereas CSS rates were 94.1%, 88.1%, and 78.1%, respectively. In the 45 patients who were treated with curative intent (M0), the OS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91.1%, 88.9%, and 86.7%, respectively; whereas CSS rates were 97.6%, 95.2%, and 90.3%, respectively; and DFS rates were 90.7%, 88.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. We did not find any locoregional failure in patients with M0-status (n=45). Chronic toxicity was rare. KRAS mutations, as detected in 33.3%, showed no correlation with the clinicopathological parameters nor significance for either OS (P=.112), CSS (P=.264), or DFS (P=.565). Conclusions: Taken together, chemoradiation therapy combined with cetuximab is safe, feasible, and offers excellent survival rates. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor. Importantly, lack of improvement in pCR rate did not

  18. Can MRI-derived factors predict the survival in glioblastoma patients treated with postoperative chemoradiation therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hideo Nakamura, Hideo [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto, (Japan); Murakami, Ryuji [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan)], e-mail: murakami@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Hirai, Toshinori; Kitajima, Mika; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Background: Advanced diagnostic and therapeutic developments may yield novel prognostic factors in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Purpose: To validate the predictive values of pretreatment quantitative diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI performed within 72 h after surgery in patients with GBM. Material and Methods: Between January 2000 and September 2009, 138 patients with GBM underwent postoperative chemoradiation therapy (chemo-RT) and longitudinal MRI before surgery, in the early postoperative period, and at 1-month intervals thereafter. The role of the patient age, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on pretreatment DW-MRI, and gross residual tumor on early postoperative MRI were assessed by factor analysis of overall survival (OS). Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method; the multivariate Cox's proportional hazards model was used to adjust for the influence of prognostic factors. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-recursive partitioning analysis (RTOG-RPA) criteria were used to validate the predictive value of the MRI-derived factors. Results: Substantial independent prognostic factors were the KPS score (hazard ratio [HR], 1.812), minimum ADC (HR, 2.365), and gross residual tumor (HR, 1.777). Based on MRI-derived factors, we assigned the patients to different prognostic groups in the RTOG-RPA classification and grouped them according to the level of risk, i.e. a high-risk group with low minimum ADCs (<0.93 X 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) with gross residual tumor and a low-risk group with high minimum ADCs ({>=}0.93 X 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/s) without gross residual tumor; the other patients were assigned to the intermediate-risk group. Median OS for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 28.2, 14.7, and 10.8 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The minimum ADC on pretreatment DW-MRI and gross residual tumor on early

  19. Longitudinal Changes in Active Bone Marrow for Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noticewala, Sonal S.; Li, Nan; Williamson, Casey W. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Hoh, Carl K. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Shen, Hanjie [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T.; Saenz, Cheryl C. [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Einck, John [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Plaxe, Steven [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify longitudinal changes in active bone marrow (ABM) distributions within unirradiated (extrapelvic) and irradiated (pelvic) bone marrow (BM) in cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: We sampled 39 cervical cancer patients treated with CRT, of whom 25 were treated with concurrent cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) and 14 were treated with cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) plus gemcitabine (50-125 mg/m{sup 2}) (C/G). Patients underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic imaging at baseline and 1.5 to 6.0 months after treatment. ABM was defined as the subvolume of bone with standardized uptake value (SUV) above the mean SUV of the total bone. The primary aim was to measure the compensatory response, defined as the change in the log of the ratio of extrapelvic versus pelvic ABM percentage from baseline to after treatment. We also quantified the change in the proportion of ABM and mean SUV in pelvic and extrapelvic BM using a 2-sided paired t test. Results: We observed a significant increase in the overall extrapelvic compensatory response after CRT (0.381; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.312, 0.449) and separately in patients treated with cisplatin (0.429; 95% CI: 0.340, 0.517) and C/G (0.294; 95% CI: 0.186, 0.402). We observed a trend toward higher compensatory response in patients treated with cisplatin compared with C/G (P=.057). Pelvic ABM percentage was reduced after CRT both in patients receiving cisplatin (P<.001) and in those receiving C/G (P<.001), whereas extrapelvic ABM percentage was increased in patients receiving cisplatin (P<.001) and C/G (P<.001). The mean SUV in pelvic structures was lower after CRT with both cisplatin (P<.001) and C/G (P<.001). The mean SUV appeared lower in extrapelvic structures after CRT in patients treated with C/G (P=.076) but not with cisplatin (P=.942). We also observed that older age and more intense chemotherapy

  20. PET/CT and histopathologic response to preoperative chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, C.; Loft, A.; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...

  1. SU-E-J-268: Change of CT Number During the Course of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X; Dalah, E; Liu, F; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Zhang, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Qianfoshan Hospital Affiliated to Shandon, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It has been observed radiation can induce changes in CT number (CTN) inside tumor during the course of radiation therapy (RT) for several tumor sites including lung and head and neck, suggesting that the CTN change may be potentially used to assess RT response. In this study, we investigate the CTN changes inside tumor during the course of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Daily diagnostic-quality CT data acquired during IGRT for 17 pancreatic head cancer patients using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were analyzed. All patients were treated with a radiation dose of 50.4 in 1.8 Gy per fraction. On each daily CT set, The contour of the pancreatic head, included in the treatment target, was generated by populating the pancreatic head contour from the planning CT or MRI using an auto-segmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing if necessary. The CTN at each voxel in the pancreatic head contour was extracted and the 3D distribution of the CTNs was processed using MATLAB. The mean value of CTN distribution was used to quantify the daily CTN change in the pancreatic head. Results: Reduction of CTN in pancreatic head was observed during the CRT delivery in 14 out the 17 (82%) patients studied. Although the average reduction is only 3.5 Houncefield Unit (HU), this change is significant (p<0.01). Among them, there are 7 patients who had a CTN drop larger than 5 HU, ranging from 6.0 to 11.8 HU. In contrast to this trend, CTN was increased in 3 patients. Conclusion: Measurable changes in the CT number in tumor target were observed during the course of chemoradiation therapy for the pancreas cancer patients, indicating this radiation-induced CTN change may be used to assess treatment response.

  2. SU-C-207B-06: Comparison of Registration Methods for Modeling Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riyahi, S; Choi, W; Bhooshan, N; Tan, S; Zhang, H; Lu, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare linear and deformable registration methods for evaluation of tumor response to Chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods: Linear and multi-resolution BSpline deformable registration were performed on Pre-Post-CRT CT/PET images of 20 patients with esophageal cancer. For both registration methods, we registered CT using Mean Square Error (MSE) metric, however to register PET we used transformation obtained using Mutual Information (MI) from the same CT due to being multi-modality. Similarity of Warped-CT/PET was quantitatively evaluated using Normalized Mutual Information and plausibility of DF was assessed using inverse consistency Error. To evaluate tumor response four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) Conventional PET/CT e.g. SUV, diameter (2) Clinical parameters e.g. TNM stage, histology (3)spatial-temporal PET features that describe intensity, texture and geometry of tumor (4)all features combined. Dominant features were identified using 10-fold cross-validation and Support Vector Machine (SVM) was deployed for tumor response prediction while the accuracy was evaluated by ROC Area Under Curve (AUC). Results: Average and standard deviation of Normalized mutual information for deformable registration using MSE was 0.2±0.054 and for linear registration was 0.1±0.026, showing higher NMI for deformable registration. Likewise for MI metric, deformable registration had 0.13±0.035 comparing to linear counterpart with 0.12±0.037. Inverse consistency error for deformable registration for MSE metric was 4.65±2.49 and for linear was 1.32±2.3 showing smaller value for linear registration. The same conclusion was obtained for MI in terms of inverse consistency error. AUC for both linear and deformable registration was 1 showing no absolute difference in terms of response evaluation. Conclusion: Deformable registration showed better NMI comparing to linear registration, however inverse consistency of

  3. Squamous cell carcinoma of the prostate: long-term survival after combined chemo-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippi Andrea

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most frequent malignant tumour affecting male population. While the large majority of tumours is represented by adenocarcinoma, pure squamous cell carcinoma comprises only 0,5–1% of all prostate neoplastic lesions. It is characterised by a high degree of malignancy, commonly metastasising to the bone (mainly with osteolytic lesions, liver and lungs with a median survival time of 14 months. Several therapeutic approaches have been employed in the effort to treat prostate pure squamous cell carcinoma, including radical surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. All of them mostly failed to gain a significant survival benefit. Case report We herein report on a case of pure squamous cell carcinoma of the prostate approached with combined-modality treatment, with the administration of 3 courses of cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 1 and continous infusion 5-fluorouracil 750 mg/m2 on day 1 to 5 and, subsequently, radiotherapy, with the delivery of a total dose of 46 Gy to the whole pelvis, with additional boost doses of 20 Gy to the prostatic bed and adjunctive 6 Gy to the prostate gland (72 Gy in total. The patient remained free of disease for 5 years, finally experiencing local relapse and, subsequently, dying of acute renal failure due to bilateral uretero-hydro-nephrosis. In addition, we provide a complete overview of all reported cases available within the medical literature. Conclusion Since it remains questionable which should be the most appropriate therapeutic approach towards prostate pure squamous cell carcinoma, our report demonstrates that a prolonged disease control, with a consistent survival time, may be achieved by the combination of an effective local treatment such as radiotherapy with systemic infusion of chemotherapeutic drugs.

  4. SU-D-207B-07: Development of a CT-Radiomics Based Early Response Prediction Model During Delivery of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klawikowski, S; Christian, J; Schott, D; Zhang, M; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Pilot study developing a CT-texture based model for early assessment of treatment response during the delivery of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Daily CT data acquired for 24 pancreatic head cancer patients using CT-on-rails, during the routine CT-guided CRT delivery with a radiation dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, were analyzed. The pancreas head was contoured on each daily CT. Texture analysis was performed within the pancreas head contour using a research tool (IBEX). Over 1300 texture metrics including: grey level co-occurrence, run-length, histogram, neighborhood intensity difference, and geometrical shape features were calculated for each daily CT. Metric-trend information was established by finding the best fit of either a linear, quadratic, or exponential function for each metric value verses accumulated dose. Thus all the daily CT texture information was consolidated into a best-fit trend type for a given patient and texture metric. Linear correlation was performed between the patient histological response vector (good, medium, poor) and all combinations of 23 patient subgroups (statistical jackknife) determining which metrics were most correlated to response and repeatedly reliable across most patients. Control correlations against CT scanner, reconstruction kernel, and gated/nongated CT images were also calculated. Euclidean distance measure was used to group/sort patient vectors based on the data of these trend-response metrics. Results: We found four specific trend-metrics (Gray Level Coocurence Matrix311-1InverseDiffMomentNorm, Gray Level Coocurence Matrix311-1InverseDiffNorm, Gray Level Coocurence Matrix311-1 Homogeneity2, and Intensity Direct Local StdMean) that were highly correlated with patient response and repeatedly reliable. Our four trend-metric model successfully ordered our pilot response dataset (p=0.00070). We found no significant correlation to our control parameters: gating (p=0.7717), scanner (p

  5. SU-F-R-50: Radiation-Induced Changes in CT Number Histogram During Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X; Schott, D; Song, Y; Li, D; Hall, W; Erickson, B; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In an effort of early assessment of treatment response, we investigate radiation induced changes in CT number histogram of GTV during the delivery of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Diagnostic-quality CT data acquired daily during routine CT-guided CRT using a CT-on-rails for 20 pancreatic head cancer patients were analyzed. All patients were treated with a radiation dose of 50.4 in 28 fractions. On each daily CT set, the contours of the pancreatic head and the spinal cord were delineated. The Hounsfiled Units (HU) histogram in these contourswere extracted and processed using MATLAB. Eight parameters of the histogram including the mean HU over all the voxels, peak position, volume, standard deviation (SD), skewness, kurtosis, energy, and entropy were calculated for each fraction. The significances were inspected using paired two-tailed t-test and the correlations were analyzed using Spearman rank correlation tests. Results: In general, HU histogram in pancreatic head (but not in spinal cord) changed during the CRT delivery. Changes from the first to the last fraction in mean HU in pancreatic head ranged from −13.4 to 3.7 HU with an average of −4.4 HU, which was significant (P<0.001). Among other quantities, the volume decreased, the skewness increased (less skewed), and the kurtosis decreased (less sharp) during the CRT delivery. The changes of mean HU, volume, skewness, and kurtosis became significant after two weeks of treatment. Patient pathological response status is associated with the changes of SD (ΔSD), i.e., ΔSD= 1.85 (average of 7 patients) for good reponse, −0.08 (average of 6 patients) for moderate and poor response. Conclusion: Significant changes in HU histogram and the histogram-based metrics (e.g., meam HU, skewness, and kurtosis) in tumor were observed during the course of chemoradiation therapy for pancreas cancer. These changes may be potentially used for early assessment of treatment response.

  6. Locally advanced rectal cancer: is diffusion weighted MRI helpful for the identification of complete responders (ypT0N0) after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassen, S.; Booij, M. de; Vliegen, R. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Sosef, M. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of General Surgery, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Berendsen, R. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of Clinical Physics, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Lammering, G. [MAASTRO Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, P.O. Box 3035, Maastricht (Netherlands); Clarijs, R. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of Pathology, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Bakker, M. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, R. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Warmerdam, F. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of Internal Medicine/Oncology, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    To determine retrospectively the additional value of DWI-MRI toT2-MRI for predicting complete response (ypT0N0 = CR) after chemoradiation-therapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer. Seventy locally advanced rectal cancer patients underwent CRT followed by restaging MRI and resection. Two readers with different experience levels independently scored T2 images for CR and, in a second reading, combined T2 and DWI. A 5-point confidence-level score was used to generate ROC curves. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) and interobserver agreement were compared for both readings. Histology served as reference standard. The interobserver agreement increased after addition of DWI from 0.35 to 0.58 but the AUC improved only for the experienced reader (0.77 to 0.89, p = 0.005 vs. 0.74 to 0.70, p > 0.05). Sensitivity and NPV improved from 20-30 % to 40-70 %, respectively 88 % to 91-95 %. Specificity and PPV improved only for the experienced reader (87 to 93 % respectively 27 to 63 %). Adding DWI to T2-MRI improves consistency between readers and has potential to improve readers' accuracy dependent on his/her experience. DWI could be of additional value, particularly in ruling out CR (high NPV), but considering the sub-optimal PPV one should be cautious about relying solely on MRI for the clinical decision to offer a wait-and-see strategy. (orig.)

  7. Murine xenograft model demonstrates significant radio-sensitising effect of liposomal doxorubicin in a combination therapy for Feline Injection Site Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petznek, H; Kleiter, M; Tichy, A; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, A; Hohenadl, C

    2014-10-01

    Therapy of cats suffering from feline injection site sarcomas (FISS) is still a challenging problem, as the recurrence rate after surgery is up to 70%. Four FISS-derived primary tumour cell lines and corresponding xenograft tumour mouse models were established to evaluate the efficacy of a concomitant chemo-/radiation therapy with doxorubicin. In vitro, strongly depending upon the timing of administration, pre-treatment with 0.25 µmol doxorubicin resulted in a significant enhancement of radiation-induced (3.5 Gy) tumour cell death. This result was confirmed in vivo, where only the combined chemo-/radiation therapy resulted in a significant reduction in tumour growth compared to the respective mono-therapies with either doxorubicin or radiation. These results support the use of the concomitant chemo-/radiation therapy for adjuvant treatment of FISS, particularly in advanced or recurrent disease where surgery alone is no longer feasible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enteral feeding tubes in patients undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyfman, Shlomo A; Adelstein, David J

    2012-11-01

    Definitive chemoradiation therapy has evolved as the preferred organ preservation strategy in the treatment of locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LA-HNC). Dry mouth and dysphagia are among the most common and most debilitating treatment-related toxicities that frequently necessitate the placement of enteral feeding tubes (FT) in these patients to help them meet their nutritional requirements. The use of either a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube or a nasogastric tube, the choice of using a prophylactic vs a reactive approach, and the effects of FTs on weight loss, hospitalization, quality of life, and long-term functional outcomes are areas of continued controversy. Considerable variations in practice patterns exist in the United States and abroad. This critical review synthesizes the current data for the use of enteral FTs in this patient population and clarifies the relative advantages of different types of FTs and the timing of their use. Recent developments in the biologic understanding and treatment approaches for LA-HNC appear to be favorably impacting the frequency and severity of treatment-related dysphagia and may reduce the need for enteral tube feeding in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Enteral Feeding Tubes in Patients Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Critical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyfman, Shlomo A., E-mail: koyfmas@ccf.org [Departments of Radiation and Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Adelstein, David J. [Departments of Radiation and Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Definitive chemoradiation therapy has evolved as the preferred organ preservation strategy in the treatment of locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LA-HNC). Dry mouth and dysphagia are among the most common and most debilitating treatment-related toxicities that frequently necessitate the placement of enteral feeding tubes (FT) in these patients to help them meet their nutritional requirements. The use of either a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube or a nasogastric tube, the choice of using a prophylactic vs a reactive approach, and the effects of FTs on weight loss, hospitalization, quality of life, and long-term functional outcomes are areas of continued controversy. Considerable variations in practice patterns exist in the United States and abroad. This critical review synthesizes the current data for the use of enteral FTs in this patient population and clarifies the relative advantages of different types of FTs and the timing of their use. Recent developments in the biologic understanding and treatment approaches for LA-HNC appear to be favorably impacting the frequency and severity of treatment-related dysphagia and may reduce the need for enteral tube feeding in the future.

  10. Using [{sup 18}F]Fluorothymidine Imaged With Positron Emission Tomography to Quantify and Reduce Hematologic Toxicity Due to Chemoradiation Therapy for Pelvic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, Sarah M., E-mail: sarah-mcguire@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Jacobson, Geraldine M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia (United States); Menda, Yusuf; Ponto, Laura L. [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Smith, Brian J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Gross, Brandie A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Bayouth, John E. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Sunderland, John J.; Graham, Michael M. [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present prospective clinical trial was to determine the efficacy of [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine (FLT)-identified active bone marrow sparing for pelvic cancer patients by correlating the FLT uptake change during and after chemoradiation therapy with hematologic toxicity. Methods and Materials: Simulation FLT positron emission tomography (PET) images were used to spare pelvic bone marrow using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT BMS) for 32 patients with pelvic cancer. FLT PET scans taken during chemoradiation therapy after 1 and 2 weeks and 30 days and 1 year after completion of chemoradiation therapy were used to evaluate the acute and chronic dose response of pelvic bone marrow. Complete blood counts were recorded at each imaging point to correlate the FLT uptake change with systemic hematologic toxicity. Results: IMRT BMS plans significantly reduced the dose to the pelvic regions identified with FLT uptake compared with control IMRT plans (P<.001, paired t test). Radiation doses of 4 Gy caused an ∼50% decrease in FLT uptake in the pelvic bone marrow after either 1 or 2 weeks of chemoradiation therapy. Additionally, subjects with more FLT-identified bone marrow exposed to ≥4 Gy after 1 week developed grade 2 leukopenia sooner than subjects with less marrow exposed to ≥4 Gy (P<.05, Cox regression analysis). Apparent bone marrow recovery at 30 days after therapy was not maintained 1 year after chemotherapy. The FLT uptake in the pelvic bone marrow regions that received >35 Gy was 18.8% ± 1.8% greater at 30 days after therapy than at 1 year after therapy. The white blood cell, platelet, lymphocyte, and neutrophil counts at 1 year after therapy were all lower than the pretherapy levels (P<.05, paired t test). Conclusions: IMRT BMS plans reduced the dose to FLT-identified pelvic bone marrow for pelvic cancer patients. However, reducing hematologic toxicity is challenging owing to the acute radiation sensitivity

  11. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: An International Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London (Canada); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tsujino, Kayoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Barriger, Robert B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Moreno, Marta [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Kim, Tae Hyun [Center for Proton Therapy, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Ramella, Sara [Radiotherapy Unit, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); De Petris, Luigi [Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm (Sweden); Stitt, Larry [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Rodrigues, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London (Canada); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2013-02-01

    Background: Radiation pneumonitis is a dose-limiting toxicity for patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed an individual patient data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 836 patients who underwent CCRT in Europe, North America, and Asia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (two-thirds vs one-third of patients). Factors predictive of symptomatic pneumonitis (grade {>=}2 by 1 of several scoring systems) or fatal pneumonitis were evaluated using logistic regression. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to define risk groups. Results: The median radiation therapy dose was 60 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.3 years. Most patients received concurrent cisplatin/etoposide (38%) or carboplatin/paclitaxel (26%). The overall rate of symptomatic pneumonitis was 29.8% (n=249), with fatal pneumonitis in 1.9% (n=16). In the training set, factors predictive of symptomatic pneumonitis were lung volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}) (odds ratio [OR] 1.03 per 1% increase, P=.008), and carboplatin/paclitaxel chemotherapy (OR 3.33, P<.001), with a trend for age (OR 1.24 per decade, P=.09); the model remained predictive in the validation set with good discrimination in both datasets (c-statistic >0.65). On RPA, the highest risk of pneumonitis (>50%) was in patients >65 years of age receiving carboplatin/paclitaxel. Predictors of fatal pneumonitis were daily dose >2 Gy, V{sub 20}, and lower-lobe tumor location. Conclusions: Several treatment-related risk factors predict the development of symptomatic pneumonitis, and elderly patients who undergo CCRT with carboplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy are at highest risk. Fatal pneumonitis, although uncommon, is related to dosimetric factors and tumor location.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in head and neck cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Héliton S; Schluckebier, Luciene Fontes; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Small, Isabele A; Araújo, Carlos M M; Viégas, Celia Maria Pais; Rampini, Mariana P; Ferreira, Elza M S; Dias, Fernando L; Teich, Vanessa; Teich, Nelson; Ferreira, Carlos G

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a major event increasing treatment costs of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with chemoradiation (CRT). This study was designed to estimate the cost-effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to prevent oral mucositis in HNSCC patients receiving CRT. From June 2007 to December 2010, 94 patients with HNSCC of nasopharynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx entered a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trial. CRT consisted of conventional radiotherapy (RT: 70.2 Gy, 1.8 Gy/d, 5 times/wk)+concurrent cisplatin (100mg/m2) every 3 weeks. An InGaAlP (660 nm-100 mW-4J/cm2) laser diode was used for LLLT. From the perspective of Brazil's public health care system (SUS), total costs were higher in Placebo Group (PG) than Laser Group (LG) for opioid use (LG=US$ 9.08, PG=US$ 44.28), gastrostomy feeding (LG=US$ 50.50, PG=US$ 129.86), and hospitalization (PG=US$ 77.03). In LG, the cost was higher for laser therapy only (US$ 1880.57). The total incremental cost associated with the use of LLLT was US$ 1689.00 per patient. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was US$ 4961.37 per grade 3-4 OM case prevented compared to no treatment. Our results indicate that morbidity was lower in the Laser Group and that LLLT was more cost-effective than placebo up to a threshold of at least US$ 5000 per mucositis case prevented. NCT01439724. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. SU-F-J-222: Using PET Imaging to Evaluate Proliferation and Blood Flow in Irradiated and Non-Irradiated Bone Marrow 1 Year After Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S; Ponto, L; Menda, Y [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare proliferation and blood flow in pelvic and thoracic bone marrow 1 year after pelvic chemoradiation. Methods: Sixteen pelvic cancer patients were enrolled in an IRB-approved protocol to acquire FLT PET images during radiation therapy simulation (baseline) and 1 year after chemoradiation therapy. Three subjects also had optional O-15 water PET images acquired 1 year after chemoradiation therapy. Baseline FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans to spare pelvic bone marrow identified as regions with FLT SUV ≥ 2 without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing. Marrow VOIs were defined using a 50% maximum pixel value threshold on baseline FLT PET images (VIEW, PMOD version 3.5) in the sacrum and thoracic spine representing irradiated and non-irradiated regions, respectively. FLT PET and O-15 water PET images acquired 1 year after therapy were co-registered to baseline images (FUSION PMOD) and the same VOIs were used to measure proliferation (FLT SUV) and blood flow (O-15 water uptake). Separate image-based input functions were used for blood flow quantitation in each VOI. Results: Mean 1 year FLT SUV in sacral and thoracic VOIs for were 1.1 ± 0.4 and 6.5 ± 1.7, respectively for N = 16 subjects and were 1.2 ± 0.2 and 5.6 ± 1.6, respectively for N = 3 subjects who also underwent O-15 water imaging. Blood flow measures in equivalent sacral and thoracic marrow regions (N = 3) were 21.3 ± 8.7 and 18.3 ± 4.9 mL/min/100mL respectively. Conclusion: Decreased bone marrow proliferation measured by FLT SUV does not appear to correspond to decreased blood flow as measured by O-15 water PET imaging. Based on this small sample at a single time point, reduced blood supply does not explain reductions in bone marrow proliferative activity 1 year after chemoradiation therapy.

  14. Epigenetic Regulation of KLHL34 Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ye J. [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan W. [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Seon A. [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Dong H. [Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong L.; Kim, Seon Y. [Medical Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong S., E-mail: yongsung@kribb.re.kr [Medical Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin C., E-mail: jckim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Prediction of individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is urgently needed in patients with poorly responsive locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Candidate methylation genes associated with radiosensitivity were identified using a 3-step process. In the first step, genome-wide screening of methylation genes was performed in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade in 45 patients with LARC. In the second step, the methylation status of selected sites was analyzed by pyrosequencing in 67 LARC patients, including 24 patients analyzed in the first step. Finally, colorectal cancer cell clones with stable KLHL34 knockdown were generated and tested for cellular sensitivity to radiation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 7 hypermethylated CpG sites (DZIP1 cg24107021, DZIP1 cg26886381, ZEB1 cg04430381, DKK3 cg041006961, STL cg00991794, KLHL34 cg01828474, and ARHGAP6 cg07828380) associated with preoperative CRT responses. Radiosensitivity in patients with hypermethylated KLHL34 cg14232291 was confirmed by pyrosequencing in additional cohorts. Knockdown of KLHL34 significantly reduced colony formation (KLHL34 sh#1: 20.1%, P=.0001 and KLHL34 sh#2: 15.8%, P=.0002), increased the cytotoxicity (KLHL34 sh#1: 14.8%, P=.019 and KLHL34 sh#2: 17.9%, P=.007) in LoVo cells, and increased radiation-induced caspase-3 activity and the sub-G1 population of cells. Conclusions: The methylation status of KLHL34 cg14232291 may be a predictive candidate of sensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts using various cell types.

  15. Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy for Localized Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dongryul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Yong Chan, E-mail: ycahn.ahn@samsung.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Young Hyeh [Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) with 40 Gy followed by consolidation chemotherapy for localized extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL), nasal type. Methods and Materials: From August 2004 to August 2012, 62 patients with newly diagnosed stage IE to IIE ENKTL underwent CCRT followed by consolidation chemotherapy. The median RT dose was 40 Gy. Cisplatin, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, was administered weekly during the RT course. Responders to CCRT were encouraged to undergo consolidation chemotherapy. Three different consolidation chemotherapy regimens were used consecutively: VIPD (etoposide, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and dexamethasone); VIDL (etoposide, ifosfamide, and dexamethasone followed by intramuscular injection of L-asparaginase); and MIDLE (methotrexate, etoposide, ifosfamide, mesna, and L-asparaginase). Results: The median follow-up period was 49 months (range 8-112). After completion of CCRT, 56 patients (90.3%) had a complete response, 4 (6.4%) had a partial response, 1 (1.6%) had stable disease, and 1 patient (1.6%) had progressive disease (PD). Consolidation chemotherapy was recommended to 61 patients, after excluding the patient with PD, but was actually delivered to 58. Of these 58 patients, 56 (96.5%) had a complete response and 2 (3.5%) had PD. During the follow-up period, 17 patients (including 3 with PD) experienced progression. The median interval to progression was 11 months (range 1-61). Local failure developed in 6 patients, of whom, 2 had developed progression outside the RT field. For all patients, the 3-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local control rates were 83.1%, 77.1%, and 92.4%, respectively. Grade ≥3 nonhematologic toxicity developed in only 3 patients (4.8%). Conclusions: Excellent clinical outcomes were achieved using CCRT with 40 Gy followed by consolidation chemotherapy. Additional investigation, however, is warranted to confirm our findings.

  16. Treatment Outcomes, Growth Height, and Neuroendocrine Functions in Patients With Intracranial Germ Cell Tumors Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odagiri, Kazumasa, E-mail: t086016a@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Omura, Motoko [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Hata, Masaharu [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu [Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Ogino, Ichiro [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Kigasawa, Hisato [Division of Hemato-oncology/Regeneration Medicine, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Ito, Susumu [Department of Neurosurgery, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Adachi, Masataka [Department of Endocrinology, Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: We carried out a retrospective review of patients receiving chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for intracranial germ cell tumor (GCT) using a lower dose than those previously reported. To identify an optimal GCT treatment strategy, we evaluated treatment outcomes, growth height, and neuroendocrine functions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GCT, including 4 patients with nongerminomatous GCT (NGGCT) were treated with CRT. The median age at initial diagnosis was 11.5 years (range, 6-19 years). Seventeen patients initially received whole brain irradiation (median dose, 19.8 Gy), and 5 patients, including 4 with NGGCT, received craniospinal irradiation (median dose, 30.6 Gy). The median radiation doses delivered to the primary site were 36 Gy for pure germinoma and 45 Gy for NGGCT. Seventeen patients had tumors adjacent to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA), and 5 had tumors away from the HPA. Results: The median follow-up time was 72 months (range, 18-203 months). The rates of both disease-free survival and overall survival were 100%. The standard deviation scores (SDSs) of final heights recorded at the last assessment tended to be lower than those at initial diagnosis. Even in all 5 patients with tumors located away from the HPA, final height SDSs decreased (p = 0.018). In 16 patients with tumors adjacent to the HPA, 8 showed metabolic changes suggestive of hypothalamic obesity and/or growth hormone deficiency, and 13 had other pituitary hormone deficiencies. In contrast, 4 of 5 patients with tumors away from the HPA did not show any neuroendocrine dysfunctions except for a tendency to short stature. Conclusions: CRT for GCT using limited radiation doses resulted in excellent treatment outcomes. Even after limited radiation doses, insufficient growth height was often observed that was independent of tumor location. Our study suggests that close follow-up of neuroendocrine functions, including growth hormone, is essential for all patients with

  17. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki, E-mail: isohashi@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Mabuchi, Seiji [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Konishi, Koji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Division of Medical Physics, Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Maruoka, Shintaroh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kimura, Tadashi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  18. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials In total, 744...... patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during...

  19. Nomogram Prediction of Survival and Recurrence in Patients With Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer Undergoing Curative Resection Followed by Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Changhoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyubo, E-mail: kyubokim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chie, Eui Kyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sung W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To develop nomograms for predicting the overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation therapy after curative resection. Methods and Materials: From January 1995 through August 2006, a total of 166 consecutive patients underwent curative resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression was performed, and this Cox model was used as the basis for the nomograms of OS and RFS. We calculated concordance indices of the constructed nomograms and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Results: The OS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 60.8% and 42.5%, respectively, and the RFS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 52.5% and 38.2%, respectively. The model containing age, sex, tumor location, histologic differentiation, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement was selected for nomograms. The bootstrap-corrected concordance index of the nomogram for OS and RFS was 0.63 and 0.62, respectively, and that of AJCC staging for OS and RFS was 0.50 and 0.52, respectively. Conclusions: We developed nomograms that predicted survival and recurrence better than AJCC staging. With caution, clinicians may use these nomograms as an adjunct to or substitute for AJCC staging for predicting an individual's prognosis and offering tailored adjuvant therapy.

  20. Health-Related Quality of Life in SCALOP, a Randomized Phase 2 Trial Comparing Chemoradiation Therapy Regimens in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, Christopher N., E-mail: hurtcn@cardiff.ac.uk [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Mukherjee, Somnath [Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Oxford University, NIHR Biomedical Research, Oxford (United Kingdom); Bridgewater, John [UCL Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom); Falk, Stephen [Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, Bristol (United Kingdom); Crosby, Tom [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); McDonald, Alec [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Joseph, George [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Staffurth, John [Institute of Cancer and Genetics, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Blazeby, Jane M. [Division of Surgery, Head and Neck, University Hospitals Bristol National Health Service Foundation Trust, Bristol and School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Bridges, Sarah [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Dutton, Peter [Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Griffiths, Gareth [Southampton Clinical Trials Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Southampton University, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Maughan, Tim [Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Oxford University, NIHR Biomedical Research, Oxford (United Kingdom); Johnson, Colin [University Surgical Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) provides survival benefits but may result in considerable toxicity. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) measurements during CRT have not been widely reported. This paper reports HRQL data from the Selective Chemoradiation in Advanced Localised Pancreatic Cancer (SCALOP) trial, including validation of the QLQ-PAN26 tool in CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced, inoperable, nonmetastatic carcinoma of the pancreas were eligible. Following 12 weeks of induction gemcitabine plus capecitabine (GEMCAP) chemotherapy, patients with stable and responding disease were randomized to a further cycle of GEMCAP followed by capecitabine- or gemcitabine-based CRT. HRQL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the EORTC Pancreatic Cancer module (PAN26). Results: A total of 114 patients from 28 UK centers were registered and 74 patients randomized. There was improvement in the majority of HRQL scales during induction chemotherapy. Patients with significant deterioration in fatigue, appetite loss, and gastrointestinal symptoms during CRT recovered within 3 weeks following CRT. Differences in changes in HRQL scores between trial arms rarely reached statistical significance; however, where they did, they favored capecitabine therapy. PAN26 scales had good internal consistency and were able to distinguish between subgroups of patients experiencing toxicity. Conclusions: Although there is deterioration in HRQL following CRT, this resolves within 3 weeks. HRQL data support the use of capecitabine- over gemcitabine-based chemoradiation. The QLQ-PAN26 is a reliable and valid tool for use in patients receiving CRT.

  1. Predicting Esophagitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

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    Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oberije, Cary [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dios, Núria Rodríguez de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barriger, R. Bryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Moreno-Jiménez, Marta [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [Center for Proton Therapy, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Ramella, Sara [Division of Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Everitt, Sarah [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University (Australia); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); De Ruyck, Kim [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) improves survival compared with sequential treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but it increases toxicity, particularly radiation esophagitis (RE). Validated predictors of RE for clinical use are lacking. We performed an individual-patient-data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant RE. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 1082 patients who underwent CCRT, including patients from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (2/3 vs 1/3 of patients). Factors predictive of RE (grade ≥2 and grade ≥3) were assessed using logistic modeling, with the concordance statistic (c statistic) used to evaluate the performance of each model. Results: The median radiation therapy dose delivered was 65 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.1 years. Most patients (91%) received platinum-containing CCRT regimens. The development of RE was common, scored as grade 2 in 348 patients (32.2%), grade 3 in 185 (17.1%), and grade 4 in 10 (0.9%). There were no RE-related deaths. On univariable analysis using the training set, several baseline factors were statistically predictive of RE (P<.05), but only dosimetric factors had good discrimination scores (c > .60). On multivariable analysis, the esophageal volume receiving ≥60 Gy (V60) alone emerged as the best predictor of grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 RE, with good calibration and discrimination. Recursive partitioning identified 3 risk groups: low (V60 <0.07%), intermediate (V60 0.07% to 16.99%), and high (V60 ≥17%). With use of the validation set, the predictive model performed inferiorly for the grade ≥2 endpoint (c = .58) but performed well for the grade ≥3 endpoint (c = .66). Conclusions: Clinically significant RE is common, but life-threatening complications occur in <1% of patients. Although several factors

  2. Multimodal Treatment of Hepatic Metastasis in the Form of a Bile Duct Tumor Thrombus from Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma: Case Report of Successful Resection after Chemoradiation Therapy

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    Hirotada Kittaka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC is a rare tumor, and its pathophysiology has not been well understood. Treatment strategies for hepatic metastasis originating from ACC remain controversial. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman who had undergone total pancreatectomy from ACC 7 years prior to clinical presentation. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging revealed a tumorous lesion measuring 7 cm in length and 1 cm in diameter and extending along the intrahepatic bile duct (B6, which showed mild enhancement in the early phase and modest washout in the late phase. This lesion was diagnosed as hepatic metastasis primarily in the form of a bile duct tumor thrombus originating from the prior ACC by the pathological evaluation of the fine needle biopsy specimen. The patient underwent preoperative gemcitabine-based chemoradiation therapy followed by subsequent surgical resection, which included subsegmentectomy (S6 of the liver and complete removal of the bile duct tumor thrombus. The patient has had no recurrence during the past 8 months since her last surgery. Multimodal treatment including preoperative chemoradiation therapy might be beneficial especially for marginally resectable cases of ACC.

  3. Thoracic Vertebral Body Irradiation Contributes to Acute Hematologic Toxicity During Chemoradiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Deek, Matthew P.; Benenati, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kim, Sinae [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey (United States); Biometrics Division, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Chen, Ting; Ahmed, Inaya; Zou, Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Aisner, Joseph [Division of Medical Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationships between radiation doses to the thoracic bone marrow and declines in blood cell counts in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: We included 52 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive concurrent carboplatin–paclitaxel and RT. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for the thoracic vertebrae (TV), sternum, scapulae, clavicles, and ribs were assessed for associations with changes in blood counts during the course of CRT. Linear and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify associations between hematologic nadirs and DVH parameters. A DVH parameter of Vx was the percentage of the total organ volume exceeding x radiation dose. Results: Grade ≥3 hematologic toxicity including neutropenia developed in 21% (n=11), leukopenia in 42% (n=22), anemia in 6% (n=3), and throbocytopenia in 2% (n=1) of patients. Greater RT dose to the TV was associated with higher risk of grade ≥3 leukopenia across multiple DVH parameters, including TV V{sub 20} (TVV) (odds ratio [OR] 1.06; P=.025), TVV{sub 30} (OR 1.07; P=.013), and mean vertebral dose (MVD) (OR 1.13; P=.026). On multiple regression analysis, TVV{sub 30} (β = −0.004; P=.018) and TVV{sub 20} (β = −0.003; P=.048) were associated with white blood cell nadir. Additional bone marrow sites (scapulae, clavicles, and ribs) did not affect hematologic toxicity. A 20% chance of grade ≥3 leukopenia was associated with a MVD of 13.5 Gy and a TTV{sub 30} of 28%. Cutoff values to avoid grade ≥3 leukopenia were MVD ≤23.9 Gy, TVV{sub 20} ≤56.0%, and TVV{sub 30} ≤52.1%. Conclusions: Hematologic toxicity is associated with greater RT doses to the TV during CRT for NSCLC. Sparing of the TV using advanced radiation techniques may improve tolerance of CRT and result in improved tolerance of concurrent chemotherapy.

  4. Molecular targeting agents in the context of primary chemoradiation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Simon; Wang, Chia Jung; Münscher, Adrian; Tribius, Silke; Schafhausen, Philippe; Knecht, Rainald

    2013-05-01

    Demands for organ preservation and increasing knowledge in molecular tumor biology have lead to the development of molecular targeting agents. These substances have also been incorporated into concomitant and sequential chemoradiation protocols. This study was conducted using a systematic literature review. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling as a central step in carcinogenesis, progression, and metastasis is the predominant approach. Although EGFR targeting substances are commonly used, the specific influence of molecular targeting therapies on patient outcome remains unclear. In this review, results from recent clinical trials in the area of primary chemoradiation in the combination with EGFR targeting agents are discussed. Encouraging results from recent trials need to be confirmed in larger patient cohorts and cost-effectiveness analyses have to be undertaken. Phase III studies need to confirm these results before, time and again, new phase II studies are initiated. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost After Concurrent Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study

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    Hepel, Jaroslaw T., E-mail: jhepel@lifespan.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Leonard, Kara Lynne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Safran, Howard [Division of Medical Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Division of Medical Oncology, Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Ng, Thomas [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Taber, Angela [Division of Medical Oncology, Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Khurshid, Humera; Birnbaum, Ariel [Division of Medical Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Wazer, David E.; DiPetrillo, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost to primary and nodal disease after chemoradiation has potential to improve outcomes for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A dose escalation study was initiated to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received chemoradiation to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions and had primary and nodal volumes appropriate for SBRT boost (<120 cc and <60 cc, respectively). SBRT was delivered in 2 fractions after chemoradiation. Dose was escalated from 16 to 28 Gy in 2 Gy/fraction increments, resulting in 4 dose cohorts. MTD was defined when ≥2 of 6 patients per cohort experienced any treatment-related grade 3 to 5 toxicity within 4 weeks of treatment or the maximum dose was reached. Late toxicity, disease control, and survival were also evaluated. Results: Twelve patients (3 per dose level) underwent treatment. All treatment plans met predetermined dose-volume constraints. The mean age was 64 years. Most patients had stage III disease (92%) and were medically inoperable (92%). The maximum dose level was reached with no grade 3 to 5 acute toxicities. At a median follow-up time of 16 months, 1-year local-regional control (LRC) was 78%. LRC was 50% at <24 Gy and 100% at ≥24 Gy (P=.02). Overall survival at 1 year was 67%. Late toxicity (grade 3-5) was seen in only 1 patient who experienced fatal bronchopulmonary hemorrhage (grade 5). There were no predetermined dose constraints for the proximal bronchial-vascular tree (PBV) in this study. This patient's 4-cc PBV dose was substantially higher than that received by other patients in all 4 cohorts and was associated with the toxicity observed: 20.3 Gy (P<.05) and 73.5 Gy (P=.07) for SBRT boost and total treatment, respectively. Conclusions: SBRT boost to both primary and nodal disease after chemoradiation is feasible and well tolerated. Local control rates are encouraging, especially at doses ≥24

  6. Combining Clozapine and Talk Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulroy, Kevin

    Clozapine is an antipsychotic medication used in the treatment of schizophrenia. This paper reviews articles concerning clozapine therapy. It considers its benefits and dangers in various situations, and how it can be successfully combined with talk therapies. Studies are reviewed concerning patients in outpatient clinics, partial hospitalization…

  7. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2: proposed applications and treatment protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved and dosimetric parameters may lead to the management of a broader range of complications associated with HNC treatment. This could enhance patient adherence to cancer therapy, and improve quality of life and treatment outcomes. The mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations for PBM have been reviewed in part 1. Part 2 discusses the head and neck treatment side effects for which PBM may prove to be effective. In addition, PBM parameters for each of these complications are suggested and future research directions are discussed. Methods Narrative review and presentation of PBM parameters are based on current evidence and expert opinion. Results PBM may have potential applications in the management of a broad range of side effects of (chemo)radiation therapy (CRT) in patients being treated for HNC. For OM management, optimal PBM parameters identified were as follows: wavelength, typically between 633 and 685 nm or 780–830 nm; energy density, laser or light-emitting diode (LED) output between 10 and 150 mW; dose, 2–3 J (J/cm2), and no more than 6 J/cm2 on the tissue surface treated; treatment schedule, two to three times a week up to daily; emission type, pulsed (<100 Hz); and route of delivery, intraorally and/or transcutaneously. To facilitate further studies, we propose potentially effective PBM parameters for prophylactic and therapeutic use in supportive care for dermatitis, dysphagia, dry mouth, dysgeusia, trismus, necrosis, lymphedema, and voice/speech alterations. Conclusion PBM may have a role in supportive care for a broad range of complications associated with the treatment of HNC with CRT

  8. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2: proposed applications and treatment protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Judith A E M; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E; Nair, Raj G; Epstein, Joel B; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A; Milstein, Dan M J; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E; Schubert, Mark M; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2016-06-01

    There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved and dosimetric parameters may lead to the management of a broader range of complications associated with HNC treatment. This could enhance patient adherence to cancer therapy, and improve quality of life and treatment outcomes. The mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations for PBM have been reviewed in part 1. Part 2 discusses the head and neck treatment side effects for which PBM may prove to be effective. In addition, PBM parameters for each of these complications are suggested and future research directions are discussed. Narrative review and presentation of PBM parameters are based on current evidence and expert opinion. PBM may have potential applications in the management of a broad range of side effects of (chemo)radiation therapy (CRT) in patients being treated for HNC. For OM management, optimal PBM parameters identified were as follows: wavelength, typically between 633 and 685 nm or 780-830 nm; energy density, laser or light-emitting diode (LED) output between 10 and 150 mW; dose, 2-3 J (J/cm(2)), and no more than 6 J/cm(2) on the tissue surface treated; treatment schedule, two to three times a week up to daily; emission type, pulsed (<100 Hz); and route of delivery, intraorally and/or transcutaneously. To facilitate further studies, we propose potentially effective PBM parameters for prophylactic and therapeutic use in supportive care for dermatitis, dysphagia, dry mouth, dysgeusia, trismus, necrosis, lymphedema, and voice/speech alterations. PBM may have a role in supportive care for a broad range of complications associated with the treatment of HNC with CRT. The suggested PBM irradiation

  9. Reduction in the size of enlarged pelvic lymph nodes after chemoradiation therapy is associated with fewer lymph node metastases in locally advanced rectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Miyakura, Yasuyuki; Lefor, Alan T; Takahashi, Kazuya; Horie, Hisanaga; Koinuma, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Ito, Homare; Shimizu, Tetsuichiro; Kono, Yoshihiko; Sata, Naohiro; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Sakatani, Takashi; Yasuda, Yoshikazu

    2015-07-01

    We hypothesized that a reduction in the size of the lymph nodes after neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma would be associated with decreased lymph node metastases and/or a better prognosis. Between March 2006 and April 2012, 71 patients with primary rectal cancer received neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). For all lymph nodes 5 mm or larger in size, the major and minor axes were measured on CT scan images, and the product was calculated. The lymph node size was determined before and after CRT. The patients were divided into three groups based on the lymph node size before and after treatment. Group A exhibited a reduction in size of 60% or more, Group B a reduction of less than 60% and Group C had no lymph node enlargement before treatment. The incidence of lymph node metastases on pathological examination was 15% in Group A and 50% in Group B (p = 0.006). The five-year disease-free survival in Group A was 84% compared with 78% in Group B (log rank p = 0.34). The five-year overall survival in Group A was 92% compared with 74% in Group B (log rank p = 0.088). A reduction in the size of enlarged lymph nodes after neoadjuvant therapy may be a useful prognostic factor for recurrence and survival.

  10. SU-E-T-256: Radiation Dose Responses for Chemoradiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer: An Analysis of Compiled Clinical Data Using Biophysical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, I; Tai, A; Erickson, B; Li, X

    2012-06-01

    We have analyzed recent clinical data obtained from chemoradiation of unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer in order to examine possible benefits from radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation as well as to propose possible dose escalated fractionation schemes. A modified linear quadratic (LQ) model was used to fit clinical tumor response data from chemoradiation treatments using different fractionations. Biophysical radiosensitivy parameters, a and α/β, tumor potential doubling time, Td, and delay time for tumor doubling during treatment, Tk, were extracted from the fits and were used to calculate feasible fractionation schemes for dose escalations. Examination of published data from 20 institutions showed no clear indication of improved survival with raised radiation dose. However, an enhancement in tumor response was observed for higher irradiation doses, an important and promising clinical Result with respect to palliation and quality of life. The radiobiological parameter estimates obtained from the analysis are: α/β = 10 ± 3 Gy, a = 0.010 ± 0.003 Gŷ-1, Td = 56 ± 5 days and Tk = 7 ± 2 days. Possible dose escalation schemes are proposed based on the calculation of the biologically equivalent dose (BED) required for a 50% tumor response rate. From the point of view of tumor response, escalation of the administered radiation dose leads to a potential clinical benefit, which when combined with normal tissue complication analyses may Result in improved treatments for certain patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Based on this analysis, a dose escalation trial with 2.25 Gy/fraction up to 69.75 Gy is being initiated for unresectable pancreatic cancer at our institution. Partially supported by MCW Cancer Center Meinerz Foundation. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Postoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in High-Risk Cervical Cancer: Re-evaluating the Findings of Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 109 in a Large, Population-Based Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Showalter, Timothy N; Hegarty, Sarah E; Grover, Surbhi

    2015-12-01

    To review the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to evaluate postoperative high-risk cervical cancer patients for factors associated with a benefit from chemoradiation therapy (CRT) over external beam radiation therapy alone (EBRT). The National Cancer Database was queried for women with cervical cancer treated with hysterectomy and adjuvant EBRT from 2002 to 2012. Only patients with pathologic lymph node involvement (LN+), positive surgical margins, and/or parametrial invasion were included in our analysis (on the basis of Peter's criteria). Univariable and multivariable analyses (MVA) were performed, and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to investigate for factors associated with of CRT utilization and overall survival (OS). A total of 3053 patients met inclusion criteria, and 2479 received adjuvant CRT (81%), whereas 574 (19%) received EBRT alone. Factors associated with increased CRT utilization on MVA included age cervical cancer compared with EBRT alone, but this benefit seems to be restricted to patients with LN+. The benefits of adjuvant CRT over EBRT alone in patients with parametrial invasion and/or positive margins (without nodal involvement) are unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effects of body mass index on complications and survival outcomes in patients with cervical carcinoma undergoing curative chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizer, Nora T; Thaker, Premal H; Gao, Feng; Zighelboim, Israel; Powell, Matthew A; Rader, Janet S; Mutch, David G; Grigsby, Perry W

    2011-03-01

    The effect of body mass index (BMI) on treatment outcomes for patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma who receive definitive chemoradiation is unclear. The cohort in this study included all patients with cervical carcinoma (n = 404) who had stage IB(1) disease and positive lymph nodes or stage ≥IB(2) disease and received treatment at the authors' facility between January 1998 and January 2008. The mean follow-up was 47.2 months. BMI was calculated using the National Institute of Health online calculator. BMI categories were created according to the World Health Organization classification system. Primary outcomes were overall survival, disease-free survival, and complication rate. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and compared using Cox proportional hazard models. On multivariate analysis, compared with normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2) ), a BMI 24.9 kg/m(2) , respectively. A BMI 24.9 kg/m(2) (radiation enteritis: 16.7% vs 13.6%, respectively; P = .03; fistula: 11.1% vs 8.8%, respectively; P = .05; bowel obstruction: 33.3% vs 4.4%, respectively; P cervical cancer had diminished overall survival and more complications than normal weight and obese patients. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  13. Chemoradiation in cervical cancer with cisplatin and high-dose rate brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. Results of a phase-II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, H.G.; Laban, C.; Puschmann, D.; Koelbl, H. [Dept. of Gynecology, Martin-Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Dunst, J.; Haensgen, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin-Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Background: In 1999, five randomized studies demonstrated that chemoradiation with cisplatin and low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy has a benefit in locally advanced cervical cancer and for surgically treated patients in high-risk situations. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of concomitant chemoradiation with cisplatin and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Patients and Method: 27 patients were included in our phase-II trial: 13 locally advanced cases (group A) and 14 adjuvant-therapy patients in high-risk situations (group B). A definitive radiotherapy was performed with 25 fractions of external beam therapy (1.8 Gy per fraction/middle shielded after eleven fractions). Brachytherapy was delivered at HDR schedules with 7 Gy in point A per fraction (total dose 35 Gy) in FIGO Stages IIB-IIIB. The total dose of external and brachytherapy was 70 Gy in point A and 52-54 Gy in point B. All patients in stage IVA were treated without brachytherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed with external beam radiotherapy of the pelvis with 1.8 Gy single-dose up to 50.4 Gy. Brachytherapy was delivered at HDR schedules with two fractions of 5 Gy only in patients with tumor-positive margins or tumor involvement of the upper vagina. The chemotherapeutic treatment schedule provided six courses of cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly recommended in the randomized studies GOG-120 and -123. Results: A total of 18/27 patients (66.7%) completed all six courses of chemotherapy. Discontinuation of radiotherapy due to therapy-related morbidity was not necessary in the whole study group. G3 leukopenia (29.6%) was the only relevant acute toxicity. There were no differences in toxicity between group A and B. Serious late morbidity occurred in 2/27 patients (7.4%). 12/13 patients (92.3%) with IIB-IVA cervical cancer showed a complete response (CR). 13/14 adjuvant cases (92.8%) are free of recurrence (median follow up: 19.1 months). Conclusion: Concomitant

  14. Ku70, Ku80, and sClusterin: A Cluster of Predicting Factors for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pucci, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.pucci@uniroma2.it; Polidoro, Chiara; Joubert, Alessandro; Mastrangeli, Francesca; Tolu, Barbara; Benassi, Michaela; Fiaschetti, Valeria; Greco, Laura; Miceli, Roberto; Floris, Roberto; Novelli, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Augusto; Santoni, Riccardo

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: The identification of predictive biomarkers for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is a current clinical need. The heterodimer Ku70/80 plays a critical role in DNA repair and cell death induction after damage. The aberrant expression and localization of these proteins fail to control DNA repair and apoptosis. sClusterin is the Ku70 partner that sterically inhibits Bax-dependent cell death after damage in some pathologic conditions. This study sought to evaluate the molecular relevance of Ku70-Ku80-Clu as a molecular cluster predicting the response to neoadjuvant CRT in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Patients enrolled in this study underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgical excision. A retrospective study based on individual response, evaluated by computed tomography and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, identified responder (56%) and no-responder patients (44%). Ku70/80 and Clu expression were observed in biopsy specimens obtained before and after treatment with neoadjuvant CRT from the same LARC patients. In vitro studies before and after irradiation were also performed on radioresistant (SW480) and radiosensitive (SW620) colorectal cancer cell lines, mimicking sensitive or resistant tumor behavior. Results: We found a conventional nuclear localization of Ku70/80 in pretherapeutic tumor biopsies of responder patients, in agreement with their role in DNA repair and regulating apoptosis. By contrast, in the no-responder population we observed an unconventional overexpression of Ku70 in the cytoplasm (P<.001). In this context we also overexpression of sClu in the cytoplasm, which accorded with its role in stabilizing of Bax-Ku70 complex, inhibiting Bax-dependent apoptosis. Strikingly, Ku80 in these tumor tissues was lost (P<.005). In vitro testing of colon cancer cells finally confirmed the results observed in tumor biopsy specimens, proving that Ku70/80-Clu deregulation is extensively

  15. Pretreatment weight status and weight loss among head and neck cancer patients receiving definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy: implications for nutrition integrated treatment pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Mary E; Myrick, Elizabeth; McCloskey, Susan A; Gupta, Vishal; Reid, Mary E; Wilding, Gregory E; Cohan, David; Arshad, Hassan; Rigual, Nestor R; Hicks, Wesley L; Sullivan, Maureen; Warren, Graham W; Singh, Anurag K

    2013-10-01

    The purpose was to examine the effect of pretreatment weight status on loco-regional progression for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) after receiving definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). In an expanded cohort of 140 patients, we retrospectively reviewed weight status and loco-regional progression of SCCHN patients treated with CCRT between 2004 and 2010. Pretreatment ideal body weight percentage (IBW%) was statistically significantly different for patients with disease progression than for those without progression (p = 0.02) but was not an independent predictor of progression. Median pretreatment IBW% was 118 (72-193) for the progression-free group and was 101.5 (73-163) for the group with progression. Both groups suffered clinically severe weight loss of approximately 9 % from baseline to end treatment. Pretreatment weight status, a very crude indicator of nutrition status, may have prognostic value in patients with SCCHN undergoing definitive CCRT. Inadequate nutritional status in these patients has been associated with poor clinical outcomes and decreased quality of life. Based on this report and others, the best next steps include routine validated malnutrition screening and the testing of evidence-based nutrition care protocols with the goals of minimizing weight loss and improvement of quality of life.

  16. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Following Surgical Resection or Radiosurgery Plus Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis: A Curative Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parlak, Cem, E-mail: cemparlak@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University, Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Mertsoylu, Hüseyin [Department of Medical Oncology, Baskent University, Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Güler, Ozan Cem; Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University, Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of definitive thoracic chemoradiation therapy following surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) on the outcomes of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with synchronous solitary brain metastasis (SSBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 63 NSCLC patients with SSBM were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were staged using positron emission tomography-computed tomography in addition to conventional staging tools. Thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) with a total dose of 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was delivered along with 2 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy following either surgery plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=33) or SRS plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=30) for BM. Results: Overall, the treatment was well tolerated. All patients received planned TRT, and 57 patients (90.5%) were also able to receive 2 cycles of chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 25.3 months (7.1-52.1 months), the median months of overall, locoregional progression-free, neurological progression-free, and progression-free survival were 28.6, 17.7, 26.4, and 14.6, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that patients with a T1-T2 thoracic disease burden (P=.001), a nodal stage of N0-N1 (P=.003), and no weight loss (P=.008) exhibited superior survival. Conclusions: In the present series, surgical and radiosurgical treatments directed toward SSBM in NSCLC patients were equally effective. The similarities between the present survival outcomes and those reported in other studies for locally advanced NSCLC patients indicate the potentially curative role of definitive chemoradiation therapy for highly selected patients with SSBM.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Chemoradiation Therapy Versus Transoral Robotic Surgery for Human Papillomavirus–Associated, Clinical N2 Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: david.sher@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Fidler, Mary Jo [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Stenson, Kerstin; Al-Khudari, Samer [Department of Otolaryngology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a cost-effectiveness analysis of primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT) versus transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for clinical N2, human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe the health states after treatment with CRT or TORS, followed by adjuvant radiation therapy or CRT in the presence of high-risk pathology (positive margins or extracapsular extension). Outcomes, toxicities, and costs were extracted from the literature. One-way sensitivity analyses (SA) were performed over a wide range of parameters, as were 2-way SA between the key variables. Probabilistic SA and value of information studies were performed over key parameters. Results: The expected quality-adjusted life years (QALYs)/total costs for CRT and TORS were 7.31/$50,100 and 7.29/$62,200, respectively, so that CRT dominated TORS. In SA, primary CRT was almost always cost-effective up to a societal willingness-to-pay of $200,000/QALY, unless the locoregional recurrence risk after TORS was 30% to 50% lower, at which point it became cost effective at a willingness-to-pay of $50-100,000/QALY. Probabilistic SA confirmed the importance of locoregional recurrence risk, and the value of information in precisely knowing this parameter was more than $7M per year. If the long-term utility after TORS was 0.03 lower than CRT, CRT was cost-effective over nearly any assumption. Conclusions: Under nearly all assumptions, primary CRT was the cost-effective therapy for HPV-associated, clinical N2 OPC. However, in the hypothetical event of a large relative improvement in LRR with surgery and equivalent long-term utilities, primary TORS would become the higher-value treatment, arguing for prospective, comparative study of the 2 paradigms.

  18. Curcumin in combined cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troselj, Koraljka Gall; Kujundzic, Renata Novak

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of beneficial preventive and therapeutic effects achieved by traditional and complementary medicine are currently being deciphered in molecular medicine. Curcumin, a yellow-colored polyphenol derived from the rhizome of turmeric (Curcuma longa), influences a wide variety of cellular processes through the reshaping of many molecular targets. One of them, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), represents a strong mediator of inflammation and, in a majority of systems, supports the pro-proliferative features of cancer cells. The application of various anticancer drugs, cytostatics, triggers signals which lead to an increase in cellular NF-κB activity. As a consequence, cancer cells often reshape their survival signaling pathways and, over time, become resistant to applied therapy. Curcumin was shown to be a strong inhibitor of NF-κB activity and its inhibitory effect on NF-κB related pathways often leads to cellular apoptotic response. All these facts, tested and confirmed in many different biological systems, have paved the way for research aimed to elucidate the potential beneficial effects of combining curcumin and various anti-cancer drugs in order to establish more efficient and less toxic cancer treatment modalities. This review addresses certain aspects of NF-κB-related inflammatory response, its role in carcinogenesis and therapy benefits that may be gained through silencing NF-κB by selectively combining curcumin and various anticancer drugs.

  19. Impact of Weight Change During the Course of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy on Outcomes in Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Retrospective Analysis of 425 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkan, Erkan, E-mail: docdretopkan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Parlak, Cem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Selek, Ugur [American Hospital, University of Texas MD Anderson Radiation Oncology Center, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively investigated the impact of weight change (WC) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) on clinical outcomes of stage 3B non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 425 patients treated with C-CRT were included. All patients received 60 to 66 Gy of thoracic radiation therapy concurrently with 1 to 3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy. Pre- and posttreatment weight measurements on first and last days of C-CRT were used for WC. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 = weight loss (WL); group 2 = weight preservation/gain (WP) for comparative analyses. Results: Following C-CRT, 252 patients (59.3%) experienced WL, while 89 patients (20.9%) and 84 patients (19.8%) showed WP or WG. At median 24.2 months of follow-up, 142 patients (33.4%) were alive (84 WP [48.6%] and 58 WL [23.0%]), and 58 (13.6%) of them were free of disease progression (41 [23.7%] for WP and 17 [6.7%] for WL). Median overall survival (OS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) for the entire population were 22.8, 14.4, 10.6, and 11.7 months, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between WP and WL cohorts revealed significantly superior OS, LRPFS, PFS, and DMFS in WP patients (P<.05 for each). On multivariate analyses, only WL and advanced T stage were associated with poor prognosis (P<.05). Conclusions: Present results in 425 stage 3B NSCLC patients demonstrated that WL during C-CRT is strongly associated with inferior survival outcomes compared to WP. This emerging finding might be useful by forming an encouraging basis for future investigations in facilitating a way to improve the outcomes of these patients experiencing WL during C-CRT.

  20. A Phase 1/2 Study of Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Using Docetaxel, Nedaplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil (DNF-R) for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuma, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Okagawa, Yutaka; Osuga, Takahiro; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Miyanishi, Koji; Kobune, Masayoshi; Takimoto, Rishu [Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Sagawa, Tamotsu [Division of Gastroenterology, Hokkaido Cancer Center, Sapporo (Japan); Hori, Masakazu; Someya, Masanori; Nakata, Kensei; Sakata, Koh-ichi [Department of Radiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takayama, Tetsuji [Department of Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan); Kato, Junji, E-mail: jkato@sapmed.ac.jp [Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Patient survival in esophageal cancer (EC) remains poor. The purpose of this study was to investigate a regimen of definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) that exerts good local control of EC. We performed a phase 1/2 study to assess the safety and efficacy of CRT with docetaxel, nedaplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DNF-R). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients presented with stage IB to IV EC. Patients received 2 cycles of docetaxel (20, 30, or 40 mg/m{sup 2}) and nedaplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1 and 8 and a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 to 5 and 8 to 12, every 5 weeks, with concurrent radiation therapy (59.4 Gy/33 fractions). The recommended dose (RD) was determined using a 3 + 3 design. Results: In the phase 1 study, the dose-limiting toxicities were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The RD of docetaxel was determined to be 20 mg/m{sup 2}. In the phase 2 study, grade 3 to 4 acute toxicities included neutropenia (42.8%), febrile neutropenia (7.14%), thrombocytopenia (17.9%), and esophagitis (21.4%). Grade 3 to 4 late radiation toxicity included esophagostenosis (10.7%). The complete response rate was 82.1% (95% confidence interval: 67.9-96.3%). Both the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 41.2 months. Conclusions: DNF-R showed good tolerability and strong antitumor activity, suggesting that it is a potentially effective therapeutic regimen for EC.

  1. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with gemcitabine/cisplatin and surgery versus immediate surgery in resectable pancreatic cancer. Results of the first prospective randomized phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golcher, Henriette; Merkel, Susanne; Hohenberger, Werner [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Brunner, Thomas B. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Witzigmann, Helmut [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Surgery, Leipzig (Germany); Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, General Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Marti, Lukas [Hospital of Kanton St. Gallen, General Surgery, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Bechstein, Wolf-Otto [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Surgery, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Bruns, Christiane [University Hospital Munich, Department of Surgery - Hospital Campus Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); University Hospital Magdeburg, Department of Surgery, Magdeburg (Germany); Jungnickel, Henry [Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, General Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Schreiber, Stefan [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Surgery, Leipzig (Germany); Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Coburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany); Meyer, Thomas [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Ansbach, General Surgery, Ansbach (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-25

    In nonrandomized trials, neoadjuvant treatment was reported to prolong survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. As neoadjuvant chemoradiation is established for the treatment of rectal cancer we examined the value of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic cancer in a randomized phase II trial. Radiological staging defining resectability was basic information prior to randomization in contrast to adjuvant therapy trials resting on pathological staging. Patients with resectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head were randomized to primary surgery (Arm A) or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery (Arm B), which was followed by adjuvant chemotherapy in both arms. A total of 254 patients were required to detect a 4.33-month improvement in median overall survival (mOS). The trial was stopped after 73 patients; 66 patients were eligible for analysis. Twenty nine of 33 allocated patients received chemoradiotherapy. Radiotherapy was completed in all patients. Chemotherapy was changed in 3 patients due to toxicity. Tumor resection was performed in 23 vs. 19 patients (A vs. B). The R0 resection rate was 48 % (A) and 52 % (B, P = 0.81) and (y)pN0 was 30 % (A) vs. 39 % (B, P = 0.44), respectively. Postoperative complications were comparable in both groups. mOS was 14.4 vs. 17.4 months (A vs. B; intention-to-treat analysis; P = 0.96). After tumor resection, mOS was 18.9 vs. 25.0 months (A vs. B; P = 0.79). This worldwide first randomized trial for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic cancer showed that neoadjuvant chemoradiation is safe with respect to toxicity, perioperative morbidity, and mortality. Nevertheless, the trial was terminated early due to slow recruiting and the results were not significant. ISRCTN78805636; NCT00335543. (orig.) [German] Mehrere nichtrandomisierte Studien zeigten, dass eine neoadjuvante Therapie das Ueberleben bei Patienten mit Pankreaskarzinom verlaengert. Beim lokal fortgeschrittenen Rektumkarzinom gehoert die

  2. Phase 2 Trial of De-intensified Chemoradiation Therapy for Favorable-Risk Human Papillomavirus–Associated Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chera, Bhishamjit S., E-mail: bchera@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Amdur, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida School of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Shands Cancer Center, University of Florida School of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Tepper, Joel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Qaqish, Bahjat [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Green, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Aumer, Shannon L. [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Hayes, Neil; Weiss, Jared; Grilley-Olson, Juneko [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Zanation, Adam; Hackman, Trevor [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); and others

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To perform a prospective, multi-institutional, phase 2 study of a substantial decrease in concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) intensity as primary treatment for favorable-risk, human papillomavirus–associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The major inclusion criteria were: (1) T0 to T3, N0 to N2c, M0; (2) human papillomavirus or p16 positive; and (3) minimal/remote smoking history. Treatment was limited to 60 Gy intensity modulated radiation therapy with concurrent weekly intravenous cisplatinum (30 mg/m{sup 2}). The primary study endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate based on required biopsy of the primary site and dissection of pretreatment positive lymph node regions, regardless of radiographic response. Power computations were performed for the null hypothesis that the pCR rate is 87% and n=40, resulting in a type 1 error of 14.2%. Secondary endpoint measures included physician-reported toxicity (Common Toxicity Terminology for Adverse Events, CTCAE), patient-reported symptoms (PRO-CTCAE), and modified barium swallow studies. Results: The study population was 43 patients. The pCR rate was 86% (37 of 43). The incidence of CTCAE grade 3/4 toxicity and PRO-CTCAE severe/very severe symptoms was as follows: mucositis 34%/45%, general pain 5%/48%, nausea 18%/52%, vomiting 5%/34%, dysphagia 39%/55%, and xerostomia 2%/75%. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were 11%. Thirty-nine percent of patients required a feeding tube for a median of 15 weeks (range, 5-22 weeks). There were no significant differences in modified barium swallow studies before and after CRT. Conclusions: The pCR rate with decreased intensity of therapy with 60 Gy of IMRT and weekly low-dose cisplatinum is very high in favorable-risk oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, with evidence of decreased toxicity compared with standard therapies. (ClinicalTrials.gov) ID: (NCT01530997).

  3. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose/Positron Emission Tomography Predicts Patterns of Failure After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Bodner, William R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Halmos, Balazs; Cheng, Haiying; Perez-Soler, Roman [Department of Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Keller, Steven M. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Background: We previously reported that pretreatment positron emission tomography (PET) identifies lesions at high risk for progression after concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we validate those findings and generate tumor control probability (TCP) models. Methods: We identified patients treated with definitive, concurrent CRT for locally advanced NSCLC who underwent staging {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose/PET/computed tomography. Visible hypermetabolic lesions (primary tumors and lymph nodes) were delineated on each patient's pretreatment PET scan. Posttreatment imaging was reviewed to identify locations of disease progression. Competing risks analyses were performed to examine metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and radiation therapy dose as predictors of local disease progression. TCP modeling was performed to describe the likelihood of local disease control as a function of lesion size. Results: Eighty-nine patients with 259 hypermetabolic lesions (83 primary tumors and 176 regional lymph nodes) met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-eight patients were included in our previous report, and the remaining 61 constituted our validation cohort. The median follow-up time was 22.7 months for living patients. In 20 patients, the first site of progression was a primary tumor or lymph node treated with radiation therapy. The median time to progression for those patients was 11.5 months. Data from our validation cohort confirmed that lesion MTV predicts local progression, with a 30-month cumulative incidence rate of 23% for lesions above 25 cc compared with 4% for lesions below 25 cc (P=.008). We found no evidence that radiation therapy dose was associated with local progression risk. TCP modeling yielded predicted 30-month local control rates of 98% for a 1-cc lesion, 94% for a 10-cc lesion, and 74% for a 50-cc lesion. Conclusion: Pretreatment FDG-PET identifies lesions at risk for progression after CRT for

  4. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Ja [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Cheol [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyu [Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeong-Rok [Department of Surgery, Chonnam National University Hwansun Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung-Bum [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bungdang Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Gyu-Seog [Division of Colorectal Cancer Center, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Young [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon-Hahn [Department of Surgery, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Taek [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary Hospital, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young [Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo Yong [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Bok [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Chang Sik, E-mail: csyu@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits.

  5. Orthotopic liver transplantation after the combined use of locoregional therapy and sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo EJ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Eun Jin Yoo,1,* Hye Sun Shin,1,* Seung Up Kim,1,2,7 Dong Jin Joo,3,4 Jun Yong Park,1,2,7 Gi Hong Choi,3 Do Young Kim,1,2,7 Sang Hoon Ahn,1,2,7 Jinsil Seong,5 Myung Joo Koh,6 Kwang-Hyub Han,1,2,7 Chae Yoon Chon1,2,7 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Institute of Gastroenterology, 3Department of Surgery, 4Research Institute for Transplantation, 5Department of Radiation Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; 7Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We herein report a patient with advanced hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC beyond the Milan criteria. He underwent orthotopic liver transplantation after successful HCC downstaging that satisfied the University of California, San Francisco criteria, using concurrent chemoradiation therapy with a combination of repeated hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC and sorafenib. A 52-year-old male was diagnosed with advanced hepatitis B virus-related HCC beyond the Milan criteria. He underwent concurrent chemoradiation therapy (50 Gy with 20 fractions over 5 weeks with HAIC using 5-fluorouracil at a dose of 500 mg/day, which was administered during the first and fifth weeks of radiation therapy as an initial treatment modality. This was followed by the combined use of HAIC using 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 for 5 hours on days 1–3 and cisplatin (60 mg/m2 for 2 hours on day 2 every 4 weeks (twelve cycles and sorafenib (from the third to the twelfth cycle of HAIC to treat the remaining HCC. Because a remarkable decrease in the tumor burden that satisfied the University of California, San Francisco criteria was observed after these combination treatments, the patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation with curative aim and survived for 11 months without evidence of HCC recurrence. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation

  6. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy With Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil (DCF-R) in Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Phase 2 Trial (KDOG 0501-P2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Katsuhiko, E-mail: k.higu@kitasato-u.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Komori, Shouko [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Tanabe, Satoshi [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Katada, Chikatoshi [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Azuma, Mizutomo [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Ishiyama, Hiromichi [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Sasaki, Tohru; Ishido, Kenji [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Katada, Natsuya [Department of Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Koizumi, Wasaburo [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A previous phase 1 study suggested that definitive chemoradiation therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DCF-R) is tolerable and active in patients with advanced esophageal cancer (AEC). This phase 2 study was designed to confirm the efficacy and toxicity of DCF-R in AEC. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated thoracic AEC who had T4 tumors or M1 lymph node metastasis (M1 LYM), or both, received intravenous infusions of docetaxel (35 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and a continuous intravenous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 to 5, every 2 weeks, plus concurrent radiation. The total radiation dose was initially 61.2 Gy but was lowered to multiple-field irradiation with 50.4 Gy to decrease esophagitis and late toxicity. Consequently, the number of cycles of DCF administered during radiation therapy was reduced from 4 to 3. The primary endpoint was the clinical complete response (cCR) rate. Results: Characteristics of the 42 subjects were: median age, 62 years; performance status, 0 in 14, 1 in 25, 2 in 3; TNM classification, T4M0 in 20, non-T4M1LYM in 12, T4M1LYM in 10; total scheduled radiation dose: 61.2 Gy in 12, 50.4 Gy in 30. The cCR rate was 52.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37.3%-67.5%) overall, 33.3% in the 61.2-Gy group, and 60.0% in the 50.4-Gy group. The median progression-free survival was 11.1 months, and the median survival was 29.0 months with a survival rate of 43.9% at 3 years. Grade 3 or higher major toxicity consisted of leukopenia (71.4%), neutropenia (57.2%), anemia (16.7%), febrile neutropenia (38.1%), anorexia (31.0%), and esophagitis (28.6%). Conclusions: DCF-R frequently caused myelosuppression and esophagitis but was highly active and suggested to be a promising regimen in AEC. On the basis of efficacy and safety, a radiation dose of 50.4 Gy is recommended for further studies of DCF-R.

  7. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kim, Sinae [Division of Biometrics, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Haider, Syed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Xu, Xiaoting [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow (China); Wu, Alson [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph [Division of Medical Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Langenfeld, John [Division of Surgery, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.

  8. Laryngeal preservation in advanced piriform sinus squamous cell carcinomas using superselective intra-arterial chemoradiation therapy with three agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusaka, Tohru; Matsuda, Akira; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Minoru

    2013-03-01

    Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy, which enables local control and laryngeal preservation, is a safe and useful therapy for preservation of nutrition, speech, and swallowing functions. To improve the laryngeal preservation rate in patients with hypopharyngeal piriform sinus squamous cell carcinoma by superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. Fifty-seven patients received anterograde intra-arterial administration of docetaxel and cisplatin, and two courses of intravenous continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy over 120 h starting on day 2. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy was administered from the third course to control the primary cancer. Remaining neck lymph node metastases were treated in principle by neck dissection. The 5- and 10-year survival rates were 68.5% and 58.9%, respectively. The 5-year rates by the T classification were 96.0% (10-year rate, 88.6%) in T3, 48.1% in T4a, and 16.7% in T4b. The 5- and 10-year laryngeal preservation rates were 65.2% and 62.4%, respectively. The 5-year rates by the T classification were 92.4% (10-year rate, 87.6%) in T3, 36.2% in T4a, and 16.7% in T4b. No irreversible side effects, complications, or sequelae were reported. Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy showed superior laryngeal preservation as well as high survival rates, particularly in T3, and was considered a useful therapy.

  9. Low level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 1: mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM), for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved, may expand the applications for PBM in the management of other complications associated with HNC treatment. This article (part 1) describes PBM mechanisms of action, dosimetry, and safety aspects and, in doing so, provides a basis for a companion paper (part 2) which describes the potential breadth of potential applications of PBM in the management of side-effects of (chemo)radiation therapy in patients being treated for HNC and proposes PBM parameters. Methods This study is a narrative non-systematic review. Results We review PBM mechanisms of action and dosimetric considerations. Virtually, all conditions modulated by PBM (e.g., ulceration, inflammation, lymphedema, pain, fibrosis, neurological and muscular injury) are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of (chemo)radiation therapy-induced complications in patients treated for HNC. The impact of PBM on tumor behavior and tumor response to treatment has been insufficiently studied. In vitro studies assessing the effect of PBM on tumor cells report conflicting results, perhaps attributable to inconsistencies of PBM power and dose. Nonetheless, the biological bases for the broad clinical activities ascribed to PBM have also been noted to be similar to those activities and pathways associated with negative tumor behaviors and impeded response to treatment. While there are no anecdotal descriptions of poor tumor outcomes in patients treated with PBM, confirming its neutrality with respect to cancer responsiveness is a critical priority. Conclusion Based on its therapeutic effects, PBM may have utility in a broad range of oral, oropharyngeal, facial, and neck

  10. Low level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 1: mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Judith A E M; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E; Nair, Raj G; Epstein, Joel B; Sonis, Stephen T; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A; Milstein, Dan M J; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E; Schubert, Mark M; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2016-06-01

    There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM), for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved, may expand the applications for PBM in the management of other complications associated with HNC treatment. This article (part 1) describes PBM mechanisms of action, dosimetry, and safety aspects and, in doing so, provides a basis for a companion paper (part 2) which describes the potential breadth of potential applications of PBM in the management of side-effects of (chemo)radiation therapy in patients being treated for HNC and proposes PBM parameters. This study is a narrative non-systematic review. We review PBM mechanisms of action and dosimetric considerations. Virtually, all conditions modulated by PBM (e.g., ulceration, inflammation, lymphedema, pain, fibrosis, neurological and muscular injury) are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of (chemo)radiation therapy-induced complications in patients treated for HNC. The impact of PBM on tumor behavior and tumor response to treatment has been insufficiently studied. In vitro studies assessing the effect of PBM on tumor cells report conflicting results, perhaps attributable to inconsistencies of PBM power and dose. Nonetheless, the biological bases for the broad clinical activities ascribed to PBM have also been noted to be similar to those activities and pathways associated with negative tumor behaviors and impeded response to treatment. While there are no anecdotal descriptions of poor tumor outcomes in patients treated with PBM, confirming its neutrality with respect to cancer responsiveness is a critical priority. Based on its therapeutic effects, PBM may have utility in a broad range of oral, oropharyngeal, facial, and neck complications of HNC treatment. Although

  11. PRETREATMENT NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND LOCOREGIONAL FAILURE IN PATIENTS WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCER UNDERGOING DEFINITIVE CONCURRENT CHEMORADIATION THERAPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Mary E.; Reid, Mary E.; Wilding, Gregory E.; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rigual, Nestor R.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Popat, Saurin R.; Warren, Graham W.; Sullivan, Maureen; Thorstad, Wade L.; Khan, Mohamed K.; Loree, Thom R.; Singh, Anurag K.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to determine if markers of nutritional status predict for locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 78 patients with SCCHN who received definitive CCRT. We compared patient factors, tumor characteristics, and nutritional status indicators between patients with and without locoregional failure. Results Fifteen of 78 patients (19%) experienced locoregional failure. Median follow-up for live patients was 38 months. On univariate analysis, pretreatment percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) (p cancer undergoing definitive CCRT based on pre-treatment %IBW should be examined further. PMID:21990220

  12. Pretreatment nutritional status and locoregional failure of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Mary E; Reid, Mary E; Wilding, Gregory E; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rigual, Nestor R; Hicks, Wesley L; Popat, Saurin R; Warren, Graham W; Sullivan, Maureen; Thorstad, Wade L; Khan, Mohamed K; Loree, Thom R; Singh, Anurag K

    2011-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine if markers of nutritional status predict for locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We performed a retrospective chart review of 78 patients with SCCHN who received definitive CCRT. We compared patient factors, tumor characteristics, and nutritional status indicators between patients with and without locoregional failure. Fifteen of 78 patients (19%) experienced locoregional failure. Median follow-up for live patients was 38 months. On univariate analysis, pretreatment percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) (p cancer undergoing definitive CCRT based on pretreatment %IBW should be examined further. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Prognostic Significance of Tumor Response as Assessed by Sequential {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography During Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dongryul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Eun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae, E-mail: sj5201.huh@samsung.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Heerim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Byung-Tae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic role of metabolic response by the use of serial sets of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with cervical cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 60 patients who were treated with CCRT between February 2009 and December 2010 were analyzed. Three sequential PET/CT images were acquired for each patient: pre-CCRT, during-CCRT at 4 weeks of CCRT, and 1 month post-CCRT PET/CT. Metabolic responses were assessed qualitatively. The percentage changes in the maximum values of standardized uptake value (ΔSUV{sub max}%) from the PET/CT images acquired pre-CCRT and during-CCRT were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict complete response (CR) on the post-CCRT PET/CT and to identify the best cutoff value. Prognostic factors of progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed. Results: During-CCRT PET/CT showed that 8 patients (13%) had CR, and the other 52 patients (87%) had partial response (PR). On the post-CCRT PET/CT, 43 patients (73%) had CR, 12 patients (20%) had PR, and 4 patients (7%) had progressive disease. The average SUV{sub max} in primary tumors was 16.3 (range, 6.4-53.0) on the pre-CCRT PET/CT images and 5.3 (range, 0-19.4) on the during-CCRT PET/CT images. According to ROC curve analysis, ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict CR response on post-CCRT PET/CT (P<.001, cutoff value of 59.7%). In all patients, the PFS rate was 71.9% at 2 years. Multivariate analysis showed that ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% (P=.045) and CR response on the post-CCRT PET/CT (P=.012) were statistically significant predictors of PFS. Conclusion: Metabolic responses on the during-CCRT images at 4 weeks of treatment and 1-month post-CCRT PET/CT images may predict treatment outcomes in patients with cervical cancer. ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% at 4 weeks of CCRT may predict CR response

  14. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M; Rai, Bhavana; Cooper, Rachel; Dörr, Wolfgang; Nout, Remi A

    2016-04-01

    This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. In total, 744 patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired at baseline but improved during the first 6 months after treatment, to reach a level comparable to that of the reference population, whereas cognitive functioning remained impaired. Both social and role functioning showed the lowest scores at baseline but which increased after treatment to reach a plateau at 6 months and then declined slightly at 3 and 4 years. The overall symptom experience was elevated at baseline and decreased to a level within the range of that of the reference population. Similarly, tumor-related symptoms (eg, pain, appetite loss, and constipation), which were present before treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema and dyspnea). This longitudinal prospective QoL analysis showed that patients' general QoL and functioning were impaired before treatment compared to those of reference data. Several tumor-related symptoms resolved

  15. SU-C-BRA-04: Use of Esophageal Wall Thickness in Evaluation of the Response to Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Kligerman, S; Lu, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kang, M [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yeungnam University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the esophageal cancer response to chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by measuring the esophageal wall thickness in CT. Method: Two datasets were used in this study. The first dataset is composed of CT scans of 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The second dataset is composed of 20 esophageal cancer patients who underwent PET/CT scans before (Pre-CRT) and after CRT (Post-CRT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based algorithm. The esophageal wall thickness was then computed, on each slice, as the equivalent circle radius of the segmented esophagus excluding the lumen. To evaluate the changes of wall thickness, we computed the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (COV, SD/Mean), and flatness [(Max–Min)/Mean] of wall thickness along the entire esophagus. Results: For the first dataset, the mean wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls were 6.35 mm and 6.03 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness of the wall thickness were 2.59, 0.21, and 1.27 for the cancer patients and 1.99, 0.16, and 1.13 for normal controls. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were identified in SD and flatness. For the second dataset, the mean wall thickness of pre-CRT and post-CRT patients was 7.13 mm and 6.84 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness were 1.81, 0.26, and 1.06 for pre-CRT and 1.69, 0.26, and 1.06 for post-CRT. Statistically significant difference was not identified for these measurements. Current results are based on the entire esophagus. We believe significant differences between pre- and post-CRT scans could be obtained, if we conduct the measurements at tumor sites. Conclusion: Results show thicker wall thickness in pre-CRT scans and differences in wall thickness changes between normal and abnormal esophagus. This demonstrated the potential of esophageal wall thickness as a marker in the tumor CRT response evaluation. This work was supported in part by

  16. Factors Associated With Early Mortality in Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Dahele, Max [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hu, Bo; Palma, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oberije, Cary [Department of Radiation Oncology, MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Tsujino, Kayoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Moreno-Jimenez, Marta [Department of Oncology, Clínica Universidad, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); De Petris, Luigi [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramella, Sara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); De Ruyck, Kim [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Dios, Núria Rodriguez [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Rodrigues, George, E-mail: George.Rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (con-CRT) is recommended for fit patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) but is associated with toxicity, and observed survival continues to be limited. Identifying factors associated with early mortality could improve patient selection and identify strategies to improve prognosis. Methods and Materials: Analysis of a multi-institutional LA-NSCLC database consisting of 1245 patients treated with con-CRT in 13 institutions was performed to identify factors predictive of 180-day survival. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was performed to identify prognostic groups for 180-day survival. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to create a clinical nomogram predicting 180-day survival based on important predictors from RPA. Results: Median follow-up was 43.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 40.3-48.8) and 127 patients (10%) died within 180 days of treatment. Median, 180-day, and 1- to 5-year (by yearly increments) actuarial survival rates were 20.9 months, 90%, 71%, 45%, 32%, 27%, and 22% respectively. Multivariate analysis adjusted by region identified gross tumor volume (GTV) (odds ratio [OR] ≥100 cm{sup 3}: 2.61; 95% CI: 1.10-6.20; P=.029) and pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV{sub 1}], defined as the ratio of FEV{sub 1} to forced vital capacity [FVC]) (OR <80%: 2.53; 95% CI: 1.09-5.88; P=.030) as significant predictors of 180-day survival. RPA resulted in a 2-class risk stratification system: low-risk (GTV <100 cm{sup 3} or GTV ≥100 cm{sup 3} and FEV{sub 1} ≥80%) and high-risk (GTV ≥100 cm{sup 3} and FEV{sub 1} <80%). The 180-day survival rates were 93% for low risk and 79% for high risk, with an OR of 4.43 (95% CI: 2.07-9.51; P<.001), adjusted by region. A clinical nomogram predictive of 180-day survival, incorporating FEV{sub 1}, GTV, N stage, and maximum esophagus dose yielded favorable calibration (R{sup 2} = 0

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Petrič, Primož [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rai, Bhavana [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Cooper, Rachel [Leeds Cancer Centre, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dörr, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars; Van Der Steen Banasik, Elzbieta; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dumas, Isabelle; and others

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials: In total, 744 patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. Results: General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired at baseline but improved during the first 6 months after treatment, to reach a level comparable to that of the reference population, whereas cognitive functioning remained impaired. Both social and role functioning showed the lowest scores at baseline but which increased after treatment to reach a plateau at 6 months and then declined slightly at 3 and 4 years. The overall symptom experience was elevated at baseline and decreased to a level within the range of that of the reference population. Similarly, tumor-related symptoms (eg, pain, appetite loss, and constipation), which were present before treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema and dyspnea). Conclusions: This longitudinal prospective QoL analysis showed that patients' general QoL and functioning were impaired before treatment compared to

  18. Interim 18F-FDG PET/CT During Chemoradiation Therapy in the Management of Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garibaldi, C.; Ronchi, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Gilardi, L.; Travaini, L.; Ferrari, M.; Alterio, D.; Kaanders, J.H.; Ciardo, D.; Orecchia, R.; Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Grana, C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging modality widely applied in oncology for tumor staging, volume delineation in radiation therapy planning, and therapy response assessment. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET combined with computed tomography plays a significant role in the management of

  19. High Immunoreactivity of DUOX2 Is Associated With Poor Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Worse Prognosis in Rectal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Chun; Chang, I-Wei; Hsieh, Pei-Ling; Lin, Ching-Yih; Sun, Ding-Ping; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Yang, Ching-Chieh; Lin, Li-Ching; He, Hong-Lin; Tian, Yu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    biomarker. Additional researches to clarify the molecular and biochemical pathways are essential for developing promising DUOX2-targeted therapies for patients with rectal cancers.

  20. Sequential FDG-PET/CT reliably predicts response of locally advanced rectal cancer to neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capirci, Carlo [Hospital, Division of Radiotherapy, Rovigo (Italy); Rampin, Lucia; Banti, Elena [Hospital, Nuclear Medicine and PET Service, Rovigo (Italy); Erba, Paola A.; Mariani, Giuliano [Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Pisa (Italy); Galeotti, Fabrizio [Hospital, Division of Surgery, Rovigo (Italy); Crepaldi, Giorgio [Hospital, Division of Oncology, Rovigo (Italy); Gava, Marcello [Hospital, Medical Physics Service, Rovigo (Italy); Fanti, Stefano [Politecnico Bologna (Italy). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Muzzio, Pier C. [Dept. of Radiology, Ist. Oncologico, Padova (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [Rovigo Hospital, Istituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV)-IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine Service, PET Unit, Rovigo (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    Prediction of rectal cancer response to preoperative, neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy (CRT) provides the opportunity to identify patients in whom a major response is expected and who may therefore benefit from alternative surgical approaches. Traditional morphological imaging techniques are effective in defining tumour extension in the initial diagnostic and staging work-up, but perform poorly in distinguishing residual neoplastic tissue from scarring post CRT, when restaging the patient before surgery. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a promising tool for monitoring the effect of anti-tumour therapy. The aim of this study was to prospectively assess the value of sequential FDG-PET scans in predicting the response of locally advanced rectal cancer to neo-adjuvant CRT. Forty-four consecutive patients with locally advanced (cT3-4) primary rectal cancer and four patients with pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. Treatment consisted of external beam intensified radiotherapy, chemotherapy and, 8-10 weeks later, surgery with curative intent. All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT both before CRT and 5-6 weeks after completing CRT. One patient died before surgery because of acute myocardial infarction, and was therefore excluded from further analysis. Semi-quantitative measurements of FDG uptake (SUV{sub max}), absolute difference ({delta}SUV{sub max}) and percent SUV{sub max} difference (Response Index, RI) between pre- and post-CRT PET scans were considered. Results were correlated with pathological response, assessed both by histopathological staging of the surgical specimens (pTNM) and by the tumour regression grade (TRG) according to Mandard's criteria (patients with TRG1-2 being defined as responders and patients with TRG3-5 as non-responders). Following neo-adjuvant CRT, of the 45 patients submitted to surgery, 23 (51.1%) were classified as responders according to Mandard

  1. What future for combination therapies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, John

    2003-01-01

    For most patients who require lipid-lowering treatment, statin monotherapy is the appropriate treatment. However, in those patients where statin monotherapy does not produce optimal lipid levels, the combination of a statin with niacin, a bile acid sequestrant, a fibric acid derivative, a

  2. Long-term survival of a randomized phase III trial of head and neck cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation therapy with or without low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to prevent oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Héliton S; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Small, Isabele A; Araújo, Carlos M M; Viégas, Celia Maria Pais; de Assis Ramos, Gabriela; Dias, Fernando L; Ferreira, Carlos G

    2017-08-01

    The impact of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to prevent oral mucositis in patients treated with exclusive chemoradiation therapy remains unknown. This study evaluated the overall, disease-free and progression-free survival of these patients. Overall, disease-free and progression-free survival of 94 patients diagnosed with oropharynx, nasopharynx, and hypopharynx cancer, who participated on a phase III study, was evaluated from 2007 to 2015. The patients were subjected to conventional radiotherapy plus cisplatin every 3weeks. LLLT was applied with an InGaAlP diode (660nm-100mW-1J-4J/cm2). With a median follow-up of 41.3months (range 0.7-101.9), patients receiving LLLT had a statistically significant better complete response to treatment than those in the placebo group (LG=89.1%; PG=67.4%; p=0.013). Patients subjected to LLLT also displayed increase in progression-free survival than those in the placebo group (61.7% vs. 40.4%; p=0.030; HR:1:93; CI 95%: 1.07-3.5) and had a tendency for better overall survival (57.4% vs. 40.4%; p=0.90; HR:1.64; CI 95%: 0.92-2.91). This is the first study to suggest that LLLT may improve survival of head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Further studies, with a larger sample, are necessary to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ziconotide combination intrathecal therapy: rationale and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Mark S; Rauck, Richard L; Deer, Timothy

    2010-09-01

    Ziconotide is a nonopioid intrathecal analgesic used to manage moderate to severe chronic pain. Although ziconotide is approved in the United States for intrathecal monotherapy only, it is often used in combination with other intrathecal drugs in clinical practice. The need exists for a critical assessment of the currently available published literature on ziconotide combination therapy. This review summarizes and evaluates the publications from preclinical and clinical peer-reviewed experiments that have investigated the safety and effectiveness of ziconotide in combination with a variety of other drugs. Eleven relevant publications were identified through a systematic search of multiple databases. In preclinical studies, additive or synergistic antinociceptive effects were discovered when ziconotide was used in combination with morphine, clonidine, or baclofen; however, no additional antinociceptive effects were observed when bupivacaine was added to ziconotide therapy. Safety data from animal studies revealed that ziconotide did not exacerbate morphine-induced respiratory depression, or clonidine-induced hypotension or bradycardia; however, ziconotide did potentiate morphine-induced hypotension and inhibition of gastrointestinal tract motility. Results from 2 open-label trials indicated that combination ziconotide and morphine therapy produced greater analgesia than was produced by the use of either drug alone. Preliminary support for the use of ziconotide in combination with morphine, baclofen, or hydromorphone was provided by case studies. Although clinical and preclinical studies provide some support for the use of ziconotide in combination with morphine, hydromorphone, clonidine, or baclofen, strong evidence-based data are limited. Controlled, long-term clinical trials are warranted.

  4. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2 : proposed applications and treatment protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, J.A.E.M.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Nair, R.G.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Hamblin, M.R.; Barasch, A.; Migliorati, C.A.; Milstein, D.M.J.; Genot, M.T.; Lansaat, L.; van der Brink, R.; Arnabat-Dominguez, J.; van der Molen, L.; Jacobi, I.; van Diessen, J.; de Lange, J.; Smeele, L.E.; Schubert, M.M.; Bensadoun, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together

  5. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2: proposed applications and treatment protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2016-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a

  6. Long-term Follow-up Results of a Multi-institutional Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in East and Southeast Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Shingo, E-mail: s_kato@saitama-med.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, International Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Saitama (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences of Japan, Chiba (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Gunma University, Gunma (Japan); Thephamongkhol, Kullathorn; Chansilpa, Yaowalak [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Siriraj Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Cao, Jianping [School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Soochow University, Soochow (China); Xu, Xiaoting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow (China); Devi, C. R. Beena; Swee, Tang Tieng [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Hospital Umum Sarawak, Kuching (Malaysia); Calaguas, Miriam J.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s Medical Center, Quezon City, the Philippines (Philippines); Reyes, Rey H. de los [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dr Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center, Manila, the Philippines (Philippines); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dung, To Anh [Department of Breast and Gynecology Radiotherapy, National Cancer Institute, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Supriana, Nana [Department of Radiation Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Dr Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta (Indonesia); Erawati, Dyah [Division of Radiotherapy, Dr Soetomo General Hospital, Surabaya (Indonesia); Mizuno, Hideyuki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences of Japan, Chiba (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences of Japan, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term survival and toxicity of a multi-institutional phase 2 study of concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. Methods and Materials: Ten institutions from 8 Asian countries participated in the study. Between April 2003 and March 2006, 120 patients (60 with bulky stage IIB and 60 with stage IIIB) were treated with CCRT. Radiation therapy consisted of pelvic external beam radiation therapy and either high-dose-rate or low-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Five cycles of weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) were administered during the course of radiation therapy. Treatment results were evaluated by the rates of local control, overall survival, and late toxicities. Results: Median follow-up was 63.7 months, and the follow-up rate at 5 years was 98%. The 5-year local control and overall survival rates for all patients were 76.8% and 55.1%, respectively. The 5-year rates of major late toxicities of the rectum and bladder were 7.9% and 0%, respectively. Conclusions: The long-term results have suggested that CCRT is safe and effective for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. However, further efforts are needed to improve overall survival.

  7. Artificial intelligence in drug combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigelny, Igor F

    2018-02-09

    Currently, the development of medicines for complex diseases requires the development of combination drug therapies. It is necessary because in many cases, one drug cannot target all necessary points of intervention. For example, in cancer therapy, a physician often meets a patient having a genomic profile including more than five molecular aberrations. Drug combination therapy has been an area of interest for a while, for example the classical work of Loewe devoted to the synergism of drugs was published in 1928-and it is still used in calculations for optimal drug combinations. More recently, over the past several years, there has been an explosion in the available information related to the properties of drugs and the biomedical parameters of patients. For the drugs, hundreds of 2D and 3D molecular descriptors for medicines are now available, while for patients, large data sets related to genetic/proteomic and metabolomics profiles of the patients are now available, as well as the more traditional data relating to the histology, history of treatments, pretreatment state of the organism, etc. Moreover, during disease progression, the genetic profile can change. Thus, the ability to optimize drug combinations for each patient is rapidly moving beyond the comprehension and capabilities of an individual physician. This is the reason, that biomedical informatics methods have been developed and one of the more promising directions in this field is the application of artificial intelligence (AI). In this review, we discuss several AI methods that have been successfully implemented in several instances of combination drug therapy from HIV, hypertension, infectious diseases to cancer. The data clearly show that the combination of rule-based expert systems with machine learning algorithms may be promising direction in this field. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Application of low-level laser radiation in children's oncology with complications caused by chemoradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakirev, S. A.; Gusev, L. I.; Grabovschiner, A. A.; Khristoforov, V. N.; Ivanova, J. V.; Shyshkova, E. I.

    1999-12-01

    The present work is based on a 12 month clinical observation period of 155 patients aged from 6 months to 15 years with multiple complications after chemoradiant treatment of hemoblastos and solid tumors. The application of Magnetic Infrared Laser therapy for different complications caused by chemoradiation treatment of children's malignant tumors is an entirely new method and for the first time has been tried in children's oncology.

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene polymorphisms predict pelvic recurrence in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wu; Park, David J; Lu, Bo; Yang, Dong Yun; Gordon, Michael; Groshen, Susan; Yun, Jim; Press, Oliver A; Vallböhmer, Daniel; Rhodes, Katrin; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2005-01-15

    An association between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway and response of cancer cells to ionizing radiation has been reported. Recently, a polymorphic variant in the EGFR gene that leads to an arginine-to-lysine substitution in the extracellular domain at codon 497 within subdomain IV of EGFR has been identified. The variant EGFR (HER-1 497K) may lead to attenuation in ligand binding, growth stimulation, tyrosine kinase activation, and induction of proto-oncogenes myc, fos, and jun. A (CA)(n) repeat polymorphism in intron 1 of the EGFR gene that alters EGFR expression in vitro and in vivo has also been described. In the current pilot study, we assessed both polymorphisms in 59 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy using PCR-RFLP and a 5'-end [gamma-(33)P]ATP-labeled PCR protocol. We tested whether either polymorphism alone or in combination can be associated with local recurrence in the setting of chemoradiation treatment. We found that patients with HER-1 497 Arg/Arg genotype or lower number of CA repeats (both alleles HER-1 497 Arg allele and HER-1 R497K and EGFR intron 1 (CA)(n) repeat polymorphisms may be potential indicators of radiosensitivity in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation.

  10. Phase 2 Study of Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for High-Risk Low-Grade Gliomas: Preliminary Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0424

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Barbara J., E-mail: barbara.fisher@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Hu, Chen [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Macdonald, David R. [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lesser, Glenn J. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Coons, Stephen W. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Brachman, David G. [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Ryu, Samuel [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Junfeng [GCE Solutions, Inc., Bloomington, Illinois (United States); Chakravarti, Arnab [The Ohio State University, The James, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Mehta, Minesh [University of Maryland Medical Systems, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0424 was a phase 2 study of a high-risk low-grade glioma (LGG) population who were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and outcomes were compared to those of historical controls. This study was designed to detect a 43% increase in median survival time (MST) from 40.5 to 57.9 months and a 20% improvement in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate from 54% to 65% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 96% power. Methods and Materials: Patients with LGGs with 3 or more risk factors for recurrence (age ≥40 years, astrocytoma histology, bihemispherical tumor, preoperative tumor diameter of ≥6 cm, or a preoperative neurological function status of >1) were treated with RT (54 Gy in 30 fractions) and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Results: From 2005 to 2009, 129 evaluable patients (75 males and 54 females) were accrued. Median age was 49 years; 91% had a Zubrod score of 0 or 1; and 69%, 25%, and 6% of patients had 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. Patients had median and minimum follow-up examinations of 4.1 years and 3 years, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 73.1% (95% confidence interval: 65.3%-80.8%), which was significantly improved compared to that of prespecified historical control values (P<.001). Median survival time has not yet been reached. Three-year progression-free survival was 59.2%. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 43% and 10% of patients, respectively. One patient died of herpes encephalitis. Conclusions: The 3-year OS rate of 73.1% for RTOG 0424 high-risk LGG patients is higher than that reported for historical controls (P<.001) and the study-hypothesized rate of 65%.

  11. Concurrent chemoradiation for vaginal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T Miyamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is not known whether the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy improves outcomes in primary vaginal cancer. Here, we review clinical outcomes in patients with primary vaginal cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT. METHODS: Seventy-one patients with primary vaginal cancer treated with definitive RT with or without concurrent chemotherapy at a single institution were identified and their records reviewed. A total of 51 patients were treated with RT alone; 20 patients were treated with CRT. Recurrences were analyzed. Overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: The median age at diagnosis was 61 years (range, 18-92 years and the median follow-up time among survivors was 3.0 years. Kaplan-Meier estimates for OS and DFS differed significantly between the RT and CRT groups (3-yr OS = 56% vs. 79%, log-rank p = 0.037; 3-yr DFS = 43% vs. 73%, log-rank p = 0.011. Twenty-three patients (45% in the RT group had a relapse at any site compared to 3 (15% in the CRT group (p = 0.027. With regard to the sites of first relapse, 10 patients (14% had local only, 4 (6% had local and regional, 9 (13% had regional only, 1 (1% had regional and distant, and 2 (3% had distant only relapse. On univariate analysis, the use of concurrent chemotherapy, FIGO stage, tumor size, and date of diagnosis were significant predictors of DFS. On multivariate analysis, the use of concurrent chemotherapy remained a significant predictor of DFS (hazard ratio 0.31 (95% CI, 0.10-0.97; p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: Vaginal cancer results in poor outcomes. Adequate radiation dose is essential to ensure curative management. Concurrent chemotherapy should be considered for vaginal cancer patients.

  12. Adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT alone versus CCRT followed by adjuvant chemotherapy: Which is better in patients with radically resected extrahepatic biliary tract cancer?: a non-randomized, single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Tae-You

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently no standard adjuvant therapy for patients with curatively resected extrahepatic biliary tract cancer (EHBTC. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical features and outcomes between patients undergoing adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT alone and those undergoing CCRT followed by adjuvant chemotherapy after curative resection. Methods We included 120 patients with EHBTC who underwent radical resection and then received adjuvant CCRT with or without further adjuvant chemotherapy between 2000 and 2006 at Seoul National University Hospital. Results Out of 120 patients, 30 received CCRT alone, and 90 received CCRT followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Baseline characteristics were comparable between the two groups. Three-year disease-free survival (DFS rates for CCRT alone and CCRT followed by adjuvant chemotherapy were 26.6% and 45.2% (p = 0.04, respectively, and 3-year overall survival (OS rates were 30.8% and 62.6% (p Conclusion Adjuvant CCRT followed by adjuvant chemotherapy prolonged DFS and OS, compared with CCRT alone in patients with curatively resected EHBTC. Adjuvant chemotherapy deserves to consider after adjuvant CCRT. In the future, a randomized prospective study will be needed, with the objective of investigating the role of adjuvant chemotherapy.

  13. Phase I/II Trial of Vorinostat Combined with Temozolomide and Radiation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: Final Results of Alliance N0874/ABTC 02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanis, Evanthia; Anderson, S Keith; Miller, C Ryan; Sarkaria, Jann N; Jaeckle, Kurt; Buckner, Jan C; Ligon, Keith L; Ballman, Karla V; Moore, Dennis F; Nebozhyn, Michael; Loboda, Andrey; Schiff, David; Ahluwalia, Manmeet Singh; Lee, Eudocia Q; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Lesser, Glenn J; Prados, Michael; Grossman, Stuart A; Cerhan, Jane; Giannini, Caterina; Wen, Patrick Y

    2017-08-22

    Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, has shown radiosensitizing properties in preclinical studies. This open-label, single-arm trial evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD; phase I) and efficacy (phase II) of vorinostat combined with standard chemoradiation in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Patients received oral vorinostat (300 or 400 mg/day) on days 1-5 weekly during temozolomide chemoradiation. Following a 4- to 6-week rest, patients received up to 12 cycles of standard adjuvant temozolomide and vorinostat (400 mg/day) on days 1-7 and 15-21 of each 28-day cycle. Association between vorinostat response signatures and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed by RNA sequencing of baseline tumor tissue. Phase I and phase II enrolled 15 and 107 patients, respectively. The combination therapy MTD was vorinostat 300 mg/day and temozolomide 75 mg/m 2/day. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and grade 3 aspartate aminotransferase elevation, hyperglycemia, fatigue, and wound dehiscence. The primary efficacy endpoint in the phase II cohort, OS rate at 15 months, was 55.1% (median OS 16.1 months), and consequently, the study did not meet its efficacy objective. Most common treatment-related grade 3/4 toxicities in the phase II component were lymphopenia (32.7%), thrombocytopenia (28.0%), and neutropenia (21.5%). RNA expression profiling of baseline tumors (N=76) demonstrated that vorinostat resistance (sig-79) and sensitivity (sig-139) signatures had a reverse and positive association with OS/PFS, respectively. Vorinostat combined with standard chemoradiation had acceptable tolerability in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Although the primary efficacy endpoint was not met, vorinostat sensitivity and resistance signatures could facilitate patient selection in future trials.

  14. Combination therapy in hypertension: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalra Sanjay

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Meticulous control of blood pressure is required in patients with hypertension to produce the maximum reduction in clinical cardiovascular end points, especially in patients with comorbidities like diabetes mellitus where more aggressive blood pressure lowering might be beneficial. Recent clinical trials suggest that the approach of using monotherapy for the control of hypertension is not likely to be successful in most patients. Combination therapy may be theoretically favored by the fact that multiple factors contribute to hypertension, and achieving control of blood pressure with single agent acting through one particular mechanism may not be possible. Regimens can either be fixed dose combinations or drugs added sequentially one after other. Combining the drugs makes them available in a convenient dosing format, lower the dose of individual component, thus, reducing the side effects and improving compliance. Classes of antihypertensive agents which have been commonly used are angiotensin receptor blockers, thiazide diuretics, beta and alpha blockers, calcium antagonists and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Thiazide diuretics and calcium channel blockers are effective, as well as combinations that include renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers, in reducing BP. The majority of currently available fixed-dose combinations are diuretic-based. Combinations may be individualized according to the presence of comorbidities like diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, heart failure, thyroid disorders and for special population groups like elderly and pregnant females.

  15. Clinical observation of gene expression-guided chemoradiation therapy for nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients: a retrospective analysis of 36 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Dai, Honghai; Lv, Dongxiao; Feng, A Lei; Shu, Weibin; Han, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    To make an informed choice of chemotherapy drugs according to the oncogene mRNA expression and to explore whether it could increase the survival rate of patients. The study retrospectively analyzed 36 cases of nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated at the Center for Oncology of Shandong Provincial Hospital from December 1, 2010, to November 1, 2013. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used for the treatment with a conventional radiotherapy dose of 60-66 Gy. Chemotherapy started 1-5 weeks after radiation therapy. The selection of the chemotherapy drug was based on the mRNA expression levels of excision repair cross-complementation 1, thymidylate synthetase, ribonucleotide reductase M1, and β-tubulin isotype III. The objective response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival were observed. The reason for poor prognosis of patients with high expression of excision repair cross-complementation 1 was unknown. No correlation was observed between patient survival and expression of thymidylate synthetase, ribonucleotide reductase M1, and β-tubulin isotype III. Complete response, partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease were observed in 25, five, three, and three patients, respectively. The objective response rate was 83.3%. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year progression-free survival rates were 79.8%, 58.9%, and 54.4%, respectively. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year overall survival rates were 83.3%, 68.1%, and 58.4%, respectively. Selecting the chemotherapy drug according to the oncogene expression, combined with radiation therapy, could increase the 3-year survival rate in nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients. Such conclusion needs to be further confirmed using a larger sample size.

  16. Combination antiretroviral therapy and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges, Álvaro H

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the newest research about the effects of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on cancer risk. RECENT FINDINGS: HIV+ persons are at increased risk of cancer. As this risk is higher for malignancies driven by viral and bacterial coinfections, classifying malignancies...... initiation in reducing cancer risk, understand the relationship between long-term cART exposure and cancer incidence and assess whether adjuvant anti-inflammatory therapies can reduce cancer risk during treated HIV infection....... into infection-related and infection-unrelated has been an emerging trend. Cohorts have detected major reductions in the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) following cART initiation among immunosuppressed HIV+ persons. However, recent randomized data indicate that cART reduces risk...

  17. Appropriate customization of radiation therapy for stage II and III rectal cancer: Executive summary of an ASTRO Clinical Practice Statement using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Karyn A; Patton, Caroline E; Fisher, George A; Hoffe, Sarah E; Haddock, Michael G; Parikh, Parag J; Kim, John; Baxter, Nancy N; Czito, Brian G; Hong, Theodore S; Herman, Joseph M; Crane, Christopher H; Hoffman, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    To summarize results of a Clinical Practice Statement on radiation therapy for stage II-III rectal cancer, which addressed appropriate customization of (neo)adjuvant radiation therapy and use of non-surgical therapy for patients who are inoperable or refuse abdominoperineal resection. The RAND/University of California, Los Angeles, Appropriateness Method was applied to combine current evidence with multidisciplinary expert opinion. A systematic literature review was conducted and used by the expert panel to rate appropriateness of radiation therapy options for different clinical scenarios. Treatments were categorized by median rating as Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate. In the neoadjuvant setting, chemoradiation was rated Appropriate and the ratings indicated short-course radiation therapy, chemotherapy alone, and no neoadjuvant therapy are potential options in selected patients. However, neoadjuvant endorectal brachytherapy was rated Rarely Appropriate. For adjuvant therapy, chemoradiation (plus ≥4 months of chemotherapy) was rated Appropriate and chemotherapy alone May Be Appropriate for most scenarios. For medically inoperable patients, definitive external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy alone were rated May Be Appropriate, whereas endorectal brachytherapy and chemoradiation plus endorectal brachytherapy were possible approaches for some scenarios. The last option, definitive chemoradiation, was rated Appropriate to May Be Appropriate based on performance status. Finally, for patients with low-lying tumors refusing abdominoperineal resection, definitive chemoradiation alone, chemoradiation plus endorectal brachytherapy, and chemoradiation plus external beam radiation therapy were all rated Appropriate. This Clinical Practice Statement demonstrated the central role of radiation therapy in stage II-III rectal cancer management and evaluated ways to better individualize its use in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and definitive settings

  18. Regional Lymph Node Uptake of [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Predicts Local-Regional Failure of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of ACRIN 6668/RTOG 0235

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovina, Stephanie [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology and Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Duan, Fenghai [Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Snyder, Bradley S. [Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Siegel, Barry A. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology and Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jbradley@radonc.wustl.edu [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology and Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: The American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) 6668/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0235 study demonstrated that standardized uptake values (SUV) on post-treatment [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) correlated with survival in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This secondary analysis determined whether SUV of regional lymph nodes (RLNs) on post-treatment FDG-PET correlated with patient outcomes. Methods and Materials: Included for analysis were patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy, using radiation doses ≥60 Gy, with identifiable FDG-avid RLNs (distinct from primary tumor) on pretreatment FDG-PET, and post-treatment FDG-PET data. ACRIN core laboratory SUV measurements were used. Event time was calculated from the date of post-treatment FDG-PET. Local-regional failure was defined as failure within the treated RT volume and reported by the treating institution. Statistical analyses included Wilcoxon signed rank test, Kaplan-Meier curves (log rank test), and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Results: Of 234 trial-eligible patients, 139 (59%) had uptake in both primary tumor and RLNs on pretreatment FDG-PET and had SUV data from post-treatment FDG-PET. Maximum SUV was greater for primary tumor than for RLNs before treatment (P<.001) but not different post-treatment (P=.320). Post-treatment SUV of RLNs was not associated with overall survival. However, elevated post-treatment SUV of RLNs, both the absolute value and the percentage of residual activity compared to the pretreatment SUV were associated with inferior local-regional control (P<.001). Conclusions: High residual metabolic activity in RLNs on post-treatment FDG-PET is associated with worse local-regional control. Based on these data, future trials evaluating a radiation therapy boost should consider inclusion of both primary tumor and FDG-avid RLNs in the boost volume to maximize local

  19. Infliximab, azathioprine, or combination therapy for Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombel, Jean Frédéric; Sandborn, William J; Reinisch, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The comparative efficacy and safety of infliximab and azathioprine therapy alone or in combination for Crohn's disease are unknown.......The comparative efficacy and safety of infliximab and azathioprine therapy alone or in combination for Crohn's disease are unknown....

  20. Ectopic pregnancy treatment by combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cymbaluk-Płoska Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Detectability of early stages of ectopic pregnancies has increased due to improvements in ultrasonographic and biochemical techniques. Since the patients’ future procreative plans must be taken into consideration when commencing treatment, the goal of this work was to compare the effects of treatment methods and their impact on fertility. The study included 91 patients treated surgically for ectopic pregnancy. The choice of treatment depended on patients’ general condition, ultrasonographic evaluation and serum level of beta-hCG. A combination of laparoscopic and conservative systemic treatment was applied in 70% of cases. More rapid beta-hCG reduction was noted when laparoscopy and intra-oviductal injection of hyperosmolar glucose or methotrexate (MTX were combined with intramuscular administration of MTX at a dose of 50 mg/m2. Follow-up examination of 66 patients revealed that the greatest number of spontaneous pregnancies (48% resulted after this combination therapy. We conclude that this combination treatment is safe and provides satisfactory results in terms of future fertility.

  1. Ectopic pregnancy treatment by combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymbaluk-Płoska, Aneta; Chudecka-Głaz, Anita; Kuźniak, Sławomir; Menkiszak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Detectability of early stages of ectopic pregnancies has increased due to improvements in ultrasonographic and biochemical techniques. Since the patients' future procreative plans must be taken into consideration when commencing treatment, the goal of this work was to compare the effects of treatment methods and their impact on fertility. The study included 91 patients treated surgically for ectopic pregnancy. The choice of treatment depended on patients' general condition, ultrasonographic evaluation and serum level of beta-hCG. A combination of laparoscopic and conservative systemic treatment was applied in 70% of cases. More rapid beta-hCG reduction was noted when laparoscopy and intra-oviductal injection of hyperosmolar glucose or methotrexate (MTX) were combined with intramuscular administration of MTX at a dose of 50 mg/m2. Follow-up examination of 66 patients revealed that the greatest number of spontaneous pregnancies (48%) resulted after this combination therapy. We conclude that this combination treatment is safe and provides satisfactory results in terms of future fertility.

  2. A Phase 1/2 and Biomarker Study of Preoperative Short Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine Followed By Early Surgery for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ryan, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Deshpande, Vikram; Shinagare, Shweta [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wo, Jennifer Y.; Boucher, Yves [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wadlow, Raymond C.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Zhu, Andrew X. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ferrone, Cristina R. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; Winrich, Barbara; Grillo, Tarin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. Results: The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). Conclusions: This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRAS{sup G12D} status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival.

  3. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elicin, Olgun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Callaway, Sharon [Velocity Medical Solutions, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Prior, John O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bourhis, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ozsahin, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmut.ozsahin@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Herrera, Fernanda G., E-mail: fernanda.herrera@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}). Active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BM{sub TOT}. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40}, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} were 27% and 38%, respectively. BM{sub ACT} volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm{sup 3}, respectively; P<.0001). BM{sub ACT} V{sub 30} was significantly correlated with a reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV (R{sup 2}, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R{sup 2}, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R{sup 2}, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BM

  4. [The normative combined therapy for recurrent sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bengang; Sun, Yiqing; Miao, Xutao; Wang, Xin; Li, Wenjun

    2014-06-01

    To assess the treatment outcome after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) in patients with recurrent sinusitis and to research which factors could influence the clinical outcome. Endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in 55 patients. The clinical outcome and epithelization of mucosa after ESS were evaluated by Chinese ENT Association criteria. The total cure rate was 81.82%, effective rate was 92.73%. The mean period of epithelization after operation was 13.2 weeks. No serious complication occurred. The treatment efficacy can be greatly improved by the normative combined therapy which include the standard and orderly perioperative treatment ,the overall shape and nasalization of nasal cavity, postoperative follow-up and clearing cav ity after ESS.

  5. Topotecan and cisplatin in combination with concurrent twice-daily chemoradiation in limited disease small cell lung cancer-a Danish Oncological Lung Cancer Group (DOLG) phase II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Morten; Lassen, Ulrik; Palshof, Torben

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The longest survival time reported in randomised trials of limited disease (LD) SCLC has been achieved with early twice-daily concurrent chemoradiation. Topotecan is active in recurrent SCLC and in extensive disease as first line treatment. Aim: To incorporate and assess the effect...

  6. Topotecan and cisplatin in combination with concurrent twice-daily chemoradiation in limited disease small cell lung cancer-a Danish Oncological Lung Cancer Group (DOLG) phase II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M.; Lassen, U.; Palshof, T.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The longest survival time reported in randomised trials of limited disease (LD) SCLC has been achieved with early twice-daily concurrent chemoradiation. Topotecan is active in recurrent SCLC and in extensive disease as first line treatment. AIM: To incorporate and assess the effect...

  7. Risk factors for brain metastases after definitive chemoradiation for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Marina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. As therapy for locally advanced nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC improves, brain metastases (BM still remain a great problem. The aim of the study was to analyze risk factors for BM in patients with locally advanced NSCLC after chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Records for 150 patients with non-resectable stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC treated with combined chemoradiation therapy were analyzed. All of them had negative brain metastases imaging result before the treatment. Incidence of BM was examined in relation to age, sex, histological type, stage, performance status scale of wellbeing of cancer patients, weight loss, chemotherapy regimen and chemotherapy timing. Results. One- and 2-year incidence rates of BM were 19 and 31%, respectively. Among pretreatment parameters, stage IIIB was associated with a higher risk of BM (p < 0.004 vs stage IIIA. Histologically, the patients with nonsquamous tumors had an exceptionally high 2-year BM risk rate of 32% (p < 0.02. Examining treatment-related parameters, 1-year and 2-year actuarial risk of BM were 27 and 39%, respectively, in the patients receiving chemotherapy before radiotherapy and 15 and 20%, respectively, when radiotherapy was not delayed (p < 0.03. On multivariate analysis, timing of chemotherapy (p < 0.05 and stage IIIA vs IIIB (p < 0.01 remained statistically significant. Conclusion. Patients with IIIB stage, nonsquamous NSCLC, particularly those receiving sequential chemotherapy, had significantly high BM rates.

  8. Circulating Cell-Free DNA in Plasma of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Undergoing Preoperative Chemoradiation: A Potential Diagnostic Tool for Therapy Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Zitt

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating cell-free DNA opens up an interesting field for therapy monitoring, in particular during multimodal therapy protocols. The objective of this proof of principle study was to evaluate whether the amount of circulating plasma DNA has the potential to serve as a marker for therapy monitoring during the treatment course of locally advanced rectal cancer patients. We especially focused on kinetics of circulating DNA to assess whether variances in kinetics have the potential to discriminate between therapy responders and nonresponders.

  9. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkan, Erkan, E-mail: docdretopkan@gmail.com [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Pehlivan, Berrin [Koc University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul, and American Hospital, University of Texas MD Anderson Radiation Treatment Center, Istanbul (Turkey); Selek, Ugur [Medstar Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  10. Patterns of Symptom Burden During Radiation Therapy or Concurrent Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer: A Prospective Analysis Using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory–Head and Neck Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, David I.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Wang, X. Shelley; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Lu, Charles; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Cleeland, Charles S.; Gunn, G. Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Background We performed a prospective longitudinal study to profile patient-reported symptoms during radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) for head and neck cancer. The goals were to understand the onset and trajectory of specific symptoms and their severity, identify clusters, and to facilitate symptom interventions and clinical trial design. Methods Participants in this questionnaire-based study received RT or CCRT. They completed the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory—Head and Neck Module before and weekly during treatment. Symptom scores were compared between treatment groups, and hierarchical cluster analysis was used to depict clustering of symptoms at treatment end. Variables thought to predict symptom severity were assessed using a multivariate mixed model. Results Among the 149 patients studied, most (47%) had oropharyngeal tumors, and nearly half received CCRT. Overall symptom severity (P<0.001) and symptom interference (P<0.0001) became progressively more severe and were more severe for those receiving CCRT. On multivariate analysis, baseline performance status (P<0.001) and receipt of CCRT (P<0.04) correlated with higher symptom severity. Fatigue, drowsiness, lack of appetite, problem with mouth/throat mucus, and problem tasting food were more severe for those receiving CCRT. Both local and systemic symptom clusters were identified. Conclusions Our findings from this prospective longitudinal study identified a pattern of local and systemic symptoms, symptom clusters, and symptom interference that was temporally distinct and marked by increased magnitude and a shift in individual symptom rank order during the treatment course. These inform us about symptom intervention needs, and are a benchmark for future symptom intervention clinical trials. PMID:24711162

  11. Effects of induction docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B nasopharyngeal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy: Final results of 2 parallel phase 2 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lin; Zhang, Youwang; Hu, Chaosu; Guo, Ye; Lu, Jiade J

    2017-06-15

    The effects of docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil (TPF) induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) on locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) are unclear. This study examined the long-term outcomes of the addition of this regimen to CCRT for stage III and IVA/B NPC. Two parallel, single-arm phase 2 trials were performed synchronously to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of TPF-based induction chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B NPC. The induction chemotherapy, which preceded standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy/platinum-based chemoradiation, consisted of 3 cycles of docetaxel (75 mg/m2 on day 1), cisplatin (75 mg/m2 on day 1), and a continuous infusion of fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 /d on days 1-5) every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint for both trials was 5-year overall survival (OS). Between January 2007 and July 2010, 52 eligible patients with stage III NPC and 64 eligible patients with nonmetastatic stage IV NPC were accrued to the 2 trials. With a median follow-up of 67 months, the 5-year OS, progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and local progression-free survival (LPFS) rates were all improved in comparison with historical benchmarks for patients with stage III or IVA/IVB NPC. Multivariate analyses indicated that T and N classifications (T1/T2 vs T3/T4 and N3 vs N0-N2) were the only significant prognosticators for OS. The number of induction chemotherapy cycles was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting LPFS. TPF-based induction chemotherapy appears to significantly improve outcomes in comparison with historical data when it is administered before CCRT for locoregionally advanced NPC. A phase 3 trial is currently being performed to confirm this benefit. Cancer 2017;123:2258-2267. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. RTOG 0417: Efficacy of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefter, Tracey, E-mail: tracey.schefter@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado, Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Winter, Kathryn [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kwon, Janice S. [University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Stuhr, Kelly [University of Colorado, Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Balaraj, Khalid [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yaremko, Brian Patrick [Western University, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Small, William [Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sause, William [Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, Utah (United States); Gaffney, David [University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0417 was a phase II study that explored the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to chemoradiation therapy. The safety results have been previously reported. Herein we report the secondary efficacy endpoints of overall survival (OS), locoregional failure (LRF), para-aortic nodal failure (PAF), distant failure (DF), and disease-free survival (DFS). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky Stage IB-IIIB disease were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for 3 cycles during chemoradiation. For OS, failure was defined as death of any cause and was measured from study entry to date of death. LRF was defined as any failure in the pelvis. PAF was defined as any para-aortic nodal failure. DF was analyzed both including and excluding PAF. DFS was measured from study entry to date of first LRF. DF was measured with or without PAF or death. OS and DFS were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and LRF and DF rates were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. Results: 49 eligible patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up time was 3.8 years (range, 0.8-6.0 years). The surviving patients had a median follow-up time of 3.9 years (range, 2.1-6.0 years). Most patients had tumors of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIB (63%), and 80% were squamous. The 3-year OS, DFS, and LRF were 81.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 67.2%-89.8%), 68.7% (95% CI, 53.5%-79.8%), and 23.2% (95% CI, 11%-35.4%), respectively. The PAF, DF without PAF, and DF with PAF at 3 years were 8.4% (95% CI, 0.4%-16.3%), 14.7% (95% CI, 4.5%-24.9%), and 23.1% (95% CI 11.0%-35.2%), respectively. Conclusion: In this study, bevacizumab in combination with standard pelvic chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced cervical

  13. Therapeutic cancer vaccines in combination with conventional therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Junker, Niels; Ellebaek, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination...

  14. Combination therapy in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, M S; Staib, R L; Wicks, L M

    2013-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease without a cure, which can lead to right heart failure and death. Over the past decades, several therapeutic advances have been developed for the management of PAH. Although these agents have demonstrated clinical safety and efficacy, some patients may require additional drug therapy due to a lack of response or disease progression. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of various combination PAH therapies. A systematic search was conducted using the MEDLINE database (1966 and June 2012) for relevant clinical studies. Searches were limited to English, human and clinical trial using the terms sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil, phosphodiesterase inhibitor, prostacyclin, prostaglandin, epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost, endothelin receptor antagonist, bosentan, ambrisentan, sitaxsentan and pulmonary hypertension. Overall, 22 studies met inclusion criteria. Overall, the majority of trials demonstrated clinical efficacy in improving functional class, reducing pulmonary pressure, or increasing exercise capacity. Most trials were uncontrolled with small sample sizes investigating the acute effects of combination therapy and lacking long-term clinical outcomes. Adjunctive therapy was well tolerated by most patients. Overall, combination therapy is relatively safe and well tolerated. Published guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for monotherapy. However, suggestions for combination therapy in refractory PAH patients are lacking. Several studies evaluating several combination therapies have been published. The preferred combination treatment among several PAH drug therapies remain controversial. Therefore, clinicians should consider ease of administration, cost, and tolerability when choosing specific combination therapies. Combination therapy appears promising for patients who are refractory to treatment or whose disease progression is not well controlled

  15. Combining Immunotherapy with Standard Glioblastoma Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This clinical trial is testing standard therapy (surgery, radiation and temozolomide) plus immunotherapy with pembrolizumab with or without a cancer treatment vaccine for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, a common and deadly type of brain tumor.

  16. Phase III trial of low-level laser therapy to prevent oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Heliton S; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Small, Isabele A; Araújo, Carlos M M; Viégas, Celia Maria Pais; Cabral, Elida; Rampini, Mariana P; Rodrigues, Pedro C; Silva, Tereza G P; Ferreira, Elza M S; Dias, Fernando L; Ferreira, Carlos G

    2013-11-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a complication of chemoradiotherapy treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients with no effective therapy. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of preventive low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in reducing the incidence of grade 3-4 OM. From June 2007 to December 2010, 94 HNSCC patients entered a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional radiotherapy plus concurrent cisplatin every 3weeks. A diode InGaAlP (660nm-100mW-1J-4J/cm(2)) was used. OM evaluation was performed by WHO and OMAS scales and quality of life by EORTC questionnaires (QLQ). A six-fold decrease in the incidence of grades 3-4 OM was detected in the LLLT group compared to the placebo; (6.4% versus 40.5%). LLLT impacted the incidence of grades 3-4 OM to a relative risk ratio of 0.158 (CI 95% 0.050-0.498). After treatment QLQ-C30 showed, differences favoring LLLT in physical, emotional functioning, fatigue, and pain; while the QLQ-H&N35 showed improvements in LLLT arm for pain, swallowing, and trouble with social eating. Preventive LLLT in HNSCC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy is an effective tool for reducing the incidence of grade 3-4 OM. Efficacy data were corroborated by improvements seen in quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. SU-F-T-106: A Dosimetric Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Decrease Radiation Dose to the Thoracic Vertebral Bodies in Patients Receiving Concurrent Chemoradiation for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiCostanzo, Dominic; Barney, Christian L.; Bazan, Jose G. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Recent clinical studies have shown a correlation between radiation dose to the thoracic vertebral bodies (TVB) and the development of hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients receiving chemoradiation (CRT) for lung cancer (LuCa). The feasibility of a bone-marrow sparing (BMS) approach in this group of patients is unknown. We hypothesized that radiation dose to the TVB can be reduced with an intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT)/volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy(VMAT) without affecting plan quality. Methods: We identified LuCa cases treated with curative intent CRT using IMRT/VMAT from 4/2009 to 2/2015. The TVBs from T1–T10 were retrospectively contoured. No constraints were placed on the TVB structure initially. A subset were re-planned with BMS-IMRT/VMAT with an objective or reducing the mean TVB dose to <23 Gy. The following data were collected on the initial and BMS plans: mean dose to planning target volume (PTV), lungs-PTV, esophagus, heart; lung V20; cord max dose. Pairwise comparisons were performed using the signed rank test. Results: 94 cases received CRT with IMRT/VMAT. We selected 11 cases (7 IMRT, 4 VMAT) with a range of initial mean TVB doses (median 35.7 Gy, range 18.9–41.4 Gy). Median prescription dose was 60 Gy. BMS-IMRT/VMAT significantly reduced the mean TVB dose by a median of 10.2 Gy (range, 1.0–16.7 Gy, p=0.001) and reduced the cord max dose by 2.9 Gy (p=0.014). BMS-IMRT/VMAT had no impact on lung mean (median +17 cGy, p=0.700), lung V20 (median +0.5%, p=0.898), esophagus mean (median +13 cGy, p=1.000) or heart mean (median +16 cGy, p=0.365). PTV-mean dose was not affected by BMS-IMRT/VMAT (median +13 cGy, p=0.653). Conclusion: BMS-IMRT/VMAT was able to significantly reduce radiation dose to the TVB without compromising plan quality. Prospective evaluation of BMS-IMRT/VMAT in patients receiving CRT for LuCa is warranted to determine if this approach results in clinically significant reductions in HT.

  18. The role of combination therapy in managing pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein-Ardeschir Ghofrani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a complex, progressive disease with several pathobiological mechanisms, including the endothelin, nitric oxide and prostacyclin pathways. Current treatments for PAH target one of these pathways and, in more severe cases or instances of disease worsening, may be combined with a view to target multiple pathways in parallel. Treatment combination is performed sequentially (as an intensification from initial monotherapy or upfront (use of two or more therapies in treatment-naı¨ve patients. Whilst combination therapy has been historically considered to be an option for the treatment of PAH, supporting evidence was typically limited to expert opinion, clinical experience and registry data. Data from randomised controlled trials on sequential combination therapy in particular has grown in recent years, resulting in a change in the level of recommendations in the latest update to the PAH treatment algorithm. However, short-term trials have shown inconsistent results, and have not been powered to assess morbidity/mortality outcomes. More recent data from long-term trials suggest a potential clinical benefit associated with sequential combination therapy. In this review we will introduce the concept of combination therapy, consider the latest evidence for both sequential and upfront combination therapy, and discuss additional considerations when initiating combination therapy in clinical practice.

  19. Effect of Combination Therapy on Joint Destruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, N.; Hubeck-Graudal, T.; Tarp, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite significant cost differences, the comparative effect of combination treatments of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) with and without biologic agents has rarely been examined. Thus we performed a network meta-analysis on the effect of combination therapies...... on progression of radiographic joint erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods and Findings: The following combination drug therapies compared versus single DMARD were investigated: Double DMARD: 2 DMARDs (methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide, injectable gold, cyclosporine, chloroquine...

  20. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Nam, Jae-Kyung; Jang, Junho; Lee, Hae-June, E-mail: hjlee@kcch.re.kr; Lee, Yoon-Jin, E-mail: yjlee8@kcch.re.kr

    2015-06-26

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm{sup 3} increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors.

  1. A phase I study of dasatinib with concurrent chemoradiation for stage III non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard eSafran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Src family kinases (SFKs are expressed in NSCLC and may be involved in tumor growth and metastases. Inhibition of SFK may also enhance radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if a maximum dose of 100 mg of dasatinib could be safely administered with concurrent chemoradiation and then continued as maintenance for patients with newly diagnosed stage III NSCLC.Methods: Patients with stage III locally advanced NSCLC received paclitaxel, 50mg/m2/week, with carboplatin area under the curve (AUC = 2, weekly for 7 weeks, and concurrent radiotherapy, 64.8 Gy. Three dose levels of dasatinib 50, 70 and 100mg/day were planned.Results: Eleven patients with locally advanced NSCLC were entered. At the 70 mg dose level 1 patient had grade 5 pneumonitis not responsive to therapy, and 1 patient had reversible grade 3 pneumonitis and grade 3 pericardial effusion. Due to these toxicities the Brown University Oncology Group Data Safety Monitoring Board terminated the study. Conclusion: Dasatinib could not be safely combined with concurrent chemoradiation for stage 3 lung cancer due to pneumonitis.

  2. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  3. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressy, Christian; Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2017-06-16

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53) or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73) were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  4. The Association Between Chemoradiation-related Lymphopenia and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Aaron T; Ye, Xiaobu; Ellsworth, Susannah G; Smith, Jessica A; Narang, Amol K; Garg, Tanu; Campian, Jian; Laheru, Daniel A; Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Tran, Phuoc T; Grossman, Stuart A; Herman, Joseph M

    2015-06-01

    Lymphopenia is a common consequence of chemoradiation therapy yet is seldom addressed clinically. This study was conducted to determine if patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with definitive chemoradiation develop significant lymphopenia and if this affects clinical outcomes. A retrospective analysis of patients with LAPC treated with chemoradiation at a single institution from 1997 to 2011 was performed. Total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) were recorded at baseline and then monthly during and after chemoradiation. The correlation between treatment-induced lymphopenia, established prognostic factors, and overall survival was analyzed using univariate Cox regression analysis. Important factors identified by univariate analysis were selected as covariates to construct a multivariate proportional hazards model for survival. A total of 101 patients met eligibility criteria. TLCs were normal in 86% before chemoradiation. The mean reduction in TLC per patient was 50.6% (SD, 40.6%) 2 months after starting chemoradiation (P<0.00001), and 46% had TLC<500 cells/mm. Patients with TLC<500 cells/mm 2 months after starting chemoradiation had inferior median survival (8.7 vs. 13.3 mo, P=0.03) and PFS (4.9 vs. 9.0 mo, P=0.15). Multivariate analysis revealed TLC<500 cells/mm to be an independent predictor of inferior survival (HR=2.879, P=0.001) along with baseline serum albumin (HR=3.584, P=0.0002), BUN (HR=1.060, P=0.02), platelet count (HR=1.004, P=0.005), and radiation planning target volume (HR=1.003, P=0.0006). Severe treatment-related lymphopenia occurs frequently after chemoradiation for LAPC and is an independent predictor of inferior survival.

  5. Neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation of rectal cancer with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: summary of technical and dosimetric features and early clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salati Emanuela

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report about initial technical and clinical experience in preoperative radiation treatment of rectal cancer with volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc® (RA technology. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients (pts were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma with stage T2-T4, N0-1. Dose prescription was 44 Gy in 22 fractions (or 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Delivery was performed with single arc with a 6 MV photon beam. Twenty patients were treated preoperatively, five did not receive surgery. Twenty-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy with oral capecitabine. A comparison with a cohort of twenty patients with similar characteristics treated with conformal therapy (3DC is presented as well. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA improved conformality of doses (CI95% = 1.1 vs. 1.4 for RA and 3DC, presented similar target coverage with lower maximum doses, significant sparing of femurs and significant reduction of integral and mean dose to healthy tissue. From the clinical point of view, surgical reports resulted in a down-staging in 41% of cases. Acute toxicity was limited to Grade 1-2 diarrhoea in 40% and Grade 3 in 8% of RA pts, 45% and 5% of 3DC pts, compatible with known effects of concomitant chemotherapy. RA treatments were performed with an average of 2.0 vs. 3.4 min of 3DC. Conclusion RA proved to be a safe, qualitatively advantageous treatment modality for rectal cancer, showing some improved results in dosimetric aspects.

  6. Neuropilin-1 expression identifies a subset of regulatory T cells in human lymph nodes that is modulated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Monego, Giovanni; Peri, Laura; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Fanfani, Francesco; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We examined the phenotype and function of CD4+ T cells expressing the semaphorin III receptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) in human lymph nodes and peripheral blood. In lymph nodes, Nrp1 identified a small regulatory CD4+ CD25(high) T-cell subpopulation (Nrp1+ Treg) that expressed higher levels of Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) message and protein than Nrp1- Treg, and various molecular markers of activated Treg, i.e. CD45RO, human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR). Similarly to conventional Treg, Nrp1+ Treg proliferated poorly in vitro, and exerted contact-dependent in vitro suppression of T-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion. However, Nrp1+ Treg were more efficient than Nrp1- Treg at inducing suppression. Nrp1 was also expressed on a small subpopulation of CD25(int) and CD25- CD4+ T cells that expressed more Foxp3, CD45RO, HLA-DR and GITR than their Nrp1- counterparts. In contrast, in peripheral blood Nrp1 identified a minor CD4+ T-cell subset that did not display the phenotypic features of Treg lacking Foxp3 expression and marginally expressing CD25. Hence, the function of Nrp1+ CD4+ T cells seemingly depends on their anatomical location. In a previous report, we proposed that Treg may curb the anti-tumour T-cell response in cervical cancer. We show here that Treg and Nrp1+ Treg levels dropped in the tumour-draining lymph nodes of patients with cervical cancer following preoperative chemoradiotherapy in a direct relationship with the reduction of tumour mass, suggesting that suppressor cell elimination facilitated the generation of T cells mediating the destruction of the neoplastic cells left behind after cytotoxic therapy.

  7. Hyperbilirubinemia without Transaminitis during Combined Therapy with Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Baba

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Daclatasvir (DCV and asunaprevir (ASV are direct-acting antivirals (DAAs used in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Combined therapy with DCV and ASV shows high efficacy and safety even in patients with cirrhosis. We encountered a patient exhibiting severe hyperbilirubinemia during combined therapy, which is an unreported side effect of DCV and ASV. A 78-year-old woman with cirrhosis developed hyperbilirubinemia >10 mg/dl without transaminitis 3 weeks after starting combined therapy. We suspected DAAs-induced liver disorder and discontinued treatment, which resulted in the improvement of hyperbilirubinemia. Caution is required in the use of DAAs for patients with advanced cirrhosis.

  8. Gene and Stem Cell Therapy: Alone or in Combination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Rafi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Both gene and stem cell therapies hold great promise in the treatment of many genetic diseases and are currently focus of interest for many investigators. While both approaches are offering great and valuable treatment options for devastating and life-threatening diseases, they hold much greater promise in combination. Methods: As there are multiple options in selecting gene transfer vehicles among the non-viral and viral vectors, there are also many options among the different transplantable cell types ranging from lineage-restricted progenitor cells to multipotent and pluripotent stem cells. Here, combination of the gene therapy and stem cell therapy is discussed. Results: Several successful gene and stem cell therapies have been reported both in animal and human trials. Combination of the gene therapy and stem cell therapy can be carried out sequentially where the cell transplantation and the in vivo gene therapy are accomplished one after the other; or, as it is more commonly practiced, they can be carried out as ex vivo gene therapy where the transplantable cells are genetically modified outside the body before being transplanted into the body. Conclusion: The combination of the stem-cell technology with gene therapy has the potential of providing both regenerative tissue and therapeutic material simultaneously; therefore, having the benefits of both technologies.

  9. Perception of the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    West Nigeria and perception of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Design and methods-About 180 pre-tested questionnaires were administered to randomly selected nurses out of which 155 were sufficiently completed and ...

  10. NMR with Combined Antiangiogenic and Radiation Therapies - Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The original goal of the present study was to determine optimal strategies for combining radiation and antiangiogenic therapies in spontaneous murine tumors and to evaluate the potential of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR...

  11. The comparison between monotherapy and combination therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalvat A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory condition. The condition can affected many tissues throught out the body, but the joints are usually most severely affected. The high incidence of RA, the conventional treatments and the experimental observation have shown by combination therapy, the disease symptoms of the patients reduce. To compare the efficacy and tolerability of single-agent Hydroxychloroquin (HCQ with combination therapies composed of (HCQ and Methotrexate (MTX and (HCQ, (MTX and Sulfasalazin (SSZ in active rheumatoid arthritis patients with additive arthritis. Methods: One hundred and twenty RA patients with active arthritis (male/female: 30/90 who were treated in rheumatology clinic between 2003 and 2005 were enrolled in this trial. Patients treated with (HCQ alone(200 mg/daywere include in group (I, patients treated with combination of (HCQ (200 mg/dayand (MTX (7.5mg/weekin group (II,and patents treated with combination of (HCQ (200mg/day,(MTX (7.5mg/weekand (SSZ(1 gr/dayin group (III, Forty patients (male/female:10/30 in group (I,(II and (IIIwere eligible for statistical analysis at the end of study. Changes in variable were compared by the T-test. Results: The combination of (MTX, (HCQand (SSZ and the combination of (MTX and (HCQ were more effective regarding the clinical and laboratory parameters than (HCQ alone (P<0.05. Moreover the combination of (MTX, (HCQ and (SSZ was more effective than the combination of (MTX and (HCQ (P<0.05. Combination therapies seem to be more effective and no more toxic than monotherapy in RA patients with additive arthritis. Conclusion: Combination therapy with methotrexate, hydroxychloroquin and sulfasalazin is more effective than hydroxychloroquin alone or a combination of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquin in RA. We suggest starting combination therapy for the patients with early RA, when the diagnosis has been established.

  12. Adjuvant chemo-radiation for gastric adenocarcinoma: an institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosn Marwan G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that surgery alone is less than satisfactory in the management of early gastric cancer, with cure rates approaching 40%. The role of adjuvant therapy was indefinite until three large, randomized controlled trials showed the survival benefit of adjuvant therapy over surgery alone. Chemoradiation therapy has been criticized for its high toxicity. Methods 24 patients diagnosed between September 2001 and July 2007 were treated with adjuvant chemoradiation. 18 patients had the classical MacDonald regimen of 4500 cGy of XRT and chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5FU and leucovorin, while chemotherapy consisted of 5FU/Cisplatin for 6 patients. Results This series consisted of non-metastatic patients, 17 females and 7 males with a median age of 62.5 years. 23 patients (96% had a performance status of 0 or 1. The full course of radiation therapy (4500 cGy was completed by 22 patients (91.7%. Only 7 patients (36.8% completed the total planned courses of chemotherapy. 2 local relapses (10%, 2 regional relapses (10% and 2 distant relapses (10% were recorded. Time to progression has not been reached. 9 patients (37.5% died during follow-up with a median overall survival of 75 months. Patients lost a mean of 4 Kgs during radiation therapy. We recorded 6 episodes of febrile neutropenia and the most frequent toxicity was gastro-intestinal in 17 patients (70.8% with 9 (36% patients suffering grade 3 or 4 toxicity and 5 patients (20% suffering from grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. 4 (17% patients required total parenteral nutrition for a mean duration of 20 days. 4 patients suffered septic shock (17% and 1 patient developed a deep venous thrombosis and a pulmonary embolus. Conclusions Adjuvant chemo-radiation for gastric cancer is a standard at our institution and has resulted in few relapses and an interesting median survival. Toxicity rates were serious and this remains a harsh regimen with only 36.8% of patients completing the

  13. Efficacy of rifampicin combination therapy on selected non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Combination therapy or polytherapy is the use of more than one antibacterial agent in the treatment of a single infection. In this study, rifampicin that was mainly used in the treatment of mycobacterial infections has been used in combination with other agents in non mycobacterial organisms. Clinical isolates of ...

  14. Combination therapy: the next opportunity and challenge of medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract From an historical point of view, combination therapy was the basis for the care of important diseases like infection diseases or cancer. Today the "cocktail drug" of the Highly Active Anti Retroviral Therapy (HAART has reduced the death for HIV infection changing the outcome of such disease. Moreover, the combination of different strategies changed the course of transplants (both in haematology and surgical transplant. Different diseases with high social impact including cardiovascular, metabolic (obesity, hypercholesterolaemia and diabetes and autoimmune diseases, have better results with combinations of different drug classes of drugs. After recent successes in the immunotherapy field (Sepuleucel-T, ipilimumab and the new promising small molecule therapies, cancer should be the next challenge for combination strategies.

  15. Dosimetric Coverage of the External Anal Sphincter by 3-Dimensional Conformal Fields in Rectal Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Implications for the Concept of Sphincter-Preserving Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jen Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We evaluated the anatomic location of the external anal sphincter (EAS to pelvic bony landmarks related to 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DRT and studied the dosimetric coverage of the EAS in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Methods. Sixty-four consecutive rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation were included. All patients were treated in a prone position on a bellyboard by 3DRT. The inferior border of the RT fields was at least 3–5 cm inferior to the gross tumorous volume (GTV or at the inferior border of the obturator foramen (IBOF, whichever was more inferior. The EAS was contoured and dose distributions were determined using dose-volume histograms. Results. In 53 out of 64 cases (82.8%, the EAS was completely inferior to the IBOF. In the remaining 11 cases, the EAS was either overlapping the IBOF (10 cases; 15.6% or completely superior to the IBOF (1 case; 1.7%. The average mean dose delivered to the EAS was 2795 cGy. Lower mean doses were delivered to the EAS when the center of the EAS was located more distant from the GTV. Conclusions. Meticulous planning to define the inferior border of the RT field is recommended to avoid irradiating the EAS.

  16. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Pai, Reetesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  17. TOPGEAR: A Randomized, Phase III Trial of Perioperative ECF Chemotherapy with or Without Preoperative Chemoradiation for Resectable Gastric Cancer: Interim Results from an International, Intergroup Trial of the AGITG, TROG, EORTC and CCTG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Trevor; Smithers, B Mark; Haustermans, Karin; Michael, Michael; Gebski, Val; Miller, Danielle; Zalcberg, John; Boussioutas, Alex; Findlay, Michael; O'Connell, Rachel L; Verghis, Jaclyn; Willis, David; Kron, Tomas; Crain, Melissa; Murray, William K; Lordick, Florian; Swallow, Carol; Darling, Gail; Simes, John; Wong, Rebecca

    2017-08-01

    Postoperative chemoradiation and perioperative chemotherapy using epirubicin/cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (ECF) represent two standards of care for resectable gastric cancer. In the TOPGEAR (Trial Of Preoperative therapy for Gastric and Esophagogastric junction AdenocaRcinoma) trial, we hypothesized that adding preoperative chemoradiation to perioperative ECF will improve survival; however, the safety and feasibility of preoperative chemoradiation have yet to be determined. TOPGEAR is an international phase III trial in which patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were randomized to perioperative ECF alone or with preoperative chemoradiation. The ECF-alone group received three preoperative cycles of ECF, while the chemoradiation group received two cycles of preoperative ECF followed by chemoradiation. Both groups received three postoperative cycles of ECF. A planned interim analysis of the first 120 patients was conducted, and was reviewed by the Independent Data Safety Monitoring Committee to assess treatment compliance, toxicity/safety, and response rates. The proportion of patients who received all cycles of preoperative chemotherapy was 93% (ECF group) and 98% (chemoradiation group), while 65 and 53%, respectively, received all cycles of postoperative chemotherapy. Overall, 92% of patients allocated to preoperative chemoradiation received this treatment. The proportion of patients proceeding to surgery was 90% (ECF group) and 85% (chemoradiation group). Grade 3 or higher surgical complications occurred in 22% of patients in both groups. Furthermore, grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 32% (ECF group) and 30% (chemoradiation group) of patients, while hematologic toxicity occurred in 50 and 52% of patients. These results demonstrate that preoperative chemoradiation can be safely delivered to the vast majority of patients without a significant increase in treatment toxicity or surgical morbidity.

  18. Treating Hypothyroidism with Thyroxine/Triiodothyronine Combination Therapy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsson, Luba Freja; Medici, Bjarke Borregaard; la Cour, Jeppe Lerche

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Five to ten percent of patients with hypothyroidism describe persistent symptoms despite being biochemically well regulated on levothyroxine (L-T4). Thyroxine (T4)/triiodothyronine (T3) combination therapy [L-T4/liothyronine (L-T3) or desiccated thyroid] are still regarded as experime......BACKGROUND: Five to ten percent of patients with hypothyroidism describe persistent symptoms despite being biochemically well regulated on levothyroxine (L-T4). Thyroxine (T4)/triiodothyronine (T3) combination therapy [L-T4/liothyronine (L-T3) or desiccated thyroid] are still regarded...... after a patient published a book describing her experiences with hypothyroidism and treatment. OBJECTIVE: To investigate current Danish trends in the use of T4/T3 combination therapy. METHODS: We used an Internet-based questionnaire, distributed as a link via two Danish patient fora. Further...

  19. Combination antitumor therapy with targeted dual-nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenbing; Wang, Xiaoyou; Song, Ge; Liu, Tongzhou; He, Bing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-06-01

    Combination therapy is one of the important treatment strategies for cancer at present. However, the outcome of current combination therapy based on the co-administration of conventional dosage forms is suboptimal, due to the short half-lives of chemodrugs, their deficient tumor selectivity and so forth. Nanotechnology-based targeted delivery systems show great promise in addressing the associated problems and providing superior therapeutic benefits. In this review, we focus on the combination of therapeutic strategies between different nanomedicines or drug-loaded nanocarriers, rather than the co-delivery of different drugs via a single nanocarrier. We introduce the general concept of various targeting strategies of nanomedicines, present the principles of combination antitumor therapy with dual-nanomedicines, analyze their advantages and limitations compared with co-delivery strategies, and overview the recent advances of combination therapy based on targeted nanomedicines. Finally, we reviewed the challenges and future perspectives regarding the selection of therapeutic agents, targeting efficiency and the gap between the preclinical and clinical outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Atypical and Typical Winter Depressive Symptoms and Responsiveness to Light Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, or Combination Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive - Behavioral Therapy , or Combination Treatment” Name of Candidate: Leigh G. Johnson Master of Science Degree 2005 Thesis and Abstract...and Typical Winter Depressive Symptoms and Responsiveness to Light Therapy , Cognitive - Behavioral Therapy , or Combination Treatment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...entitled: “Atypical and Typical Winter Depressive Symptoms and Responsiveness to Light Therapy , Cognitive - Behavioral Therapy , or

  1. Combined statin-fibrate therapy-induced rhabdomyolysis: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozić Tanja L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but serious and potentially fatal adverse reaction of the statin application that may be developed in any time of therapy. It is characterized by massive destruction of muscles associated with the large increase of creatine kinase (CK leading to myoglobinuria and potential acute renal failure. Combined statin-fibrate therapy increases the risk of rhabdomyolysis, especially in elderly and diabetic patients. Case report An 81-year-old male was admitted to Coronary Care Unit of the Emergency Center, Clinical Center of Serbia (CCS with the clinical picture and electrocardiogram of the acute anterior wall myocardial infarction complicated with pulmonary edema. Laboratory tests on admission showed higher elevated values of serum creatinine 179 μmol/L and BUN 9.2 mmol/L (eGFR 32 mL/min/1.73m2, CK 309 U/L (on day 2: 3476 U/L and mixed hyperlipidemia (total cholesterol 10.3 mmol/L, HDL 2.26 mmol/L, TG 4.85 mmol/L. The patient was treated with thrombolysis medication therapy (Alteplase, anticoagulant and dual antiplatelet therapy, diuretics, organic nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, antibiotics, and proton pump inhibitors. During seven days, his therapy included combined pravastatin 20 mg and fenofibrate (160 mg, which was discontinued due to pains and weakness of muscles and significantly elevated CC to 7080 U/L (upper limit 200 U/L, but no significant deterioration of renal function was observed. Discontinuation of therapy resulted in CC level normalization and improvement of clinical condition. Conclusion Combined statin and fibrate therapy requires strict clinical control and monitoring of CK i transaminases. Four-time or higher increase of CK requires discontinuation of therapy. In addition, patients are advised to report immediately any pains in muscles, sensibility, weakness or cramps.

  2. [Ozone therapy combined with sulfasalazine delivered via a colon therapy system for treatment of ulcerative colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yan; Wang, Wei; Ma, Qiang; Peng, Li-qiong; Liang, Zhong-hui

    2010-12-01

    To assess the therapeutic effect of ozone therapy combined with sulfasalazine sulfasalazine delivered via a colon therapy system in the treatment of distal ulcerative colitis. This prospective randomized controlled clinical trial involved 54 patients with mild to moderate active distal ulcerative colitis, who were randomize into 3 groups in accordance with the inclusion criteria (n=18). Each group was given sulfasalazine at the daily dose of 2 g, and in colon therapy group and ozone therapy plus sulfasalazine therapy group, sulfasalazine was delivered via a colon therapy system on a daily basis; the control group received sulfasalazine via retention enema only. At 0, 2, and 4 weeks of the treatment, colonoscopy was performed to evaluate the disease activity, and biopsy samples were obtained at 0 and 4 weeks for histological examination. In comparison with colon therapy group and control group, ozone therapy plus colon therapy resulted in more rapid alleviation of the clinical symptoms and better histological improvement without any adverse effects. Ozone therapy combined with sulfasalazine delivered via a colon therapy system is feasible and effective for treatment of ulcerative colitis.

  3. Combined and alternating paracetamol and ibuprofen therapy for febrile children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tiffany; Stang, Antonia S; Ganshorn, Heather; Hartling, Lisa; Maconochie, Ian K; Thomsen, Anna M; Johnson, David W

    2014-09-01

    Health professionals frequently recommend fever treatment regimens for children that either combine paracetamol and ibuprofen or alternate them. However, there is uncertainty about whether these regimens are better than the use of single agents, and about the adverse effect profile of combination regimens. To assess the effects and side effects of combining paracetamol and ibuprofen, or alternating them on consecutive treatments, compared with monotherapy for treating fever in children. In September 2013, we searched Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (2009-2011). We included randomized controlled trials comparing alternating or combined paracetamol and ibuprofen regimens with monotherapy in children with fever. One review author and two assistants independently screened the searches and applied inclusion criteria. Two authors assessed risk of bias and graded the evidence independently. We conducted separate analyses for different comparison groups (combined therapy versus monotherapy, alternating therapy versus monotherapy, combined therapy versus alternating therapy). Six studies, enrolling 915 participants, are included. Compared to giving a single antipyretic alone, giving combined paracetamol and ibuprofen to febrile children can result in a lower mean temperature at one hour after treatment (MD -0.27 °Celsius, 95% CI -0.45 to -0.08, two trials, 163 participants, moderate quality evidence). If no further antipyretics are given, combined treatment probably also results in a lower mean temperature at four hours (MD -0.70 °Celsius, 95% CI -1.05 to -0.35, two trials, 196 participants, moderate quality evidence), and in fewer children remaining or becoming febrile for at least four hours after treatment (RR 0.08, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.42, two trials, 196 participants, moderate quality evidence). Only one trial assessed a

  4. APPROACHES TO COMBINED THERAPY OF ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Soboleva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of combined therapy of acute intestinal infections in children with lactulose and pancreatine in prebiotic dose are discussed in this article. Authors showed advantages of combined treatment: significant shortening of terms of symptoms stopping and children’s recovery.Key words: children, acute intestinal infections, lactulose, pancreatine.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(3:102-106

  5. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Combination with Conventional Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mads Hald Andersen; Niels Junker; Eva Ellebaek; Inge Marie Svane; Per thor Straten

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination with chemotherapy may lead to improved clinical efficacy by clearing suppressor cells, reboot of the immune system, by rendering tumor cells more susceptible to immune mediated killing, or by activation o...

  6. Risks and safety of combination therapy for hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonklaas, Jacqueline

    2016-08-01

    Hypothyroidism is currently a condition that can be treated, but not cured. Although levothyroxine reverses stigmata of hypothyroidism in most individuals, some patients feel dissatisfied with 'monotherapy', and this has stimulated interest in 'combination therapy' with both levothyroxine and liothyronine. A search of PubMed was conducted using terms including hypothyroidism, treatment, benefits, risks, and safety. Based on the articles identified, the body of evidence regarding the efficacy of traditional levothyroxine is reviewed. Concerns with levothyroxine therapy including impaired quality of life in treated patients, thyroxine-predominant hormone ratios, and inadvertent iatrogenic thyroid disease are discussed. The trials of combination therapy performed since 1999 were reviewed. The heterogeneity of these trials, both in terms of design and results, is discussed. The potential for new trials to determine whether combination therapy can reverse the dissatisfaction associated with monotherapy, while avoiding non-physiologic hormone ratios, inadvertent thyrotoxicosis, and unacceptable side effects is discussed. Expert commentary: Research regarding which therapy fully reverses hypothyroidism at a tissue and cellular level is ongoing. The field would be advanced by the development of an extended release preparation of liothyronine. In the future regeneration of functional thyroid follicles from stem cells may offer hope for curing hypothyroidism.

  7. Therapeutic Advances using Combinational Therapy in the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staberg, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant brain tumor in adults. Median survival is only about 15 months despite aggressive treatment, consisting of surgery followed by radio- and chemotherapy, stressing the need for new therapies. Development of glioblastoma is thought to be a result of both genetic...... of glioblastoma cells, an effect that is even more pronounced when combined with traditional chemotherapeutic agents. The EGFR and Notch pathways are shown to be of great importance for glioblastoma cell survival and for the formation of new blood vessels, a process known as angiogenesis. Results presented herein...... suggests that targeting redundant signaling pathways can overcome required or initial treatment resistance, thus leading to improved tumor cell elimination. We hypothesize that future therapies will likely be a result of combination therapies for glioblastoma patients based on their molecular tumor profile...

  8. Adverse Event Monitoring of Artemesinin Combination Therapy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artemesinin combination therapies (ACTs) are first line antimalarial drugs in malaria endemic regions of the world as recommended by the World Health Organization. ACTs are relatively new in Nigeria and there is little experience with their use. The pharmacovigilance of ACT drugs has been advocated in African countries ...

  9. Combination therapy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tršinar

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of observational program of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS because of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH (LUTS/BPH was to acquire additional pharmaco-epidemiological data on the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with finasteride and tamsulosin.Methods: Observational program of men with BPH was conducted in urological outpatient clinics in Slovenia from April 2004 until November 2005. In open-label, non-interventional program 1173 patients were observed, who had been treated because of LUTS/BPH with combination therapy with finasteride and tamsulosin, in the framework of common treatment. At baseline and after six months of treatment for each patient the International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS questionnaire and assessment of quality of life (QL were filled in. In addition, urinary flow rate and prostate volume were determined. Adverse effects of drugs were reported spontaneously. For statistical analysis the Student’s t-test was performed.Results: Combination therapy with finasteride and tamsulosin was well tolerated. 89 (7.6 % patients discontinued with medication because of lack of efficacy or because of adverse effects of drugs. Symptom score, assessment of quality of patients’ lives and volume of prostates were significantly lower (p < 0.0001, while urinary flow rate was significantly higher (p < 0.0001 after six months of treatment with finasteride and tamsulosin.Conclusions: Combination therapy of patients with LUTS/BPH with finasteride and tamsulosin is effective and safe.

  10. for assessing efficacy of artemisinin combination therapy against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SD Bioline malaria antigen Pf (HRP-2/pLHD) for assessing efficacy of artemisinin combination therapy against Plasmodium falciparum in pediatric patients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. ... Methods: Five hundred and one patients with malaria symptoms were screened for P. falciparum in Kinshasa, DRC.

  11. Is Chloroquine better than Artemisinin combination therapy as first ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current case management and drug policy of malaria in Nigeria recommended by the Federal ministry of health may not be appropriate for all age categories. This suspicion was tested by running a cost effectiveness analysis of two possible and alternative strategies: Artemisinin Combination Therapy (ACT) or ...

  12. Smoking Intervention: A Combination Therapy Approach to Cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Penny Neathery

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of the Start SMART smoking cessation program which combines nicotine withdrawal therapy with behavior modification. The Start SMART program provides seven, intensive one-hour group sessions that are shown to be a most effective intervention with a specific population--motivated, yet highly dependent smokers. (GLR)

  13. Use of Artemisinin- Combination Therapies in Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the use of Artemisinin- based combination therapies (ACTs) as the first line of treatment for malaria in Sub –Saharan Africa. This study was carried out to determine the pattern of use of ACTs in Port Harcourt so as to identify problems associated with ACTS use and to ...

  14. Predicting the Toxicity of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Drug Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Combination With Trastuzumab in Patients With HER2-Positive, Metastatic Breast Cancer Recruiting No Results Available NO Drug: Lapatinib|Drug: Herceptin ...Trastuzumab ( Herceptin ) -Refractory, Metastatic Breast Cancer Active, not recruiting No Results Available NO Drug: Capecitabine|Drug: Lapatinib Lapatinib...Lapatinib Plus Herceptin With or Without Endocrine Therapy Recruiting No Results Available NO Drug: Herceptin |Drug: Lapatinib|Drug: Letrozole

  15. Atorvastatin/trimetazidine combination therapy in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the outcomes and safety of atorvastatin/trimetazidine combination therapy in patients with chronic cardiac failure. Methods: A total of 144 patients with chronic cardiac failure were divided into test group (n = 72) and control group (n = 72). In addition to conventional anti-heart failure treatment, all patients ...

  16. Combination Drug Therapy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BPH symptom reduction and shrinkage of prostate size by the use of a combination of alpha adrenergic uroselective blocker (Tamsulosin) and 5 alpha iso-enzyme inhibitor (Dutasteride) is a first option of therapy in the management of BPH especially in those cases that are surgical risks with the category of mild to moderate ...

  17. Combination therapy for type 2 diabetes: dapagliflozin plus metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xueying; Hu, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic and multifactorial metabolic disease, which brings great threats to public health. The morbidity of T2D keeps growing, and it is estimated that the population with T2D will rise to 552 million throughout the world by 2030. Effective glycemic control in patients is crucial for the treatment of T2D. However, with progressive deterioration of disease, most patients are usually unable to achieve glycemic targets receiving antidiabetic agent monotherapy. In such cases, combination therapy with different mechanisms of antidiabetic agents is highly desired. In addition, combination therapy can provide advantages beyond better glycemic improvement such as reduced incidence of hypoglycemia and cardiovascular events. We reviewed all the published data regarding the fixed-dose combination therapy of dapagliflozin combined with metformin, including complementary mechanism of action, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and safety. The fixed-dose combination of dapagliflozin and metformin exerts synergistic effects based on two antidiabetic agents with complementary mechanisms of action. Rational co-administration of dapagliflozin and metformin provides better glycemic control with potential weight loss and the reduced incidence of hypoglycaemia.

  18. Synergistic combination dry powders for inhaled antimicrobial therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Desmond; Lee, Sie Huey; Teo, Jeanette; Ng, Wai Kiong; Chan, Hak-Kim; Tan, Reginald B. H.

    2013-06-01

    Combination products play an important role in medicine as they offer improved clinical effectiveness, enhanced patient adherence, and reduced administrative costs. In combination antimicrobial therapy, the desired outcome is to extend the antimicrobial spectrum and to achieve a possible synergistic effect. However, adverse antagonistic species may sometimes emerge from such combinations, leading to treatment failure. Therefore, it is crucial to screen the drug candidates for compatibility and possible antagonistic interactions. This work aims to develop a novel synergistic dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation for antimicrobial combination therapy via the pulmonary route. Binary and ternary combinations were prepared via spray drying on a BUCHI® Nano Spray Dryer B-90. All powders were within the respirable size range, and were consisted of spherical particles that were slightly corrugated. The powers yielded fine particle fractions (of the loaded dose) of over 40% when dispersed using an Aerolizer® DPI at 60 L/min. Time-kill studies carried out against common respiratory tract pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Acinetobacter baumannii at 1x the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) over 24 hours revealed no antagonistic behavior for both combinations. While the interactions were generally found to be indifferent, a favorable synergistic effect was detected in the binary combination when it was tested against Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria.

  19. Considerations in glaucoma therapy: fixed combinations versus their component medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve J Higginbotham

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Eve J HigginbothamMorehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USAAbstract: Fixed combinations of medications that lower intraocular pressure (IOP are increasingly used in the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension and offer several potential advantages over combined use of the separate component medications including enhanced convenience, improved adherence, reduced exposure to preservatives, and possible cost savings. This review aims to examine the current role of IOP-lowering fixed combinations in disease management. The results of studies that compared the efficacy and safety of IOP-lowering fixed combinations with their component medications are summarized, including those fixed combinations that consist of a prostaglandin analog and timolol. The fixed combinations currently available for use in the United States are fixed-combination dorzolamide/timolol (FCDT and fixed-combination brimonidine/timolol (FCBT. Both of these fixed combinations reduce IOP more effectively than their component medications used separately as monotherapy. FCBT therapy also demonstrates a more favorable safety profile and reduced ocular allergy compared to monotherapy with brimonidine, a component medication. Few studies have directly compared the efficacy and safety of FCDT and FCBT, but available evidence suggests that FCBT is at least as effective as FCDT in lowering IOP and is more comfortable and better tolerated. Additional studies are needed to further evaluate the comparative efficacy and tolerability of FCDT and FCBT in the management of glaucoma and ocular hypertension.Keywords: glaucoma, intraocular pressure, fixed combination, adherence, brimonidine

  20. Precision medicine and personalized breast cancer: combination pertuzumab therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynolds K

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kerry Reynolds, Sasmit Sarangi, Aditya Bardia, Don S Dizon Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Trastuzumab (Herceptin, a monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2 (HER2, is the poster child for antibody-based targeted therapy in breast cancer. Pertuzumab, another humanized monoclonal antibody, binds to a different domain of HER2 and prevents the formation of HER2:HER3 dimers, which is the most potent heterodimer in the HER family. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab has synergistic activity, and is associated with improved clinical outcomes. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab-based chemotherapy originally as first-line therapy for metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer in 2012, and more recently as neoadjuvant therapy for localized disease in 2013. Pertuzumab is the first neoadjuvant drug to receive accelerated approval by the FDA based on pathological complete response as the primary end point. In this article, we review the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and current role of pertuzumab in the management of breast cancer, as well as ongoing clinical trials and future directions regarding the utility of pertuzumab as a personalized therapeutic option for HER2-positive breast cancer. In the coming years, we anticipate increased utilization of neoadjuvant trials for drug development, biomarker discovery, and validation, and envision conduct of personalized breast cancer clinics in which therapies will be routinely selected based on genetic alterations in the tumor. Regardless of the targeted therapy combinations employed based on tumor genomic profile, trastuzumab and pertuzumab will likely continue to form the backbone of the personalized regimen for HER2-positive breast cancer. Keywords: pertuzumab, HER2 breast cancer, personalized therapy

  1. Effectiveness of medication / auricular therapy / phyto-therapy combination in the treatment of hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Martínez Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: hypertension is one of the main cardiovascular risk factors, so its control improves the life expectancy of patients.Objective: to assess the effects of a treatment combining medication with auricular therapy and phyto-therapy in hypertensive patients assisted at the health area of ”Romárico Oro” Polyclinic, in Puerto Padre, Las Tunas province.Methods: an intervention study was carried out in 68 hypertensive patients of the health area of “Romárico Oro” Polyclinic in Puerto Padre from April, 2013 to April, 2014. The patients were distributed at random into two equal groups; the first received medication combined with auricular therapy and phyto-therapy, while the second one received only medication. The statistical analysis was done by means of Statistic system, t-student and Chi-Square tests were used and p< or =0.05 was considered as level of statistical significance.Results: by the end of the intervention, 73, 53% of the patients of the group with the combination of drug treatment and auricular therapy and phyto-therapy were controlled. In this group, the diastolic filling pressure diminished to 2, 2 mm Hg and the systolic gradient to 3, 66 mm, regarding the group treated only with drugs. Only one patient, representing the 2, 94% showed adverse reaction to the natural and traditional treatment.Conclusions: the combination of medication with auricular therapy and phyto-therapy proved to be effective, corroborated by a significant decrease of quantity of crisis, diastolic and systolic filling pressure values and increase of number of patients with their disease controlled; the report of only one complication shows the innocuousness of the auricular therapy and phyto-therapy treatment.

  2. Low level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 1: mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2016-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM), for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a

  3. Better Together: Targeted Combination Therapies in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Elisa; Bregni, Giacomo; de Braud, Filippo; Di Cosimo, Serena

    2015-12-01

    Recent discoveries both in cell proliferation and survival mechanisms and new antineoplastic agents have led to deep change in the breast cancer treatment paradigm. Nonetheless, all of the progress in knowledge and strategy has not been enough to overcome mechanisms of escape and resistance put in place by the tumor cells. New targeted agents mean new possibilities for combinations, a viable option to try to stop compensatory pathways of tumor growth activated in response to therapeutics. The main challenges in designing a combined therapy come from the variety of subtypes of breast cancer (luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, and basal-like) and from the multitude of pathways each subtype can exploit. Recent research has focused on dual blockade of HER2 (trastuzumab-lapatinib; trastuzumab-pertuzumab) and concomitant blockade of the endocrine driver and other pathways such as the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway (everolimus-exemestane), HER2 (trastuzumab/lapatinib-endocrine therapy) and the cell cycle through cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition (letrozole-palbociclib). This combined and personalized approach to treatment needs a profound knowledge of the mechanisms leading to proliferation in each tumor subtype. Deepening our understanding of tumor growth is mandatory to keep improving the efficacy of combination therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy Combined With Physical Therapy in Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma Victoria; Arnal-Gómez, Anna; Balasch-Bernat, Mercè; Inglés, Marta

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the treatment effectiveness of the combination of manual therapy (MT) with other physical therapy techniques. Systematic searches of scientific literature were undertaken on PubMed and the Cochrane Library (2004-2014). The following terms were used: "patellofemoral pain syndrome," "physical therapy," "manual therapy," and "manipulation." RCTs that studied adults diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) treated by MT and physical therapy approaches were included. The quality of the studies was assessed by the Jadad Scale. Five RCTs with an acceptable methodological quality (Jadad ≥ 3) were selected. The studies indicated that MT combined with physical therapy has some effect on reducing pain and improving function in PFPS, especially when applied on the full kinetic chain and when strengthening hip and knee muscles. The different combinations of MT and physical therapy programs analyzed in this review suggest that giving more emphasis to proximal stabilization and full kinetic chain treatments in PFPS will help better alleviation of symptoms.

  5. Natural compounds and combination therapy in colorectal cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejhová, A; Opattová, A; Čumová, A; Slíva, D; Vodička, P

    2018-01-20

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) therapy using conventional chemotherapeutics represents a considerable burden for the patient's organism because of high toxicity while the response is relatively low. Our review summarizes the findings about natural compounds as chemoprotective agents for decreasing risk of CRC. It also identifies natural compounds which possess anti-tumor effects of various characteristics, mainly in vitro on colorectal cell lines or in vivo studies on experimental models, but also in a few clinical trials. Many of natural compounds suppress proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest or induce apoptosis of CRC cells resulting in the inhibition of tumor growth. A novel employment of natural substances is a so-called combination therapy - administration of two or more substances - conventional chemotherapeutics and a natural compound or more natural compounds at a time. Some natural compounds may sensitize to conventional cytotoxic therapy, reinforce the drug effective concentration, intensify the combined effect of both administered therapeutics or exert cytotoxic effects specifically on tumor cells. Moreover, combined therapy by targeting multiple signaling pathways, uses various mechanisms to reduce the development of resistance to antitumor drugs. The desired effect could be to diminish burden on the patient's organism by replacing part of the dose of a conventional chemotherapeutic with a natural substance with a defined effect. Many natural compounds are well tolerated by the patients and do not cause toxic effects even at high doses. Interaction of conventional chemotherapeutics with natural compounds introduces a new aspect in the research and therapy of cancer. It could be a promising approach to potentially achieve improvements, while minimizing of adverse effects associated with conventional chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Orthodontics-surgical combination therapy for Class III skeletal malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion with severe mandibular prognathism in an adult individual requires surgical and Othodontic combination therapy. The inter disciplinary approach is the treatment of choice in most of the skeletal malocclusions. A case report of an adult individual with Class III malocclusion, having mandibular excess in sagittal and vertical plane and treated with orthodontics,, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and Le - Forte I osteotomy for the correction of skeletal, dental and soft tissue discrepancies is herewith presented. The surgical-orthodontic combination therapy has resulted in near-normal skeletal, dental and soft tissue relationship, with marked improvement in the facial esthetics in turn, has helped the patient to improve the self-confidence level.

  7. Cancer treatment: the combination of vaccination with other therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.H.; Sorensen, R.B.; Schrama, D.

    2008-01-01

    approach to fight cancer, the combination with additional therapy could create a number of synergistic effects. Herein we discuss the possibilities and prospects of vaccination when combined with other treatments. In this regard, cell death upon drug exposure may be immunogenic or non-immunogenic depending...... and endothelial cells. The efficacy of therapeutic vaccination against cancer will over the next few years be studied in settings taking advantage of strategies in which vaccination is combined with other treatment modalities. These combinations should be based on current knowledge not only regarding the biology...... of the cancer cell per se, but also considering how treatment may influence the malignant cell population as well as the immune system Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  8. Oxidative stress in malaria and artemisinin combination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavishe, Reginald A.; Koenderink, Jan B.; Alifrangis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been adopted as a strategy to mitigate multidrug resistance to antimalarial monotherapies. ACT combines the rapid and effective but rather short plasma half-life antimalarial action of an artemisinin derivative with a longer acting partner drug....... Although the exact mechanisms of action of artemisinins are not well understood, several studies have proposed multiple cellular targets of artemisinins with involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Most of the currently used ACT partner drugs are also known to involve ROS production...

  9. Graciloplasty for the rectovaginal fistula after chemoradiation followed by total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalavicius, Narimantas Evaldas; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Rectovaginal fistula (RVF) is one of the intractable complications following chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision (TME) for rectal cancer. It is supposed that there is a strong possibility of this complication occurring in patients after radiation therapy and having underlying sepsis. We describe herein two female patients (73 and 40 years old) who developed RVF after chemoradiation and TME for rectal cancer, who were successfully managed by gracilis muscle transposition. Fecal diversion was done as a preliminary step to the fistula repair. Success was defined as healed fistula after stoma closure. The strategy in the present report is a useful option for RVF management in such patients as other successful modalities are very limited.

  10. Response to combination antiretroviral therapy: variation by age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide information on responses to combination antiretroviral therapy in children, adolescents and older HIV-infected persons. DESIGN AND SETTING: Multicohort collaboration of 33 European cohorts. SUBJECTS:: Forty-nine thousand nine hundred and twenty-one antiretroviral-naive indiv...... CD4 cell counts, may place this group at increased clinical risk. The poorer virological responses in children may increase the likelihood of emergence of resistance....

  11. Combination therapy design for maximizing sensitivity and minimizing toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlock, Kevin; Berlow, Noah; Keller, Charles; Pal, Ranadip

    2017-03-22

    Design of personalized targeted therapies involve modeling of patient sensitivity to various drugs and drug combinations. Majority of studies evaluate the sensitivity of tumor cells to targeted drugs without modeling the effect of the drugs on normal cells. In this article, we consider the individual modeling of drug responses to tumor and normal cells and utilize them to design targeted combination therapies that maximize sensitivity over tumor cells and minimize toxicity over normal cells. The problem is formulated as maximizing sensitivity over tumor cell models while maintaining sensitivity below a threshold over normal cell models. We utilize the constrained structure of tumor proliferation models to design an accelerated lexicographic search algorithm for generating the optimal solution. For comparison purposes, we also designed two suboptimal search algorithms based on evolutionary algorithms and hill-climbing based techniques. Results over synthetic models and models generated from Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer database shows the ability of the proposed algorithms to arrive at optimal or close to optimal solutions in significantly lower number of steps as compared to exhaustive search. We also present the theoretical analysis of the expected number of comparisons required for the proposed Lexicographic search that compare favorably with the observed number of computations. The proposed algorithms provide a framework for design of combination therapy that tackles tumor heterogeneity while satisfying toxicity constraints.

  12. Azilsartan/chlorthalidone combination therapy for blood pressure control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng JW

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Judy WM ChengMassachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USABackground: Edarbyclor® is a combined angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB and thiazide-like diuretic (azilsartan and chlorthalidone, and was approved on December 20, 2011 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for hypertension management.Objective: To review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, tolerability, and role of azilsartan plus chlorthalidone for hypertension management.Methods: Peer-reviewed clinical trials, review articles, and relevant treatment guidelines, were identified from the databases MEDLINE and Current Contents (both 1966 to February 15, 2013, inclusive using search terms “azilsartan”, “chlorthalidone”, “pharmacology”, “pharmacokinetics”, “pharmacodynamics”, “pharmacoeconomics”, and “cost-effectiveness”. The FDA website, as well as manufacturer prescribing information, was also reviewed to identify other relevant information.Results: Azilsartan is a new ARB with high affinity for the angiotensin 1 receptor, approved by the FDA for hypertension management. Unlike other ARBs, azilsartan has no clinical data supporting improvement in cardiovascular outcomes, and is not approved for indications other than hypertension, which a select few other ARBs may be used for (eg, diabetic nephropathy and heart failure. Chlorthalidone is a longer acting thiazide-like diuretic that has been demonstrated to improve cardiovascular outcomes. Combination treatment with azilsartan/chlorthalidone is effective for reducing blood pressure. Compared to olmesartan/hydrochlorothiazide and azilsartan/hydrochlorothiazide combinations, azilsartan/chlorthalidone appears to be more efficacious for reducing blood pressure.Conclusions: Azilsartan/chlorthalidone can be considered an antihypertensive therapy option in patients for whom combination therapy is required (blood pressure >20 mmHg systolic or

  13. Drastic therapy for listerial brain abscess involving combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy and antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Keiichi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ideo, Katsumasa; Shindo, Seigo; Suga, Tomohiro; Ueda, Akihiko; Honda, Shoji; Hirahara, Tomoo; Watanabe, Masaki; Yamashita, Taro; Maeda, Yasushi; Yonemochi, Yasuhiro; Takita, Tomohiro; Ando, Yukio

    2014-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) is a rare causative pathogen of brain abscess that is often found in immunocompromised patients. Although patients with supratentorial listerial abscesses showed a longer survival with surgical drainage, the standard therapy for patients with subtentorial lesions has not been established. We report herein a patient with supra- and subtentorial brain abscesses caused by L. monocytogenes infection. These abscesses did not respond to antibiotics, and his symptoms gradually worsened. Drainage was not indicated for subtentorial lesions, and the patient was additionally treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which dramatically reduced the volume of abscesses and improved the symptoms. This is the first report of drastic therapy for a patient with listerial brain abscesses involving combined antibiotics and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The findings suggest that hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a good option for treating patients with deep-seated listerial abscesses and for who surgical drainage is not indicated.

  14. A cost-minimization analysis of combination therapy in hypertension: fixed-dose vs extemporary combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bellone

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease management and prevention represent the leading cost driver in Italian healthcare expenditure. In order to reach the target blood pressure, a large majority of patients require simultaneous administration of multiple antihypertensive agents.OBJECTIVE: To assess the economic impact of the use of fixed dose combinations of antihypertensive agents, compared to the extemporary combination of the same principles.METHODS: A cost minimization analysis was conducted to determine the pharmaceutical daily cost of five fixed dose combinations (olmesartan 20 mg + amlodipine 5 mg, perindopril 5 mg + amlodipine 5 mg, enalapril 20 mg + lercanidipine 10 mg, felodipine 5 mg + ramipril 5 mg, and delapril 30 mg + manidipine 10 mg compared with extemporary combination of the same principles in the perspective of the Italian NHS. Daily acquisition costs are estimated based on current Italian prices and tariffs.RESULTS: In three cases the use of fixed‑dose combination instead of extemporary combination induces a lower daily cost. Fixed combination treatment with delapril 30 mg + manidipine 10 mg induces greater cost savings for the National Health System (95,47 €/pts/year, as compared to free drugs combination therapy.CONCLUSIONS: Compared with free drug combinations, fixed‑dose combinations of antihypertensive agents are associated with lower daily National Health Service acquisition costs.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/fe.v14i4.886

  15. Combining HDAC inhibitors with oncolytic virotherapy for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hiroshi Nakashima, Tran Nguyen, Ennio Antonio ChioccaDepartment of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Histone deacetylase (HDAC enzymes play a critical role in the epigenetic regulation of cellular functions and signaling pathways in many cancers. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi have been validated for single use or in combination with other drugs in oncologic therapeutics. An even more novel combination therapy with HDACi is to use them with an oncolytic virus. HDACi may lead to an amplification of tumor-specific lytic effects by facilitating increased cycles of viral replication, but there may also be direct anticancer effects of the drug by itself. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer effects of the combination of oncolytic viruses with HDACi.Keywords: epigenetics, glioma, oncolytic virus, HDAC inhibitor, HSV-1, cancer

  16. 5-Alpha-Reductase Inhibitors and Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllhase, Claudius; Schneider, Marc P

    2016-08-01

    By inhibiting the conversion from testosterone to dihydrotestosterone 5-Alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) are able to hinder prostatic growth, shrink prostate volumes, and improve BPH-related LUTS. 5ARIs are particularly beneficial for patients with larger prostates (>30-40ml). Generally the side effects of 5ARI treatment are mild, and according to the FORTA classification 5ARIs are suitable for frail elderly. 5ARI / alpha-blocker (AB) combination therapy showed the best symptomatic outcome and risk reduction for clinical progression. Combining Phosphodieseterase type 5 inhbibitors (PDE5Is) with 5ARIs counteracts the negative androgenic sexual side effects of 5ARIs, and simultaneously combines their synergistic effects on LUTS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cancer nanomedicine: from targeted delivery to combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Ho, William; Zhang, Xueqing; Bertrand, Nicolas; Farokhzad, Omid

    2015-04-01

    The advent of nanomedicine marks an unparalleled opportunity to advance the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. The unique properties of nanoparticles (NPs), such as large surface-to-volume ratio, small size, the ability to encapsulate various drugs, and tunable surface chemistry, give them many advantages over their bulk counterparts. This includes multivalent surface modification with targeting ligands, efficient navigation of the complex in vivo environment, increased intracellular trafficking, and sustained release of drug payload. These advantages make NPs a mode of treatment potentially superior to conventional cancer therapies. This review highlights the most recent developments in cancer treatment using NPs as drug delivery vehicles, including promising opportunities in targeted and combination therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Combination of photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy - evolving role in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Hong-Wei; Huang, Zheng

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment modality. It offers alternative options in the treatment of cancer and vascular diseases. In cancer treatment, PDT has been used primarily for localized superficial or endoluminal malignant and premalignant conditions. More recently, its application has also been expanded to solid tumors. However, its antitumor efficacy remains debatable and its acceptance still variable. Pre-clinical studies demonstrate that, in addition to the primary local cytotoxicity, PDT might induce secondary host immune responses, which may further enhance PDT's therapeutic effects on primary tumor as well as metastasis. Therefore, PDT-induced local and systemic antitumor immune response might play an important role in successful control of malignant diseases. Furthermore, PDT's antitumor efficacy might also be enhanced through an effective immunoadjuvant or immunomodulator. Our recent clinical data also indicate that improved clinical outcomes can be obtained by a combination of PDT and immunomodulation therapy for the treatment of pre-malignant skin diseases. For instance, the combination of topical ALA-PDT and Imiquimod is effective for the treatment of genital bowenoid papulosis. This presentation will also report our preliminary data in developing combination approaches of PDT and immunotherapy for actinic keratosis (AK), basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and Bowen's disease.

  19. Combined aquaretic and diuretic therapy in acute heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyfman M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Goyfman,1 Paul Zamudio,2 Kristine Jang,3 Jennifer Chee,3 Catherine Miranda,2 Javed Butler,1 Nand K Wadhwa2 1Division of Cardiology, 2Division of Nephrology, 3Department of Medicine, Stony Brook School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA Introduction: Acute heart failure (AHF is a leading cause of hospitalization and readmission in the US. The present study evaluated maximum diuresis while minimizing electrolyte imbalances, hemodynamic instability, and kidney dysfunction, to achieve a euvolemic state safely in a shorter period of time.Methods and results: A protocol of combined therapy with furosemide, metolazone, and spironolactone, with or without tolvaptan and acetazolamide, was used in 17 hospitalized patients with AHF. The mean number of days on combination diuretic protocol was 3.8 days. The mean daily fluid balance was 3.0±2.1 L negative. The mean daily urine output (UOP was 4.1±2.0 L (range 1.8–10.5 L. There were minimal fluctuations in serum electrolyte levels and serum creatinine over the duration of diuretic therapy. There was no statistically significant change in patients’ creatinine from immediately prior to therapy to the last day of therapy, with a mean increase in creatinine of 0.14 mg/dL (95% CI −0.03, +0.30, p=0.10.Conclusion: Our strategy of treating AHF by achieving high UOP, while maintaining stable electrolytes and creatinine in a short period to euvolemic state, is safe. Keywords: diuretics, aquaretic, acute heart failure, volume overload

  20. Acute Toxicity and Tumor Response in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Shortening of the Overall Treatment Time Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost: A Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    But-Hadzic, Jasna, E-mail: jbut@onko-i.si [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Anderluh, Franc [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Brecelj, Erik; Edhemovic, Ibrahim [Division of Surgery, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Secerov-Ermenc, Ajra; Hudej, Rihard; Jeromen, Ana [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kozelj, Miran; Krebs, Bojan [Division of Surgery, University Medical Centre Maribor, Maribor (Slovenia); Oblak, Irena [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Omejc, Mirko [Division of Surgery, University Medical Centre Lubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogrin, Andrej [Division of Diagnostics, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Velenik, Vaneja [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-12-01

    Background and Purpose: This phase 2 study investigated the efficacy and safety of preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) without dose escalation, concomitant with standard capecitabine chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2014 and March 2015, 51 patients with operable stage II-III rectal adenocarcinoma received preoperative IMRT with pelvic dose of 41.8 Gy and simultaneously delivered 46.2 Gy to T2/3 and 48.4 Gy to T4 tumor in 22 fractions, concomitant with capecitabine, 825 mg/m{sup 2}/12 hours, including weekends. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR). Results: Fifty patients completed preoperative treatment according to the protocol, and 47 underwent surgical resection. The sphincter preservation rate for the low rectal tumors was 62%, and the resection margins were free in all but 1 patient. Decrease in tumor and nodal stage was observed in 32 (68%) and 39 (83%) patients, respectively, with pCR achieved in 12 (25.5%) patients. There were only 2 G ≥ 3 acute toxicities, with infectious enterocolitis in 1 patient and dermatitis over the sacral area caused by the bolus effect of the treatment table in the second patient. Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT-SIB without dose escalation is well tolerated, with a low acute toxicity profile, and can achieve a high rate of pCR and downstaging.

  1. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Klysner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.

  2. Relative efficacy of psychotherapy and combined therapy in the treatment of depression: A meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, S.M.; Dekker, J.J.M.; Schoevers, R.A.; Jonghe, de F.

    2007-01-01

    0.001). Conclusions In the acute treatment of adult psychiatric outpatients with major depressive disorder, patient compliance with combined therapy matches compliance with psychotherapy alone. Combined therapy is more efficacious than psychotherapy alone. However, these results depend on severity

  3. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klysner, René; Bjerg Bendsen, Birgitte; Hansen, Maja Soon

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.......The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine....

  4. Combined preoperative therapy for oral cancer with nedaplatin and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Masatoshi; Shibata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Munehiro [Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Hospital] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    We performed preoperative combined therapy using nedaplatin (CDGP) and radiation in 12 patients with squamous cell carcinoma originating from the oral cavity and maxillary sinus, and examined for any adverse events that may have occurred during this therapeutic regimen. Regarding the irradiation, external irradiation utilizing a 6 MV linac (linear accelerator) at a dose of 2.0 Gy/day was performed 5 times a week, with the target total radiation dose set at 40 Gy. In addition, CDGP was intravenously administered 30 minutes before irradiation at a dose of 5 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Mucositis was observed in all 12 subjects, however, the severity was observed to be grade 1-2 with no major differences in comparison to the patients given standard radiation monotherapy. Two subjects developed grade 3 leucopenia and were thus given granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In addition, grade 2 and grade 3 thrombocytopenia were both observed in one subject each. The subject with grade 3 thrombocytopenia required a platelet transfusion during surgery. No marked changes in serum creatinine levels were noted. These findings are therefore considered to provide evidence supporting the safety of this combination therapy. (author)

  5. Pyronaridine-artesunate combination therapy for the treatment of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Florian; Bélard, Sabine; Basra, Arti; Ramharter, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Pyronaridine-artesunate is among the most promising novel artemisinin combination therapies for the treatment of malaria. A series of clinical phase II and III trials have been conducted for the indications of uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria in Africa and Asia. On the basis of these novel data, this review aims to provide an appraisal of current evidence and a perspective for its future role in the antimalarial portfolio. Pyronaridine-artesunate demonstrated repeatedly high efficacy in the treatment of vivax and falciparum malaria and noninferiority was established compared to standard comparator regimens. An innovative paediatric drug formulation was developed in parallel to the tablet formulation for the treatment of young children. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed dose linearity, low interindividual variation and absence of a clinically important effect of food on the bioavailability of this drug combination. Overall tolerability and safety data are reassuring; however, further surveillance of safety in special patient populations including young children is warranted. Pyronaridine-artesunate - currently under evaluation by the European Medicines Agency - may become a preferred choice as first-line therapy in malaria endemic regions based on its low cost, long shelf-life, simplified once-daily dosing regimen, proven efficacy against falciparum and vivax malaria, and the parallel clinical development of a paediatric drug formulation.

  6. Survival Outcomes for Combined Modality Therapy for Sinonasal Undifferentiated Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Phoebe; Manes, R Peter; Schwam, Zachary G; Judson, Benjamin L

    2017-01-01

    Objective Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma is a rare and aggressive malignancy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Multi-institutional studies examining outcomes of combined modality treatment versus other treatment modalities have not been performed. The objective of our study was to present outcomes for multimodality therapy through use of the National Cancer Database. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting National Cancer Database. Methods A total of 435 cases of SNUC diagnosed between 2004 and 2012 were identified. Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed to find 5-year cumulative survival rates. Multivariate Cox regression evaluated overall survival based on treatment when adjusting for other prognostic factors (age, primary site, sex, race, comorbidity, insurance, and TNM stage). Within the surgery + chemoradiotherapy group, survival analysis was also performed to compare outcomes for induction and adjuvant chemotherapy. Results The cumulative 5-year survival rate was 41.5%, and 36.1% of patients received surgery with chemoradiotherapy. In multivariate analysis, surgery + chemoradiotherapy was associated with significantly improved overall survival versus surgery + radiotherapy and radiotherapy but not significantly different from chemoradiotherapy. Within the surgery + chemoradiotherapy group, induction and adjuvant chemotherapy groups did not have associated differences in survival. Conclusion Combined modality therapy (chemoradiotherapy or surgery + chemoradiotherapy) is associated with improved survival outcomes versus other treatment modalities in patients with sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma.

  7. Improved outcome in solitary bone plasmacytomata with combined therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés, A; Huerta-Guzmán, J; Delgado, S; Fernández, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C

    1996-09-01

    Solitary bone plasmacytoma (SBP) is a rare presentation of plasma cell dyscrasias. Radiotherapy has been considered the treatment of choice, however, most patients will develop multiple myeloma, 3 to 10 years after initial diagnosis and treatment. No innovations have been introduced in the treatment of SBP in the last 30 years. We began a prospective clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant chemotherapy with low doses of melphalan and prednisone administered to patients with SBP after radiation therapy in an attempt to improve the disease-free survival and overall survival. Between 1982 and 1989, 53 patients with SBP were randomly assigned to be treated with either local radiotherapy with doses ranged from 4000 to 5000 cGy to achieve local control of disease (28 patients) or the same radiotherapy schedule followed by melphalan and prednisone given every 6 weeks for 3 years (25 patients). After a median follow-up of 8.9 years, disease-free survival and overall survival were improved in patients who were treated with combined therapy, 22 patients remain alive and free of disease in the combined treatment group compared to only 13 patients in the radiotherapy group (p radiotherapy in patients with SBP improved duration of remission and survival without severe side-effects. However, as with other studies in SBP, the group was too small to draw definitive conclusions and more controlled clinical trials are necessary to define the role of this therapeutic approach in patients with SBP.

  8. Rapid Screening of Novel Agents for Combination Therapy in Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Cubitt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For patients with sarcoma, metastatic disease remains very difficult to cure, and outcomes remain less than optimal. Treatment options have not largely changed, although some promising gains have been made with single agents in specific subtypes with the use of targeted agents. Here, we developed a system to investigate synergy of combinations of targeted and cytotoxic agents in a panel of sarcoma cell lines. Agents were investigated alone and in combination with varying dose ratios. Dose-response curves were analyzed for synergy using methods derived from Chou and Talalay (1984. A promising combination, dasatinib and triciribine, was explored in a murine model using the A673 cell line, and tumors were evaluated by MRI and histology for therapy effect. We found that histone deacetylase inhibitors were synergistic with etoposide, dasatinib, and Akt inhibitors across cell lines. Sorafenib and topotecan demonstrated a mixed response. Our systematic drug screening method allowed us to screen a large number of combinations of sarcoma agents. This method can be easily modified to accommodate other cell line models, and confirmatory assays, such as animal experiments, can provide excellent preclinical data to inform clinical trials for these rare malignancies.

  9. Pancreatic cancer: systemic combination therapies for a heterogeneous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melisi, Davide; Calvetti, Lorenzo; Frizziero, Melissa; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the only human malignancy for which patients' survival has not improved substantially during the past 30 years. Despite advances in the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic carcinogenesis, current systemic treatments offer only a modest benefit in tumor-related symptoms and survival. Over the past decades, gemcitabine and its combination with other standard cytotoxic agents have been the reference treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer patients. The recent introduction of the three-drug combination regimen FOLFIRINOX or the new taxane nab-paclitaxel represent key advances for a better control of the disease. Novel agents targeting molecular mechanisms involved in cancer development and maintenance are currently under clinical investigation. This review describes the most important findings in the field of systemic combination therapies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We discuss the emerging evidences for the clinical activity of combination treatments with standard chemotherapy plus novel agents targeting tumor cell-autonomous and tumor microenvironment signaling pathways. We present some of the most important advances in the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer and the emerging therapeutic targets to overcome this resistance.

  10. Atypical and Typical Winter Depressive Symptoms and Responsiveness to Light Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, or Combination Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Leigh G; Rohan, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    ...), group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or combination therapy (CBT+LT). Atypical and typical symptoms were assessed using subscales of the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression - SAD Version (SIGH-SAD...

  11. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Combination with Conventional Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Hald Andersen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination with chemotherapy may lead to improved clinical efficacy by clearing suppressor cells, reboot of the immune system, by rendering tumor cells more susceptible to immune mediated killing, or by activation of cells of the immune system. In addition, a range of tumor antigens have been characterized to allow targeting of proteins coupled to intrinsic properties of cancer cells. For example, proteins associated with drug resistance can be targeted, and form ideal target structures for use in combination with chemotherapy for killing of surviving drug resistant cancer cells. Proteins associated with the malignant phenotype can be targeted to specifically target cancer cells, but proteins targeted by immunotherapy may also simultaneously target cancer cells as well as suppressive cells in the tumor stroma.

  12. Hydrotherapy combined with Snoezelen multi-sensory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Efrat; Shapiro, Michele; Julius, Mona

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present a new and challenging model of treatment that combines two therapeutic interventions: hydrotherapy and Snoezelen or controlled multisensory stimulation. The combination of the two therapeutic approaches enhances the treatment effect by utilizing the unique characteristics of each approach. We believe that this combined model will further enhance each media to the benefit of the clients and create a new intervention approach. This article relates to a hydrotherapy swimming pool facility that has been established at the Williams Island Therapeutic Swimming and Recreation Center, Beit Issie Shapiro, Raanana in Israel, after acquiring many years of experience and gaining substantial knowledge both in the field of hydrotherapy and Snoezelen intervention. Beit Issie Shapiro is a non-profit community organization providing a range of services for children with developmental disabilities and their families. The organization provides direct services for nearly 6,000 children and adults each year. This article provides an overview of hydrotherapy and Snoezelen and presents a case study, which will demonstrate the new model of treatment and show how this new and innovative form of therapy can be used as a successful intervention. We believe it will open a path to enriching the repertoire of therapists helping people with special needs. This article is also addressed to researchers to provide ideas for further studies in this area.

  13. Therapeutic Results of Concurrent Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seung Hee; Suh, Hyun Suk; Yang, Kwang Mo; Lee, Eung Soo; Park, Sung Kwon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-03-15

    Purpose : Despite a development for therapeutic machines and advance in modern radiation therapy techniques, locally advanced cervical carcinoma has shown high rate of local failure and poor survival rate. Combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy demonstrated benefit in improving local control and possibly the overall survival. Our study was performed to evaluate effect of concurrent chemoradiation on locally advanced uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials : Twenty six patients with locally advanced stage(FIGO stage IIB with {>=} 5 cm in diameter, III, IVA) were treated with combination of radiation therapy and concurrent cisplatinum between May of 1988 and September of 1993 at our hospital. Radiation therapy consisted of external irradiation and 1-2 sessions of intracavitary irradiation, Cisplatinum was administered in bolus injection of 25mg/m{sup 2} at weekly intervals during the course of external radiation therapy. Results : Of the 26 patients, twenty-five patients were evaluable for estimation of response. Median follow-up period was 25 months with ranges from 3 to 73 months. Stage IIB, III, and IVA were 16, 5,4 patients, respectively. Twenty patients were squamous cell carcinoma. Response was noted in all 25 patients: complete response(CR) in 17/25(68%), partial response(PR) in 8/25(32%). Of the 24 patients except one who died of sepsis at 3 months follow-up, seventeen patients(70.8%) maintained local control in the pelvis: 16/17(94.1%) in CR, 1/17(14.3%) in PR. Fourteen of the 17 patients with CR are alive disease free on the completion of follow-up. Median survival is 28 months for CR and 15 months for PR. Analysis of 5-year survival by stage shows 11/16(59.8) in IIB, 3/5(60.6%) in III, and 1/4(25.0%) in IVA. Overall 5-year survival rate was 55.2%. Ten Patients recurred: 4 at locoregional, 3 in distant metastasis and 3 with locoregional and distant site. Toxicity by addition of cisplatinum was not excessive. Conclusion : Although the result of

  14. Development of drug delivery systems for radionuclide therapy using a combination therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, On Hee; Choi, Sun Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    For the development of new controlled drug delivery systems, the application of combination therapy using angiogenesis inhibitor and tumor static agents has drawn great attention. This approach would be very beneficial for cancer treatment especially when a new drug deliver system utilizing biodegradable polymers is developed. Therefore, the present study for the combination therapy of angiogenesis inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents was to carry out prior to the development of the novel drug delivery. In present study, the ability of inhibition on cell growth was investigated with treatment of anti-angiogenetic agent and anticancer agent. Thalidomide was used as an antivasculatory agents and Doxorubicine was treated as a chemotherapeutic agent. To demonstrate apoptotic process in in-vitro study, TUNEL assay was carried out. Also, the alteration of p53 level was examined by using western blotting. For the cell lines, NIH:OVCAR3, MKN45, SNU719, C6, L929, T98G, Hep3B and Calu6 were applied. Results showed that Thalidomide inhibited cell growth in tumor cell lines in a dose-dependent manner and Doxorubicin as well. A significant synergistic effect on the apoptotic was noticed in the combination treatment of Thalidomide and Doxorubicin compared to a single treatment of either drug. Therefore, it can be concluded that the mechanism of cytotoxicity was due to the enhancement of apoptosis in early cell death with combination treatment in tumor cell lines.

  15. Combination therapy in the management of atrophic acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrophic acne scars are difficult to treat. The demand for less invasive but highly effective treatment for scars is growing. Objective: To assess the efficacy of combination therapy using subcision, microneedling and 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA peel in the management of atrophic scars. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with atrophic acne scars were graded using Goodman and Baron Qualitative grading. After subcision, dermaroller and 15% TCA peel were performed alternatively at 2-weeks interval for a total of 6 sessions of each. Grading of acne scar photographs was done pretreatment and 1 month after last procedure. Patients own evaluation of improvement was assessed. Results: Out of 16 patients with Grade 4 scars, 10 (62.5% patients improved to Grade 2 and 6 (37.5% patients improved to Grade 3 scars. Out of 22 patients with Grade 3 scars, 5 (22.7% patients were left with no scars, 2 (9.1% patients improved to Grade 1and 15 (68.2% patients improved to Grade 2. All 11 (100% patients with Grade 2 scars were left with no scars. There was high level of patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This combination has shown good results in treating not only Grade 2 but also severe Grade 4 and 3 scars.

  16. Unusual computed tomography findings of radionecrosis after chemoradiation of stage IV hypopharyngeal cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Yuh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Radionecrosis (post-radiotherapy laryngeal submucosal inflammation and necrosis is a complication of (chemo radiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer that is difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. Case presentation A 67-year-old Japanese man presented with a condition extremely difficult to diagnose differentially as radionecrosis or tumor recurrence after radiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer. Although tumor recurrence was suspected from clinical conditions and computed tomography findings, pathologic analysis revealed no evidence of tumor recurrence, and successful therapy with steroids and antibiotics reduced the mucosal edema. Conclusion Our findings emphasize the wide spectrum of radiographic presentation of radionecrosis after chemoradiation of stage IV hypopharyngeal cancer.

  17. Calcium dobesilate and oxerutin: effectiveness of combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, B

    2010-04-01

    with objective tests. Changes of quality of life after a combination therapy might also be of interest.

  18. Spillover adherence effects of fixed-dose combination HIV therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauf TL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Teresa L Kauf1, Keith L Davis2, Stephanie R Earnshaw2, E Anne Davis31Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3Independent consultant, Pittsboro, NC, USAAbstract: The impact of fixed-dose combination (FDC products on adherence to other, non-fixed regimen components has not been examined. We compared adherence to a third antiretroviral (ART component among patients receiving a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI backbone consisting of the FDC Epzicom®, GlaxoSmithKline Inc, Research Triangle Park, NC (abacavir sulfate 600 mg + lamivudine 300 mg; FDC group versus NRTI combinations taken as two separate pills (NRTI Combo group using data from a national sample of 30 health plans covering approximately 38 million lives from 1997 to 2005. Adherence was measured as the medication possession ratio (MPR. Multivariate logistic regression compared treatment groups based on the likelihood of achieving ≥95% adherence, with sensitivity analyses using alternative thresholds. MPR was assessed as a continuous variable using multivariate linear regression. Covariates included age, gender, insurance payer type, year of study drug initiation, presence of mental health and substance abuse disorders, and third agent class. The study sample consisted of 650 FDC and 1947 NRTI Combo patients. Unadjusted mean adherence to the third agent was higher in the FDC group than the NRTI Combo group (0.92 vs 0.85; P < 0.0001. In regression analyses, FDC patients were 48% and 39% more likely to achieve 95% and 90% third agent adherence, respectively (P ≤ 0.03. None of the other MPR specifications achieved comparable results. Among managed care patients, use of an FDC appears to substantially improve adherence to a third regimen component and thus the likelihood of achieving the accepted standard for adherence to HIV therapy of 95%.Keywords

  19. Therapy of Severe Heatshock in Combination With Multiple Organ Dysfunction With Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Ming; Chen, Yang-Hong; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Yi; Chen, Jin-Hua; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to compare the clinical effects of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and routine therapy in heatshock (HS) patients. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical information of 33 severe exertional HS patients who were treated from February 1998 to October 2013. On the basis of whether or not CRRT therapy was used in addition to conventional therapy, patients were divided into a CRRT group (n = 15) and a control group (n = 18). Body temperature, blood gas analysis, routine blood tests, blood eletrolytes, enzymes and kidney function data, and APACHE II scores were obtained and compared between the 2 groups on admission and 3, 5, and 7 days after admission. Mortality was also compared between the 2 groups. CRRT treatment combined with conventional treatment resulted in a higher hospital-discharge rate, a faster return to normal of body temperature, greater increase in platelets, a greater decrease in WBC, neutrophils, and serum markers for liver and kidney dysfunction, greater improvement of organ dysfunction, and lower APACHE II scores than conventional treatment used alone. The addition of CRRT to conventional treatment for HS improves survival and causes a faster return to normal of serum markers and organ function. PMID:26252279

  20. Efficacy of Olanzapine Combined Therapy for Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy Resistant to Standard Antiemetic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Masakazu; Kasamatsu, Yuka; Kado, Nobuhiro; Kuji, Shiho; Tanaka, Aki; Takahashi, Nobutaka; Takekuma, Munetaka; Hirashima, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Olanzapine is proved to be effective for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). But its efficacy in combination with standard antiemetic therapy is unknown. The purpose of this study is to prove the preventive effect of olanzapine for the prevention of CINV caused by highly emetogenic chemotherapy when used with standard antiemetic therapy. Gynecologic cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy who had grade 2 or 3 nausea in overall phase (0-120 h after chemotherapy) despite standard therapy were assigned to this study. From the next cycles to cycles in which patients developed grade 2 or 3 nausea, they received olanzapine with standard therapy. 5 mg oral olanzapine was administered for 7 days from the day before chemotherapy. The effectiveness of preventive administration of olanzapine was evaluated retrospectively. The primary endpoint was nausea control rate (grade 0 or 1) with olanzapine. Fifty patients were evaluable. The nausea control rate with olanzapine was improved from 58% to 98% in acute phase (0-24 h after chemotherapy) and 2% to 94% in delayed phase (24-120 h after chemotherapy). In overall phase, the nausea control rate improved from 0% to 92%, and it was statistically significant (P improvement in control of refractory nausea.

  1. Combining angiogenic gene and stem cell therapies for myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Jennifer; Huang, Yu; Takagawa, Junya; Arakawa-Hoyt, Janice; Ye, Jianqin; Grossman, William; Kan, Yuet Wai; Su, Hua

    2009-09-01

    Transplantation of stem cells from various sources into infarcted hearts has the potential to promote myocardial regeneration. However, the regenerative capacity is limited partly as a result of the low survival rate of the transplanted cells in the ischemic myocardium. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that combining cell and angiogenic gene therapies would provide additive therapeutic effects via co-injection of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV), MLCVEGF, which expresses vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in a cardiac-specific and hypoxia-inducible manner. MSCs isolated from transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein and MLCVEGF packaged in AAV serotype 1 capsid were injected into mouse hearts at the border of ischemic area, immediately after occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary, individually or together. Engrafted cells were detected and quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining. Angiogenesis and infarct size were analyzed on histological and immunohistochemical stained sections. Cardiac function was analyzed by echocardiography. We found that co-injection of AAV1-MLCVEGF with MSCs reduced cell loss. Although injection of MSCs and AAV1-MLCVEGF individually improved cardiac function and reduced infarct size, co-injection of MSC and AAV1-MLCVEGF resulted in the best improvement in cardiac function as well as the smallest infarct among all groups. Moreover, injection of AAV1-MLCVEGF induced neovasculatures. Nonetheless, injection of MSCs attracted endogenous stem cell homing and increased scar thickness. Co-injection of MLCVEGF and MSCs in ischemic hearts can result in better cardiac function and MSC survival, compared to their individual injections, as a result of the additive effects of each therapy.

  2. Cognitive behavioral therapy in combination with systemic family therapy improves mild to moderate postpartum depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmei Hou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in combination with systemic family therapy (SFT on mild to moderate postpartum depression and sleep quality. Methods: 249 primiparous women with mild to moderate postpartum depression were recruited and randomly assigned to a control group (n=128, which received conventional postpartum care, or to a psychological intervention group (n=121, which received conventional postpartum care combined with psychological intervention. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI were employed to evaluate depression and sleep quality, respectively. Results: 104 patients in the intervention group and 109 in the control group completed the study. After intervention, the EPDS score, PSQI score, sleep quality score, sleep latency score, sleep duration score, habitual sleep efficiency score, sleep disturbance score, and daytime dysfunction score were significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group. The EPDS and PSQI scores of each group at different time points after intervention were markedly decreased compared with those before intervention, and the reduction in the intervention group was more evident than that in the control group. Conclusion: CBT in combination with SFT can improve depression and sleep quality in patients with mild to moderate postpartum depression.

  3. Multimodal therapy for painful bladder syndrome / interstitial cystitis: pilot study combining behavioral, pharmacologic, and endoscopic therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Hanley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We evaluated the effectiveness of combining behavioral therapy, pharmacologic therapy and endoscopic hydrodistension for treating painful bladder syndrome / interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients with PBS/IC were prospectively enrolled in a pilot multimodal behavioral, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatment protocol. Behavioral modification included diet recommendations, fluid restriction to 64 oz. /day, progressive timed voiding and Kegel exercises. Oral pharmacologic therapy consisted of daily doses of macrodantin 100 mg, hydroxyzine 10-20 mg and urised 4 tablets. Patients underwent endoscopic bladder hydrodistention under anesthesia at least 2 weeks after protocol enrollment. Behavioral and pharmacological treatments were continued after the hydrodistention. O'Leary-Sant questionnaire scores were recorded before starting the protocol, after pharmacologic/behavioral therapy, 2 months post-hydrodistension, and at scheduled follow-up. Results: Eighteen patients (72% completed the pilot multimodal treatment protocol and were followed for a mean of 10.2 months. All patients were female with a median age of 36.3 years and had mean bladder capacity under anesthesia of 836 milliliters. Mean O'Leary-Sant symptom index scores for baseline symptoms, after behavioral/pharmacologic treatment, post-hydrodistension and during follow up were 12.5, 8.6, 7.0, and 6.7 (p < 0.05. Mean O'Leary-Sant problem index scores for baseline, after behavioral/pharmacologic treatment, post-hydrodistention and during follow up were 12.7, 8.9, 6.7, and 7.7 (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Our pilot multimodal protocol of behavioral modification, pharmacologic therapy and endoscopic hydrodistention demonstrated a significant progressive improvement in PBS/IC quality of life scores, compared to a pre-treatment baseline. These results should be validated in a larger, placebo controlled trial.

  4. Multimodal therapy for painful bladder syndrome / interstitial cystitis: pilot study combining behavioral, pharmacologic, and endoscopic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Robert S; Stoffel, John T; Zagha, Ralph M; Mourtzinos, Arthur; Bresette, John F

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of combining behavioral therapy, pharmacologic therapy and endoscopic hydrodistension for treating painful bladder syndrome / interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC). Twenty-five patients with PBS/IC were prospectively enrolled in a pilot multimodal behavioral, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatment protocol. Behavioral modification included diet recommendations, fluid restriction to 64 oz. /day, progressive timed voiding and Kegel exercises. Oral pharmacologic therapy consisted of daily doses of macrodantin 100 mg, hydroxyzine 10-20 mg and urised 4 tablets. Patients underwent endoscopic bladder hydrodistention under anesthesia at least 2 weeks after protocol enrollment. Behavioral and pharmacological treatments were continued after the hydrodistention. O'Leary-Sant questionnaire scores were recorded before starting the protocol, after pharmacologic/behavioral therapy, 2 months post-hydrodistension, and at scheduled follow-up. Eighteen patients (72%) completed the pilot multimodal treatment protocol and were followed for a mean of 10.2 months. All patients were female with a median age of 36.3 years and had mean bladder capacity under anesthesia of 836 milliliters. Mean O'Leary-Sant symptom index scores for baseline symptoms, after behavioral/pharmacologic treatment, post-hydrodistension and during follow up were 12.5, 8.6, 7.0, and 6.7 (p < 0.05). Mean O'Leary-Sant problem index scores for baseline, after behavioral/pharmacologic treatment, post-hydrodistention and during follow up were 12.7, 8.9, 6.7, and 7.7 (p < 0.05). Our pilot multimodal protocol of behavioral modification, pharmacologic therapy and endoscopic hydrodistention demonstrated a significant progressive improvement in PBS/IC quality of life scores, compared to a pre-treatment baseline. These results should be validated in a larger, placebo controlled trial.

  5. Nodal Disease in Rectal Cancer Patients With Complete Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Danger Below Calm Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucom, Rebeccah B; Maguire, Lillias H; Kavalukas, Sandra L; Geiger, Timothy M; Ford, Molly M; Muldoon, Roberta L; Hopkins, M Benjamin; Hawkins, Alexander T

    2017-12-01

    A subset of patients with rectal cancer who undergo neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy will develop a complete pathologic tumor response. Complete nodal response is not universal in these patients and is difficult to assess clinically. Quantifying the risk of nodal disease would allow for targeted therapy with either radical resection or "watchful waiting." This study aimed to identify risk factors for residual nodal disease in ypT0 rectal adenocarcinoma. This is a retrospective case control study. The National Cancer Database 2006 to 2014 was used to identify patients for this study. Patients with stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma who completed chemoradiation therapy followed by resection and who had ypT0 tumors were included. Patients with metastatic disease and <2 lymph nodes evaluated were excluded. Patients were divided into 2 groups: node positive and node negative. The main outcome was nodal disease. The secondary outcome was overall survival. A total of 42,257 patients with stage II/III rectal cancer underwent chemoradiation therapy and radical resection; 4170 (9.9%) patients had ypT0 tumors and 395 (9.5%) were node positive. Of patients with clinically node-negative disease (ie, pretreatment imaging), 6.2% were node positive after chemoradiation therapy and resection. In multivariable analysis, factors predictive of nodal disease included increasing (pretreatment) clinical N-stage, high tumor grade (3/4), perineural invasion, and lymphovascular invasion. Higher clinical T-stage was inversely associated with residual nodal disease. Overall 5-year survival was significantly different between patients with ypN0, ypN1, and ypN2 disease (87.4%, 82.2%, and 62.5%, p = 0.002). This study was limited by the lack of clinical detail in the database and the inability to assess recurrence. Ten percent of patients with ypT0 tumors had positive nodes after chemoradiation therapy and resection. Factors associated with residual nodal disease included clinical nodal

  6. Long-term follow-up of severely symptomatic women with adenomyoma treated with combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Min Liu

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Combination therapy for adenomyoma provides an effective treatment option for long-term symptom control and uterine preservation in severely symptomatic women for whom previous long-term drug therapy has failed or proven to be intolerable.

  7. Understanding molecular markers in recurrent oral squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemoradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Gupta

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results signifies that tumors over expressing Cyclin D1, EGFR and p53 are resistant to chemoradiation and are associated with increased risk of locoregional recurrence and metastasis in OSCC patients undergoing chemoradiation.

  8. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Liqing; Kang, Lin; Jin, Mingji; Sun, Ping; Xin, Xin; Gao, Zhonggao; Bae, You Han

    2017-06-01

    Anticancer therapy has always been a vital challenge for the development of nanomedicine. Repeated single therapeutic agent may lead to undesirable and severe side effects, unbearable toxicity and multidrug resistance due to complex nature of tumor. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy can synergistically improve antitumor outcomes through multiple-target therapy, decreasing the dose of each therapeutic agent and reducing side effects. There are versatile combinational anticancer strategies such as chemotherapeutic combination, nucleic acid-based co-delivery, intrinsic sensitive and extrinsic stimulus combinational patterns. Based on these combination strategies, various nanocarriers and drug delivery systems were engineered to carry out the efficient co-delivery of combined therapeutic agents for combination anticancer therapy. This review focused on illustrating nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs for synergistically improving anticancer efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Acupuncture combined with traction therapy for lumbar disc herniation: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-zhen; Chen, Hai-yong; Zheng, Xiao; Liu, Nong-yu

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture combined with traction therapy for lumbar disc herniation, providing the basis for future research strategies. Randomized control trials. (RCT) of acupuncture combined with traction therapy for lumber disc herniation at home and abroad from 2000 to 2013 were searched, analysis and evaluation of literature and strength of evidence were based on the principles and methods of Evidence-based Medicine. The total effective rate and curative rate were considered as primary outcome measures; pain improvement, quality of life, relapse rate and adverse effects were considered as secondary outcome measures. Seventeen RCTs were identified, Meta-analysis showed that (1) total effective rate and curative rate: acupuncture combined with traction therapy was better than single therapy (acupuncture or traction); (2) pain improvement: acupuncture combined with traction therapy was better than traction therapy; (3) relapse rate: current evidence could not support the conclusion that acupuncture combined with traction therapy was better than traction therapy. Acupuncture combined with traction therapy for lumbar disc herniation was effective. However, the included studies were with high risk of bias, important outcome measures such as quality of life, relapse rate and adverse effects were not found in most of the studies. Current evidence has not yet been able to fully reflect acupuncture combined with traction therapy for lumbar disc herniation is better than single therapy, so more RCTs of higher quality are needed to further confirm its efficacy and safety.

  10. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esnaola, Nestor F. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O' Brien, Paul [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Camp, E. Ramsay [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Thomas, Melanie B. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Cole, David J. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Montero, Alberto J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Orwat, Kelly P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Marshall, David T., E-mail: marshadt@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  11. A case study of single-pill combination therapy: the ezetimibe/simvastatin combination for treatment of hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianhai; Chen, David Y-K

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, combination therapy has received growing popularity as a powerful therapeutic tactic for the treatment of diseases. The justifications and benefits of combination therapy are far-reaching, including but not limited to addressing unmet medical needs such as cancer, malaria, and HIV/AIDS, improved clinical efficacy and safety with reduced dosage of a single medication, understanding the underlying science of the disease, alleviating pharmaco-economic impacts, and better drug life-cycle management. Using the ezetimibe/simvastatin combination therapy as a case study, a comprehensive overview of the successful discovery and development of the single-pill combination, Vytorin, is presented in this review. A cursory introduction to combination therapy and the rationale for the ezetimibe/simvastatin combination for the treatment of hyperlipidemia provides an instructive entry point. The discovery and mode of action of simvastatin and ezetimibe monotherapies set the scene for a detailed discussion on the discovery and development of Vytorin, with emphasis on bioequivalency studies, clinical efficacy and safety profile studies, and the economic consequences of the single-pill combination therapy. Large-scale outcome clinical trials are also discussed to demonstrate the long-term effects of Vytorin. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. PATHOGENETIC RATIONALE FOR COMBINATION THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PANCREATITIS

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    V. B. Grinevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by an imbalance of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, reflecting the presence of chronic systemic inflammation. The functional state of microbial-tissue complex of the intestine determines the severity of chronic systemic inflammation. Restoration of normal microbial-tissue complex functioning of the intestine reduces the severity of inflammatory changes in the pancreas.Aim: To study clinical efficacy of combination of chronic pancreatitis through correction of the functional state of intestinal microbial-tissue complex.Materials and methods: The analyzed patient sample included 117 patients with uncomplicated chronic pancreatitis and moderate pain syndrome, moderate exocrine and endocrine, with their mean age of 43.9 ± 11.6 years (men, 40.9 ± 13.5 years and women, 48.6 ± 11.7 years. Patients with chronic pancreatitis were divided into 2 groups, with the Results: After combination therapy of chronic pancreatitis with the agent for correction of the functional state of intestinal microbial-tissue complex, there was a significant (p < 0.05 reduction in the representation of pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic microflora, with a significant increase in the primary intestinal flora, as well as a decrease in cytokines TNF-α (74.32 ± 11.22 ng/ml before treatment, 31.34 ± 8.92 ng/ml after treatment and IL-1β (25.32 ± 4.36 ng/ml before treatment, 10.52 ± 3.52 ng/ml after treatment, a significant decrease in cortisol (456.53 ± 68.99 nmol/ml before treatment, 382.61 ± 60.24 nmol/ml after treatment. The significant improvement of metabolic abnormalities was associated with positive clinical dynamics and improvement of quality of life.Conclusion: Treatment strategies in chronic pancreatitis should include agents restoring the functioning of intestinal microbial-tissue complex and positively affecting metabolic and hormonal milieu.

  13. Naphthoquine: An Emerging Candidate for Artemisinin Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brioni R; Laman, Moses; Salman, Sam; Batty, Kevin T; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Hombhanje, Francis; Manning, Laurens; Davis, Timothy M E

    2016-05-01

    Naphthoquine is a 4-aminoquinoline antimalarial drug first synthesised in China in 1986 but which was not developed for clinical use until the late 1990s. Early in vitro parasite sensitivity and in vivo efficacy data, together with a long terminal elimination half-life (up to 23 days), suggested that it could be used as monotherapy for uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria, but is now marketed as a single-dose, fixed co-formulation with artemisinin in a milligram per kilogram ratio of 1:2.5. This form of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) has also shown high cure rates, especially in two randomised trials in which, consistent with World Health Organization recommendations for all ACTs, it was administered daily for 3 days rather than as single dose for Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax infections (28-day adequate clinical and parasitological response ≥98.4 %). Although detailed safety monitoring has been performed in a minority of subjects, >4000 healthy volunteers and patients with malaria have been exposed to naphthoquine without any documented significant toxicity. As with other 4-aminoquinolines, naphthoquine is associated with prolongation of the electrocardiographic QT interval but not with cardiac or neurological events. It has been administered to children as young as 4 months of age but, due to a lack of pharmacokinetic, efficacy and toxicity data in young infants and in pregnant/lactating women, it should not be used in these vulnerable patient groups.With the emergence of parasite resistance to other ACTs, naphthoquine partnered with a potent artemisinin derivative may prove a viable alternative treatment for uncomplicated malaria.

  14. Combination Therapy for Treatment of Infections with Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Sara E.; Maragakis, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Combination antibiotic therapy for invasive infections with Gram-negative bacteria is employed in many health care facilities, especially for certain subgroups of patients, including those with neutropenia, those with infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, those with ventilator-associated pneumonia, and the severely ill. An argument can be made for empiric combination therapy, as we are witnessing a rise in infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. The wisdom of continued combination therapy after an organism is isolated and antimicrobial susceptibility data are known, however, is more controversial. The available evidence suggests that the greatest benefit of combination antibiotic therapy stems from the increased likelihood of choosing an effective agent during empiric therapy, rather than exploitation of in vitro synergy or the prevention of resistance during definitive treatment. In this review, we summarize the available data comparing monotherapy versus combination antimicrobial therapy for the treatment of infections with Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22763634

  15. Effect of p16 Status on the Quality-of-Life Experience During Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Substudy of Randomized Trial Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 02.02 (HeadSTART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringash, Jolie; Fisher, Richard; Peters, Lester; Trotti, Andy; O'Sullivan, Brian; Corry, June; Kenny, Lizbeth; Van Den Bogaert, Walter; Wratten, Chris; Rischin, Danny

    2017-03-15

    Human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) has a favorable prognosis. Current research de-escalates treatment, aiming to improve quality of life (QOL). Understanding the QOL experience with current standard treatment (chemoradiation therapy) provides context for emerging data. We report the impact of p16 status on QOL for patients with stage III or IV OPC undergoing chemoradiation therapy in an international phase 3 trial (TROG 02.02 [HeadSTART]). A subgroup analysis by p16 status was conducted in patients with OPC treated in a phase 3 randomized trial. The study subset with OPC and known p16 status was mainly from Australasia, Western Europe, and North America. Of 861 participants, 200 had OPC, known p16 status, and baseline QOL data; 82 were p16 negative and 118 were p16 positive. Radiation therapy (70 Gy over a period of 7 weeks) was given concurrently with 3 cycles of either cisplatin (100 mg/m2) or cisplatin (75 mg/m2) plus tirapazamine. QOL was measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H&N) questionnaire at baseline and 2, 6, 12, 23, and 38 months. Because no significant difference in QOL score was observed between arms, results by p16 status are reported with arms combined. The p16-positive patients were younger, had a better Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, and were less often current smokers. Our primary hypothesis that the change in FACT-H&N score from baseline to 6 months would be more favorable in the p16-positive cohort was not met (p16 positive, -6.3; p16 negative, -1.8; P=.14). The mean baseline FACT-H&N score was statistically and clinically significantly better in p16-positive patients (111 vs 102, P<.001); at 2 months, scores declined in both groups but more dramatically for p16-positive patients. By 12 months, p16-positive patients again had superior scores. A higher baseline FACT-H&N score and p16-positive status were independent predictors of overall survival

  16. Minimally invasive local ablative therapies in combination with radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid disease: preparation, feasibility and efficiency - preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Alexander; Mader, Oscar Maximilian; Gröner, Daniel; Korkusuz, Yücel; Ahmad, Shadi; Grünwald, Frank; Kranert, W Tilman; Happel, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Initial studies of combinations of radioiodine therapy (RIT) and local ablative procedures for the treatment of thyroid nodules have shown promising results. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of RIT combined with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with goitres and to determine which ablative procedure is the most suitable for a combined therapy. Thirty patients with goitres were divided into two subgroups. A test group of 15 patients received combined therapy (RIT + RFA) and a control group of 15 patients received RIT mono therapy. All patients underwent assessments including ultrasound, laboratory evaluation (T3, T4, TSH, TG, TPOAb, TgAbTRAb) and scintigraphic imaging with Tc-99m-Pertechnetate. The 3-month volume reduction was used to evaluate therapy effectiveness. Combined therapy (subgroup 1) resulted in a significant (p  0.05) than the control group (20.2 ± 32.2 ml/29.6 ± 42.1%). All patients became euthyroid after treatment. No major discomfort or complications occurred. A review of the literature investigating combinations of other local ablative procedures with RIT was performed to determine the most promising combination. The present study confirms the positive experiences with the combined therapy of RIT and local ablative procedures shown in the current literature and approves this approach for the treatment of goitres with RFA + RIT. These findings, when confirmed by further studies, should expand the indication of combined therapy as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery.

  17. Hybrid drug combination: Combination of ferulic acid and metformin as anti-diabetic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankar, Rakesh; Prabhakar, P K; Doble, Mukesh

    2017-12-15

    Ferulic acid, an anti-oxidant phytochemical present in several dietary components, is known to produce wide range of pharmacological effects. It is approved for use in food industry as a preservative and in sports food. Previous reports from our lab have shown synergistic interaction of ferulic acid with metformin in cell lines and diabetic rats. The purpose of this review is to compile information about anti-diabetic activity of ferulic acid in in vitro and in vivo models with special emphasis on activity of ferulic acid when combined with metformin. The mechanism of synergistic interaction between ferulic acid and metformin is also proposed after carefully studying effects of these compounds on molecules involved in glucose metabolism. Scientific literature for the purpose of this review was collected using online search engines and databases such as ScienceDirect, Scopus, PubMed and Google scholar. Ferulic acid forms resonance stabilized phenoxyl radical which scavenges free radicals and reduce oxidative stress. It improves glucose and lipid profile in diabetic rats by enhancing activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase in the pancreatic tissue. Combining ferulic acid with metformin improves both, in vitro glucose uptake activity and in vivo hypoglycemic activity of the latter. It is possible to reduce the dose of metformin by four folds (from 50 to 12.5 mg/kg body weight) by combining it with 10 mg of ferulic acid/kg body weight in diabetic rats. Ferulic acid improves glucose uptake through PI3-K pathway whereas metformin activates AMPK pathway to improve glucose uptake. The synergistic interaction of ferulic acid and metformin is due their action on parallel pathways which are involved in glucose uptake. Due to synergistic nature of their interaction, it is possible to reduce the dose of metformin (by combining with ferulic acid) required to achieve normoglycemia. Since the dose of metformin is reduced, the dose associated side

  18. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Conde-Muíño

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile’s ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  19. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  20. Molecular markers predict outcome in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after concomitant cisplatin-based chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Guido B; Wildeman, Maarten; Rasch, Coen R N; Armstrong, Nicola; Schuuring, Ed; Begg, Adrian C; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Scheper, Rik; van der Wal, Jacqueline E; Menkema, Lorian; van Diest, Paul J; Balm, Alfons J M; van Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2009-06-01

    Not all patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC) benefit from concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiation, but reliable predictive markers for outcome after chemoradiation are scarce. We have investigated potential prognostic biomarkers for outcome in a large group of patients. Ninety-one tumor biopsies taken from consecutive HNSCC patients were evaluated for protein expression on a tissue microarray. Using immunohistochemistry, 18 biomarkers, involved in various cellular pathways were investigated. Univariable and multivariable proportional hazard analyses were performed to investigate associations between each individual marker and outcome. In addition, the global test was used to test all variables simultaneously and selected combinations of markers for an overall association with local control. Univariable analysis showed statistically significant increased relative risks of RB, P16 and MRP2 for local control and MDR1 and HIF-1alpha for overall survival. MRP2, MDR1 and P16 levels were positively associated with outcome whereas RB and HIF-1alpha had a negative relationship. Using Goeman's global testing no combination of markers was identified that was associated with local control. Grouping the markers according to their function revealed an association between a combination of 3 markers (P16, P21 and P27) and outcome (p = 0.05) was found. In the multivariable analysis, MRP2 and RB remained significant independent predictive markers for local control. This study describes the prognostic value of biomarkers for the outcome in patients uniformly treated with concurrent chemoradiation. MRP2 and RB were found to be associated with outcome in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation.

  1. Discordant perspectives of rheumatologists and patients on COBRA combination therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyl, L.H.D. van; Plass, A.M.C.; Lems, W.F.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Kerstens, P.J.S.M.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Boers, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. The COBRA therapy (combination therapy in early rheumatoid arthritis) has proven to be an effective treatment for early RA, but is rarely prescribed. A survey showed reluctance of Dutch reumatologists to apply COBRA therapy in early RA. The present qualitative study was carried out to

  2. Discordant perspectives of rheumatologists and patients on COBRA combination therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tuyl, L.H.D.; Plass, A.M.C.; Lems, W.F.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Kerstens, P.J.S.M.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Boers, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. The COBRA therapy (combination therapy in early rheumatoid arthritis) has proven to be an effective treatment for early RA, but is rarely prescribed. A survey showed reluctance of Dutch reumatologists to apply COBRA therapy in early RA. The present qualitative study was carried out to

  3. PROTON THERAPY IN COMBINATION WITH PET AS MONITOR - A FEASIBILITY STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAANS, AMJ; SCHIPPERS, JM

    To evaluate the possibility of combining proton therapy with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) as a therapy monitor and as a tool for in situ dosimetry during therapy, proton activiation experiments have been performed using a 55 MeV proton beam on two different materials. The 3-D measurements of

  4. Combination therapy for pain management in inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthritis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramiro, Sofia; Radner, Helga; van der Heijde, Désirée; van Tubergen, Astrid; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Aletaha, Daniel; Landewé, Robert B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite optimal therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, many people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) continue to have persistent pain that may require additional therapy. To assess the benefits and safety of combination pain therapy for people with IA (rheumatoid arthritis (RA),

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Light Therapy, and Their Combination for Seasonal Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Kelly J.; Roecklein, Kathryn A.; Tierney Lindsey, Kathryn; Johnson, Leigh G.; Lippy, Robert D.; Lacy, Timothy J.; Barton, Franca B.

    2007-01-01

    This first controlled psychotherapy trial for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) compared SAD-tailored cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), light therapy (LT), and their combination to a concurrent wait-list control. Adults (N = 61) with major depression, recurrent with seasonal pattern, were randomized to one of four 6-week conditions: CBT (1.5-hr…

  6. Combination therapy of intravitreal triamcinolone and photodynamic therapy with verteporfin for subfoveal choroidal neovascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Nazimul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the six months follow-up outcome of combined intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA and photodynamic therapy (PDT for subfoveal choroidal neovascularization compared to PDT alone. Study design: Prospective interventional pilot study. Materials and Methods: Patients with six months follow-up of IVTA following PDT (Group I, eight eyes and PDT alone (Group II, eight eyes were included. Four mg/ 0.1 ml of IVTA was injected 7-10 days following PDT. The patients were reevaluated every month for the first two months and every three months thereafter in both the groups. Results: Group I: The mean age was 65.8±11.8 years (range: 47-79 years. Five patients were male. The total treatment sessions in six months were 11 (mean: 1.36. At six months, one eye had ³ 10 letters gain and three eyes had > 10 letters loss. Four eyes had stable vision. Two eyes (25% developed increased intraocular pressure (>40 mmHg during follow-up. Group II: The mean age was 58.7±11.7 years (range: 46-76 years. Five patients were male. The total treatment sessions in six months were 17 (mean: 2.13. At six months, six eyes had ³ 10 letters gain and none had > 10 letters loss. Two eyes had stable vision. Conclusion: The mean number of treatment sessions following combination therapy of IVTA (4 mg and PDT appears relatively less (1.36 at six months compared to PDT alone (mean: 2.13. ( P =0.02

  7. Aldosterone breakthrough during aliskiren, valsartan, and combination (aliskiren + valsartan) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomback, Andrew S; Rekhtman, Yelena; Klemmer, Philip J; Canetta, Pietro A; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Appel, Gerald B

    2012-01-01

    Aldosterone levels increase in 30%-40% of patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers over the long term. This "aldosterone breakthrough" may carry important clinical consequences given aldosterone's nonepithelial, pro-fibrotic actions. The renin inhibitor, aliskiren, by suppressing the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) proximally, may limit breakthrough compared to conventional RAAS blockade. This open-label study (NCT01129557) randomized subjects to aliskiren 300 mg daily (A), valsartan 320 mg daily (V), or aliskiren 150 mg + valsartan 160 mg daily (A+V) for 9 months. Eligible subjects had proteinuria >300 mg/day, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >45 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and systolic blood pressure (BP) >130 or diastolic BP >80 mm Hg. Serum and 24-hour urine aldosterone (indexed to 24-hour urine Na) were checked before initiation of therapy and at 3, 6, and 9 months. Aldosterone breakthrough was defined as a sustained increase from baseline aldosterone by study end. The study was intended to enroll 120 subjects but was terminated early by the sponsor. We present here the results of 33 subjects who completed the protocol, of which 12 were randomized to A, 11 were randomized to V, and 10 were randomized to A+V. Mean baseline eGFR was 75.5 (±23.3) mL/min/1.73 m(2); baseline proteinuria was 3104 (±2943) mg/day; and baseline BP was 134.7 (±10.5)/84.8 (±8.4) mm Hg. Three (27%) subjects on V, three (25%) subjects on A, and three (30%) subjects on A+V had aldosterone breakthrough. Mean proteinuria reduction was 31% from baseline in all subjects: 30% in subjects with breakthrough vs. 32% in subjects without breakthrough. Mean BP reduction was 11.0/8.8 mm Hg in all subjects: 8.4/6.1 mm Hg in subjects with breakthrough vs. 12.0/9.8 mm Hg in subjects without breakthrough. Aliskiren, alone or in combination with valsartan, did not reduce the incidence of aldosterone breakthrough in subjects with hypertension

  8. Changes in Cognitive-Behavioral Constructs Across Treatment Modalities for Seasonal Affective Disorder: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Light Therapy, and their Combination"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Cognitive - Behavioral Therapy , Light Therapy , and their Combination” Name of Candidate: Kathryn Tierney Lindsey Master of Science Degree...Changes in Cognitive - Behavioral Constructs Across Treatment Modalities for Seasonal Affective Disorder: Cognitive - Behavioral Therapy , Light Therapy ...assigned to light therapy (LT), group cognitive - behavioral therapy (CBT), or a combination treatment (CBT+LT). Participants completed

  9. Survival After Chemoradiation in Resected Pancreatic Cancer: The Impact of Adjuvant Gemcitabine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baschnagel, Andrew; Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Margolis, Jeffrey; Nadeau, Laura [Department of Medical Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Stein, Julie; Jury, Robert [Department of Surgery, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Robertson, John M., E-mail: jrobertson@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation with or without adjuvant gemcitabine (Gem). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 86 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent resection were treated with adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation. Thirty-four patients received concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiation (5-FU/RT) with traditional field radiation (range, 45-61.2 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) without further adjuvant therapy. Thirty patients received traditional field 5-FU/RT (range, 45-60.4 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) with Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly) either before and after radiotherapy or only after radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients received concurrent full-dose Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly)-based chemoradiation (Gem/RT), consisting of involved-field radiation (range, 27-38 Gy; median, 36 Gy) followed by further adjuvant Gem. Results: The median age of the cohort was 65 years (range, 40-80 years). Of the patients, 58 had T3 tumors (67%), 22 had T2 tumors (26%), and 6 had T1 tumors (7%). N1 disease was present in 61 patients (71%), whereas 18 patients (21%) had R1 resections. Performance status, lymph node status, and margin status were all similar among the treatment groups. Median follow-up was 19.0 months. Median overall survival (OS) (19.2 months, 19.0 months, and 21.0 months) and 3-year OS rates (26.5%, 27.2%, and 32.1%) were similar among patients with 5-FU/RT with no adjuvant Gem, those with 5-FU/RT with adjuvant Gem, and those with Gem/RT with adjuvant Gem, respectively (p = 0.88). Patients who received adjuvant Gem had a similar median OS (22.1 months) and 3-year OS rate (29%) compared to patients who did not (19.2 months and 26.5%, respectively) (p = 0.62). There was a trend for improved 3-year OS rates in patients with R0 vs. R1 resections (28.1% vs. 14.2%, p = 0.06) and in patients with T1 and T2 vs. T3 tumors (38% vs. 20%, p = 0.09). Node-negative patients had an improved 3

  10. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy integrated with systematic desensitization, cognitive behavioral therapy combined with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy combined with virtual reality exposure therapy methods in the treatment of flight anxiety: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triscari, Maria Teresa; Faraci, Palmira; Catalisano, Dario; D'Angelo, Valerio; Urso, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to compare the effectiveness of the following treatment methods for fear of flying: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) integrated with systematic desensitization, CBT combined with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy, and CBT combined with virtual reality exposure therapy. Overall, our findings have proven the efficacy of all interventions in reducing fear of flying in a pre- to post-treatment comparison. All groups showed a decrease in flight anxiety, suggesting the efficiency of all three treatments in reducing self-report measures of fear of flying. In particular, our results indicated significant improvements for the treated patients using all the treatment programs, as shown not only by test scores but also by participation in the post-treatment flight. Nevertheless, outcome measures maintained a significant effect at a 1-year follow-up. In conclusion, combining CBT with both the application of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing treatment and the virtual stimuli used to expose patients with aerophobia seemed as efficient as traditional cognitive behavioral treatments integrated with systematic desensitization.

  11. Sequential proton boost after standard chemoradiation for high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeberg, Sebastian; Bernhardt, Denise; Harrabi, Semi Ben; Uhl, Matthias; Paul, Angela; Bougatf, Nina; Verma, Vivek; Unterberg, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Haberer, Thomas; Combs, Stephanie E; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Juergen; Rieken, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    To retrospectively assess the feasibility and safety of a sequential proton boost following conventional chemoradiation in high-grade glioma (HGG). Sixty-six consecutive patients with HGG were treated with 50.0 Gy photons (50.0-50.4 Gy) in 2.0 Gy (1.8-2.0 Gy) fractions, followed by a proton boost with 10 Gy equivalent (Gy(RBE)) in 2.0 Gy(RBE) fractions. Patients were matched one to one with 66 patients with HGG undergoing conventional radiation therapy (RT) with 60.0 Gy photons (59.4-60.0 Gy) in 2.0 Gy fractions (1.8-2.0 Gy). Matching criteria were age, WHO grade, Karnofsky's performance status, PTV size, temozolomide therapy (each p > 0.1). The study assessed progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), acute treatment-related toxicity (CTCAE v.4.03) and pseudoprogression (RANO criteria). Median PFS and OS were similar in both treatment groups (bimodality RT, PFS: 8.8 months [2-32 months], OS 19.1 months [4-41 months]; photon-only RT, PFS: 7.2 months [2-39 months], 20.9 months [3-53 months]; p = 0.430 and p = 0.125). The median PTV of the proton boost was significantly smaller than the photon plan PTVs (each p compared to photon-only plans, yielded comparable progression and survival rates at lower CTCAE grade 3 acute toxicity rates. Pseudoprogression occurred rarely and evenly distributed in both treatment groups. Thus, bimodality RT was at least equivalent regarding outcome and potentially superior with respect to toxicity in patients with HGG. Treating patients with HGG with 50.0 Gy photons in 2.0 Gy fractions, followed by a proton boost with 10 Gy(RBE) in 2.0 Gy(RBE) fractions, is safe and feasible. Severe radiation-induced acute toxicity and pseudoprogression were rare in both treatment groups. Therefore, in this clinical setting, combined proton radiotherapy might be beneficial in terms of further risk reduction for treatment-related side effects. Interestingly, treatment volume reduction

  12. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy combined with CO2 laser therapy in treatment of laryngeal papilloma: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunjie; Yang, Yuguang; Zou, Xianbiao; Huang, Zheng

    2016-06-01

    This article describes the case of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy (ALA-PDT) via self-retaining laryngoscope under general anesthesia combined with CO2 Laser Therapy in the treatment of three patients with juvenile laryngeal papilloma. Laryngeal papilloma Clinically, it features rapid growth, multi-focus, frequent recurrence and possibility of spreading to the lower respiratory tract. ALA-PDT via self-retaining laryngoscope under general anesthesia combined with CO2 Laser Therapy is safe and effective for clearing laryngeal papilloma, laryngeal papilloma was fully removed from the three patients, with no recurrence during the 6-24 months of follow-up medical examination. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy (ALA-PDT) via self-retaining laryngoscope under general anesthesia combined with CO2 Laser can be used for treating laryngeal papilloma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of combined clenbuterol and metoprolol therapy on reverse remodelling during mechanical unloading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoraj Navaratnarajah

    Full Text Available Clenbuterol (Cl, a β2 agonist, is associated with enhanced myocardial recovery during left ventricular assist device (LVAD support, and exerts beneficial remodelling effects during mechanical unloading (MU in rodent heart failure (HF. However, the specific effects of combined Cl+β1 blockade during MU are unknown.We studied the chronic effects (4 weeks of β2-adrenoceptor (AR stimulation via Cl (2 mg/kg/day alone, and in combination with β1-AR blockade using metoprolol ((Met, 250 mg/kg/day, on whole heart/cell structure, function and excitation-contraction (EC coupling in failing (induced by left coronary artery (LCA ligation, and unloaded (induced by heterotopic abdominal heart transplantation (HATx failing rat hearts. Combined Cl+Met therapy displayed favourable effects in HF: Met enhanced Cl's improvement in ejection fraction (EF whilst preventing Cl-induced hypertrophy and tachycardia. During MU combined therapy was less beneficial than either mono-therapy. Met, not Cl, prevented MU-induced myocardial atrophy, with increased atrophy occurring during combined therapy. MU-induced recovery of Ca2+ transient amplitude, speed of Ca2+ release and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content was enhanced equally by Cl or Met mono-therapy, but these benefits, together with Cl's enhancement of sarcomeric contraction speed, and MU-induced recovery of Ca2+ spark frequency, disappeared during combined therapy.Combined Cl+Met therapy shows superior functional effects to mono-therapy in rodent HF, but appears inferior to either mono-therapy in enhancing MU-induced recovery of EC coupling. These results suggest that combined β2-AR simulation +β1-AR blockade therapy is likely to be a safe and beneficial therapeutic HF strategy, but is not as effective as mono-therapy in enhancing myocardial recovery during LVAD support.

  14. Comparison of therapy persistence for fixed versus free combination antihypertensives: a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmsmann, Thomas; Himmel, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to compare therapy persistence among patients who started with one of three drug regimens: a monotherapy, or combination therapy either as a fixed combination (ie, ‘single pill’) or as a free combination (ie, two separate antihypertensive agents). Design In a secondary data analysis, we used descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression to measure the effect of the three therapy regimens on therapy persistence over 4 years. Setting Prescription data from a large German statutory health insurance provider. Participants All patients who started with a new antihypertensive therapy in 2007 or 2008 (n=8032) were included and followed for 4 years. Primary outcome measure Therapy persistence, defined as receiving a refill prescription no later than within 180 days. Results The persistence rates after 4 years were nearly identical among patients who started with a monotherapy (40.3%) or a fixed combination of two drugs (39.8%). However, significantly more patients who started with free-drug combinations remained therapy persistent (56.4%), resulting in an OR of 2.00 (95% CI 1.6 to 2.5; p<0.0001) for free combinations versus fixed combinations. This trend was observed in all age groups and for men and women. At the end of the study period, the number of different antihypertensive agents was still similar between patients who started with a fixed combination (2.41) and patients who started with a free combination (2.28). Conclusions While single-pill combinations make it easier to take different drugs at once, the risk is high that these several substances are stopped at once. Therapy persistence was significantly better for patients who started with a free-drug combination without taking much fewer different antihypertensive drugs as those with a fixed combination. PMID:27881519

  15. Combining oncolytic virotherapy with p53 tumor suppressor gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bressy, Christian; Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53) or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73) were engineered with the goal of gen...

  16. Animal models testing monotherapy versus combination antifungal therapy: lessons learned and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2006-08-01

    The continued rise in serious fungal infections and rises in therapy failure dictate that more efficacious therapies be developed. Combination therapy using available drugs is an attractive choice, yet primarily only anecdotal clinical data are available. We review here data from animal models as an indicator of future potential. The primary data are from murine studies and we will briefly review chemotherapeutic combination studies, some showing benefit over monotherapy and some showing no benefit over monotherapy. In addition, we will address the potential of immunotherapy in combination with conventional therapy. The data derived from animal model studies of antifungal drug efficacy have proven to be predictive of clinical utility. Studies on combination therapy will prove useful to the clinician in evaluating courses of treatment, especially where clinical-trial data are not available or probable in the future.

  17. Combination Therapy in Asthma: A Review | Saleh | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Asthma can be defined as a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that is reversible either spontaneously or by treatment. Despite the exponential increase in asthma research, the prevalence of asthma is on the increase, especially in children and young adults in the western societies. Inhaled therapies

  18. Development of Combination Therapy with Anti-Cancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijen, S.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes early clinical trials with anti-cancer drugs in combination with commonly applied and registered chemotherapy and single agent studies with compounds that are intended for use in combination with registered or other targeted anti-cancer drugs. Gemcitabine is a prodrug that

  19. Impact of adequate empirical combination therapy on mortality from bacteremic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park So-Youn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa has gained an increasing amount of attention in the treatment of patients with pneumonia. However, the benefit of empirical combination therapy for pneumonia remains unclear. We evaluated the effects of adequate empirical combination therapy and multidrug-resistance in bacteremic Pseudomonas pneumonia on the mortality. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed at the 2,700-bed tertiary care university hospital. We reviewed the medical records of patients with bacteremic pneumonia between January 1997 and February 2011. Patients who received either inappropriate or appropriate empirical therapy were compared by using marginal structural model. Furthermore, we investigated the direct impact of combination therapy on clinical outcomes in patients with monomicrobial bacteremic pneumonia. Results Among 100 consecutive patients with bacteremic Pseudomonas pneumonia, 65 patients were classified in the adequate empirical therapy group, 32 of whom received monotherapy and 33 combination therapy. In the marginal structural model, only inadequate therapy was significantly associated with 28-day mortality (p = 0.02, and multidrug-resistance was not a significant risk factor. To examine further the direct impact of combination therapy, we performed a subgroup analysis of the 65 patients who received adequate therapy. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified absence of septic shock at the time of bacteremia (OR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01-0.49; p = 0.008, and adequate combination therapy (OR, 0.05; 95% CI, 0.01-0.34; p = 0.002 as variables independently associated with decreased all-cause 28-day mortality. Conclusions Our study suggests that adequate empirical combination therapy can decrease mortality in patients with bacteremic Pseudomonas pneumonia.

  20. chemo-radiation in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma, disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: This is a case report of a patient with advanced nasopharyngeal Carcinoma, (T4 N2 M0) who had chemo-radiation with Cisplatin based chemotherapy and total midplane dose of 60 Gray external beam radiation. Six years after treatment patient has remained disease free and the primary site histologically.

  1. Cancer prevention and treatment using combination therapy with plant- and animal-derived compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzoigwe, Jacinta; Sauter, Edward R

    2012-11-01

    Compounds naturally occurring in plants and animals play an essential role in the prevention and treatment of various cancers. There are more than 100 plant- and animal-based natural compounds currently in clinical use. Similar to synthetic compounds, these natural compounds are associated with dose-related toxicity that limits efficacy. Scientists have investigated combination therapy with compounds that have different toxicities in order to optimize efficacy. These combination therapies may work additively or synergistically, there may be no effect or they may promote tumor formation. Combination therapy with agents that have similar mechanisms of action may increase toxicity. In this article, combination therapies that have been investigated, their rationale, mechanism of action and findings are reviewed. When the data warrant it, combined (pharmacologic and natural; two or more natural) interventions that appear to increase efficacy (compared with monotherapy) while minimizing toxicity have been highlighted.

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy combined with Schwann cell transplantation promotes spinal cord injury recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-gang Peng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cell transplantation and hyperbaric oxygen therapy each promote recovery from spinal cord injury, but it remains unclear whether their combination improves therapeutic results more than monotherapy. To investigate this, we used Schwann cell transplantation via the tail vein, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, or their combination, in rat models of spinal cord contusion injury. The combined treatment was more effective in improving hindlimb motor function than either treatment alone; injured spinal tissue showed a greater number of neurite-like structures in the injured spinal tissue, somatosensory and motor evoked potential latencies were notably shorter, and their amplitudes greater, after combination therapy than after monotherapy. These findings indicate that Schwann cell transplantation combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy is more effective than either treatment alone in promoting the recovery of spinal cord in rats after injury.

  3. [Effect of combined application of ozone therapy and gravitational therapy on the remote results of complex treatment of geriatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, I V; Shchukin, Yu V; Lukashova, A V

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the remote results of treatment of an obliterating atherosclerosis of arteries of the lower extremities of the II stage at patients of advanced and senile age after the combined use of ozone therapy and gravitational therapy. We performed a prospective randomized study in three parallel groups (139 patients). The 1st group (n=57) received standard medical therapy in combination with ozone therapy; the group was divided into two subgroups: for patients of subgroup 1a (n=28) - intravenous ozonized physiological solution was performed, for patients of subgroup 1b (n=29) - major ozonized autohemotherapy. For patients of the 2nd group (n=62) - a comprehensive treatment, including gravitational therapy in addition to medical ozone, was carried out. In this group were also identified two subgroups: subgroup 2a (n=31) - patients received standard medical therapy in combination with ozonized physiological solution and gravitational therapy, subgroup 2b (n=31) - standard medical therapy in conjunction with major ozonized autohemotherapy and gravitational therapy. The 3rd control group (n=20) included patients, who received only standard medical therapy. Dynamics of changes of a stage of a disease and the number of surgeries in the remote period was estimated (up to 7 years). After 6 months of follow-on stages of the distribution of the disease patients significantly (p>0,05) did not differ from the initial amount. Analysis of survival and probable risk at 7 years of follow-Cox regression method revealed a maximum efficiency in the subgroup 2a where the risk of probability of surgeries and also increases in a stage of a disease effectively decreased.

  4. Current concepts in combination therapy for the treatment of hypertension: combined calcium channel blockers and RAAS inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto F Rubio-Guerra

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Alberto F Rubio-Guerra1, David Castro-Serna2, Cesar I Elizalde Barrera2, Luz M Ramos-Brizuela21Metabolic and Research Clinic, 2Internal Medicine Department, Hospital General de Ticomán SS DF, MéxicoAbstract: Recent guidelines for the management of hypertension recommend target blood pressures <140/90 mmHg in hypertensive patients, or <130/80 mmHg in subjects with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or coronary artery disease. Despite the availability and efficacy of antihypertensive drugs, most hypertensive patients do not reach the recommended treatment targets with monotherapy, making combination therapy necessary to achieve the therapeutic goal. Combination therapy with 2 or more agents is the most effective method for achieving strict blood pressure goals. Fixed-dose combination simplifies treatment, reduces costs, and improves adherence. There are many drug choices for combination therapy, but few data are available about the efficacy and safety of some specific combinations. Combination therapy of calcium antagonists and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS are efficacious and safe, and have been considered rational by both the JNC 7 and the 2007 European Society of Hypertension – European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension. The aim of this review is to discuss some relevant issues about the use of combinations with calcium channel blockers and RAAS inhibitors in the treatment of hypertension.Keywords: hypertension, calcium channel blockers, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, fixed-dose combination, adherence

  5. The use of combination therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension: new developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Galiè

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a strong clinical rationale for combination therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, as several pathological pathways have been implicated in its pathogenesis and no single agent has yet been shown to deliver completely satisfactory results. Registry data indicate that use of combination therapy is in fact common in existing clinical practice, even though support has been largely empirical or derived from small-scale observational studies. Data from large, adequately powered, randomised controlled trials of combination therapy in PAH are now emerging and suggest that combination therapy may be clinically beneficial. Studies of bosentan in combination with prostanoids and phosphodiesterase (PDE-5 inhibitors show consistent evidence of improvements in exercise capacity compared with placebo. Similar improvements have been observed with PDE-5 inhibitors in combination with prostanoids. The appropriate timing of combination therapy requires further evaluation but goal-oriented therapy using combinations of oral and inhaled drugs has been shown to provide acceptable long-term results in patients with advanced PAH. Monitoring should be performed regularly and be based on repeatable, noninvasive, measurable parameters that have prognostic value.

  6. Possible artemisinin-based combination therapy-resistant malaria in Nigeria: a report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnennaya Anthony Ajayi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinin-based combination therapy-resistant malaria is rare in Sub-Saharan Africa. The World Health Organization identifies monitoring and surveillance using day-3 parasitaemia post-treatment as the standard test for identifying suspected artemisinin resistance. We report three cases of early treatment failure due to possible artemisinin-based combination therapy-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. All cases showed adequate clinical and parasitological responses to quinine. This study reveals a need to re-evaluate the quality and efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy agents in Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa.

  7. How to evaluate combination therapy using interferon and nucleos(tide analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Lu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B is still one of the most important chronic diseases in China because of its high relevance to liver cirrhosis and hepatic cell cancer (HCC. Currently, interferon and nucleos(tide analogues are two main treatments for chronic hepatitis B, but they have advantages and disadvantages. More investigations are needed to explore better ways for treating this disease, and combination therapy might be one of the options. This article analyzes the advances in various combination therapies and points out views about the selection of combination therapies and patients.

  8. Overcoming tumor resistance by heterologous adeno-poxvirus combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Vähä-Koskela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful cancer control relies on overcoming resistance to cell death and on activation of host antitumor immunity. Oncolytic viruses are particularly attractive in this regard, as they lyse infected tumor cells and trigger robust immune responses during the infection. However, repeated injections of the same virus promote antiviral rather than antitumor immunity and tumors may mount innate antiviral defenses to restrict oncolytic virus replication. In this article, we have explored if alternating the therapy virus could circumvent these problems. We demonstrate in two virus-resistant animal models a substantial delay in antiviral immune- and innate cellular response induction by alternating injections of two immunologically distinct oncolytic viruses, adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Our results are in support of clinical development of heterologous adeno-/vaccinia virus therapy of cancer.

  9. Combination antiretroviral therapy and the risk of myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friis-Moller, N; Sabin, CA; Weber, R; Monforte, AD; El-Sadr, WM; Reiss, P; Thiebaut, R; Morfeldt, L; De Wit, S; Pradier, C; Calvo, G; Law, MG; Kirk, O; Phillips, AN; Lundgren, JD; Lundgren, JD; Weber, R; Monteforte, AD; Bartsch, G; Reiss, P; Dabis, F; Morfeldt, L; De Wit, S; Pradier, C; Calvo, G; Law, MG; Kirk, O; Phillips, AN; Houyez, F; Loeliger, E; Tressler, R; Weller, I.; Friis-Moller, N; Sabin, CA; Sjol, A; Lundgren, JD; Sawitz, A; Rickenbach, M; Pezzotti, P; Krum, E; Meester, R; Lavignolle, V.; Sundstrom, A; Poll, B; Fontas, E; Torres, F; Petoumenos, K; Kjaer, J; Hammer, S; Neaton, J; Sjol, A; de Wolf, F; van der Ven, E; Zaheri, S; Van Valkengoed, L; Meester, R; Bronsveld, W; Weigel, H; Brinkman, K; Frissen, P; ten Veen, J; Hillbrand, M; Schieveld, S; Mulder, J; van Gorp, E; Meenhorst, P; Danner, S; Claessen, F; Perenboom, R; Schattenkerk, JKE; Godfried, M; Lange, J; Lowe, S; van der Meer, J; Nellen, F; Pogany, K; van der Poll, T; Reiss, R; Ruys, T; Wit, F; Richter, C; van Leusen, R; Vriesendorp, R; Jeurissen, F; Kauffmann, R; Koger, E; Brevenboer, B; Sprenger, HG; Law, G; ten Kate, RW; Leemhuis, M; Schippers, E; Schrey, G; van der Geest, S; Verbon, A; Koopmans, P; Keuter, M; Telgt, D; van der Ven, A; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Gyssens, I.; de Marie, S; Juttmann, J; van der Heul, C; Schneider, M; Borleffs, J; Hoepelman, I.; Jaspers, C; Matute, A; Schurink, C; Blok, W; Salamon, R; Beylot, J; Dupon, M; Le Bras, M; Pellegrin, JL; Ragnaud, JM; Dabis, F; Chene, G; Jacqmin-Gadda, H; Rhiebaut, R; Lawson-Ayayi, S; Lavignolle, V.; Balestre, E; Blaizeau, MJ; Decoin, M; Formaggio, AM; Delveaux, S; Labarerre, S; Uwamaliya, B; Vimard, E; Merchadou, L; Palmer, G; Touchard, D; Dutoit, D; Pereira, F; Boulant, B; Beylot, J; Morlat, P; Bonarek, M; Bonnet, F; Coadou, B; Gelie, P; Jaubert, D; Nouts, C; Lacoste, D; Dupon, M; Dutronc, H; Cipriano, G; Lafarie, S; Chossat, I.; Lacut, JY; Leng, B; Pellegrin, JL; Mercie, P; Viallard, JF; Faure, I.; Rispal, P; Cipriano, C; Tchamgoue, S; Le Bras, M; Djossou, F; Malvy, D; Pivetaud, JP; Ragnaud, JM; Chambon, D; De La Taille, C; Galperine, T; Lafarie, S; Neau, D; Ochoa, A; Beylot, C; Doutre, MS; Bezian, JH; Moreau, JF; Taupin, JL; Conri, C; Constans, J; Couzigou, P; Castera, L; Fleury, H; Lafon, ME; Masquelier, B; Pellegrin, I.; Trimoulet, P; Moreau, F; Mestre, C; Series, C; Taytard, A; Law, M; Petoumenos, K; Bal, J; Mijch, A; Watson, K; Roth, N; Wood, H; Austin, D; Gowers, A; Baker, B; McFarlane, R; Carr, A; Cooper, D; Chuah, J; Fankhauser, W; Mallal, S; Skett, J; Calvo, G; Torres, F; Mateau, S; Domingo, P; Sambeat, MA; Gatell, J; Del Cacho, E; Cadafalch, J; Fuster, M; Codina, C; Sirera, G; Vaque, A; Clumeck, N; De Wit, S; Gerard, M; Hildebrand, M; Kabeya, K; Konopnicki, D; Payen, MC; Poll, B; Van Laethem, Y; Neaton, J; Bartsch, G; El-Sadr, WM; Krum, E; Thompson, G; Wentworth, D; Luskin-Hawk, R; Telzak, E; El-Sadr, WM; Abrams, DI; Cohn, D; Markowitz, N; Arduino, R; Mushatt, D; Friedland, G; Perez, G; Tedaldi, E; Fisher, E; Gordin, F; Crane, LR; Sampson, J; Baxter, J; Kirk, O; Mocroft, A; Phillips, AN; Lundgren, JD; Vetter, N; Clumeck, N; Hermans, P; Colebunders, R; Machala, L; Nielsen, J; Benfield, T; Gerstoft, J; Katzenstein, T; Roge, B; Skinhoj, P; Pedersen, C; Katlama, C; Viard, JP; Saint-Marc, T; Vanhems, P; Pradier, C; Dietrich, M; Manegold, C; van Lunzen, J; Miller, V.; Staszewski, S; Bieckel, M; Goebel, FD; Salzberger, B; Rockstroh, J; Kosmidis, J; Gargalianos, P; Sambatakou, H; Perdios, J; Panos, G; Karydis, I.; Filandras, A; Banhegyi, D; Mulcahy, F; Yust, I.; Turner, D; Pollack, S; Ben-Ishai, Z; Bentwich, Z; Maayan, S; Vella, S; Chiesi, A; Arici, C; Pristera, R; Mazzotta, F; Gabbuti, A; Esposito, R; Bedini, A; Chirianni, A; Montesarchio, E; Vullo, V.; Santopadre, P; Narciso, P; Antinori, A; Franci, P; Zaccarelli, M; Lazzarin, A; Finazzi, R; Monforte, VO; Hemmer, R; Staub, T; Reiss, P; Bruun, J; Maeland, A; Ormaasen, V.; Knysz, B; Gasiorowski, J; Horban, A; Prokopowicz, D; Boron-Kaczmarska, A; Pnyka, M; Beniowski, M; Trocha, H; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Proenca, R; Gonzalez-Lahoz, J; Diaz, B; Garcia-Benayas, T; Martin-Carbonero, L; Soriano, V.; Clotet, B; Jou, A; Conejero, J; Tural, C; Gatell, JM; Miro, JM; Blaxhult, A; Heidemann, B; Pehrson, P; Ledergerber, B; Weber, R; Francioli, P; Telenti, A; Hirschel, B; Soravia-Dunand, V.; Furrer, H; Fisher, M; Brettle, R; Barton, S; Johnson, AM; Mercey, D; Loveday, C; Johnson, MA; Pinching, A; Parkin, J; Weber, J; Scullard, G; Morfeldt, L; Thulin, G; Sunstrom, A; Akerlund, B; Koppel, K; Karlsson, A; Flamholc, L; Hakangard, C; Monforte, AD; Pezzotti, P; Moroni, M; Monforte, AD; Cargnel, A; Merli, S; Vigevani, GM; Pastecchia, C; Lazzarin, A; Novati, R; Caggese, L; Moioli, C; Mura, MS; Mannazzu, M; Suter, F; Arici, C; Manconi, PE; Piano, P; Mazzotta, F; Lo Caputo, S; Poggio, A; Bottari, G; Pagano, G; Alessandrini, A; Scasso, A; Vincenti, A; Abbadesse, V.; Mancuso, S; Alberici, F; Ruggieri, A; Arlotti, M; Ortolani, P; De Lalla, F; Tositti, G; Piersantelli, N; Piscopo, R; Raise, E; Pasquinucci, S; Soscia, F; Tacconi, L; Tirelli, U; Nasti, G; Santoro, D; Pusterla, L; Carosi, G; Castelli, F; Cadeo, G; Vangi, D; Carnevale, G; Galloni, D; Filice, G; Bruno, R; Sinicco, A; Sciandra, M; Caramello, P; Gennero, L; Soranzo, ML; Bonasso, M; Rizzardini, G; Migliorino, G; Chiodo, F; Colangeli, V.; Magnani, G; Ursitti, M; Menichetti, F; Martinelli, C; Esposito, R; Mussini, C; Ghinelli, F; Sighinolfi, L; Coronado, O; Zauli, T; Ballardini, G; Montroni, M; Zoli, A; Petrelli, E; Cioppi, A; Ortona, L; De Luca, A; Petrosillo, N; Noto, P; Narciso, P; Salcuni, P; Antinori, A; De Longis, P; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M; Pastore, G; Minafra, G; Chiriann, A; Loiacono, L; Piazza, M; Nappa, S; Abrescia, N; De Marco, M; Colomba, A; Prestileo, T; De Stefano, C; La Gala, A; Ferraro, T; Scerbo, A; Grima, P; Tundo, P; Pizzigallo, E; D'Alessandro, M; Grisorio, B; Ferrara, S; Pradier, C; Fontas, E; Caissotti, C; Dellamonica, P; Bentz, L; Bernard, E; Chaillou, S; De Salvador-Guillouet, F; Durant, J; Guttman, R; Heripret, L; Mondain-Miton, V.; Perbost, I.; Prouvost-Keller, B; Pugliese, P; Rahelinirina, V.; Roger, PM; Vandenbos, F; Bernasconi, E; Bucher, H; Burgisser, P; Cattacin, S; Egger, M; Erb, P; Fierz, W; Fischer, M; Flepp, M; Fontana, A; Francioli, P; Furrer, HJ; Gorgievski, M; Hirschel, B; Kaiser, L; Kind, C; Klimkait, T; Ledergerber, B; Lauper, U; Opravil, M; Paccaud, F; Pantaleo, G; Perrin, L; Piffaretti, JC; Rickenbach, M; Rudin, C; Schupbach, J; Speck, R; Telenti, A; Trkola, A; Vernazza, P; Weber, R; Yerly, S; Ten Napel, C.

    2003-01-01

    Background: It remains controversial whether exposure to combination antiretroviral treatment increases the risk of myocardial infarction. Methods: In this prospective observational study, we enrolled 23,468 patients from 11 previously established cohorts from December 1999 to April 2001 and

  10. A Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Prophylactic Manuka Honey for the Reduction of Chemoradiation Therapy-Induced Esophagitis During the Treatment of Lung Cancer: Results of NRG Oncology RTOG 1012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogh, Shannon E; Deshmukh, Snehal; Berk, Lawrence B; Dueck, Amylou C; Roof, Kevin; Yacoub, Sherif; Gergel, Thomas; Stephans, Kevin; Rimner, Andreas; DeNittis, Albert; Pablo, John; Rineer, Justin; Williams, Terence M; Bruner, Deborah

    2017-03-15

    Randomized trials have shown that honey is effective for the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Because there is no efficacious preventative for radiation esophagitis in lung cancer patients, this trial compared liquid honey, honey lozenges, and standard supportive care for radiation esophagitis. The patients were stratified by percentage of esophagus receiving specific radiation dose (V60 Gy esophagus honey 4 times a day, and 2 lozenges (10 mL of dehydrated manuka honey) 4 times a day during concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The primary endpoint was patient-reported pain on swallowing, with the use of an 11-point (0-10) scale at 4 weeks (Numerical Rating Pain Scale, NRPS). The study was designed to detect a 15% relative reduction of change in NRPS score. The secondary endpoints were trend of pain over time, opioid use, clinically graded and patient-reported adverse events, weight loss, dysphagia, nutritional status, and quality of life. 53 patients were randomized to supportive care, 54 were randomized to liquid honey, and 56 were randomized to lozenge honey. There was no significant difference in the primary endpoint of change in the NRPS at 4 weeks between arms. There were no differences in any of the secondary endpoints except for opioid use at 4 weeks during treatment between the supportive care and liquid honey arms, which was found to be significant (P=.03), with more patients on the supportive care arm taking opioids. Honey as prescribed within this protocol was not superior to best supportive care in preventing radiation esophagitis. Further testing of other types of honey and research into the mechanisms of action are needed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Combinations of Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Review of Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Christopher A., E-mail: barkerc@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Postow, Michael A. [Department of Medicine, Melanoma and Sarcoma Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Radiation therapy has long played a role in the management of melanoma. Recent advances have also demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical data suggest a biologic interaction between radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Several clinical studies corroborate these findings. This review will summarize the outcomes of studies reporting on patients with melanoma treated with a combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Vaccine therapies often use irradiated melanoma cells, and may be enhanced by radiation therapy. The cytokines interferon-α and interleukin-2 have been combined with radiation therapy in several small studies, with some evidence suggesting increased toxicity and/or efficacy. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been combined with radiation therapy in several notable case studies and series. Finally, pilot studies of adoptive cell transfer have suggested that radiation therapy may improve the efficacy of treatment. The review will demonstrate that the combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy has been reported in several notable case studies, series and clinical trials. These clinical results suggest interaction and the need for further study.

  12. Success of rechallenging dabrafenib and trametinib combination therapy after trametinib-induced rhabdomyolysis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Yusuke; Ng, William; Namikawa, Kenjiro; Takahashi, Akira; Tsutsumida, Arata; Nishida, Makiko; Yamazaki, Naoya

    2018-01-29

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway regulates cell growth and differentiation and is activated by BRAF mutations. BRAF mutations are present in about 40-50% of cutaneous melanomas. More than 90% of BRAF mutations are the V600E type. BRAF inhibitor (dabrafenib or vemurafenib) and MEK inhibitor (trametinib or cobimetinib) combination therapies are effective for BRAF-mutant advanced melanomas. A variety of side effects have been observed with combination therapy including pyrexia, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. Rhabdomyolysis is one of the most severe adverse events, but it is very rare. Only two cases of rhabdomyolysis have been reported in clinical trials. A 41-year-old Japanese woman with cutaneous melanoma was started on a combination of dabrafenib and trametinib therapy after failure of immune checkpoint therapy. One month later, she complained of myalgia and fatigue and was shifted to our hospital. She was diagnosed with trametinib-induced rhabdomyolysis and showed improvement only with a high volume of fluid infusion. We stopped combination therapy, but there were no useful treatment options for her. After resuming dabrafenib, followed by trametinib, she did not have any problems. This is the first case of a patient with metastatic cutaneous melanoma who could recommence combination therapy after trametinib-associated rhabdomyolysis. We assume that not all patients experience recurrence of rhabdomyolysis in trametinib-induced rhabdomyolysis. As few cases have been reported, more information is needed. We have to evaluate safety carefully if rechallenging combination therapy.

  13. Impact of combined secondary prevention therapy after myocardial infarction: data from a nationwide French registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Nicolas; Cambou, Jean-Pierre; Hanania, Guy; Kadri, Zena; Genès, Nathalie; Lablanche, Jean-Marc; Blanchard, Didier; Vaur, Laurent; Clerson, Pierre; Guéret, Pascal

    2005-12-01

    Several classes of medications improve survival in patients with coronary artery disease. Whether these medications, as used in the real world, have additive efficacy remains speculative. To assess whether patients discharged on combined secondary prevention medications after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have improved 1-year survival, compared with the action of any single class of medications. Nationwide registry of consecutive patients admitted to intensive care units for AMI in November 2000 in France. Multivariate Cox regression analysis, including a propensity score for the prescription of combined therapy, was used. Of the 2119 patients discharged alive, 1095 (52%) were prescribed a combination of antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, and statins (triple therapy), of whom 567 (27%) also received angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (quadruple therapy) and 528 (25%) did not. One-year survival was 97% in patients receiving triple combination therapy versus 88% in those who received either none, 1, or 2 of these medications (P After multivariate adjustment including the propensity score, the hazard ratio for 1-year mortality in patients with triple combination therapy was 0.52 (95% CI 0.33-0.81). In patients with ejection fraction therapy had no additional prognostic value. Compared with the prescription of any single class of secondary prevention medications, combination therapy offers additional protection in patients with AMI.

  14. Explorations of combinational therapy in cancer : targeting the tumor and its microenvironment by combining chemotherapy with chemopreventive approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, Johannes Willem van

    2011-01-01

    One of the most effective anticancer therapy still remains chemotherapy, however, both used as single agent as in combinational regimens, chemotherapy still encounters the problem of therapeutic resistance. Limitations of chemotherapy have led to the exploration of alternative anti-cancer approaches

  15. Successful therapy of progressive rhino-orbital mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus arrhizus with combined and sequential antifungal therapy, surgery and hyperbaric therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernón, Adrián; Agud, José Luis; Cuétara, María Soledad; Casqueiro, José Carlos; Nuñez, Pilar; Domínguez, Alegría R; Bullido, Eusebio; Stchigel, Alberto M

    2014-10-01

    We present a case of rhino-orbitary mucormycosis which progressed despite liposomal amphotericin and early surgical debridement. Combined echinocandin and high dose liposomal amphotericin, repeated debridement, prolonged therapy with hyperbaric oxygen and continued therapy with posaconazole, along with strict diabetic control, allowed cure without disfigurement.

  16. Successful therapy of progressive rhino-orbital mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus arrhizus with combined and sequential antifungal therapy, surgery and hyperbaric therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Imbernón, Adrián; Agud, José Luis; Cuétara, María Soledad; Casqueiro, José Carlos; Nuñez, Pilar; Domínguez, Alegría R.; Bullido, Eusebio; Stchigel, Alberto M.

    2014-01-01

    10.1016/j.mmcr.2014.09.004 We present a case of rhino-orbitary mucormycosis which progressed despite liposomal amphotericin and early surgical debridement. Combined echinocandin and high dose liposomal amphotericin, repeated debridement, prolonged therapy with hyperbaric oxygen and continued therapy with posaconazole, along with strict diabetic control, allowed cure without disfigurement.

  17. Successful therapy of progressive rhino-orbital mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus arrhizus with combined and sequential antifungal therapy, surgery and hyperbaric therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Imbernón

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of rhino-orbitary mucormycosis which progressed despite liposomal amphotericin and early surgical debridement. Combined echinocandin and high dose liposomal amphotericin, repeated debridement, prolonged therapy with hyperbaric oxygen and continued therapy with posaconazole, along with strict diabetic control, allowed cure without disfigurement.

  18. Use of combination therapy with immunomodulators and immunosuppressants in treating multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Douglas R

    2004-12-28

    Immunomodulating agents have beneficial effects in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), decreasing the frequency of relapses, the progression of disability, and MRI measures of disease activity. Despite the efficacy of these agents, many patients continue to show progression of disability, breakthrough relapses, and active disease on MRI. Therefore, clinicians have employed a variety of combinations of agents in an attempt to decrease disease activity in those with active disease despite standard immunomodulatory therapy. Although a variety of combination therapies have been used in clinical practice, there is a paucity of data available to guide clinical decision-making. A major pitfall in using combination therapy in the absence of data demonstrating safety is the possibility that the agent added to the primary therapy may have no effect or, worse, may antagonize the effect of the primary agent. The combination of mitoxantrone and interferon beta (IFNbeta) appears safe in short-term studies from a toxicity standpoint and is associated with a reduction in relapse rates, a decrease in the frequency of enhancing lesions, and a decrease in T2 lesion burden. Other combinations that appear safe in preliminary studies include IFNbeta-1a and methotrexate, IFNbeta-1a and azathioprine, and mitoxantrone plus methylprednisolone. The decision to use combination therapy in patients with a suboptimal response to monotherapy should be considered early and not be delayed until disability becomes advanced. This review discusses the available data regarding the combination of standard immunomodulatory therapy with immunosuppressive agents.

  19. Combination therapy with leflunomide and genetic engineering biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Vladimirovna Chichasova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on the use of a combination of genetic engineering biological agents (GEBAs and leflunomide in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In accordance with the international guidelines, the majority of GEBAs should be given in a combination with methotrexate (MTX, which increases the efficacy of a number of GEBAs (tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, rituximab and affects tolerability (remikeid, humira. However, MTX cannot be always used in real practice. The data given in the paper on the efficiency and safety of the coadministration of leflunomide and a GEBA in patients with active RA, which are based on the results of randomized studies and national registers, including the Russian one, point to the compatibility of the results of treatment with this and GEBA-MTX combinations.

  20. Combination therapy with leflunomide and genetic engineering biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Vladimirovna Chichasova

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on the use of a combination of genetic engineering biological agents (GEBAs and leflunomide in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In accordance with the international guidelines, the majority of GEBAs should be given in a combination with methotrexate (MTX, which increases the efficacy of a number of GEBAs (tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, rituximab and affects tolerability (remikeid, humira. However, MTX cannot be always used in real practice. The data given in the paper on the efficiency and safety of the coadministration of leflunomide and a GEBA in patients with active RA, which are based on the results of randomized studies and national registers, including the Russian one, point to the compatibility of the results of treatment with this and GEBA-MTX combinations.

  1. Combination of negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy for treatment of infected surgical wounds: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Paul A; Peters, Kim L; Bowers, Jolene M

    2008-05-01

    The optimal wound therapy for healing infected wounds post surgery or surgical debridement has not been established. Negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy are advanced wound-healing modalities that apply forms of mechanical pressure to wound tissue in an effort to promote healing by stimulating cellular proliferation. Using a combination of negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy was evaluated in a series of six patients with large, infected surgical wounds presenting with moderate to large amounts of serosanguineous drainage. After concurrent treatment with both modalities (range: 4 to 12 weeks), wound volume was reduced by 99% to 100% in all wounds except one wound for which depth at end of treatment was not measurable due to hypergranulation. Similarly, wound surface area was reduced by 82% to 100%, with the exception of the hypergranular wound, which decreased in size by 60%. Serosanguineous wound drainage was reduced in four wounds and remained unchanged in two wounds.

  2. Efficacy of Pharmacotherapy and Cognitive Therapy, Alone and in Combination in Major Depressive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi, A; F. Shamsaie; M.K. Zarabian; Sedehi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Patients with Major depressive are difficult to treat, and the relative efficacy of medications and cognitive therapy in the treatment of depression is still a matter of deabath. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacies of antidepressant medication, cognitive therapy and combination of cognitive therapy and antidepressant medication. Materials & Methods: In an experimental study, 120 depressive patients were randomly selected and divided in three grou...

  3. Effect of Decompression Therapy Combined with Joint Mobilization on Patients with Lumbar Herniated Nucleus Pulposus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Younghwa; Lee, Chang-Ryeol; Cho, Misuk

    2012-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of decompression therapy combined with joint mobilization on the pain and range of motion of patients with lumbar herniated nucleus pulposus. [Subjects...

  4. Effectiveness of a positive psychology intervention combined with cognitive behavioral therapy in university students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosario Josefa Marrero; Mónica Carballeira; Sabrina Martín; Miriam Mejías

    2016-01-01

      The aim of this study was to design and implement a positive intervention combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy to enhance subjective and psychological well-being and other positive functioning...

  5. Gametocyte carriage in uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria following treatment with artemisinin combination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdulla, Salim; Achan, Jane; Adam, Ishag

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gametocytes are responsible for transmission of malaria from human to mosquito. Artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) reduces post-treatment gametocyte carriage, dependent upon host, parasite and pharmacodynamic factors. The gametocytocidal properties of antimalarial drugs are importa...

  6. Adjuvant combined ozone therapy for extensive wound over tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasham Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Disinfectant and antibacterial properties of ozone are utilized in the treatment of nonhealing or ischemic wounds. We present here a case of 59 years old woman with compartment syndrome following surgical treatment of stress fracture of proximal tibia with extensively infected wound and exposed tibia to about 4/5 of its extent. The knee joint was also infected with active pus draining from a medial wound. At presentation the patient had already taken treatment for 15 days in the form of repeated wound debridements and parenteral antibiotics, which failed to heal the wound and she was advised amputation. Topical ozone therapy twice daily and ozone autohemotherapy once daily were given to the patient along with daily dressings and parenteral antibiotics. Within 5 days, the wound was healthy enough for spilt thickness skin graft to provide biological dressing to the exposed tibia bone. Topical ozone therapy was continued for further 5 days till the knee wound healed. On the 15th day, implant removal, intramedullary nailing, and latissimus dorsi pedicle flap were performed. Both the bone and the soft tissue healed without further complications and at 20 months follow-up, the patient was walking independently with minimal disability.

  7. Adjuvant combined ozone therapy for extensive wound over tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Prasham; Shyam, Ashok K; Shah, Sambhav

    2011-07-01

    Disinfectant and antibacterial properties of ozone are utilized in the treatment of nonhealing or ischemic wounds. We present here a case of 59 years old woman with compartment syndrome following surgical treatment of stress fracture of proximal tibia with extensively infected wound and exposed tibia to about 4/5 of its extent. The knee joint was also infected with active pus draining from a medial wound. At presentation the patient had already taken treatment for 15 days in the form of repeated wound debridements and parenteral antibiotics, which failed to heal the wound and she was advised amputation. Topical ozone therapy twice daily and ozone autohemotherapy once daily were given to the patient along with daily dressings and parenteral antibiotics. Within 5 days, the wound was healthy enough for spilt thickness skin graft to provide biological dressing to the exposed tibia bone. Topical ozone therapy was continued for further 5 days till the knee wound healed. On the 15(th) day, implant removal, intramedullary nailing, and latissimus dorsi pedicle flap were performed. Both the bone and the soft tissue healed without further complications and at 20 months follow-up, the patient was walking independently with minimal disability.

  8. Gene Therapy for RAG-deficient Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Pike (Karin)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractSevere combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a rare class of primary, inherited, immunodeficiency causing infants to suffer from persistent diarrhea, opportunistic infections and a failure to thrive. RAG proteins play a crucial role in the initiation of V(D)J recombination of

  9. Immunological therapy in urological malignancy: novel combination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, David S; Pouliot, Frederic; Chin, Arnold I; Shuch, Brian; Pantuck, Alan J; Belldegrun, Arie S; Dekernion, Jean B

    2011-02-01

    At present, immunotherapy in urological malignancy is experiencing a renaissance, particularly with the emergence of a host of innovative cancer vaccines. Herein, we will review promising immunotherapeutic approaches and evaluate the data supporting their inclusion in novel combination strategies. © 2010 The Japanese Urological Association.

  10. KRAS Mutation Status and Clinical Outcome of Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 2 Phase II Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Young; Shim, Eun Kyung [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Hyun Yang [Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Ji Yeon [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yong Sang [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Won [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jee Hyun [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seock-Ah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyung Hae [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hee Jin, E-mail: heejincmd@yahoo.com [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab-containing chemotherapy is known to be effective for KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer; however, it is not clear whether cetuximab-based preoperative chemoradiation confers an additional benefit compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status with direct sequencing and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression status with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples of 82 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were enrolled in the IRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine; n=44) or the ERBIRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine plus cetuximab; n=38). Both trials were similarly designed except for the administration of cetuximab; radiation therapy was administered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions and irinotecan and capecitabine were given at doses of 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly and 1650 mg/m{sup 2}/day, respectively, for 5 days per week. In the ERBIRIX trial, cetuximab was additionally given with a loading dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} on 1 week before radiation, and 250 mg/m{sup 2} weekly thereafter. Results: Baseline characteristics before chemoradiation were similar between the 2 trial cohorts. A KRAS mutation in codon 12, 13, and 61 was noted in 15 (34%) patients in the IRIX cohort and 5 (13%) in the ERBIRIX cohort (P=.028). Among 62 KRAS wild-type cancer patients, major pathologic response rate, disease-free survival and pathologic stage did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. No mutations were detected in BRAF exon 11 and 15, PIK3CA exon 9 and 20, or EGFR exon 18-24 in any of the 82 patients, and PTEN and EGFR expression were not predictive of clinical outcome. Conclusions: In patients with KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer, the addition of cetuximab to the chemoradiation with

  11. Facilitating the use of COBRA combination therapy in early rheumatoid arthritis: a pilot implementation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyl, L.H.D. van; Plass, A.M.C.; Lems, W.F.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Kerstens, P.J.S.M.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Boers, M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: COBRA combination therapy is well known and has uncontested efficacy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is infrequently applied in Dutch clinical practice. Based on qualitative research on opinions of physicians and patients towards COBRA therapy, our study

  12. Combined spa-exercise therapy is effective in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tubergen, A.; Landewé, R.; van der Heijde, D.; Hidding, A.; Wolter, N.; Asscher, M.; Falkenbach, A.; Genth, E.; Thè, H. G.; van der Linden, S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of combined spa-exercise therapy in addition to standard treatment with drugs and weekly group physical therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 120 Dutch outpatients with AS were randomly allocated into 3 groups of 40 patients each. Group 1 (mean

  13. A Novel Combination of Thermal Ablation and Heat-Inducible Gene therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    intensity focused ultrasound ( HIFU ) has been developed as an emerging non-invasive strategy for cancer treatment by thermal ablation of tumor tissue. The...feasibility of synergistic combination of HIFU thermal ablation and HIFU -induced gene therapy is interpreted both in vitro and in vivo using cancer...distribution. This work opens up a new paradigm for synergistic combination of HIFU thermal ablation with heat-induced gene therapy to improve the overall

  14. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Combination with Conventional Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Junker, N.; Ellebaek, E.

    2010-01-01

    of proteins coupled to intrinsic properties of cancer cells. For example, proteins associated with drug resistance can be targeted, and form ideal target structures for use in combination with chemotherapy for killing of surviving drug resistant cancer cells. Proteins associated with the malignant phenotype...... can be targeted to specifically target cancer cells, but proteins targeted by immunotherapy may also simultaneously target cancer cells as well as suppressive cells in the tumor stroma....

  15. How should we sequence and combine novel therapies in CLL?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Matthew S

    2017-12-08

    With the recent approval of several effective and well-tolerated novel agents (NAs), including ibrutinib, idelalisib, venetoclax, and obinutuzumab, patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have more therapeutic options than ever before. The availability of these agents is both an important advance for patients but also a challenge for practicing hematologist/oncologists to learn how best to sequence NAs, both with respect to chemoimmunotherapy (CIT) and to other NAs. The sequencing of NAs in clinical practice should be guided both by an individual patient's prognostic markers, such as FISH and immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV)-mutation status, as well as the patient's medical comorbidities and goals of care. For older, frailer patients with lower-risk CLL prognostic markers, NA monotherapy may remain a mainstay of CLL treatment for years to come. For younger, fitter patients and those with higher-risk CLL, such as del(17p) or unmutated IGHV, combination approaches may prove to be more valuable than NA monotherapy. Trials are currently evaluating the efficacy of several such combination approaches, including NA plus anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, NA plus NA (with or without anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody), and NA plus CIT. Given the tremendous efficacy of the already approved NAs, as well as the promising data for next generation NAs, the development of well-tolerated, highly effective combination strategies with curative potential for patients with CLL has become a realistic goal. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  16. Combination therapy patterns and predictors of ADHD in commercially insured and Medicaid populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molife, Cliff; Bernauer, Mark J; Farr, Amanda M; Haynes, Virginia S; Kelsey, Doug

    2012-09-01

    Several stimulant and nonstimulant medications are used alone or in combination to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Little is known about the current prevalence and predictors of combination therapy. This analysis describes ADHD medication use focusing on combination versus monotherapy. Health insurance claims from the Truven Health MarketScan® Commercial Database and Multi-State Medicaid Database were analyzed for patients with an ADHD diagnosis (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes 314.0x). Patients included were aged ≥ 6 years as of January 2010, continuously enrolled from July 2009 through December 2010, and had a claim for an ADHD medication in 2010. Medication use was measured in treatment months during 2010. Baseline demographic and clinical predictors of combination therapy (> 1 ADHD medication class in the same month) involving atomoxetine, long-acting stimulants, and α2-adrenergic agonists were explored using logistic regression, with generalized estimating equations to account for within-patient correlation between months. Commercially insured patients with ADHD (N = 211 226) were primarily aged 6 to 17 years (58.4%) and male (61.5%). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with hyperactivity was present in 15.8% of these patients. Combination therapy was used in 10.3% of 1 125 119 treatment months. Short-acting stimulants and α2-adrenergic agonists had the highest combination use (45.3% and 54.0%, respectively). Patients with ADHD insured through Medicaid (N = 125 104) were primarily aged 6 to 17 years (94.4%) and male (69.5%). Hyperactivity was present in 39.7% of these patients. Combination therapy was used in 24.0% of 721 986 treatment months. Short-acting stimulants, α2-adrenergic agonists, and intermediate-acting stimulants had the highest combination use (70.0%, 63.8%, and 51.8%, respectively). In multivariate models for both data sources, female patients were less likely to use combination

  17. Molecular Imaging to Identify Tumor Recurrence following Chemoradiation in a Hostile Surgical Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga T. Okusanya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical biopsy of potential tumor recurrence is a common challenge facing oncologists, surgeons, and cancer patients. Imaging modalities have limited ability to accurately detect recurrent cancer in fields affected by previous surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. However, definitive tissue diagnosis is often needed to initiate treatment and to direct therapy. We sought to determine if a targeted fluorescent intraoperative molecular imaging technique could be applied in a clinical setting to assist a surgical biopsy in a “hostile” field. We describe the use of a folate-fluorescein conjugate to direct the biopsy of a suspected recurrent lung adenocarcinoma invading the mediastinum that had been previously treated with chemoradiation. We found that intraoperative imaging allowed the identification of small viable tumor deposits that were otherwise indistinguishable from scar and necrosis. Our operative observations were confirmed by histology, fluorescence microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate one possible application and clinical value of intraoperative molecular imaging.

  18. Newcastle disease virus, rituximab, and doxorubicin combination as anti-hematological malignancy therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shammari AM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Majeed Al-Shammari,1 Huda Rameez,2 Maha F Al-Taee2 1Department of Experimental Therapy, Iraqi Center for Cancer and Medical Genetic Research, Mustansiriyah University, 2Department of Biotechnology, College of Science, Baghdad University, Baghdad, IraqAbstract: Hematological malignancies are important diseases that need more powerful therapeutics. Even with current targeting therapies, such as rituximab and other chemotherapeutic agents, there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Combination therapy seems the best option to target the tumor cells by different mechanisms. Virotherapy is a very promising treatment modality, as it is selective, safe, and causes cancer destruction. The Iraqi strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV has proved to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. In the current work, we tested its ability on anti-hematological tumors and enhanced current treatments with combination therapy, and studied this combination using Chou–Talalay analysis. p53 concentration was measured to evaluate the mechanism of this proposed synergism. The results showed that NDV was synergistic with doxorubicin in low doses on plasmacytoma cells, with no involvement of p53 pathways, but involved p53 when the combination was used on non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. NDV in combination with rituximab showed enhanced cytotoxicity that was p53-independent. In conclusion, this work proposes a novel combination modality for treatment of some hematological malignancies.Keywords: oncolytic viruses, virotherapy, combination therapy

  19. Combination approaches with immune checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Swart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals, immune checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 and programmed death-1 (PD-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate anti-tumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune checkpoint blockade, aimed at increasing response-rates to the single treatments.

  20. Successful Therapy of Severe Pseudomembranous Clostridium difficile Colitis Using a Combination of Fecal Microbiota Therapy and Fidaxomicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, Peter C.; Haziri, Drilon; Helfritzsch, Harry; Hess, Thomas; Harsch, Igor A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to describe the use of a combination of fidaxomicin and fecal microbiota therapy (FMT) in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Clinical Presentation and Intervention A 78-year-old female, who was admitted for surgery due to acute diverticulitis caused by postoperative complications and broad antibiotic therapy, developed CDI-induced colitis. Despite the introduction of metronidazole and vancomycin therapy, her clinical condition continued to deteriorate. She was transferred to the intensive care unit where FMT followed by fidaxomicin were performed because her C-reactive protein and leucocyte levels remained elevated. Further clinical improvement and the resolution of colitis was observed. Conclusion In this case, severe CDI colitis was successfully treated with the combination of FMT and fidaxomicin. PMID:27978522

  1. Successful Therapy of Severe Pseudomembranous Clostridium difficile Colitis Using a Combination of Fecal Microbiota Therapy and Fidaxomicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, Peter C; Haziri, Drilon; Helfritzsch, Harry; Hess, Thomas; Harsch, Igor A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to describe the use of a combination of fidaxomicin and fecal microbiota therapy (FMT) in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). A 78-year-old female, who was admitted for surgery due to acute diverticulitis caused by postoperative complications and broad antibiotic therapy, developed CDI-induced colitis. Despite the introduction of metronidazole and vancomycin therapy, her clinical condition continued to deteriorate. She was transferred to the intensive care unit where FMT followed by fidaxomicin were performed because her C-reactive protein and leucocyte levels remained elevated. Further clinical improvement and the resolution of colitis was observed. In this case, severe CDI colitis was successfully treated with the combination of FMT and fidaxomicin. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Visually augmented targeted combination light therapy for acne vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Alireza; Lyons, Colin-William; Roberts, Niamh

    2017-10-31

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease. Pharmacological modalities for treatment are proven to be efficacious but have limitations. Light therapy for acne vulgaris has shown promise in previous studies. This case report and its accompanying images show how a novel approach of visually augmented high fluence light therapy has been used to good effect. A 26-year-old Caucasian woman with acne vulgaris resistant to treatment with topical therapy underwent three sessions of combination potassium titanyl phosphate laser (532 nm)/neodymium-doped: yttrium aluminum garnet laser (1064 nm) light therapy with visually augmented narrow spot size and high fluence. A 73% reduction in total inflammatory lesions was evident 6 months after the initial treatment. This case report illustrates that there may be utility in this novel approach of narrow spot size, magnification-assisted, high fluence targeted combination laser therapy for inflammatory acne.

  3. A phase I, dose-finding study of sorafenib in combination with gemcitabine and radiation therapy in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a Grupo Español Multidisciplinario en Cáncer Digestivo (GEMCAD study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Aparicio

    Full Text Available Sorafenib, an oral inhibitor of B-raf, VEGFR2, and PDGFR2-beta, acts against pancreatic cancer in preclinical models. Due to the radio-sensitization activity of both sorafenib and gemcitabine, we designed a multicenter, phase I trial to evaluate the safety profile and the recommended dose of this combination used with concomitant radiation therapy.Patients with biopsy-proven, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma (based on vascular invasion detected by computed tomography were treated with gemcitabine (300 mg/m2 i.v. weekly ×5 weeks concurrently with radiation therapy (45 Gy in 25 fractions and sorafenib (escalated doses in a 3+3 design, from 200 to 800 mg/day. Radiation portals included the primary tumor but not the regional lymph nodes. Patients with planning target volumes (PTV over 500 cc were excluded. Cases not progressing during chemoradiation were allowed to continue with sorafenib until disease progression.Twelve patients were included. Three patients received 200 mg/day, 6 received 400 mg/day, and 3 received 800 mg/day; PTVs ranged from 105 to 500 cc. No dose-limiting toxicities occurred. The most common grade 2 toxicities were fatigue, neutropenia, nausea, and raised serum transaminases. Treatment was discontinued in one patient because of a reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy. There were no treatment-related deaths.The addition of sorafenib to concurrent gemcitabine and radiation therapy showed a favorable safety profile in unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A dose of 800 mg/day is recommended for phase II evaluation.EudraCT 2007-003211-31 ClinicalTrials.gov 00789763.

  4. Value of gadofosveset-enhanced MRI and multiplanar reformatting for selecting good responders after chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijnen, Luc A.; Martens, Milou H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, PO Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maas, Monique; Lahaye, Max J.; Lalji, Ulrich; Lambregts, Doenja M.J. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Riedl, Robert G. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, PO Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, PO Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Our primary objective was to evaluate diagnostic performance of gadofosveset T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T1W MRI) for discriminating between ypT0-2 and ypT3-4 tumours after chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer compared with T2W MRI for a general and expert reader. Second objectives included assessing the value of multiplanar reformatting (MPR) and interobserver agreement. A general and expert reader evaluated 49 patients for likelihood of ypT0-2 tumour after CRT on T2W, gadofosveset T1W MRI, and gadofosveset T1W MRI + T2W MRI. The general reader scored with and without MPR. Confidence level scores were used to construct receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Area under the curve (AUC) values and diagnostic parameters were calculated and compared. Gadofosveset T1W MRI + T2W MRI showed slightly superior sensitivity than T2W MRI for the general but not the expert reader. Specificity was higher for the expert on gadofosveset T1W MRI only compared with T2W MRI only (100 % vs. 82 %). MPR did not increase diagnostic performance. Interobserver agreement was highest for the combination of gadofosveset-enhanced T1W imaging plus T2W MRI. The sole use or addition of gadofosveset-enhanced T1W MRI to T2W MRI did not increase significantly diagnostic performance for assessing ypT0-2 tumours. Adding gadofosveset-enhanced T1W MRI slightly increased sensitivity for the general reader and specificity for the expert reader, but this increase was not significant for more accurate clinical decision making. MPR did not improve diagnostic performance. (orig.)

  5. Oxidative stress in malaria and artemisinin combination therapy: Pros and Cons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavishe, R.A.; Koenderink, J.B.; Alifrangis, M.

    2017-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been adopted as a strategy to mitigate multidrug resistance to antimalarial monotherapies. ACT combines the rapid and effective but rather short plasma half-life antimalarial action of an artemisinin derivative with a longer acting partner drug.

  6. [Current optimization of combined therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, E N

    2015-01-01

    Testing the new combined bronchodilator Anoro Ellipta in different clinical trials gives to its high clinical efficacy and safety in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The drug contains the molecules of sustained-release selective β2-adrenergic receptor agonist (vilanterol) and a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist (umeclidinium bromide). The bronchodilating mechanisms of umeclidinium bromide are in the competitive inhibition of the binding of acetylcholine with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of airway smooth muscles whereas in those of vilanterol are in that with the stimulation of intracellular adenylate cyclase. On days 1 and 24 after inhalation of the first dose of vilanterol and umeclidinium bromide, there was a significant increase in the forced expiratory volume in one second as compared to placebo. No clinical effects on QT interval on an electrocardiogram and cardiac rhythm were found. The benefits of an inhalation device (Ellipta) are its innovation design ensuring the effective delivery of an aerosol dose into the airway, convenience, and simplicity.

  7. Combined Immune Therapy for the Treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Faleiro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic disease caused by infections, cancer or autoimmunity can result in profound immune suppression. Immunoregulatory networks are established to prevent tissue damage caused by inflammation. Although these immune checkpoints preserve tissue function, they allow pathogens and tumors to persist, and even expand. Immune checkpoint blockade has recently been successfully employed to treat cancer. This strategy modulates immunoregulatory mechanisms to allow host immune cells to kill or control tumors. However, the utility of this approach for controlling established infections has not been extensively investigated. Here, we examined the potential of modulating glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor-related protein (GITR on T cells to improve anti-parasitic immunity in blood and spleen tissue from visceral leishmaniasis (VL patients infected with Leishmania donovani. We found little effect on parasite growth or parasite-specific IFNγ production. However, this treatment reversed the improved anti-parasitic immunity achieved by IL-10 signaling blockade. Further investigations using an experimental VL model caused by infection of C57BL/6 mice with L. donovani revealed that this negative effect was prominent in the liver, dependent on parasite burden and associated with an accumulation of Th1 cells expressing high levels of KLRG-1. Nevertheless, combined anti-IL-10 and anti-GITR mAb treatment could improve anti-parasitic immunity when used with sub-optimal doses of anti-parasitic drug. However, additional studies with VL patient samples indicated that targeting GITR had no overall benefit over IL-10 signaling blockade alone at improving anti-parasitic immune responses, even with drug treatment cover. These findings identify several important factors that influence the effectiveness of immune modulation, including parasite burden, target tissue and the use of anti-parasitic drug. Critically, these results also highlight potential negative effects of

  8. Ultrasound elastography in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, S R; Vagn-Hansen, C; Sørensen, T

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current literature has described several predictive markers in rectal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation, but so far none of them have been validated for clinical use. The purpose of the present study was to compare quantitative elastography based on ultrasound measurements...... in the course of chemoradiation with tumor response based on T stage classification and the Mandard tumor regression grading (TRG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 31 patients with rectal cancer planned for high dose radiochemotherapy. The tumor and the mesorectal fat elasticity were measured...... using the Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse to generate information on the mechanical properties of the tissue. The objective quantitative elastography shear wave velocity was compared to the T stage classification and TRG. RESULTS: The baseline mean tumor elasticity was 3.13m/s. Two and six weeks after...

  9. Combination Therapy With and Without Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Faurschou, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    the effects of combination DMARD therapies with and without biologic agents as therapy for patients with RA. METHODS: Eight randomized controlled trials published in 10 articles were selected from a systematic literature search of 1,674 identified studies and integrated in a meta-analysis. These trials...... compared combinations of DMARDs versus a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor plus methotrexate. Two reviewers independently entered data into standardized extraction forms. The combined effect measures were compared by means of the inverse variance method (continuous data) and the Mantel-Haenszel method...

  10. FIRST EXPERIENCE OF CYMEVEN IN THE COMBINED THERAPY OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R M Balabanova

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ummary Objective. To reveal J'reguency of accompaning virus infection and possibility to use antivirus therapy together in therapy RA. Material. 40 patients with RA at the age of 17-45 were studied. The duration of disease was not more than 6 months; patients had 2-3 degrees of activity. Every one had a positive rheumatoid factor. Results. 78,2% of the examined patients connected the beginning of the illness with virus infection they have had. The most difficalt variant of RA course and uneffectiveness of basic therapy were registerd among the patients with combination HSV and CMV infection. Inclusion of Cymevene in complex therapy RA has exerted positive influence on clinical-laboratory, signs stregthened effect of basic therapy. Conclusion. The most difficult variant of RA course was registered among the patients with virus infection. Inclusion of antivirus drugs had a positive influence on effectiveness of basic therapy.

  11. Dosage dependent hormonal counter regulation to combination therapy in patients with left ventricular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galløe, A.M.; Skagen, K.; Christensen, Niels Juel

    2006-01-01

    The present study attempts to assess the efficacy combination therapy for heart failure. Genuine dose-response studies on combination therapy are not available and published studies involved adding one drug on top of 'usual treatment'. Sixteen different dosage combinations of trandolapril...... with the maximal effect at 0.5 mg daily. Both drugs significantly increased renin concentration with a significant potentiating interaction. It was not possible to detect beneficial effects of combination therapies. The optimal dosage of Bumetanide appeared to be 0.5 mg twice daily based on its effect on quality...... of life and weight loss. Estimated by the reduction in systolic blood pressure the optimal dosage of Trandolapril appeared to be 0.5 mg once daily. CONCLUSIONS: It appears that patients should be given less than the usually recommended dosages. Patients may be treated with a low dose loop diuretic...

  12. Combination therapy with the type II anti-CD20 antibody obinutuzumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Bacac, Marina; Umana, Pablo; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter

    2017-10-01

    Obinutuzumab is a novel humanized type II glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibody approved for first-line treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in combination with chlorambucil and for treatment of rituximab-refractory follicular lymphoma (FL). Areas covered: We describe current preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the combination of obinutuzumab with not only chemotherapy but also novel targeted therapies for B-cell hematologic malignancies, and its application in chemoimmunotherapy. We also provide an overview of the current clinical trial landscape investigating novel combination therapies based on obinutuzumab. Expert opinion: Within the next 10 years the treatment of B-cell malignancies with obinutuzumab is expected to increasingly move towards chemotherapy-free regimens. Novel combinations of obinutuzumab will be explored with targeted therapies, antibody-drug conjugates, and/or other immunotherapeutic agents, with the aim to achieve clinically meaningful improvements in efficacy and patient safety.

  13. PET/CT Response Criteria (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) Predict Survival Better Than Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Won Jun; Nam, Eun Ji

    2016-09-01

    To investigate whether the ratio of SUVs measured with F-FDG PET/CT between pretreatment and posttreatment has prognostic value in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy. Cases of locally advanced cervical cancer (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1 to IVA) treated with a nonsurgical curative modality (172 cases including chemoradiation or radiation therapy) were reviewed. F-FDG PET/CT parameters, including SUVmax and SUVmean, were evaluated by F-FDG PET/CT performed prior to treatment and 6 weeks after the end of treatment. Metabolic response was evaluated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines and was compared with radiologic response measured according to the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumours (RECIST). In total, 142 patients receiving chemoradiation showed radiologic responses (median 56% decrease in maximal diameter), whereas 160 and 146 patients showed metabolic responses measured with SUVmax and SUVmean, respectively (73% decrease in SUVmax; 48% decrease in SUVmean). Radiologic response and metabolic response were significantly correlated for SUVmax and SUVmean (P = 0.0009; P = 0.0457, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed significant differences in overall survival and progression-free survival between the responder and nonresponder groups, based on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria (both P PET/CT parameters are good prognostic markers for the response of cervical cancer patients to concurrent chemoradiation therapy, as compared with the RECIST criteria.

  14. Improvement of cancer immunotherapy by combining molecular targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka eKawakami

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In human cancer cells, a constitutive activation of MAPK, STAT3, β-catenin, and various other signaling pathways triggers multiple immunosuppressive cascades. These cascades result in the production of immunosuppressive molecules (e.g. TGF-β, IL-10, IL-6, VEGF, and CCL2 and induction of immunosuppressive immune cells (e.g. regulatory T cells, tolerogenic dendritic cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells. Consequently, immunosuppressive conditions are formed in tumor-associated microenvironments, including the tumor and sentinel lymph nodes. Some of these cancer-derived cytokines and chemokines impair immune cells and render them immunosuppressive via the activation of signaling molecules, such as STAT3, in the immune cells. Thus, administration of signal inhibitors may inhibit the multiple immunosuppressive cascades by acting simultaneously on both cancer and immune cells at the key regulatory points in the cancer-immune network. Since common signaling pathways are involved in manifestation of several hallmarks of cancer, including cancer cell proliferation/survival, invasion/metastasis, and immunosuppression, targeting these shared signaling pathways in combination with immunotherapy may be a promising strategy for cancer treatment.

  15. Phase II study of bevacizumab and temsirolimus combination therapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik; Sorensen, Morten; Gaziel, Tine Bernhardtsen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy has recently shown promising efficacy in recurrent high-grade glioma. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients causes abnormally high activity of the pathways of Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K....../10), infection (1/10), hypertension (1/10), and hyperglycemia (1/10). CONCLUSION: Temsirolimus can be safely administered in combination with bevacizumab. This study failed to detect activity of such a combination in patients with progressive GBM beyond bevacizumab therapy....

  16. [One year adherence of ramipril versus ramipril/amlodipine fixed dose combination therapy in hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyi, Gábor; Ferenci, Tamás

    2017-10-01

    In the treatment of hypertension avoiding adverse cardiovascular complications to achieve target blood pressure is essential. The appropriate drug selection, and if necessary to change to combination therapy, patients adherence is important which may help fixed dose combination. The aim of the authors was to investigate the one year adherence of the ramipril and ramipril/amlodipine fixed dose combination in hypertensive patients. Prescriptions database of the National Health Insurance Fund in Hungary on pharmacy-claims was analysed between October 1, 2012 and September 30, 2013. The authors identified patients who filled prescriptions for ramipril monotherapy and fixed dose combinations of ramipril/amlodipine prescribed for the first time in hypertensive patients who have not received similar drugs in the previous year. To model the adherence, the apparatus of survival analysis was used, where "survival" was the time to abandon the medication. As it was available to month precision, discrete time survival analysis was applied: a generalized linear model was estimated with complementary log-log link function with the kind of drug being the only explanatory variable. 92,546 patients met the inclusion criteria. During the trial period, ramipril therapy or ramipril/amlodipine fixed dose combination was started in 82,251 and 10,295 patients, respectively. One year persistence rate in patients with ramipril was 30% and 54% in patients with ramipril/amlodipine fixed dose combination therapy. Considering only the 360-day study period, the mean duration of persistence was 189.9 days in patients on ramipril and 270.6 days on ramipril/amlodipine fixed dose combination therapy. The hazard of discontinuation was more than twofold higher during treatment with ramipril compared with the use of the ramipril/amlodipine fixed dose combination therapy (HR = 2.11 [95% CI: 2.05-2.17], p<0,001). There is a significant difference between the one year persistence of ramipril and ramipril

  17. Nanostructured lipid carriers of artemether-lumefantrine combination for intravenous therapy of cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Priyanka; Suryavanshi, Shital; Pathak, Sulabha; Patra, Aditya; Sharma, Shobhona; Patravale, Vandana

    2016-11-20

    Patients with cerebral malaria (CM) are unable to take oral medication due to impaired consciousness and vomiting thus necessitating parenteral therapy. Quinine, artemether, and artesunate which are currently used for parenteral malaria therapy have their own drawbacks. The World Health Organization (WHO) has now banned monotherapy and recommends artemisinin-based combination therapy for malaria treatment. However, presently there is no intravenous formulation available for combination therapy of malaria. Artemether-Lumefantrine (ARM-LFN) is a WHO approved combination for oral malaria therapy. However, the low aqueous solubility of ARM and LFN hinders their intravenous delivery. The objective of this study was to formulate ARM-LFN nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) for intravenous therapy of CM. ARM-LFN NLC were prepared by microemulsion template technique and characterized for size, drug content, entrapment efficiency, drug release, crystallinity, morphology, amenability to autoclaving, compatibility with infusion fluids, stability, antimalarial efficacy in mice, and toxicity in rats. The ARM-LFN NLC showed sustained drug release, amenability to autoclaving, compatibility with infusion fluids, good stability, complete parasite clearance and reversal of CM symptoms with 100% survival in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice, and safety in rats. The biocompatible ARM-LFN NLC fabricated by an industrially feasible technique offer a promising solution for intravenous therapy of CM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Recent Advances in Upconversion Nanoparticles-Based Multifunctional Nanocomposites for Combined Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Gan; Zhang, Xiao; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-12-16

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have the ability to generate ultraviolet or visible emissions under continuous-wave near-infrared (NIR) excitation. Utilizing this special luminescence property, UCNPs are approved as a new generation of contrast agents in optical imaging with deep tissue-penetration ability and high signal-to-noise ratio. The integration of UCNPs with other functional moieties can endow them with highly enriched functionalities for imaging-guided cancer therapy, which makes composites based on UCNPs emerge as a new class of theranostic agents in biomedicine. Here, recent progress in combined cancer therapy using functional nanocomposites based on UCNPs is reviewed. Combined therapy referring to the co-delivery of two or more therapeutic agents or a combination of different treatments is becoming more popular in clinical treatment of cancer because it generates synergistic anti-cancer effects, reduces individual drug-related toxicity and suppresses multi-drug resistance through different mechanisms of action. Here, the recent advances of combined therapy contributed by UCNPs-based nanocomposites on two main branches are reviewed: i) photodynamic therapy and ii) chemotherapy, which are the two most widely adopted therapies of UCNPs-based composites. The future prospects and challenges in this emerging field will be also discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Effectiveness of standardized combination therapy for migraine treatment in the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Stephanie; Bulloch, Blake; Young, Christine; Yonker, Marcy; Hostetler, Mark

    2013-03-01

    To compare outcomes of pediatric migraine patients treated in an emergency department (ED) before and after implementation of a standardized combination intravenous therapy regimen aimed toward improving and standardizing abortive migraine therapy. In a pediatric ED, migraines represent 8-18% of all headache visits. Despite this large number, no standard treatment for acute migraine therapy currently exists. The study utilized a retrospective chart review of patients seeking acute migraine treatment at a tertiary care, pediatric ED from August 2006 to March 2010. Inclusion criteria were pediatric migraine patients as defined by International Headache Society guidelines. The comparison population received various migraine therapies based on attending practice preference. After October 2008, patients received standardized intravenous combination therapy involving a normal saline fluid bolus, ketorolac, prochlorperazine, and diphenhydramine. Occasionally, metoclopramide was substituted during prochlorperazine shortages. Reduction in headache pain score was the primary outcome. Secondary outcome measures included length of ED stay, hospital admission rate, and ED readmission rate within 48 hours. The study yielded 87 patients who received standardized combination therapy and 165 comparison patients. No significant difference in patient characteristics existed when evaluating patient demographics, outpatient medication use, and initial headache pain score. When compared with the non-standardized therapy population, the combination therapy patients revealed significant reductions in pain score (decrease of 5.3 vs. 6.9, difference -1.6, 95% confidence interval -2.2 to -0.8, P pediatric migraine therapy in the ED by significantly reducing headache pain scores, length of ED stay, and hospital admission rates. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  20. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, Friederike; Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  1. Combined Antirelapse Therapy in Patients with Schizoaffective Disorder: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna R. Gardanova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In most studies, patients with schizoaffective disorder (SAD are often combined into one group along with schizophrenia patients or less commonly with those suffering from affective disorders, which makes it difficult to obtain data about the peculiarities of SAD treatment. Articles dedicated to SAD treatment in the interictal period are rare. Methods and Results: The prospective cohort study was conducted from 2011 to 2015. The study involved 86 patients diagnosed with SAD according to ICD-10. Patients received neuroleptics (NLs as antirelapse therapy for 2 years (NL therapy; then mood stabilizers (MSs were added to the antirelapse treatment (NL+MS therapy. The results of this combined therapy with MSs were evaluated after 2 years of treatment. Our results suggest that the use of combination therapy that includes antipsychotics and MSs leads to maintenance of a higher quality remission. Remission becomes more prolonged and affective swings less pronounced, resulting in improved quality of life in SAD patients. Improving the quality of remission can be attributed to the following characteristics of the combined therapy: a the use of lower doses of neuroleptics; b a reduction in the frequency and severity of mood swings; and c an increase in patient compliance. Conclusion: The use of combined pharmacotherapy including antipsychotics and MSs produces a longer, high-quality remission. The inclusion of MSs in the scheme of treatment increases the patient adherence to a medication regimen. The use of MSs in combination therapy reduces affective fluctuations, thereby increasing the probability of maintaining remission with complete symptom relief.

  2. Fixed-dose combination for adults accessing antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA HIV Clinicians Society

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This document serves to guide clinicians and programme managers on how to switch from 3 separate antiretroviral (ARV drugs to the new, single, fixed-dose combination (FDC tablet containing tenofovir (TDF, emtricitabine (FTC and efavirenz (EFV. Summary Transitioning from individual drugs to an FDC tablet needs to be managed carefully, particularly regarding stock management, ordering processes, supply-chain integrity and comprehensive patient counselling. Priority groups • Initially, FDC supply will be insufficient to provide for all FDC-suitable patients • Therefore, the National Department of Health (NDoH has recommended that the following patient groups be prioritized for FDC initiation/switch: • Priority group 1: All HIV-positive patients newly initiating ART – adults, adolescents and pregnant women (regardless of CD4 count (amendment to the guidelines for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT anticipated in April 2013 – and who do not have contra-indications to the FDC component drugs • Priority group 2: HIV-positive pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers currently stable on lamivudine (3TC, TDF and EFV • Priority group 3: Virologically suppressed patients on a stavudine (d4T-based regimen and who have normal renal function • Priority group 4: Stable patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who have tuberculosis (TB co-infection • Priority group 5: Stable patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who have other co-morbidites (e.g. hypertension, diabetes • Priority group 6: Patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who request to switch to the FDC treatment • Priority group 7: Patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who, after counselling, agree to switch to the FDC treatment. Important: Clinic staff must co-ordinate this process and only switch as many patients to the FDC tablet as stock allows. This should avoid patients being switched back and forth

  3. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy and DMARD therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients reduces inflammatory gene expression in whole blood compared to DMARD therapy alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl K Edwards

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodic assessment of gene expression for diagnosis and monitoring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA may provide a readily available and useful method to detect subclinical disease progression and follow responses to therapy with disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs or anti-TNF-α therapy. We used quantitative real-time PCR to compare peripheral blood gene expression profiles in active ("unstable" RA patients on DMARDs, stable RA patients on DMARDs, and stable RA patients treated with a combination of a DMARD and an anti-TNF-α agent (infliximab or etanercept to healthy human controls. The expression of 48 inflammatory genes were compared between healthy controls (N=122, unstable DMARD patients (N=18, stable DMARD patients (N=26, and stable patients on combination therapy (N=20. Expression of 13 genes was very low or undetectable in all study groups. Compared to healthy controls, patients with unstable RA on DMARDs exhibited increased expression of 25 genes, stable DMARD patients exhibited increased expression of 14 genes and decreased expression of five genes, and combined therapy patients exhibited increased expression of six genes and decreased expression of 10 genes. These findings demonstrate that active RA is associated with increased expression of circulating inflammatory markers whereas increases in inflammatory gene expression are diminished in patients with stable disease on either DMARD or anti-TNF-α therapy. Furthermore, combination DMARD and anti-TNF-α therapy is associated with greater reductions in circulating inflammatory gene expression compared to DMARD therapy alone. These results suggest that assessment of peripheral blood gene expression may prove useful to monitor disease progression and response to therapy.

  4. The impact of timolol maleate on the ocular tolerability of fixed-combination glaucoma therapies

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    Radcliffe NM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nathan M Radcliffe Ophthalmology, New York University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Glaucomatous optic atrophy is the second most common cause of blindness worldwide, and lowering intraocular pressure (IOP is the only proven method to slow or stop the progression of the disease. Approximately 40% of patients with elevated IOP will require more than one medication to obtain a modest 20% reduction in IOP, and as a result, some patients may require two medications, provided in either two separate bottles or in one bottle with the use of fixed-combination therapies. Each therapy has its own unique safety and efficacy profile. Topical beta-blockers have a particularly favorable ocular-tolerability profile, and several studies of fixed-combination medications containing the beta-blocker timolol maleate have shown a lower prevalence of some ocular adverse events for the fixed-combination therapy compared to the non-beta-blocker individual component. In this review, we examined clinical data pertaining to the ocular surface tolerability of fixed-combination medications containing timolol maleate in comparison to the individual components. In particular, preference was given to prospective, randomized, multicenter trials of 3 months in duration or longer that compared a fixed-combination therapy to monotherapy with the individual components. A review of the literature revealed that some fixed-combination therapies can provide a reduced risk of common side effects compared to their individual components, with conjunctival hyperemia and ocular allergy being less frequent in some timolol-containing fixed-combination therapies. This effect appears to be most significant for latanoprost 0.005%, bimatoprost 0.03%, and brimonidine 0.2%. Keywords: bimatoprost, brimonidine, hyperemia, latanoprost, ocular allergy

  5. COMBINATION THERAPY OF HYPERTENSION — A RELIABLE WAY TO TARGET ACHIEVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lukina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data of evidence-based cardiology and clinical guidelines that define the position of combined therapy to achieve the targets of hypertension (HT treatment (achievement and maintenance of the target blood pressure (BP level, protection of the target organs, improvement of the quality of life in hypertensive patients are presented in the article. The advantages of rational combined therapies (potentiation of antihypertensive effect, reduction of a number of adverse events are considered. Studies of therapeutic efficacy and safety of combined antihypertensive therapy based on generics are important. The advantages of combined therapy in achievement of target BP levels are presented on example of comparative study of new generic and original amlodipine in patients with HT of 1-2 degrees. Target BP level was reached respectively in 90% and 97% of patients with HT in groups of generic and original amlodipine combined with generic lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide. Safety profile was acceptable. This confirms the high efficacy of amlodipine + lisinopril + hydrochlorothiazide combination, including one on the basis of generics.

  6. [Effect of cyclosporine and simulect mono and combination therapy on cardiac allo-transplantation in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hai-Bo; Xia, Sui-Sheng; Huang, Zu-Fal; Ye, Qi-Fa; Wen, Hao

    2005-10-01

    To observe the effect of cyclosporine and simulect mono or combination therapy on cardiac allo-transplantation in rats. Recipients with allografts were treated with different doses of cyclosporine and/or simulect after cardiac allo-transplantation. Graft survival time was observed; the histopathological examination of graft tissues was performed; and levels of serum IL-2 and IL-4 were determined. Mono or combination therapy with cyclosporine and/or simulect increased the survival of cardiac allografts. With the prolongation of survival time of the grafts, the rejection of grafts was moderated. The serum IL-2 level increased in acute rejected grafts; the serum IL-4 level increased evidently in long survival grafts. Cyclosporine and simulect have an effect in the prolongation of cardiac allograft survival in rats, and the combination therapy shows an evident synergistic effect.

  7. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Xiao Lianchun [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1-56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic treatment

  8. HIV-1 CCR5 gene therapy will fail unless it is combined with a suicide gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-12-17

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has successfully turned Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from a deadly pathogen into a manageable chronic infection. ART is a lifelong therapy which is both expensive and toxic, and HIV can become resistant to it. An alternative to lifelong ART is gene therapy that targets the CCR5 co-receptor and creates a population of genetically modified host cells that are less susceptible to viral infection. With generic mathematical models we show that gene therapy that only targets the CCR5 co-receptor fails to suppress HIV-1 (which is in agreement with current data). We predict that the same gene therapy can be markedly improved if it is combined with a suicide gene that is only expressed upon HIV-1 infection.

  9. The Potential for Cellular Therapy Combined with Growth Factors in Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Rosner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Any traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI may cause symptoms ranging from pain to complete loss of motor and sensory functions below the level of the injury. Currently, there are over 2 million SCI patients worldwide. The cost of their necessary continuing care creates a burden for the patient, their families, and society. Presently, few SCI treatments are available and none have facilitated neural regeneration and/or significant functional improvement. Research is being conducted in the following areas: pathophysiology, cellular therapies (Schwann cells, embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, growth factors (BDNF, inhibitory molecules (NG2, myelin protein, and combination therapies (cell grafts and neurotrophins, cotransplantation. Results are often limited because of the inhibitory environment created following the injury and the limited regenerative potential of the central nervous system. Therapies that show promise in small animal models may not transfer to nonhuman primates and humans. None of the research has resulted in remarkable improvement, but many areas show promise. Studies have suggested that a combination of therapies may enhance results and may be more effective than a single therapy. This paper reviews and discusses the most promising new SCI research including combination therapies.

  10. Combination therapy of fexofenadine and montelukast is effective in prurigo nodularis and pemphigoid nodularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Takako; Ohata, Chika; Koga, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Bungo; Hamada, Takahiro; Nakama, Takekuni; Furumura, Minao; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report on the efficacy of combination therapy of second-generation antihistamine antagonist, fexofenadine hydrochloride, and leukotriene receptor inhibitor, montelukast sodium, for the treatment of 15 prurigo nodularis or pemphigoid nodularis patients, in whom conventional therapy was ineffective. All patients received 10 mg montelukast once a day and 240 mg fexofenadine twice a day for 4 weeks in addition to other medications they had been taking. We assessed the manifestations of the lesions and itching intensity before and after the therapy, and we evaluated each patient as (i) markedly improved, (ii) improved, (iii) slightly improved, (iv) no change, (v) worse. Two patients (13.3%) were evaluated as markedly improved, and the lesions of one patient completely disappeared. Three patients (20.0%) were evaluated as improved, and six patients (40.0%) as slightly improved. Thus, 11 of 15 cases (73.3%) improved by combination therapy of fexofenadine and montelukast, in which nine cases (75.0%) of prurigo nodularis and two cases (66.7%) of pemphigoid nodularis were involved. No patients revealed any side effects. This study revealed that combination therapy of fexofenadine and montelukast was effective for some patients with conventional therapy-resistant prurigo nodularis and pemphigoid nodularis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Targeting the NF-κB Pathway as a Combination Therapy for Advanced Thyroid Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Pozdeyev

    Full Text Available NF-κB signaling plays an important role in tumor cell proliferation, cell survival, angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis and drug/radiation resistance. Combination therapy involving NF-κB pathway inhibition is an attractive strategy for the treatment of advanced forms of thyroid cancer. This study was designed to test the efficacy of NF-κB pathway inhibition in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy, using docetaxel and ionizing radiation in in vitro models of thyroid cancer. We found that while both docetaxel and ionizing radiation activated NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer cells, there was no synergistic effect on cell proliferation and/or programmed cell death with either genetic (transduction of a dominant negative mutant form of IκBα or pharmacologic (proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and IKKβ inhibitor GO-Y030 inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in thyroid cancer cell lines BCPAP, 8505C, THJ16T and SW1736. Docetaxel plus bortezomib synergistically decreased in vitro invasion of 8505C cells, but not in the other cell lines. Screening of a panel of clinically relevant targeted therapies for synergy with genetic NF-κB inhibition in a proliferation/cytotoxicity assay identified the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA as a potential candidate. However, the synergistic effect was confirmed only in the BCPAP cells. These results indicate that NF-κB inhibitors are unlikely to be beneficial as combination therapy with taxane cytotoxic chemotherapy, external radiation therapy or radioiodine therapy. There may be unique circumstances where NF-κB inhibitors may be considered in combination with docetaxel to reduce tumor invasion or in combination with HDAC inhibitors to reduce tumor growth, but this does not appear to be a combination therapy that could be broadly applied to patients with advanced thyroid cancer. Further research may identify which subsets of patients/tumors may respond to this therapeutic

  12. Effects of combination therapy with captopril and nifedipine in severe or resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, W B; Viadero, J J; Lane, T J; Podesla, S

    1986-01-01

    To assess the effect of potent vasodilator therapy in patients with severe or resistant hypertension, 10 patients underwent therapy with captopril and nifedipine alone and in combination. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate, and blood chemistry values were monitored for 4 weeks during captopril monotherapy and after 8 weeks during combination therapy with captopril and nifedipine. Compared with baseline, the BP decreased during captopril monotherapy (180 +/- 11/98 +/- 7 vs. 209 +/- 16/118 +/- 12 mm Hg; P less than 0.005). After the addition of nifedipine, the BP was further reduced (148 +/- 23/85 +/- 16 mm Hg), but there was no change in heart rate. In three patients not achieving the diastolic BP goal during combination therapy with dosing every 8 hours, automatic 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring demonstrated lack of antihypertensive control for only the last 2 to 3 hours of the dosing interval. These data demonstrate that combination therapy with captopril and nifedipine is effective in patients with severe hypertension, but frequent dosing intervals are necessary for adequate antihypertensive control.

  13. Combining kangaroo care and live harp music therapy in the neonatal intensive care unit setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlez, Ayelet; Litmanovitz, Ita; Bauer, Sofia; Dolfin, Tzipora; Regev, Rivka; Arnon, Shmuel

    2011-06-01

    Music therapy has been recommended as an adjuvant therapy for both preterm infants and mothers during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and has been shown to have beneficial effects. To study the usefulness of combining live harp music therapy and kangaroo care (KC) on short-term physiological and behavioral parameters of preterm infants and their mothers in the NICU setting. Included in this study were stable infants born between 32 and 37 weeks of gestation, with normal hearing. Mother-infant dyads were randomly assigned to KC and live harp music therapy or to KC alone. Using repeated measures, neonatal and maternal heart rate, oxygen saturation and respiratory rate were recorded along with neonatal behavioral state and maternal anxiety state. Maternal age, ethnicity, education, and love of music were documented. Fifty-two mother-infant dyads were tested. Compared with KC alone, KC and live harp music therapy had a significantly beneficial effect on maternal anxiety score (46.8 +/- 10 vs. 27.7 +/- 7.1, respectively, P therapy is more beneficial in reducing maternal anxiety than KC alone. This combined therapy had no apparent effect on the tested infants' physiological responses or behavioral state.

  14. Long-term results from a randomized phase II trial of neoadjuvant combined-modality therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oblak Irena

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluated the effectiveness and safety of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with capecitabine in patients with locally advanced resectable rectal cancer. This report summarizes the results of the phase II study together with long-term (5-year follow-up. Methods Between June 2004 and January 2005, 57 patients with operable, clinical stage II-III adenocarcinoma of the rectum entered the study. Radiation dose was 45 Gy delivered as 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy with oral capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily was administered during radiotherapy and at weekends. Surgery was scheduled 6 weeks after the completion of the chemoradiotherapy. Patients received four cycles of postoperative chemotherapy comprising either capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 bid days 1-14 every 3 weeks or bolus i.v. 5-fluorouracil 425 mg/m2/day and leucovorin 20 mg/m2/day days 1-5 every 4 weeks (choice was at the oncologist's discretion. Study endpoints included complete pathological remission, proportion of R0 resections and sphincter-sparing procedures, toxicity, survival parameters and long-term (5-year rectal and urogenital morbidity assessment. Results One patient died after receiving 27 Gy because of a pulmonary embolism. Fifty-six patients completed radiochemotherapy and had surgery. Median follow-up time was 62 months. No patients were lost to follow-up. R0 resection was achieved in 55 patients. A complete pathological response was observed in 5 patients (9.1%; T-, N- and overall downstaging rates were 40%, 52.9% and 49.1%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rate, recurrence-free survival, and local control was 61.4% (95% CI: 48.9-73.9%, 52.4% (95% CI: 39.3-65.5%, and 87.4% (95% CI: 75.0-99.8%, respectively. In 5 patients local relapse has occurred; dissemination was observed in 19 patients and secondary malignancies have occurred in 2 patients. The most frequent side-effect of the preoperative combined therapy was dermatitis

  15. Feasibility Study Combining Art Therapy or Cognitive Remediation Therapy with Family-based Treatment for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Agras, William S; Weinbach, Noam; Jo, Booil

    2018-01-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa who have obsessive-compulsive (OC) features respond poorly to family-based treatment (FBT). This study evaluated the feasibility of combining FBT with either cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) or art therapy (AT) to improve treatment response in this at-risk group. Thirty adolescents with anorexia nervosa and OC features were randomized to 15 sessions of FBT + CRT or AT. Recruitment rate was 1 per month, and treatment attrition was 16.6% with no differences between groups. Suitability, expectancy and therapeutic relationships were acceptable for both combinations. Correlations between changes in OC traits and changes in cognitive inefficiencies were found for both combinations. Moderate changes in cognitive inefficiencies were found in both groups but were larger in the FBT + AT combination. This study suggests that an RCT for poor responders to FBT because of OC traits combining FBT with either CRT or AT is feasible to conduct. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  16. Effectiveness of β-Lactam Monotherapy vs Macrolide Combination Therapy for Children Hospitalized With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Derek J; Edwards, Kathryn M; Self, Wesley H; Zhu, Yuwei; Arnold, Sandra R; McCullers, Jonathan A; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Anderson, Evan J; Hicks, Lauri A; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Grijalva, Carlos G

    2017-12-01

    β-Lactam monotherapy and β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy are both common empirical treatment strategies for children hospitalized with pneumonia, but few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of these 2 treatment approaches. To compare the effectiveness of β-lactam monotherapy vs β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy among a cohort of children hospitalized with pneumonia. We analyzed data from the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study, a multicenter, prospective, population-based study of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations conducted from January 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012, in 3 children's hospitals in Nashville, Tennessee; Memphis, Tennessee; and Salt Lake City, Utah. The study included all children (up to 18 years of age) who were hospitalized with radiographically confirmed pneumonia and who received β-lactam monotherapy or β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. Data analysis was completed in April 2017. We defined the referent as β-lactam monotherapy, including exclusive use of an oral or parenteral second- or third-generation cephalosporin, penicillin, ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin, or amoxicillin-clavulanate. Use of a β-lactam plus an oral or parenteral macrolide (azithromycin or clarithromycin) served as the comparison group. We modeled the association between these groups and patients' length of stay using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Covariates included demographic, clinical, and radiographic variables. We further evaluated length of stay in a cohort matched by propensity to receive combination therapy. Logistic regression was used to evaluate secondary outcomes in the unmatched cohort, including intensive care admission, rehospitalizations, and self-reported recovery at follow-up. Our study included 1418 children (693 girls and 725 boys) with a median age of 27 months (interquartile range, 12-69 months). This cohort was 60.1% of the 2358 children enrolled in the

  17. Photothermal therapy combined with dinitrophenyl hapten for the treatment of late stage malignant melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaosong; Du, Nan; Li, Haijun; Long, Shan; Chen, Dianjun; Zhou, Feifan; Xu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Fuli; Chen, Wei R.

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of photothermal with dinitrophenyl hapten (DNP) for patients with malignant melanoma (MM), Patients with pathology confirmed stage III or IV MM were enrolled. Seventy-two patients were randomized into two groups, DNP alone group (n=36) and DNP plus photothermal therapy group (n=36). The results showed that the patients in the combination treatment group had longer median progression-free survival time (19.0m vs. 12.0m, p=0.007). No severe adverse events were observed in both groups. Thus, the combination of photothermal therapy and DNP maybe a new therapeutic strategy for patients with advanced MM.

  18. Adherence to oral antidiabetic agents with pioglitazone and metformin: comparison of fixed-dose combination therapy with monotherapy and loose-dose combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barner, Jamie C

    2011-09-01

    Several studies have examined adherence when switching from loose-dose combination therapy (LDCT) to fixed-dose combination therapy (FDCT) among oral antidiabetic agents. However, little is known regarding combination therapies, including pioglitazone and metformin. The objectives of this study were (1) to describe adherence to monotherapy (MT), LDCT, and FDCT of oral diabetic agents containing pioglitazone and metformin; (2) to determine whether there are differences in the medication adherence of patients switching from MT or LDCT to the corresponding FDCT, while controlling for covariates; and (3) to determine whether there are differences in medication costs between LDCT and the analogous FDCT. This retrospective database study included continuously enrolled Texas Medicaid recipients (18-65 years) who were prescribed FDCT with pioglitazone and metformin in the postindex period and prescribed the analogous LDCT or MT in the preindex period. Prescription claims were extracted from August 1, 2004, to August 31, 2007. Medication possession ratio (MPR) was used to measure medication adherence, and medication costs were assessed using reimbursement amount to dispensing pharmacies. Descriptive statistics, paired t tests, χ(2) tests, and logistic regression analyses were employed to address the study objectives. Patients (n = 270) were on average (mean [SD]) 50.7 (9.7) years of age, and the majority were female (73.3%). Overall adherence to FDCT was 80.5 (19.7). Regarding patients who switched from LDCT (n = 60) to FDCT, adherence increased significantly (P = 0.0081) by 8.9% (76.0 [16.8] to 82.8 [18.2]), whereas those who switched from MT (n = 210) to FDCT had a 9% significant (P pioglitazone and metformin resulted in a 9% decrease in medication cost and a 9% increase in adherence. Caution should be used when generalizing the study results to different FDCT combinations and other payers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy for semen collection from infertile males in whom masturbation fails].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen-Hao; Jiang, Hui; Ma, Lu-Lin; Hong, Kai; Zhao, Lian-Ming; Liu, De-Feng; Mao, Jia-Ming; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Ju; Gao, Ling; Qiao, Jie

    2013-05-01

    To study the effect of Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy in helping obtain semen from infertile men in whom masturbation has failed. Sixty male infertile patients from whom masturbation had failed to obtain semen were equally assigned to receive Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy (combination group) or Tadalafil only (control group). All the patients took Tadalafil 20 mg orally the night before the day of semen collection by masturbation. Before this procedure, the patients of the combination group practiced masturbation 16 - 24 times at home. The average ages of the patients were (37.0 +/- 5.1) yr and (37.5 +/- 5.2) yr and their IIEF-5 scores were 16.50 +/- 1.25 and 16.90 +/- 1.09 in the combination and the control group, respectively, neither with statistically significant difference between the two groups. Semen was successfully obtained from 9 patients (30.0%) of the combination group and 1 patient (3.33%) of the control group, with statistically significant difference between the two groups (chi2 = 7.680, P masturbation, Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy can significantly increase the success rate of semen collection from the male infertile patients in whom masturbation fails.

  20. COMPARATIVE EFFICIENCY OF THE COMBINED THERAPY IN PATIENT’S WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Shchekotov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective — to assess influence of the combined therapy on a functional condition endothelium, the central haemodynamics and geometry of heart in patients with hypertensive disease.Subjects and methods. The volume of supervision has made 40 patients with arterial hypertension grade II hypertension, moderate — highrisk. Patients of the first group received the combined therapy lisinopril — 20 mg and hydrochlortiazid — 12.5 mg (iruzid — “Belupo”, Croatia, patients of the second group — therapy trandolapril and verapamil (tarka — “Ebbot”, Germany — 2 and 180 mg accordingly.Results. The combined therapy trandolapril and verapamil renders more expressed antihypertension effect, than lisinopril and hydrochlortiazid.Appointment of the combined therapy promoted normalization morphofunctional heart indicators: in group of tarka ejection fraction(EF has authentically increased by 4.34 % (р = 0,02, the thickness to a back wall of the left ventricle has decreased for 5.8 % (р = 0,03 in group of iruzid. Also in both groups optimization functional a condition endothelium vessels as on level desquamation endotheliocytes, a function indicator endothelium and on a level of a factor of Willebrand was marked. Authentically more expressed positive influence on endothelium tarka in comparison with iruzid has been noticed.Conclusion. At comparison of combinations fat-soluble ACE inhibitor with verapamil (tarka and water-soluble ACE inhibitor in a combination with hydrochlortiazid (iruzid the insignificant superiority of the first combination over the second for level of positive influence on endothelium of vessels has been revealed, more expressed antihypertensive effect and ability authentically to increase EF.

  1. COMPARATIVE EFFICIENCY OF THE COMBINED THERAPY IN PATIENT’S WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Shchekotov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective — to assess influence of the combined therapy on a functional condition endothelium, the central haemodynamics and geometry of heart in patients with hypertensive disease.Subjects and methods. The volume of supervision has made 40 patients with arterial hypertension grade II hypertension, moderate — highrisk. Patients of the first group received the combined therapy lisinopril — 20 mg and hydrochlortiazid — 12.5 mg (iruzid — “Belupo”, Croatia, patients of the second group — therapy trandolapril and verapamil (tarka — “Ebbot”, Germany — 2 and 180 mg accordingly.Results. The combined therapy trandolapril and verapamil renders more expressed antihypertension effect, than lisinopril and hydrochlortiazid.Appointment of the combined therapy promoted normalization morphofunctional heart indicators: in group of tarka ejection fraction(EF has authentically increased by 4.34 % (р = 0,02, the thickness to a back wall of the left ventricle has decreased for 5.8 % (р = 0,03 in group of iruzid. Also in both groups optimization functional a condition endothelium vessels as on level desquamation endotheliocytes, a function indicator endothelium and on a level of a factor of Willebrand was marked. Authentically more expressed positive influence on endothelium tarka in comparison with iruzid has been noticed.Conclusion. At comparison of combinations fat-soluble ACE inhibitor with verapamil (tarka and water-soluble ACE inhibitor in a combination with hydrochlortiazid (iruzid the insignificant superiority of the first combination over the second for level of positive influence on endothelium of vessels has been revealed, more expressed antihypertensive effect and ability authentically to increase EF.

  2. Challenges in optimizing chemoradiation in locally advanced non small-cell lung cancers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data supporting use of concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced lung cancers comes from clinical trials from developed countries. Applicability and outcomes of such schedules in developing countries is not widely reported. There are various challenges in delivering chemoradiation in locally advanced non small cell lung cancer in developing countries which is highlighted by an audit of patients treated with chemoradiation in our center. This article deals with the challenges in the context of a developing country. We conclude that sequential chemoradiotherapy is better tolerated than concurrent chemoradiation in Indian patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancers. Patients with stage IIIa, normal weight or overweight, and adequate baseline pulmonary function should be offered concurrent chemoradiation.

  3. EFFECTS OF COMBINATION THERAPY ON PLATELET COUNT IN PATIENTS OF MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin and clopidogrel are usually used individually to prevent adverse cardiovascular events and stroke. They are used in stabilizing the blood pressure in patients of myocardial infarction while combination therapy of aspirin and Clopidogrel (dual anti-platelet therapy is used for preventing adverse cardiovascular events in myocardial infarction patients. A cross-sectional observational study is conducted through a structured questionnaire from 110 patients of K.I.H.D (Karachi Institute of Heart Disease hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Indoor/admitted patients with diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTE-MI, ST elevation myocardial infarction (STE-MI, supra ventricular tachycardia (SVT were included along with those with previous or current onset of angina pectoris or heart attack. Information from the test reports of these patients was included in the data. Patients without proper test reports were excluded from the study. Combination therapy duration is considered as key tool for evaluation. Out of 100 patients (after exclusion criteria applied almost 18% patients were using the combination therapy for 10 to 25 years while 52% of patients were using the combination therapy for 1 to 10 years. Platelet count of 88% patients was found to be in between 1,50,000–3,50,000/µl. Remaining patients had less than 1,50,000 µl to more than 3,50,000 to 4,50,000 µl. Most frequently reported side effects were chest pain, respiratory issues, headache and depression. On the basis of our data analysis it is concluded that long duration dual anti-platelet therapy will not harm platelet count in human blood but it can create drug dependency in patients. Hypertension is not completely cured with this therapy but can help in stabilizing blood pressure.

  4. Advances in combination therapy of lung cancer: Rationales, delivery technologies and dosage regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lan; Leng, Donglei; Cun, Dongmei

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease caused by a multitude of genetic and environmental factors. The progression of lung cancer involves dynamic changes in the genome and a complex network of interactions between cancer cells with multiple, distinct cell types that form tumors. Combination therapy...... using different pharmaceuticals has been proven highly effective due to the ability to affect multiple cellular pathways involved in the disease progression. However, the currently used drug combination designs are primarily based on empirical clinical studies, and little attention has been given...... for the selection of specific combination therapies for lung cancer treatment, and state of the art of delivery technologies and dosage regimens for the combinations, tested in preclinical and clinical trials....

  5. Efficacy of Combined Therapy with Amantadine, Oseltamivir, and Ribavirin In Vivo against Susceptible and Amantadine-Resistant Influenza A Viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Jack T.; Smee, Donald F.; Barnard, Dale L.; Julander, Justin G.; Gross, Matthew; de Jong, Menno D.; Went, Gregory T.

    2012-01-01

    The limited efficacy of existing antiviral therapies for influenza - coupled with widespread baseline antiviral resistance highlights the urgent need for more effective therapy. We describe a triple combination antiviral drug (TCAD) regimen composed of amantadine, oseltamivir, and ribavirin that is

  6. Cochrane in context: Combined and alternating paracetamol and ibuprofen therapy for febrile children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tiffany; Stang, Antonia S; Ganshorn, Heather; Hartling, Lisa; Maconochie, Ian K; Thomsen, Anna M; Johnson, David W

    2014-09-01

    Health-care professionals frequently recommend fever treatment regimens for children who either combine paracetamol and ibuprofen or alternate them.However, there is uncertainty about whether these regimens are better than using single agents and about the adverse effect profile of combination regimens. To assess the results and side effects of combining paracetamol and ibuprofen, or alternating them in consecutive treatments, compared with monotherapy for treating fever in children. In September 2013, we searched Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (2009-2011). We included randomized controlled trials that compared alternating or combined paracetamol and ibuprofen regimens with monotherapy in children with fever. One review author and two assistants independently screened the searches and applied the inclusion criteria. Two authors assessed risk of bias and graded the evidence independently. We conducted various analyses for different comparison groups (combined therapy versus monotherapy, alternating therapy versus monotherapy and combined therapy versus alternating therapy). Six studies, enrolling 915 participants, are included. Compared to administering a single antipyretic alone, administering combined paracetamol and ibuprofen to febrile children can result in a lower mean temperature at 1 hour after treatment (mean difference -0.27 ∘C, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.08, two trials, 163 participants, moderate quality evidence). If no further antipyretics are given, combined treatment probably also results in a lower mean temperature at 4 hours (mean difference -0.70 ∘C, 95% confidence interval -1.05 to -0.35, two trials, 196 participants, moderate quality evidence), and in fewer children remaining or becoming febrile for at least 4 hours after treatment (relative risk 0.08, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0

  7. MaLT - Combined Motor and Language Therapy Tool for Brain Injury Patients Using Kinect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wairagkar, Maitreyee; McCrindle, Rachel; Robson, Holly; Meteyard, Lotte; Sperrin, Malcom; Smith, Andy; Pugh, Moyra

    2017-03-23

    The functional connectivity and structural proximity of elements of the language and motor systems result in frequent co-morbidity post brain injury. Although rehabilitation services are becoming increasingly multidisciplinary and "integrated", treatment for language and motor functions often occurs in isolation. Thus, behavioural therapies which promote neural reorganisation do not reflect the high intersystem connectivity of the neurologically intact brain. As such, there is a pressing need for rehabilitation tools which better reflect and target the impaired cognitive networks. The objective of this research is to develop a combined high dosage therapy tool for language and motor rehabilitation. The rehabilitation therapy tool developed, MaLT (Motor and Language Therapy), comprises a suite of computer games targeting both language and motor therapy that use the Kinect sensor as an interaction device. The games developed are intended for use in the home environment over prolonged periods of time. In order to track patients' engagement with the games and their rehabilitation progress, the game records patient performance data for the therapist to interrogate. MaLT incorporates Kinect-based games, a database of objects and language parameters, and a reporting tool for therapists. Games have been developed that target four major language therapy tasks involving single word comprehension, initial phoneme identification, rhyme identification and a naming task. These tasks have 8 levels each increasing in difficulty. A database of 750 objects is used to programmatically generate appropriate questions for the game, providing both targeted therapy and unique gameplay every time. The design of the games has been informed by therapists and by discussions with a Public Patient Involvement (PPI) group. Pilot MaLT trials have been conducted with three stroke survivors for the duration of 6 to 8 weeks. Patients' performance is monitored through MaLT's reporting facility

  8. Chemoradiation in patients with unresectable extrahepatic and hilar cholangiocarcinoma or at high risk for disease recurrence after resection.. Analysis of treatment efficacy and failure in patients receiving postoperative or primary chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habermehl, D.; Lindel, K.; Rieken, S.; Haase, K.; Welzel, T.; Debus, J.; Combs, S.E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Goeppert, B.; Schirmacher, P. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Pathology; Buechler, M.W. [University Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Visceral Surgery

    2012-09-15

    Background: The purpose of this work was to determine efficacy, toxicity, and patterns of recurrence after concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) in patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer (EHBDC) and hilar cholangiocarcinoma (Klatskin tumours) in case of incomplete resection or unresectable disease. Patients and methods: From 2003-2010, 25 patients with nonmetastasized EHBDC and hilar cholangiocarcinoma were treated with radiotherapy and CRT at our institution in an postoperative setting (10 patients, 9 patients with R1 resections) or in case of unresectable disease (15 patients). Median age was 63 years (range 38-80 years) and there were 20 men and 5 women. Median applied dose was 45 Gy in both patient groups. Results: Patients at high risk (9 times R1 resection, 1 pathologically confirmed lymphangiosis) for tumour recurrence after curative surgery had a median time to disease progression of 8.7 months and an estimated mean overall survival of 23.2 months (6 of 10 patients are still under observation). Patients undergoing combined chemoradiation in case of unresectable primary tumours are still having a poor prognosis with a progression-free survival of 7.1 months and a median overall survival of 12.0 months. The main site of progression was systemic (liver, peritoneum) in both patient groups. Conclusion: Chemoradiation with gemcitabine is safe and can be applied safely in either patients with EHBDC or Klatskin tumours at high risk for tumour recurrence after resection and patients with unresectable tumours. Escalation of systemic and local treatment should be investigated in future clinical trials. (orig.)

  9. Pathophysiologic effects of vascular-targeting agents and the implications for combination with conventional therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael Robert; Siemann, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    of vascular-targeting agent (VTA) have now emerged: those that prevent the angiogenic development of the neovasculature of the tumor and those that specifically damage the already established tumor vascular supply. When used alone neither approach readily leads to tumor control, and so, for VTAs to be most...... successful in the clinic they will need to be combined with more conventional therapies. However, by affecting the tumor vascular supply, these VTAs should induce pathophysiologic changes in variables, such as blood flow, pH, and oxygenation. Such changes could have negative or positive influences...... on the tumor response to more conventional therapies. This review aims to discuss the pathophysiologic changes induced by VTAs and the implications of these effects on the potential use of VTAs in combined modality therapy....

  10. POSSIBILITIES OF COMBINATIONAL MAGNESIAL AND NEUROPROTECTOR THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY CEREBROVASCULAR PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Gusev

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The serum level of magnesium was evaluated in 232 teenagers and adolescents with early cerebrovascular diseases aged 16–21 years. In cases of magnesium deficiency, monotherapy with complex magnesium medication is an effective treatment both for concurrent magnesium deficiency and for early forms of cerebrovascular pathology with different patterns of vascular response (hyper_ and hypoconstrictive variants. Maximum normotensive effect of the therapy and maximal efficacy in treating vertigo and headaches is reached in combinational therapy with vinpocetin and complex magnesium medication. a combination of complex magnesium medication with bylobil potentiates antiasthenic effect, mostly through diminishing excessive neuron muscular irritability and paresthesiae.Key words: teenagers, magnesium, b6 vitamin, cavinton, bylobil, potentiative therapy, early forms of cerebrovascular diseases.

  11. Efficacy and safety of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) for non-falciparum malaria: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Benjamin J.; Wieten, Rosanne W.; Kroon, Daniëlle; Nagel, Ingeborg M.; Bélard, Sabine; van Vugt, Michèle; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    Artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is recommended as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, whereas chloroquine is still commonly used for the treatment of non-falciparum species (Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium malariae). A more simplified, more

  12. The influence of pregnancy on the pharmacokinetic properties of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT): a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Renée J.; Visser, Benjamin J.; Grobusch, Martin P.; van Vugt, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy has been reported to alter the pharmacokinetic properties of anti-malarial drugs, including the different components of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). However, small sample sizes make it difficult to draw strong conclusions based on individual pharmacokinetic studies. The aim

  13. Combination therapy with interferon and JAK1-2 inhibitor is feasible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, M E; de Stricker, K; Kjær, L

    2014-01-01

    We report a 55 year old woman with post-ET PV for 12 years, who experienced resolution of severe constitutional symptoms within 3 days, a marked reduction in splenomegaly and a rapid decline in the JAK2V617F allele burden during combination therapy with interferon-alpha2a and ruxolitinib. Within ...

  14. Bedaquiline as part of combination therapy in adults with pulmonary multi-drug resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T. V. A.; Cao, T. B. T.; Akkerman, O. W.; Tiberi, S.; Vu, D. H.; Alffenaar, J. W. C.

    Introduction: Few innovative anti-microbial products have been brought to market in recent years to combat the global multidrug resistant-tuberculosis (MDR-TB) epidemic. Bedaquiline, a novel oral diarylquinoline, was approved by the US FDA as a part of combination therapy in adults with pulmonary

  15. High dose simvastatin exhibits enhanced lipid lowering effects relative to simvastatin/ezetimibe combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Abstract: Background: Statins are the frontline in cholesterol reduction therapies; however use in combination with agents that possess complimentary mechanisms of action may achieve further reduce in LDL-C. Methods and Results: Thirty-nine patients were treated with either 80mg simvasta...

  16. The effect of combined antiretroviral therapy on the overall mortality of HIV-infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, A. N.; Gilson, R.; Easterbrook, P.; Fisher, M.; Gazzard, B.; Johnson, M.; Walsh, J.; Leen, C.; Orkin, C.; Anderson, J.; Pillay, D.; Delpech, V.; Schwenk, A.; Dunn, D.; Gompels, M.; Hill, T.; Porter, K.; Babiker, A.; Sabin, C.; Waters, A.; Crates, D.; Mohamed-Saad, S.; Perry, N.; Pullin, A.; Churchill, D.; Harris, W.; Nelson, M.; Asboe, D.; Bulbeck, S.; Mandalia, S.; Clarke, J.; Dodds, J.; Rider, A.; Youle, M.; Lampe, F.; Smith, C.; Gumley, H.; Chaloner, C.; Ismajani, D.; Weber, J.; Cashin, S.; Kemble, C.; Mackie, N.; Thomas, R.; Jones, K.; Gann, S.; Wilson, A.; Ainsworth, J.; de Wolf, F.; Bezemer, D. O.; Gras, L. A. J.; Kesselring, A. M.; van Sighem, A. I.; Smit, C.; Zhang, S.; Zaheri, S.; Prins, J. M.; Bos, J. C.; Eeftinck-Schattenkerk, J. K. M.; Geerlings, S. E.; Godfried, M. H.; Lange, J. M. A.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Olszyna, D. P.; van der Poll, M.; Reiss, P.; Sankatsing, S. U. C.; Steingrover, R.; van der Valk, M.; Vermeulen, J. N.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; van Vugt, M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Schreij, G.; van der Geest, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Lowe, S.; Verbon, A.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Pajkrt, D.; Scherpbier, H. J.; van der Ende, M. E.; Bax, H.; van der Feltz, M.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Nouwen, J. L.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; de Ruiter, E. D.; Slobbe, L.; Schurink, C. A. M.; de Vries, T. E. M. S.; Driessen, G.; van der Flier, M.; Hartwig, N. G.; Branger, J.; Kauffmann, R. H.; Schippers, E. F.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alleman, M. A.; ten Kate, R. W.; Soetekouw, R.; Kroon, F. P.; Arend, S. M.; de Boer, M. G. J.; van den Broek, P. J.; van Dissel, J. T.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; den Hollander, J. G.; Bronsveld, W.; Vriesendorp, R.; Jeurissen, F. J. F.; Leyten, E. M. S.; van Houte, D.; Polée, M. B.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Brinkman, K.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Mairuhu, A. T. A.; Wagenaar, J.; Juttmann, J. R.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Veenstra, J.; Vasmel, W. L. E.; Koopmans, P. P.; Brouwer, A. M.; Dofferhoff, A. S. M.; de Groot, R.; ter Hofstede, H. J. M.; Keuter, M.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; van Assen, S.; van Leeuwen, J. T. M.; Stek, C. J.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; Hoepelman, I. M.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Bonten, M. J. M.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L. J.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Peters, E. J. G.; Mudrikova, T.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Weijer, S.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Danner, S. A.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Bierman, W. F. W.; Claessen, F. A. P.; Hillebrand, M. E.; de Jong, E. V.; Kortmann, W.; Perenboom, R. M.; bij de Vaate, E. A.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J.; Gisolf, E. H.; Tanis, A. A.; Duits, A. J.; Winkel, K.; Elisabeth, S. T.; Abgrall, S.; Barin, F.; Bentata, M.; Billaud, E.; Boué, F.; Burty, C.; Cabié, A.; Costagliola, D.; Cotte, L.; de Truchis, P.; Duval, X.; Duvivier, C.; Enel, P.; Fredouille-Heripret, L.; Gasnault, J.; Gaud, C.; Gilquin, J.; Grabar, S.; Katlama, C.; Khuong, M. A.; Lang, J. M.; Lascaux, A. S.; Launay, O.; Mahamat, A.; Mary-Krause, M.; Matheron, S.; Meynard, J. L.; Pavie, J.; Pialoux, G.; Pilorgé, F.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Pradier, C.; Reynes, J.; Rouveix, E.; Simon, A.; Tattevin, P.; Tissot-Dupont, H.; Viard, J. P.; Viget, N.; Salomon, Valérie; Jacquemet, N.; Guiguet, M.; Lanoy, E.; Liévre, L.; Selinger-Leneman, H.; Lacombe, J. M.; Potard, V.; Bricaire, F.; Herson, S.; Desplanque, N.; Girard, P. M.; Meyohas, M. C.; Picard, O.; Cadranel, J.; Mayaud, C.; Clauvel, J. P.; Decazes, J. M.; Gerard, L.; Molina, J. M.; Diemer, M.; Sellier, P.; Honoré, P.; Jeantils, V.; Tassi, S.; Mechali, D.; Taverne, B.; Berthé, H.; Dupont, C.; Chandemerle, C.; Mortier, E.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Weiss, L.; Salmon, D.; Auperin, I.; Roudière, L.; Fior, R.; Delfraissy, J. F.; Goujard, C.; Jung, C.; Lesprit, P. H.; Vittecoq, D.; Fraisse, P.; Rey, D.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Stahl, J. P.; Lecercq, P.; Gourdon, F.; Laurichesse, H.; Fresard, A.; Lucht, F.; Bazin, C.; Verdon, R.; Chavanet, P.; Arvieux, C.; Michelet, C.; Choutet, P.; Goudeau, A.; Maître, M. F.; Hoen, B.; Eglinger, P.; Faller, J. P.; Borsa-Lebas, F.; Caron, F.; Daures, J. P.; May, T.; Rabaud, C.; Berger, J. L.; Rémy, G.; Arlet-Suau, E.; Cuzin, L.; Massip, P.; Legrand, M. F. Thiercelin; Pontonnier, G.; Yasdanpanah, Y.; Dellamonica, P.; Pugliese, P.; Aleksandrowicz, K.; Quinsat, D.; Ravaux, I.; Delmont, J. P.; Moreau, J.; Gastaut, J. A.; Retornaz, F.; Soubeyrand, J.; Galinier, A.; Ruiz, J. M.; Allegre, T.; Blanc, P. A.; Bonnet-Montchardon, D.; Lepeu, G.; Granet-Brunello, P.; Esterni, J. P.; Pelissier, L.; Cohen-Valensi, R.; Nezri, M.; Chadapaud, S.; Laffeuillade, A.; Raffi, F.; Boibieux, A.; Peyramond, D.; Livrozet, J. M.; Touraine, J. L.; Trepo, C.; Strobel, M.; Bissuel, F.; Pradinaud, R.; Sobesky, M.; Contant, M.; Aebi, C.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Brazzola, P.; Bucher, H. C.; Bürgisser, P. H.; Calmy, A.; Cattacin, S.; Cavassini, M.; Cheseaux, J.-J.; Drack, G.; Dubs, R.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fischer, M.; Flepp, M.; Fontana, A.; Francioli, P.; Furrer, H. J.; Fux, C.; Gayet-Ageron, A.; Gerber, S.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Gyr, T. H.; Hirsch, H.; Hirschel, B.; Hösli, I.; Hüsler, M.; Kaiser, L.; Kahlert, C. H.; Karrer, U.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, T. H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez, B.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Paccaud, F.; Pantaleo, G.; Raio, L.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Wyler, C.-A.; Yerly, S.; Casabona, J.; Miró, J. M.; Alquézar, A.; Isern, V.; Esteve, A.; Podzamczer, D.; Murillas, J.; Gatell, J. M.; Agüero, F.; Tural, C.; Clotet, B.; Ferrer, E.; Riera, M.; Segura, F.; Navarro, G.; Force, L.; Vilaró, J.; Masabeu, A.; García, I.; Guadarrama, M.; Romero, A.; Agustí, C.; Montoliu, A.; Ortega, N.; Lazzari, E.; Puchol, E.; Sanchez, M.; Blanco, J. L.; Garcia-Alcaide, F.; Martínez, E.; López-Dieguez, M.; García-Goez, J. F.; Sirera, G.; Romeu, J.; Jou, A.; Negredo, E.; Miranda, C.; Capitan, M. C.; Olmo, M.; Barragan, P.; Saumoy, M.; Bolao, F.; Cabellos, C.; Peña, C.; Sala, M.; Cervantes, M.; Amengual, M. J.; Navarro, M.; Penelo, E.; Berenguer, J.; del Amo, J.; García, F.; Gutiérrez, F.; Labarga, P.; Moreno, S.; Muñoz, M. A.; Caro-Murillo, A. M.; Sobrino, P.; Jarrín, I.; Sirvent, J. L. Gómez; Rodríguez, P.; Alemán, M. R.; Alonso, M. M.; López, A. M.; Hernández, M. I.; Soriano, V.; Barreiro, P.; Medrano, J.; Rivas, P.; Herrero, D.; Blanco, F.; Vispo, M. E.; Martín, L.; Ramírez, G.; de Diego, M.; Rubio, R.; Pulido, F.; Moreno, V.; Cepeda, C.; Hervás, R. I.; Iribarren, J. A.; Arrizabalaga, J.; Aramburu, M. J.; Camino, X.; Rodríguez-Arrondo, F.; von Wichmann, M. A.; Pascual, L.; Goenaga, M. A.; Masiá, M.; Ramos, J. M.; Padilla, S.; Sánchez-Hellín, V.; Bernal, E.; Escolano, C.; Montolio, F.; Peral, Y.; López, J. C.; Miralles, P.; Cosín, J.; Sánchez, M.; Gutiérrez, I.; Ramírez, M.; Padilla, B.; Vidal, F.; Sanjuan, M.; Peraire, J.; Veloso, S.; Viladés, C.; López-Dupla, M.; Olona, M.; Vargas, M.; Aldeguer, J. L.; Blanes, M.; Lacruz, J.; Salavert, M.; Montero, M.; Cuéllar, S.; de los Santos, I.; Sanz, J.; Oteo, J. A.; Blanco, J. R.; Ibarra, V.; Metola, L.; Sanz, M.; Pérez-Martínez, L.; Sola, J.; Uriz, J.; Castiello, J.; Reparaz, J.; Arriaza, M. J.; Irigoyen, C.; Antela, A.; Casado, J. L.; Dronda, F.; Moreno, A.; Pérez, M. J.; López, D.; Gutiérrez, C.; Hernández, B.; Pumares, M.; Martí, P.; García, L.; Page, C.; Hernández, J.; Peña, A.; Muñoz, L.; Parra, J.; Viciana, P.; Leal, M.; López-Cortés, L. F.; Trastoy, M.; Mata, R.; Justice, A. C.; Fiellin, D. A.; Rimland, D.; Jones-Taylor, C.; Oursler, K. A.; Titanji, R.; Brown, S.; Garrison, S.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Masozera, N.; Goetz, M.; Leaf, D.; Simberkoff, M.; Blumenthal, D.; Leung, J.; Butt, A.; Hoffman, E.; Gibert, C.; Peck, R.; Mattocks, K.; Braithwaite, S.; Brandt, C.; Bryant, K.; Cook, R.; Conigliaro, J.; Crothers, K.; Chang, J.; Crystal, S.; Day, N.; Erdos, J.; Freiberg, M.; Kozal, M.; Gandhi, N.; Gaziano, M.; Gerschenson, M.; Good, B.; Gordon, A.; Goulet, J. L.; Hernán, M. A.; Kraemer, K.; Lim, J.; Maisto, S.; Miller, P.; Mole, L.; O'Connor, P.; Papas, R.; Robins, J. M.; Rinaldo, C.; Roberts, M.; Samet, J.; Tierney, B.; Whittle, J.; Phillips, A.; Brettle, R.; Darbyshire, J.; Fidler, S.; Goldberg, D.; Hawkins, D.; Jaffe, H.; McLean, K.; Porter, Kholoud; Cursley, Adam; Ewings, Fiona; Fairbrother, Keith; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Lodi, Sara; Murphy, Brendan; Douglas, G.; Kennedy, N.; Pritchard, J.; Andrady, U.; Gwynedd, Ysbyty; Rajda, N.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; Drake, S.; Gilleran, G.; White, D.; Ross, J.; Toomer, S.; Hewart, R.; Wilding, H.; Woodward, R.; Dean, G.; Heald, L.; Horner, P.; Glover, S.; Bansaal, D.; Eduards, S.; Carne, C.; Browing, M.; Das, R.; Stanley, B.; Estreich, S.; Magdy, A.; O'Mahony, C.; Fraser, P.; Hayman, B.; Jebakumar, S. P. R.; Joshi, U.; Ralph, S.; Wade, A.; Mette, R.; Lalik, J.; Summerfield, H.; El-Dalil, A.; France, A. J.; White, C.; Robertson, R.; Gordon, S.; McMillan, S.; Morris, S.; Lean, C.; Vithayathil, K.; McLean, L.; Winter, A.; Gale, D.; Jacobs, S.; Tayal, S.; Short, L.; Green, S.; Williams, G.; Sivakumar, K.; Bhattacharyya, D. N.; Monteiro, E.; Minton, J.; Dhar, J.; Nye, F.; DeSouza, C. B.; Isaksen, A.; McDonald, L.; Franca, A.; William, L.; Jendrulek, I.; Shaunak, S.; El-Gadi, S.; Easterbrook, P. J.; Mazhude, C.; Johnstone, R.; Fakoya, A.; Mchale, J.; Kegg, S.; Mitchell, S.; Byrne, P.; Rice, P.; Mullaney, S. A.; McCormack, S.; David, D.; Melville, R.; Phillip, K.; Balachandran, T.; Mabey-Puttock, S.; Sukthankar, A.; Murphy, C.; Wilkins, E.; Ahmad, S.; Haynes, J.; Evans, E.; Ong, E.; Grey, R.; Meaden, J.; Bignell, C.; Loay, D.; Peacock, K.; Girgis, M. R.; Morgan, B.; Palfreeman, A.; Wilcox, J.; Tobin, J.; Tucker, L.; Saeed, A. M.; Chen, F.; Deheragada, A.; Williams, O.; Lacey, H.; Herman, S.; Kinghorn, D.; Devendra, S. V.; Wither, J.; Dawson, S.; Rowen, D.; Harvey, J.; Bridgwood, A.; Singh, G.; Chauhan, M.; Kellock, D.; Young, S.; Dannino, S.; Kathir, Y.; Rooney, G.; Currie, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Devendra, S.; Keane, F.; Booth, G.; Green, T.; Arumainayyagam, J.; Chandramani, S.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Robinson, T.; Curless, E.; Gokhale, R.; Tariq, A.; Luzzi, G.; Fairley, I.; Wallis, F.; Smit, E.; Ward, F.; Morlat, P.; Bonarek, M.; Bonnet, F.; Nouts, C.; Louis, J.; Reliquet, V.; Sauser, F.; Biron, C.; Mounoury, O.; Hue, H.; Brosseau, D.; Ghosn, J.; Rannou, M. T.; Bergmann, J. F.; Badsi, E.; Rami, A.; Parrinello, M.; Samanon-Bollens, D.; Campa, P.; Tourneur, M.; Desplanques, N.; Jeanblanc, F.; Chiarello, P.; Makhloufi, D.; Blanc, A. P.; Allègre, T.; Baillat, V.; Lemoing, V.; de Boever, C. Merle; Tramoni, C.; Sobesky, G.; Abel, S.; Beaujolais, V.; Slama, L.; Chakvetadze, C.; Berrebi, V.; Yeni, P.; Bouvet, E.; Fournier, I.; Gerbe, J.; Koffi, K.; Augustin-Normand, C.; Miailhes, P.; Thoirain, V.; Brochier, C.; Souala, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Beytoux, J.; Jacomet, C.; Morelon, S.; Olivier, C.; Lortholary, O.; Dupont, B.; Maignan, A.; Ragnaud, J. M.; Raymond, I.; Leport, C.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Longuet, P.; Boucherit, S.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Prevoteau, F.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Lelièvre, J. D.; Dominguez, S.; Dumont, C.; Aumaître, H.; Delmas, B.; Saada, M.; Medus, M.; Guillevin, L.; Tahi, T.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Pavel, S.; Marien, M. C.; Drenou, B.; Beck, C.; Benomar, M.; Tubiana, R.; Mohand, H. Ait; Chermak, A.; Abdallah, S. Ben; Touam, F.; Drobacheff, C.; Folzer, A.; Obadia, M.; Prudhomme, L.; Bonnet, E.; Balzarin, F.; Pichard, E.; Chennebault, J. M.; Fialaire, P.; Loison, J.; Galanaud, P.; Bornarel, D.; Six, M.; Ferret, P.; Batisse, D.; Gonzales-Canali, G.; Devidas, A.; Chevojon, P.; Turpault, I.; Lafeuillade, A.; Cheret, A.; Philip, G.; Morel, P.; Timsit, J.; Amirat, N.; Brancion, C.; Cabane, J.; Tredup, J.; Stein, A.; Ravault, I.; Chavanet, C.; Buisson, M.; Treuvetot, S.; Nau, P.; Bastides, F.; Boyer, L.; Wassoumbou, S.; Oksenhendeler, E.; Gérard, L.; Bernard, L.; Domart, Y.; Merrien, D.; Belan, A. Greder; Gayraud, M.; Bodard, L.; Meudec, A.; Beuscart, C.; Daniel, C.; Pape, E.; Vinceneux, P.; Simonpoli, A. M.; Zeng, A.; Fournier, L.; Fuzibet, J. G.; Sohn, C.; Rosenthal, E.; Quaranta, M.; Chaillou, S.; Sabah, M.; Audhuy, B.; Schieber, A.; Moreau, P.; Niault, M.; Vaillant, O.; Huchon, G.; Compagnucci, A.; Szmania, I. De Lacroix; Richier, L.; Lamaury, I.; Saint-Dizier, F.; Garipuy, D.; Drogoul, M. P.; Martin, I. Poizot; Fabre, G.; de Cursay, G. Lambert; Abraham, B.; Perino, C.; Lagarde, P.; David, F.; Roche-Sicot, J.; Saraux, J. L.; Leprêtre, A.; Fampin, B.; Uludag, A.; Morin, A. S.; Bletry, O.; Zucman, D.; Regnier, A.; Girard, J. J.; Quinsat, D. T.; Heripret, L.; Grihon, F.; Houlbert, D.; Ruel, M.; Chemlal, K.; Debab, Y.; Tremollieres, F.; Perronne, V.; Slama, B.; Perré, P.; Miodovski, C.; Guermonprez, G.; Dulioust, A.; Boudon, P.; Malbec, D.; Patey, O.; Semaille, C.; Deville, J.; Remy, G.; Béguinot, I.; Boue, F.; Chambrin, V.; Pignon, C.; Estocq, G. A.; Levy, A.; Duracinsky, M.; Le Bras, P.; Ngussan, M. S.; Peretti, D.; Medintzeff, N.; Lambert, T.; Segeral, O.; Lezeau, P.; Laurian, Y.; Piketty, C.; Karmochkine, M.; Eliaszewitch, M.; Jayle, D.; Tisne- Dessus, D.; Kazatchkine, M.; Colasante, U.; Nouaouia, W.; Vilde, J. L.; Bollens, D.; Binet, D.; Diallo, B.; Fonquernie, L.; Lagneau, J. L.; Pietrie, M. P.; Sicard, D.; Stieltjes, N.; Michot, J.; Bourdillon, F.; Lelievre, J. D.; Obenga, G.; Escaut, L.; Bolliot, C.; Schneider, L.; Iguertsira, M.; Tomei, C.; Dhiver, C.; Dupont, H. Tissot; Vallon, A.; Gallais, J.; Gallais, H.; Durant, J.; Mondain, V.; Perbost, I.; Cassuto, J. P.; Karsenti, J. M.; Venti, H.; Ceppi, C.; Krivitsky, J. A.; Bouchaud, O.; Honore, P.; Delgado, J.; Rouzioux, C.; Burgard, M.; Boufassa, L.; Peynet, J.; Hoyos, S. Pérez; Ferreros, I.; Hurtado, I.; González, C.; Caro, A. M.; Muga, R.; Sanvicens, A.; Tor, J.; del Romero, J.; Raposo, P.; Rodríguez, C.; García, Soledad; Alastrue, I.; Belda, J.; Trullen, P.; Fernández, E.; Santos, C.; Tasa, T.; Zafra, T.; Guerrero, R.; Marco, A.; Quintana, M.; Ruiz, I.; Nuñez, R.; Pérez, R.; Castilla, J.; Guevara, M.; de Mendoza, C.; Zahonero, N.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effect of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) on mortality among HIV-infected individuals after appropriate adjustment for time-varying confounding by indication. DESIGN: A collaboration of 12 prospective cohort studies from Europe and the United States (the HIV-CAUSAL

  17. Opportunistic infections and AIDS malignancies early after initiating combination antiretroviral therapy in high-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodi, Sara; Del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Bucher, Heiner C.; Furrer, Hansjakob; Logan, Roger; Sterne, Jonathan; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Jarrín, Inma; Phillips, Andrew; Olson, Ashley; Van Sighem, Ard; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Jose, Sophie; Justice, Amy; Goulet, Joseph; Miró, José M.; Ferrer, Elena; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Rémonie; Vourli, Georgia; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Dabis, Francois; Vandenhede, Mari-Anne; Costagliola, Dominique; Abgrall, Sophie; Hernán, Miguel A.; Hernan, Miguel; Bansi, L.; Hill, T.; Sabin, C.; Dunn, D.; Porter, K.; Glabay, A.; Orkin, C.; Thomas, R.; Jones, K.; Fisher, M.; Perry, N.; Pullin, A.; Churchill, D.; Gazzard, B.; Nelson, M.; Asboe, D.; Bulbeck, S.; Mandalia, S.; Clarke, J.; Delpech, V.; Anderson, J.; Munshi, S.; Post, F.; Easterbrook, P.; Khan, Y.; Patel, P.; Karim, F.; Duffell, S.; Gilson, R.; Man, S.-L.; Williams, I.; Gompels, M.; Dooley, D.; Schwenk, A.; Ainsworth, J.; Johnson, M.; Youle, M.; Lampe, F.; Smith, C.; Grabowska, H.; Chaloner, C.; Ismajani Puradiredja, D.; Bansi, L.; Hill, T.; Phillips, A.; Sabin, C.; Walsh, J.; Weber, J.; Kemble, C.; Mackie, N.; Winston, A.; Leen, C.; Wilson, A.; Bezemer, D.O.; Gras, L.A.J.; Kesselring, A.M.; Van Sighem, A.I.; Zaheri, S.; Van Twillert, G.; Kortmann, W.; Branger, J.; Prins, J.M.; Kuijpers, T.W.; Scherpbier, H.J.; Van Der Meer, J.T.M.; Wit, F.W.M.N.; Godfried, M.H.; Reiss, P.; Van Der Poll, T.; Nellen, F.J.B.; Lange, J.M.A.; Geerlings, S.E.; Van Vugt, M.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J.C.; van der Valk, M.; Grijsen, M.L.; Wiersinga, W.J.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W.L.; Frissen, P.H.J.; Schouten, W.E.M.; Van Den Berk, G.E.L.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K.D.; Mulder, J.W.; Vrouenraets, S.M.E.; Lauw, F.N.; Van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D.W.M.; Van Agtmael, M.A.; Perenboom, R.M.; Claessen, F.A.P.; Bomers, M.; Peters, E.J.G.; Richter, C.; Van Der Berg, J.P.; Gisolf, E.H.; Schippers, E.F.; Van Nieuwkoop, C.; Van Elzakker, E.P.; Leyten, E.M.S.; Gelinck, L.B.S.; Pronk, M.J.H.; Bravenboer, B.; Kootstra, G.J.; Delsing, C.E.; Sprenger, H.G.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E.H.; Van Assen, S.; Bierman, W.F.W.; Soetekouw, R.; Ten Kate, R.W.; Van Vonderen, M.G.A.; Van Houte, D.P.F.; Kroon, F.P.; Van Dissel, J.T.; Arend, S.M.; De Boer, M.G.J.; Jolink, H.; Ter Vollaard, H.J.M.; Bauer, M.P.; Weijer, S.; El Moussaoui, R.; Lowe, S.; Schreij, G.; Oude Lashof, A.; Posthouwer, D.; Koopmans, P.P.; Keuter, M.; Van Der Ven, A.J.A.M.; Ter Hofstede, H.J.M.; Dofferhoff, A.S.M.; Warris, A.; Van Crevel, R.; van der Ende, Marchina E.; De Vries-Sluijs, T.E.M.S.; Schurink, C.A.M.; Nouwen, J.L.; Nispen Tot Pannerden, M.H.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B.J.A.; Van Gorp, E.C.M.; Hassing, R.J.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Hartwig, N.G.; Driessen, G.J.A.; Den Hollander, J.G.; Pogany, K.; Juttmann, J.R.; Van Kasteren, M.E.E.; Hoepelman, A.I.M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M.M.E.; Jaspers, C.A.J.J.; Ellerbroek, P.M.; Oosterheert, J.J.; Arends, J.E.; Wassenberg, M.W.M.; Barth, R.E.; Geelen, S.P.M.; Wolfs, T.F.W.; Bont, L.J.; Van Den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; Groeneveld, P.H.P.; Alleman, M.A.; Bouwhuis, J.W.; Barin, F.; Burty, C.; Duvivier, C.; Enel, P.; Fredouille-Heripret, L.; Gasnault, J.; Khuong, M.A.; Mahamat, A.; Pilorgé, F.; Tattevin, P.; Salomon, Valérie; Jacquemet, N.; Abgrall, S.; Costagliola, D.; Grabar, S.; Guiguet, M.; Lanoy, E.; Lièvre, L.; Mary-Krause, M.; Selinger-Leneman, H.; Lacombe, J.M.; Potard, V.; Bricaire, F.; Herson, S.; Katlama, C.; Simon, A.; Desplanque, N.; Girard, P.M.; Meynard, J.L.; Meyohas, M.C.; Picard, O.; Cadranel, J.; Mayaud, C.; Pialoux, G.; Clauvel, J.P.; Decazes, J.M.; Gerard, L.; Molina, J.M.; Diemer, M.; Sellier, P.; Bentata, M.; Honoré, P.; Jeantils, V.; Tassi, S.; Mechali, D.; Taverne, B.; Bouvet, E.; Crickx, B.; Ecobichon, J.L.; Matheron, S.; Picard-Dahan, C.; Yeni, P.; Berthé, H.; Dupont, C.; Chandemerle, C.; Mortier, E.; De Truchis, P.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Weiss, L.; Salmon, D.; Auperin, I.; Gilquin, J.; Roudière, L.; Viard, J.P.; Boué, F.; Fior, R.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Jung, C.; Lesprit, Ph.; Vittecoq, D.; Fraisse, P.; Lang, J.M.; Rey, D.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Stahl, J.P.; Lecercq, P.; Gourdon, F.; Laurichesse, H.; Fresard, A.; Lucht, F.; Bazin, C.; Verdon, R.; Chavanet, P.; Arvieux, C.; Michelet, C.; Choutet, P.; Goudeau, A.; Maître, M.F.; Hoen, B.; Eglinger, P.; Faller, J.P.; Borsa-Lebas, F.; Caron, F.; Reynes, J.; Daures, J.P.; May, T.; Rabaud, C.; Berger, J.L.; Rémy, G.; Arlet-Suau, E.; Cuzin, L.; Massip, P.; Thiercelin Legrand, M.F.; Pontonnier, G.; Viget, N.; Yasdanpanah, Y.; Dellamonica, P.; Pradier, C.; Pugliese, P.; Aleksandrowicz, K.; Quinsat, D.; Ravaux, I.; Tissot-Dupont, H.; Delmont, J.P.; Moreau, J.; Gastaut, J.A.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Retornaz, F.; Soubeyrand, J.; Galinier, A.; Ruiz, J.M.; Allegre, T.; Blanc, P.A.; Bonnet-Montchardon, D.; Lepeu, G.; Granet-Brunello, P.; Esterni, J.P.; Pelissier, L.; Cohen-Valensi, R.; Nezri, M.; Chadapaud, S.; Laffeuillade, A.; Billaud, E.; Raffi, F.; Boibieux, A.; Peyramond, D.; Livrozet, J.M.; Touraine, J.L.; Cotte, L.; Trepo, C.; Strobel, M.; Bissuel, F.; Pradinaud, R.; Sobesky, M.; Cabié, A.; Gaud, C.; Contant, M.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H.C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Furrer, H.; Haerry, D.; Fux, C.A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H.H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez De Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.; Casabona, J.; Gallois, A.; Esteve, A.; Podzamczer, D.; Murillas, J.; Gatell, J.M.; Manzardo, C.; Tural, C.; Clotet, B.; Ferrer, E.; Riera, M.; Segura, F.; Navarro, G.; Force, L.; Vilaró, J.; Masabeu, A.; García, I.; Guadarrama, M.; Cifuentes, C.; Dalmau, D.; Jaen, À.; Agustí, C.; Montoliu, A.; Pérez, I.; Gargoulas, Freyra; Blanco, J.L.; Garcia-Alcaide, F.; Martínez, E.; Mallolas, J.; López-Dieguez, M.; García-Goez, J.F.; Sirera, G.; Romeu, J.; Jou, A.; Negredo, E.; Miranda, C.; Capitan, M.C.; Saumoy, M.; Imaz, A.; Tiraboschi, J.M.; Murillo, O.; Bolao, F.; Peña, C.; Cabellos, C.; Masó, M.; Vila, A.; Sala, M.; Cervantes, M.; Jose Amengual, Ma.; Navarro, M.; Penelo, E.; Barrufet, P.; Bejarano, G.; Molina, J.; Guadarrama, M.; Alvaro, M.; Mercadal, J.; Fernandez, Juanse; Ospina, Jesus E.; Muñoz, M.A.; Caro-Murillo, A.M.; Sobrino, P.; Jarrín, I.; Gomez Sirvent, J.L.; Rodríguez, P.; Aleman, M.R.; Alonso, M.M.; Lopez, A.M.; Hernandez, M.I.; Soriano, V.; Labarga, P.; Barreiro, P.; Medrano, J.; Rivas, P.; Herrero, D.; Blanco, F.; Vispo, M.E.; Martín, L.; Ramírez, G.; De Diego, M.; Rubio, R.; Pulido, F.; Moreno, V.; Cepeda, C.; Hervás, Rl.; Iribarren, J.A.; Arrizabalaga, J.; Aramburu, M.J.; Camino, X.; Rodrí-guez-Arrondo, F.; Von Wichmann, M.A.; Pascual, L.; Goenaga, M.A.; Gutierrez, F.; Masia, M.; Ramos, J.M.; Padilla, S.; Sanchez-Hellín, V.; Bernal, E.; Escolano, C.; Montolio, F.; Peral, Y.; Berenguer, J.; Lopez, J.C.; Miralles, P.; Cosín, J.; Sanchez, M.; Gutierrez, I.; Ramírez, M.; Padilla, B.; Vidal, F.; Sanjuan, M.; Peraire, J.; Veloso, S.; Vilades, C.; Lopez-Dupla, M.; Olona, M.; Vargas, M.; Aldeguer, J.L.; Blanes, M.; Lacruz, J.; Salavert, M.; Montero, M.; Cuéllar, S.; De Los Santos, I.; Sanz, J.; Oteo, J.A.; Blanco, J.R.; Ibarra, V.; Metola, L.; Sanz, M.; Pérez-Martínez, L.; Sola, J.; Uriz, J.; Castiello, J.; Reparaz, J.; Arriaza, M.J.; Irigoyen, C.; Moreno, S.; Antela, A.; Casado, J.L.; Dronda, F.; Moreno, A.; Pérez, M.J.; López, D.; Gutiérrez, C.; Hernández, B.; Pumares, M.; Martí, P.; García, L.; Page, C.; García, F.; Hernández, J.; Peña, A.; Muñoz, L.; Parra, J.; Viciana, P.; Leal, M.; López-Cortés, L.F.; Trastoy, M.; Mata, R.; Justice, A.C.; Fiellin, D.A.; Rimland, D.; Jones-Taylor, C.; Oursler, K.A.; Titanji, R.; Brown, S.; Garrison, S.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Masozera, N.; Goetz, M.; Leaf, D.; Simberkoff, M.; Blumenthal, D.; Leung, J.; Butt, A.; Hoffman, E.; Gibert, C.; Peck, R.; Mattocks, K.; Braithwaite, S.; Brandt, C.; Bryant, K.; Cook, R.; Conigliaro, J.; Crothers, K.; Chang, J.; Crystal, S.; Day, N.; Erdos, J.; Freiberg, M.; Kozal, M.; Gandhi, N.; Gaziano, M.; Gerschenson, M.; Good, B.; Gordon, A.; Goulet, J.L.; Hernán, M.A.; Kraemer, K.; Lim, J.; Maisto, S.; Miller, P.; Mole, L.; O'Connor, P.; Papas, R.; Robins, J.M.; Rinaldo, C.; Roberts, M.; Samet, J.; Tierney, B.; Whittle, J.; Babiker, A.; Brettle, R.; Darbyshire, J.; Gilson, R.; Goldberg, D.; Hawkins, D.; Jaffe, H.; Johnson, A.; McLean, K.; Pillay, D.; Cursley, Adam; Ewings, Fiona; Fairbrother, Keith; Louisa Gnatiuc, S.L.; Murphy, Brendan; Douglas, G.; Kennedy, N.; Pritchard, J.; Andrady, U.; Rajda, N.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; Drake, S.; Gilleran, G.; White, D.; Ross, J.; Toomer, S.; Hewart, R.; Wilding, H.; Woodward, R.; Dean, G.; Heald, L.; Horner, P.; Glover, S.; Bansaal, D.; Eduards, S.; Carne, C.; Browing, M.; Das, R.; Stanley, B.; Estreich, S.; Magdy, A.; O'Mahony, C.; Fraser, P.; Hayman, B.; Jebakumar, S.P.R.; Joshi, U.; Ralph, S.; Wade, A.; Mette, R.; Lalik, J.; Summerfield, H.; El-Dalil, A.; France, J.A.; White, C.; Robertson, R.; Gordon, S.; McMillan, S.; Morris, S.; Lean, C.; Vithayathil, K.; McLean, L.; Winter, A.; Gale, D.; Jacobs, S.; Tayal, S.; Short, L.; Roberts, M.; Green, S.; Williams, G.; Sivakumar, K.; Bhattacharyya, N.D.; Monteiro, E.; Minton, J.; Dhar, J.; Nye, F.; De Souza, C.B.; Isaksen, A.; McDonald, L.; McLean, K.; Franca, A.; Hawkins, D.; William, L.; Jendrulek, I.; Peters, B.; Shaunak, S.; El-Gadi, S.; Easterbrook, P.J.; Mazhude, C.; Gilson, R.; Johnstone, R.; Fakoya, A.; McHale, J.; Waters, A.; Kegg, S.; Mitchell, S.; Byrne, P.; Johnson, M.; Rice, P.; Fidler, S.; Mullaney, S.A.; McCormack, S.; David, D.; Melville, R.; Phillip, K.; Balachandran, T.; Mabey-Puttock, S.; Sukthankar, A.; Murphy, C.; Wilkins, E.; Ahmad, S.; Tayal, S.; Haynes, J.; Evans, E.; Ong, E.; Das, R.; Grey, R.; Meaden, J.; Bignell, C.; Loay, D.; Peacock, K.; Girgis, M.R.; Morgan, B.; Palfreeman, A.; Wilcox, J.; Tobin, J.; Tucker, L.; Saeed, A.M.; Chen, F.; Deheragada, A.; Williams, O.; Lacey, H.; Herman, S.; Kinghorn, D.; Devendra, V.S.; Wither, J.; Dawson, S.; Rowen, D.; Harvey, J.; Wilkins, E.; Bridgwood, A.; Singh, G.; Chauhan, M.; Kellock, D.; Young, S.; Dannino, S.; Kathir, Y.; Rooney, G.; Currie, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Devendra, S.; Keane, F.; Booth, G.; Green, T.; Arumainayyagam, J.; Chandramani, S.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Robinson, T.; Curless, E.; Gokhale, R.; Tariq, A.; Roberts, M.; Williams, O.; Luzzi, G.; FitzGerald, M.; Fairley, I.; Wallis, F.; Smit, E.; Ward, F.; Molina, J.M.; Loze, B.; Morlat, P.; Bonarek, M.; Bonnet, F.; Nouts, C.; Louis, I.; Raffi, F.; Reliquet, V.; Sauser, F.; Biron, C.; Mounoury, O.; Hue, H.; Brosseau, D.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Ghosn, J.; Rannou, M.T.; Bergmann, J.F.; Badsi, E.; Rami, A.; Diemer, M.; Parrinello, M.; Girard, P.M.; Samanon-Bollens, D.; Campa, P.; Tourneur, M.; Desplanques, N.; Livrozet, J.M.; Jeanblanc, F.; Chiarello, P.; Makhloufi, D.; Blanc, A.P.; Allègre, T.; Reynes, J.; Baillat, V.; Lemoing, V.; Merle De Boever, C.; Tramoni, C.; Cabié, A.; Sobesky, G.; Abel, S.; Beaujolais, V.; Pialoux, G.; Slama, L.; Chakvetadze, C.; Berrebi, V.; Yeni, P.; Bouvet, E.; Fournier, I.; Gerbe, J.; Trepo, C.; Koffi, K.; Augustin-Normand, C.; Miailhes, P.; Thoirain, V.; Brochier, C.; Thomas, R.; Souala, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Beytoux, J.; Jacomet, C.; Gourdon, F.; Rouveix, E.; Morelon, S.; Dupont, C.; Olivier, C.; Lortholary, O.; Dupont, B.; Viard, J.P.; Maignan, A.; Ragnaud, J.M.; Raymond, I.; Leport, C.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Longuet, P.; Boucherit, S.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Prevoteau, F.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Lelièvre, J.D.; Lascaux, A.S.; Dominguez, S.; Dumont, C.; Aumâitre, H.; Delmas, B.; Saada, M.; Medus, M.; Guillevin, L.; Salmon, D.; Tahi, T.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Pavel, S.; Marien, M.C.; Drenou, B.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Beck, C.; Benomar, M.; Katlama, C.; Tubiana, R.; Ait Mohand, H.; Chermak, A.; Ben Abdallah, S.; Bentata, M.; Touam, F.; Hoen, B.; Drobacheff, C.; Folzer, A.; Massip, P.; Obadia, M.; Prudhomme, L.; Bonnet, E.; Balzarin, F.; Pichard, E.; Chennebault, J.M.; Fialaire, P.; Loison, J.; Galanaud, P.; Boué, F.; Bornarel, D.; Verdon, R.; Bazin, C.; Six, M.; Ferret, P.; Weiss, L.; Batisse, D.; Gonzales-Canali, G.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Devidas, A.; Chevojon, P.; Turpault, I.; Lafeuillade, A.; Cheret, A.; Philip, G.; Morel, P.; Timsit, J.; Herson, S.; Amirat, N.; Simon, A.; Brancion, C.; Cabane, J.; Picard, O.; Tredup, J.; Stein, A.; Ravault, I.; Chavanet, C.; Buisson, M.; Treuvetot, S.; Choutet, P.; Nau, P.; Bastides, F.; May, T.; Boyer, L.; Wassoumbou, S.; Oksenhendeler, E.; Gérard, L.; Bernard, L.; De Truchis, P.; Berthé, H.; Domart, Y.; Merrien, D.; Greder Belan, A.; Gayraud, M.; Bodard, L.; Meudec, A.; Beuscart, C.; Daniel, C.; Pape, E.; Vinceneux, P.; Simonpoli, A.M.; Zeng, A.; Fournier, L.; Fuzibet, J.G.; Sohn, C.; Rosenthal, E.; Quaranta, M.; Dellamonica, P.; Chaillou, S.; Sabah, M.; Audhuy, B.; Schieber, A.; Moreau, P.; Niault, M.; Vaillant, O.; Huchon, G.; Compagnucci, A.; De Lacroix Szmania, I.; Richier, L.; Lamaury, I.; Saint-Dizier, F.; Garipuy, D.; Gastaut, J.A.; Drogoul, M.P.; Poizot Martin, I.; Fabre, G.; Lambert De Cursay, G.; Abraham, B.; Perino, C.; Lagarde, P.; David, F.; Roche-Sicot, J.; Saraux, J.L.; Leprêtre, A.; Fampin, B.; Uludag, A.; Morin, A.S.; Bletry, O.; Zucman, D.; Regnier, A.; Girard, J.J.; Quinsat, D.T.; Heripret, L.; Grihon, F.; Houlbert, D.; Ruel, M.; Chemlal, K.; Caron, F.; Debab, Y.; Tremollieres, F.; Perronne, V.; Lepeu, G.; Slama, B.; Perré, P.; Miodovski, C.; Guermonprez, G.; Dulioust, A.; Boudon, P.; Malbec, D.; Patey, O.; Semaille, C.; Deville, J.; Remy, G.; Béguinot, I.; Galanaud, P.; Boue, F.; Chambrin, V.; Pignon, C.; Estocq, G.A.; Levy, A.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Duracinsky, M.; Le Bras, P.; Ngussan, M.S.; Peretti, D.; Medintzeff, N.; Lambert, T.; Segeral, O.; Lezeau, P.; Laurian, Y.; Weiss, L.; Buisson, M.; Piketty, C.; Karmochkine, M.; Batisse, D.; Eliaszewitch, M.; Jayle, D.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Kazatchkine, M.; Leport, C.; Colasante, U.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Duval, X.; Nouaouia, W.; Boucherit, S.; Vilde, J.L.; Girard, P.M.; Bollens, D.; Binet, D.; Diallo, B.; Meyohas, M.C.; Fonquernie, L.; Lagneau, J.L.; Salmon, D.; Guillevin, L.; Tahi, T.; Launay, O.; Pietrie, M.P.; Sicard, D.; Stieltjes, N.; Michot, J.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Bourdillon, F.; Lascaux, A.S.; Lelievre, J.D.; Dumont, C.; Dupont, B.; Obenga, G.; Viard, J.P.; Maignan, A.; Vittecoq, D.; Escaut, L.; Bolliot, C.; Bricaire, F.; Katlama, C.; Schneider, L.; Herson, S.; Simon, A.; Iguertsira, M.; Stein, A.; Tomei, C.; Ravaux, I.; Dhiver, C.; Tissot Dupont, H.; Vallon, A.; Gallais, J.; Gallais, H.; Gastaut, J.A.; Drogoul, M.P.; Fabre, G.; Dellamonica, P.; Durant, J.; Mondain, V.; Perbost, I.; Cassuto, J.P.; Karsenti, J.M.; Venti, H.; Fuzibet, J.G.; Rosenthal, E.; Ceppi, C.; Quaranta, M.; Krivitsky, J.A.; Bentata, M.; Bouchaud, O.; Honore, P.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Delgado, J.; Rouzioux, C.; Burgard, M.; Boufassa, L.; Peynet, J.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Del Amo, J.; Alvarez, D.; Monge, S.; Muga, R.; Sanvisens, A.; Clotet, B.; Tor, J.; Bolao, F.; Rivas, I.; Vallecillo, G.; Del Romero, J.; Raposo, P.; Rodríguez, C.; Vera, M.; Hurtado, I.; Belda, J.; Fernandez, E.; Alastrue, I.; Santos, C.; Tasa, T.; Juan, A.; Trullen, J.; Garcia De Olalla, P.; Cayla, J.; Masdeu, E.; Knobel, H.; Mirò, J.M.; Sambeat, M.A.; Guerrero, R.; Rivera, E.; Guerrero, R.; Marco, A.; Quintana, M.; Gonzalez, C.; Castilla, J.; Guevara, M.; De Mendoza, C.; Zahonero, N.; Ortíz, M.; Paraskevis, D.; Touloumi, G.; Pantazis, N.; Bakoyannis, G.; Gioukari, V.; Antoniadou, A.; Papadopoulos, A.; Petrikkos, G.; Daikos, G.; Psichogiou, M.; Gargalianos-Kakolyris, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Katsarou, O.; Kouramba, A.; Ioannidou, P.; Kordossis, T.; Kontos, A.; Lazanas, M.; Chini, M.; Tsogas, N.; Panos, G.; Paparizos, V.; Leuow, K.; Kourkounti, S.; Sambatakou, H.; Mariolis, I.; Skoutelis, A.; Papastamopoulos, V.; Baraboutis, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is little information on the incidence of AIDS-defining events which have been reported in the literature to be associated with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation. These events include tuberculosis,

  18. Relative efficacy of psychotherapy and combined therapy in the treatment of depression: A meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, S.M.; Dekker, J.J.M.; Schoevers, R.A.; de Jonghe, F.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Reviews of the relative efficacy of psychotherapy and combined therapy (psychotherapy with pharmacotherapy) for depression have yielded contradicting conclusions. This may be explained by the clinical heterogeneity of the studies reviewed. Aims To conduct a meta-analysis with an

  19. Parents' perceptions, attitudes and acceptability of treatment of childhood malaria with artemisinin combination therapies in ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, G O; Darkwah, A K; Goka, B Q

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little information on sociocultural and contextual factors that may influence attitudes of patients to new treatments, such as artemisinin combination therapies (ACT). METHODS: Semi-structured questionnaires and focus group discussions were used to assess views of parents...

  20. Beyond metformin: initiating combination therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman-Levine, Jennifer D

    2011-12-01

    The majority of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus will eventually require combination therapy involving two or more agents to achieve their glycemic target as their disease progresses. This review contrasts current treatment guidelines and recommendations by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (referred to as ADA) and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology (referred to as AACE) for the initiation of combination therapy. Both treatment guidelines emphasize that treatment selection for patients with type 2 diabetes should be guided by the goal of lowering hemoglobin A(1c) (A1C) level and individualizing therapy to each patient based on clinical factors and comorbidities. In addition, combination therapy should include classes of drugs with complementary mechanisms of action that efficiently and effectively target the underlying type 2 diabetes pathophysiology. Both the ADA and AACE recommend metformin as a firstline oral agent; however, the ADA supports early use of sulfonylureas or insulin in patients who do not reach their target A1C goal, whereas the AACE recommends earlier and more frequent use of the newer incretin agents-glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. Mechanisms of action, benefits, and risks of traditional and newer agents are discussed to better enable the pharmacist to recommend the best combinations of agents for individual patients.

  1. T Cell Subsets in HIV Infected Patients after Successful Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Katzenstein, Terese Lea

    2012-01-01

    Immune activation is decreased by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but residual activation remains and has been proposed as a cause of premature aging and death, but data are lacking. We analyzed the relationship between T......-cell subsets after 18 months of cART and overall survival during 12 years of follow up....

  2. Sitagliptin/Metformin (Janumet) as Combination Therapy In the Treatment of Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    St. Onge, Erin L.; Miller, Shannon; Clements, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Used together, sitagliptin (Januvia) and metformin (Glucophage) help to improve glycemic levels in diabetic patients, suggesting a synergy between the agents. However, the cost of sitagliptin and the need for more data may restrict its use. More studies are needed to assess the effects of long-term sitagliptin and to determine its role in combination therapy.

  3. Non-AIDS-defining deaths and immunodeficiency in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin, Benoît; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Bucher, Heiner C.; Rondeau, Virginie; Costagliola, Dominique; Dorrucci, Maria; Hamouda, Osamah; Prins, Maria; Walker, Sarah; Porter, Kholoud; Sabin, Caroline; Chêne, Geneviève

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether immunodeficiency is associated with the most frequent non-AIDS-defining causes of death in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). DESIGN: Observational multicentre cohorts. METHODS: Twenty-three cohorts of adults with estimated dates of human

  4. TOPGEAR: a randomised phase III trial of perioperative ECF chemotherapy versus preoperative chemoradiation plus perioperative ECF chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer (an international, intergroup trial of the AGITG/TROG/EORTC/NCIC CTG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Trevor; Smithers, B Mark; Michael, Michael; Gebski, Val; Boussioutas, Alex; Miller, Danielle; Simes, John; Zalcberg, John; Haustermans, Karin; Lordick, Florian; Schuhmacher, Christoph; Swallow, Carol; Darling, Gail; Wong, Rebecca

    2015-07-21

    The optimal management of patients with resectable gastric cancer continues to evolve in Western countries. Following publication of the US Intergroup 0116 and UK Medical Research Council MAGIC trials, there are now two standards of care for adjuvant therapy in resectable gastric cancer, at least in the Western world: postoperative chemoradiotherapy and perioperative epirubicin/cisplatin/fluorouracil (ECF) chemotherapy. We hypothesize that adding chemoradiation to standard perioperative ECF chemotherapy will achieve further survival gains. We also believe there are advantages to administering chemoradiation in the preoperative rather than postoperative setting. In this article, we describe the TOPGEAR trial, which is a randomised phase III trial comparing control arm therapy of perioperative ECF chemotherapy with experimental arm therapy of preoperative chemoradiation plus perioperative ECF chemotherapy. Eligible patients with resectable adenocarcinoma of the stomach or gastroesophageal junction will be randomized to receive either perioperative chemotherapy alone (3 preoperative and 3 postoperative cycles of ECF) or perioperative chemotherapy plus preoperative chemoradiation. In the chemoradiation arm, patients receive 2 cycles of ECF plus chemoradiation prior to surgery, and then following surgery 3 further cycles of ECF are given. The trial is being conducted in two Parts; Part 1 (phase II component) has recruited 120 patients with the aim of assessing feasibility, safety and preliminary efficacy of preoperative chemoradiation. Part 2 (phase III component) will recruit a further 632 patients to provide a total sample size of 752 patients. The primary endpoint of the phase III trial is overall survival. The trial includes quality of life and biological substudies, as well as a health economic evaluation. In addition, the trial incorporates a rigorous quality assurance program that includes real time central review of radiotherapy plans and central review of

  5. Photodynamic therapy combined with antivascular endothelial growth factor treatment for recalcitrant chronic central serous chorioretinopathy

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    Asahi MG

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Masumi G Asahi,1 Andrew T Chon,1 Esmeralda Gallemore,1 Ron P Gallemore1,2 1Clinical Research Department, Retina Macula Institute, Torrance, CA, USA; 2Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Purpose: To determine whether combination photodynamic therapy (PDT and antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF therapy is effective in the management of chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC recalcitrant to conventional therapy. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of eight patients with chronic CSC unresponsive to topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, focal photocoagulation, anti-VEGF alone, or PDT alone. All patients were evaluated with a full ophthalmic examination, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT, fluorescein angiography (FA, and most with indocyanine green angiography (ICGA followed by treatment with half-fluence PDT and intravitreal anti-VEGF injection (seven bevacizumab, one aflibercept. Patients were seen in follow-up 1 month after treatment. Results: All eight patients achieved complete resolution in subretinal fluid following combination treatment. Average duration of CSC prior to initiation of combination therapy was 7.5 months. Mean central macular thickness on OCT decreased significantly from 401.2±52.7 µm to 297.9±18.2 µm (p=0.0010 by 4 months after treatment (1.63±1.18 months. Seven of eight patients were followed up for an average of 13 months with no recurrence during that time. One case recurred at 8 months and was treated with repeat combination at that time. Frank choroidal neovascularization (CNV was not identified in these cases on FA or ICGA studies. Eight of eight patients showed significant improvement in vision from a logMAR of 0.1125±0.099 to 0.0125±0.064 (p=0.019. Conclusion: Combination PDT and anti-VEGF is effective for chronic CSC which has failed conventional therapy. Associated CNV and/or inflammation may be reasons for greater success in

  6. Effect of Smilax China Capsules and azithromycin combined therapy on chronic annexitis

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    Rong-Jun Cong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the mechanism of Smilax China (Chinese spelling: Jingangteng Capsules and Azithromycin combined therapy for chronic annexitis, and offer help to patients with chronic annexitis on relevant clinical therapies. Methods: A total of 170 cases of patients with chronic annexitis were selected from the gynecological department in our hospital, and randomly divided to be the combination therapy group and the control group by digital table, 85 cases for each group. Patients in control group were treated with Azithromycin. Patients in combination therapy group were treated by giving Smilax China capsules based on the Azithromycin treatment. Relevant indexes of lymphocyte subsets (CD3+ , CD4+ , CD8+ and CD4+ /CD8+ , cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 and hemorheology (blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, red blood cell aggregation index in patients of the two groups were detected before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, no statistical significance found on the differences of lymphocyte subsets, cytokines and hemorheology between the two groups of patients (P>0.05; After treatment received on the two groups of patients, indexes of CD3+ , CD4+ and CD4+ /CD8+ were dramatically increased, CD8+ , cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 and hemorheology in the combination therapy group were significantly decreased compared with patients in the control group; Statistical significance existed in differences between the two groups (P<0.05. Conclusions: Patients who received Azithromycin therapy added with Smilax China capsules concurrently could be significantly improved levels of lymphocyte subsets, cytokines and hemorheology index. It is of clinical importance for treatment of patients with chronic annexitis.

  7. Ribavirin-induced anemia in hepatitis C virus patients undergoing combination therapy.

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    Sheeja M Krishnan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The current standard of care for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection - combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin - elicits sustained responses in only ∼50% of the patients treated. No alternatives exist for patients who do not respond to combination therapy. Addition of ribavirin substantially improves response rates to interferon and lowers relapse rates following the cessation of therapy, suggesting that increasing ribavirin exposure may further improve treatment response. A key limitation, however, is the toxic side-effect of ribavirin, hemolytic anemia, which often necessitates a reduction of ribavirin dosage and compromises treatment response. Maximizing treatment response thus requires striking a balance between the antiviral and hemolytic activities of ribavirin. Current models of viral kinetics describe the enhancement of treatment response due to ribavirin. Ribavirin-induced anemia, however, remains poorly understood and precludes rational optimization of combination therapy. Here, we develop a new mathematical model of the population dynamics of erythrocytes that quantitatively describes ribavirin-induced anemia in HCV patients. Based on the assumption that ribavirin accumulation decreases erythrocyte lifespan in a dose-dependent manner, model predictions capture several independent experimental observations of the accumulation of ribavirin in erythrocytes and the resulting decline of hemoglobin in HCV patients undergoing combination therapy, estimate the reduced erythrocyte lifespan during therapy, and describe inter-patient variations in the severity of ribavirin-induced anemia. Further, model predictions estimate the threshold ribavirin exposure beyond which anemia becomes intolerable and suggest guidelines for the usage of growth hormones, such as erythropoietin, that stimulate erythrocyte production and avert the reduction of ribavirin dosage, thereby improving treatment response. Our model thus facilitates, in

  8. When combination therapy isn't working: emerging therapies for the management of inflammatory bowel disease.

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    Krishnareddy, Suneeta; Swaminath, Arun

    2014-02-07

    Although antagonists of tumor necrosis factor have resulted in major therapeutic benefits in inflammatory bowel disease, the magnitude and durability of response are variable. Similar to previously available drugs such as 5-aminosalicylates and immunomodulators, the therapeutic effect is not universal leaving many people searching for options. The development of newer agents has benefited from advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Uncontrolled activation of the acquired immune system has an important role, and lymphocytes, cytokines, and adhesion molecules are broadly targeted for therapeutic intervention. There is increasing evidence of an important role of the innate immune system and the intestinal epithelium, and the therapeutic paradigm is also shifting from immunosuppression to the reinforcement of the intestinal barrier, and modification of the disease process. In this review, we explore the limitation of current therapy as well as mechanisms of actions of new drugs and the efficacy and adverse events from data from clinical trials.

  9. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

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    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho [The Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy.

  10. Combination of psychotherapy and benzodiazepines versus either therapy alone for panic disorder: a systematic review

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    Furukawa Toshi A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The efficacy of combined psychotherapy and benzodiazepine treatment for panic disorder is still unclear despite its widespread use. The present systematic review aims to examine its efficacy compared with either monotherapy alone. Methods: All randomised trials comparing combined psychotherapy and benzodiazepine for panic disorder with either therapy alone were identified by comprehensive electronic search on the Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews, and by contacting experts in the field. Two reviewers independently checked eligibility of trials, assessed quality of trials and extracted data from eligible trials using a standardized data extraction form. Our primary outcome was "response" defined by global judgement. Authors of the original trials were contacted for further unpublished data. Meta-analyses were undertaken synthesizing data from all relevant trials. Results: Only two studies, which compared the combination with behaviour (exposure therapy, met our eligibility criteria. Both studies had a 16-week intervention. Unpublished data were retrieved for one study. The relative risk for response for the combination was 1.25 (95%CI: 0.78 to 2.03 during acute phase treatment, 0.78 (0.45 to 1.35 at the end of treatment, and 0.62 (0.36 to 1.07 at 6–12 months follow-up. Some secondary outcomes hinted at superiority of the combination during acute phase treatment. One study was identified comparing the combination to benzodiazepine. The relative risk for response was 1.57 (0.83 to 2.98, 3.39 (1.03 to 11.21, statistically significant and 2.31 (0.79 to 6.74 respectively. The superiority of the combination was observed on secondary outcomes at all the time points. No sub-group analyses were conducted due to the limited number of included trials. Conclusion: Unlike some narrative reviews in the literature, our systematic search established the paucity of high quality evidence for

  11. Antihypertensive combination therapy in primary care offices: results of a cross-sectional survey in Switzerland

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    Roas S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Susanne Roas,1 Felix Bernhart,2 Michael Schwarz,3 Walter Kaiser,4 Georg Noll5 1Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Zurich, 2Private Practice, Biberist, 3Ambulatorium Wiesendamm, Basel, 4Healthworld (Schweiz AG, Steinhausen, 5HerzKlinik Hirslanden, Zurich, Switzerland Background: Most hypertensive patients need more than one substance to reach their target blood pressure (BP. Several clinical studies indicate the high efficacy of antihypertensive combinations, and recent guidelines recommend them in some situations even as initial therapies. In general practice they seem widespread, but only limited data are available on their effectiveness under the conditions of everyday life. The objectives of this survey among Swiss primary care physicians treating hypertensive patients were: to know the frequency of application of different treatment modalities (monotherapies, free individual combinations, single-pill combinations; to see whether there are relationships between prescribed treatment modalities and patient characteristics, especially age, treatment duration, and comorbidities; and to determine the response rate (percentage of patients reaching target BP of different treatment modalities under the conditions of daily practice. Methods: This cross-sectional, observational survey among 228 randomly chosen Swiss primary care physicians analyzed data for 3,888 consecutive hypertensive patients collected at one single consultation. Results: In this survey, 31.9% of patients received monotherapy, 41.2% two substances, 20.9% three substances, and 4.7% more than three substances. By combination mode, 34.9% took free individual combinations and 30.0% took fixed-dose single-pill combinations. Combinations were more frequently given to older patients with a long history of hypertension and/or comorbidities. In total, 67.8% of patients achieved their BP target according to their physician's judgment. When compared, single

  12. A new therapy for highly effective tumor eradication using HVJ-E combined with chemotherapy

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    Kanamori Toshihide

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inactivated HVJ (hemagglutinating virus of Japan; Sendai virus particles (HVJ envelope vector; HVJ-E can incorporate and deliver plasmid DNA, siRNA, antibody and peptide and anti-cancer drugs to cells both in vitro and in vivo. We attempted to eradicate tumors derived from mouse colon cancer cells, CT26, by combining bleomycin (BLM-incorporated HVJ-E (HVJ-E/BLM with cisplatin (CDDP administration. Methods CT-26 tumor mass was intradermally established in Balb/c mice. HVJ-E/BLM was directly injected into the tumor mass with or without intraperitoneal administration of CDDP. The anti-tumor effect was evaluated by measuring tumor size and cytotoxic T cell activity against CT26. Re-challenge of tumor cells to treated mice was performed 10 days or 8 months after the initial tumor inoculation. Results We found that three intratumoral injections of HVJ-E/BLM along with a single intraperitoneal administration of CDDP eradicated CT26 tumors with more than 75% efficiency. When tumor cells were intradermally re-injected on day 10 after the initial tumor inoculation, tumors on both sides disappeared in most of the mice that received the combination therapy of HVJ-E/BLM and CDDP. Eight months after the initial tumor eradication, surviving mice were re-challenged with CT26 cells. The re-challenged tumors were rejected in all of the surviving mice treated with the combination therapy. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for CT26 were generated in these surviving mice. Conclusion Combination therapy consisting of HVJ-E and chemotherapy completely eradicated the tumor, and generated anti-tumor immunity. The combination therapy could therefore be a promising new strategy for cancer therapy.

  13. A new therapy for highly effective tumor eradication using HVJ-E combined with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hirokazu; Komaba, Shintarou; Kanamori, Toshihide; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2007-09-21

    Inactivated HVJ (hemagglutinating virus of Japan; Sendai virus) particles (HVJ envelope vector; HVJ-E can incorporate and deliver plasmid DNA, siRNA, antibody and peptide and anti-cancer drugs to cells both in vitro and in vivo. We attempted to eradicate tumors derived from mouse colon cancer cells, CT26, by combining bleomycin (BLM)-incorporated HVJ-E (HVJ-E/BLM) with cisplatin (CDDP) administration. CT-26 tumor mass was intradermally established in Balb/c mice. HVJ-E/BLM was directly injected into the tumor mass with or without intraperitoneal administration of CDDP. The anti-tumor effect was evaluated by measuring tumor size and cytotoxic T cell activity against CT26. Re-challenge of tumor cells to treated mice was performed 10 days or 8 months after the initial tumor inoculation. We found that three intratumoral injections of HVJ-E/BLM along with a single intraperitoneal administration of CDDP eradicated CT26 tumors with more than 75% efficiency. When tumor cells were intradermally re-injected on day 10 after the initial tumor inoculation, tumors on both sides disappeared in most of the mice that received the combination therapy of HVJ-E/BLM and CDDP. Eight months after the initial tumor eradication, surviving mice were re-challenged with CT26 cells. The re-challenged tumors were rejected in all of the surviving mice treated with the combination therapy. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for CT26 were generated in these surviving mice. Combination therapy consisting of HVJ-E and chemotherapy completely eradicated the tumor, and generated anti-tumor immunity. The combination therapy could therefore be a promising new strategy for cancer therapy.

  14. Intrathecal ziconotide and opioid combination therapy for noncancer pain: an observational study.

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    Deer, Timothy R; Kim, Christopher; Bowman, Richard; Tolentino, Diana; Stewart, C; Tolentino, Wilfrido

    2009-01-01

    Intrathecal ziconotide is used to manage severe chronic pain. Although ziconotide is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for monotherapy, it is sometimes used in combination with other intrathecal drugs for the management of intractable pain conditions in clinical practice. Evaluate the safety and tolerability of ziconotide combination therapy. A retrospective, observational study. A single center. Patients with severe chronic pain of noncancer origin who were receiving inadequate analgesia with intrathecal opioid therapy (with or without intrathecal adjuvants) and who had ziconotide added to their intrathecal regimens were included. Patient characteristics, intrathecal ziconotide doses, concomitant intrathecal and systemic drug use, visual analog scale pain scores, Oswestry Disability Index scores, mini-mental status examination scores, neurological examination results, clinical observations (including adverse event reports), and equipment complications were reviewed for 12 weeks after ziconotide initiation. Sixteen patients were identified. Ziconotide was initiated at a dose of 0.5 mcg/d and titrated to a mean dose of 2.64 mcg/d at week 12. Intrathecal opioids were hydromorphone (n=7), morphine (n=5), fentanyl (n=3), and sufentanil (n=1). Adverse events were noted in one patient, who reported increased depression and pain during combination therapy; ziconotide treatment was discontinued, and all adverse events resolved over a 4-week period. Substantial pain relief (> or =4-point decrease in visual analog scale score) was reported in 3 of 15 patients (20.0%) and increased functional capacity was evident in 3 of 15 patients (20.0%). A retrospective study with a limited number of patients from a single center. Results from this observational study suggest that combination intrathecal ziconotide and opioid therapy may be a safe and potentially effective treatment option for patients with refractory chronic pain. Controlled, prospective clinical trials to

  15. Radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy in prostate cancer: the state of the art

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    Piotr Milecki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Piotr Milecki1,2, Piotr Martenka1, Andrzej Antczak3, Zbigniew Kwias31Department of Radiotherapy, Greater Poland Cancer Center, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Electroradiology, Medical University, Poznan, Poland; 3Chair of Urology, Medical University, Poznan, PolandAbstract: Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT is used routinely in combination with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT in patients with high-risk clinically localized or locally advanced disease. The combined treatment (ADT–EBRT also seems to play a significant role in improving treatment results in the intermediate-risk group of prostate cancer patients. On the other hand, there is a growing body of evidence that treatment with ADT can be associated with serious and lifelong adverse events including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and many others. Almost all ADT adverse events are time dependant and tend to increase in severity with prolongation of hormonal manipulation. Therefore, it is crucial to clearly state the optimal schedule for ADT in combination with EBRT, that maintaining the positive effect on treatment efficacy would keep the adverse events risk at reasonable level. To achieve this goal, treatment schedule may have to be highly individualized on the basis of the patient-specific potential vulnerability to adverse events. In this study, the concise and evidence-based review of current literature concerning the general rationales for combining radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, its mechanism, treatment results, and toxicity profile is presented.Keywords: prostate cancer, radiotherapy, androgen deprivation, combined treatment

  16. Rational Design and Adaptive Management of Combination Therapies for Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

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    Ruian Ke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent discoveries of direct acting antivirals against Hepatitis C virus (HCV have raised hopes of effective treatment via combination therapies. Yet rapid evolution and high diversity of HCV populations, combined with the reality of suboptimal treatment adherence, make drug resistance a clinical and public health concern. We develop a general model incorporating viral dynamics and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics to assess how suboptimal adherence affects resistance development and clinical outcomes. We derive design principles and adaptive treatment strategies, identifying a high-risk period when missing doses is particularly risky for de novo resistance, and quantifying the number of additional doses needed to compensate when doses are missed. Using data from large-scale resistance assays, we demonstrate that the risk of resistance can be reduced substantially by applying these principles to a combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir. By providing a mechanistic framework to link patient characteristics to the risk of resistance, these findings show the potential of rational treatment design.

  17. The effect of oral clindamycin and rifampicin combination therapy in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa in Singapore

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    Ochi H

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Harumi Ochi, Lixian Chris Tan, Hazel H Oon Department of Dermatology, National Skin Centre, Singapore Abstract: Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS is a chronic inflammatory disease of follicular occlusion characterized by abscesses, draining sinuses, and scarring. The efficacy and tolerability of combination treatment with oral clindamycin and rifampicin have previously been assessed in 4 studies including groups of Caucasian patients. Overall results are promising with reported improvement rates between 71.4% and 85.7%. In this study, we propose that combination therapy is safe and efficacious in the treatment of HS, not only among Caucasians, but also in a group of Asian patients in Singapore. Keywords: hidradenitis suppurativa, combination therapy, clindamycin, rifampicin

  18. Combined therapy of major depression with concomitant borderline personality disorder: comparison of interpersonal and cognitive psychotherapy.

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    Bellino, Silvio; Zizza, Monica; Rinaldi, Camilla; Bogetto, Filippo

    2007-11-01

    The combination of antidepressants and brief psychotherapies has been proven more efficacious in treating major depression and is particularly recommended in patients with concomitant personality disorders. We compare the effects of 2 combined therapies, fluoxetine and interpersonal therapy (IPT) or fluoxetine and cognitive therapy (CT), on major depression in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Thirty-five consecutive outpatients with a diagnosis of BPD and a major depressive episode (not bipolar and not psychotic) were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 combined treatments and treated for 24 weeks. Assessment included a semistructured interview, Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS), Satisfaction Profile (SAT-P) for quality of life (QOL), and Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-64). Statistical analysis was performed using the univariate General Linear Model to calculate the effects of duration and type of treatment. No significant differences between treatments were found at CGI, HDRS, BDI-II, and SOFAS score. Combined treatment with CT had greater effects on HARS score and on psychological functioning factor of SAT-P. Combined treatment with IPT was more effective on social functioning factor of SAT-P and on domains domineering or controlling and intrusive or needy of IIP-64. Both combined therapies are efficacious in treating major depression in patients with BPD. Differences between CT and IPT concern specific features of subjective QOL and interpersonal problems. These findings lack reliable comparisons and need to be replicated.

  19. Complete Response after Treatment with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation with Prolonged Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced, Unresectable Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

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    Tiffany A. Pompa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is the only chance for cure in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN suggests chemotherapy and consideration for radiation in cases of unresectable LAPC. Here we present a rare case of unresectable LAPC with a complete histopathological response after chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. A 54-year-old female presented to our clinic in December 2013 with complaints of abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. An MRI demonstrated a mass in the pancreatic body measuring 6.2×3.2 cm; biopsy revealed proven ductal adenocarcinoma. Due to splenic vein/artery and contiguous celiac artery encasement, she was deemed surgically unresectable. She was started on FOLFIRINOX therapy (three cycles, intensity modulated radiation to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions concurrent with capecitabine, followed by FOLFIRI, and finally XELIRI. After 8 cycles of ongoing XELIRI completed in March 2015, restaging showed a remarkable decrease in tumor size, along with PET-CT revealing no FDG-avid uptake. She was reevaluated by surgery and taken for definitive resection. Histopathological evaluation demonstrated a complete R0 resection and no residual tumor. Based on this patient and literature review, this strategy demonstrates potential efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with prolonged chemotherapy, followed by surgery, which may improve outcomes in patients deemed previously unresectable.

  20. Combining Dopaminergic Facilitation with Robot-Assisted Upper Limb Therapy in Stroke Survivors: A Focused Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Duc A; Pajaro-Blazquez, Marta; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Gallegos, Jaime G; Pons, Jose; Fregni, Felipe; Bonato, Paolo; Zafonte, Ross

    2016-06-01

    Despite aggressive conventional therapy, lasting hemiplegia persists in a large percentage of stroke survivors. The aim of this article is to critically review the rationale behind targeting multiple sites along the motor learning network by combining robotic therapy with pharmacotherapy and virtual reality-based reward learning to alleviate upper extremity impairment in stroke survivors. Methods for personalizing pharmacologic facilitation to each individual's unique biology are also reviewed. At the molecular level, treatment with levodopa was shown to induce long-term potentiation-like and practice-dependent plasticity. Clinically, trials combining conventional therapy with levodopa in stroke survivors yielded statistically significant but clinically unconvincing outcomes because of limited personalization, standardization, and reproducibility. Robotic therapy can induce neuroplasticity by delivering intensive, reproducible, and functionally meaningful interventions that are objective enough for the rigors of research. Robotic therapy also provides an apt platform for virtual reality, which boosts learning by engaging reward circuits. The future of stroke rehabilitation should target distinct molecular, synaptic, and cortical sites through personalized multimodal treatments to maximize motor recovery.

  1. Combining Dopaminergic Facilitation with Robot-Assisted Upper Limb Therapy in Stroke Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Duc A.; Pajaro-Blazquez, Marta; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Gallegos, Jaime G.; Pons, Jose; Fregni, Felipe; Bonato, Paolo; Zafonte, Ross

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite aggressive conventional therapy, lasting hemiplegia persists in a large percentage of stroke survivors. The aim of this article is to critically review the rationale behind targeting multiple sites along the motor learning network by combining robotic therapy with pharmacotherapy and virtual reality–based reward learning to alleviate upper extremity impairment in stroke survivors. Methods for personalizing pharmacologic facilitation to each individual’s unique biology are also reviewed. At the molecular level, treatment with levodopa was shown to induce long-term potentiation-like and practice-dependent plasticity. Clinically, trials combining conventional therapy with levodopa in stroke survivors yielded statistically significant but clinically unconvincing outcomes because of limited personalization, standardization, and reproducibility. Robotic therapy can induce neuroplasticity by delivering intensive, reproducible, and functionally meaningful interventions that are objective enough for the rigors of research. Robotic therapy also provides an apt platform for virtual reality, which boosts learning by engaging reward circuits. The future of stroke rehabilitation should target distinct molecular, synaptic, and cortical sites through personalized multimodal treatments to maximize motor recovery. PMID:26829074

  2. Response of spinal myoclonus to a combination therapy of autogenic training and biofeedback

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    Kempuraj Duraisamy

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Clinical evidence indicates that certain types of movement disorders are due to psychosomatic factors. Patients with myoclonic movements are usually treated by a variety of therapeutic agents. Autogenic training (AT, a recognized form of psychosomatic therapies, is suitable for certain types of neurological diseases. We describe a patient with myoclonus who failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. His symptoms were exaggerated by psychogenic factors, especially anger. Case presentation A 42-year-old man was admitted to our hospital, Preventive Welfare Clinic, for severe paroxysmal axial myoclonus of the left shoulder and abdominal muscles. The initial diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus". The myoclonic movements did not occur during sleep but were aggravated by bathing, alcohol drinking, and anger. Psychological examination indicated hostile attribution. Although considered not to be a case of psychogenic myoclonus, a "psychogenic factor" was definitely involved in the induction of the organic myoclonus. The final diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus accompanied by features of psychosomatic disorders". The patient underwent psychosomatic therapy including AT and surface electromyography (EMG-biofeedback therapy and treatment with clonazepam and carbamazepine. Results AT and EMG-biofeedback resulted in shortening the duration and reducing the amplitude and frequency of the myoclonic discharges. Conclusion Psychosomatic therapy with AT and surface EMG-biofeedback produced excellent improvement of myoclonic movements and allowed the reduction of the dosage of conventional medications.

  3. Cardiovascular safety of combination therapies with incretin-based drugs and metformin compared with a combination of metformin and sulphonylurea in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, U. M.; Andersson, C.; Fosbøl, E. L.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists are widely used in combinations with metformin in the treatment of type 2 diabetes; however, data on long-term safety compared with conventional combination therapies are limited. METHODS: Danish individuals...... with metformin were safe compared with conventional combinations of glucose-lowering therapy. Use of incretin-based therapy may be target for strategies to lower CV risk in type 2 diabetes, although it should be recognized that the multivariable analysis may not have fully accounted for important baseline...

  4. Colistin combination therapy improves microbiologic cure in critically ill patients with multi-drug resistant gram-negative pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchem, N L; Bauer, K A; Cook, C H; Mangino, J E; Jones, C D; Porter, K; Murphy, C V

    2016-09-01

    Currently, in vitro synergy with colistin has not translated into improved clinical outcomes. This study aimed to compare colistin combination therapy to colistin monotherapy in critically ill patients with multi-drug resistant gram-negative (MDR-GN) pneumonia. This was a retrospective analysis of critically ill adult patients receiving intravenous colistin for MDR-GN pneumonia comparing colistin combination therapy to colistin monotherapy with a primary endpoint of clinical cure. Combination therapy was defined by administration of another antibiotic to which the MDR-GN pathogen was reported as susceptible or intermediate. Ninety patients were included for evaluation (41 combination therapy and 49 monotherapy). Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. No difference in clinical cure was observed between combination therapy and monotherapy in univariate analysis, nor when adjusted for APACHE II score and time to appropriate antibiotic therapy (57.1 vs. 63.4 %, adjusted OR 1.15, p = 0.78). Microbiological cure was significantly higher for combination therapy (87 vs. 35.5 %, p Colistin combination therapy was associated with a significant improvement in microbiological cure, without improvement in clinical cure. Based on the in vitro synergy and improvement in microbiological clearance, colistin combination therapy should be prescribed for MDR-GN pneumonia. Further research is warranted to determine if in vitro synergy with colistin translates into improved clinical outcomes.

  5. The role of fluticasone propionate/salmeterol combination therapy in preventing exacerbations of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P Yawn

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Barbara P Yawn1, Ibrahim Raphiou2, Judith S Hurley3, Anand A Dalal21Olmsted Medical Center, University of Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, USA; 2GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA; 3Hurley Consulting, Placitas, New Mexico, USAAbstract: Exacerbations contribute significantly to the morbidity of COPD, leading to an accelerated decline in lung function, reduced functional status, reduced health status and quality of life, poorer prognosis and increased mortality. Prevention of exacerbations is thus an important goal of COPD management. In patients with COPD, treatment with a combination of the inhaled corticosteroid fluticasone propionate (250 μg and the long-acting β2-agonist salmeterol (50 μg in a single inhaler (250/50 μg is an effective therapy option that has been shown to reduce the frequency of exacerbations, to improve lung function, dyspnea and health status, and to be relatively cost-effective as a COPD maintenance therapy. Importantly, results of various studies suggest that fluticasone propionate and salmeterol have synergistic effects when administered together that improve their efficacy in controlling symptoms and reducing exacerbations. The present non-systematic review summarizes the role of fluticasone propionate/salmeterol combination therapy in the prevention of exacerbations of COPD and its related effects on lung function, survival, health status, and healthcare costs.Keywords: Advair, COPD, disease exacerbation, fluticasone propionate, salmeterol, combination drug therapy

  6. Polydopamine Nanoparticles as a Versatile Molecular Loading Platform to Enable Imaging-guided Cancer Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ziliang; Gong, Hua; Gao, Min; Zhu, Wenwen; Sun, Xiaoqi; Feng, Liangzhu; Fu, Tingting; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer combination therapy to treat tumors with different therapeutic approaches can efficiently improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects. Herein, we develop a theranostic nano-platform based on polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, which then are exploited as a versatile carrier to allow simultaneous loading of indocyanine green (ICG), doxorubicin (DOX) and manganese ions (PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn)), to enable imaging-guided chemo & photothermal cancer therapy. In this system, ICG acts as a photothermal agent, which shows red-shifted near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and enhanced photostability compared with free ICG. DOX, a model chemotherapy drug, is then loaded onto the surface of PDA-ICG-PEG with high efficiency. With Mn(2+) ions intrinsically chelated, PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn) is able to offer contrast under T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In a mouse tumor model, the MR imaging-guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy achieves a remarkable synergistic therapeutic effect compared with the respective single treatment modality. This work demonstrates that PDA nanoparticles could serve as a versatile molecular loading platform for MR imaging guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy with minimal side effects, showing great potential for cancer theranostics.

  7. HSP90 Inhibitor Encapsulated Photo-Theranostic Nanoparticles for Synergistic Combination Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Guo, Wenchang; Long, Qilai; Ma, Aihong; Liu, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Hongyong; Huang, Yee; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Pan, Chongxian; Lam, Kit S; Li, Yuanpei

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising non-invasive therapeutic modality that has been proposed for treating prostate cancer, but the procedure is associated with limited efficacy, tumor recurrence and photo-toxicity. In the present study, we proposed to develop a novel multifunctional nano-platform for targeted delivery of heat, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor simultaneously for combination therapy against prostate cancer. This new nano-platform combines two newly developed entities: 1) a unique organic and biocompatible nanoporphyrin-based drug delivery system that can generate efficient heat and ROS simultaneously with light activation at the tumor sites for dual-modal photothermal- and photodynamic- therapy (PTT/PDT), and 2) new nano-formulations of Hsp90 inhibitors that can decrease the levels of pro-survival and angiogenic signaling molecules induced by phototherapy, therefore, further sensitizing cancer cells to phototherapy. Furthermore, the nanoparticles have activatable near infrared (NIR) fluorescence for optical imaging to conveniently monitor the real-time drug delivery in both subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models bearing prostate cancer xenograft. This novel multifunctional nano-platform has great potential to improve the care of prostate cancer patients through targeted combination therapy.

  8. Chikungunya Virus: In Vitro Response to Combination Therapy With Ribavirin and Interferon Alfa 2a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Karen M; Drusano, George L; D Argenio, David Z; Brown, Ashley N

    2016-10-15

    We evaluated the antiviral activities of ribavirin (RBV) and interferon (IFN) alfa as monotherapy and combination therapy against chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Vero cells were infected with CHIKV in the presence of RBV and/or IFN alfa, and viral production was quantified by plaque assay. A mathematical model was fit to the data to identify drug interactions for effect. We ran simulations using the best-fit model parameters to predict the antiviral activity associated with clinically relevant regimens of RBV and IFN alfa as combination therapy. The model predictions were validated using the hollow fiber infection model (HFIM) system. RBV and IFN alfa were effective against CHIKV as monotherapy at supraphysiological concentrations. However, RBV and IFN alfa were highly synergistic for antiviral effect when administered as combination therapy. Simulations with our mathematical model predicted that a standard clinical regimen of RBV plus IFN alfa would inhibit CHIKV burden by 2.5 log10 following 24 hours of treatment. In the HFIM system, RBV plus IFN alfa at clinical exposures resulted in a 2.1-log10 decrease in the CHIKV burden following 24 hours of therapy. These findings validate the prediction made by the mathematical model. These studies illustrate the promise of RBV plus IFN alfa as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of CHIKV infections. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Combination photodynamic therapy of human breast cancer using salicylic acid and methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Khorsandi, Khatereh; Jahanshiri, Maryam

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of combination therapy with methylene blue (MB) assisted photodynamic therapy (PDT) and salicylic acid (SA) as chemo-therapy anticancer agent. The binding of salicylic acid to methylene blue was studied using spectrophotometric method. The results show the 1:2 complex formation between SA and MB. The binding constants and related Gibbs free energies o are obtained (Kb1 = 183.74, Kb2 = 38.13 and ∆ Gb1° = 12.92 kJ·mol- 1, ∆ Gb2° =9.02 kJ·mol- 1). The spectrophotometric results show the improvement in solubilization and reduction prevention for SA and MB in the complex form. These results are in agreements with cellular experiments. The dark toxicity measurements represent the improve efficacy of chemotherapy using combination of SA and MB. The photodynamic therapy results (using red LED as light source (630 nm; power density: 30 mW cm- 2)) show that the cancer cell killing efficiency of MB increases in the combination with SA due to reduction prevention and stabilization of monomeric form of MB.

  10. Initial High-Dose Prednisolone Combination Therapy Using COBRA and COBRA-Light in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasch, L.A.; van Tuyl, L.H.D.; Lems, W.F.; Boers, M.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with initial high-dose prednisolone and a combination of methotrexate (MTX) and sulfasalazine (SSZ) according to the COBRA regimen (Dutch acronym for combinatietherapie bij reumatoide artritis, 'combination therapy for rheumatoid arthritis'), has repeatedly been demonstrated to be very

  11. Helicobacter pylori eradication in Western Australia using novel quadruple therapy combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, C Y; Windsor, H M; Thirriot, F; Lu, W; Conway, C; Perkins, T T; Marshall, B J

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori eradication rates with standard triple therapy are declining worldwide. The optimal management of H. pylori is evolving and new treatment combinations for antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains are required, especially for patients with penicillin allergy. To review the effectiveness of alternative antibiotic combinations and necessity of pre-antibiotic sensitivity testing. A total of 310 consecutive patients who had failed at least one course of standard 7-day triple therapy initially prescribed by their physicians were included in this study between year 2007 and 2011. Antibiotics were prescribed based on pre-antibiotic sensitivity tests and, if any, patient's allergy to penicillin. In 98.7% of the patients' samples, H. pylori was successfully cultured. The proportion resistant to clarithromycin and metronidazole was 94.1% and 67.6% respectively, with 65% resistant to both. For the in-house primary quadruple therapy, with Proton pump inhibitor, Amoxicillin, Rifabutin and Ciprofloxacin (PARC), H. pylori was successfully eradicated in 95.2% of patients. For patients allergic to amoxicillin, an alternative quadruple therapy using Proton pump inhibitor, Bismuth subcitrate, Rifabutin and Ciprofloxacin (PBRC) gave an eradication rate of 94.2%. Patients needing alternative salvage therapy were given novel personalised combinations consisting of bismuth, rifabutin, tetracycline or furazolidone; the eradication rate was 73.8%. Patients who present with antibiotic resistant H. pylori can be confidently treated with PARC, PBRC or other personalised salvage therapies. These regimens can be used when treatment options are limited by penicillin allergy. Pre-treatment H. pylori antibiotic sensitivity tests contributed to the high eradication rate in this study. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. In vitro combination therapy using low dose clotrimazole and photodynamic therapy leads to enhanced killing of the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, C Oliver; Chau, Mousawi; Stack, Colin

    2014-10-15

    Superficial infections of the skin and mucous membranes caused by dermatophyte fungi are amongst the most common and challenging infections to treat. Previously we demonstrated the phototoxic effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) towards Trichophyton rubrum, using a green laser to photoactivate Rose Bengal (RB). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether we could; (1) achieve a similar effect using an inexpensive light-emitting diode (LED) to photoactivate RB and (2) to evaluate whether our PDT regime could be combined with standard antifungal drug therapy and increase its effectiveness. We designed and built our own inexpensive green (530 nm) LED source and tested its efficacy as part our RB-PDT regime in vitro against T. rubrum. We also examined the potential benefits of incorporating PDT as part of combination therapy and whether the order in which this was done had an impact. First we subjected spore suspensions to sub-inhibitory concentrations of a number of antifungal agents (CLT, MCZ and TRB) for 72 hours followed by RB-PDT. Secondly we subjected spore suspensions to sub-inhibitory PDT followed by drug treatment and evaluated if there were any changes to the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the drugs tested. The optimal conditions for photoinactivation of T. rubrum using RB-PDT alone were 140 μM of RB and 24 J/cm2 of LED (equating to a 30-minute exposure). These parameters also caused a 100% reduction in the viability of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans and the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By combining our RB-PDT regime as an adjunct to antifungal drugs we were able to dramatically reduce the exposure times. Treatment of spore suspensions using a sub-inhibitory dose of clotrimazole (CLT) followed by RB-PDT, this order was critical, significantly reduced the exposure times required to achieve 100% inhibition of T. rubrum to 15 minutes as compared to RB-PDT alone. The combination of antifungal drug and RB-PDT represents an

  13. Combination therapy with GLP-1 receptor agonists and basal insulin: a systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balena, R; Hensley, I E; Miller, S; Barnett, A H

    2013-01-01

    Treatment algorithms for type 2 diabetes call for intensification of therapy over time as the disease progresses and glycaemic control worsens. If diet, exercise and oral antihyperglycaemic medications (OAMs) fail to maintain glycaemic control then basal insulin is added and ultimately prandial insulin may be required. However, such an intensification strategy carries risk of increased hypoglycaemia and weight gain, both of which are associated with worse long-term outcomes. An alternative strategy is to intensify therapy by the addition of a short-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA) rather than prandial insulin. Short-acting GLP-1 RAs such as exenatide twice daily are particularly effective at reducing postprandial glucose while basal insulin has a greater effect on fasting glucose, providing a physiological rationale for this complementary approach. This review analyzes the latest randomized controlled clinical trials of insulin/GLP-1 RA combination therapy and examines results from ‘real-world’ use of the combinations as reported through observational and clinical practice studies. The most common finding across all types of studies was that combination therapy improved glycaemic control without weight gain or an increased risk of hypoglycaemia. Many studies reported weight loss and a reduction in insulin use when a GLP-1 RA was added to existing insulin therapy. Overall, the relative degree of benefit to glycaemic control and weight was influenced by the insulin titration employed in conjunction with the GLP-1 RA. The greatest glycaemic benefits were observed in studies with structured titration of insulin to glycaemic targets while the greatest weight benefits were observed in studies with a protocol-specified focus on insulin sparing. The adverse event profile of GLP-1 RAs in the reviewed trials was similar to that reported with GLP-1 RAs as monotherapy or in combination with OAMs with gastrointestinal events being the most commonly

  14. Studies on effect of psychological intervention combination with music therapy on nursing for abdominal MRI scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-xia SUN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effectiveness and significance of the Psychological intervention combined with music therapy in abdominal MRI examination. Methods: 230 cases who underwent abdominal MRI examination between 2010 January and 2012 December were collected. They were divided into three groups randomly: routine nursing group, Psychological intervention group and music therapy group. Differences in age, gender, educational level, blood pressure and heart rate were compared between the three groups; To analyze the changes of vital signs after MRI examination, MRI examination results , psychological reaction before and after MRI examination of the three groups. Results: (1There was no significant difference in the general information (P>0.05; (2The heart rate, respiration and blood pressure after MRI examination of patients with routine nursing increased significantly than the other two groups. And psychological nursing group was higher than the music therapy group to some extent;The MRI detection time of routine nursing group was significantly longer than the other two groups (P <0.05; (3The one-time completion rate of the last two groups was significantly higher than the routine nursing  group (P <0.05, and music therapy group was significantly higher than that of the psychological intervention group.The adverse psychological reaction in Psychological intervention group was significantly decreased compared with routine nursing group; and music therapy group decreased significantly compared with the psychological  intervention  group (P <0.05; (4Although the anxiety / depression score of psychological  intervention  group increased slightly ,but it significantly lower than the usual care group (P <0.05; The anxiety / depression scores of music therapy group were significantly decreased, significantly lower than the other two groups (P <0.05. Conclusion: Psychological nursing combined with music therapy is a good way to eliminate the

  15. Low-dose combination therapy: the rationalization for an ACE inhibitor and a calcium channel blocker in higher risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, N M

    2001-05-01

    As more high-risk hypertensives are treated and the need for more intensive antihypertensive therapy is recognized, combination therapies are increasingly used. For initial therapy, particularly for relatively low-risk patients, low-dose combinations are often appropriate. For those who require additional therapy, higher doses of combinations may provide further efficacy while minimizing dose-dependent side effects of monotherapy, thereby improving adherence to therapy. Those combination agents should provide 24-h control with one daily dose, thereby ensuring protection in the early morning hours. Combining an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and a calcium channel blocker is a rational approach to treating hypertension. Not only does it provide significantly better blood pressure control than individual components used as monotherapy, it also minimizes dose-dependent side effects. Also, combining agents from different classes results in complementary mechanisms of action that provide other cardiovascular protective benefits.

  16. Combination decongestion therapy in hospitalized heart failure: loop diuretics, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Mentz, Robert J; Greene, Stephen J; Senni, Michele; Sato, Naoki; Nodari, Savina; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Congestion is the most common reason for admissions and readmissions for heart failure (HF). The vast majority of hospitalized HF patients appear to respond readily to loop diuretics, but available data suggest that a significant proportion are being discharged with persistent evidence of congestion. Although novel therapies targeting congestion should continue to be developed, currently available agents may be utilized more optimally to facilitate complete decongestion. The combination of loop diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists represents a regimen of currently available therapies that affects early and persistent decongestion, while limiting the associated risks of electrolyte disturbances, hemodynamic fluctuations, renal dysfunction and mortality.

  17. Single versus combination intravenous anti-pseudomonal antibiotic therapy for people with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, Heather E; Scott, Alison

    2016-12-01

    Choice of antibiotic, and the use of single or combined therapy are controversial areas in the treatment of respiratory infection due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF). Advantages of combination therapy include wider range of modes of action, possible synergy and reduction of resistant organisms; advantages of monotherapy include lower cost, ease of administration and reduction of drug-related toxicity. Current evidence does not provide a clear answer and the use of intravenous antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis requires further evaluation. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the effectiveness of single compared to combination intravenous anti-pseudomonal antibiotic therapy for treating people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Most recent search of the Group's Trials Register: 14 October 2016. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing a single intravenous anti-pseudomonal antibiotic with a combination of that antibiotic plus a second anti-pseudomonal antibiotic in people with CF. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We identified 45 trials, of which eight trials (356 participants) comparing a single anti-pseudomonal agent to a combination of the same antibiotic and one other, were included.There was a wide variation in the individual antibiotics used in each trial. In total, the trials included seven comparisons of a beta-lactam antibiotic (penicillin-related or third generation cephalosporin) with a beta-lactam-aminoglycoside combination and three comparisons of an aminoglycoside with a beta-lactam-aminoglycoside combination. These two groups of trials were analysed as separate subgroups.There was considerable heterogeneity amongst these trials

  18. EFFICACY OF FIXED COMBINATION OF VALSARTAN, AMLODIPINE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE IN COMPLEX THERAPY OF THE PATIENT OF VERY HIGH CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Sokolov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high prevalence of arterial hypertension in association with high and very high cardiovascular risk requires widespread use of combined therapy. Current approaches to selection of combination components of antihypertensive drugs are based the efficacy of these drugs proven in multicenter randomized clinical trials. The triple combination of calcium antagonist, angiotensin II receptor blocker and thiazide diuretic is regarded as the best option for combined therapy in patients with arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease to reduce cardiovascular risk.

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of combination therapies for visceral leishmaniasis in the Indian subcontinent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Meheus

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis is a systemic parasitic disease that is fatal unless treated. We assessed the cost and cost-effectiveness of alternative strategies for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in the Indian subcontinent. In particular we examined whether combination therapies are a cost-effective alternative compared to monotherapies.We assessed the cost-effectiveness of all possible mono- and combination therapies for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in the Indian subcontinent (India, Nepal and Bangladesh from a societal perspective using a decision analytical model based on a decision tree. Primary data collected in each country was combined with data from the literature and an expert poll (Delphi method. The cost per patient treated and average and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios expressed as cost per death averted were calculated. Extensive sensitivity analysis was done to evaluate the robustness of our estimations and conclusions. With a cost of US$92 per death averted, the combination miltefosine-paromomycin was the most cost-effective treatment strategy. The next best alternative was a combination of liposomal amphotericin B with paromomycin with an incremental cost-effectiveness of $652 per death averted. All other strategies were dominated with the exception of a single dose of 10mg per kg of liposomal amphotericin B. While strategies based on liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome were found to be the most effective, its current drug cost of US$20 per vial resulted in a higher average cost-effectiveness. Sensitivity analysis showed the conclusion to be robust to variations in the input parameters over their plausible range.Combination treatments are a cost-effective alternative to current monotherapy for VL. Given their expected impact on the emergence of drug resistance, a switch to combination therapy should be considered once final results from clinical trials are available.

  20. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy combined with conventional endodontic treatment to eliminate root canal biofilm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Aguinaldo S; Ribeiro, Martha S; Tegos, George P; Núñez, Silvia C; Jorge, Antonio O C; Hamblin, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT), standard endodontic treatment and the combined treatment to eliminate bacterial biofilms present in infected root canals. Ten single-rooted freshly extracted human teeth were inoculated with stable bioluminescent Gram-negative bacteria, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form 3-day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify bacterial burdens. PDT employed a conjugate between polyethylenimine and chlorin(e6) as the photosensitizer (PS) and 660-nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 200-micro fiber, and this was compared and combined with standard endodontic treatment using mechanical debridement and antiseptic irrigation. Endodontic therapy alone reduced bacterial bioluminescence by 90% while PDT alone reduced bioluminescence by 95%. The combination reduced bioluminescence by >98%, and importantly the bacterial regrowth observed 24 hours after treatment was much less for the combination (PAntimicrobial PDT may have a role to play in optimized endodontic therapy. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Immunotherapy regimens for combination with photodynamic therapy aimed at eradication of solid cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen

    2000-06-01

    Due to inflammatory/immune responses elicited by photodynamic therapy (PDT), this modality is particularly suitable in combination with various forms of immunotherapy for an improved therapeutic gain. A wide variety of approaches that may be applicable in this context include those focusing on amplifying the activity of particular immune cell types (neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells, helper or cytotoxic T lymphocytes). Another type of approach is to focus on a specific phase of immune response development, which comprises the activation of non-specific inflammatory immune effectors, immune recognition, immune memory, immune rejection, or blocking of immune suppression. These different strategies call for a variety of immunotherapeutic protocols to be employed in combination with PDT. These include treatments such as: (1) non-specific immunoactivators (e.g. bacterial vaccines), (2) specific immune agents (cytokines, or other activating factors), (3) adoptive immunotherapy treatments (transfer of dendritic cells, tumor-sensitized T lymphocytes or natural killer cells), or (4) their combinations. Techniques of gene therapy employed in some of these protocols offer novel opportunities for securing a potent and persistent immune activity. Using PDT and immunotherapy represents an attractive combination for cancer therapy that is capable of eradicating both localized and disseminated malignant lesions.

  2. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Combined With Conventional Endodontic Treatment to Eliminate Root Canal Biofilm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Aguinaldo S.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Tegos, George P.; Núñez, Silvia C.; Jorge, Antonio O.C.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective To compare the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT), standard endodontic treatment and the combined treatment to eliminate bacterial biofilms present in infected root canals. Study Design/Materials and Methods Ten single-rooted freshly extracted human teeth were inoculated with stable bioluminescent Gram-negative bacteria, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form 3-day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify bacterial burdens. PDT employed a conjugate between polyethylenimine and chlorin(e6) as the photosensitizer (PS) and 660-nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 200-µ fiber, and this was compared and combined with standard endodontic treatment using mechanical debridement and antiseptic irrigation. Results Endodontic therapy alone reduced bacterial bioluminescence by 90% while PDT alone reduced bioluminescence by 95%. The combination reduced bioluminescence by >98%, and importantly the bacterial regrowth observed 24 hours after treatment was much less for the combination (PAntimicrobial PDT may have a role to play in optimized endodontic therapy. PMID:17066481

  3. Triple Combination Therapy for Global Cardiovascular Risk: Atorvastatin, Perindopril, and Amlodipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Michel E; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Mourad, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have markedly changed the clinical progression of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The goal of this paper is to review the rationale and evidence for combining these three drug classes in hypertensive patients with hypercholesterolemia or CAD. Data sources include a literature search for publications on the use of a statin combined with various antihypertensive drugs in patients with hypertension and hypercholesterolemia or stable CAD. Hypercholesterolemia and hypertension constitute major physiological risk factors of ischemic heart disease. Current guidelines recommend a global approach to risk management, using agents that address as many risk factors as possible. Dual combination therapies are an important component of guideline-recommended therapy in hypertension. Our review of the literature indicates that triple therapy with a statin, ACE inhibitor, and CCB is associated with a significant reduction in major cardiovascular events. For example, a post hoc analysis in 1056 patients with stable CAD participating in the EUROPA trial indicated that the addition of perindopril to a CCB and a lipid-lowering agent was associated with a 46 % reduction in the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and resuscitated cardiac arrest (p = 0.023). In addition, single pill formulations are known to result in better adherence to the treatment. Single-pill formulations that combine a statin, an ACE inhibitor, and a CCB appear to offer an effective approach to the management of global cardiovascular risk.

  4. Combination therapy with spironolactone and candesartan protects against streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofni, Amal; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Taye, Ashraf; Khalifa, Mohamed M

    2014-12-05

    Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most common causes of end-stage kidney disease. Aldosterone and angiotensin II appear to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of this disease. The present study aimed to investigate effects of the combination therapy with spironolactone and candesartan on diabetic nephropathy and elucidate the underlying mechanism(s) involved. Diabetes was induced in rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (55 mg/kg). The diabetic rats were orally treated with spironolactone (50 mg/kg/day) and/or candesartan (1 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks. Administration of STZ caused a marked elevation in the serum level of creatinine, urea and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR). This was associated with upregulated renal protein levels of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) alongside increasing the renal superoxide anion (O2(-)) production, malondialdehyde (MDA) level and the systolic blood pressure. There was a marked decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and antioxidant enzyme capacity. The combined therapy of spironolactone and candesartan significantly normalized the oxidative stress and fibrotic/inflammatory alterations. Additionally, the elevated blood pressure was attenuated by administration of candesartan alone or in combination. This was associated with improving the renal function parameters. The combined therapy exhibited more profound response compared to the monotherapy. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the combined therapy of spironolactone and candesartan can confer an additive benefit over the use of either drug alone against STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy, presumably via attenuating the inflammatory responses and oxidative status markers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of combination drug therapy to develop regimens with shortened duration of treatment for tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George L Drusano

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a worldwide problem, particularly with the advent of multi-drug resistance. Shortening therapy duration for Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major goal, requiring generation of optimal kill rate and resistance-suppression. Combination therapy is required to attain the goal of shorter therapy.Our objective was to identify a method for identifying optimal combination chemotherapy. We developed a mathematical model for attaining this end. This is accomplished by identifying drug effect interaction (synergy, additivity, antagonism for susceptible organisms and subpopulations resistant to each drug in the combination.We studied the combination of linezolid plus rifampin in our hollow fiber infection model. We generated a fully parametric drug effect interaction mathematical model. The results were subjected to Monte Carlo simulation to extend the findings to a population of patients by accounting for between-patient variability in drug pharmacokinetics.All monotherapy allowed emergence of resistance over the first two weeks of the experiment. In combination, the interaction was additive for each population (susceptible and resistant. For a 600 mg/600 mg daily regimen of linezolid plus rifampin, we demonstrated that >50% of simulated subjects had eradicated the susceptible population by day 27 with the remaining organisms resistant to one or the other drug. Only 4% of patients had complete organism eradication by experiment end.These data strongly suggest that in order to achieve the goal of shortening therapy, the original regimen may need to be changed at one month to a regimen of two completely new agents with resistance mechanisms independent of the initial regimen. This hypothesis which arose from the analysis is immediately testable in a clinical trial.

  6. Test of critical steps towards a combined cell and gene therapy approach for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kajhøj, Tine Qvistgaard; Duch, Mogens R.; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2015-01-01

    Background: Therapies for muscular dystrophies remain a major challenge in spite of advanced strategies using either cell or gene therapy. We here propose a combined approach of cell and gene therapy. As gene delivery vehicles with specific homing potential we have chosen mesoangioblasts which...

  7. Options for empagliflozin in combination therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hershon KS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth S Hershon1,2 1North Shore Diabetes and Endocrine Associates, New Hyde Park, 2Department of Medicine, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hempstead, NY, USA Objective: To update clinicians with an overview of empagliflozin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, with focus on use in combination regimens. Methods: Keyword searches were conducted in the Medline database to identify literature reporting clinical trials of at least 12 weeks' duration using empagliflozin treatment in patients with T2DM. Results: When given as monotherapy or in combination therapy (as add-on or single-pill therapy with metformin, pioglitazone, sulfonylurea, linagliptin, and insulin, empagliflozin produced clinically meaningful reductions in glycated hemoglobin levels, plasma glucose concentrations, bodyweight, and blood pressure. These changes were sustained during long-term treatment. In a dedicated cardiovascular event trial, empagliflozin on top of standard of care demonstrated a significant reduction in the risk of cardiovascular mortality and all-cause mortality. Across the clinical trials, empagliflozin combination therapies were well tolerated, and empagliflozin used alone was not associated with increased risk of hypoglycemia versus placebo. Indeed, the combination of empagliflozin and metformin had a significantly reduced rate of hypoglycemia compared with the combination of metformin and a sulfonylurea. On the other hand, empagliflozin treatment did have increased risk of genital infections compared with placebo. In clinical trials to date, diabetic ketoacidosis was not seen more frequently with empagliflozin than with placebo, but physicians should be alert to the possibility of this rare event. Conclusion: Empagliflozin has the potential to make an important contribution to the treatment of patients with T2DM. In some patients, empagliflozin may be used as monotherapy, but it is most likely to be used in combination with other

  8. Antibiotic combination therapy can select for broad-spectrum multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm; Marvig, Rasmus L.

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with several antibiotics is one strategy that has been applied in order to limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance. We compared the de novo evolution of resistance during combination therapy with the β-lactam ceftazidime and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin with the resi...

  9. Combination therapy of ursodeoxycholic acid and budesonide for PBC–AIH overlap syndrome: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huawei; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Rong; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Yuqing; Dai, Weiqi; Wang, Fan; Chen, Kan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Chengfen; Li, Sainan; Liu, Tong; Abudumijiti, Huerxidan; Zhou, Zheng; Wang, Jianrong; Lu, Wenxia; Wang, Junshan; Xia, Yujing; Zhou, Yingqun; Lu, Jie; Guo, Chuanyong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) monotherapy with combination therapies utilizing UDCA and budesonide was performed. We found that combination therapy with UDCA and budesonide was more effective than UDCA monotherapy for primary biliary cirrhosis–autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome. Moreover, compared to prednisone, budesonide has fewer side effects. PMID:25632224

  10. Combination therapy of ursodeoxycholic acid and budesonide for PBC-AIH overlap syndrome: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huawei; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Rong; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Yuqing; Dai, Weiqi; Wang, Fan; Chen, Kan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Chengfen; Li, Sainan; Liu, Tong; Abudumijiti, Huerxidan; Zhou, Zheng; Wang, Jianrong; Lu, Wenxia; Wang, Junshan; Xia, Yujing; Zhou, Yingqun; Lu, Jie; Guo, Chuanyong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) monotherapy with combination therapies utilizing UDCA and budesonide was performed. We found that combination therapy with UDCA and budesonide was more effective than UDCA monotherapy for primary biliary cirrhosis-autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome. Moreover, compared to prednisone, budesonide has fewer side effects.

  11. Combined treatment of exudative age related macular degeneration with photodynamic therapy and intravitreal triamcinolone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Mª Ruiz-Moreno

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available José Mª Ruiz-Moreno1,2, Javier A Montero21Department of Ophthalmology, Miguel Hernández University School of Medicine, Alicante, Spain; 2Vitreo-Retinal Unit, Alicante Institute of Ophthalmology, Alicante, SpainAbstract: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV secondary to age related macular degeneration is among the leading causes of legal blindness in developed countries. Photodynamic therapy (PDT with verteporfin induces CNV closure causing little damage to healthy tissue, but the need to re-treat may lead to low final visual acuity at an unacceptable cost. The association of intravitreous triamcinolone or antiangiogenic drugs with PDT has been used in order to reduce these limitations of the therapy. The combination of PDT and intravitreous triamcinolone, its complications and outcome at one and two-year follow-up are discussed.Keywords: age related macular degeneration, choroidal neovascularization, photodynamic therapy, steroid, triamcinolone

  12. Case of acne conglobata successfully treated by CO(2) laser combined with topical tretinoin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Toshio; Matsukura, Tomoyuki; Suga, Yasushi; Muramatsu, Shigenori; Mizuno, Yuki; Tsuchihashi, Hitoshi; Haruna, Kunitaka; Ogawa, Hideoki; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2007-08-01

    Acne conglobata is an uncommon disorder characterized by the presence of nodulocystic lesions. Conservative therapy with oral and topical antibiotics is of limited efficacy in many cases, and surgical excision is often needed for removal of the cystic lesions. Treatment is particularly difficult in cases with lesions located in aesthetically sensitive areas, such as the face. We successfully treated a case of acne conglobata by CO(2) laser ablation to remove the top of the sinuses and their tracts. In addition, topical tretinoin therapy was also initiated simultaneously to prevent the appearance of new acne lesions. Based on the results, we propose that the use of CO(2) laser for opening the cysts, combined with topical tretinoin therapy to prevent the appearance of new lesions, is a powerful treatment option for acne conglobata.

  13. Manipulating Protein Acetylation in Breast Cancer: A Promising Approach in Combination with Hormonal Therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Linares

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens play an essential role in the normal physiology of the breast as well as in mammary tumorigenesis. Their effects are mediated by two nuclear estrogen receptors, ERα and β, which regulate transcription of specific genes by interacting with multiprotein complexes, including histone deacetylases (HDACs. During the past few years, HDACs have raised great interest as therapeutic targets in the field of cancer therapy. In breast cancer, several experimental arguments suggest that HDACs are involved at multiple levels in mammary tumorigenesis: their expression is deregulated in breast tumors; they interfere with ER signaling in intricate ways, restoring hormone sensitivity in models of estrogen resistance, and they clinically represent new potential targets for HDACs inhibitors (HDIs in combination with hormonal therapies. In this paper, we will describe these different aspects and underline the clinical interest of HDIs in the context of breast cancer resistance to hormone therapies (HTs.

  14. Can We Predict Individual Combined Benefit and Harm of Therapy? Warfarin Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation as a Test Case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Li

    Full Text Available To construct and validate a prediction model for individual combined ben