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Sample records for combinatorial labeling probes

  1. PNA-COMBO-FISH: From combinatorial probe design in silico to vitality compatible, specific labelling of gene targets in cell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Patrick; Rößler, Jens; Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Schmitt, Eberhard; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Recently, advantages concerning targeting specificity of PCR constructed oligonucleotide FISH probes in contrast to established FISH probes, e.g. BAC clones, have been demonstrated. These techniques, however, are still using labelling protocols with DNA denaturing steps applying harsh heat treatment with or without further denaturing chemical agents. COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH) allows the design of specific oligonucleotide probe combinations in silico. Thus, being independent from primer libraries or PCR laboratory conditions, the probe sequences extracted by computer sequence data base search can also be synthesized as single stranded PNA-probes (Peptide Nucleic Acid probes). Gene targets can be specifically labelled with at least about 20 PNA-probes obtaining visibly background free specimens. By using appropriately designed triplex forming oligonucleotides, the denaturing procedures can completely be omitted. These results reveal a significant step towards oligonucleotide-FISH maintaining the 3D-nanostructure and even the viability of the cell target. The method is demonstrated with the detection of Her2/neu and GRB7 genes, which are indicators in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy. - Highlights: • Denaturation free protocols preserve 3D architecture of chromosomes and nuclei. • Labelling sets are determined in silico for duplex and triplex binding. • Probes are produced chemically with freely chosen backbones and base variants. • Peptide nucleic acid backbones reduce hindering charge interactions. • Intercalating side chains stabilize binding of short oligonucleotides.

  2. PNA-COMBO-FISH: From combinatorial probe design in silico to vitality compatible, specific labelling of gene targets in cell nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Patrick; Rößler, Jens; Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta [University of Heidelberg, Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schmitt, Eberhard, E-mail: eschmitt@kip.uni-heidelberg.de [University of Heidelberg, Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); University of Göttingen, Institute for Numerical and Applied Mathematics, Lotzestraße 16-18, D-37083 Göttingen (Germany); Hausmann, Michael, E-mail: hausmann@kip.uni-heidelberg.de [University of Heidelberg, Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Recently, advantages concerning targeting specificity of PCR constructed oligonucleotide FISH probes in contrast to established FISH probes, e.g. BAC clones, have been demonstrated. These techniques, however, are still using labelling protocols with DNA denaturing steps applying harsh heat treatment with or without further denaturing chemical agents. COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH) allows the design of specific oligonucleotide probe combinations in silico. Thus, being independent from primer libraries or PCR laboratory conditions, the probe sequences extracted by computer sequence data base search can also be synthesized as single stranded PNA-probes (Peptide Nucleic Acid probes). Gene targets can be specifically labelled with at least about 20 PNA-probes obtaining visibly background free specimens. By using appropriately designed triplex forming oligonucleotides, the denaturing procedures can completely be omitted. These results reveal a significant step towards oligonucleotide-FISH maintaining the 3D-nanostructure and even the viability of the cell target. The method is demonstrated with the detection of Her2/neu and GRB7 genes, which are indicators in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy. - Highlights: • Denaturation free protocols preserve 3D architecture of chromosomes and nuclei. • Labelling sets are determined in silico for duplex and triplex binding. • Probes are produced chemically with freely chosen backbones and base variants. • Peptide nucleic acid backbones reduce hindering charge interactions. • Intercalating side chains stabilize binding of short oligonucleotides.

  3. A combinatorial framework for map labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, F.; Wolff, A.; Whitesides, S.

    1998-01-01

    The general map labeling problem consists in labeling a set of sites (points, lines, regions) given a set of candidates (rectangles, circles, ellipses, irregularly shaped labels) for each site. A map can be a classical cartographical map, a diagram, a graph or any other figure that needs to be

  4. A combinatorial proof of Postnikov's identity and a generalized enumeration of labeled trees

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Seunghyun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we give a simple combinatorial explanation of a formula of A. Postnikov relating bicolored rooted trees to bicolored binary trees. We also present generalized formulas for the number of labeled k-ary trees, rooted labeled trees, and labeled plane trees.

  5. Combinatorial Integer Labeling Thorems on Finite Sets with an Application to Discrete Systems of Nonlinear Equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, G.; Talman, A.J.J.; Yang, Z.F.

    2007-01-01

    Tucker's well-known combinatorial lemma states that for any given symmetric triangulation of the n-dimensional unit cube and for any integer labeling that assigns to each vertex of the triangulation a label from the set f§1;§2; ¢ ¢ ¢ ;§ng with the property that antipodal vertices on the boundary of

  6. Introducing Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: Probing the Substrate Selectivity of Acetylcholinesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelin, Marcus; Larsson, Rikard; Vongvilai, Pornrapee; Ramstrom, Olof

    2010-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, college students are introduced to dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) and apply it to determine the substrate selectivity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Initially, the students construct a chemical library of dynamically interchanging thioesters and thiols. Then, AChE is added and allowed to select and hydrolyze…

  7. Labeled estrogens as mammary tumor probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feenstra, A.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis estrogens labeled with a gamma or positron emitting nuclide, called estrogen-receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals are investigated as mammary tumour probes. The requirements for estrogen-receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals are formulated and the literature on estrogens labeled for this purpose is reviewed. The potential of mercury-197/197m and of carbon-11 as label for estrogen-receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals is investigated. The synthesis of 197 Hg-labeled 4-mercury-estradiol and 2-mercury-estradiol and their properties in vitro and in vivo are described. It appears that though basically carbon-11 labeled compounds are very promising as mammary tumour probes, their achievable specific activity has to be increased. (Auth.)

  8. Combinatorial Dansyl Library and its Applications to pH-Responsive Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong Cheol; Murale, Dhiraj P; Lee, Jun-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report the first 48-membered, dansyl-based, combinatorial fluorescent library. From the electronic and structural properties of the probes, we analyzed their optical properties and chemical yields, with an average of 49 %. The molecules were examined for their pH responses, and DS-2 and DS-45 showed blue-shifts, whereas DS-7 and DS-40 showed red-shifts in wavelength with increasing pH. Finally, cell permeability was investigated by treating SNU-2292 cells. Our results demonstrate the potential application of this library in biosensors, bio-imaging and pH indicators.

  9. A systematic analysis of backbone amide assignments achieved via combinatorial selective labelling of amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremy Craven, C. [University of Sheffield, Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Biology (United Kingdom); Al-Owais, Moza; Parker, Martin J. [University of Leeds, Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.j.parker@leeds.ac.uk

    2007-06-15

    With the advent of high-yield cell-free expressions systems, many researchers are exploiting selective isotope labelling of amino acids to increase the efficiency and accuracy of the NMR assignment process. We developed recently a combinatorial selective labelling (CSL) method capable of yielding large numbers of residue-type and sequence-specific backbone amide assignments, which involves comparing cross-peak intensities in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC and 2D {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HNCO spectra collected for five samples containing different combinations of {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-labelled amino acids [Parker MJ, Aulton-Jones M, Hounslow A, Craven C J (2004) J Am Chem Soc 126:5020-5021]. In this paper we develop a robust method for establishing the reliability of these assignments. We have performed a detailed statistical analysis of the CSL data collected for a model system (the B1 domain of protein G from Streptococcus), developing a scoring method which allows the confidence in assignments to be assessed, and which enables the effects of overlap on assignment fidelity to be predicted. To further test the scoring method and also to assess the performance of CSL in relation to sample quality, we have applied the method to the CSL data collected for GFP in our previous study.

  10. A Chemical Probe that Labels Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Hirata

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A small-molecule fluorescent probe specific for human pluripotent stem cells would serve as a useful tool for basic cell biology research and stem cell therapy. Screening of fluorescent chemical libraries with human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and subsequent evaluation of hit molecules identified a fluorescent compound (Kyoto probe 1 [KP-1] that selectively labels human pluripotent stem cells. Our analyses indicated that the selectivity results primarily from a distinct expression pattern of ABC transporters in human pluripotent stem cells and from the transporter selectivity of KP-1. Expression of ABCB1 (MDR1 and ABCG2 (BCRP, both of which cause the efflux of KP-1, is repressed in human pluripotent stem cells. Although KP-1, like other pluripotent markers, is not absolutely specific for pluripotent stem cells, the identified chemical probe may be used in conjunction with other reagents.

  11. Guided mass spectrum labelling in atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, D., E-mail: daniel.haley@materials.ox.ac.uk [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Plack Straße 1, Düsseldorf (Germany); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Choi, P.; Raabe, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Plack Straße 1, Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a valuable near-atomic scale imaging technique, which yields mass spectrographic data. Experimental correctness can often pivot on the identification of peaks within a dataset, this is a manual process where subjectivity and errors can arise. The limitations of manual procedures complicate APT experiments for the operator and furthermore are a barrier to technique standardisation. In this work we explore the capabilities of computer-guided ranging to aid identification and analysis of mass spectra. We propose a fully robust algorithm for enumeration of the possible identities of detected peak positions, which assists labelling. Furthermore, a simple ranking scheme is developed to allow for evaluation of the likelihood of each possible identity being the likely assignment from the enumerated set. We demonstrate a simple, yet complete work-chain that allows for the conversion of mass-spectra to fully identified APT spectra, with the goal of minimising identification errors, and the inter-operator variance within APT experiments. This work chain is compared to current procedures via experimental trials with different APT operators, to determine the relative effectiveness and precision of the two approaches. It is found that there is little loss of precision (and occasionally gain) when participants are given computer assistance. We find that in either case, inter-operator precision for ranging varies between 0 and 2 “significant figures” (2σ confidence in the first n digits of the reported value) when reporting compositions. Intra-operator precision is weakly tested and found to vary between 1 and 3 significant figures, depending upon species composition levels. Finally it is suggested that inconsistencies in inter-operator peak labelling may be the largest source of scatter when reporting composition data in APT. - Highlights: • Demonstration of a complete, but simple, automation chain for APT spectra analysis. • Algorithm for

  12. Guided mass spectrum labelling in atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, D.; Choi, P.; Raabe, D.

    2015-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a valuable near-atomic scale imaging technique, which yields mass spectrographic data. Experimental correctness can often pivot on the identification of peaks within a dataset, this is a manual process where subjectivity and errors can arise. The limitations of manual procedures complicate APT experiments for the operator and furthermore are a barrier to technique standardisation. In this work we explore the capabilities of computer-guided ranging to aid identification and analysis of mass spectra. We propose a fully robust algorithm for enumeration of the possible identities of detected peak positions, which assists labelling. Furthermore, a simple ranking scheme is developed to allow for evaluation of the likelihood of each possible identity being the likely assignment from the enumerated set. We demonstrate a simple, yet complete work-chain that allows for the conversion of mass-spectra to fully identified APT spectra, with the goal of minimising identification errors, and the inter-operator variance within APT experiments. This work chain is compared to current procedures via experimental trials with different APT operators, to determine the relative effectiveness and precision of the two approaches. It is found that there is little loss of precision (and occasionally gain) when participants are given computer assistance. We find that in either case, inter-operator precision for ranging varies between 0 and 2 “significant figures” (2σ confidence in the first n digits of the reported value) when reporting compositions. Intra-operator precision is weakly tested and found to vary between 1 and 3 significant figures, depending upon species composition levels. Finally it is suggested that inconsistencies in inter-operator peak labelling may be the largest source of scatter when reporting composition data in APT. - Highlights: • Demonstration of a complete, but simple, automation chain for APT spectra analysis. • Algorithm for

  13. Labelling of HBV-DNA probe using reagent made in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Quanshi

    1991-01-01

    The labelling hepatitis Bvirus DNA (HBV-DNA) probe was studied by using reagent made in China. The results showed that: (1) The dNTPs with high specific activity was necessary for the labelling of nigh specific activity HBV-DNA probe; (2) reaction of labelling HBV-DNA probe was completed in a few minutes; (3) 0.37 MBq 3 H dTTP (specific activity 1.554TBq/mmol) was enough to label 1 μg HBV-DNA and the specific activity of probe reached 3.4 x 10 cpm/μg; (4) 7 MBqα- 32 P dATP (specific activity > 111 TBq/mmol) can label HBV-DNA probe to specific activity 1.35 x 10 cpm/μg. It was concluded that the reagent made in China can be used for the study in molecular biology

  14. Sandwich nucleic acid hybridization: a method with a universally usable labeled probe for various specific tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, H.; Leser, U.; Haus, M.; Gu, S.Y.; Pathmanathan, R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of recombinant m13 phages as hybridization probes offers a considerable advantage over the commonly used recombinant plasmids as the preparation of the DNA probe is very simple and it can easily be labeled directly, e.g. with isotopes with long half-life like 125 I and used for hybridization. However, as the application of nucleic acid hybridization for diagnostic and epidemiological purposes becomes almost unavoidable, the logistic problems of keeping numerous individually labeled hybridization probes increase considerably and may reach prohibitory levels in less well-equipped laboratories. In a new sandwich technique, the first step involves hybridization with an unlabeled recombinant m13 DNA carrying an insert of the desired specificity. In a second step a universally usable labeled probe directed against the m13 part of the recombinant phage DNA is applied. This reduces considerably the problem of preparing and keeping multiple labeled probes in stock. (Auth.)

  15. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  16. Multiplex fluorescence melting curve analysis for mutation detection with dual-labeled, self-quenched probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuying Huang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA is a powerful tool for mutation detection based on melting temperature generated by thermal denaturation of the probe-target hybrid. Nevertheless, the color multiplexing, probe design, and cross-platform compatibility remain to be limited by using existing probe chemistries. We hereby explored two dual-labeled, self-quenched probes, TaqMan and shared-stem molecular beacons, in their ability to conduct FMCA. Both probes could be directly used for FMCA and readily integrated with closed-tube amplicon hybridization under asymmetric PCR conditions. Improved flexibility of FMCA by using these probes was illustrated in three representative applications of FMCA: mutation scanning, mutation identification and mutation genotyping, all of which achieved improved color-multiplexing with easy probe design and versatile probe combination and all were validated with a large number of real clinical samples. The universal cross-platform compatibility of these probes-based FMCA was also demonstrated by a 4-color mutation genotyping assay performed on five different real-time PCR instruments. The dual-labeled, self-quenched probes offered unprecedented combined advantage of enhanced multiplexing, improved flexibility in probe design, and expanded cross-platform compatibility, which would substantially improve FMCA in mutation detection of various applications.

  17. Cu2+-labeled dansyl compounds as fluorescent and PET probes for imaging apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junyan; Wang, Xukui; Yu, MeiXiang

    2016-11-15

    Compound DNSTT-Cu 2+ , a novel chelate of Cu 2+ with DOTA conjugated to a fluorescent dansyl fragment, is developed for imaging cell apoptosis. Apoptotic U-87MG cells could be selectively visualized by the fluorescence of DNSTT-Cu 2+ from cytoplasm of cells, confirmed by the fluorescence of apoptosis cells co-labeled with Alexa Fluor 568-labeled annexin V, a conventional probe for selectively labeling membranes of apoptosis cells. A radioactive 64 Cu 2 + analog, DNSTT- 64 Cu 2+ , was easily synthesized, providing a potential PET probe for imaging apoptosis in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preparation and quality test of superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled antisense oligodeoxynucleotide probe: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Li, Bibo; Ouyang, Yu; Luo, Yi; Li, Shaolin

    2009-06-01

    Molecular imaging of tumor antisense gene techniques have been applied to the study of magnetic resonance (MR) gene imaging associated with malignant tumors. In this study, we designed, synthesized, and tested a novel molecular probe, in which the antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) was labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), and its efficiency was examined by in vitro MR imaging after SK-Br-3 mammary carcinoma cell lines (oncocytes) transfection. The SPIO-labeled ASODN probe was prepared through SPIO conjugated to ASODN using a chemical cross linking method. Its morphology and size were detected by atomic force microscope, size distribution were detected by laser granulometer, the conjugating rate and biological activity were determined by high performance liquid chromatography, and the stability was determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After that, the probes were transfected into the SK-Br-3 oncocytes, cellular iron uptake was analyzed qualitatively at light and electron microscopy and was quantified at atomic absorption spectrometry, and the signal change of the transfected cells was observed and measured using MR imaging. The morphology of the SPIO-labeled ASODN probe was mostly spherical with well-distributed scattering, and the diameters were between 25 and 40 nm (95%) by atomic force microscope and laser granulometer, the conjugating rate of the probe was 99%. Moreover, this probe kept its activity under physiological conditions and could conjugate with antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. In addition, light microscopy revealed an intracellular uptake of iron oxides in the cytosol and electron microscopic studies revealed a lysosomal deposition of iron oxides in the transfected SK-Br-3 oncocytes by antisense probes, some of them gathered stacks, and the iron content of the group of transfected SK-Br-3 oncocytes by antisense probe is significantly higher (18.37 +/- 0.42 pg) than other contrast groups, the MR imaging showed that

  19. In Situ Live-Cell Nucleus Fluorescence Labeling with Bioinspired Fluorescent Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Pan; Wang, Houyu; Song, Bin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2017-08-01

    Fluorescent imaging techniques for visualization of nuclear structure and function in live cells are fundamentally important for exploring major cellular events. The ideal cellular labeling method is capable of realizing label-free, in situ, real-time, and long-term nucleus labeling in live cells, which can fully obtain the nucleus-relative information and effectively alleviate negative effects of alien probes on cellular metabolism. However, current established fluorescent probes-based strategies (e.g., fluorescent proteins-, organic dyes-, fluorescent organic/inorganic nanoparticles-based imaging techniques) are unable to simultaneously realize label-free, in situ, long-term, and real-time nucleus labeling, resulting in inevitable difficulties in fully visualizing nuclear structure and function in live cells. To this end, we present a type of bioinspired fluorescent probes, which are highly efficacious for in situ and label-free tracking of nucleus in long-term and real-time manners. Typically, the bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, served as fluorescent probes, can be readily synthesized in situ within live cell nucleus without any further modifications under physiological conditions (37 °C, pH ∼7.4). Compared with other conventional nuclear dyes (e.g., propidium iodide (PI), Hoechst), superior spectroscopic properties (e.g., quantum yield of ∼35.8% and high photostability) and low cytotoxicity of PDA-based probes enable long-term (e.g., 3 h) fluorescence tracking of nucleus. We also demonstrate the generality of this type of bioinspired fluorescent probes in different cell lines and complex biological samples.

  20. Label-free biosensing with functionalized nanopipette probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Senkei; Karhanek, Miloslav; Davis, Ronald W; Pourmand, Nader

    2009-03-24

    Nanopipette technology can uniquely identify biomolecules such as proteins based on differences in size, shape, and electrical charge. These differences are determined by the detection of changes in ionic current as the proteins interact with the nanopipette tip coated with probe molecules. Here we show that electrostatic, biotin-streptavidin, and antibody-antigen interactions on the nanopipette tip surface affect ionic current flowing through a 50-nm pore. Highly charged polymers interacting with the glass surface modulated the rectification property of the nanopipette electrode. Affinity-based binding between the probes tethered to the surface and their target proteins caused a change in the ionic current due to a partial blockade or an altered surface charge. These findings suggest that nanopipettes functionalized with appropriate molecular recognition elements can be used as nanosensors in biomedical and biological research.

  1. Label-free biosensing with functionalized nanopipette probes

    OpenAIRE

    Umehara, Senkei; Karhanek, Miloslav; Davis, Ronald W.; Pourmand, Nader

    2009-01-01

    Nanopipette technology can uniquely identify biomolecules such as proteins based on differences in size, shape, and electrical charge. These differences are determined by the detection of changes in ionic current as the proteins interact with the nanopipette tip coated with probe molecules. Here we show that electrostatic, biotin-streptavidin, and antibody-antigen interactions on the nanopipette tip surface affect ionic current flowing through a 50-nm pore. Highly charged polymers interacting...

  2. Leishmania diagnostic and identification py using 32P labelled DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de; Melo, Maria Norma de

    1999-10-01

    P 32 labelled DNA probes are valious instruments for the parasitic diseases by using hybridization reaction. In this paper we describe the methodology and present the foundations for the radioactive probes production, based on the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), for the Leishmania diagnostic an identification. We also describe the kDNA purification protocol from Leishmania reference cepa, the process of P 32 labelling of the kDNA by using the nick translation method, gathering, sample preparation and treatment, the optimum conditions for the hybridization reaction and the procedures for the autoradiography

  3. In situ hybridization of phytoplankton using fluorescently labeled rRNA probes

    OpenAIRE

    Groben, R.; Medlin, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescently-labelled molecular probes were used to identify and characterise phytoplankton species using in situ hybridisation coupled with fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The application of this technique is sometimes problematic, because of the many different species with which this method is to be used. Problems that may occur are: probe penetration versus maintanance of cell stability, strong autofluorescence and/or cell lost during the sample processing. Here we present a m...

  4. Detection of TTV-DNA in PBMC using digoxigenin labelled probe by in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Qi Qige

    2002-01-01

    To determine TTV-DNA in PBMC in patients with viral hepatitis, a study of in situ hybridization using digoxigenin labelled probe by PCR method to the TTV ORF1 region was performed on PBMC. Results showed that the detection rate of TTV-DNA using double-stranded probe in TTV-DNA positive group in sera was 58.06 (18/31), and the detection rate of TTV-DNA using double-stranded probe in TTV-DNA negative group in sera was 27.59 (8/29). For TTV-DNA positive group detected by double- stranded probe, then we use negative- stranded probe to detect their replication. The detection rate was 22.2%(4/18). Conclusions: TTV can infect PBMC and replicate in PBMC

  5. CONVERGENT SYNTHESIS AND EVALUATION OF 18F-LABELED AZULENIC COX2 PROBES FOR CANCER IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald D. Nolting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall objectives of this research are to (i develop azulene-based PET probes and (ii image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8+2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and deserves further

  6. Intrinsically Labeled Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes on Quantum Dots for Transduction of Nucleic Acid Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmuradyan, Anna; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been widely used in chemical and biosensing due to their unique photoelectrical properties and are well suited as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Selective hybridization interactions of oligonucleotides on QDs have been determined by FRET. Typically, the QD-FRET constructs have made use of labeled targets or have implemented labeled sandwich format assays to introduce dyes in proximity to the QDs for the FRET process. The intention of this new work is to explore a method to incorporate the acceptor dye into the probe molecule. Thiazole orange (TO) derivatives are fluorescent intercalating dyes that have been used for detection of double-stranded nucleic acids. One such dye system has been reported in which single-stranded oligonucleotide probes were doubly labeled with adjacent thiazole orange derivatives. In the absence of the fully complementary (FC) oligonucleotide target, the dyes form an H-aggregate, which results in quenching of fluorescence emission due to excitonic interactions between the dyes. The hybridization of the FC target to the probe provides for dissociation of the aggregate as the dyes intercalate into the double stranded duplex, resulting in increased fluorescence. This work reports investigation of the dependence of the ratiometric signal on the type of linkage used to conjugate the dyes to the probe, the location of the dye along the length of the probe, and the distance between adjacent dye molecules. The limit of detection for 34mer and 90mer targets was found to be identical and was 10 nM (2 pmol), similar to analogous QD-FRET using labeled oligonucleotide target. The detection system could discriminate a one base pair mismatch (1BPM) target and was functional without substantial compromise of the signal in 75% serum. The 1BPM was found to reduce background signal, indicating that the structure of the mismatch affected the environment of the intercalating dyes.

  7. DNA probe labeling with digoxigenin-dUTP and its application in gene diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guoyang

    1992-01-01

    DNA probe labeling by the randomly primed incorporation of digoxigenin-dUTP is reported. The sensitivity of color reaction and hybridization were 32 fg and 200 fg, respectively, and both were specific for the target. Single-copy and multi-copy gene fragments among 2 μg human genomic DNA were detected by β IVS II, Fr 3-42 and 3'HVR labeled with digoxigenin-dUTP. The results were consistent with a radioactive control assay. This method has been successfully used in the gene diagnosis of adult polycystic kidney disease

  8. Improving Probe Immobilization for Label-Free Capacitive Detection of DNA Hybridization on Microfabricated Gold Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Carrara

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative approaches to labeled optical detection for DNA arrays are actively investigated for low-cost point-of-care applications. In this domain, label-free capacitive detection is one of the most intensely studied techniques. It is based on the idea to detect the Helmholtz ion layer displacements when molecular recognition occurs at the electrodes/solution interface. The sensing layer is usually prepared by using thiols terminated DNA single-strength oligonucleotide probes on top of the sensor electrodes. However, published data shows evident time drift, which greatly complicates signal conditioning and processing and ultimately increases the uncertainty in DNA recognition sensing. The aim of this work is to show that newly developed ethylene-glycol functionalized alkanethiols greatly reduce time drift, thereby significantly improving capacitance based label-free detection of DNA.

  9. Protein rotational dynamics investigated with a dual EPR/optical molecular probe. Spin-labeled eosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, C E; Hustedt, E J; Beechem, J M; Beth, A H

    1993-01-01

    An acyl spin-label derivative of 5-aminoeosin (5-SLE) was chemically synthesized and employed in studies of rotational dynamics of the free probe and of the probe when bound noncovalently to bovine serum albumin using the spectroscopic techniques of fluorescence anisotropy decay and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and their long-lifetime counterparts phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR. Previous work (Beth, A. H., Cobb, C. E., and J. M. Beechem, 1992. Synthesis and characterization of a combined fluorescence, phosphorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance probe. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. Time-Resolved Laser Spectroscopy III. 504-512) has shown that the spin-label moiety only slightly altered the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes and quantum yields of 5-SLE when compared with 5-SLE whose nitroxide had been reduced with ascorbate and with the diamagnetic homolog 5-acetyleosin. In the present work, we have utilized time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and linear EPR spectroscopies to observe and quantitate the psec motions of 5-SLE in solution and the nsec motions of the 5-SLE-bovine serum albumin complex. Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR studies have been carried out to observe and quantitate the microseconds motions of the 5-SLE-albumin complex in glycerol/buffer solutions of varying viscosity. These latter studies have enabled a rigorous comparison of rotational correlation times obtained from these complementary techniques to be made with a single probe. The studies described demonstrate that it is possible to employ a single molecular probe to carry out the full range of fluorescence, phosphorescence, EPR, and saturation transfer EPR studies. It is anticipated that "dual" molecular probes of this general type will significantly enhance capabilities for extracting dynamics and structural information from macromolecules and their functional

  10. On optical detection of densely labeled synapses in neuropil and mapping connectivity with combinatorially multiplexed fluorescent synaptic markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Mishchenko

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for mapping neural connectivity optically, by utilizing Cre/Lox system Brainbow to tag synapses of different neurons with random mixtures of different fluorophores, such as GFP, YFP, etc., and then detecting patterns of fluorophores at different synapses using light microscopy (LM. Such patterns will immediately report the pre- and post-synaptic cells at each synaptic connection, without tracing neural projections from individual synapses to corresponding cell bodies. We simulate fluorescence from a population of densely labeled synapses in a block of hippocampal neuropil, completely reconstructed from electron microscopy data, and show that high-end LM is able to detect such patterns with over 95% accuracy. We conclude, therefore, that with the described approach neural connectivity in macroscopically large neural circuits can be mapped with great accuracy, in scalable manner, using fast optical tools, and straightforward image processing. Relying on an electron microscopy dataset, we also derive and explicitly enumerate the conditions that should be met to allow synaptic connectivity studies with high-resolution optical tools.

  11. Europium-labeled epidermal growth factor and neurotensin: novel probes for receptor-binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Ohad; Hillairet de Boisferon, Marc; Lombet, Alain; Gruaz-Guyon, Anne; Gayer, Batya; Skrzydelsky, Delphine; Kohen, Fortune; Forgez, Patricia; Scherz, Avigdor; Rostene, William; Salomon, Yoram

    2002-02-01

    We investigated the possibility of labeling two biologically active peptides, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and neurotensin (NT), with europium (Eu)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. More specifically, we tested them as probes in studying receptor binding using time-resolved fluorescence of Eu3+. The relatively simple synthesis yields ligands with acceptable binding characteristics similar to isotopically labeled derivatives. The binding affinity (Kd) of labeled Eu-EGF to human A431 epidermal carcinoid cells was 3.6 +/- 1.2 nM, similar to the reported Kd values of EGF, whereas the Kd of Eu-NT to human HT29 colon cancer cells (7.4 +/- 0.5 nM) or to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with the high-affinity NT receptor (CHO-NT1) were about 10-fold higher than the Kd values of NT. The bioactivity of the Eu-labeled EGF as determined by stimulation of cultured murine D1 hematopoietic cell proliferation was nearly the same as that obtained with native EGF. The maximal stimulation of Ca2+ influx with NT and Eu-NT in CHO-NT1 cells was similar, but the respective K0.5 values were 20 pM and 1 nM, corresponding to differences in the binding affinities previously described. The results of these studies indicate that Eu labeling of peptide hormones and growth factor molecules ranging from 10(3) to 10(5) Da can be conveniently accomplished. Importantly, the Eu-labeled products are stable for approximately 2 years and are completely safe for laboratory use compared to the biohazardous radioligands. Thus, Eu-labeled peptides present an attractive alternative for commonly used radiolabeled ligands in biological studies in general and in receptor assays in particular.

  12. Intra-albumin migration of bound fatty acid probed by spin label ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurachevsky, Andrey; Shimanovitch, Ekaterina; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Muravsky, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Conventional ESR spectra of 16-doxyl-stearic acid bound to bovine and human serum albumin were recorded at different temperatures in order to investigate the status of spin-labeled fatty acid in the interior of the protein globule. A computer spectrum simulation of measured spectra, performed by non-linear least-squares fits, clearly showed two components corresponding to strongly and weakly immobilized fatty acid molecules. The two-component model was verified on spectra measured at different pH. Thermodynamic parameters of the spin probe exchange between two spin probe states were analyzed. It was concluded that at physiological conditions, fatty acid molecules permanently migrate in the globule interior between the specific binding sites and a space among albumin domains

  13. Determination for Enterobacter cloacae based on a europium ternary complex labeled DNA probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui; Niu, Cheng-Gang; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Ruan, Min; Qin, Pin-Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2011-11-01

    The fast detection and accurate diagnosis of the prevalent pathogenic bacteria is very important for the treatment of disease. Nowadays, fluorescence techniques are important tools for diagnosis. A two-probe tandem DNA hybridization assay was designed for the detection of Enterobacter cloacae based on time-resolved fluorescence. In this work, the authors synthesized a novel europium ternary complex Eu(TTA) 3(5-NH 2-phen) with intense luminescence, high fluorescence quantum yield and long lifetime before. We developed a method based on this europium complex for the specific detection of original extracted DNA from E. cloacae. In the hybridization assay format, the reporter probe was labeled with Eu(TTA) 3(5-NH 2-phen) on the 5'-terminus, and the capture probe capture probe was covalent immobilized on the surface of the glutaraldehyde treated glass slides. The original extracted DNA of samples was directly used without any DNA purification and amplification. The detection was conducted by monitoring the fluorescence intensity from the glass surface after DNA hybridization. The detection limit of the DNA was 5 × 10 -10 mol L -1. The results of the present work proved that this new approach was easy to operate with high sensitivity and specificity. It could be conducted as a powerful tool for the detection of pathogen microorganisms in the environment.

  14. Label-Free Potentiometry for Detecting DNA Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid and DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Miyahara

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Peptide nucleic acid (PNA has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  15. Label-Free Potentiometry for Detecting DNA Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid and DNA Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry. PMID:23435052

  16. EPR spin probe and spin label studies of some low molecular and polymer micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, A. M.; Kasaikin, V. A.; Timofeev, V. P.

    1998-12-01

    The rotational mobility of spin probes of different shape and size in low molecular and polymer micelles has been studied. Several probes having nitroxide fragment localized either in the vicinity of micelle interface or in the hydrocarbon core have been used. Upon increasing the number of carbon atoms in hydrocarbon chain of detergent from 7 to 13 (sodium alkyl sulfate micelles) or from 12 to 16 (alkyltrimethylammonium bromide micelles) the rotational mobility of spin probes is decreased by the factor 1.5-2.0. The spin probe rotational mobility in polymer micelles (the complexes of alkyltrimethylammonium bromides and polymethacrylic or polyacrylic acids) is less than mobility in free micelles of the same surfactants. The study of EPR-spectra of spin labeled polymethacrylic acid (PMA) indicated that formation of water soluble complexes of polymer and alkyltrimethylammonium bromides in alkaline solutions (pH 9) does not affect the polymer segmental mobility. On the other hand, the polymer complexes formation in slightly acidic water solution (pH 6) breaks down the compact PMA conformation, thus increasing the polymer segmental mobility. Possible structures of polymer micelles are discussed.

  17. Protocols for 16S rDNA Array Analyses of Microbial Communities by Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Rudi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of complex microbial communities are becoming increasingly important. Bottlenecks in these analyses, however, are the tools to actually describe the biodiversity. Novel protocols for DNA array-based analyses of microbial communities are presented. In these protocols, the specificity obtained by sequence-specific labeling of DNA probes is combined with the possibility of detecting several different probes simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. The gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA was chosen as the target in these analyses. This gene contains both universally conserved regions and regions with relatively high variability. The universally conserved regions are used for PCR amplification primers, while the variable regions are used for the specific probes. Protocols are presented for DNA purification, probe construction, probe labeling, and DNA array hybridizations.

  18. Technetium-99m labeled antisense probes uptake in vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.X.; Qin, G.M.; An, R.; Cao, G.X.; Cao, W.; Gao, Z.R.

    2002-01-01

    In the arterial wall, smooth muscle cells (SMC) normally exist in a quiescent, differentiated state, representing the contractile phenotype. During the development of atherosclerosis SMC change towards the synthetic phenotype going along with proliferation, chemotactic response and increased monocyte binding. The Fas/Fas ligand/caspase death-signaling pathway, Bcl-2 protein family/mitochondria, the tumor suppressive gene p53, and the proto-oncogene c-myc may be activated in atherosclerotic lesions, and mediates vascular apoptosis during the development of atherosclerosis. The atherosclerotic plaques contained 3-4 fold more c-myc mRNA than those in the normal aortic arteries, while increased Bax and Bak coupled with lack/paucity of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL are associated with SMC apoptosis in advanced lesions. Methods: 1 Oligonucleotide Conjugation: A solution of single stranded amine-derivatized DNA (100-1000μg) was prepared at a concentration of 2 mg/ml in 0.25M sodium bicarbonate, 1 M sodium chloride, 1mM EDTA, pH8.5. Cell uptake studies: 99m Tc- MAG 3 -DNA radioactivity incorporation into porcine coronary smooth muscle cells in the log and plateau phases, respectively, was determined after different times of incubation at 37. The influence of extracellular 99m Tc- MAG 3 -DNA concentration on SMC uptake was also analyzed. [Results] Essentially complete conjugation was achieved by reverse-phase Sep-Pak C18 chromatography analysis. The MAG 3 -DNA was labeled with 99m Tc at room temperature and neutral pH, with a mean labeling efficiency of 80.11%(s.d=2.96%,n=4). The labeled antisense DNA still remained the ability to hybridize with its complementary DNA. After labeling, the stability of the DNA in saline or serum was retained as determined by reverse-phase Sep-Pak C18 chromatography analysis, except a shift at 30 min in serum incubation that suggesting a short time serum protein binding. 99m Tc-MAG 3 -c-myc uptake plateaued at 60 min and was directly proportional to the

  19. In situ visualization of glucocerebrosidase in human skin tissue: zymography versus activity-based probe labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Dijkhoff, Irini M; Helder, Richard W J; Al-Khakany, Hanin; Boer, Daphne E C; Schreuder, Anne; Kallemeijn, Wouter W; Absalah, Samira; Overkleeft, Herman S; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2017-12-01

    Epidermal β-glucocerebrosidase (GBA1), an acid β-glucosidase normally located in lysosomes, converts (glucosyl)ceramides into ceramides, which is crucial to generate an optimal barrier function of the outermost skin layer, the stratum corneum (SC). Here we report on two developed in situ methods to localize active GBA in human epidermis: i ) an optimized zymography method that is less labor intensive and visualizes enzymatic activity with higher resolution than currently reported methods using either substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucopyranoside or resorufin-β-D-glucopyranoside; and ii ) a novel technique to visualize active GBA1 molecules by their specific labeling with a fluorescent activity-based probe (ABP), MDW941. The latter method pro-ved to be more robust and sensitive, provided higher resolution microscopic images, and was less prone to sample preparation effects. Moreover, in contrast to the zymography substrates that react with various β-glucosidases, MDW941 specifically labeled GBA1. We demonstrate that active GBA1 in the epidermis is primarily located in the extracellular lipid matrix at the interface of the viable epidermis and the lower layers of the SC. With ABP-labeling, we observed reduced GBA1 activity in 3D-cultured skin models when supplemented with the reversible inhibitor, isofagomine, irrespective of GBA expression. This inhibition affected the SC ceramide composition: MS analysis revealed an inhibitor-dependent increase in the glucosylceramide:ceramide ratio. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Applications of combinatorial optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Paschos, Vangelis Th

    2013-01-01

    Combinatorial optimization is a multidisciplinary scientific area, lying in the interface of three major scientific domains: mathematics, theoretical computer science and management. The three volumes of the Combinatorial Optimization series aims to cover a wide range of topics in this area. These topics also deal with fundamental notions and approaches as with several classical applications of combinatorial optimization. "Applications of Combinatorial Optimization" is presenting a certain number among the most common and well-known applications of Combinatorial Optimization.

  1. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of {sup 18}F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolting, Donald D.; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Yu, James Y. H.; Xie, Jingping [Department of Radiology, Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Peterson, Todd E. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Crews, Brenda C. [Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology, Nashville, TN (United States); Marnett, Larry [Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Gore, John C. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Pham, Wellington, E-mail: wellington.pham@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Radiology, Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2013-01-03

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel {sup 18}F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional {sup 18}F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an {sup 18}F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The {sup 18}F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for

  2. Silver-gold core-shell nanoparticles containing methylene blue as SERS labels for probing and imaging of live cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, X.; Guo, Z.; Jin, Y.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, W.; Huang, D.

    2012-01-01

    We report on silver-gold core-shell nanostructures that contain Methylene Blue (MB) at the gold/x96silver interface. They can be used as reporter molecules in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) labels. The labels are stable and have strong SERS activity. TEM imaging revealed that these nanoparticles display bright and dark stripe structures. In addition, these labels can act as probes that can be detected and imaged through the specific Raman signatures of the reporters. We show that such SERS probes can identify cellular structures due to enhanced Raman spectra of intrinsic cellular molecules measured in the local optical fields of the core-shell nanostructures. They also provide structural information on the cellular environment as demonstrated for these nanoparticles as new SERS-active and biocompatible substrates for imaging of live cells. (author)

  3. Double-labeled donor probe can enhance the signal of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in detection of nucleic acid hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Yukio; Kondo, Satoshi; Sase, Ichiro; Suga, Takayuki; Mise, Kazuyuki; Furusawa, Iwao; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2000-01-01

    A set of fluorescently-labeled DNA probes that hybridize with the target RNA and produce fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals can be utilized for the detection of specific RNA. We have developed probe sets to detect and discriminate single-strand RNA molecules of plant viral genome, and sought a method to improve the FRET signals to handle in vivo applications. Consequently, we found that a double-labeled donor probe labeled with Bodipy dye yielded a remarkable increase in fluorescence intensity compared to a single-labeled donor probe used in an ordinary FRET. This double-labeled donor system can be easily applied to improve various FRET probes since the dependence upon sequence and label position in enhancement is not as strict. Furthermore this method could be applied to other nucleic acid substances, such as oligo RNA and phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (S-oligos) to enhance FRET signal. Although the double-labeled donor probes labeled with a variety of fluorophores had unexpected properties (strange UV-visible absorption spectra, decrease of intensity and decay of donor fluorescence) compared with single-labeled ones, they had no relation to FRET enhancement. This signal amplification mechanism cannot be explained simply based on our current results and knowledge of FRET. Yet it is possible to utilize this double-labeled donor system in various applications of FRET as a simple signal-enhancement method. PMID:11121494

  4. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  5. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  6. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensing for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells incorporating antibody as capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as signal probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haiying [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Department of Chemistry, Yuncheng University, Yuncheng 044300 (China); Li, Zhejian; Shan, Meng; Li, Congcong; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Wang, Jinyi [College of Science and College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Zhang, Chengxiao, E-mail: cxzhang@snnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China)

    2015-03-10

    Highlights: • A novel biosensor was developed for the detection of prostate cancer cells. • The selectivity of the biosensor was improved using antibody as capture probe. • The biosensor showed the low extremely detection limit of 2.6 × 10{sup 2} cells mL{sup −1}. • The ruthenium complex-labelled WGA can be transported in the cell vesicles. - Abstract: A highly selective and sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells was designed using a prostate specific antibody as a capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as a signal probe. The ECL biosensor was fabricated by covalently immobilising the capture probe on a graphene oxide-coated glassy carbon electrode. Target PC-3 cells were selectively captured on the surface of the biosensor, and then, the signal probe was bound with the captured PC-3 cells to form a sandwich. In the presence of tripropylamine, the ECL intensity of the sandwich biosensor was logarithmically directly proportion to the concentration of PC-3 cells over a range from 7.0 × 10{sup 2} to 3.0 × 10{sup 4} cells mL{sup −1}, with a detection limit of 2.6 × 10{sup 2} cells mL{sup −1}. The ECL biosensor was also applied to detect prostate specific antigen with a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL{sup −1}. The high selectivity of the biosensor was demonstrated in comparison with that of a lectin-based biosensor. The strategy developed in this study may be a promising approach and could be extended to the design of ECL biosensors for highly sensitive and selective detection of other cancer-related cells or cancer biomarkers using different probes.

  7. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensing for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells incorporating antibody as capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as signal probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Haiying; Li, Zhejian; Shan, Meng; Li, Congcong; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Jinyi; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel biosensor was developed for the detection of prostate cancer cells. • The selectivity of the biosensor was improved using antibody as capture probe. • The biosensor showed the low extremely detection limit of 2.6 × 10 2 cells mL −1 . • The ruthenium complex-labelled WGA can be transported in the cell vesicles. - Abstract: A highly selective and sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells was designed using a prostate specific antibody as a capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as a signal probe. The ECL biosensor was fabricated by covalently immobilising the capture probe on a graphene oxide-coated glassy carbon electrode. Target PC-3 cells were selectively captured on the surface of the biosensor, and then, the signal probe was bound with the captured PC-3 cells to form a sandwich. In the presence of tripropylamine, the ECL intensity of the sandwich biosensor was logarithmically directly proportion to the concentration of PC-3 cells over a range from 7.0 × 10 2 to 3.0 × 10 4 cells mL −1 , with a detection limit of 2.6 × 10 2 cells mL −1 . The ECL biosensor was also applied to detect prostate specific antigen with a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL −1 . The high selectivity of the biosensor was demonstrated in comparison with that of a lectin-based biosensor. The strategy developed in this study may be a promising approach and could be extended to the design of ECL biosensors for highly sensitive and selective detection of other cancer-related cells or cancer biomarkers using different probes

  8. Tumor-targeting peptides from combinatorial libraries*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruiwu; Li, Xiaocen; Xiao, Wenwu; Lam, Kit S.

    2018-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major and leading causes of death worldwide. Two of the greatest challenges infighting cancer are early detection and effective treatments with no or minimum side effects. Widespread use of targeted therapies and molecular imaging in clinics requires high affinity, tumor-specific agents as effective targeting vehicles to deliver therapeutics and imaging probes to the primary or metastatic tumor sites. Combinatorial libraries such as phage-display and one-bead one-compound (OBOC) peptide libraries are powerful approaches in discovering tumor-targeting peptides. This review gives an overview of different combinatorial library technologies that have been used for the discovery of tumor-targeting peptides. Examples of tumor-targeting peptides identified from each combinatorial library method will be discussed. Published tumor-targeting peptide ligands and their applications will also be summarized by the combinatorial library methods and their corresponding binding receptors. PMID:27210583

  9. Concepts of combinatorial optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Paschos, Vangelis Th

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial optimization is a multidisciplinary scientific area, lying in the interface of three major scientific domains: mathematics, theoretical computer science and management.  The three volumes of the Combinatorial Optimization series aim to cover a wide range  of topics in this area. These topics also deal with fundamental notions and approaches as with several classical applications of combinatorial optimization.Concepts of Combinatorial Optimization, is divided into three parts:- On the complexity of combinatorial optimization problems, presenting basics about worst-case and randomi

  10. Scrambling free combinatorial labeling of alanine-β, isoleucine-δ1, leucine-proS and valine-proS methyl groups for the detection of long range NOEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerfah, Rime [NMR-Bio, IBS/CEA (France); Plevin, Michael J. [University of York, Department of Biology (United Kingdom); Pessey, Ombeline [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France); Hamelin, Olivier [CNRS (France); Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jerome, E-mail: jerome.boisbouvier@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2015-01-15

    Specific isotopic labeling of methyl groups in proteins has greatly extended the applicability of solution NMR spectroscopy. Simultaneous labeling of the methyl groups of several different amino acid types can offer a larger number of useful probes that can be used for structural characterisations of challenging proteins. Herein, we propose an improved AILV methyl-labeling protocol in which L and V are stereo-specifically labeled. We show that 2-ketobutyrate cannot be combined with Ala and 2-acetolactate (for the stereo-specific labeling of L and V) as this results in co-incorporation incompatibility and isotopic scrambling. Thus, we developed a robust and cost-effective enzymatic synthesis of the isoleucine precursor, 2-hydroxy-2-(1′-[{sup 2}H{sub 2}], 2′-[{sup 13}C])ethyl-3-keto-4-[{sup 2}H{sub 3}]butanoic acid, as well as an incorporation protocol that eliminates metabolic leakage. We show that application of this labeling scheme to a large 82 kDa protein permits the detection of long-range {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H NOE cross-peaks between methyl probes separated by up to 10 Å.

  11. Biconically Tapered Fiber Optic Probes for Rapid Label-Free Immunoassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Miller

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We report use of U-shaped biconically tapered optical fibers (BTOF as probes for label-free immunoassays. The tapered regions of the sensors were functionalized by immobilization of immunoglobulin-G (Ig-G and tested for detection of anti-IgG at concentrations of 50 ng/mL to 50 µg/mL. Antibody-antigen reaction creates a biological nanolayer modifying the waveguide structure leading to a change in the sensor signal, which allows real-time monitoring. The kinetics of the antibody (mouse Ig-G-antigen (rabbit anti-mouse IgG reactions was studied. Hydrofluoric acid treatment makes the sensitive region thinner to enhance sensitivity, which we confirmed by experiments and simulations. The limit of detection for the sensor was estimated to be less than 50 ng/mL. Utilization of the rate of the sensor peak shift within the first few minutes of the antibody-antigen reaction is proposed as a rapid protein detection method.

  12. Iodine-125 labeling of 4, 4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, dapsone (DDS): an imaging probe for inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Ghany, E.A.; EI-Wetery, A.S.; Hussin, H.; Saleh, Z.A.; EI-SheiKH, R.

    2007-01-01

    Dapsone is a drug that, alone or in combination with other therapeutic agents, is effective in a variety of infectious diseases, including leprosy and malaria. The labeling of this antibacterial agent with iodine-125 offers an advantage to image and identify leprosy. The labeling reaction was carded out in an acidic medium with ph 2. Both chloramine- T and iodogen coated glass frits produced a high yield of 125 IDDS tracer more than 96 %, when the reaction mixture was heated at 100 degree C for 15 min at ph 2. The biodistribution studies gave the possibility to.use this tracer as a probe for the detection of septic and aseptic inflammations. The intra-venous injection of the tracer into the mice reflects the lipophilic nature of the tracer, as the liver uptake at early time post injection (1/2 h) was 14.4 %. The tracer was excreted via the liver and to some extent via the kidneys. The in-vivo stability of the tracer was confirmed as the activity taken by the thyroid gland not exceed 2.3 % at 2 h postinjection. The tracer tends to be retained in the muscle as the activity taken by the muscle was 5 % at 2 h post injection. The interesting observation during this study was the uptake of the tracer by the brain, which confirm the ability of the tracer to pass through the blood brain barrier (BUB) with activity more than 3 % and still fixed even at one hour post injection. This brain uptake support the idea to , use this tracer as brain imaging agent, especially the tracer was retained in the brain tissues for long time. The ratio of the uptake of E.Coli- and oil-inflammed muscles to that of the non-inflammed muscle were high and equal to 1.8,2.5, and 3.7 and 1.5, 2.75, and 3.3 at 1/2, 2, and 4 hours post injection, respectively. Due to the inability to cultivate mycobacterium leprae in artificial media and the lack of experimental animals susceptible to human leprosy, a biological evaluation of 125 IDDS tracer in leprotie animals can not be done

  13. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Combinatorial commutative algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Ezra

    2005-01-01

    Offers an introduction to combinatorial commutative algebra, focusing on combinatorial techniques for multigraded polynomial rings, semigroup algebras, and determined rings. The chapters in this work cover topics ranging from homological invariants of monomial ideals and their polyhedral resolutions, to tools for studying algebraic varieties.

  15. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Sijbren; Furlan, Ricardo L.E.; Sanders, Jeremy K.M.

    2002-01-01

    A combinatorial library that responds to its target by increasing the concentration of strong binders at the expense of weak binders sounds ideal. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry has the potential to achieve exactly this. In this review, we will highlight the unique features that distinguish dynamic

  16. Detection of Helicobacter Pylori Genome with an Optical Biosensor Based on Hybridization of Urease Gene with a Gold Nanoparticles-Labeled Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrashoob, M.; Mohsenifar, A.; Tabatabaei, M.; Rahmani-Cherati, T.; Mobaraki, M.; Mota, A.; Shojaei, T. R.

    2016-05-01

    A novel optics-based nanobiosensor for sensitive determination of the Helicobacter pylori genome using a gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-labeled probe is reported. Two specific thiol-modified capture and signal probes were designed based on a single-stranded complementary DNA (cDNA) region of the urease gene. The capture probe was immobilized on AuNPs, which were previously immobilized on an APTES-activated glass, and the signal probe was conjugated to different AuNPs as well. The presence of the cDNA in the reaction mixture led to the hybridization of the AuNPs-labeled capture probe and the signal probe with the cDNA, and consequently the optical density of the reaction mixture (AuNPs) was reduced proportionally to the cDNA concentration. The limit of detection was measured at 0.5 nM.

  17. Fluorescently labeled dengue viruses as probes to identify antigen-specific memory B cells by multiparametric flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Marcia; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-01-01

    Low frequencies of memory B cells in the peripheral blood make it challenging to measure the functional and phenotypic characteristics of this antigen experienced subset of B cells without in vitro culture. To date, reagents are lacking to measure ex vivo frequencies of dengue virus (DENV)-specific memory B cells. We wanted to explore the possibility of using fluorescently labeled DENV as probes to detect antigen-specific memory B cells in the peripheral blood of DENV immune individuals. Alexa Fluor dye-labeled DENV yielded viable virus that could be stored at -80°C for long periods of time. Using a careful gating strategy and methods to decrease non-specific binding, we were able to identify a small frequency of B cells from dengue immune individuals that bound labeled DENV. Sorted DENV(+) B cells from immune, but not naïve donors secreted antibodies that bound DENV after in vitro stimulation. Overall, Alexa Fluor dye-labeled DENVs are useful reagents to enable the detection and characterization of memory B cells in DENV immune individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A rhodamine-labeled citalopram analogue as a high-affinity fluorescent probe for the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Peng; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Løland, Claus Juul

    2013-01-01

    A novel fluorescent ligand was synthesized as a high-affinity, high specificity probe for visualizing the serotonin transporter (SERT). The rhodamine fluorophore was extended from an aniline substitution on the 5-position of the dihydroisobenzofuran ring of citalopram (2, 1-(3-(dimethylamino......)propyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-5-carbonitrile), using an ethylamino linker. The resulting rhodamine-labeled ligand 8 inhibited [3H]5-HT uptake in COS-7 cells (Ki = 225 nM) with similar potency to the tropane-based JHC 1-064 (1), but with higher specificity towards the SERT relative...

  19. Organic liquids-responsive β-cyclodextrin-functionalized graphene-based fluorescence probe: label-free selective detection of tetrahydrofuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huawen; Xin, John H; Hu, Hong; Wang, Xiaowen; Lu, Xinkun

    2014-06-06

    In this study, a label-free graphene-based fluorescence probe used for detection of volatile organic liquids was fabricated by a simple, efficient and low-cost method. To fabricate the probe, a bio-based β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was firstly grafted on reduced graphene surfaces effectively and uniformly, as evidenced by various characterization techniques such as Ultraviolet/Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The subsequent inclusion of Rhodamine B (RhB) into the inner cavities of the β-CD grafted on the graphene surfaces was achieved easily by a solution mixing method, which yielded the graphene-based fluorescent switch-on probe. In addition, the gradual and controllable quenching of RhB by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer from RhB to graphene during the process of stepwise accommodation of the RhB molecules into the β-CD-functionalized graphene was investigated in depth. A wide range of organic solvents was examined using the as-fabricated fluorescence probe, which revealed the highest sensitivity to tetrahydrofuran with the detection limit of about 1.7 μg/mL. Some insight into the mechanism of the different responsive behaviors of the fluorescence sensor to the examined targets was also described.

  20. Organic Liquids-Responsive β-Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Graphene-Based Fluorescence Probe: Label-Free Selective Detection of Tetrahydrofuran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawen Hu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a label-free graphene-based fluorescence probe used for detection of volatile organic liquids was fabricated by a simple, efficient and low-cost method. To fabricate the probe, a bio-based β-cyclodextrin (β-CD was firstly grafted on reduced graphene surfaces effectively and uniformly, as evidenced by various characterization techniques such as Ultraviolet/Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The subsequent inclusion of Rhodamine B (RhB into the inner cavities of the β-CD grafted on the graphene surfaces was achieved easily by a solution mixing method, which yielded the graphene-based fluorescent switch-on probe. In addition, the gradual and controllable quenching of RhB by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer from RhB to graphene during the process of stepwise accommodation of the RhB molecules into the β-CD-functionalized graphene was investigated in depth. A wide range of organic solvents was examined using the as-fabricated fluorescence probe, which revealed the highest sensitivity to tetrahydrofuran with the detection limit of about 1.7 μg/mL. Some insight into the mechanism of the different responsive behaviors of the fluorescence sensor to the examined targets was also described.

  1. Identification of squid species by melting temperature shifts on fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) using single dual-labeled probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eunjung; Song, Ha Jeong; Kwon, Na Young; Kim, Gi Won; Lee, Kwang Ho; Jo, Soyeon; Park, Sujin; Park, Jihyun; Park, Eun Kyeong; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2017-06-01

    Real time PCR is a standard method for identification of species. One of limitations of the qPCR is that there would be false-positive result due to mismatched hybridization between target sequence and probe depending on the annealing temperature in the PCR condition. As an alternative, fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) could be applied for species identification. FMCA is based on a dual-labeled probe. Even with subtle difference of target sequence, there are visible melting temperature (Tm) shift. One of FMCA applications is distinguishing organisms distributed and consumed globally as popular food ingredients. Their prices are set by species or country of origin. However, counterfeiting or distributing them without any verification procedure are becoming social problems and threatening food safety. Besides distinguishing them in naked eye is very difficult and almost impossible in any processed form. Therefore, it is necessary to identify species in molecular level. In this research three species of squids which have 1-2 base pair differences each are selected as samples since they have the same issue. We designed a probe which perfectly matches with one species and the others mismatches 2 and 1 base pair respectively and labeled with fluorophore and quencher. In an experiment with a single probe, we successfully distinguished them by Tm shift depending on the difference of base pair. By combining FMCA and qPCR chip, smaller-scale assay with higher sensitivity and resolution could be possible, andc furthermore, enabling results analysis with smart phone would realize point-of-care testing (POCT).

  2. Label-free probing of genes by time-domain terahertz sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, P Haring; Brucherseifer, M; Nagel, M; Kurz, H; Bosserhoff, A; Buettner, R

    2002-01-01

    A label-free sensing approach for the label-free characterization of genetic material with terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves is presented. Time-resolved THz analysis of polynucleotides demonstrates a strong dependence of the complex refractive index of DNA molecules in the THz frequency range on their hybridization state. By monitoring THz signals one can thus infer the binding state (hybridized or denatured) of oligo- and polynucleotides, enabling the label-free determination the genetic composition of unknown DNA sequences. A broadband experimental proof-of-principle in a free-space analytic configuration, as well as a higher-sensitivity approach using integrated THz sensors reaching femtomol detection levels and demonstrating the capability to detect single-base mutations, are presented. The potential application for next generation high-throughput label-free genetic analytic systems is discussed

  3. Label-free probing of genes by time-domain terahertz sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, P Haring [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, RWTH Aachen, Sommerfeldstr. 24, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Brucherseifer, M [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, RWTH Aachen, Sommerfeldstr. 24, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Nagel, M [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, RWTH Aachen, Sommerfeldstr. 24, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Kurz, H [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, RWTH Aachen, Sommerfeldstr. 24, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Bosserhoff, A [Institut fuer Pathologie, Universitaet Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Buettner, R [Institut fuer Pathologie, Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany)

    2002-11-07

    A label-free sensing approach for the label-free characterization of genetic material with terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves is presented. Time-resolved THz analysis of polynucleotides demonstrates a strong dependence of the complex refractive index of DNA molecules in the THz frequency range on their hybridization state. By monitoring THz signals one can thus infer the binding state (hybridized or denatured) of oligo- and polynucleotides, enabling the label-free determination the genetic composition of unknown DNA sequences. A broadband experimental proof-of-principle in a free-space analytic configuration, as well as a higher-sensitivity approach using integrated THz sensors reaching femtomol detection levels and demonstrating the capability to detect single-base mutations, are presented. The potential application for next generation high-throughput label-free genetic analytic systems is discussed.

  4. Synthesis and detection of 3'-OH terminal biotin-labeled DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brakel, C.L.; Engelhardt, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nick translation has been used to prepare biotin-dUTP-containing DNA probes. These stable DNA probes have been identified, following hybridization to target DNA, by fluorescence using antibiotin antibodies or by enzyme reactions in which the enzyme has been linked to avidin or streptavidin. It is probable that this technology will be applicable to certain diagnostic determinations and that, with sufficient sensitivity, this technology might provide a system for obtaining rapid and specific diagnoses in situations presently requiring time-consuming growth assays. The sensitivity of this assay can be increased in two ways: (1) by increasing the amount of biotin contained in the DNA probes, and (2) by increasing the response to individual biotin molecules in the DNA probes. This report demonstrates that terminal deoxynucleotide transferase can be employed to increase the biotin content of DNA probes. We also introduce a new streptavidin-linked enzyme system that produces a greater response to biotinylated DNA probes than does streptavidin-linked horseradish peroxidase

  5. Integer and combinatorial optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Nemhauser, George L

    1999-01-01

    Rave reviews for INTEGER AND COMBINATORIAL OPTIMIZATION ""This book provides an excellent introduction and survey of traditional fields of combinatorial optimization . . . It is indeed one of the best and most complete texts on combinatorial optimization . . . available. [And] with more than 700 entries, [it] has quite an exhaustive reference list.""-Optima ""A unifying approach to optimization problems is to formulate them like linear programming problems, while restricting some or all of the variables to the integers. This book is an encyclopedic resource for such f

  6. Photoaffinity labeling of mammalian α1-adrenergic receptors: identification of the ligand binding subunit with a high affinity radioiodinated probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeb-Lundberg, L.M.F.; Dickinson, K.E.J.; Heald, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    A description is given of the synthesised and characterization of a novel high affinity radioiodinated α 1 -adrenergic receptor photoaffinity probe, 4-amino-6,7-dimethoxy-2-[4-[5-(4-azido-3-[ 125 I]iodophenyl)pentanoyl]-1-piperazinyl] quinazoline. In the absence of light, this ligand binds with high affinity (K/sub d/ = 130 pm) in a reverisble and saturable manner to sites in rat hepatic plasma membranes. The binding is stereoselective and competitively inhibited by adrenergic agonists and antagonists with an α 1 -adrenergic specificity. Upon photolysis, this ligand incorporates irreversibly into plasma membranes prepared from several mammalian tissues including rat liver, rat, guinea pig, and rabbit spleen, rabbit lung, and rabbit aorta vascular smooth muscle cells, also with typical α 1 -adrenergic specificity. Autoradiograms of such membrane samples subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis reveal a major specifically labeled polypeptide at M/sub 4/ = 78,000-85,000, depending on the tissue used, in addition to some lower molecular weight peptides. Protease inhibitors, in particular EDTA, a metalloprotease inhibitor, dramatically increases the predominance of the M/sub r/ = 78,000-85,000 polypeptide while attenuating the labeling of the lower molecular weight bands. This new high affinity radioiodinated photoaffinity probe should be of great value for the molecular characterization of the α 1 -adrenergic receptor

  7. Selective Labeling of Proteins on Living Cell Membranes Using Fluorescent Nanodiamond Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Sotoma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The impeccable photostability of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs is an ideal property for use in fluorescence imaging of proteins in living cells. However, such an application requires highly specific labeling of the target proteins with FNDs. Furthermore, the surface of unmodified FNDs tends to adsorb biomolecules nonspecifically, which hinders the reliable targeting of proteins with FNDs. Here, we combined hyperbranched polyglycerol modification of FNDs with the β-lactamase-tag system to develop a strategy for selective imaging of the protein of interest in cells. The combination of these techniques enabled site-specific labeling of Interleukin-18 receptor alpha chain, a membrane receptor, with FNDs, which eventually enabled tracking of the diffusion trajectory of FND-labeled proteins on the membrane surface.

  8. Nonparametric combinatorial sequence models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauthier, Fabian L; Jordan, Michael I; Jojic, Nebojsa

    2011-11-01

    This work considers biological sequences that exhibit combinatorial structures in their composition: groups of positions of the aligned sequences are "linked" and covary as one unit across sequences. If multiple such groups exist, complex interactions can emerge between them. Sequences of this kind arise frequently in biology but methodologies for analyzing them are still being developed. This article presents a nonparametric prior on sequences which allows combinatorial structures to emerge and which induces a posterior distribution over factorized sequence representations. We carry out experiments on three biological sequence families which indicate that combinatorial structures are indeed present and that combinatorial sequence models can more succinctly describe them than simpler mixture models. We conclude with an application to MHC binding prediction which highlights the utility of the posterior distribution over sequence representations induced by the prior. By integrating out the posterior, our method compares favorably to leading binding predictors.

  9. Combinatorial Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard; Wisniewski, Rafal; Grunnet, Jacob Deleuran

    2008-01-01

    indicates for a given face the future simplex. In the suggested definition we allow nondeterminacy in form of splitting and merging of solution trajectories. The combinatorial vector field gives rise to combinatorial counterparts of most concepts from dynamical systems, such as duals to vector fields, flow......, flow lines, fixed points and Lyapunov functions. Finally it will be shown how this theory extends to switched dynamical systems and an algorithmic overview of how to do supervisory control will be shown towards the end....

  10. Probing the metabolic network in bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei using untargeted metabolomics with stable isotope labelled glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Creek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate.

  11. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Guo, Ning; Li, Quanzheng; Ma, Ying; Jacboson, Orit; Lee, Seulki; Choi, Hak Soo; Mansfield, James R; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/(64)Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide. The integrin α(v)β(3) binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA)-ZW-1 was characterized by cell staining and receptor binding assay. Sixty-min dynamic PET and optical imaging were acquired on a MDA-MB-435 tumor model. Singular value decomposition (SVD) method was applied to compute the dynamic optical signal from the two-dimensional optical projection images. Compartment models were used to quantitatively analyze and compare the dynamic optical and PET data. The dual-labeled probe (64)Cu-RGD-C(DOTA)-ZW-1 showed integrin specific binding in vitro and in vivo. The binding potential (Bp) derived from dynamic optical imaging (1.762 ± 0.020) is comparable to that from dynamic PET (1.752 ± 0.026). The signal un-mixing process using SVD improved the accuracy of kinetic modeling of 2D dynamic optical data. Our results demonstrate that 2D dynamic optical imaging with SVD analysis could achieve comparable quantitative results as dynamic PET imaging in preclinical xenograft models.

  12. Label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive detection of adenosine triphosphate using a loop DNA probe with low background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chunshui; Cai, Zhixiong; Wang, Yiru; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James; Chen, Xi

    2014-07-15

    A simple, rapid, label-free, and ultrasensitive fluorescence strategy for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection was developed using a loop DNA probe with low background noise. In this strategy, a loop DNA probe, which is the substrate for both ligation and digestion enzyme reaction, was designed. SYBR green I (SG I), a double-stranded specific dye, was applied for the readout fluorescence signal. Exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease III (Exo III), sequence-independent nucleases, were selected to digest the loop DNA probe in order to minimize the background fluorescence signal. As a result, in the absence of ATP, the loop DNA was completely digested by Exo I and Exo III, leading to low background fluorescence owing to the weak electrostatic interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. On the other hand, ATP induced the ligation of the nicking site, and the sealed loop DNA resisted the digestion of Exo I and ExoIII, resulting in a remarkable increase of fluorescence response. Upon background noise reduction, the sensitivity of the ATP determination was improved significantly, and the detection limitation was found to be 1.2 pM, which is much lower than that in almost all the previously reported methods. This strategy has promise for wide application in the determination of ATP.

  13. Fast neuronal labeling in live tissue using a biocytin conjugated fluorescent probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harsløf, Mads; Müller, Christoph Felix; Rohrberg, Julie

    2015-01-01

    of local synapses within 10min. TMR biocytin is fixable, stable during methyl salicylate clearing, and can be visualized deep in nervous tissue. COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHODS: Retrograde labeling with TMR biocytin enables long-range neuronal visualization and concurrent calcium imaging after only a few...

  14. Microfluidic technology platforms for synthesizing, labeling and measuring the kinetics of transport and biochemical reactions for developing molecular imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, Michael E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Radiotracer techniques are used in environmental sciences, geology, biology and medicine. Radiotracers with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provided biological examinations of ~3 million patients 2008. Despite the success of positron labeled tracers in many sciences, there is limited access in an affordable and convenient manner to develop and use new tracers. Integrated microfluidic chips are a new technology well matched to the concentrations of tracers. Our goal is to develop microfluidic chips and new synthesis approaches to enable wide dissemination of diverse types of tracers at low cost, and to produce new generations of radiochemists for which there are many unfilled jobs. The program objectives are to: 1. Develop an integrated microfluidic platform technology for synthesizing and 18F-labeling diverse arrays of different classes of molecules. 2. Incorporate microfluidic chips into small PC controlled devices (“Synthesizer”) with a platform interfaced to PC for electronic and fluid input/out control. 3. Establish a de-centralized model with Synthesizers for discovering and producing molecular imaging probes, only requiring delivery of inexpensive [18F]fluoride ion from commercial PET radiopharmacies vs the centralized approach of cyclotron facilities synthesizing and shipping a few different types of 18F-probes. 4. Develop a position sensitive avalanche photo diode (PSAPD) camera for beta particles embedded in a microfluidic chip for imaging and measuring transport and biochemical reaction rates to valid new 18F-labeled probes in an array of cell cultures. These objectives are met within a research and educational program integrating radio-chemistry, synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, engineering and biology in the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging. The Radiochemistry Training Program exposes PhD and post doctoral students to molecular imaging in vitro in cells and microorganisms in microfluidic chips and in vivo with PET, from new technologies

  15. Study on sensitivity of southern blotting hybridization using a 32P-labeled probe of PCR products in detecting human cytomegalovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bu Hengfu; Chen Juan; Shen Rongsen; Ma Liren; Xu Yongqiang

    1996-01-01

    Southern blotting hybridization (SBH) using a 32 P-labeled probe is one of the most practical methods for genetic diagnosis of pathogen. On the basis of establishing PCR and nested PCR for detecting human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a 32 P-labeled probe was prepared with the amplified products of 613 bp PCR outer primers and hybridized with 300 bp inner primer amplified product, resulting in increase in detecting sensitivity from 17 ng (in 1.2% agarose electrophoresis) before SBH to 500 pg (autoradiographed), in other words, increasing the sensitivity of detecting HCMV by 10 2 dilutions after using SBH. The method of PCR and SBH using a 32 P-labeled probe could detect less than 1 gene copy of HCMV, therefore, it is a rapid and reliable diagnosis method for detecting HCMV latent infection

  16. Near-infrared dyes and upconverting phosphors as biomolecule labels and probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patonay, Gabor; Strekowski, Lucjan; Nguyen, Diem-Ngoc; Seok, Kim Jun

    2007-02-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) absorbing chromophores have been used in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry extensively, including for determination of properties of biomolecules, DNA sequencing, immunoassays, capillary electrophoresis (CE) separations, etc. The major analytical advantages of these dyes are low background interference and high molar absorptivities. NIR dyes have additional advantages due to their sensitivity to microenvironmental changes. Spectral changes induced by the microenvironment are not desirable if the labels are used as a simple reporting group, e.g., during a biorecognition reaction. For these applications upconverting phosphors seem to be a better choice. There are several difficulties in utilizing upconverting phosphors as reporting labels. These are: large physical size, no reactive groups and insolubility in aqueous systems. This presentation will discuss how these difficulties can be overcome for bioanalytical and forensic applications. During these studies we also have investigated how to reduce physical size of the phosphor by simple grinding without losing activity and how to attach reactive moiety to the phosphor to covalently bind to the biomolecule of interest. It has to be emphasized that the described approach is not suitable for medical applications and the results of this research are not applicable in medical applications. For bioanalytical and forensic applications upconverting phosphors used as reporting labels have several advantages. They are excited with lasers that are red shifted respective to phosphorescence, resulting in no light scatter issues during detection. Also some phosphors are excited using eye safe lasers. In addition energy transfer to NIR dyes is possible, allowing detection schemes using donor-acceptor pairs. Data is presented to illustrate the feasibility of this phenomenon. If microenvironmental sensitivity is required, then specially designed NIR dyes can be used as acceptor labels. Several novel dyes

  17. Carbon-13 Labeling Used to Probe Cure and Degradation Reactions of High- Temperature Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature, crosslinked polyimides are typically insoluble, intractible materials. Consequently, in these systems it has been difficult to follow high-temperature curing or long-term degradation reactions on a molecular level. Selective labeling of the polymers with carbon-13, coupled with solid nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), enables these reactions to be followed. We successfully employed this technique to provide insight into both curing and degradation reactions of PMR-15, a polymer matrix resin used extensively in aircraft engine applications.

  18. Multiply osmium-labeled reporter probes for electrochemical DNA hybridization assays: detection of trinucleotide repeats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojta, Miroslav; Havran, Luděk; Kizek, René; Paleček, Emil

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 5 (2004), s. 985-994 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA MPO 1H-PK/42; GA AV ČR IAA4004108; GA AV ČR IBS5004355; GA AV ČR KJB4004302; GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : electrochemical sensors * DNA hybridization * DNA labeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.251, year: 2004

  19. Probing Xylan-Specific Raman Bands for Label-Free Imaging Xylan in Plant Cell Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-06-15

    Xylan constitutes a significant portion of biomass (e.g. 22% in corn stover used in this study). Xylan is also an important source of carbohydrates, besides cellulose, for renewable and sustainable energy applications. Currently used method for the localization of xylan in biomass is to use fluorescence confocal microscope to image the fluorescent dye labeled monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to xylan. With the rapid adoption of the Raman-based label-free chemical imaging techniques in biology, identifying Raman bands that are unique to xylan would be critical for the implementation of the above label-free techniques for in situ xylan imaging. Unlike lignin and cellulose that have long be assigned fingerprint Raman bands, specific Raman bands for xylan remain unclear. The major challenge is the cellulose in plant cell wall, which has chemical units highly similar to that of xylan. Here we report using xylanase to specifically remove xylan from feedstock. Under various degree of xylan removal, with minimum impact to other major cell wall components, i.e. lignin and cellulose, we have identified Raman bands that could be further tested for chemical imaging of xylan in biomass in situ.

  20. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus M204I Mutation by Quantum Dot-Labeled DNA Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are semiconductor nanoparticles with a diameter of less than 10 nm, which have been widely used as fluorescent probes in biochemical analysis and vivo imaging because of their excellent optical properties. Sensitive and convenient detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV gene mutations is important in clinical diagnosis. Therefore, we developed a sensitive, low-cost and convenient QDs-mediated fluorescent method for the detection of HBV gene mutations in real serum samples from chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients who had received lamivudine or telbivudine antiviral therapy. We also evaluated the efficiency of this method for the detection of drug-resistant mutations compared with direct sequencing. In CHB, HBV DNA from the serum samples of patients with poor response or virological breakthrough can be hybridized to probes containing the M204I mutation to visualize fluorescence under fluorescence microscopy, where fluorescence intensity is related to the virus load, in our method. At present, the limits of the method used to detect HBV genetic variations by fluorescence quantum dots is 103 IU/mL. These results show that QDs can be used as fluorescent probes to detect viral HBV DNA polymerase gene variation, and is a simple readout system without complex and expensive instruments, which provides an attractive platform for the detection of HBV M204I mutation.

  1. Multiplexed microRNA detection using lanthanide-labeled DNA probes and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun

    2014-01-01

    coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Three miRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana were analyzed simultaneously with high specificity, and the sensitivity of the method was comparable to radioactive detection (low femtomol range). The perspective of the developed method is highly multiplexed......In the past decade, microRNAs (miRNAs) have drawn increasing attention due to their role in regulation of gene expression. Especially, their potential as biomarkers in disease diagnostics has motivated miRNA research, including the development of simple, accurate, and sensitive detection methods....... The narrow size range of miRNAs (20-24 nucleotides) combined with the chemical properties of conventional reporter tags has hampered the development of multiplexed miRNA assays. In this study, we have used lanthanide-labeled DNA probes for the detection of miRNAs on membranes using laser ablation inductively...

  2. "Multicolor" electrochemical labeling of DNA hybridization probes with osmium tetroxide complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojta, Miroslav; Kostečka, Pavel; Trefulka, Mojmír; Havran, Luděk; Paleček, Emil

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 3 (2007), s. 1022-1029 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4004402; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0043; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/04/1325; GA MPO(CZ) 1H-PK/42; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : DNA labeling * osmium tetroxide complexes * DNA hybridization Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.287, year: 2007

  3. A SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-PROBE DETECTION LABEL-FREE OPTICAL-RESOLUTION PHOTOACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE BASED ON MICROCAVITY TRANSDUCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YONGBO WU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous multi-probe detection for an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM system. OR-PAM has elicited the attention of biomedical imaging researchers because of its optical absorption contrast and high spatial resolution with great imaging depth. OR-PAM allows label-free and noninvasive imaging by maximizing the optical absorption of endogenous biomolecules. However, given the inadequate absorption of some biomolecules, detection sensitivity at the same incident intensity requires improvement. In this study, a modulated continuous wave with power density less than 3 mW/cm2 (1/4 of the ANSI safety limit excited the weak photoacoustic (PA signals of biological cells. A microcavity transducer is developed based on the bulk modulus of gas five orders of magnitude lower than that of solid; air pressure variation is inversely proportional to cavity volume at the same temperature increase. Considering that a PA wave expands in various directions, detecting PA signals from different positions and adding them together can increase detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we employ four detectors to acquire tiny PA signals simultaneously. Experimental results show that the developed OR-PAM system allows the label-free imaging of cells with weak optical absorption.

  4. Synthesis of water-soluble, ring-substituted squaraine dyes and their evaluation as fluorescent probes and labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatarets, Anatoliy L. [SSI ' Institute for Single Crystals' of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Lenin Ave., Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine); Fedyunyayeva, Irina A. [SSI ' Institute for Single Crystals' of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Lenin Ave., Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine); Dyubko, Tatyana S. [SSI ' Institute for Single Crystals' of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Lenin Ave., Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine); Povrozin, Yevgeniy A. [SSI ' Institute for Single Crystals' of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Lenin Ave., Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine); Doroshenko, Andrey O. [Institute of Chemistry, V.N. Karazin National University, 4 Svobody Sq., Kharkov 61077 (Ukraine); Terpetschnig, Ewald A. [SETA BioMedicals, LLC, 2014 Silver Ct East, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) and ISS, Inc., 1602 Newton Drive, Champaign, IL 61822 (United States)]. E-mail: ewaldte@juno.com; Patsenker, Leonid D. [SSI ' Institute for Single Crystals' of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Lenin Ave., Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine); SETA BioMedicals, LLC, 2014 Silver Ct East, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2006-06-16

    A series of ring-substituted squaraines absorbing and emitting in the red and NIR spectral region was synthesized and their spectral and photophysical properties (quantum yields, fluorescence lifetimes) and photostabilities were measured and compared to Cy5, a commonly used fluorescent label. The absorption maxima in aqueous media were found to be between 628 and 667 nm and the emission maxima are between 642 and 685 nm. Squaraine dyes exhibit high extinction coefficients (163,000-265,000 M{sup -1} cm{sup -1}) and lower quantum yields (2-7%) in aqueous buffer but high quantum yields (up to 45%) and long fluorescence lifetimes (up to 3.3 ns) in presence of BSA. Dicyanomethylene- and thio-substituted squaraines exhibit an additional absorption around 400 nm with extinction coefficients between 21,500 and 44,500 M{sup -1} cm{sup -1}. These dyes are excitable not only with red but also with blue diode lasers or light emitting diodes. Due to the favourable spectral and photophysical properties these dyes can be used as fluorescent probes and labels for intensity- and fluorescence lifetime-based biomedical applications.

  5. Synthesis of water-soluble, ring-substituted squaraine dyes and their evaluation as fluorescent probes and labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatarets, Anatoliy L.; Fedyunyayeva, Irina A.; Dyubko, Tatyana S.; Povrozin, Yevgeniy A.; Doroshenko, Andrey O.; Terpetschnig, Ewald A.; Patsenker, Leonid D.

    2006-01-01

    A series of ring-substituted squaraines absorbing and emitting in the red and NIR spectral region was synthesized and their spectral and photophysical properties (quantum yields, fluorescence lifetimes) and photostabilities were measured and compared to Cy5, a commonly used fluorescent label. The absorption maxima in aqueous media were found to be between 628 and 667 nm and the emission maxima are between 642 and 685 nm. Squaraine dyes exhibit high extinction coefficients (163,000-265,000 M -1 cm -1 ) and lower quantum yields (2-7%) in aqueous buffer but high quantum yields (up to 45%) and long fluorescence lifetimes (up to 3.3 ns) in presence of BSA. Dicyanomethylene- and thio-substituted squaraines exhibit an additional absorption around 400 nm with extinction coefficients between 21,500 and 44,500 M -1 cm -1 . These dyes are excitable not only with red but also with blue diode lasers or light emitting diodes. Due to the favourable spectral and photophysical properties these dyes can be used as fluorescent probes and labels for intensity- and fluorescence lifetime-based biomedical applications

  6. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu, Ning Guo, Quanzheng Li, Ying Ma, Orit Jacboson, Seulki Lee, Hak Soo Choi, James R. Mansfield, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/64Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide.Methods: The integrin αvβ3 binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 was characterized by cell staining and receptor binding assay. Sixty-min dynamic PET and optical imaging were acquired on a MDA-MB-435 tumor model. Singular value decomposition (SVD method was applied to compute the dynamic optical signal from the two-dimensional optical projection images. Compartment models were used to quantitatively analyze and compare the dynamic optical and PET data.Results: The dual-labeled probe 64Cu-RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 showed integrin specific binding in vitro and in vivo. The binding potential (Bp derived from dynamic optical imaging (1.762 ± 0.020 is comparable to that from dynamic PET (1.752 ± 0.026.Conclusion: The signal un-mixing process using SVD improved the accuracy of kinetic modeling of 2D dynamic optical data. Our results demonstrate that 2D dynamic optical imaging with SVD analysis could achieve comparable quantitative results as dynamic PET imaging in preclinical xenograft models.

  7. Radioiodine labeled CdSe/CdS quantum dots. Lectin targeted dual probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akca, Ozlet; Unak, Perihan; Medine, E. Ilker; Kilcar, Ayfer Yurt; Ichedef, Cigdem [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Applications; Sakarya, Serhan [Adnan Menderes Univ., Aydin (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Bekis, Recep [Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Timur, Suna [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Biochemistry Dept.

    2014-11-01

    CdSe/CdS quantum dots (QD) were synthesized and bioconjugated with Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) lectin (Lec). Mannose triflate and cysteamine molecules (MTC) were also utilized to prepare MTC-QDs and MTC-QDs-Lec probes as well as Lec bound QDs. Afterwards; potential use of these nanoparticles as radiolabeled fluorescence nano-probes for the cell imaging studies has been investigated. Biological activities of {sup 125}I{sup -}, {sup 125}I-MTC-QDs, MTC-QDs- Lec-{sup 125}I, QDs-Lec-{sup 125}I and Lec-{sup 125}I were examined on various cancer cell lines such as Caco-2, MCF-7 and A-549 in terms of cell incorporation. QDs-Lec-{sup 125}I exhibited the highest cell incorporation on whole cell lines. In addition, the QDs-Lec-{sup 131}I, was used for in vivo imaging. The whole body distribution of the radiolabeled QDs on New Zealand rabbits and Balb C mice were examined by taking dynamic and static images. Radioactivity cleared from the kidneys and the bladder, while significant amount radioactivity was retained in the heart and liver within 24 h.

  8. Introduction to combinatorial designs

    CERN Document Server

    Wallis, WD

    2007-01-01

    Combinatorial theory is one of the fastest growing areas of modern mathematics. Focusing on a major part of this subject, Introduction to Combinatorial Designs, Second Edition provides a solid foundation in the classical areas of design theory as well as in more contemporary designs based on applications in a variety of fields. After an overview of basic concepts, the text introduces balanced designs and finite geometries. The author then delves into balanced incomplete block designs, covering difference methods, residual and derived designs, and resolvability. Following a chapter on the e

  9. Electrochemical detection of DNA binding by tumor suppressor p53 protein using osmium-labeled oligonucleotide probes and catalytic hydrogen evolution at the mercury electrode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němcová, Kateřina; Šebest, Peter; Havran, Luděk; Orság, Petr; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 406, č. 24 (2014), s. 5843-5852 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2076; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Electrochemical analysis * Labeled probes * Osmium complex Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  10. Design of photoaffinity labeling probes derived from 3,4,5-trimethylfuran-2(5H)-one for mode of action elucidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pošta, Martin; Soós, V.; Beier, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, 27/28 (2016), s. 3809-3817 ISSN 0040-4020 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : photoaffinity labeling probes * protein cross-linking * smoke * butenolides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.651, year: 2016

  11. Infinitary Combinatory Reduction Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketema, Jeroen; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2011-01-01

    We define infinitary Combinatory Reduction Systems (iCRSs), thus providing the first notion of infinitary higher-order rewriting. The systems defined are sufficiently general that ordinary infinitary term rewriting and infinitary ¿-calculus are special cases. Furthermore,we generalise a number...

  12. Manipulating Combinatorial Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labelle, Gilbert

    This set of transparencies shows how the manipulation of combinatorial structures in the context of modern combinatorics can easily lead to interesting teaching and learning activities at every level of education from elementary school to university. The transparencies describe: (1) the importance and relations of combinatorics to science and…

  13. Introduction to combinatorial geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Emmett, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    The combinatorial geometry package as used in many three-dimensional multimedia Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, such as HETC, MORSE, and EGS, is becoming the preferred way to describe simple and complicated systems. Just about any system can be modeled using the package with relatively few input statements. This can be contrasted against the older style geometry packages in which the required input statements could be large even for relatively simple systems. However, with advancements come some difficulties. The users of combinatorial geometry must be able to visualize more, and, in some instances, all of the system at a time. Errors can be introduced into the modeling which, though slight, and at times hard to detect, can have devastating effects on the calculated results. As with all modeling packages, the best way to learn the combinatorial geometry is to use it, first on a simple system then on more complicated systems. The basic technique for the description of the geometry consists of defining the location and shape of the various zones in terms of the intersections and unions of geometric bodies. The geometric bodies which are generally included in most combinatorial geometry packages are: (1) box, (2) right parallelepiped, (3) sphere, (4) right circular cylinder, (5) right elliptic cylinder, (6) ellipsoid, (7) truncated right cone, (8) right angle wedge, and (9) arbitrary polyhedron. The data necessary to describe each of these bodies are given. As can be easily noted, there are some subsets included for simplicity

  14. Labeling RNAs in Live Cells Using Malachite Green Aptamer Scaffolds as Fluorescent Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramilli, V Siddartha; Kim, Kyung Hyuk

    2018-03-16

    RNAs mediate many different processes that are central to cellular function. The ability to quantify or image RNAs in live cells is very useful in elucidating such functions of RNA. RNA aptamer-fluorogen systems have been increasingly used in labeling RNAs in live cells. Here, we use the malachite green aptamer (MGA), an RNA aptamer that can specifically bind to malachite green (MG) dye and induces it to emit far-red fluorescence signals. Previous studies on MGA showed a potential for the use of MGA for genetically tagging other RNA molecules in live cells. However, these studies also exhibited low fluorescence signals and high background noise. Here we constructed and tested RNA scaffolds containing multiple tandem repeats of MGA as a strategy to increase the brightness of the MGA aptamer-fluorogen system as well as to make the system fluoresce when tagging various RNA molecules, in live cells. We demonstrate that our MGA scaffolds can induce fluorescence signals by up to ∼20-fold compared to the basal level as a genetic tag for other RNA molecules. We also show that our scaffolds function reliably as genetically encoded fluorescent tags for mRNAs of fluorescent proteins and other RNA aptamers.

  15. Fluorescent probes as a tool for labelling and tracking the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Sarah M; Leung, Tommy L F; Bishop, Phillip J

    2011-09-09

    The dissemination of the virulent pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has contributed to the decline and extinction of many amphibian species worldwide. Several different strains have been identified, some of which are sympatric. Interactions between co-infecting strains of a pathogen can have significant influences on disease epidemiology and evolution; therefore the dynamics of multi-strain infections is an important area of research. We stained Bd cells with 2 fluorescent BODIPY fatty acid probes to determine whether these can potentially be used to distinguish and track Bd cell lines in multi-strain experiments. Bd cells in broth culture were stained with 5 concentrations of green-fluorescent BODIPY FL and red-fluorescent BODIPY 558/568 and visualised under an epifluorescent microscope for up to 16 d post-dye. Dyed strains were also assessed for growth inhibition. The most effective concentration for both dyes was 10 pM. This concentration of dye produced strong fluorescence for 12 to 16 d in Bd cultures held at 23 degrees C (3 to 4 generations), and did not inhibit Bd growth. Cells dyed with BODIPY FL and BODIPY 558/568 can be distinguished from each other on the basis of their fluorescence characteristics. Therefore, it is likely that this technique will be useful for research into multi-strain dynamics of Bd infections.

  16. Luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, highly sensitive and selective detection of minocycline

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Peng, Rufang

    2014-11-01

    In this work, luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles (LuAuNPs) were used as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, sensitive and selective detection of minocycline (MC). The LuAuNPs were prepared by simple one-pot reduction of HAuCl4 with luminol, which exhibited a good chemiluminescence (CL) activity owing to the presence of luminol molecules on their surface and surface plasmon resonance absorption. In the absence of MC, the color of LuAuNPs was wine red and their size was relatively small (˜25 nm), which could react with silver nitrate, producing a strong CL emission. Upon the addition of MC at acidic buffer solutions, the electrostatic interaction between positively charged MC and negatively charged LuAuNPs caused the aggregation of LuAuNPs, generating a purple or blue color. Simultaneously, the aggregated LuAuNPs did not effectively react with silver nitrate, producing a weak CL emission. The signal change was linearly dependent on the logarithm of MC concentration in the range from 30 ng to 1.0 μg for colorimetric detection and from 10 ng to 1.0 μg for CL detection. With colorimetry, a detection limit of 22 ng was achieved, while the detection limit for CL detection modality was 9.7 ng.

  17. Luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, highly sensitive and selective detection of minocycline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yi; Peng, Rufang

    2014-01-01

    In this work, luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles (LuAuNPs) were used as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, sensitive and selective detection of minocycline (MC). The LuAuNPs were prepared by simple one-pot reduction of HAuCl 4 with luminol, which exhibited a good chemiluminescence (CL) activity owing to the presence of luminol molecules on their surface and surface plasmon resonance absorption. In the absence of MC, the color of LuAuNPs was wine red and their size was relatively small (∼25 nm), which could react with silver nitrate, producing a strong CL emission. Upon the addition of MC at acidic buffer solutions, the electrostatic interaction between positively charged MC and negatively charged LuAuNPs caused the aggregation of LuAuNPs, generating a purple or blue color. Simultaneously, the aggregated LuAuNPs did not effectively react with silver nitrate, producing a weak CL emission. The signal change was linearly dependent on the logarithm of MC concentration in the range from 30 ng to 1.0 μg for colorimetric detection and from 10 ng to 1.0 μg for CL detection. With colorimetry, a detection limit of 22 ng was achieved, while the detection limit for CL detection modality was 9.7 ng. (paper)

  18. Synthesis of dansyl-labeled probe of thiophene analogue of annonaceous acetogenins for visualization of cell distribution and growth inhibitory activity toward human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Naoto; Suga, Yuki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Tanaka, Tetsuaki; Akatsuka, Akinobu; Yamori, Takao; Dan, Shingo; Iwasaki, Hiroki; Yamashita, Masayuki

    2015-03-15

    The convergent synthesis of the dansyl-labeled probe of the thiophene-3-carboxamide analogue of annonaceous acetogenins, which shows potent antitumor activity, was accomplished by two asymmetric alkynylations of the 2,5-diformyl THF equivalent with an alkyne having a thiophene moiety and another alkyne tagged with a dansyl group. The growth inhibitory profiles toward 39 human cancer cell lines revealed that the probe retained the biological function of its mother compound, and would be useful for studying cellular activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Label-free logic modules and two-layer cascade based on stem-loop probes containing a G-quadruplex domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yahui; Cheng, Junjie; Wang, Jine; Zhou, Xiaodong; Hu, Jiming; Pei, Renjun

    2014-09-01

    A simple, versatile, and label-free DNA computing strategy was designed by using toehold-mediated strand displacement and stem-loop probes. A full set of logic gates (YES, NOT, OR, NAND, AND, INHIBIT, NOR, XOR, XNOR) and a two-layer logic cascade were constructed. The probes contain a G-quadruplex domain, which was blocked or unfolded through inputs initiating strand displacement and the obviously distinguishable light-up fluorescent signal of G-quadruplex/NMM complex was used as the output readout. The inputs are the disease-specific nucleotide sequences with potential for clinic diagnosis. The developed versatile computing system based on our label-free and modular strategy might be adapted in multi-target diagnosis through DNA hybridization and aptamer-target interaction. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The combinatorial derivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Protasov

    2013-09-01

    $\\Delta(A=\\{g\\in G:|gA\\cap A|=\\infty\\}$. The mapping $\\Delta:\\mathcal{P}_G\\rightarrow\\mathcal{P}_G$, $A\\mapsto\\Delta(A$, is called a combinatorial derivation and can be considered as an analogue of the topological derivation $d:\\mathcal{P}_X\\rightarrow\\mathcal{P}_X$, $A\\mapsto A^d$, where $X$ is a topological space and $A^d$ is the set of all limit points of $A$. Content: elementary properties, thin and almost thin subsets, partitions, inverse construction and $\\Delta$-trajectories,  $\\Delta$ and $d$.

  1. Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisbjerg, Micke

    This thesis is divided into seven chapters, which can all be read individually. The first chapter, however, contains a general introduction to the chemistry used in the remaining six chapters, and it is therefore recommended to read chapter one before reading the other chapters. Chapter 1...... is a general introductory chapter for the whole thesis. The history and concepts of dynamic combinatorial chemistry are described, as are some of the new and intriguing results recently obtained. Finally, the properties of a broad range of hexameric macrocycles are described in detail. Chapter 2 gives...

  2. Boltzmann Oracle for Combinatorial Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Pivoteau , Carine; Salvy , Bruno; Soria , Michèle

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Boltzmann random generation applies to well-defined systems of recursive combinatorial equations. It relies on oracles giving values of the enumeration generating series inside their disk of convergence. We show that the combinatorial systems translate into numerical iteration schemes that provide such oracles. In particular, we give a fast oracle based on Newton iteration.

  3. Combinatorial matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mitjana, Margarida

    2018-01-01

    This book contains the notes of the lectures delivered at an Advanced Course on Combinatorial Matrix Theory held at Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (CRM) in Barcelona. These notes correspond to five series of lectures. The first series is dedicated to the study of several matrix classes defined combinatorially, and was delivered by Richard A. Brualdi. The second one, given by Pauline van den Driessche, is concerned with the study of spectral properties of matrices with a given sign pattern. Dragan Stevanović delivered the third one, devoted to describing the spectral radius of a graph as a tool to provide bounds of parameters related with properties of a graph. The fourth lecture was delivered by Stephen Kirkland and is dedicated to the applications of the Group Inverse of the Laplacian matrix. The last one, given by Ángeles Carmona, focuses on boundary value problems on finite networks with special in-depth on the M-matrix inverse problem.

  4. Cryptographic Combinatorial Securities Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    We present a useful new mechanism that facilitates the atomic exchange of many large baskets of securities in a combinatorial exchange. Cryptography prevents information about the securities in the baskets from being exploited, enhancing trust. Our exchange offers institutions who wish to trade large positions a new alternative to existing methods of block trading: they can reduce transaction costs by taking advantage of other institutions’ available liquidity, while third party liquidity providers guarantee execution—preserving their desired portfolio composition at all times. In our exchange, institutions submit encrypted orders which are crossed, leaving a “remainder”. The exchange proves facts about the portfolio risk of this remainder to third party liquidity providers without revealing the securities in the remainder, the knowledge of which could also be exploited. The third parties learn either (depending on the setting) the portfolio risk parameters of the remainder itself, or how their own portfolio risk would change if they were to incorporate the remainder into a portfolio they submit. In one setting, these third parties submit bids on the commission, and the winner supplies necessary liquidity for the entire exchange to clear. This guaranteed clearing, coupled with external price discovery from the primary markets for the securities, sidesteps difficult combinatorial optimization problems. This latter method of proving how taking on the remainder would change risk parameters of one’s own portfolio, without revealing the remainder’s contents or its own risk parameters, is a useful protocol of independent interest.

  5. Prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint (PROBE) designed trials yield the same results as double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with respect to ABPM measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David H; Neutel, Joel M; Lacourcière, Yves; Kempthorne-Rawson, Joan

    2003-07-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to determine whether ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) results from double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC) and prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint (PROBE) hypertension trials are statistically comparable. Two DBPC and three PROBE parallel-group studies were selected from an angiotensin II receptor blocker clinical programme. These were fixed-dose studies involving similar mild to moderate hypertensive patient populations. All used SpaceLabs 90207 ABPM devices, and each comprised a 4-week placebo period and a 4-8-week treatment period. Data from patients receiving telmisartan 80 mg were used to compare the results of DBPC (126 patients) and PROBE (734 patients) trials. The analysis had approximately 87% power to show equivalence between the two design types in terms of ruling out differences of >or= 3 mmHg in SBP and >or= 2 mmHg in DBP. Office blood pressure was also compared. The change from baseline in mean 24-h ambulatory SBP was -12.2 mmHg in DBPC trials and -12.3 mmHg in PROBE trials, a rounded difference of 0.2 mmHg [95% confidence interval (CI): -1.8, 2.1]. The change from baseline in mean 24-h ambulatory DBP was -7.7 mmHg in DBPC trials versus -7.9 mmHg in PROBE trials, a difference of 0.2 mmHg (95% CI: -1.1, 1.5). Ambulatory pulse pressure results were identical. Thus, changes in mean 24-h ambulatory blood pressure from the DBPC and PROBE trials in this meta-analysis are statistically equivalent in terms of ruling out a difference of >or= 3 mmHg in SBP and >or= 2 mmHg in DBP. This supports the validity of the PROBE design in assessing antihypertensive efficacy based on blinded ABPM measurements.

  6. Horseradish peroxidase and antibody labeled gold nanoparticle probe for amplified immunoassay of ciguatoxin in fish samples based on capillary electrophoresis with electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Chaoying; Luan, Wenxiu

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a new amplified immunoassay with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and antibody (Ab) labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) probe hyphenated to capillary electrophoresis (CE) with electrochemical (EC) detection for ultrasensitive determination of ciguatoxin CTX1B. AuNPs were conjugated with HRP and Ab, and then incubated with limited amount of CTX1B to produce immunocomplex. The immunoreactive sample was injected into capillary for CE separation and EC detection. Enhanced sensitivity was obtained by adopting the AuNPs as carriers of HRP and Ab at high HRP/Ab molar ratio. The calibration curve of CTX1B was in the range of 0.06-90 ng/mL. The detection limit was 0.045 ng/mL, which is 38-fold lower than that of HPLC-MS method for CTX1B analysis. The proposed method was successfully applied for the quantification of CTX1B in contamined fish samples by simultaneously labeling Ab and HRP on AuNPs. The amplified IA with HRP and Ab labeled AuNPs probe hyphenated to CE and EC detection provides a sensitive analytical approach for the determination of trace ciguatoxin in complex samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A regenerated electrochemical biosensor for label-free detection of glucose and urea based on conformational switch of i-motif oligonucleotide probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Chen, Dong Mei [Key Laboratory of Eco-environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Lei, Jing Lei [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Luo, Hong Qun, E-mail: luohq@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Li, Nian Bing, E-mail: linb@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Improving the reproducibility of electrochemical signal remains a great challenge over the past decades. In this work, i-motif oligonucleotide probe-based electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor is introduced for the first time as a regenerated sensing platform, which enhances the reproducibility of electrochemical signal, for label-free detection of glucose and urea. The addition of glucose or urea is able to activate glucose oxidase-catalyzed or urease-catalyzed reaction, inducing or destroying the formation of i-motif oligonucleotide probe. The conformational switch of oligonucleotide probe can be recorded by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Thus, the difference of electron transfer resistance is utilized for the quantitative determination of glucose and urea. We further demonstrate that the E-DNA sensor exhibits high selectivity, excellent stability, and remarkable regenerated ability. The human serum analysis indicates that this simple and regenerated strategy holds promising potential in future biosensing applications. - Highlights: • Conformational switch of i-motif is used for the detection of glucose and urea. • The sensor can be regenerated. • The proposed method is successfully applied in real sample assay. • Our method is label-free and inexpensive.

  8. Combinatorial optimization games

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, X. [York Univ., North York, Ontario (Canada); Ibaraki, Toshihide; Nagamochi, Hiroshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    We introduce a general integer programming formulation for a class of combinatorial optimization games, which immediately allows us to improve the algorithmic result for finding amputations in the core (an important solution concept in cooperative game theory) of the network flow game on simple networks by Kalai and Zemel. An interesting result is a general theorem that the core for this class of games is nonempty if and only if a related linear program has an integer optimal solution. We study the properties for this mathematical condition to hold for several interesting problems, and apply them to resolve algorithmic and complexity issues for their cores along the line as put forward in: decide whether the core is empty; if the core is empty, find an imputation in the core; given an imputation x, test whether x is in the core. We also explore the properties of totally balanced games in this succinct formulation of cooperative games.

  9. Combinatorial Testing for VDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Gorm; Lausdahl, Kenneth; Battle, Nick

    2010-01-01

    by forgotten preconditions as well as broken invariants and post-conditions. Trace definitions are defined as regular expressions describing possible sequences of operation calls, and are conceptually similar to UML sequence diagrams. In this paper we present a tool enabling test automation based on VDM traces......Abstract—Combinatorial testing in VDM involves the automatic generation and execution of a large collection of test cases derived from templates provided in the form of trace definitions added to a VDM specification. The main value of this is the rapid detection of run-time errors caused......, and explain how it is possible to reduce large collections of test cases in different ways. Its use is illustrated with a small case study....

  10. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gyoyeon [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyeon, E-mail: jylee@kist.re.kr [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. - Highlights: • We prepared a probe linked between QD and telomeric oligonucleotide with platinum-guanine bonding. • Telomeres were detected by our new telomere probes successfully in three different human metaphase chromosomes. • QDPt-DNA probe has high fluorescence intensity in comparison with organic dye-DNA probe.

  11. Site-directed fluorescence labeling of a membrane protein with BADAN: probing protein topology and local environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehorst, R.B.M.; Spruijt, R.B.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    We present a new and simple method based on site-directed fluorescence labeling using the BADAN label that allows to examine protein-lipid interactions in great detail. We apply this approach to a membrane-embedded mainly -helical reference protein, the M13 major coat protein, of which in a

  12. On an extension of a combinatorial identity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to an infinite family of 4-way combinatorial identities. In some particular cases we get even 5-way combinatorial identities which give us four new combinatorial versions of. Göllnitz–Gordon identities. Keywords. n-Color partitions; lattice paths; Frobenius partitions; Göllnitz–Gordon identities; combinatorial interpretations. 1.

  13. Combinatorial Nano-Bio Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Pingqiang; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Ming; Wu, Yun-Long; Chen, Xiaodong

    2018-06-08

    Nano-bio interfaces are emerging from the convergence of engineered nanomaterials and biological entities. Despite rapid growth, clinical translation of biomedical nanomaterials is heavily compromised by the lack of comprehensive understanding of biophysicochemical interactions at nano-bio interfaces. In the past decade, a few investigations have adopted a combinatorial approach toward decoding nano-bio interfaces. Combinatorial nano-bio interfaces comprise the design of nanocombinatorial libraries and high-throughput bioevaluation. In this Perspective, we address challenges in combinatorial nano-bio interfaces and call for multiparametric nanocombinatorics (composition, morphology, mechanics, surface chemistry), multiscale bioevaluation (biomolecules, organelles, cells, tissues/organs), and the recruitment of computational modeling and artificial intelligence. Leveraging combinatorial nano-bio interfaces will shed light on precision nanomedicine and its potential applications.

  14. Combinatorial designs constructions and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Stinson, Douglas R

    2004-01-01

    Created to teach students many of the most important techniques used for constructing combinatorial designs, this is an ideal textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in combinatorial design theory. The text features clear explanations of basic designs, such as Steiner and Kirkman triple systems, mutual orthogonal Latin squares, finite projective and affine planes, and Steiner quadruple systems. In these settings, the student will master various construction techniques, both classic and modern, and will be well-prepared to construct a vast array of combinatorial designs. Design theory offers a progressive approach to the subject, with carefully ordered results. It begins with simple constructions that gradually increase in complexity. Each design has a construction that contains new ideas or that reinforces and builds upon similar ideas previously introduced. A new text/reference covering all apsects of modern combinatorial design theory. Graduates and professionals in computer science, applie...

  15. Combinatorial Mathematics: Research into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraman, Bharath; English, Lyn D.

    2004-01-01

    Implications and suggestions for using combinatorial mathematics in the classroom through a survey and synthesis of numerous research studies are presented. The implications revolve around five major themes that emerge from analysis of these studies.

  16. Combinatorial methods with computer applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Jonathan L

    2007-01-01

    Combinatorial Methods with Computer Applications provides in-depth coverage of recurrences, generating functions, partitions, and permutations, along with some of the most interesting graph and network topics, design constructions, and finite geometries. Requiring only a foundation in discrete mathematics, it can serve as the textbook in a combinatorial methods course or in a combined graph theory and combinatorics course.After an introduction to combinatorics, the book explores six systematic approaches within a comprehensive framework: sequences, solving recurrences, evaluating summation exp

  17. Number systems and combinatorial problems

    OpenAIRE

    Yordzhev, Krasimir

    2014-01-01

    The present work has been designed for students in secondary school and their teachers in mathematics. We will show how with the help of our knowledge of number systems we can solve problems from other fields of mathematics for example in combinatorial analysis and most of all when proving some combinatorial identities. To demonstrate discussed in this article method we have chosen several suitable mathematical tasks.

  18. Relativity in Combinatorial Gravitational Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Linfan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A combinatorial spacetime $(mathscr{C}_G| uboverline{t}$ is a smoothly combinatorial manifold $mathscr{C}$ underlying a graph $G$ evolving on a time vector $overline{t}$. As we known, Einstein's general relativity is suitable for use only in one spacetime. What is its disguise in a combinatorial spacetime? Applying combinatorial Riemannian geometry enables us to present a combinatorial spacetime model for the Universe and suggest a generalized Einstein gravitational equation in such model. Forfinding its solutions, a generalized relativity principle, called projective principle is proposed, i.e., a physics law ina combinatorial spacetime is invariant under a projection on its a subspace and then a spherically symmetric multi-solutions ofgeneralized Einstein gravitational equations in vacuum or charged body are found. We also consider the geometrical structure in such solutions with physical formations, and conclude that an ultimate theory for the Universe maybe established if all such spacetimes in ${f R}^3$. Otherwise, our theory is only an approximate theory and endless forever.

  19. Development of positron emission tomography probe of 64Cu-labeled anti-C-kit 12A8 Fab to measure protooncogene C-kit expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Chisato; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Sudo, Hitomi; Sugyo, Aya; Sogawa, Chizuru; Inubushi, Masayuki; Uehara, Tomoya; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Arano, Yasushi; Saga, Tsuneo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: C-kit is an important diagnostic and therapeutic target molecule for several malignancies, and c-kit-targeted drugs have been used clinically. Because abundant c-kit expression in tumors is a prerequisite for successful c-kit-targeted therapy, imaging of c-kit expression is expected to play a pivotal role in the therapeutic decision for each patient. We evaluated 64 Cu-labeled Fab of anti-c-kit antibody 12A8 as a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging probe. Methods: 111 In- or 125 I-Labeled 12A8 Fab was evaluated in vitro by cell binding, competitive inhibition and cellular internalization assays, and in vivo by biodistribution in mice bearing c-kit-expressing and -non-expressing tumors. Next, Fab fragment was labeled with the positron emitter 64 Cu and evaluated by PET. Results: Radiolabeled 12A8 Fab showed specific binding to c-kit-expressing cells with high affinity and internalized into cells after binding to c-kit on cell surface. Although tumor accumulation of [ 111 In]Fab was lower than that of [ 111 In]IgG, the faster blood clearance of [ 111 In]Fab provided higher tumor-to-blood ratio at 6 h postinjection onwards. Blood clearance of 64 Cu-labeled 12A8 Fab was slower than that of [ 111 In]Fab, but PET using [ 64 Cu]Fab clearly visualized the tumor at 6 h postinjection onwards. Conclusion: The 64 Cu-labeled 12A8 Fab could be used for c-kit-specific PET imaging and might help in selecting appropriate patients for c-kit-targeted treatments.

  20. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lei; Guo, Ning; Li, Quanzheng; Ma, Ying; Jacboson, Orit; Lee, Seulki; Choi, Hak Soo; Mansfield, James R.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/64Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide. Methods: The integrin αvβ3 binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA)...

  1. Dual-Labeled Near-Infrared/99mTc Imaging Probes Using PAMAM-Coated Silica Nanoparticles for the Imaging of HER2-Expressing Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Yamaguchi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We sought to develop dual-modality imaging probes using functionalized silica nanoparticles to target human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and achieve efficient target imaging of HER2-expressing tumors. Polyamidoamine-based functionalized silica nanoparticles (PCSNs for multimodal imaging were synthesized with near-infrared (NIR fluorescence (indocyanine green (ICG and technetium-99m (99mTc radioactivity. Anti-HER2 antibodies were bound to the labeled PCSNs. These dual-imaging probes were tested to image HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma cells. In vivo imaging was also examined in breast tumor xenograft models in mice. SK-BR3 (HER2 positive cells were imaged with stronger NIR fluorescent signals than that in MDA-MB231 (HER2 negative cells. The increased radioactivity of the SK-BR3 cells was also confirmed by phosphor imaging. NIR images showed strong fluorescent signals in the SK-BR3 tumor model compared to muscle tissues and the MDA-MB231 tumor model. Automatic well counting results showed increased radioactivity in the SK-BR3 xenograft tumors. We developed functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with 99mTc and ICG for the targeting and imaging of HER2-expressing cells. The dual-imaging probes efficiently imaged HER2-overexpressing cells. Although further studies are needed to produce efficient isotope labeling, the results suggest that the multifunctional silica nanoparticles are a promising vehicle for imaging specific components of the cell membrane in a dual-modality manner.

  2. Detection of KatG Gen Mutation on Mycobacterium Tuberculosis by Means of PCR-Dot Blot Hybridization with 32P Labeled Oligonucleotide Probe Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Lina R; Budiman Bela; Andi Yasmon

    2009-01-01

    Handling and controlling of tuberculosis, a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), is now complicated since there are many MTBs that are resistant against anti-tuberculosis drugs such as isoniazid. The drug resistance could occurred due to the inadequate and un-regular drug utilization that cause gene mutation of the drug target such as katG gene for isoniazid. The molecular biology techniques such as the PCR- dot blot hybridization with radioisotope ( 32 P) labeled oligonucleotide probe, has been reported as a technique that is more sensitive and rapid for detection of gene mutations related with drug resistances. Hence, the aim of this study was to apply the PCR- dot blot hybridization technique using 32 P labeled oligonucleotide probe for detection of single mutation at codon 315 of katG gene of MTBs that rise the isoniazid resistance. In this study, we used 89 sputum specimens and a standard MTB (MTB H 37 RV) as a control. DNA extractions were performed by the BOOM method and the phenol chloroform for sputum samples and standard MTB, respectively. Primers used for PCR technique were Pt8 and Pt9 and RTB59 and RTB36 for detecting tuberculosis causing Mycobacterium and the existence of katG gene, respectively. Both of the primers are specific for IS6110 region and katG gene, respectively. PCR products were detected by an agarose gel electrophoresis technique. Dot blot hybridization with 32 P-oligonucleotide probe 315mu was performed to detect mutation at codon 315 of tested samples. Results of the PCR using primer Pt8 and Pt9 showed that all sputum specimens had positive results. Mutation detection by PCR- dot blot hybridization with 32 P-oligonucleotide probe 315mu, revealed that 11 of 89 tested samples had a mutation at their codon 315 of katG gene. Based upon these results, it is concluded that PCR-dot blot hybridization with 32 P-oligonucleotide probe is a technique that is rapid and highly specific and sensitive for detection of mutation at codon

  3. Identification and Interrogation of Combinatorial Histone Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly R Karch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Histone proteins are dynamically modified to mediate a variety of cellular processes including gene transcription, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis. Regulation of these processes occurs through the recruitment of non-histone proteins to chromatin by specific combinations of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs. Mass spectrometry has emerged as an essential tool to discover and quantify histone PTMs both within and between samples in an unbiased manner. Developments in mass spectrometry that allow for characterization of large histone peptides or intact protein has made it possible to determine which modifications occur simultaneously on a single histone polypeptide. A variety of techniques from biochemistry, biophysics, and chemical biology have been employed to determine the biological relevance of discovered combinatorial codes. This review first describes advancements in the field of mass spectrometry that have facilitated histone PTM analysis and then covers notable approaches to probe the biological relevance of these modifications in their nucleosomal context.

  4. Combinatorial synthesis of natural products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    2002-01-01

    Combinatorial syntheses allow production of compound libraries in an expeditious and organized manner immediately applicable for high-throughput screening. Natural products possess a pedigree to justify quality and appreciation in drug discovery and development. Currently, we are seeing a rapid...... increase in application of natural products in combinatorial chemistry and vice versa. The therapeutic areas of infectious disease and oncology still dominate but many new areas are emerging. Several complex natural products have now been synthesised by solid-phase methods and have created the foundation...... for preparation of combinatorial libraries. In other examples, natural products or intermediates have served as building blocks or scaffolds in the synthesis of complex natural products, bioactive analogues or designed hybrid molecules. Finally, structural motifs from the biologically active parent molecule have...

  5. Combinatorial optimization theory and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Korte, Bernhard

    2018-01-01

    This comprehensive textbook on combinatorial optimization places special emphasis on theoretical results and algorithms with provably good performance, in contrast to heuristics. It is based on numerous courses on combinatorial optimization and specialized topics, mostly at graduate level. This book reviews the fundamentals, covers the classical topics (paths, flows, matching, matroids, NP-completeness, approximation algorithms) in detail, and proceeds to advanced and recent topics, some of which have not appeared in a textbook before. Throughout, it contains complete but concise proofs, and also provides numerous exercises and references. This sixth edition has again been updated, revised, and significantly extended. Among other additions, there are new sections on shallow-light trees, submodular function maximization, smoothed analysis of the knapsack problem, the (ln 4+ɛ)-approximation for Steiner trees, and the VPN theorem. Thus, this book continues to represent the state of the art of combinatorial opti...

  6. Hybridization chain reaction-based colorimetric aptasensor of adenosine 5'-triphosphate on unmodified gold nanoparticles and two label-free hairpin probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhuangqiang; Qiu, Zhenli; Lu, Minghua; Shu, Jian; Tang, Dianping

    2017-03-15

    This work designs a new label-free aptasensor for the colorimetric determination of small molecules (adenosine 5'-triphosphate, ATP) by using visible gold nanoparticles as the signal-generation tags, based on target-triggered hybridization chain reaction (HCR) between two hairpin DNA probes. The assay is carried out referring to the change in the color/absorbance by salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles after the interaction with hairpins, gold nanoparticles and ATP. To construct such an assay system, two hairpin DNA probes with a short single-stranded DNA at the sticky end are utilized for interaction with gold nanoparticles. In the absence of target ATP, the hairpin DNA probes can prevent gold nanoparticles from the salt-induced aggregation through the interaction of the single-stranded DNA at the sticky end with gold nanoparticles. Upon target ATP introduction, the aptamer-based hairpin probe is opened to expose a new sticky end for the strand-displacement reaction with another complementary hairpin, thus resulting in the decreasing single-stranded DNA because of the consumption of hairpins. In this case, gold nanoparticles are uncovered owing to the formation of double-stranded DNA, which causes their aggregation upon addition of the salt, thereby leading to the change in the red-to-blue color. Under the optimal conditions, the HCR-based colorimetric assay presents good visible color or absorbance responses for the determination of target ATP at a concentration as low as 1.0nM. Importantly, the methodology can be further extended to quantitatively or qualitatively monitor other small molecules or biotoxins by changing the sequence of the corresponding aptamer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of the Implicit Combinatorial Model on Combinatorial Reasoning in Secondary School Pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batanero, Carmen; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Elementary combinatorial problems may be classified into three different combinatorial models: (1) selection; (2) partition; and (3) distribution. The main goal of this research was to determine the effect of the implicit combinatorial model on pupils' combinatorial reasoning before and after instruction. Gives an analysis of variance of the…

  8. PET imaging of liposomes labeled with an [18F]-fluorocholesteryl ether probe prepared by automated radiosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Tue Ingemann; Binderup, Tina; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2012-01-01

    , was observed, corresponding to expected liposomal pharmacokinetics. The tumor accumulation 8 hours postinjection accounted for 2.25 +/- 0.23 (mean +/- standard error of the mean) percent of injected dose per gram (%ID/g), and the tumor-to-muscle ratio reached 2.20 +/- 0.24 after 8 hours, which...... is satisfactorily high for visualization of pathological lesions. Moreover, the blood concentration was still at a high level (13.9 +/- 1.5 %ID/g) at the end of the 8-hour time frame. The present work demonstrates the methodology for automated preparation of radiolabeled liposomes, and shows that [F-18]-labeled...... extrusion through 100-nm filters. The [F-18]-labeled liposomes were injected into nude, tumor-bearing mice, and positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed several times over 8 hours to investigate the in vivo biodistribution. Clear tumor accumulation, as well as hepatic and splenic uptake...

  9. Fluorescent quenching-based quantitative detection of specific DNA/RNA using a BODIPY® FL-labeled probe or primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Shinya; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Yamada, Kazutaka; Torimura, Masaki; Yokomaku, Toyokazu; Kamagata, Yoichi; Kurane, Ryuichiro

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a simple method for the quantitative detection of specific DNA or RNA molecules based on the finding that BODIPY® FL fluorescence was quenched by its interaction with a uniquely positioned guanine. This approach makes use of an oligonucleotide probe or primer containing a BODIPY® FL-modified cytosine at its 5′-end. When such a probe was hybridized with a target DNA, its fluorescence was quenched by the guanine in the target, complementary to the modified cytosine, and the quench rate was proportional to the amount of target DNA. This widely applicable technique will be used directly with larger samples or in conjunction with the polymerase chain reaction to quantify small DNA samples. PMID:11239011

  10. Label-Free Imaging of Female Genital Tract Melanocytic Lesions With Pump-Probe Microscopy: A Promising Diagnostic Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Francisco E; Deb, Sanghamitra; Fischer, Martin C; Warren, Warren S; Selim, Maria Angelica

    2017-04-01

    Melanomas of the female genital tract present a unique clinical challenge. Not only are these lesions in an anatomically sensitive area, but also they tend to be multifocal and have high recurrence rates. Furthermore, several benign melanocytic proliferations resemble early-stage melanoma clinically and/or histopathologically. Thus, there is a significant need for additional tools that can help correctly diagnose and stage these lesions. Here, we quantitatively and nondestructively analyze the chemical composition of melanin in excised pigmented lesions of the female genital tract using pump-probe microscopy, a high-resolution optical imaging technique that is sensitive to many biochemical properties of melanin. Thirty-one thin (~5 μm) tissue sections previously excised from female genital tract melanocytic lesions were imaged with pump-probe microscopy and analyzed. We find significant quantitative differences in melanin type and structure between melanoma and nonmalignant melanocytic proliferations. Our analysis also suggests a link between the molecular signatures of melanins and lesion-specific genetic mutations. Finally, significant differences are found between metastatic and nonmetastatic melanomas. The limitations of this work include the fact that molecular information is restricted to melanin pigment and the sample size is relatively small. Pump-probe microscopy provides unique information regarding the biochemical composition of genital tract melanocytic lesions, which can be used to improve the diagnosis and staging of vulvar melanomas.

  11. Combinatorial optimization networks and matroids

    CERN Document Server

    Lawler, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Perceptively written text examines optimization problems that can be formulated in terms of networks and algebraic structures called matroids. Chapters cover shortest paths, network flows, bipartite matching, nonbipartite matching, matroids and the greedy algorithm, matroid intersections, and the matroid parity problems. A suitable text or reference for courses in combinatorial computing and concrete computational complexity in departments of computer science and mathematics.

  12. Algorithms in combinatorial design theory

    CERN Document Server

    Colbourn, CJ

    1985-01-01

    The scope of the volume includes all algorithmic and computational aspects of research on combinatorial designs. Algorithmic aspects include generation, isomorphism and analysis techniques - both heuristic methods used in practice, and the computational complexity of these operations. The scope within design theory includes all aspects of block designs, Latin squares and their variants, pairwise balanced designs and projective planes and related geometries.

  13. Computational Complexity of Combinatorial Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Gert; Yap, Chee K.

    1990-01-01

    We investigate the computational problems associated with combinatorial surfaces. Specifically, we present an algorithm (based on the Brahana-Dehn-Heegaard approach) for transforming the polygonal schema of a closed triangulated surface into its canonical form in O(n log n) time, where n is the

  14. Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauf, Robert J.; Walls, Claudia A.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2006-11-14

    A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

  15. Combinatorial auctions for electronic business

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    (6) Information feedback: An auction protocol may be a direct mechanism or an .... transparency of allocation decisions arise in resolving these ties. .... bidding, however more recently, combinatorial bids are allowed [50] making ...... Also, truth revelation and other game theoretic considerations are not taken into account.

  16. Combinatorial Proofs and Algebraic Proofs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/018/07/0630-0645. Keywords. Combinatorial proof; algebraic proof; binomial identity; recurrence relation; composition; Fibonacci number; Fibonacci identity; Pascal triangle. Author Affiliations. Shailesh A Shirali1. Sahyadri School Tiwai Hill, Rajgurunagar Pune 410 ...

  17. Capability of focused Ar ion beam sputtering for combinatorial synthesis of metal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, T.; Haemori, M.; Chikyow, T.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the use of focused Ar ion beam sputtering (FAIS) for combinatorial synthesis. A Langmuir probe revealed that the electron temperature and density for FAIS of metal film deposition was lower than that of other major combinatorial thin film growth techniques such as pulsed laser deposition. Combining FAIS with the combinatorial method allowed the compositional fraction of the Pt-Ru binary alloy to be systematically controlled. Pt-Ru alloy metal film grew epitaxially on ZnO substrates, and crystal structures changed from the Pt phase (cubic structure) to the Ru phase (hexagonal structure) in the Pt-Ru alloy phase diagram. The alloy film has a smooth surface, with the Ru phase, in particular, showing a clear step-and-terrace structure. The combination of FAIS and the combinatorial method has major potential for the fabrication of high quality composition-spread metal film.

  18. Capability of focused Ar ion beam sputtering for combinatorial synthesis of metal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, T.; Haemori, M.; Chikyow, T. [Advanced Electric Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    The authors examined the use of focused Ar ion beam sputtering (FAIS) for combinatorial synthesis. A Langmuir probe revealed that the electron temperature and density for FAIS of metal film deposition was lower than that of other major combinatorial thin film growth techniques such as pulsed laser deposition. Combining FAIS with the combinatorial method allowed the compositional fraction of the Pt-Ru binary alloy to be systematically controlled. Pt-Ru alloy metal film grew epitaxially on ZnO substrates, and crystal structures changed from the Pt phase (cubic structure) to the Ru phase (hexagonal structure) in the Pt-Ru alloy phase diagram. The alloy film has a smooth surface, with the Ru phase, in particular, showing a clear step-and-terrace structure. The combination of FAIS and the combinatorial method has major potential for the fabrication of high quality composition-spread metal film.

  19. In situ, accurate, surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of cancer cell nucleus with synchronous location by an alkyne-labeled biomolecular probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liang, Lijia; Guan, Xin; Deng, Rong; Qu, Huixin; Huang, Dianshuai; Xu, Shuping; Liang, Chongyang; Xu, Weiqing

    2018-01-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method for in situ detection and analysis of the intranuclear biomolecular information of a cell has been developed based on a small, biocompatible, nuclear-targeting alkyne-tagged deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probe (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine, EDU) that can specially accumulate in the cell nucleus during DNA replications to precisely locate the nuclear region without disturbance in cell biological activities and functions. Since the specific alkyne group shows a Raman peak in the Raman-silent region of cells, it is an interior label to visualize the nuclear location synchronously in real time when measuring the SERS spectra of a cell. Because no fluorescent-labeled dyes were used for locating cell nuclei, this method is simple, nondestructive, non- photobleaching, and valuable for the in situ exploration of vital physiological processes with DNA participation in cell organelles. Graphical abstract A universal strategy was developed to accurately locate the nuclear region and obtain precise molecular information of cell nuclei by SERS.

  20. Photoaffinity analogues of methotrexate as folate antagonist binding probes. 1. Photoaffinity labeling of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase and amino acid sequence of the binding region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, E.M.; Smith, P.L.; Klein, T.E.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    N/sup α/-(4-Amino-4-deoxy-10-methylpteroyl)-N/sup epsilon/-(4-azido-5-[ 125 I]iodosalicylyl)-L-lysine, a photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate, is only 2-fold less potent than methotrexate in the inhibition of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase. Irradiation of the enzyme in the presence of an equimolar concentration of the 125 I-labeled analogue ultimately leads to an 8% incorporation of the photoprobe. A 100-fold molar excess of methotrexate essentially blocks this incorporation. Cyanogen bromide digestion of the labeled enzyme, followed by high-pressure liquid chromatography purification of the generated peptides, indicates that greater than 85% of the total radioactivity is incorporated into a single cyanogen bromide peptide. Sequence analysis revealed this peptide to be residues 53-111, with a majority of the radioactivity centered around residues 63-65 (Lys-Asn-Arg). These data demonstrate that the photoaffinity analogue specifically binds to dihydrofolate reductase and covalently modifies the enzyme following irradiation and is therefore a photolabeling agent useful for probing the inhibitor binding domain of the enzyme

  1. Multifunctional molecular imaging probes for estrogen receptors. 99mTc labeled diethylstilbestrol (DES) conjugated, cuinp quantum dot nanoparticles (DESCIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payam Moharrami; Perihan Unak; Ozge Kozgus Guldu; Medine, E.I.; Gul Gumuser; Elvan Sayit Bilgin; Omer Aras

    2017-01-01

    A theranostic nanoparticle was synthesized based on diethylstilbestrol conjugated with phosphate, copper, and indium (DESCIP) and labelled with 99m Tc which can be used for SPECT imaging of ER-enriched cancers. In vitro biological activity of 99m Tc-DESCIP was examined in breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7), prostatic carcinoma cells (PC-3), and pulmonary epithelial cells (A-549). In vivo lymph node imaging was performed in normal and receptor blocked female New Zealand rabbits. Results demonstrated that 99m Tc-DESCIP and DESCIP has potential for imaging ER-enriched tumors such as breast and prostate tumors, and their metastases in the lung, as well as improving management for their therapies. (author)

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of [{sup 14}C]-Labelled and fluorescent-Tagged paclitaxel derivatives as new biological probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, C.S.; Chu, J.-J.; Lai, Y.-K. [Department of Life Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    1998-11-01

    Our present report deals with the preparation of hitherto unreported 7-([carbonyl-{sup 14}C]-acetyl)paclitaxel 4 and two new bioactive 7-substituted fluorescent taxoids (FITC 9 and rhodamine 11), as well as evaluation towards their applications as biological probes. The results in this report demonstrate that (a) the new paclitaxel derivatives 4, 9, 11 could be prepared with good yields starting from paclitaxel; (b) the [{sup 14}C]acetylation step was found to be better by using [{sup 14}C]acetic anhydride rather than [{sup 14}C]sodium acetate; (c) the radiochemical purity of 4 was 96% and its specific activity was 48 mCi/mmol; (d) the cytotoxicity of 4 was close to that of paclitaxel whereas 9, 11 were far less active than paclitaxel, but these cytotoxic levels were good enough for their biological applications; (e) the drug-quantitation by flow cytometric analysis using 9 and 11 was proved to be equally efficient with respect to the radioactivity-based determination employing 4; (f) the intracellular fluorescence mapping by 9 and 11 was found to be effective and the microtubule network pattern was visible in both the cases; (g) the overall fluorescence imaging efficiency was better with 11 while the intensity of fluorescence was higher with 9; (h) staining of nucleolus was observed in fluorescence studies of both 9 and 11. Based on these results, the newly prepared paclitaxel derivatives can be considered as efficient biological probes and should find further use in relevant applications. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Combinatorial Speculations and the Combinatorial Conjecture for Mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Linfan

    2006-01-01

    Combinatorics is a powerful tool for dealing with relations among objectives mushroomed in the past century. However, an more important work for mathematician is to apply combinatorics to other mathematics and other sciences not merely to find combinatorial behavior for objectives. Recently, such research works appeared on journals for mathematics and theoretical physics on cosmos. The main purpose of this paper is to survey these thinking and ideas for mathematics and cosmological physics, s...

  4. Na+/substrate Coupling in the Multidrug Antiporter NorM Probed with a Spin-labeled Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, P. Ryan; Stein, Richard A.; Mishra, Smriti; Goodman, Michael C.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2013-01-01

    NorM of the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family of transporters couples the efflux of a broad range of hydrophobic molecules to an inward Na+ gradient across the cell membrane. Several crystal structures of MATE transporters revealed distinct substrate binding sites leading to differing models of the mechanism of ion-coupled substrate extrusion. In the experiments reported here, we observed that a spin-labeled derivative of daunorubicin, Ruboxyl, is transported by NorM from Vibrio cholerae. It is therefore ideal to characterize mechanistically relevant binding interactions with NorM and to directly address the coupling of ion and drug binding. Fluorescence and EPR experiments revealed that Ruboxyl binds to NorM with micromolar affinity and becomes immobilized upon binding, even in the presence of Na+. Using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we determined that Ruboxyl binds to a single site on the periplasmic side of the protein. The presence of Na+ did not translocate the substrate to a second site as previously proposed. These experiments surprisingly show that Na+ does not affect the affinity or location of the substrate binding site on detergent-solubilized NorM, thus suggesting that additional factors beyond simple mutual exclusivity of binding, such as the presence of a Na+ gradient across the native membrane, govern Na+/drug coupling during antiport. PMID:23902581

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of ¹⁸F-labeled fluoropropyl tryptophan analogs as potential PET probes for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiotellis, Aristeidis; Mu, Linjing; Müller, Adrienne; Selivanova, Svetlana V; Keller, Claudia; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    In the search for an efficient, fluorine-18 labeled amino acid based radiotracer for tumor imaging with positron emission tomography (PET), two new tryptophan analogs were synthesized and characterized in vitro and in vivo. Both are tryptophan alkyl-derivatives, namely 2-(3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl)-DL-tryptophan ([(18)F]2-FPTRP) and 5-(3-[(18)F]fluoro-propyl)-DL-tryptophan ([(18)F]5-FPTRP). Standard reference compounds and precursors were prepared by multi step approaches. Radiosynthesis was achieved by no-carrier-added nucleophilic [(18)F]fluorination in 29-34% decay corrected yields with radiochemical purity over 99%. In vitro cell uptake assays showed that both compounds are substrates for amino acid transport and enter small cell lung cancer cells (NCI-H69) most probably almost exclusively via large neutral amino acids transporter(s) (LAT). Small animal PET imaging with xenograft bearing mice revealed high tumor/background ratios for [(18)F]2-FPTRP comparable to the well established tyrosine analog O-(2-[(18)F]fluroethyl)-L-tyrosine ([(18)F]FET). Radiometabolite studies showed no evidence of involvement of a biotransformation step in tumor accumulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Combinatorial algebra syntax and semantics

    CERN Document Server

    Sapir, Mark V

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial Algebra: Syntax and Semantics provides a comprehensive account of many areas of combinatorial algebra. It contains self-contained proofs of  more than 20 fundamental results, both classical and modern. This includes Golod–Shafarevich and Olshanskii's solutions of Burnside problems, Shirshov's solution of Kurosh's problem for PI rings, Belov's solution of Specht's problem for varieties of rings, Grigorchuk's solution of Milnor's problem, Bass–Guivarc'h theorem about the growth of nilpotent groups, Kleiman's solution of Hanna Neumann's problem for varieties of groups, Adian's solution of von Neumann-Day's problem, Trahtman's solution of the road coloring problem of Adler, Goodwyn and Weiss. The book emphasize several ``universal" tools, such as trees, subshifts, uniformly recurrent words, diagrams and automata.   With over 350 exercises at various levels of difficulty and with hints for the more difficult problems, this book can be used as a textbook, and aims to reach a wide and diversified...

  7. Combinatorial aspects of covering arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Colbourn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Covering arrays generalize orthogonal arrays by requiring that t -tuples be covered, but not requiring that the appearance of t -tuples be balanced.Their uses in screening experiments has found application in software testing, hardware testing, and a variety of fields in which interactions among factors are to be identified. Here a combinatorial view of covering arrays is adopted, encompassing basic bounds, direct constructions, recursive constructions, algorithmic methods, and applications.

  8. Evaluation of (89Zr-labeled human anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody as a positron emission tomography probe in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Sugyo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer and its prognosis remains poor. Therefore, additional effective therapy is required to augment and/or complement current therapy. CD147, high expression in pancreatic cancer, is involved in the metastatic process and is considered a good candidate for targeted therapy. CD147-specfic imaging could be useful for selection of appropriate patients. Therefore, we evaluated the potential of a fully human anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody 059-053 as a new positron emission tomography (PET probe for pancreatic cancer. METHODS: CD147 expression was evaluated in four pancreatic cancer cell lines (MIA Paca-2, PANC-1, BxPC-3, and AsPC-1 and a mouse cell line A4 as a negative control. Cell binding, competitive inhibition and internalization assays were conducted with (125I-, (67Ga-, or (89Zr-labeled 059-053. In vivo biodistribution of (125I- or (89Zr-labeled 059-053 was conducted in mice bearing MIA Paca-2 and A4 tumors. PET imaging with [(89Zr]059-053 was conducted in subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor mouse models. RESULTS: Among four pancreatic cancer cell lines, MIA Paca-2 cells showed the highest expression of CD147, while A4 cells had no expression. Immunohistochemical staining showed that MIA Paca-2 xenografts also highly expressed CD147 in vivo. Radiolabeled 059-053 specifically bound to MIA Paca-2 cells with high affinity, but not to A4. [(89Zr]059-053 uptake in MIA Paca-2 tumors increased with time from 11.0±1.3% injected dose per gram (ID/g at day 1 to 16.9±3.2% ID/g at day 6, while [(125I]059-053 uptake was relatively low and decreased with time, suggesting that 059-053 was internalized into tumor cells in vivo and (125I was released from the cells. PET with [(89Zr]059-053 clearly visualized subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors. CONCLUSION: [(89Zr]059-053 is a promising PET probe for imaging CD147 expression in pancreatic cancer and has the potential to select appropriate patients with CD147

  9. Ultrasensitive Single Fluorescence-Labeled Probe-Mediated Single Universal Primer-Multiplex-Droplet Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction for High-Throughput Genetically Modified Organism Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chenqi; Xu, Yuancong; Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Pengyu; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2018-05-01

    As genetically modified (GM) technology develops and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) become more available, GMOs face increasing regulations and pressure to adhere to strict labeling guidelines. A singleplex detection method cannot perform the high-throughput analysis necessary for optimal GMO detection. Combining the advantages of multiplex detection and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR), a single universal primer-multiplex-ddPCR (SUP-M-ddPCR) strategy was proposed for accurate broad-spectrum screening and quantification. The SUP increases efficiency of the primers in PCR and plays an important role in establishing a high-throughput, multiplex detection method. Emerging ddPCR technology has been used for accurate quantification of nucleic acid molecules without a standard curve. Using maize as a reference point, four heterologous sequences ( 35S, NOS, NPTII, and PAT) were selected to evaluate the feasibility and applicability of this strategy. Surprisingly, these four genes cover more than 93% of the transgenic maize lines and serve as preliminary screening sequences. All screening probes were labeled with FAM fluorescence, which allows the signals from the samples with GMO content and those without to be easily differentiated. This fiveplex screening method is a new development in GMO screening. Utilizing an optimal amplification assay, the specificity, limit of detection (LOD), and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were validated. The LOD and LOQ of this GMO screening method were 0.1% and 0.01%, respectively, with a relative standard deviation (RSD) < 25%. This method could serve as an important tool for the detection of GM maize from different processed, commercially available products. Further, this screening method could be applied to other fields that require reliable and sensitive detection of DNA targets.

  10. Evaluation of 18F-labeled targeted perfluorocarbon-filled albumin microbubbles as a probe for microUS and microPET in tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Wu, Shih-Yen; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Weng, Chien-Hsiu; Wu, Ming-Fang; Li, Pai-Chi

    2013-02-01

    In this study, albumin-shelled, targeted MBs (tMBs) were first demonstrated with the expectation of visualization of biodistribution of albumin-shelled tMBs. The actual biodistribution of albumin-shelled tMBs is of vital importance either for molecular imaging or for drug delivery. Recently, albumin microbubbles (MBs) have been studied for drug and gene delivery in vitro and in vivo through cavitation. Targeted lipid-shelled MBs have been applied for ultrasound molecular imaging and conjugated with radiolabeled antibodies for whole-body biodistribution evaluations. The novelty of the work is that, in addition to the lipid tMBs, the albumin tMBs was also applied in biodistribution detection. Multimodality albumin-shelled, (18)F-SFB-labeled VEGFR2 tMBs were synthesized, and their characteristics in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer were investigated with micro-positron-emission tomography (microPET) and high-frequency ultrasound (microUS). Albumin-shelled MBs can be labeled with (18)F-SFB directly and conjugated with antibodies for dual molecular imaging. The albumin-shelled tMBs show a lifetime in 30min in the blood pool and a highly specific adherence to tumor vessels in mice bearing human breast cancer. From the evaluations of whole-body biodistribution, the potential of the dual molecular imaging probe for drug or gene delivery in animal experiments with albumin shelled MBs has been investigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Studies on focal alveolar bone healing with technetium (Tc)-99m labeled methylene diphosphonate and gold-collimated cadmium telluride probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchimochi, M.; Hosain, F.; Engelke, W.; Zeichner, S.J.; Ruttimann, U.E.; Webber, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The benefit of using a collimator for a miniaturized cadmium telluride probe was evaluated by monitoring the bone-healing processes for 13 weeks after the induction of small iatrogenic alveolar bone lesions in one side of the mandible in beagles. Technetium (Tc)-99m labeled methylene diphosphonate (200 to 300 MBq, 5.1 to 8.1 mCi, in a solution of 0.5 to 1 ml, intravenously) was used as a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical. The radioactivity over the bone lesion (L) and the contralateral normal site (C) in the mandible were measured between 1.5 and 2 hours after injection of the tracer, and the activity ratio L/C served as an index of relative bone uptake. A study of six dogs revealed that the healing response to a hemispheric bone defect of 2 mm diameter in the cortical bone could not be detected by an uncollimated probe, and in a repeated study in two dogs the use of a gold collimator (5 mm in diameter, 5 mm in length) did not increase the L/C ratio significantly. A second study in six dogs with 5 mm lesions showed that although systematic trends in the time courses of the L/C ratio obtained both with and without the collimator could be demonstrated, the L/C ratio of collimated versus uncollimated measurements was significantly (p less than 0.005) increased. In three of the latter six dogs, abscesses developed after 9 weeks, leading to a second increase (p less than 0.05) of the L/C ratio with collimation compared with the noninflammation group; without collimation no significant (p greater than 0.15) difference between the two groups could be demonstrated

  12. Europium-decorated graphene quantum dots as a fluorescent probe for label-free, rapid and sensitive detection of Cu{sup 2+} and L-cysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Liping [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, 350002 (China); Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Wang, Yiru [Department of Chemistry and the MOE Key Laboratory of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Zhao, Li; Zhao, Tingting [Xiamen Huaxia College, Xiamen, 361024 (China); Chen, Xi, E-mail: xichen@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the MOE Key Laboratory of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China)

    2015-09-03

    In this work, europium-decorated graphene quantum dots (Eu-GQDs) were prepared by treating three-dimensional Eu-decorated graphene (3D Eu-graphene) via a strong acid treatment. Various characterizations revealed that Eu atoms were successfully complexed with the oxygen functional groups on the surface of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with the atomic ratio of 2.54%. Compared with Eu free GQDs, the introduction of Eu atoms enhanced the electron density and improved the surface chemical activities of Eu-GQDs. Therefore, the obtained Eu-GQDs were used as a novel “off-on” fluorescent probe for the label-free determination of Cu{sup 2+} and L-cysteine (L-Cys) with high sensitivity and selectivity. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs was quenched in the presence of Cu{sup 2+} owing to the coordination reaction between Cu{sup 2+} and carboxyl groups on the surface of the Eu-GQDs. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs recovered with the subsequent addition of L-Cys because of the strong affinity of Cu{sup 2+} to L-Cys via the Cu–S bond. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence variation of the proposed approach had a good linear relationship in the range of 0.1–10 μM for Cu{sup 2+} and 0.5–50 μM for L-Cys with corresponding detection limits of 0.056 μM for Cu{sup 2+} and 0.31 μM for L-Cys. The current approach also displayed a special response to Cu{sup 2+} and L-Cys over the other co-existing metal ions and amino acids, and the results obtained from buffer-diluted serum samples suggested its applicability in biological samples. - Highlights: • The europium-decorated graphene quantum dots (Eu-GQDs) have been successfully prepared. • Various characterizations results proved that Eu atoms were successfully introduced into graphene quantum dots. • The introduced Eu atoms changed the electron density and surface chemical activities of Eu-GQDs. • Eu-GQDs were used as an “off-on” fluorescent probe for Cu{sup 2+} and L-cysteine detection

  13. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-2,5-Bis(4’-hydroxy-3’-carboxystyryl)benzene as a Probe for β-Amyloid Fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Sergey V.; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Sviripa, Vitaliy M.; Fazio, Robert C.; Watt, David S.; LeVine, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of Aβ in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from their brains. Alternative cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by processing proteases generates soluble APP fragments including the neurotoxic amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides that assemble into fibrils and form plaques. Plaque-buildup occurs over an extended time-frame, and the early detection and modulation of plaque formation are areas of active research. Radiolabeled probes for the detection of amyloid plaques and fibrils in living subjects are important for noninvasive evaluation of AD diagnosis, progression, and differentiation of AD from other neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cognitive decline. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-1-[3H]-2,5-bis(4’-hydroxy-3’-carbomethoxystyryl)benzene possesses an improved level of chemical stability relative to a previously reported radioiodinated analog for radiometric quantification of Aβ plaque and tau pathology in brain tissue and in vitro studies with synthetic Aβ and tau fibrils. PMID:25452000

  14. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carboxystyryl)benzene as a probe for β-amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Sergey V; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Sviripa, Vitaliy M; Fazio, Robert C; Watt, David S; LeVine, Harry

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of Aβ in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from their brains. Alternative cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by processing proteases generates soluble APP fragments including the neurotoxic amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides that assemble into fibrils and form plaques. Plaque-buildup occurs over an extended time-frame, and the early detection and modulation of plaque formation are areas of active research. Radiolabeled probes for the detection of amyloid plaques and fibrils in living subjects are important for noninvasive evaluation of AD diagnosis, progression, and differentiation of AD from other neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cognitive decline. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-1-[(3)H]-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carbomethoxystyryl)benzene possesses an improved level of chemical stability relative to a previously reported radioiodinated analog for radiometric quantification of Aβ plaque and tau pathology in brain tissue and in vitro studies with synthetic Aβ and tau fibrils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic combinatorial libraries : new opportunities in systems chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunt, Rosemary A. R.; Otto, Sijbren; Hunt, Rosemary A.R.

    2011-01-01

    Combinatorial chemistry is a tool for selecting molecules with special properties. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry started off aiming to be just that. However, unlike ordinary combinatorial chemistry, the interconnectedness of dynamic libraries gives them an extra dimension. An understanding of

  16. A novel single fluorophore-labeled double-stranded oligonucleotide probe for fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection based on the inherent quenching ability of deoxyguanosine bases and competitive strand-displacement reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingwei; Tian, Jingqi; Li, Hailong; Wang, Lei; Sun, Xuping

    2012-01-01

    We develop a novel single fluorophore-labeled double-stranded oligonucleotide (OND) probe for rapid, nanostructure-free, fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection for the first time. We further demonstrate such probe is able to well discriminate single-base mutation in nucleic acid. The design takes advantage of an inherent quenching ability of guanine bases. The short strand of the probe is designed with an end-labeled fluorophore that is placed adjacent to two guanines as the quencher located on the long opposite strand, resulting in great quenching of dye fluorescence. In the presence of a target complementary to the long strand of the probe, a competitive strand-displacement reaction occurs and the long strand forms a more stable duplex with the target, resulting in the two strands of the probe being separated from each other. As a consequence of this displacement, the fluorophore and the quencher are no longer in close proximity and dye fluorescence increases, signaling the presence of target.

  17. The Yoccoz Combinatorial Analytic Invariant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Carsten Lunde; Roesch, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we develop a combinatorial analytic encoding of the Mandelbrot set M. The encoding is implicit in Yoccoz' proof of local connectivity of M at any Yoccoz parameter, i.e. any at most finitely renormalizable parameter for which all periodic orbits are repelling. Using this encoding we ...... to reprove that the dyadic veins of M are arcs and that more generally any two Yoccoz parameters are joined by a unique ruled (in the sense of Douady-Hubbard) arc in M....

  18. Probabilistic methods in combinatorial analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sachkov, Vladimir N

    2014-01-01

    This 1997 work explores the role of probabilistic methods for solving combinatorial problems. These methods not only provide the means of efficiently using such notions as characteristic and generating functions, the moment method and so on but also let us use the powerful technique of limit theorems. The basic objects under investigation are nonnegative matrices, partitions and mappings of finite sets, with special emphasis on permutations and graphs, and equivalence classes specified on sequences of finite length consisting of elements of partially ordered sets; these specify the probabilist

  19. Log-balanced combinatorial sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Došlic

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider log-convex sequences that satisfy an additional constraint imposed on their rate of growth. We call such sequences log-balanced. It is shown that all such sequences satisfy a pair of double inequalities. Sufficient conditions for log-balancedness are given for the case when the sequence satisfies a two- (or more- term linear recurrence. It is shown that many combinatorially interesting sequences belong to this class, and, as a consequence, that the above-mentioned double inequalities are valid for all of them.

  20. Differentiating inflamed and normal lungs by the apparent reaction rate constants of lactate dehydrogenase probed by hyperpolarized (13)C labeled pyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N; Kadlececk, Stephen; Shaghaghi, Hoora; Zhao, Huaqing; Profka, Harilla; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Rizi, Rahim; Li, Lin Z

    2016-02-01

    Clinically translatable hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C-NMR can probe in vivo enzymatic reactions, e.g., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-catalyzed reaction by injecting HP (13)C-pyruvate into the subject, which is converted to (13)C labeled lactate by the enzyme. Parameters such as (13)C-lactate signals and lactate-to-pyruvate signal ratio are commonly used for analyzing the HP (13)C-NMR data. However, the biochemical/biological meaning of these parameters remains either unclear or dependent on experimental settings. It is preferable to quantify the reaction rate constants with a clearer physical meaning. Here we report the extraction of the kinetic parameters of the LDH reaction from HP (13)C-NMR data and investigate if they can be potential predictors of lung inflammation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (12 controls, 14 treated) were used. One dose of bleomycin (2.5 U/kg) was administered intratracheally to the treatment group. The lungs were removed, perfused, and observed by the HP-NMR technique, where a HyperSense dynamic nuclear polarization system was used to generate the HP (13)C-pyruvate for injecting into the lungs. A 20 mm (1)H/(13)C dual-tuned coil in a 9.4-T Varian vertical bore NMR spectrometer was employed to acquire the (13)C spectral data every 1 s over a time period of 300 s using a non-selective, 15-degree radiofrequency pulse. The apparent rate constants of the LDH reaction and their ratio were quantified by applying ratiometric fitting analysis to the time series data of (13)C labeled pyruvate and lactate. The apparent forward rate constant kp =(3.67±3.31)×10(-4) s(-1), reverse rate constant kl =(4.95±2.90)×10(-2) s(-1), rate constant ratio kp /kl =(7.53±5.75)×10(-3) for the control lungs; kp =(11.71±4.35)×10(-4) s(-1), kl =(9.89±3.89)×10(-2) s(-1), and kp /kl =(12.39±4.18)×10(-3) for the inflamed lungs at the 7(th) day post treatment. Wilcoxon rank-sum test showed that the medians of these kinetic parameters of the 7-day cohort were significantly

  1. Combinatorial optimization on a Boltzmann machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korst, J.H.M.; Aarts, E.H.L.

    1989-01-01

    We discuss the problem of solving (approximately) combinatorial optimization problems on a Boltzmann machine. It is shown for a number of combinatorial optimization problems how they can be mapped directly onto a Boltzmann machine by choosing appropriate connection patterns and connection strengths.

  2. Combinatorial Interpretation of General Eulerian Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Tingyao Xiong; Jonathan I. Hall; Hung-Ping Tsao

    2014-01-01

    Since 1950s, mathematicians have successfully interpreted the traditional Eulerian numbers and $q-$Eulerian numbers combinatorially. In this paper, the authors give a combinatorial interpretation to the general Eulerian numbers defined on general arithmetic progressions { a, a+d, a+2d,...}.

  3. Fourier analysis in combinatorial number theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkredov, Il'ya D

    2010-01-01

    In this survey applications of harmonic analysis to combinatorial number theory are considered. Discussion topics include classical problems of additive combinatorics, colouring problems, higher-order Fourier analysis, theorems about sets of large trigonometric sums, results on estimates for trigonometric sums over subgroups, and the connection between combinatorial and analytic number theory. Bibliography: 162 titles.

  4. Fourier analysis in combinatorial number theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkredov, Il' ya D [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-16

    In this survey applications of harmonic analysis to combinatorial number theory are considered. Discussion topics include classical problems of additive combinatorics, colouring problems, higher-order Fourier analysis, theorems about sets of large trigonometric sums, results on estimates for trigonometric sums over subgroups, and the connection between combinatorial and analytic number theory. Bibliography: 162 titles.

  5. Toward Chemical Implementation of Encoded Combinatorial Libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Janda, Kim D.

    1994-01-01

    The recent application of "combinatorial libraries" to supplement existing drug screening processes might simplify and accelerate the search for new lead compounds or drugs. Recently, a scheme for encoded combinatorial chemistry was put forward to surmount a number of the limitations possessed...

  6. Design principles and theory of paramagnetic fluorine-labelled lanthanide complexes as probes for (19)F magnetic resonance: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; De Luca, Elena; Hogg, Naomi H M; Kenwright, Alan M; Kuprov, Ilya; Parker, David; Botta, Mauro; Wilson, J Ian; Blamire, Andrew M

    2010-01-04

    The synthesis and spectroscopic properties of a series of CF(3)-labelled lanthanide(III) complexes (Ln=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) with amide-substituted ligands based on 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane are described. The theoretical contributions of the (19)F magnetic relaxation processes in these systems are critically assessed and selected volumetric plots are presented. These plots allow an accurate estimation of the increase in the rates of longitudinal and transverse relaxation as a function of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the fluorine nucleus, the applied magnetic field, and the re-rotational correlation time of the complex, for a given Ln(III) ion. Selected complexes exhibit pH-dependent chemical shift behaviour, and a pK(a) of 7.0 was determined in one example based on the holmium complex of an ortho-cyano DO3A-monoamide ligand, which allowed the pH to be assessed by measuring the difference in chemical shift (varying by over 14 ppm) between two (19)F resonances. Relaxation analyses of variable-temperature and variable-field (19)F, (17)O and (1)H NMR spectroscopy experiments are reported, aided by identification of salient low-energy conformers by using density functional theory. The study of fluorine relaxation rates, over a field range of 4.7 to 16.5 T allowed precise computation of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the CF(3) reporter group by using global fitting methods. The sensitivity benefits of using such paramagnetic fluorinated probes in (19)F NMR spectroscopic studies are quantified in preliminary spectroscopic and imaging experiments with respect to a diamagnetic yttrium(III) analogue.

  7. Label-free and enzyme-free detection of transcription factors with graphene oxide fluorescence switch-based multifunctional G-quadruplex-hairpin probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Desong; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) play pivotal roles in the regulation of a variety of essential cellular processes and some of them have been recognized as potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets of some diseases. Sensitive and accurate detection of TFs is of great importance to better understanding their roles in gene regulation and evaluation of disease state. Here, we developed a simple, label-free and enzyme-free new fluorescent strategy for the detection of TFs by graphene oxide (GO) fluorescence switch-based multifunctional G-quadruplex-hairpin probe (MGHP). The MGHP possessed of three functions simultaneously, adsorbing onto GO with the loop part, binding to target with the stem part and serving as signal carrier with the terminal G-quadruplex. First, the MGHP was adsorbed quickly to GO. Next, the TF bound to the stem part of MGHP to form a huge target-MGHP complex, which led to desorption of the complex from GO. Finally, NMM was inserted into G-quadruplex in the complex to yield an enhanced fluorescence response. The GO used here, as a fluorescence switch, could quickly and efficiently quench the fluorescence of NMM inserted into the MGHP absorbed on the GO, guaranteeing a high signal-to-noise ratio. Sensitive detection of purified NF-κB p50 and HeLa cell nuclear extracts were achieved with detection limits of 0.2nM and 7.8ng/µL, respectively. Moreover, this proposed strategy could be used to screen inhibitors of NF-κB p50 activity. The strategy proposed here might offer a new potential approach for reliable quantification of TFs in clinical diagnostics and treatment research of some diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Europium-decorated graphene quantum dots as a fluorescent probe for label-free, rapid and sensitive detection of Cu(2+) and L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liping; Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Wang, Yiru; Zhao, Li; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Xi

    2015-09-03

    In this work, europium-decorated graphene quantum dots (Eu-GQDs) were prepared by treating three-dimensional Eu-decorated graphene (3D Eu-graphene) via a strong acid treatment. Various characterizations revealed that Eu atoms were successfully complexed with the oxygen functional groups on the surface of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with the atomic ratio of 2.54%. Compared with Eu free GQDs, the introduction of Eu atoms enhanced the electron density and improved the surface chemical activities of Eu-GQDs. Therefore, the obtained Eu-GQDs were used as a novel "off-on" fluorescent probe for the label-free determination of Cu(2+) and l-cysteine (L-Cys) with high sensitivity and selectivity. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs was quenched in the presence of Cu(2+) owing to the coordination reaction between Cu(2+) and carboxyl groups on the surface of the Eu-GQDs. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs recovered with the subsequent addition of L-Cys because of the strong affinity of Cu(2+) to L-Cys via the Cu-S bond. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence variation of the proposed approach had a good linear relationship in the range of 0.1-10 μM for Cu(2+) and 0.5-50 μM for L-Cys with corresponding detection limits of 0.056 μM for Cu(2+) and 0.31 μM for L-Cys. The current approach also displayed a special response to Cu(2+) and L-Cys over the other co-existing metal ions and amino acids, and the results obtained from buffer-diluted serum samples suggested its applicability in biological samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  10. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  11. Combinatorial Micro-Macro Dynamical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz, Rafael; Villamarin, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics states that the entropy of an isolated system is almost always increasing. We propose combinatorial formalizations of the second law and explore their conditions of possibilities.

  12. Cubical version of combinatorial differential forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The theory of combinatorial differential forms is usually presented in simplicial terms. We present here a cubical version; it depends on the possibility of forming affine combinations of mutual neighbour points in a manifold, in the context of synthetic differential geometry.......The theory of combinatorial differential forms is usually presented in simplicial terms. We present here a cubical version; it depends on the possibility of forming affine combinations of mutual neighbour points in a manifold, in the context of synthetic differential geometry....

  13. Conferences on Combinatorial and Additive Number Theory

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This proceedings volume is based on papers presented at the Workshops on Combinatorial and Additive Number Theory (CANT), which were held at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in 2011 and 2012. The goal of the workshops is to survey recent progress in combinatorial number theory and related parts of mathematics. The workshop attracts researchers and students who discuss the state-of-the-art, open problems, and future challenges in number theory.

  14. Jack superpolynomials: physical and combinatorial definitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrosiers, P.; Mathieu, P.; Lapointe, L.

    2004-01-01

    Jack superpolynomials are eigenfunctions of the supersymmetric extension of the quantum trigonometric Calogero-Moser-Sutherland Hamiltonian. They are orthogonal with respect to the scalar product, dubbed physical, that is naturally induced by this quantum-mechanical problem. But Jack superpolynomials can also be defined more combinatorially, starting from the multiplicative bases of symmetric superpolynomials, enforcing orthogonality with respect to a one-parameter deformation of the combinatorial scalar product. Both constructions turn out to be equivalent. (author)

  15. Gene probes: principles and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aquino de Muro, Marilena; Rapley, Ralph

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  16. The Complement of Binary Klein Quadric as a Combinatorial Grassmannian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metod Saniga

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Given a hyperbolic quadric of PG(5, 2, there are 28 points off this quadric and 56 lines skew to it. It is shown that the (286; 563-configuration formed by these points and lines is isomorphic to the combinatorial Grassmannian of type G2(8. It is also pointed out that a set of seven points of G2(8 whose labels share a mark corresponds to a Conwell heptad of PG(5, 2. Gradual removal of Conwell heptads from the (286; 563-configuration yields a nested sequence of binomial configurations identical with part of that found to be associated with Cayley-Dickson algebras (arXiv:1405.6888.

  17. Combinatorial stresses kill pathogenic Candida species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna; Cook, Emily; Jacobsen, Mette; You, Tao; Lenardon, Megan; Ames, Lauren; Barahona, Mauricio; Chandrasekaran, Komelapriya; Coghill, George; Goodman, Daniel; Gow, Neil A. R.; Grebogi, Celso; Ho, Hsueh-Lui; Ingram, Piers; McDonagh, Andrew; De Moura, Alessandro P. S.; Pang, Wei; Puttnam, Melanie; Radmaneshfar, Elahe; Romano, Maria Carmen; Silk, Daniel; Stark, Jaroslav; Stumpf, Michael; Thiel, Marco; Thorne, Thomas; Usher, Jane; Yin, Zhikang; Haynes, Ken; Brown, Alistair J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes exist in dynamic niches and have evolved robust adaptive responses to promote survival in their hosts. The major fungal pathogens of humans, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata, are exposed to a range of environmental stresses in their hosts including osmotic, oxidative and nitrosative stresses. Significant efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the adaptive responses to each of these stresses. In the wild, cells are frequently exposed simultaneously to combinations of these stresses and yet the effects of such combinatorial stresses have not been explored. We have developed a common experimental platform to facilitate the comparison of combinatorial stress responses in C. glabrata and C. albicans. This platform is based on the growth of cells in buffered rich medium at 30°C, and was used to define relatively low, medium and high doses of osmotic (NaCl), oxidative (H 2O2) and nitrosative stresses (e.g., dipropylenetriamine (DPTA)-NONOate). The effects of combinatorial stresses were compared with the corresponding individual stresses under these growth conditions. We show for the first time that certain combinations of combinatorial stress are especially potent in terms of their ability to kill C. albicans and C. glabrata and/or inhibit their growth. This was the case for combinations of osmotic plus oxidative stress and for oxidative plus nitrosative stress. We predict that combinatorial stresses may be highly signif cant in host defences against these pathogenic yeasts. PMID:22463109

  18. Resonance assignment of disordered protein with repetitive and overlapping sequence using combinatorial approach reveals initial structural propensities and local restrictions in the denatured state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Nikita; Kumar, Ashutosh, E-mail: askutoshk@iitb.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering (India)

    2016-09-15

    NMR resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins poses a challenge because of the limited dispersion of amide proton chemical shifts. This becomes even more complex with the increase in the size of the system. Residue specific selective labeling/unlabeling experiments have been used to resolve the overlap, but require multiple sample preparations. Here, we demonstrate an assignment strategy requiring only a single sample of uniformly labeled {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-protein. We have used a combinatorial approach, involving 3D-HNN, CC(CO)NH and 2D-MUSIC, which allowed us to assign a denatured centromeric protein Cse4 of 229 residues. Further, we show that even the less sensitive experiments, when used in an efficient manner can lead to the complete assignment of a complex system without the use of specialized probes in a relatively short time frame. The assignment of the amino acids discloses the presence of local structural propensities even in the denatured state accompanied by restricted motion in certain regions that provides insights into the early folding events of the protein.

  19. Resonance assignment of disordered protein with repetitive and overlapping sequence using combinatorial approach reveals initial structural propensities and local restrictions in the denatured state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Nikita; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    NMR resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins poses a challenge because of the limited dispersion of amide proton chemical shifts. This becomes even more complex with the increase in the size of the system. Residue specific selective labeling/unlabeling experiments have been used to resolve the overlap, but require multiple sample preparations. Here, we demonstrate an assignment strategy requiring only a single sample of uniformly labeled "1"3C,"1"5N-protein. We have used a combinatorial approach, involving 3D-HNN, CC(CO)NH and 2D-MUSIC, which allowed us to assign a denatured centromeric protein Cse4 of 229 residues. Further, we show that even the less sensitive experiments, when used in an efficient manner can lead to the complete assignment of a complex system without the use of specialized probes in a relatively short time frame. The assignment of the amino acids discloses the presence of local structural propensities even in the denatured state accompanied by restricted motion in certain regions that provides insights into the early folding events of the protein.

  20. Hierarchical Bayesian mixture modelling for antigen-specific T-cell subtyping in combinatorially encoded flow cytometry studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Lin; Chan, Cliburn; Hadrup, Sine R

    2013-01-01

    subtype identification in this novel, general model framework, and provide a detailed example using simulated data. We then describe application to a data set from an experimental study of antigen-specific T-cell subtyping using combinatorially encoded assays in human blood samples. Summary comments...... profiling in many biological areas, traditional flow cytometry measures relative levels of abundance of marker proteins using fluorescently labeled tags that identify specific markers by a single-color. One specific and important recent development in this area is the use of combinatorial marker assays...

  1. Local formulae for combinatorial Pontryagin classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaifullin, Alexander A

    2004-01-01

    Let p(|K|) be the characteristic class of a combinatorial manifold K given by a polynomial p in the rational Pontryagin classes of K. We prove that for any polynomial p there is a function taking each combinatorial manifold K to a cycle z p (K) in its rational simplicial chains such that: 1) the Poincare dual of z p (K) represents the cohomology class p(|K|); 2) the coefficient of each simplex Δ in the cycle z p (K) is determined solely by the combinatorial type of linkΔ. We explicitly describe all such functions for the first Pontryagin class. We obtain estimates for the denominators of the coefficients of the simplices in the cycles z p (K)

  2. Accessing Specific Peptide Recognition by Combinatorial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ming

    Molecular recognition is at the basis of all processes for life, and plays a central role in many biological processes, such as protein folding, the structural organization of cells and organelles, signal transduction, and the immune response. Hence, my PhD project is entitled “Accessing Specific...... Peptide Recognition by Combinatorial Chemistry”. Molecular recognition is a specific interaction between two or more molecules through noncovalent bonding, such as hydrogen bonding, metal coordination, van der Waals forces, π−π, hydrophobic, or electrostatic interactions. The association involves kinetic....... Combinatorial chemistry was invented in 1980s based on observation of functional aspects of the adaptive immune system. It was employed for drug development and optimization in conjunction with high-throughput synthesis and screening. (chapter 2) Combinatorial chemistry is able to rapidly produce many thousands...

  3. Design of a dual-function peptide probe as a binder of angiotensin II and an inducer of silver nanoparticle aggregation for use in label-free colorimetric assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Mina; Kuboyama, Masashi; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Label-free colorimetric assays using metallic nanoparticles have received much recent attention, for their application in simple and sensitive methods for detection of biomolecules. Short peptide probes that can bind to analyte biomolecules are attractive ligands in molecular nanotechnology; however, identification of biological recognition motifs is usually based on trial-and-error experiments. Herein, a peptide probe was screened for colorimetric detection of angiotensin II (Ang II) using a mechanism for non-crosslinking aggregation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The dual-function peptides, which bind to the analyte and induce AgNP aggregation, were identified using a two-step strategy: (1) screening of an Ang II-binding peptide from an Ang II receptor sequence library, using SPOT technology, which enable peptides synthesis on cellulose membranes via an Fmoc method and (2) selection of peptide probes that effectively induce aggregation of AgNPs using a photolinker modified peptide array. Using the identified peptide probe, KGKNKRRR, aggregation of AgNPs was detected by observation of a pink color in the absence of Ang II, whereas AgNPs remained dispersed in the presence of Ang II (yellow). The color changes were not observed in the presence of other hormone molecules. Ang II could be detected within 15 min, with a detection limit of 10 µM, by measuring the ratio of absorbance at 400 nm and 568 nm; the signal could also be observed with the naked eye. These data suggest that the peptide identified here could be used as a probe for simple and rapid colorimetric detection of Ang II. This strategy for the identification of functional peptides shows promise for the development of colorimetric detection of various diagnostically important biomolecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Design and spectroscopic reflectometry characterization of pulsed laser deposition combinatorial libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenck, Peter K.; Bassim, Nabil D.; Otani, Makoto; Oguchi, Hiroyuki; Green, Martin L.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the design of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) combinatorial library films is to optimize the compositional coverage of the films while maintaining a uniform thickness. The deposition pattern of excimer laser PLD films can be modeled with a bimodal cos n distribution. Deposited films were characterized using a spectroscopic reflectometer (250-1000 nm) to map the thickness of both single composition calibration films and combinatorial library films. These distribution functions were used to simulate the composition and thickness of multiple target combinatorial library films. The simulations were correlated with electron-probe microanalysis wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy (EPMA-WDS) composition maps. The composition and thickness of the library films can be fine-tuned by adjusting the laser spot size, fluence, background gas pressure, target geometry and other processing parameters which affect the deposition pattern. Results from compositionally graded combinatorial library films of the ternary system Al 2 O 3 -HfO 2 -Y 2 O 3 are discussed

  5. A quark interpretation of the combinatorial hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, Kari.

    1979-01-01

    We propose a physical interpretation of the second level of the combinatorial hierarchy in terms of three quarks, three antiquarks and the vacuum. This interpretation allows us to introduce a new quantum number, which measures electromagnetic mass splitting of the quarks. We extend our argument by analogue to baryons, and find some SU(3) and some new mass formulas for baryons. The generalization of our approach to other hierarchy levels is discussed. We present also an empirical mass formula for baryons, which seems to be loosely connected with the combinatorial hierarchy. (author)

  6. Combinatorial designs a tribute to Haim Hanani

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, A

    1989-01-01

    Haim Hanani pioneered the techniques for constructing designs and the theory of pairwise balanced designs, leading directly to Wilson''s Existence Theorem. He also led the way in the study of resolvable designs, covering and packing problems, latin squares, 3-designs and other combinatorial configurations.The Hanani volume is a collection of research and survey papers at the forefront of research in combinatorial design theory, including Professor Hanani''s own latest work on Balanced Incomplete Block Designs. Other areas covered include Steiner systems, finite geometries, quasigroups, and t-designs.

  7. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry with diselenides and disulfides in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Brian; Sørensen, Anne; Gotfredsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Diselenide exchange is introduced as a reversible reaction in dynamic combinatorial chemistry in water. At neutral pH, diselenides are found to mix with disulfides and form dynamic combinatorial libraries of diselenides, disulfides, and selenenylsulfides. This journal is......Diselenide exchange is introduced as a reversible reaction in dynamic combinatorial chemistry in water. At neutral pH, diselenides are found to mix with disulfides and form dynamic combinatorial libraries of diselenides, disulfides, and selenenylsulfides. This journal is...

  8. A New Approach for Proving or Generating Combinatorial Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Luis

    2010-01-01

    A new method for proving, in an immediate way, many combinatorial identities is presented. The method is based on a simple recursive combinatorial formula involving n + 1 arbitrary real parameters. Moreover, this formula enables one not only to prove, but also generate many different combinatorial identities (not being required to know them "a…

  9. Asessing for Structural Understanding in Childrens' Combinatorial Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Lyn

    1999-01-01

    Assesses children's structural understanding of combinatorial problems when presented in a variety of task situations. Provides an explanatory model of students' combinatorial understandings that informs teaching and assessment. Addresses several components of children's structural understanding of elementary combinatorial problems. (Contains 50…

  10. The sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for {alpha}-fetoprotein based on enrichment by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au magnetic nano probes and signal amplification by CdS-Au composite nanoparticles labeled anti-AFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Hankun [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Material Science and Chemical Engineering of Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Gan Ning, E-mail: ganning@nbu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Material Science and Chemical Engineering of Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Li Tianhua; Cao Yuting; Zeng Saolin [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Material Science and Chemical Engineering of Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Zheng Lei, E-mail: nfyyzl@163.com [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Guo Zhiyong [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Material Science and Chemical Engineering of Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China)

    2012-10-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sandwich immunoreaction, testing a large number of samples simultaneously. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic separation and enrichment by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au magnetic nano probes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amplification of detection signal by CdS-Au composite nanoparticles labeled anti-AFP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost no background signal, which greatly improve the sensitivity of detection. - Abstract: A novel and sensitive sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was fabricated on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for ultra trace levels of {alpha}-fetoprotein (AFP) based on sandwich immunoreaction strategy by enrichment using magnetic capture probes and quantum dots coated with Au shell (CdS-Au) as the signal tag. The capture probe was prepared by immobilizing the primary antibody of AFP (Ab1) on the core/shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au nanoparticles, which was first employed to capture AFP antigens to form Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au/Ab1/AFP complex from the serum after incubation. The product can be separated from the background solution through the magnetic separation. Then the CdS-Au labeled secondary antibody (Ab2) as signal tag (CdS-Au/Ab2) was conjugated successfully with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au/Ab1/AFP complex to form a sandwich-type immunocomplex (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au/Ab1/AFP/Ab2/CdS-Au), which can be further separated by an external magnetic field and produce ECL signals at a fixed voltage. The signal was proportional to a certain concentration range of AFP for quantification. Thus, an easy-to-use immunosensor with magnetic probes and a quantum dots signal tag was obtained. The immunosensor performed at a level of high sensitivity and a broad concentration range for AFP between 0.0005 and 5.0 ng mL{sup -1} with a detection limit of 0.2 pg mL{sup -1}. The use of magnetic probes was combined with pre-concentration and separation for trace levels of tumor markers in the serum. Due to the

  11. Rhodamine-labeled 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)tropane analogues as high-affinity fluorescent probes for the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, Joo Hwan; Zou, Mu-Fa; Adkins, Erika M

    2005-01-01

    linker. The resulting 2-substituted (5) and N-substituted (9) rhodamine-labeled ligands provided the highest DAT binding affinities expressed in COS-7 cells (Ki= 27 and 18 nM, respectively) in the series. Visualization of the DAT with 5 and 9 was demonstrated by confocal fluorescence laser scanning...

  12. Convenient synthesis of (68)Ga-labeled gadolinium(III) complexes:towards bimodal responsive probes for functional imaging with PET/MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Notni, Johannes; Hermann, Petr; Dregely, Isabel; Wester, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    A killer application? Recently, fully integrated full-body positron-emission tomography (PET) and magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI) scanners were brought to market, allowing simultaneous recording of complementary 3D data sets. By using bimodal PET/MRI probes (see figure), in vivo 3D mapping of various parameters with medical relevance could become feasible.

  13. Combinatorial biosynthesis of medicinal plant secondary metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julsing, Mattijs K.; Koulman, Albert; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Quax, Wim J.; Kayser, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Combinatorial biosynthesis is a new tool in the generation of novel natural products and for the production of rare and expensive natural products. The basic concept is combining metabolic pathways in different organisms on a genetic level. As a consequence heterologous organisms provide precursors

  14. Infinitary Combinatory Reduction Systems: Normalising Reduction Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketema, J.; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2010-01-01

    We study normalising reduction strategies for infinitary Combinatory Reduction Systems (iCRSs). We prove that all fair, outermost-fair, and needed-fair strategies are normalising for orthogonal, fully-extended iCRSs. These facts properly generalise a number of results on normalising strategies in

  15. PIPERIDINE OLIGOMERS AND COMBINATORIAL LIBRARIES THEREOF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to piperidine oligomers, methods for the preparation of piperidine oligomers and compound libraries thereof, and the use of piperidine oligomers as drug substances. The present invention also relates to the use of combinatorial libraries of piperidine oligomers...... in libraries (arrays) of compounds especially suitable for screening purposes....

  16. Dendrimer-based dynamic combinatorial libraries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, T.; Meijer, E.W.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project is to create water-sol. dynamic combinatorial libraries based upon dendrimer-guest complexes. The guest mols. are designed to bind to dendrimers using multiple secondary interactions, such as electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. We have been able to incorporate various guest

  17. Gian-Carlos Rota and Combinatorial Math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolata, Gina Bari

    1979-01-01

    Presents the first of a series of occasional articles about mathematics as seen through the eyes of its prominent scholars. In an interview with Gian-Carlos Rota of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology he discusses how combinatorial mathematics began as a field and its future. (HM)

  18. A Model of Students' Combinatorial Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Elise

    2013-01-01

    Combinatorial topics have become increasingly prevalent in K-12 and undergraduate curricula, yet research on combinatorics education indicates that students face difficulties when solving counting problems. The research community has not yet addressed students' ways of thinking at a level that facilitates deeper understanding of how students…

  19. Torus actions, combinatorial topology, and homological algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhshtaber, V M; Panov, T E

    2000-01-01

    This paper is a survey of new results and open problems connected with fundamental combinatorial concepts, including polytopes, simplicial complexes, cubical complexes, and arrangements of subspaces. Attention is concentrated on simplicial and cubical subdivisions of manifolds, and especially on spheres. Important constructions are described that enable one to study these combinatorial objects by using commutative and homological algebra. The proposed approach to combinatorial problems is based on the theory of moment-angle complexes recently developed by the authors. The crucial construction assigns to each simplicial complex K with m vertices a T m -space Z K with special bigraded cellular decomposition. In the framework of this theory, well-known non-singular toric varieties arise as orbit spaces of maximally free actions of subtori on moment-angle complexes corresponding to simplicial spheres. It is shown that diverse invariants of simplicial complexes and related combinatorial-geometric objects can be expressed in terms of bigraded cohomology rings of the corresponding moment-angle complexes. Finally, it is shown that the new relationships between combinatorics, geometry, and topology lead to solutions of some well-known topological problems

  20. Combinatorial Aspects of the Generalized Euler's Totient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nittiya Pabhapote

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A generalized Euler's totient is defined as a Dirichlet convolution of a power function and a product of the Souriau-Hsu-Möbius function with a completely multiplicative function. Two combinatorial aspects of the generalized Euler's totient, namely, its connections to other totients and its relations with counting formulae, are investigated.

  1. Quantum Resonance Approach to Combinatorial Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that quantum resonance can be used for combinatorial optimization. The advantage of the approach is in independence of the computing time upon the dimensionality of the problem. As an example, the solution to a constraint satisfaction problem of exponential complexity is demonstrated.

  2. Logging to Facilitate Combinatorial System Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruse, P.M.; Prasetya, I.S.W.B.; Hage, J; Elyasov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Testing a web application is typically very complicated. Imposing simple coverage criteria such as function or line coverage is often not sufficient to uncover bugs due to incorrect components integration. Combinatorial testing can enforce a stronger criterion, while still allowing the

  3. The sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for α-fetoprotein based on enrichment by Fe3O4-Au magnetic nano probes and signal amplification by CdS-Au composite nanoparticles labeled anti-AFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hankun; Gan, Ning; Li, Tianhua; Cao, Yuting; Zeng, Saolin; Zheng, Lei; Guo, Zhiyong

    2012-10-09

    A novel and sensitive sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was fabricated on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for ultra trace levels of α-fetoprotein (AFP) based on sandwich immunoreaction strategy by enrichment using magnetic capture probes and quantum dots coated with Au shell (CdS-Au) as the signal tag. The capture probe was prepared by immobilizing the primary antibody of AFP (Ab1) on the core/shell Fe(3)O(4)-Au nanoparticles, which was first employed to capture AFP antigens to form Fe(3)O(4)-Au/Ab1/AFP complex from the serum after incubation. The product can be separated from the background solution through the magnetic separation. Then the CdS-Au labeled secondary antibody (Ab2) as signal tag (CdS-Au/Ab2) was conjugated successfully with Fe(3)O(4)-Au/Ab1/AFP complex to form a sandwich-type immunocomplex (Fe(3)O(4)-Au/Ab1/AFP/Ab2/CdS-Au), which can be further separated by an external magnetic field and produce ECL signals at a fixed voltage. The signal was proportional to a certain concentration range of AFP for quantification. Thus, an easy-to-use immunosensor with magnetic probes and a quantum dots signal tag was obtained. The immunosensor performed at a level of high sensitivity and a broad concentration range for AFP between 0.0005 and 5.0 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.2 pg mL(-1). The use of magnetic probes was combined with pre-concentration and separation for trace levels of tumor markers in the serum. Due to the amplification of the signal tag, the immunosensor is highly sensitive, which can offer great promise for rapid, simple, selective and cost-effective detection of effective biomonitoring for clinical application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Combinatorial structures to modeling simple games and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    We connect three different topics: combinatorial structures, game theory and chemistry. In particular, we establish the bases to represent some simple games, defined as influence games, and molecules, defined from atoms, by using combinatorial structures. First, we characterize simple games as influence games using influence graphs. It let us to modeling simple games as combinatorial structures (from the viewpoint of structures or graphs). Second, we formally define molecules as combinations of atoms. It let us to modeling molecules as combinatorial structures (from the viewpoint of combinations). It is open to generate such combinatorial structures using some specific techniques as genetic algorithms, (meta-)heuristics algorithms and parallel programming, among others.

  5. Tail-labelling of DNA probes using modified deoxynucleotide triphosphates and terminal deoxynucleotidyl tranferase. Application in electrochemical DNA hybridization and protein-DNA binding assays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Macíčková-Cahová, Hana; Pivoňková, Hana; Špaček, Jan; Havran, Luděk; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2011), s. 1366-1371 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA MŠk(CZ) LC512; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DNA tail- labelling * protein-DNA binding * DNA hybridization Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  6. Synthesis and Monkey-PET Study of (R)- and (S)-18F-Labeled 2-Arylbenzoheterocyclic Derivatives as Amyloid Probes with Distinctive in Vivo Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanping; Wang, Xuedan; Yang, Hui; Fu, Hualong; Zhang, Jinming; Zhang, Xiaojun; Dai, Jiapei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lin, Chunping; Guo, Yuzhi; Cui, Mengchao

    2016-11-07

    This study describes an effective strategy to improve pharmacokinetics of Aβ imaging agents, offering a novel class of (R)- and (S)- 18 F-labeled 2-arylbenzoheterocyclic derivatives which bear an additional chiral hydroxyl group on the side chain. These ligands displayed binding abilities toward Aβ aggregates with K i values ranging from 3.2 to 195.6 nM. Chirality-related discrepancy was observed in biodistribution, and (S)-2-phenylbenzoxazole enantiomers exhibited vastly improved brain clearance with washout ratios higher than 20. Notably, (S)-[ 18 F]28 possessed high binding potency (K i = 7.6 nM) and exceptional brain kinetics (9.46% ID/g at 2 min, brain 2min /brain 60min = 27.8) that is superior to well-established [ 18 F]AV45. The excellent pharmacokinetics and low nonspecific binding of (S)-[ 18 F]28 were testified by dynamic PET/CT scans in monkey brains. In addition, (S)-[ 18 F]28 clearly labeled Aβ plaques both in vitro and ex vivo. These results might qualify (S)-[ 18 F]28 to detect Aβ plaques with high signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Quantum fields and processes a combinatorial approach

    CERN Document Server

    Gough, John

    2018-01-01

    Wick ordering of creation and annihilation operators is of fundamental importance for computing averages and correlations in quantum field theory and, by extension, in the Hudson-Parthasarathy theory of quantum stochastic processes, quantum mechanics, stochastic processes, and probability. This book develops the unified combinatorial framework behind these examples, starting with the simplest mathematically, and working up to the Fock space setting for quantum fields. Emphasizing ideas from combinatorics such as the role of lattice of partitions for multiple stochastic integrals by Wallstrom-Rota and combinatorial species by Joyal, it presents insights coming from quantum probability. It also introduces a 'field calculus' which acts as a succinct alternative to standard Feynman diagrams and formulates quantum field theory (cumulant moments, Dyson-Schwinger equation, tree expansions, 1-particle irreducibility) in this language. Featuring many worked examples, the book is aimed at mathematical physicists, quant...

  8. Gems of combinatorial optimization and graph algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Skutella, Martin; Stiller, Sebastian; Wagner, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    Are you looking for new lectures for your course on algorithms, combinatorial optimization, or algorithmic game theory?  Maybe you need a convenient source of relevant, current topics for a graduate student or advanced undergraduate student seminar?  Or perhaps you just want an enjoyable look at some beautiful mathematical and algorithmic results, ideas, proofs, concepts, and techniques in discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science?   Gems of Combinatorial Optimization and Graph Algorithms is a handpicked collection of up-to-date articles, carefully prepared by a select group of international experts, who have contributed some of their most mathematically or algorithmically elegant ideas.  Topics include longest tours and Steiner trees in geometric spaces, cartograms, resource buying games, congestion games, selfish routing, revenue equivalence and shortest paths, scheduling, linear structures in graphs, contraction hierarchies, budgeted matching problems, and motifs in networks.   This ...

  9. Quantum fields and processes a combinatorial approach

    CERN Document Server

    Gough, John

    2018-01-01

    Wick ordering of creation and annihilation operators is of fundamental importance for computing averages and correlations in quantum field theory and, by extension, in the Hudson–Parthasarathy theory of quantum stochastic processes, quantum mechanics, stochastic processes, and probability. This book develops the unified combinatorial framework behind these examples, starting with the simplest mathematically, and working up to the Fock space setting for quantum fields. Emphasizing ideas from combinatorics such as the role of lattice of partitions for multiple stochastic integrals by Wallstrom–Rota and combinatorial species by Joyal, it presents insights coming from quantum probability. It also introduces a 'field calculus' which acts as a succinct alternative to standard Feynman diagrams and formulates quantum field theory (cumulant moments, Dyson–Schwinger equation, tree expansions, 1-particle irreducibility) in this language. Featuring many worked examples, the book is aimed at mathematical physicists,...

  10. Three Syntactic Theories for Combinatory Graph Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Zerny, Ian

    2011-01-01

    in a third syntactic theory. The structure of the store-based abstract machine corresponding to this third syntactic theory oincides with that of Turner's original reduction machine. The three syntactic theories presented here The three syntactic heories presented here therefore have the following......We present a purely syntactic theory of graph reduction for the canonical combinators S, K, and I, where graph vertices are represented with evaluation contexts and let expressions. We express this syntactic theory as a reduction semantics, which we refocus into the first storeless abstract machine...... for combinatory graph reduction, which we refunctionalize into the first storeless natural semantics for combinatory graph reduction.We then factor out the introduction of let expressions to denote as many graph vertices as possible upfront instead of on demand, resulting in a second syntactic theory, this one...

  11. Three Syntactic Theories for Combinatory Graph Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Zerny, Ian

    2013-01-01

    , as a store-based reduction semantics of combinatory term graphs. We then refocus this store-based reduction semantics into a store-based abstract machine. The architecture of this store-based abstract machine coincides with that of Turner's original reduction machine. The three syntactic theories presented......We present a purely syntactic theory of graph reduction for the canonical combinators S, K, and I, where graph vertices are represented with evaluation contexts and let expressions. We express this rst syntactic theory as a storeless reduction semantics of combinatory terms. We then factor out...... the introduction of let expressions to denote as many graph vertices as possible upfront instead of on demand . The factored terms can be interpreted as term graphs in the sense of Barendregt et al. We express this second syntactic theory, which we prove equivalent to the rst, as a storeless reduction semantics...

  12. DNA-Encoded Dynamic Combinatorial Chemical Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddavide, Francesco V; Lin, Weilin; Lehnert, Sarah; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) explores the thermodynamic equilibrium of reversible reactions. Its application in the discovery of protein binders is largely limited by difficulties in the analysis of complex reaction mixtures. DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) technology allows the selection of binders from a mixture of up to billions of different compounds; however, experimental results often show low a signal-to-noise ratio and poor correlation between enrichment factor and binding affinity. Herein we describe the design and application of DNA-encoded dynamic combinatorial chemical libraries (EDCCLs). Our experiments have shown that the EDCCL approach can be used not only to convert monovalent binders into high-affinity bivalent binders, but also to cause remarkably enhanced enrichment of potent bivalent binders by driving their in situ synthesis. We also demonstrate the application of EDCCLs in DNA-templated chemical reactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Exploiting Quantum Resonance to Solve Combinatorial Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail; Fijany, Amir

    2006-01-01

    Quantum resonance would be exploited in a proposed quantum-computing approach to the solution of combinatorial optimization problems. In quantum computing in general, one takes advantage of the fact that an algorithm cannot be decoupled from the physical effects available to implement it. Prior approaches to quantum computing have involved exploitation of only a subset of known quantum physical effects, notably including parallelism and entanglement, but not including resonance. In the proposed approach, one would utilize the combinatorial properties of tensor-product decomposability of unitary evolution of many-particle quantum systems for physically simulating solutions to NP-complete problems (a class of problems that are intractable with respect to classical methods of computation). In this approach, reinforcement and selection of a desired solution would be executed by means of quantum resonance. Classes of NP-complete problems that are important in practice and could be solved by the proposed approach include planning, scheduling, search, and optimal design.

  14. Slow aggregation of lysozyme in alkaline pH monitored in real time employing the fluorescence anisotropy of covalently labelled dansyl probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homchaudhuri, Lopamudra; Kumar, Satish; Swaminathan, Rajaram

    2006-04-03

    The onset of hen egg white lysozyme aggregation on exposure to alkaline pH of 12.2 and subsequent slow growth of soluble lysozyme aggregates (at 298 K) was directly monitored by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of covalently attached dansyl probe over a period of 24 h. The rotational correlation time accounting for tumbling of lysozyme in solution (40 microM) increased from approximately 3.6 ns (in pH 7) to approximately 40ns on exposure to pH 12.2 over a period of 6 h and remained stable thereafter. The growth of aggregates was strongly concentration dependent, irreversible after 60 min and inhibited by the presence of 0.9 M l-arginine in the medium. The day old aggregates were resistant to denaturation by 6 M guanidine.HCl. Our results reveal slow segmental motion of the dansyl probe in day old aggregates in the absence of L-arginine (0.9 M), but a much faster motion in its presence, when growth of aggregates is halted.

  15. Functional Single-Cell Approach to Probing Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria in Soil Communities by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy with 15N2 Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li; Yang, Kai; Li, Hong-Zhe; Zhang, Han; Su, Jian-Qiang; Paraskevaidi, Maria; Martin, Francis L; Ren, Bin; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2018-04-17

    Nitrogen (N) fixation is the conversion of inert nitrogen gas (N 2 ) to bioavailable N essential for all forms of life. N 2 -fixing microorganisms (diazotrophs), which play a key role in global N cycling, remain largely obscure because a large majority are uncultured. Direct probing of active diazotrophs in the environment is still a major challenge. Herein, a novel culture-independent single-cell approach combining resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy with 15 N 2 stable isotope probing (SIP) was developed to discern N 2 -fixing bacteria in a complex soil community. Strong RR signals of cytochrome c (Cyt c, frequently present in diverse N 2 -fixing bacteria), along with a marked 15 N 2 -induced Cyt c band shift, generated a highly distinguishable biomarker for N 2 fixation. 15 N 2 -induced shift was consistent well with 15 N abundance in cell determined by isotope ratio mass spectroscopy. By applying this biomarker and Raman imaging, N 2 -fixing bacteria in both artificial and complex soil communities were discerned and imaged at the single-cell level. The linear band shift of Cyt c versus 15 N 2 percentage allowed quantification of N 2 fixation extent of diverse soil bacteria. This single-cell approach will advance the exploration of hitherto uncultured diazotrophs in diverse ecosystems.

  16. A potential fluorescent probe: Maillard reaction product from glutathione and ascorbic acid for rapid and label-free dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jiang Xue; Song, Xiao Fang; Shi, Yan; Gao, Zhong Feng; Li, Bang Lin; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-07-15

    Maillard reactions and their fluorescent products have drawn much attention in the fields of food and life science, however, the application of fluorescent products separated from the reaction as an indicator for detection of certain substances in sensor field has not been mentioned. In this article, we report on an easy-to-synthesize and water-soluble fluorescent probe separated from the typical Maillard reaction products of glutathione and ascorbic acid, with excellent stability and high quantum yield (18.2%). The further application of the probe has been explored for dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols including cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione, which is based on Hg(2+)-induced fluorescence quenching of the Maillard reaction fluorescent products (MRFPs) and the fluorescence recovery as the introduction of biothiols. This sensing system exhibits a good selectivity and sensitivity, and the linear ranges for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 0.05-12, 0.5-10, 0.3-20, and 0.3-20μM, respectively. The detection limits for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 22, 47, 96, and 30nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, respectively. Furthermore, the practical applications of this sensor for Hg(2+) and biothiols determination in water samples and human plasma sample have been demonstrated with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  18. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  19. Combinatorial Cis-regulation in Saccharomyces Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron T. Spivak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional control of gene expression requires interactions between the cis-regulatory elements (CREs controlling gene promoters. We developed a sensitive computational method to identify CRE combinations with conserved spacing that does not require genome alignments. When applied to seven sensu stricto and sensu lato Saccharomyces species, 80% of the predicted interactions displayed some evidence of combinatorial transcriptional behavior in several existing datasets including: (1 chromatin immunoprecipitation data for colocalization of transcription factors, (2 gene expression data for coexpression of predicted regulatory targets, and (3 gene ontology databases for common pathway membership of predicted regulatory targets. We tested several predicted CRE interactions with chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in a wild-type strain and strains in which a predicted cofactor was deleted. Our experiments confirmed that transcription factor (TF occupancy at the promoters of the CRE combination target genes depends on the predicted cofactor while occupancy of other promoters is independent of the predicted cofactor. Our method has the additional advantage of identifying regulatory differences between species. By analyzing the S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genomes, we identified differences in combinatorial cis-regulation between the species and showed that the predicted changes in gene regulation explain several of the species-specific differences seen in gene expression datasets. In some instances, the same CRE combinations appear to regulate genes involved in distinct biological processes in the two different species. The results of this research demonstrate that (1 combinatorial cis-regulation can be inferred by multi-genome analysis and (2 combinatorial cis-regulation can explain differences in gene expression between species.

  20. The Combinatorial Trace Method in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Mike; Martinez, Natalie C.

    2013-01-01

    On any finite graph, the number of closed walks of length k is equal to the sum of the kth powers of the eigenvalues of any adjacency matrix. This simple observation is the basis for the combinatorial trace method, wherein we attempt to count (or bound) the number of closed walks of a given length so as to obtain information about the graph's…

  1. Development of Combinatorial Methods for Alloy Design and Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.; Santella, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    The primary goal of this research was to develop a comprehensive methodology for designing and optimizing metallic alloys by combinatorial principles. Because conventional techniques for alloy preparation are unavoidably restrictive in the range of alloy composition that can be examined, combinatorial methods promise to significantly reduce the time, energy, and expense needed for alloy design. Combinatorial methods can be developed not only to optimize existing alloys, but to explore and develop new ones as well. The scientific approach involved fabricating an alloy specimen with a continuous distribution of binary and ternary alloy compositions across its surface--an ''alloy library''--and then using spatially resolved probing techniques to characterize its structure, composition, and relevant properties. The three specific objectives of the project were: (1) to devise means by which simple test specimens with a library of alloy compositions spanning the range interest can be produced; (2) to assess how well the properties of the combinatorial specimen reproduce those of the conventionally processed alloys; and (3) to devise screening tools which can be used to rapidly assess the important properties of the alloys. As proof of principle, the methodology was applied to the Fe-Ni-Cr ternary alloy system that constitutes many commercially important materials such as stainless steels and the H-series and C-series heat and corrosion resistant casting alloys. Three different techniques were developed for making alloy libraries: (1) vapor deposition of discrete thin films on an appropriate substrate and then alloying them together by solid-state diffusion; (2) co-deposition of the alloying elements from three separate magnetron sputtering sources onto an inert substrate; and (3) localized melting of thin films with a focused electron-beam welding system. Each of the techniques was found to have its own advantages and disadvantages. A new and very powerful technique for

  2. MIFT: GIFT Combinatorial Geometry Input to VCS Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    r-w w-^ H ^ß0318is CQ BRL °RCUMr REPORT NO. 1967 —-S: ... MIFT: GIFT COMBINATORIAL GEOMETRY INPUT TO VCS CODE Albert E...TITLE (and Subtitle) MIFT: GIFT Combinatorial Geometry Input to VCS Code S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED FINAL 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER...Vehicle Code System (VCS) called MORSE was modified to accept the GIFT combinatorial geometry package. GIFT , as opposed to the geometry package

  3. Neural Meta-Memes Framework for Combinatorial Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li Qin; Lim, Meng Hiot; Ong, Yew Soon

    In this paper, we present a Neural Meta-Memes Framework (NMMF) for combinatorial optimization. NMMF is a framework which models basic optimization algorithms as memes and manages them dynamically when solving combinatorial problems. NMMF encompasses neural networks which serve as the overall planner/coordinator to balance the workload between memes. We show the efficacy of the proposed NMMF through empirical study on a class of combinatorial problem, the quadratic assignment problem (QAP).

  4. Asymmetric proteome equalization of the skeletal muscle proteome using a combinatorial hexapeptide library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Rivers

    Full Text Available Immobilized combinatorial peptide libraries have been advocated as a strategy for equalization of the dynamic range of a typical proteome. The technology has been applied predominantly to blood plasma and other biological fluids such as urine, but has not been used extensively to address the issue of dynamic range in tissue samples. Here, we have applied the combinatorial library approach to the equalization of a tissue where there is also a dramatic asymmetry in the range of abundances of proteins; namely, the soluble fraction of skeletal muscle. We have applied QconCAT and label-free methodology to the quantification of the proteins that bind to the beads as the loading is progressively increased. Although some equalization is achieved, and the most abundant proteins no longer dominate the proteome analysis, at high protein loadings a new asymmetry of protein expression is reached, consistent with the formation of complex assembles of heat shock proteins, cytoskeletal elements and other proteins on the beads. Loading at different ionic strength values leads to capture of different subpopulations of proteins, but does not completely eliminate the bias in protein accumulation. These assemblies may impair the broader utility of combinatorial library approaches to the equalization of tissue proteomes. However, the asymmetry in equalization is manifest at either low and high ionic strength values but manipulation of the solvent conditions may extend the capacity of the method.

  5. Use of combinatorial chemistry to speed drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rádl, S

    1998-10-01

    IBC's International Conference on Integrating Combinatorial Chemistry into the Discovery Pipeline was held September 14-15, 1998. The program started with a pre-conference workshop on High-Throughput Compound Characterization and Purification. The agenda of the main conference was divided into sessions of Synthesis, Automation and Unique Chemistries; Integrating Combinatorial Chemistry, Medicinal Chemistry and Screening; Combinatorial Chemistry Applications for Drug Discovery; and Information and Data Management. This meeting was an excellent opportunity to see how big pharma, biotech and service companies are addressing the current bottlenecks in combinatorial chemistry to speed drug discovery. (c) 1998 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  6. Advanced Aqueous Phase Catalyst Development using Combinatorial Methods, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Combinatorial methods are proposed to develop advanced Aqueous Oxidation Catalysts (AOCs) with the capability to mineralize organic contaminants present in effluents...

  7. Metabolic and improved organ scan studies. II. Nitrogen-13 labeled compounds used as in-vivo probes for enzyme therapy and as tumor localizing and organ imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    A number of 13 N-labeled compounds have been enzymatically synthesized and are being evaluated as tumor and/or organ localizing agents. 13 N-Ammonia, produced after cyclotron generation of 13 N-nitrate and subsequent reduction was used to enzymatically aminate the appropriate substrate to yield 13 N-L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, L-asparagine, L-valine, L-leucine and L-alanine. The use of 13 N-asparagine as a myocardial scanning agent and as a tumor localizing agent in asparaginase-sensitive tumors is discussed. Two imaging devices were used to study the effectiveness of the compounds as localizing agents. For static whole body distribution studies, a dual-detector high energy gamma ray (HEG) rectilinear scanner, equipped with constant response collimators was employed. The uniformity of response of this system permits quantitative determination of the amount of 13 N activity present in the organ or tumor of interest. The total organ kinetic imaging monitor (TOKIM) gamma camera system was used for dynamic studies covering smaller areas of the subject's body

  8. Synthesis of [123I]iodine labelled imidazo[1,2-b] pyridazines as potential probes for the study of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsifis, A.; Mattner, F.; Dikic, B.; Barlin, G.

    2004-01-01

    The pyridazines 3-acetamidomethyl-6-chloro-2-(4'-iodophenyl)imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine 1 (IC 50 = 1.6 nM) and 3-benzamidomethyl-6-iodo-2-(4'-t-butylphenyl)imidazo[1,2-b] pyridazine 2 (IC 50 = 4.2 nM), are high affinity and selective ligands for the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) compared to the central benzodiazepine counterparts. The [ 123 I]1 and [ 123 I]2 labelled analogues of these compounds were subsequently synthesised for the potential study of the PBR in vivo using SPECT. Radioiodination of [ 123 I]1 was achieved by iododestannylation of the corresponding tributyl tin precursor with Na[ 123 I] in the presence of peracetic acid or chloramine-T and the product isolated by C-18 RP HPLC. Radioiodination of [ 123 I]2 was achieved by copper assisted bromine [ 123 I]iodine exchange of the corresponding bromo precursor in the presence of acetic acid and sodium bisulfate as reducing agent at 200 C. Purification of the crude products were achieved by semi-preparative C-18 RP HPLC to give the products in radiochemical yields > 90%. The products were obtained in > 97% chemical and radiochemical purity and with specific activities > 180 GBq/μmol. (orig.)

  9. Synthesis of [{sup 123}I]iodine labelled imidazo[1,2-b] pyridazines as potential probes for the study of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors using SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsifis, A.; Mattner, F.; Dikic, B. [Radiopharmaceuticals Div. ANSTO, Menai, NSW (Australia); Barlin, G. [Div. of Neurosciences, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)

    2004-07-01

    The pyridazines 3-acetamidomethyl-6-chloro-2-(4'-iodophenyl)imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine 1 (IC{sub 50} = 1.6 nM) and 3-benzamidomethyl-6-iodo-2-(4'-t-butylphenyl)imidazo[1,2-b] pyridazine 2 (IC{sub 50} = 4.2 nM), are high affinity and selective ligands for the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) compared to the central benzodiazepine counterparts. The [{sup 123}I]1 and [{sup 123}I]2 labelled analogues of these compounds were subsequently synthesised for the potential study of the PBR in vivo using SPECT. Radioiodination of [{sup 123}I]1 was achieved by iododestannylation of the corresponding tributyl tin precursor with Na[{sup 123}I] in the presence of peracetic acid or chloramine-T and the product isolated by C-18 RP HPLC. Radioiodination of [{sup 123}I]2 was achieved by copper assisted bromine [{sup 123}I]iodine exchange of the corresponding bromo precursor in the presence of acetic acid and sodium bisulfate as reducing agent at 200 C. Purification of the crude products were achieved by semi-preparative C-18 RP HPLC to give the products in radiochemical yields > 90%. The products were obtained in > 97% chemical and radiochemical purity and with specific activities > 180 GBq/{mu}mol. (orig.)

  10. Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Food Labels KidsHealth / For Teens / Food Labels What's in ... to have at least 95% organic ingredients. Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  11. Label-free aptamer-based colorimetric detection of mercury ions in aqueous media using unmodified gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Li; Li, Baoxin; Qi, Yingying; Jin, Yan [Shaanxi Normal University, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science of Shaanxi Province, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Xi' an (China)

    2009-04-15

    We report a simple and sensitive aptamer-based colorimetric detection of mercury ions (Hg{sup 2+}) using unmodified gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probe. It is based on the fact that bare gold nanoparticles interact differently with short single-strand DNA and double-stranded DNA. The anti-Hg{sup 2+} aptamer is rich in thymine (T) and readily forms T-Hg{sup 2+}-T configuration in the presence of Hg{sup 2+}. By measuring color change or adsorption ratio, the bare gold nanoparticles can effectively differentiate the Hg{sup 2+}-induced conformational change of the aptamer in the presence of a given salt with high concentration. The assay shows a linear response toward Hg{sup 2+} concentration through a five-decade range of 1 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1} to 1 x 10{sup -9} mol L{sup -1}. Even with the naked eye, we could identify micromolar Hg{sup 2+} concentrations within minutes. By using the spectrometric method, the detection limit was improved to the nanomolar range (0.6 nM). The assay shows excellent selectivity for Hg{sup 2+} over other metal cations including K{sup +}, Ba{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Al{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+}. The major advantages of this Hg{sup 2+} assay are its water-solubility, simplicity, low cost, visual colorimetry, and high sensitivity. This method provides a potentially useful tool for the Hg{sup 2+} detection. (orig.)

  12. Effects of Suboptimal Bidding in Combinatorial Auctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stefan; Shabalin, Pasha; Bichler, Martin

    Though the VCG auction assumes a central place in the mechanism design literature, there are a number of reasons for favoring iterative combinatorial auction designs. Several promising ascending auction formats have been developed throughout the past few years based on primal-dual and subgradient algorithms and linear programming theory. Prices are interpreted as a feasible dual solution and the provisional allocation is interpreted as a feasible primal solution. iBundle( 3) (Parkes and Ungar 2000), dVSV (de Vries et al. 2007) and the Ascending Proxy auction (Ausubel and Milgrom 2002) result in VCG payoffs when the coalitional value function satisfies the buyer submodularity condition and bidders bid straightforward, which is an expost Nash equilibrium in that case. iBEA and CreditDebit auctions (Mishra and Parkes 2007) do not even require the buyer submodularity condition and achieve the same properties for general valuations. In many situations, however, one cannot assume bidders to bid straightforward and it is not clear from the theory how these non-linear personalized price auctions (NLPPAs) perform in this case. Robustness of auctions with respect to different bidding behavior is therefore a critical issue for any application. We have conducted a large number of computational experiments to analyze the performance of NLPPA designs with respect to different bidding strategies and different valuation models. We compare the results of NLPPAs to those of the VCG auction and those of iterative combinatorial auctions with approximate linear prices, such as ALPS (Bichler et al. 2009) and the Combinatorial Clock auction (Porter et al. 2003).

  13. Recursive deconvolution of combinatorial chemical libraries.

    OpenAIRE

    Erb, E; Janda, K D; Brenner, S

    1994-01-01

    A recursive strategy that solves for the active members of a chemical library is presented. A pentapeptide library with an alphabet of Gly, Leu, Phe, and Tyr (1024 members) was constructed on a solid support by the method of split synthesis. One member of this library (NH2-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu) is a native binder to a beta-endorphin antibody. A variation of the split synthesis approach is used to build the combinatorial library. In four vials, a member of the library's alphabet is coupled to a...

  14. Dynamical System Approaches to Combinatorial Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Jens

    2013-01-01

    of large times as an asymptotically stable point of the dynamics. The obtained solutions are often not globally optimal but good approximations of it. Dynamical system and neural network approaches are appropriate methods for distributed and parallel processing. Because of the parallelization......Several dynamical system approaches to combinatorial optimization problems are described and compared. These include dynamical systems derived from penalty methods; the approach of Hopfield and Tank; self-organizing maps, that is, Kohonen networks; coupled selection equations; and hybrid methods...... thereof can be used as models for many industrial problems like manufacturing planning and optimization of flexible manufacturing systems. This is illustrated for an example in distributed robotic systems....

  15. Quantum resonance for simulating combinatorial problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, Michail; Fijany, Amir

    2005-01-01

    Quantum computing by simulations is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of a quantum phenomenon and phenomena to be analyzed. In this Letter, the mathematical formalism of quantum resonance combined with tensor product decomposability of unitary evolutions is mapped onto a class of NP-complete combinatorial problems. It has been demonstrated that nature has polynomial resources for solving NP-complete problems and that will help to develop a new strategy for artificial intelligence, as well as to re-evaluate the role of natural selection in biological evolution

  16. Automatic generation of combinatorial test data

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jian; Ma, Feifei

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews the state-of-the-art in combinatorial testing, with particular emphasis on the automatic generation of test data. It describes the most commonly used approaches in this area - including algebraic construction, greedy methods, evolutionary computation, constraint solving and optimization - and explains major algorithms with examples. In addition, the book lists a number of test generation tools, as well as benchmarks and applications. Addressing a multidisciplinary topic, it will be of particular interest to researchers and professionals in the areas of software testing, combi

  17. Method and apparatus for combinatorial chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Robert S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-06-05

    A method and apparatus are provided for performing light-directed reactions in spatially addressable channels within a plurality of channels. One aspect of the invention employs photoactivatable reagents in solutions disposed into spatially addressable flow streams to control the parallel synthesis of molecules immobilized within the channels. The reagents may be photoactivated within a subset of channels at the site of immobilized substrate molecules or at a light-addressable site upstream from the substrate molecules. The method and apparatus of the invention find particularly utility in the synthesis of biopolymer arrays, e.g., oligonucleotides, peptides and carbohydrates, and in the combinatorial synthesis of small molecule arrays for drug discovery.

  18. An Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Immunosensor for HIV p24 Based on Fe3O4@SiO2 Nanomagnetic Probes and Nanogold Colloid-Labeled Enzyme–Antibody Copolymer as Signal Tag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhua Li

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasensitive portable electrochemical immunosensor for human immunodeficiency virus p24 (HIV p24 antigen detection has been developed, whereby the detection sensitivity was 1000 times higher than that of the ELISA method. Firstly, a novel HRP enzyme–antibody copolymer (EV-p24 Ab2 was synthesized through an EnVision regent (EV, a dextrin amine skeleton anchoring more than 100 molecules of HRP and 15 molecules of anti IgG, then incubated in the secondary antibody of p24. Secondly, the copolymer was immobilized on the gold nanocolloids (AuNPs to fabricate a novel signal tag (AuNPs/EV-p24 Ab2. Subsequently, a sandwich-type immunoreaction would take place between the capture probe (silicon dioxide-coated magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNPs labeled with the primary p24 antibody (MNPs-p24 Ab1, p24 (different concentrations and the signal tag [AuNPs/EV-p24 Ab2] to form the immunocomplex. Finally, the immunocomplex was absorbed on the surface of screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE by a magnet and immersed in the o-hydroxyl phenol (HQ and H2O2. The large amounts of HRP on the signal tag can catalyze the oxidation of HQ by H2O2, which can induce an amplified reductive current. Moreover, the capture probe could improve the accumulation ability of p24 and facilitate its separation from the substrate through the magnet. Under optimal conditions, the proposed immunoassay exhibited good sensitivity to p24 within a certain concentration range from 0.001 to 10.00 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.5 pg/mL (S/N = 3. The proposed method can be used for real-time and early detection of HIV-infected people.

  19. Evaluation of F-18-labeled amino acid derivatives and [18F]FDG as PET probes in a brain tumor-bearing animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.-E.; Wu, S.-Y.; Chang, C.-W.; Liu, R.-S.; Hwang, L.-C.; Lee, T.-W.; Chen, J.-C.; Hwang, J.-J.

    2005-01-01

    2-Deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) has been extensively used as positron emission tomography (PET) tracer in clinical tumor imaging. This study compared the pharmacokinetics of two 18 F-labeled amino acid derivatives, O-2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (L-[ 18 F]FET) and 4-borono-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine-fructose (L-[ 18 F]FBPA-Fr), to that of [ 18 F]FDG in an animal brain tumor model. Methods: A self-modified automated PET tracer synthesizer was used to produce no-carrier-added (nca) L-[ 18 F]FET. The cellular uptake, biodistribution, autoradiography and microPET imaging of L-[ 18 F]FET, L-[ 18 F]FBPA-Fr and [ 18 F]FDG were performed with F98 glioma cell culture and F98 glioma-bearing Fischer344 rats. Results: The radiochemical purity of L-[ 18 F]FET was >98% and the radiochemical yield was 50% in average of 16 runs. The uptake of L-[ 18 F]FET and L-[ 18 F]FBPA-Fr in the F98 glioma cells increased rapidly for the first 5 min and reached a steady-state level after 10 min of incubation, whereas the cellular uptake of [ 18 F]FDG kept increasing during the study period. The biodistribution of L-[ 18 F]FET, L-[ 18 F]FBPA-Fr and [ 18 F]FDG in the brain tumors was 1.26±0.22, 0.86±0.08 and 2.77±0.44 %ID/g at 60 min postinjection, respectively, while the tumor-to-normal brain ratios of L-[ 18 F]FET (3.15) and L-[ 18 F]FBPA-Fr (3.44) were higher than that of [ 18 F]FDG (1.44). Both microPET images and autoradiograms of L-[ 18 F]FET and L-[ 18 F]FBPA-Fr exhibited remarkable uptake with high contrast in the brain tumor, whereas [ 18 F]FDG showed high uptake in the normal brain and gave blurred brain tumor images. Conclusion: Both L-[ 18 F]FET and L-[ 18 F]FBPA-Fr are superior to [ 18 F]FDG for the brain tumor imaging as shown in this study with microPET

  20. On Definitions and Existence of Combinatorial Entropy of 2d Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren Otto; Shtarkov, Yuri; Justesen, Jørn

    1998-01-01

    Different definitions of combinatorial entropy is presented and conditions for their existence examined.......Different definitions of combinatorial entropy is presented and conditions for their existence examined....

  1. Combinatorial Quantum Field Theory and Gluing Formula for Determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reshetikhin, N.; Vertman, B.

    2015-01-01

    We define the combinatorial Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator and establish a gluing formula for determinants of discrete Laplacians using a combinatorial Gaussian quantum field theory. In case of a diagonal inner product on cochains we provide an explicit local expression for the discrete

  2. Combinatorial Libraries of Bis-Heterocyclic Compounds with Skeletal Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soural, Miroslav; Bouillon, Isabelle; Krchňák, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    Combinatorial solid-phase synthesis of bis-heterocyclic compounds, characterized by the presence of two heterocyclic cores connected by a spacer of variable length/structure, provided structurally heterogeneous libraries with skeletal diversity. Both heterocyclic rings were assembled on resin in a combinatorial fashion. PMID:18811208

  3. Combinatorial Libraries of Bis-Heterocyclic Compounds with Skeletal Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Soural, Miroslav; Bouillon, Isabelle; Krchňák, Viktor

    2008-01-01

    Combinatorial solid-phase synthesis of bis-heterocyclic compounds, characterized by the presence of two heterocyclic cores connected by a spacer of variable length/structure, provided structurally heterogeneous libraries with skeletal diversity. Both heterocyclic rings were assembled on resin in a combinatorial fashion.

  4. Combinatorial identities for tenth order mock theta functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    44

    which lead us to one 4-way and one 3-way combinatorial identity. ... mock theta functions, partition identities and different combinatorial parameters, see for ... 3. Example 1.1. There are twelve (n + 1)–color partitions of 2: 21, 21 + 01, 11 + 11, ...

  5. Exact model reduction of combinatorial reaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fey Dirk

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Receptors and scaffold proteins usually possess a high number of distinct binding domains inducing the formation of large multiprotein signaling complexes. Due to combinatorial reasons the number of distinguishable species grows exponentially with the number of binding domains and can easily reach several millions. Even by including only a limited number of components and binding domains the resulting models are very large and hardly manageable. A novel model reduction technique allows the significant reduction and modularization of these models. Results We introduce methods that extend and complete the already introduced approach. For instance, we provide techniques to handle the formation of multi-scaffold complexes as well as receptor dimerization. Furthermore, we discuss a new modeling approach that allows the direct generation of exactly reduced model structures. The developed methods are used to reduce a model of EGF and insulin receptor crosstalk comprising 5,182 ordinary differential equations (ODEs to a model with 87 ODEs. Conclusion The methods, presented in this contribution, significantly enhance the available methods to exactly reduce models of combinatorial reaction networks.

  6. Heterogenous phase as a mean in combinatorial chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hamid, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    Combinatorial chemistry is a rapid and inexpensive technique for the synthesis of hundreds of thousands of organic compounds of potential medicinal activity. In the past few decades a large number of combinatorial libraries have been constructed, and significantly supplement the chemical diversity of the traditional collections of the potentially active medicinal compounds. Solid phase synthesis was used to enrich the combinatorial chemistry libraries, through the use of solid supports (resins) and their modified forms. Most of the new libraries of compounds appeared recently, were synthesized by the use of solid-phase. Solid-phase combinatorial chemistry (SPCC) is now considered as an outstanding branch in pharmaceutical chemistry research and used extensively as a tool for drug discovery within the context of high-throughput chemical synthesis. The best pure libraries synthesized by the use of solid phase combinatorial chemistry (SPCC) may well be those of intermediate complexity that are free of artifact-causing nuisance compounds. (author)

  7. A label-free, fluorescence based assay for microarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Sanjun

    DNA chip technology has drawn tremendous attention since it emerged in the mid 90's as a method that expedites gene sequencing by over 100-fold. DNA chip, also called DNA microarray, is a combinatorial technology in which different single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules of known sequences are immobilized at specific spots. The immobilized ssDNA strands are called probes. In application, the chip is exposed to a solution containing ssDNA of unknown sequence, called targets, which are labeled with fluorescent dyes. Due to specific molecular recognition among the base pairs in the DNA, the binding or hybridization occurs only when the probe and target sequences are complementary. The nucleotide sequence of the target is determined by imaging the fluorescence from the spots. The uncertainty of background in signal detection and statistical error in data analysis, primarily due to the error in the DNA amplification process and statistical distribution of the tags in the target DNA, have become the fundamental barriers in bringing the technology into application for clinical diagnostics. Furthermore, the dye and tagging process are expensive, making the cost of DNA chips inhibitive for clinical testing. These limitations and challenges make it difficult to implement DNA chip methods as a diagnostic tool in a pathology laboratory. The objective of this dissertation research is to provide an alternative approach that will address the above challenges. In this research, a label-free assay is designed and studied. Polystyrene (PS), a commonly used polymeric material, serves as the fluorescence agent. Probe ssDNA is covalently immobilized on polystyrene thin film that is supported by a reflecting substrate. When this chip is exposed to excitation light, fluorescence light intensity from PS is detected as the signal. Since the optical constants and conformations of ssDNA and dsDNA (double stranded DNA) are different, the measured fluorescence from PS changes for the same

  8. cDREM: inferring dynamic combinatorial gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Aaron; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2015-04-01

    Genes are often combinatorially regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Such combinatorial regulation plays an important role in development and facilitates the ability of cells to respond to different stresses. While a number of approaches have utilized sequence and ChIP-based datasets to study combinational regulation, these have often ignored the combinational logic and the dynamics associated with such regulation. Here we present cDREM, a new method for reconstructing dynamic models of combinatorial regulation. cDREM integrates time series gene expression data with (static) protein interaction data. The method is based on a hidden Markov model and utilizes the sparse group Lasso to identify small subsets of combinatorially active TFs, their time of activation, and the logical function they implement. We tested cDREM on yeast and human data sets. Using yeast we show that the predicted combinatorial sets agree with other high throughput genomic datasets and improve upon prior methods developed to infer combinatorial regulation. Applying cDREM to study human response to flu, we were able to identify several combinatorial TF sets, some of which were known to regulate immune response while others represent novel combinations of important TFs.

  9. Bifurcation-based approach reveals synergism and optimal combinatorial perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanwei; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Zengrong; Wang, Ruiqi

    2016-06-01

    Cells accomplish the process of fate decisions and form terminal lineages through a series of binary choices in which cells switch stable states from one branch to another as the interacting strengths of regulatory factors continuously vary. Various combinatorial effects may occur because almost all regulatory processes are managed in a combinatorial fashion. Combinatorial regulation is crucial for cell fate decisions because it may effectively integrate many different signaling pathways to meet the higher regulation demand during cell development. However, whether the contribution of combinatorial regulation to the state transition is better than that of a single one and if so, what the optimal combination strategy is, seem to be significant issue from the point of view of both biology and mathematics. Using the approaches of combinatorial perturbations and bifurcation analysis, we provide a general framework for the quantitative analysis of synergism in molecular networks. Different from the known methods, the bifurcation-based approach depends only on stable state responses to stimuli because the state transition induced by combinatorial perturbations occurs between stable states. More importantly, an optimal combinatorial perturbation strategy can be determined by investigating the relationship between the bifurcation curve of a synergistic perturbation pair and the level set of a specific objective function. The approach is applied to two models, i.e., a theoretical multistable decision model and a biologically realistic CREB model, to show its validity, although the approach holds for a general class of biological systems.

  10. Characterizing the combinatorial beam angle selection problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, Mark; Ziegenhein, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    The beam angle selection (BAS) problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy is often interpreted as a combinatorial optimization problem, i.e. finding the best combination of η beams in a discrete set of candidate beams. It is well established that the combinatorial BAS problem may be solved efficiently with metaheuristics such as simulated annealing or genetic algorithms. However, the underlying parameters of the optimization process, such as the inclusion of non-coplanar candidate beams, the angular resolution in the space of candidate beams, and the number of evaluated beam ensembles as well as the relative performance of different metaheuristics have not yet been systematically investigated. We study these open questions in a meta-analysis of four strategies for combinatorial optimization in order to provide a reference for future research related to the BAS problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. We introduce a high-performance inverse planning engine for BAS. It performs a full fluence optimization for ≈3600 treatment plans per hour while handling up to 50 GB of dose influence data (≈1400 candidate beams). For three head and neck patients, we compare the relative performance of a genetic, a cross-entropy, a simulated annealing and a naive iterative algorithm. The selection of ensembles with 5, 7, 9 and 11 beams considering either only coplanar or all feasible candidate beams is studied for an angular resolution of 5°, 10°, 15° and 20° in the space of candidate beams. The impact of different convergence criteria is investigated in comparison to a fixed termination after the evaluation of 10 000 beam ensembles. In total, our simulations comprise a full fluence optimization for about 3000 000 treatment plans. All four combinatorial BAS strategies yield significant improvements of the objective function value and of the corresponding dose distributions compared to standard beam configurations with equi

  11. Combinatorial nanomedicines for colon cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, A; Maya, S; Sivaram, Amal J; Mony, U; Jayakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the major causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Even after surgical resection and aggressive chemotherapy, 50% of colorectal carcinoma patients develop recurrent disease. Thus, the rationale of developing new therapeutic approaches to improve the current chemotherapeutic regimen would be highly recommended. There are reports on the effectiveness of combination chemotherapy in colon cancer and it has been practiced in clinics for long time. These approaches are associated with toxic side effects. Later, the drug delivery research had shown the potential of nanoencapsulation techniques and active targeting as an effective method to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy with less toxicity. This current focus article provides a brief analysis of the ongoing research in the colon cancer area using the combinatorial nanomedicines and its outcome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Characterizing the combinatorial beam angle selection problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangert, Mark; Ziegenhein, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The beam angle selection (BAS) problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy is often interpreted as a combinatorial optimization problem, i.e. finding the best combination of η beams in a discrete set of candidate beams. It is well established that the combinatorial BAS problem may be solved efficiently with metaheuristics such as simulated annealing or genetic algorithms. However, the underlying parameters of the optimization process, such as the inclusion of non-coplanar candidate beams, the angular resolution in the space of candidate beams, and the number of evaluated beam ensembles as well as the relative performance of different metaheuristics have not yet been systematically investigated. We study these open questions in a meta-analysis of four strategies for combinatorial optimization in order to provide a reference for future research related to the BAS problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. We introduce a high-performance inverse planning engine for BAS. It performs a full fluence optimization for ≈3600 treatment plans per hour while handling up to 50 GB of dose influence data (≈1400 candidate beams). For three head and neck patients, we compare the relative performance of a genetic, a cross-entropy, a simulated annealing and a naive iterative algorithm. The selection of ensembles with 5, 7, 9 and 11 beams considering either only coplanar or all feasible candidate beams is studied for an angular resolution of 5°, 10°, 15° and 20° in the space of candidate beams. The impact of different convergence criteria is investigated in comparison to a fixed termination after the evaluation of 10 000 beam ensembles. In total, our simulations comprise a full fluence optimization for about 3000 000 treatment plans. All four combinatorial BAS strategies yield significant improvements of the objective function value and of the corresponding dose distributions compared to standard beam configurations with equi

  13. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrenholt, H.; Åberg, S.; Dobrowolski, A.; Døssing, Th.; Ichikawa, T.; Möller, P.

    2013-01-01

    A microscopic nuclear level-density model is presented. The model is a completely combinatorial (micro-canonical) model based on the folded-Yukawa single-particle potential and includes explicit treatment of pairing, rotational and vibrational states. The microscopic character of all states enables extraction of level-distribution functions with respect to pairing gaps, parity and angular momentum. The results of the model are compared to available experimental data: level spacings at neutron separation energy, data on total level-density functions from the Oslo method, cumulative level densities from low-lying discrete states, and data on parity ratios. Spherical and deformed nuclei follow basically different coupling schemes, and we focus on deformed nuclei

  14. On the Cut-off Point for Combinatorial Group Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Klasner, N.; Wegener, I.

    1999-01-01

    is answered by 1 if Q contains at least one essential object and by 0 otherwise. In the statistical setting the objects are essential, independently of each other, with a given probability p combinatorial setting the number k ... group testing is equal to p* = 12(3 - 5), i.e., the strategy of testing each object individually minimizes the average number of queries iff p >= p* or n = 1. In the combinatorial setting the worst case number of queries is of interest. It has been conjectured that the cut-off point of combinatorial...

  15. Maximization of Tsallis entropy in the combinatorial formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyari, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the mathematical reformulation for maximization of Tsallis entropy S q in the combinatorial sense. More concretely, we generalize the original derivation of Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution law to Tsallis statistics by means of the corresponding generalized multinomial coefficient. Our results reveal that maximization of S 2-q under the usual expectation or S q under q-average using the escort expectation are naturally derived from the combinatorial formulations for Tsallis statistics with respective combinatorial dualities, that is, one for additive duality and the other for multiplicative duality.

  16. Evaluation of a fluorescence-labelled oligonucleotide tide probe targeting 23S rRNA for in situ detection of Salmonella serovars in paraffin-embedded tissue sections and their rapid identification in bacterial smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Steen; Christensen, H.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1997-01-01

    with the probe. The probe did not hybridize to serovars from subspecies IIIa (S. arizonae) or to S. bongori. No cross-reaction to 64 other strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae or 18 other bacterial strains outside this family was observed. The probe was tested with sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin...

  17. Tritium labelling of highly selective probes for. delta. -opioid receptors: ( sup 3 H)Tyr-D-Ser(O-t-Bu)-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr(DSTBULET) and ( sup 3 H)Tyr-D-Ser(O-t-Bu)-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr(O-t-Bu)(BUBU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellion, E.; Gacel, G.; Roques, B.P. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), 75 - Paris (France)); Roy, J.; Morgat, J.L. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Biochimie)

    1990-08-01

    The introduction of bulky residue(s) in linear enkephalin-related hexapeptides represents a new approach in the design of selective probes for {delta}-opioid receptors, displaying the appropriate criteria to investigate biological and pharmacological properties of the assumed binding site ({delta}) of endogenous enkephalins. The selectivities and high affinities of Tyr-D-Ser(O-t-Bu)-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr(DSTBULET) and especially Tyr-D-Ser(O-t-Bu)Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr(O-t-Bu) (BUBU) associated with a satisfactory resistance to peptidases, make them the most suitable {delta}-probes reported to date. In the present paper, we report the synthesis of DSTBULET and BUBU under tritiated forms with high specific radioactivities. These radio-labelled probes will enable extensive in vitro and in vivo investigations of {delta}-opioid receptors properties to be carried out. (author).

  18. Implementation of a combinatorial cleavage and deprotection scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Rasmussen, Palle H.

    1996-01-01

    Phthalhydrazide libraries are synthesized in solution from substituted hydrazines and phthalimides in several different library formats including single compounds, indexed sub-libraries and a full library. When carried out during solid-phase synthesis, this combinatorial cleavage and deprotection...

  19. ON 3-WAY COMBINATORIAL IDENTITIES A. K. AGARWAL MEGHA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    36

    ∗Corresponding author: Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, University College of Engineering,. Punjabi ... In this paper we provide combinatorial meanings to two generalized basic ... 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification. 05A15 ...

  20. Analysis and design of algorithms for combinatorial problems

    CERN Document Server

    Ausiello, G

    1985-01-01

    Combinatorial problems have been from the very beginning part of the history of mathematics. By the Sixties, the main classes of combinatorial problems had been defined. During that decade, a great number of research contributions in graph theory had been produced, which laid the foundations for most of the research in graph optimization in the following years. During the Seventies, a large number of special purpose models were developed. The impressive growth of this field since has been strongly determined by the demand of applications and influenced by the technological increases in computing power and the availability of data and software. The availability of such basic tools has led to the feasibility of the exact or well approximate solution of large scale realistic combinatorial optimization problems and has created a number of new combinatorial problems.

  1. Olefin Metathesis in Peptidomimetics, Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry, and Molecular Imprinting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Low, Tammy K

    2006-01-01

    .... Our research goals consisted of employing olefin metathesis in the synthesis of peptidomimetics, and studying the feasibility of this method in dynamic combinatorial chemistry and molecular imprinting of nerve agents...

  2. Dynamic combinatorial libraries: from exploring molecular recognition to systems chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianwei; Nowak, Piotr; Otto, Sijbren

    2013-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is a subset of combinatorial chemistry where the library members interconvert continuously by exchanging building blocks with each other. Dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) are powerful tools for discovering the unexpected and have given rise to many fascinating molecules, ranging from interlocked structures to self-replicators. Furthermore, dynamic combinatorial molecular networks can produce emergent properties at systems level, which provide exciting new opportunities in systems chemistry. In this perspective we will highlight some new methodologies in this field and analyze selected examples of DCLs that are under thermodynamic control, leading to synthetic receptors, catalytic systems, and complex self-assembled supramolecular architectures. Also reviewed are extensions of the principles of DCC to systems that are not at equilibrium and may therefore harbor richer functional behavior. Examples include self-replication and molecular machines.

  3. Novel Combinatorial Chemistry-Derived Inhibitors of Oncogenic Phosphatases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lazo, John

    1999-01-01

    Our overall goal of this US Army Breast Cancer Grant entitled "Novel Combinatorial Chemistry-Derived Inhibitors of Oncogenic Phosphatases" is to identity and develop novel therapeutic agents for human breast cancer...

  4. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  5. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α- 32 P-labeled probe

  6. The Combinatorial Rigidity Conjecture is False for Cubic Polynomials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    We show that there exist two cubic polynomials with connected Julia sets which are combinatorially equivalent but not topologically conjugate on their Julia sets. This disproves a conjecture by McMullen from 1995.......We show that there exist two cubic polynomials with connected Julia sets which are combinatorially equivalent but not topologically conjugate on their Julia sets. This disproves a conjecture by McMullen from 1995....

  7. Distributing the computation in combinatorial optimization experiments over the cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Brcic; Nikica Hlupic; Nenad Katanic

    2017-01-01

    Combinatorial optimization is an area of great importance since many of the real-world problems have discrete parameters which are part of the objective function to be optimized. Development of combinatorial optimization algorithms is guided by the empirical study of the candidate ideas and their performance over a wide range of settings or scenarios to infer general conclusions. Number of scenarios can be overwhelming, especially when modeling uncertainty in some of the problem’s parameters....

  8. Enabling high performance computational science through combinatorial algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, Erik G; Bozdag, Doruk; Catalyurek, Umit V; Devine, Karen D; Gebremedhin, Assefaw H; Hovland, Paul D; Pothen, Alex; Strout, Michelle Mills

    2007-01-01

    The Combinatorial Scientific Computing and Petascale Simulations (CSCAPES) Institute is developing algorithms and software for combinatorial problems that play an enabling role in scientific and engineering computations. Discrete algorithms will be increasingly critical for achieving high performance for irregular problems on petascale architectures. This paper describes recent contributions by researchers at the CSCAPES Institute in the areas of load balancing, parallel graph coloring, performance improvement, and parallel automatic differentiation

  9. On the combinatorial foundations of Regge-calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budach, L.

    1989-01-01

    Lipschitz-Killing curvatures of piecewise flat spaces are combinatorial analogues of Lipschitz-Killing curvatures of Riemannian manifolds. In the following paper rigorous combinatorial representations and proofs of all basic results for Lipschitz-Killing curvatures not using analytic arguments are given. The principal tools for an elementary representation of Regge calculus can be developed by means of basic properties of dihedral angles. (author)

  10. Immune-Stimulating Combinatorial Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Overlap: None 20 90061946 (Drake) Title: Epigenetic Drugs and Immuno Therapy for Prostate Cancer (EDIT-PC) Effort: 1.2 calendar months (10% effort...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0667 TITLE: Immune-Stimulating Combinatorial Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert Ivkov...Stimulating Combinatorial Therapy for Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0667 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  11. Enabling high performance computational science through combinatorial algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boman, Erik G [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Bozdag, Doruk [Biomedical Informatics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University (United States); Catalyurek, Umit V [Biomedical Informatics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University (United States); Devine, Karen D [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Gebremedhin, Assefaw H [Computer Science and Center for Computational Science, Old Dominion University (United States); Hovland, Paul D [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Pothen, Alex [Computer Science and Center for Computational Science, Old Dominion University (United States); Strout, Michelle Mills [Computer Science, Colorado State University (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The Combinatorial Scientific Computing and Petascale Simulations (CSCAPES) Institute is developing algorithms and software for combinatorial problems that play an enabling role in scientific and engineering computations. Discrete algorithms will be increasingly critical for achieving high performance for irregular problems on petascale architectures. This paper describes recent contributions by researchers at the CSCAPES Institute in the areas of load balancing, parallel graph coloring, performance improvement, and parallel automatic differentiation.

  12. Combinatorial Dyson-Schwinger equations and inductive data types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this contribution is to explain the analogy between combinatorial Dyson-Schwinger equations and inductive data types to a readership of mathematical physicists. The connection relies on an interpretation of combinatorial Dyson-Schwinger equations as fixpoint equations for polynomial functors (established elsewhere by the author, and summarised here), combined with the now-classical fact that polynomial functors provide semantics for inductive types. The paper is expository, and comprises also a brief introduction to type theory.

  13. Intrinsic information carriers in combinatorial dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Russ; Danos, Vincent; Feret, Jérôme; Krivine, Jean; Fontana, Walter

    2010-09-01

    Many proteins are composed of structural and chemical features—"sites" for short—characterized by definite interaction capabilities, such as noncovalent binding or covalent modification of other proteins. This modularity allows for varying degrees of independence, as the behavior of a site might be controlled by the state of some but not all sites of the ambient protein. Independence quickly generates a startling combinatorial complexity that shapes most biological networks, such as mammalian signaling systems, and effectively prevents their study in terms of kinetic equations—unless the complexity is radically trimmed. Yet, if combinatorial complexity is key to the system's behavior, eliminating it will prevent, not facilitate, understanding. A more adequate representation of a combinatorial system is provided by a graph-based framework of rewrite rules where each rule specifies only the information that an interaction mechanism depends on. Unlike reactions, which deal with molecular species, rules deal with patterns, i.e., multisets of molecular species. Although the stochastic dynamics induced by a collection of rules on a mixture of molecules can be simulated, it appears useful to capture the system's average or deterministic behavior by means of differential equations. However, expansion of the rules into kinetic equations at the level of molecular species is not only impractical, but conceptually indefensible. If rules describe bona fide patterns of interaction, molecular species are unlikely to constitute appropriate units of dynamics. Rather, we must seek aggregate variables reflective of the causal structure laid down by the rules. We call these variables "fragments" and the process of identifying them "fragmentation." Ideally, fragments are aspects of the system's microscopic population that the set of rules can actually distinguish on average; in practice, it may only be feasible to identify an approximation to this. Most importantly, fragments are

  14. Intrinsic information carriers in combinatorial dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Russ; Danos, Vincent; Feret, Jérôme; Krivine, Jean; Fontana, Walter

    2010-09-01

    Many proteins are composed of structural and chemical features--"sites" for short--characterized by definite interaction capabilities, such as noncovalent binding or covalent modification of other proteins. This modularity allows for varying degrees of independence, as the behavior of a site might be controlled by the state of some but not all sites of the ambient protein. Independence quickly generates a startling combinatorial complexity that shapes most biological networks, such as mammalian signaling systems, and effectively prevents their study in terms of kinetic equations-unless the complexity is radically trimmed. Yet, if combinatorial complexity is key to the system's behavior, eliminating it will prevent, not facilitate, understanding. A more adequate representation of a combinatorial system is provided by a graph-based framework of rewrite rules where each rule specifies only the information that an interaction mechanism depends on. Unlike reactions, which deal with molecular species, rules deal with patterns, i.e., multisets of molecular species. Although the stochastic dynamics induced by a collection of rules on a mixture of molecules can be simulated, it appears useful to capture the system's average or deterministic behavior by means of differential equations. However, expansion of the rules into kinetic equations at the level of molecular species is not only impractical, but conceptually indefensible. If rules describe bona fide patterns of interaction, molecular species are unlikely to constitute appropriate units of dynamics. Rather, we must seek aggregate variables reflective of the causal structure laid down by the rules. We call these variables "fragments" and the process of identifying them "fragmentation." Ideally, fragments are aspects of the system's microscopic population that the set of rules can actually distinguish on average; in practice, it may only be feasible to identify an approximation to this. Most importantly, fragments are

  15. A combinatorial approach to angiosperm pollen morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Luke

    2016-11-30

    Angiosperms (flowering plants) are strikingly diverse. This is clearly expressed in the morphology of their pollen grains, which are characterized by enormous variety in their shape and patterning. In this paper, I approach angiosperm pollen morphology from the perspective of enumerative combinatorics. This involves generating angiosperm pollen morphotypes by algorithmically combining character states and enumerating the results of these combinations. I use this approach to generate 3 643 200 pollen morphotypes, which I visualize using a parallel-coordinates plot. This represents a raw morphospace. To compare real-world and theoretical morphologies, I map the pollen of 1008 species of Neotropical angiosperms growing on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama, onto this raw morphospace. This highlights that, in addition to their well-documented taxonomic diversity, Neotropical rainforests also represent an enormous reservoir of morphological diversity. Angiosperm pollen morphospace at BCI has been filled mostly by pollen morphotypes that are unique to single plant species. Repetition of pollen morphotypes among higher taxa at BCI reflects both constraint and convergence. This combinatorial approach to morphology addresses the complexity that results from large numbers of discrete character combinations and could be employed in any situation where organismal form can be captured by discrete morphological characters. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Exact combinatorial approach to finite coagulating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronczak, Agata; Chmiel, Anna; Fronczak, Piotr

    2018-02-01

    This paper outlines an exact combinatorial approach to finite coagulating systems. In this approach, cluster sizes and time are discrete and the binary aggregation alone governs the time evolution of the systems. By considering the growth histories of all possible clusters, an exact expression is derived for the probability of a coagulating system with an arbitrary kernel being found in a given cluster configuration when monodisperse initial conditions are applied. Then this probability is used to calculate the time-dependent distribution for the number of clusters of a given size, the average number of such clusters, and that average's standard deviation. The correctness of our general expressions is proved based on the (analytical and numerical) results obtained for systems with the constant kernel. In addition, the results obtained are compared with the results arising from the solutions to the mean-field Smoluchowski coagulation equation, indicating its weak points. The paper closes with a brief discussion on the extensibility to other systems of the approach presented herein, emphasizing the issue of arbitrary initial conditions.

  17. Scalable Combinatorial Tools for Health Disparities Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Langston

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite staggering investments made in unraveling the human genome, current estimates suggest that as much as 90% of the variance in cancer and chronic diseases can be attributed to factors outside an individual’s genetic endowment, particularly to environmental exposures experienced across his or her life course. New analytical approaches are clearly required as investigators turn to complicated systems theory and ecological, place-based and life-history perspectives in order to understand more clearly the relationships between social determinants, environmental exposures and health disparities. While traditional data analysis techniques remain foundational to health disparities research, they are easily overwhelmed by the ever-increasing size and heterogeneity of available data needed to illuminate latent gene x environment interactions. This has prompted the adaptation and application of scalable combinatorial methods, many from genome science research, to the study of population health. Most of these powerful tools are algorithmically sophisticated, highly automated and mathematically abstract. Their utility motivates the main theme of this paper, which is to describe real applications of innovative transdisciplinary models and analyses in an effort to help move the research community closer toward identifying the causal mechanisms and associated environmental contexts underlying health disparities. The public health exposome is used as a contemporary focus for addressing the complex nature of this subject.

  18. Combinatorial effects of odorants on mouse behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Kondoh, Kunio; Ye, Xiaolan; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Hernandez, Marcus; Buck, Linda B.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which odors induce instinctive behaviors are largely unknown. Odor detection in the mouse nose is mediated by >1, 000 different odorant receptors (ORs) and trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Odor perceptions are encoded combinatorially by ORs and can be altered by slight changes in the combination of activated receptors. However, the stereotyped nature of instinctive odor responses suggests the involvement of specific receptors and genetically programmed neural circuits relatively immune to extraneous odor stimuli and receptor inputs. Here, we report that, contrary to expectation, innate odor-induced behaviors can be context-dependent. First, different ligands for a given TAAR can vary in behavioral effect. Second, when combined, some attractive and aversive odorants neutralize one another’s behavioral effects. Both a TAAR ligand and a common odorant block aversion to a predator odor, indicating that this ability is not unique to TAARs and can extend to an aversive response of potential importance to survival. In vitro testing of single receptors with binary odorant mixtures indicates that behavioral blocking can occur without receptor antagonism in the nose. Moreover, genetic ablation of a single receptor prevents its cognate ligand from blocking predator odor aversion, indicating that the blocking requires sensory input from the receptor. Together, these findings indicate that innate odor-induced behaviors can depend on context, that signals from a single receptor can block innate odor aversion, and that instinctive behavioral responses to odors can be modulated by interactions in the brain among signals derived from different receptors. PMID:27208093

  19. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  20. Private Labels

    OpenAIRE

    Kolmačková, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    This Bachelor Thesis titled Private labels deals with distribution strategy based on the introduction of private labels especially in retail chains. At the beginning it is focused on the general concept of private label offered by retailers, where is mentioned basic characteristics, history and structuring of distribution brands. Subsequently this thesis informs readers about the introduction of new special distribution brands, which focus primarily on the new consumption habits of customers....

  1. Far Western: probing membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarson, Margret B; Pugacheva, Elena N; Orlinick, Jason R

    2007-08-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe far-Western technique described in this protocol is fundamentally similar to Western blotting. In Western blots, an antibody is used to detect a query protein on a membrane. In contrast, in a far-Western blot (also known as an overlay assay) the antibody is replaced by a recombinant GST fusion protein (produced and purified from bacteria), and the assay detects the interaction of this protein with target proteins on a membrane. The membranes are washed and blocked, incubated with probe protein, washed again, and subjected to autoradiography. The GST fusion (probe) proteins are often labeled with (32)P; alternatively, the membrane can be probed with unlabeled GST fusion protein, followed by detection using commercially available GST antibodies. The nonradioactive approach is substantially more expensive (due to the purchase of antibody and detection reagents) than using radioactively labeled proteins. In addition, care must be taken to control for nonspecific interactions with GST alone and a signal resulting from antibody cross-reactivity. In some instances, proteins on the membrane are not able to interact after transfer. This may be due to improper folding, particularly in the case of proteins expressed from a phage expression library. This protocol describes a way to overcome this by washing the membrane in denaturation buffer, which is then serially diluted to permit slow renaturation of the proteins.

  2. Solid-Phase Synthesis of Small Molecule Libraries using Double Combinatorial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Jensen, Flemming R.

    1997-01-01

    The first synthesis of a combinatorial library using double combinatorial chemistry is presented. Coupling of unprotected Fmoc-tyrosine to the solid support was followed by Mitsunobu O-alkylation. Introduction of a diacid linker yields a system in which the double combinatorial step can be demons......The first synthesis of a combinatorial library using double combinatorial chemistry is presented. Coupling of unprotected Fmoc-tyrosine to the solid support was followed by Mitsunobu O-alkylation. Introduction of a diacid linker yields a system in which the double combinatorial step can...

  3. Physical interpretation of the combinatorial hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastin, T.; Noyes, H.P.

    1978-01-01

    The combinatorial hierarchy model for base particle processes is compared and contrasted with the Ur-theory as developed at the Tutzing Conferences. It agrees with Ur-theory about a finite basis, the ''fixed past--uncertain future'' aspects of physics, and the necessity of dropping Bohr's requirement of reduction to the haptic language of commonsense and classical physics. However, it retains a constructive, hierarchial approach with can yield only an approximate and discrete ''space time'', and introduces the observation metaphysic at the start. Concrete interpretation of the four levels of the hierarchy (with cardinals 3, 7, 127, 2 127 -1 approx. =10 38 ) associates the three levels which map up and down with three absolute conservation laws (charge, baryon number, lepton number) and the spin dichotomy. The first level represents +, -, and +- unit charge. The second has the quantum nubmers of a baryon--antibaryon pair and associated charged meson (e.g., n anti n, p anti n, p anti p, n anti p, π + , π 0 , π - ). The third level associates this pair, now including four spin states as well as four charge states, with a neutral lepton--antilepton pair (e anti e or ν anti ν) in four spin states (total, 64 states): three charged spinless, three charged spin-1, and neutral spin-1 mesons (15 states), and a neutral vector boson associated with the leptons; this gives 3 + 15 + 3 x 15 = 63 possible boson states, so a total correct count of 63 + 64 = 127 states. Something like SU 2 X SU 3 and other indications of quark quantum numbers can occur as substructures at the fourth (unstable) level. A slight extension gives the usual static approximation to the building energy of the hydrogen atom, α 2 m/sub e/c 2 . Cosmological implications of the theory are in accord with current experience. A beginning in the physical interpretation of a theory which could eventually encompass all branches of physics was made. 3 figures, 6 tables

  4. Combinatorial explosion in model gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R.; Glass, L.

    2000-09-01

    The explosive growth in knowledge of the genome of humans and other organisms leaves open the question of how the functioning of genes in interacting networks is coordinated for orderly activity. One approach to this problem is to study mathematical properties of abstract network models that capture the logical structures of gene networks. The principal issue is to understand how particular patterns of activity can result from particular network structures, and what types of behavior are possible. We study idealized models in which the logical structure of the network is explicitly represented by Boolean functions that can be represented by directed graphs on n-cubes, but which are continuous in time and described by differential equations, rather than being updated synchronously via a discrete clock. The equations are piecewise linear, which allows significant analysis and facilitates rapid integration along trajectories. We first give a combinatorial solution to the question of how many distinct logical structures exist for n-dimensional networks, showing that the number increases very rapidly with n. We then outline analytic methods that can be used to establish the existence, stability and periods of periodic orbits corresponding to particular cycles on the n-cube. We use these methods to confirm the existence of limit cycles discovered in a sample of a million randomly generated structures of networks of 4 genes. Even with only 4 genes, at least several hundred different patterns of stable periodic behavior are possible, many of them surprisingly complex. We discuss ways of further classifying these periodic behaviors, showing that small mutations (reversal of one or a few edges on the n-cube) need not destroy the stability of a limit cycle. Although these networks are very simple as models of gene networks, their mathematical transparency reveals relationships between structure and behavior, they suggest that the possibilities for orderly dynamics in such

  5. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.; Koelmans, W.W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data

  6. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  7. Morphological Constraints on Cerebellar Granule Cell Combinatorial Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmer, Jesse I; Person, Abigail L

    2017-12-13

    Combinatorial expansion by the cerebellar granule cell layer (GCL) is fundamental to theories of cerebellar contributions to motor control and learning. Granule cells (GrCs) sample approximately four mossy fiber inputs and are thought to form a combinatorial code useful for pattern separation and learning. We constructed a spatially realistic model of the cerebellar GCL and examined how GCL architecture contributes to GrC combinatorial diversity. We found that GrC combinatorial diversity saturates quickly as mossy fiber input diversity increases, and that this saturation is in part a consequence of short dendrites, which limit access to diverse inputs and favor dense sampling of local inputs. This local sampling also produced GrCs that were combinatorially redundant, even when input diversity was extremely high. In addition, we found that mossy fiber clustering, which is a common anatomical pattern, also led to increased redundancy of GrC input combinations. We related this redundancy to hypothesized roles of temporal expansion of GrC information encoding in service of learned timing, and we show that GCL architecture produces GrC populations that support both temporal and combinatorial expansion. Finally, we used novel anatomical measurements from mice of either sex to inform modeling of sparse and filopodia-bearing mossy fibers, finding that these circuit features uniquely contribute to enhancing GrC diversification and redundancy. Our results complement information theoretic studies of granule layer structure and provide insight into the contributions of granule layer anatomical features to afferent mixing. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cerebellar granule cells are among the simplest neurons, with tiny somata and, on average, just four dendrites. These characteristics, along with their dense organization, inspired influential theoretical work on the granule cell layer as a combinatorial expander, where each granule cell represents a unique combination of inputs

  8. The priming of basic combinatory responses in MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Elorrieta, Esti; Ferreira, Victor S; Del Prato, Paul; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2018-01-01

    Priming has been a powerful tool for the study of human memory and especially the memory representations relevant for language. However, although it is well established that lexical access can be primed, we do not know exactly what types of computations can be primed above the word level. This work took a neurobiological approach and assessed the ways in which the complex representation of a minimal combinatory phrase, such as red boat, can be primed, as evidenced by the spatiotemporal profiles of magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. Specifically, we built upon recent progress on the neural signatures of phrasal composition and tested whether the brain activities implicated for the basic combination of two words could be primed. In two experiments, MEG was recorded during a picture naming task where the prime trials were designed to replicate previously reported combinatory effects and the target trials to test whether those combinatory effects could be primed. The manipulation of the primes was successful in eliciting larger activity for adjective-noun combinations than single nouns in left anterior temporal and ventromedial prefrontal cortices, replicating prior MEG studies on parallel contrasts. Priming of similarly timed activity was observed during target trials in anterior temporal cortex, but only when the prime and target shared an adjective. No priming in temporal cortex was observed for single word repetition and two control tasks showed that the priming effect was not elicited if the prime pictures were simply viewed but not named. In sum, this work provides evidence that very basic combinatory operations can be primed, with the necessity for some lexical overlap between prime and target suggesting combinatory conceptual, as opposed to syntactic processing. Both our combinatory and priming effects were early, onsetting between 100 and 150ms after picture onset and thus are likely to reflect the very earliest planning stages of a combinatory message

  9. Sustainability Labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability labeling originated from a need to protect the identity of alternative systems of food production and to increase market transparency. From the 1980s onwards sustainability labeling has changed into a policy instrument replacing direct government regulation of the food market, and a

  10. Balancing focused combinatorial libraries based on multiple GPCR ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanshahi, Farhad; Mansley, Tamsin E.; Choi, Sun; Clark, Robert D.

    2006-08-01

    G-Protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important targets for drug discovery, and combinatorial chemistry is an important tool for pharmaceutical development. The absence of detailed structural information, however, limits the kinds of combinatorial design techniques that can be applied to GPCR targets. This is particularly problematic given the current emphasis on focused combinatorial libraries. By linking an incremental construction method (OptDesign) to the very fast shape-matching capability of ChemSpace, we have created an efficient method for designing targeted sublibraries that are topomerically similar to known actives. Multi-objective scoring allows consideration of multiple queries (actives) simultaneously. This can lead to a distribution of products skewed towards one particular query structure, however, particularly when the ligands of interest are quite dissimilar to one another. A novel pivoting technique is described which makes it possible to generate promising designs even under those circumstances. The approach is illustrated by application to some serotonergic agonists and chemokine antagonists.

  11. Summation on the basis of combinatorial representation of equal powers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I. Nikonov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the conclusion of combinatorial expressions for the sums of members of several sequences is considered. Conclusion is made on the basis of combinatorial representation of the sum of the weighted equal powers. The weighted members of a geometrical progression, the simple arithmetic-geometrical and combined progressions are subject to summation. One of principal places in the given conclusion occupies representation of members of each of the specified progressions in the form of matrix elements. The row of this matrix is formed with use of a gang of equal powers with the set weight factor. Besides, in work formulas of combinatorial identities with participation of free components of the sums of equal powers, and also separate power-member of sequence of equal powers or a geometrical progression are presented. All presented formulas have the general basis-components of the sums of equal powers.

  12. Combinatorial vector fields and the valley structure of fitness landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Bärbel M R; Stadler, Peter F

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive (downhill) walks are a computationally convenient way of analyzing the geometric structure of fitness landscapes. Their inherently stochastic nature has limited their mathematical analysis, however. Here we develop a framework that interprets adaptive walks as deterministic trajectories in combinatorial vector fields and in return associate these combinatorial vector fields with weights that measure their steepness across the landscape. We show that the combinatorial vector fields and their weights have a product structure that is governed by the neutrality of the landscape. This product structure makes practical computations feasible. The framework presented here also provides an alternative, and mathematically more convenient, way of defining notions of valleys, saddle points, and barriers in landscape. As an application, we propose a refined approximation for transition rates between macrostates that are associated with the valleys of the landscape.

  13. Recent advances in combinatorial biosynthesis for drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun H

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Huihua Sun,1,* Zihe Liu,1,* Huimin Zhao,1,2 Ee Lui Ang1 1Metabolic Engineering Research Laboratory, Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore; 2Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Because of extraordinary structural diversity and broad biological activities, natural products have played a significant role in drug discovery. These therapeutically important secondary metabolites are assembled and modified by dedicated biosynthetic pathways in their host living organisms. Traditionally, chemists have attempted to synthesize natural product analogs that are important sources of new drugs. However, the extraordinary structural complexity of natural products sometimes makes it challenging for traditional chemical synthesis, which usually involves multiple steps, harsh conditions, toxic organic solvents, and byproduct wastes. In contrast, combinatorial biosynthesis exploits substrate promiscuity and employs engineered enzymes and pathways to produce novel “unnatural” natural products, substantially expanding the structural diversity of natural products with potential pharmaceutical value. Thus, combinatorial biosynthesis provides an environmentally friendly way to produce natural product analogs. Efficient expression of the combinatorial biosynthetic pathway in genetically tractable heterologous hosts can increase the titer of the compound, eventually resulting in less expensive drugs. In this review, we will discuss three major strategies for combinatorial biosynthesis: 1 precursor-directed biosynthesis; 2 enzyme-level modification, which includes swapping of the entire domains, modules and subunits, site-specific mutagenesis, and directed evolution; 3 pathway-level recombination. Recent examples of combinatorial biosynthesis employing these

  14. Combinatorial methods for advanced materials research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, R.; Dondorf, S.; Hauck, M.; Horbach, D.; Kaiser, M.; Krysta, S.; Kyrylov, O.; Muenstermann, E.; Philipps, M.; Reichert, K.; Strauch, G. [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Huettenkunde

    2001-10-01

    The applicability of combinatorial methods in developing advanced materials is illustrated presenting four examples for the deposition and characterization of one- and two-dimensionally laterally graded coatings, which were deposited by means of (reactive) magnetron sputtering and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. To emphasize the advantages of combinatorial approaches, metastable hard coatings like (Ti,Al)N and (Ti,Al,Hf)N respectively, as well as Ge-Sb-Te based films for rewritable optical data storage were investigated with respect to the relations between structure, composition, and the desired materials properties. (orig.)

  15. Combinatorial algebraic geometry selected papers from the 2016 apprenticeship program

    CERN Document Server

    Sturmfels, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    This volume consolidates selected articles from the 2016 Apprenticeship Program at the Fields Institute, part of the larger program on Combinatorial Algebraic Geometry that ran from July through December of 2016. Written primarily by junior mathematicians, the articles cover a range of topics in combinatorial algebraic geometry including curves, surfaces, Grassmannians, convexity, abelian varieties, and moduli spaces. This book bridges the gap between graduate courses and cutting-edge research by connecting historical sources, computation, explicit examples, and new results.

  16. Combinatorial reasoning an introduction to the art of counting

    CERN Document Server

    DeTemple, Duane

    2014-01-01

    Written by well-known scholars in the field, this book introduces combinatorics alongside modern techniques, showcases the interdisciplinary aspects of the topic, and illustrates how to problem solve with a multitude of exercises throughout. The authors' approach is very reader-friendly and avoids the ""scholarly tone"" found in many books on this topic. Combinatorial Reasoning: An Introduction to the Art of Counting: Focuses on enumeration and combinatorial thinking as a way to develop a variety of effective approaches to solving counting problemsIncludes brief summaries of basic concepts f

  17. Mitigation of Control Channel Jamming via Combinatorial Key Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahati, Abolfazl; Azarafrooz, Mahdi

    The problem of countering control channel jamming against internal adversaries in wireless ad hoc networks is addressed. Using combinatorial key distribution, a new method to secure the control channel access is introduced. This method, utilizes the established keys in the key establishment phase to hide the location of control channels without the need for a secure BS. This is in obtained by combination of a collision free one-way function and a combinatorial key establishment method. The proposed scheme can be considered as a special case of the ALOHA random access schemes which uses the common established keys as its seeds to generate the pattern of transmission.

  18. Polyhedral and semidefinite programming methods in combinatorial optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Tunçel, Levent

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, polyhedral methods have played a central role in both the theory and practice of combinatorial optimization. Since the early 1990s, a new technique, semidefinite programming, has been increasingly applied to some combinatorial optimization problems. The semidefinite programming problem is the problem of optimizing a linear function of matrix variables, subject to finitely many linear inequalities and the positive semidefiniteness condition on some of the matrix variables. On certain problems, such as maximum cut, maximum satisfiability, maximum stable set and geometric r

  19. Some results from the combinatorial approach to quantum logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greechie, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The combinatorial approach to quantum logic focuses on certain interconnections between graphs, combinatorial designs, and convex sets as applied to a quantum logic. This article is concerned only with orthomodular lattices and associated structures. A class of complete atomic irreducible semimodular orthomodular lattices is derived which may not be represented as linear subspaces of a vector space over a division ring. Each of these lattices is a proposition system of dimension three. These proposition systems form orthocomplemented non-Desarguesian projective geometries. (B.R.H.)

  20. Markov's theorem and algorithmically non-recognizable combinatorial manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtan'ko, M A

    2004-01-01

    We prove the theorem of Markov on the existence of an algorithmically non-recognizable combinatorial n-dimensional manifold for every n≥4. We construct for the first time a concrete manifold which is algorithmically non-recognizable. A strengthened form of Markov's theorem is proved using the combinatorial methods of regular neighbourhoods and handle theory. The proofs coincide for all n≥4. We use Borisov's group with insoluble word problem. It has two generators and twelve relations. The use of this group forms the base for proving the strengthened form of Markov's theorem

  1. On some interconnections between combinatorial optimization and extremal graph theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Dragoš M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The uniting feature of combinatorial optimization and extremal graph theory is that in both areas one should find extrema of a function defined in most cases on a finite set. While in combinatorial optimization the point is in developing efficient algorithms and heuristics for solving specified types of problems, the extremal graph theory deals with finding bounds for various graph invariants under some constraints and with constructing extremal graphs. We analyze by examples some interconnections and interactions of the two theories and propose some conclusions.

  2. Fast Combinatorial Algorithm for the Solution of Linearly Constrained Least Squares Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Benthem, Mark H.; Keenan, Michael R.

    2008-11-11

    A fast combinatorial algorithm can significantly reduce the computational burden when solving general equality and inequality constrained least squares problems with large numbers of observation vectors. The combinatorial algorithm provides a mathematically rigorous solution and operates at great speed by reorganizing the calculations to take advantage of the combinatorial nature of the problems to be solved. The combinatorial algorithm exploits the structure that exists in large-scale problems in order to minimize the number of arithmetic operations required to obtain a solution.

  3. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  4. Optical probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, J.; Decaudin, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The probe includes optical means of refractive index n, refracting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n1>n and reflecting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n2 [fr

  5. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Solid-Phase Synthesis of Small Molecule Libraries using Double Combinatorial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Jensen, Flemming R.

    1997-01-01

    The first synthesis of a combinatorial library using double combinatorial chemistry is presented. Coupling of unprotected Fmoc-tyrosine to the solid support was followed by Mitsunobu O-alkylation. Introduction of a diacid linker yields a system in which the double combinatorial step can be demons...

  7. Pesticide Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  8. Labelling patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strudwick, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at how diagnostic radiographers label their patients. An ethnographic study of the workplace culture in one diagnostic imaging department was undertaken using participant observation for four months and semi-structured interviews with ten key informants. One of the key themes; the way in which radiographers label their patients, is explored in this article. It was found from the study that within the department studied the diagnostic radiographers labelled or categorised their patients based on the information that they had. This information is used to form judgements and these judgements were used to assist the radiographers in dealing with the many different people that they encountered in their work. This categorisation and labelling of the patient appears to assist the radiographer in their decision-making processes about the examination to be carried out and the patient they are to image. This is an important aspect of the role of the diagnostic radiographer. - Highlights: • I have studied the culture in one imaging department. • Radiographers label or categorise their patients. • These labels/categories are used to manage the patient. • This is an important aspect of the way in which radiographers work.

  9. Isocyanide based multi component reactions in combinatorial chemistry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dömling, A.

    1998-01-01

    Although usually regarded as a recent development, the combinatorial approach to the synthesis of libraries of new drug candidates was first described as early as 1961 using the isocyanide-based one-pot multicomponent Ugi reaction. Isocyanide-based multi component reactions (MCR's) markedly differ

  10. Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry with Diselenides, Disulfides, Imines and Metal Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne

    combinatorial chemistry, namely the reversible diselenide exchange reaction. The first part of the thesis describes the development of a thermally induced OAr → SeAr migration reaction. Here, it was proven possible to rearrange a variety of substituted O-aryl selenocarbamates into the corresponding Se...

  11. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry at the phospholipid bilayer interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansfeld, Friederike M.; Au-Yeung, Ho Yu; Sanders, Jeremy K.M.; Otto, Sijbren

    2010-01-01

    Background: Molecular recognition at the environment provided by the phospholipid bilayer interface plays an important role in biology and is subject of intense investigation. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry is a powerful approach for exploring molecular recognition, but has thus far not been

  12. Confluence of an extension of combinatory logic by Boolean constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czajka, Łukasz

    2017-01-01

    We show confluence of a conditional term rewriting system CL-pc1, which is an extension of Combinatory Logic by Boolean constants. This solves problem 15 from the RTA list of open problems. The proof has been fully formalized in the Coq proof assistant....

  13. Combinatorial Solid-Phase Synthesis of Balanol Analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Lyngsø, Lars Ole

    1996-01-01

    The natural product balanol has served as a template for the design and synthesis of a combinatorial library using solid-phase chemistry. Using a retrosynthetic analysis, the structural analogues have been assembled from three relatively accessible building blocks. The solid-phase chemistry inclu...

  14. Combinatorial algorithms enabling computational science: tales from the front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Boman, Erik G; Devine, Karen; Gebremedhin, Assefaw; Hendrickson, Bruce; Hovland, Paul; Munson, Todd; Pothen, Alex

    2006-01-01

    Combinatorial algorithms have long played a crucial enabling role in scientific and engineering computations. The importance of discrete algorithms continues to grow with the demands of new applications and advanced architectures. This paper surveys some recent developments in this rapidly changing and highly interdisciplinary field

  15. Combinatorial structures and processing in neural blackboard architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Frank; van der Velde, Frank; de Kamps, Marc; Besold, Tarek R.; d'Avila Garcez, Artur; Marcus, Gary F.; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    We discuss and illustrate Neural Blackboard Architectures (NBAs) as the basis for variable binding and combinatorial processing the brain. We focus on the NBA for sentence structure. NBAs are based on the notion that conceptual representations are in situ, hence cannot be copied or transported.

  16. Combinatorial chemistry approach to development of molecular plastic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godovsky, Dmitri; Inganäs, Olle; Brabec, Christoph J.; Sariciftci, N. Serdar; Hummelen, Jan C.; Janssen, Rene A.J.; Prato, M.; Maggini, M.; Segura, Jose; Martin, Nazario

    1999-01-01

    We used a combinatorial chemistry approach to develop the molecular plastic solar cells based on soluble fullerene derivatives or solubilized TCNQ molecules in combination with conjugated polymers. Profiles, formed by the diffusion of low molecular weight component in the spin-cast polymer host were

  17. Dynamic combinatorial libraries based on hydrogen-bonde molecular boxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerckhoffs, J.M.C.A.; Mateos timoneda, Miguel; Reinhoudt, David; Crego Calama, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    This article describes two different types of dynamic combinatorial libraries of host and guest molecules. The first part of this article describes the encapsulation of alizarin trimer 2 a3 by dynamic mixtures of up to twenty different self-assembled molecular receptors together with the

  18. Anti-termite efficacy of Capparis decidua and its combinatorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: Capparis deciduas and its combinatorial mixtures were evaluated to observe the anti-termite efficacy against Indian white termite Odontotermes obesus. These have shown very high termiticidal activity and wood protection in the soil. It is proved by very low LD50 values i.e. 0.0218mg/g and 0.021mg/g obtained ...

  19. Combinatorial algorithms enabling computational science: tales from the front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Boman, Erik G [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Devine, Karen [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Gebremedhin, Assefaw [Computer Science Department, Old Dominion University (United States); Hendrickson, Bruce [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Hovland, Paul [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Munson, Todd [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Pothen, Alex [Computer Science Department, Old Dominion University (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Combinatorial algorithms have long played a crucial enabling role in scientific and engineering computations. The importance of discrete algorithms continues to grow with the demands of new applications and advanced architectures. This paper surveys some recent developments in this rapidly changing and highly interdisciplinary field.

  20. Some Combinatorial Interpretations and Applications of Fuss-Catalan Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chin-Hung

    2011-01-01

    Fuss-Catalan number is a family of generalized Catalan numbers. We begin by two definitions of Fuss-Catalan numbers and some basic properties. And we give some combinatorial interpretations different from original Catalan numbers. Finally we generalize the Jonah's theorem as its applications.

  1. A Combinatorial Proof of a Result on Generalized Lucas Polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laugier Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We give a combinatorial proof of an elementary property of generalized Lucas polynomials, inspired by [1]. These polynomials in s and t are defined by the recurrence relation 〈n〉 = s〈n-1〉+t〈n-2〉 for n ≥ 2. The initial values are 〈0〉 = 2; 〈1〉= s, respectively.

  2. Some experience of shielding calculations by combinatorial method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobejnikov, V.V.; Oussanov, V.I.

    1996-01-01

    Some aspects of the compound systems shielding calculations by a combinatorial approach are discussed. The effectiveness of such an approach is based on the fundamental characteristic of a compound system: if some element of the system have in itself mathematical or physical properties favorable for calculation, these properties may be used in a combinatorial approach and are lost when the system is being calculated in the whole by a direct approach. The combinatorial technique applied is well known. A compound system are being splitting for two or more auxiliary subsystems (so that calculation each of them is a more simple problem than calculation of the original problem (or at last is a soluble problem if original one is not). Calculation of every subsystem are carried out by suitable method and code, the coupling being made through boundary conditions or boundary source. The special consideration in the paper is given to a fast reactor shielding combinatorial analysis and to the testing of the results received. (author)

  3. A combinatorial approximation algorithm for CDMA downlink rate allocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucherie, Richardus J.; Bumb, A.F.; Endrayanto, A.I.; Woeginger, Gerhard; Raghavan, S.; Anandalingam, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a combinatorial algorithm for downlink rate allocation in Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) mobile networks. By discretizing the coverage area into small segments, the transmit power requirements are characterized via a matrix representation that separates user and system

  4. A combinatorial approximation algorithm for CDMA downlink rate allocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucherie, Richardus J.; Bumb, A.F.; Endrayanto, A.I.; Woeginger, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a combinatorial algorithm for downlink rate allocation in Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) mobile networks. By discretizing the coverage area into small segments, the transmit power requirements are characterized via a matrix representation that separates user and system

  5. A combinatorial enumeration problem of RNA secondary structures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... interesting combinatorial questions (Chen et al., 2005;. Liu, 2006; Schmitt and Waterman 1994; Stein and. Waterman 1978). The research on the enumeration of. RNA secondary structures becomes one of the hot topics in Computational Molecular Biology. An RNA molecule is described by its sequences of.

  6. Neurogenetic Algorithm for Solving Combinatorial Engineering Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jalali Varnamkhasti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of the population in a genetic algorithm plays an important role in impeding premature convergence. This paper proposes an adaptive neurofuzzy inference system genetic algorithm based on sexual selection. In this technique, for choosing the female chromosome during sexual selection, a bilinear allocation lifetime approach is used to label the chromosomes based on their fitness value which will then be used to characterize the diversity of the population. The motivation of this algorithm is to maintain the population diversity throughout the search procedure. To promote diversity, the proposed algorithm combines the concept of gender and age of individuals and the fuzzy logic during the selection of parents. In order to appraise the performance of the techniques used in this study, one of the chemistry problems and some nonlinear functions available in literature is used.

  7. Paths and partitions: Combinatorial descriptions of the parafermionic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Pierre

    2009-09-01

    The Zk parafermionic conformal field theories, despite the relative complexity of their modes algebra, offer the simplest context for the study of the bases of states and their different combinatorial representations. Three bases are known. The classic one is given by strings of the fundamental parafermionic operators whose sequences of modes are in correspondence with restricted partitions with parts at distance k -1 differing at least by 2. Another basis is expressed in terms of the ordered modes of the k -1 different parafermionic fields, which are in correspondence with the so-called multiple partitions. Both types of partitions have a natural (Bressoud) path representation. Finally, a third basis, formulated in terms of different paths, is inherited from the solution of the restricted solid-on-solid model of Andrews-Baxter-Forrester. The aim of this work is to review, in a unified and pedagogical exposition, these four different combinatorial representations of the states of the Zk parafermionic models. The first part of this article presents the different paths and partitions and their bijective relations; it is purely combinatorial, self-contained, and elementary; it can be read independently of the conformal-field-theory applications. The second part links this combinatorial analysis with the bases of states of the Zk parafermionic theories. With the prototypical example of the parafermionic models worked out in detail, this analysis contributes to fix some foundations for the combinatorial study of more complicated theories. Indeed, as we briefly indicate in ending, generalized versions of both the Bressoud and the Andrews-Baxter-Forrester paths emerge naturally in the description of the minimal models.

  8. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-labeled DNA probe. Images PMID:16348233

  9. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Assistant in design of tissue targeting leads with radio-combinatorial screening vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ciyi; Zeng Jun; Xie Wenhui; Hu Silong; Jin Muxiu

    2004-01-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic efficiency of drug depends highly on the drug distribution in target tissues (tumor for example) both specifically and accumulatively. We report here a powerful approach in design of tissue targeting leads with the assistant of radio-combinatorial screening technique developed in our laboratory. Methods: The C-terminal amide tripeptide libraries were synthesized on Rink Amide-MBHA resin in the OXX aO1OXaO1O2O positional scanning format and iterative protoco. A technetium (V) oxo core[(TcO)3+] was bound to the N4-triligands of tripeptide libraries via four deprotonated anfide nitrogen atoms to form a structure of 99Tcm-tripeptoid libraries. The radio-combinatorial screening (RCS) in vivo was then carried out after SD rats and A549 tumor bearing mice received i.v. with 99Tcm-tripeptoid libraries. Results: Signals of tissue distribution and metabolism of libraries were recorded by g counting or imaging. From library of 8,000 99Tcm-tripeptoid members, the tissue targeting leads had been identified by RCS. Those included 99Tcm-DSG (RES), 99Tcm-VAA, and 99Tcm-VIG that had specific tissue targeting in kidney, stomach, and liver respectively. The percent injected dose per gram tissue (%ID/g) of 99Tcm labeled leads in their target tissues was highly structure-dependent The discovery of 99Tcm-VAA and 99Tcm-VIG indicates that side chain methyl at positionl and 2 are crucial for stomach and liver accumulating 99Tcm-tripeptoids. In the case of kidney targeting, Ser in the position 2 and 3 is crucial for 99Tcm-tripeptoids renal excretion and accumulation characteristics respectively. Conclusion: RCS in vivo is a powerful tool for design of tissue targeting leads. (authors)

  11. Phthalocyanine-loaded graphene nanoplatform for imaging-guided combinatorial phototherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taratula O

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Olena Taratula,1 Mehulkumar Patel,2 Canan Schumann,1 Michael A Naleway,1 Addison J Pang,1 Huixin He,2 Oleh Taratula1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Oregon State University, Portland, OR, USA; 2Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University-Newark, Newark, NJ, USA Abstract: We report a novel cancer-targeted nanomedicine platform for imaging and prospect for future treatment of unresected ovarian cancer tumors by intraoperative multimodal phototherapy. To develop the required theranostic system, novel low-oxygen graphene nanosheets were chemically modified with polypropylenimine dendrimers loaded with phthalocyanine (Pc as a photosensitizer. Such a molecular design prevents fluorescence quenching of the Pc by graphene nanosheets, providing the possibility of fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, the developed nanoplatform was conjugated with poly(ethylene glycol, to improve biocompatibility, and with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH peptide, for tumor-targeted delivery. Notably, a low-power near-infrared (NIR irradiation of single wavelength was used for both heat generation by the graphene nanosheets (photothermal therapy [PTT] and for reactive oxygen species (ROS-production by Pc (photodynamic therapy [PDT]. The combinatorial phototherapy resulted in an enhanced destruction of ovarian cancer cells, with a killing efficacy of 90%–95% at low Pc and low-oxygen graphene dosages, presumably conferring cytotoxicity to the synergistic effects of generated ROS and mild hyperthermia. An animal study confirmed that Pc loaded into the nanoplatform can be employed as a NIR fluorescence agent for imaging-guided drug delivery. Hence, the newly developed Pc-graphene nanoplatform has the significant potential as an effective NIR theranostic probe for imaging and combinatorial phototherapy. Keywords: graphene nanosheets, phthalocyanine, photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, theranostic 

  12. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  13. Programme for test generation for combinatorial and sequential systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Huy Hoan

    1973-01-01

    This research thesis reports the computer-assisted search for tests aimed at failure detection in combinatorial and sequential logic circuits. As he wants to deal with complex circuits with many modules such as those met in large scale integrated circuits (LSI), the author used propagation paths. He reports the development of a method which is valid for combinatorial systems and for several sequential circuits comprising elementary logic modules and JK and RS flip-flops. This method is developed on an IBM 360/91 computer in PL/1 language. The used memory space is limited and adjustable with respect to circuit dimension. Computing time is short when compared to that needed by other programmes. The solution is practical and efficient for failure test and localisation

  14. Bioinspired computation in combinatorial optimization: algorithms and their computational complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Frank; Witt, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Bioinspired computation methods, such as evolutionary algorithms and ant colony optimization, are being applied successfully to complex engineering and combinatorial optimization problems, and it is very important that we understand the computational complexity of these algorithms. This tutorials...... problems. Classical single objective optimization is examined first. They then investigate the computational complexity of bioinspired computation applied to multiobjective variants of the considered combinatorial optimization problems, and in particular they show how multiobjective optimization can help...... to speed up bioinspired computation for single-objective optimization problems. The tutorial is based on a book written by the authors with the same title. Further information about the book can be found at www.bioinspiredcomputation.com....

  15. An Atlas of Combinatorial Transcriptional Regulation in Mouse and Man

    KAUST Repository

    Ravasi, Timothy; Suzuki, Harukazu; Cannistraci, Carlo; Katayama, Shintaro; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Tan, Kai; Akalin, Altuna; Schmeier, Sebastian; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Bertin, Nicolas; Carninci, Piero; Daub, Carsten O.; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Gough, Julian; Grimmond, Sean; Han, Jung-Hoon; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Hide, Winston; Hofmann, Oliver; Kamburov, Atanas; Kaur, Mandeep; Kawaji, Hideya; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Lassmann, Timo; van Nimwegen, Erik; MacPherson, Cameron Ross; Ogawa, Chihiro; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Schwartz, Ariel; Teasdale, Rohan D.; Tegné r, Jesper; Lenhard, Boris; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Arakawa, Takahiro; Ninomiya, Noriko; Murakami, Kayoko; Tagami, Michihira; Fukuda, Shiro; Imamura, Kengo; Kai, Chikatoshi; Ishihara, Ryoko; Kitazume, Yayoi; Kawai, Jun; Hume, David A.; Ideker, Trey; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial interactions among transcription factors are critical to directing tissue-specific gene expression. To build a global atlas of these combinations, we have screened for physical interactions among the majority of human and mouse DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs). The complete networks contain 762 human and 877 mouse interactions. Analysis of the networks reveals that highly connected TFs are broadly expressed across tissues, and that roughly half of the measured interactions are conserved between mouse and human. The data highlight the importance of TF combinations for determining cell fate, and they lead to the identification of a SMAD3/FLI1 complex expressed during development of immunity. The availability of large TF combinatorial networks in both human and mouse will provide many opportunities to study gene regulation, tissue differentiation, and mammalian evolution.

  16. CUNY Graduate Center Workshops on Combinatorial and Additive Number Theory

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Based on talks from the 2015 and 2016 Combinatorial and Additive Number Theory (CANT) workshops at the City University of New York, these proceedings offer 19 peer-reviewed and edited papers on current topics in number theory. Held every year since 2003, the workshop series surveys state-of-the-art open problems in combinatorial and additive number theory and related parts of mathematics. Sumsets, partitions, convex polytopes and discrete geometry, Ramsey theory, primality testing, and cryptography are among the topics featured in this volume. Each contribution is dedicated to a specific topic that reflects the latest results by experts in the field. Researchers and graduate students interested in the current progress in number theory will find this selection of articles relevant and compelling. .

  17. Combinatorial geometry domain decomposition strategies for Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G.; Zhang, B.; Deng, L.; Mo, Z.; Liu, Z.; Shangguan, D.; Ma, Y.; Li, S.; Hu, Z. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing, 100094 (China)

    2013-07-01

    Analysis and modeling of nuclear reactors can lead to memory overload for a single core processor when it comes to refined modeling. A method to solve this problem is called 'domain decomposition'. In the current work, domain decomposition algorithms for a combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code are developed on the JCOGIN (J Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo transport INfrastructure). Tree-based decomposition and asynchronous communication of particle information between domains are described in the paper. Combination of domain decomposition and domain replication (particle parallelism) is demonstrated and compared with that of MERCURY code. A full-core reactor model is simulated to verify the domain decomposition algorithms using the Monte Carlo particle transport code JMCT (J Monte Carlo Transport Code), which has being developed on the JCOGIN infrastructure. Besides, influences of the domain decomposition algorithms to tally variances are discussed. (authors)

  18. Combinatorial geometry domain decomposition strategies for Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.; Zhang, B.; Deng, L.; Mo, Z.; Liu, Z.; Shangguan, D.; Ma, Y.; Li, S.; Hu, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis and modeling of nuclear reactors can lead to memory overload for a single core processor when it comes to refined modeling. A method to solve this problem is called 'domain decomposition'. In the current work, domain decomposition algorithms for a combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code are developed on the JCOGIN (J Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo transport INfrastructure). Tree-based decomposition and asynchronous communication of particle information between domains are described in the paper. Combination of domain decomposition and domain replication (particle parallelism) is demonstrated and compared with that of MERCURY code. A full-core reactor model is simulated to verify the domain decomposition algorithms using the Monte Carlo particle transport code JMCT (J Monte Carlo Transport Code), which has being developed on the JCOGIN infrastructure. Besides, influences of the domain decomposition algorithms to tally variances are discussed. (authors)

  19. Laguerre-type derivatives: Dobinski relations and combinatorial identities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penson, K. A.; Blasiak, P.; Horzela, A.; Duchamp, G. H. E.; Solomon, A. I.

    2009-01-01

    We consider properties of the operators D(r,M)=a r (a † a) M (which we call generalized Laguerre-type derivatives), with r=1,2,..., M=0,1,..., where a and a † are boson annihilation and creation operators, respectively, satisfying [a,a † ]=1. We obtain explicit formulas for the normally ordered form of arbitrary Taylor-expandable functions of D(r,M) with the help of an operator relation that generalizes the Dobinski formula. Coherent state expectation values of certain operator functions of D(r,M) turn out to be generating functions of combinatorial numbers. In many cases the corresponding combinatorial structures can be explicitly identified.

  20. An Atlas of Combinatorial Transcriptional Regulation in Mouse and Man

    KAUST Repository

    Ravasi, Timothy

    2010-03-01

    Combinatorial interactions among transcription factors are critical to directing tissue-specific gene expression. To build a global atlas of these combinations, we have screened for physical interactions among the majority of human and mouse DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs). The complete networks contain 762 human and 877 mouse interactions. Analysis of the networks reveals that highly connected TFs are broadly expressed across tissues, and that roughly half of the measured interactions are conserved between mouse and human. The data highlight the importance of TF combinations for determining cell fate, and they lead to the identification of a SMAD3/FLI1 complex expressed during development of immunity. The availability of large TF combinatorial networks in both human and mouse will provide many opportunities to study gene regulation, tissue differentiation, and mammalian evolution.

  1. Combinatorial Optimization in Project Selection Using Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Sari; Sawaluddin

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of project selection in the presence of two objective functions that maximize profit and minimize cost and the existence of some limitations is limited resources availability and time available so that there is need allocation of resources in each project. These resources are human resources, machine resources, raw material resources. This is treated as a consideration to not exceed the budget that has been determined. So that can be formulated mathematics for objective function (multi-objective) with boundaries that fulfilled. To assist the project selection process, a multi-objective combinatorial optimization approach is used to obtain an optimal solution for the selection of the right project. It then described a multi-objective method of genetic algorithm as one method of multi-objective combinatorial optimization approach to simplify the project selection process in a large scope.

  2. Non-unique factorizations algebraic, combinatorial and analytic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Geroldinger, Alfred

    2006-01-01

    From its origins in algebraic number theory, the theory of non-unique factorizations has emerged as an independent branch of algebra and number theory. Focused efforts over the past few decades have wrought a great number and variety of results. However, these remain dispersed throughout the vast literature. For the first time, Non-Unique Factorizations: Algebraic, Combinatorial, and Analytic Theory offers a look at the present state of the theory in a single, unified resource.Taking a broad look at the algebraic, combinatorial, and analytic fundamentals, this book derives factorization results and applies them in concrete arithmetical situations using appropriate transfer principles. It begins with a basic introduction that can be understood with knowledge of standard basic algebra. The authors then move to the algebraic theory of monoids, arithmetic theory of monoids, the structure of sets of lengths, additive group theory, arithmetical invariants, and the arithmetic of Krull monoids. They also provide a s...

  3. Combinatorial nuclear level density by a Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerf, N.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new combinatorial method for the calculation of the nuclear level density. It is based on a Monte Carlo technique, in order to avoid a direct counting procedure which is generally impracticable for high-A nuclei. The Monte Carlo simulation, making use of the Metropolis sampling scheme, allows a computationally fast estimate of the level density for many fermion systems in large shell model spaces. We emphasize the advantages of this Monte Carlo approach, particularly concerning the prediction of the spin and parity distributions of the excited states,and compare our results with those derived from a traditional combinatorial or a statistical method. Such a Monte Carlo technique seems very promising to determine accurate level densities in a large energy range for nuclear reaction calculations

  4. Obfuscation Framework Based on Functionally Equivalent Combinatorial Logic Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    of Defense, or the United States Government . AFIT/GCS/ENG/08-12 Obfuscation Framework Based on Functionally Equivalent Combinatorial Logic Families...time, United States policy strongly encourages the sale and transfer of some military equipment to foreign governments and makes it easier for...Proceedings of the International Conference on Availability, Reliability and Security, 2007. 14. McDonald, J. Todd and Alec Yasinsac. “Of unicorns and random

  5. Combinatorial drug screening identifies Ewing sarcoma-specific sensitivities

    OpenAIRE

    Radic-Sarikas, Branka; Tsafou, Kalliopi P.; Emdal, Kristina B.; Papamarkou, Theodore; Huber, Kilian V.M.; Mutz, Cornelia; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Brunak, Søren; Kovar, Heinrich; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    Improvements in survival for Ewing sarcoma pediatric and adolescent patients have been modest over the past 20 years. Combinations of anticancer agents endure as an option to overcome resistance to single treatments caused by compensatory pathways. Moreover, combinations are thought to lessen any associated adverse side effects through reduced dosing, which is particularly important in childhood tumors. Using a parallel phenotypic combinatorial screening approach of cells derived from three p...

  6. Rapid mapping of protein functional epitopes by combinatorial alanine scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, GA; Watanabe, CK; Zhong, A; Goddard, A; Sidhu, SS

    2000-01-01

    A combinatorial alanine-scanning strategy was used to determine simultaneously the functional contributions of 19 side chains buried at the interface between human growth hormone and the extracellular domain of its receptor. A phage-displayed protein library was constructed in which the 19 side chains were preferentially allowed to vary only as the wild type or alanine. The library pool was subjected to binding selections to isolate functional clones, and DNA sequencing was used to determine ...

  7. Combinatorial Models for Assembly and Decomposition of Products

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Bojko

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the most popular combinatorial models that are used for the synthesis of design solutions at the stage of the assembly process flow preparation. It shows that while assembling the product the relations of parts can be represented as a structure of preferences, which is formed on the basis of objective design restrictions put in at the stage of the product design. This structure is a binary preference relation pre-order. Its symmetrical part is equivalence and describes the...

  8. From combinatorial optimization to real algebraic geometry and back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Povh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explain the relations between combinatorial optimization and real algebraic geometry with a special focus to the quadratic assignment problem. We demonstrate how to write a quadratic optimization problem over discrete feasible set as a linear optimization problem over the cone of completely positive matrices. The latter formulation enables a hierarchy of approximations which rely on results from polynomial optimization, a sub-eld of real algebraic geometry.

  9. A binary plasmid system for shuffling combinatorial antibody libraries.

    OpenAIRE

    Collet, T A; Roben, P; O'Kennedy, R; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Lerner, R A

    1992-01-01

    We have used a binary system of replicon-compatible plasmids to test the potential for promiscuous recombination of heavy and light chains within sets of human Fab fragments isolated from combinatorial antibody libraries. Antibody molecules showed a surprising amount of promiscuity in that a particular heavy chain could recombine with multiple light chains with retention of binding to a protein antigen. The degree to which a given heavy chain productively paired with any light chain to bind a...

  10. Distributing the computation in combinatorial optimization experiments over the cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Brcic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Combinatorial optimization is an area of great importance since many of the real-world problems have discrete parameters which are part of the objective function to be optimized. Development of combinatorial optimization algorithms is guided by the empirical study of the candidate ideas and their performance over a wide range of settings or scenarios to infer general conclusions. Number of scenarios can be overwhelming, especially when modeling uncertainty in some of the problem’s parameters. Since the process is also iterative and many ideas and hypotheses may be tested, execution time of each experiment has an important role in the efficiency and successfulness. Structure of such experiments allows for significant execution time improvement by distributing the computation. We focus on the cloud computing as a cost-efficient solution in these circumstances. In this paper we present a system for validating and comparing stochastic combinatorial optimization algorithms. The system also deals with selection of the optimal settings for computational nodes and number of nodes in terms of performance-cost tradeoff. We present applications of the system on a new class of project scheduling problem. We show that we can optimize the selection over cloud service providers as one of the settings and, according to the model, it resulted in a substantial cost-savings while meeting the deadline.

  11. View discovery in OLAP databases through statistical combinatorial optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengartner, Nick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burke, John [PNNL; Critchlow, Terence [PNNL; Joslyn, Cliff [PNNL; Hogan, Emilie [PNNL

    2009-01-01

    OnLine Analytical Processing (OLAP) is a relational database technology providing users with rapid access to summary, aggregated views of a single large database, and is widely recognized for knowledge representation and discovery in high-dimensional relational databases. OLAP technologies provide intuitive and graphical access to the massively complex set of possible summary views available in large relational (SQL) structured data repositories. The capability of OLAP database software systems to handle data complexity comes at a high price for analysts, presenting them a combinatorially vast space of views of a relational database. We respond to the need to deploy technologies sufficient to allow users to guide themselves to areas of local structure by casting the space of 'views' of an OLAP database as a combinatorial object of all projections and subsets, and 'view discovery' as an search process over that lattice. We equip the view lattice with statistical information theoretical measures sufficient to support a combinatorial optimization process. We outline 'hop-chaining' as a particular view discovery algorithm over this object, wherein users are guided across a permutation of the dimensions by searching for successive two-dimensional views, pushing seen dimensions into an increasingly large background filter in a 'spiraling' search process. We illustrate this work in the context of data cubes recording summary statistics for radiation portal monitors at US ports.

  12. A combinatorial perspective of the protein inference problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; He, Zengyou; Yu, Weichuan

    2013-01-01

    In a shotgun proteomics experiment, proteins are the most biologically meaningful output. The success of proteomics studies depends on the ability to accurately and efficiently identify proteins. Many methods have been proposed to facilitate the identification of proteins from peptide identification results. However, the relationship between protein identification and peptide identification has not been thoroughly explained before. In this paper, we devote ourselves to a combinatorial perspective of the protein inference problem. We employ combinatorial mathematics to calculate the conditional protein probabilities (protein probability means the probability that a protein is correctly identified) under three assumptions, which lead to a lower bound, an upper bound, and an empirical estimation of protein probabilities, respectively. The combinatorial perspective enables us to obtain an analytical expression for protein inference. Our method achieves comparable results with ProteinProphet in a more efficient manner in experiments on two data sets of standard protein mixtures and two data sets of real samples. Based on our model, we study the impact of unique peptides and degenerate peptides (degenerate peptides are peptides shared by at least two proteins) on protein probabilities. Meanwhile, we also study the relationship between our model and ProteinProphet. We name our program ProteinInfer. Its Java source code, our supplementary document and experimental results are available at: >http://bioinformatics.ust.hk/proteininfer.

  13. View Discovery in OLAP Databases through Statistical Combinatorial Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Burke, Edward J.; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2009-05-01

    The capability of OLAP database software systems to handle data complexity comes at a high price for analysts, presenting them a combinatorially vast space of views of a relational database. We respond to the need to deploy technologies sufficient to allow users to guide themselves to areas of local structure by casting the space of ``views'' of an OLAP database as a combinatorial object of all projections and subsets, and ``view discovery'' as an search process over that lattice. We equip the view lattice with statistical information theoretical measures sufficient to support a combinatorial optimization process. We outline ``hop-chaining'' as a particular view discovery algorithm over this object, wherein users are guided across a permutation of the dimensions by searching for successive two-dimensional views, pushing seen dimensions into an increasingly large background filter in a ``spiraling'' search process. We illustrate this work in the context of data cubes recording summary statistics for radiation portal monitors at US ports.

  14. Food labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsøe Sørensen, Henrik; Clement, Jesper; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    evidence for dividing consumers into two profiles: one relying on general food knowledge and another using knowledge related to signpost labels. In a combined eyetracking and questionnaire survey we analyse the influence of background knowledge and identify different patterns of visual attention......The food industry develops tasty and healthy food but fails to deliver the message to all consumers. The consumers’ background knowledge is essential for how they find and decode relevant elements in the cocktail of signs which fight for attention on food labels. In this exploratory study, we find...... for the two consumer profiles. This underlines the complexity in choosing and designing the ‘right’ elements for a food package that consumers actually look at and are able to make rational use of. In spite of any regulation of food information provided by authorities, consumers will still be confronted...

  15. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imagining and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography

  16. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  17. Advances in stable isotope assisted labeling strategies with information science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigawa, Takanori

    2017-08-15

    Stable-isotope (SI) labeling of proteins is an essential technique to investigate their structures, interactions or dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The assignment of the main-chain signals, which is the fundamental first step in these analyses, is usually achieved by a sequential assignment method based on triple resonance experiments. Independently of the triple resonance experiment-based sequential assignment, amino acid-selective SI labeling is beneficial for discriminating the amino acid type of each signal; therefore, it is especially useful for the signal assignment of difficult targets. Various combinatorial selective labeling schemes have been developed as more sophisticated labeling strategies. In these strategies, amino acids are represented by combinations of SI labeled samples, rather than simply assigning one amino acid to one SI labeled sample as in the case of conventional amino acid-selective labeling. These strategies have proven to be useful for NMR analyses of difficult proteins, such as those in large complex systems, in living cells, attached or integrated into membranes, or with poor solubility. In this review, recent advances in stable isotope assisted labeling strategies will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An Ultrasensitive Electrochemiluminescence Immunoassay for Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Serum Based on Antibody Labeled Fe3O4 Nanoparticles as Capture Probes and Graphene/CdTe Quantum Dot Bionanoconjugates as Signal Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ning; Zhou, Jing; Xiong, Ping; Li, Tianhua; Jiang, Shan; Cao, Yuting; Jiang, Qianli

    2013-01-01

    The CdTe quantum dots (QDs), graphene nanocomposite (CdTe-G) and dextran–Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for developing an ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay for Carcinoembryonic antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) in serums. Firstly, the capture probes (CA 19-9 Ab1/Fe3O4) for enriching CA 19-9 were synthesized by immobilizing the CA 19-9’s first antibody (CA 19-9 Ab1) on magnetic nanoparticles (dextran-Fe3O4). Secondly, the signal probes (CA 19-9 Ab2/CdTe-G), which can emit an ECL signal, were formed by attaching the secondary CA 19-9 antibody (CA 19-9 Ab2) to the surface of the CdTe-G. Thirdly, the above two probes were used for conjugating with a serial of CA 19-9 concentrations. Graphene can immobilize dozens of CdTe QDs on their surface, which can emit stronger ECL intensity than CdTe QDs. Based on the amplified signal, ultrasensitive antigen detection can be realized. Under the optimal conditions, the ECL signal depended linearly on the logarithm of CA 19-9 concentration from 0.005 to 100 pg/mL, and the detection limit was 0.002 pg/mL. Finally, five samples of human serum were tested, and the results were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence assay (TRFA). The novel immunoassay provides a stable, specific and highly sensitive immunoassay protocol for tumor marker detection at very low levels, which can be applied in early diagnosis of tumor. PMID:23685872

  19. Aptamer and 5-fluorouracil dual-loading Ag2S quantum dots used as a sensitive label-free probe for near-infrared photoluminescence turn-on detection of CA125 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Gui, Rijun; Gong, Jun; Huang, Wenxue

    2017-06-15

    In this article, Ag 2 S quantum dots (QDs) were prepared by a facile aqueous synthesis method, using thiourea as a new sulfur precursor. Based on electrostatic interactions, 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) was combined with the aptamer of CA125 antigen to fabricate aptamer/5-Fu complex. The surface of as-prepared Ag 2 S QDs was modified with polyethylenimine, followed by combination with the aptamer/5-Fu complex to form Ag 2 S QDs/aptamer/5-Fu hybrids. During the combination of Ag 2 S QDs with aptamer/5-Fu complex, near-infrared (NIR) photoluminescence (PL) of QDs (peaked at 850nm) was markedly reduced under excitation at 625nm, attributed to photo-induced electron transfer from QDs to 5-Fu. However, the addition of CA125 induced obvious NIR PL recovery, which was ascribed to the strong binding affinity of CA125 with its aptamer, and the separation of aptamer/5-Fu complex from the surface of QDs. Hence, the Ag 2 S QDs/aptamer/5-Fu hybrids were developed as a novel NIR PL turn-on probe of CA125. In the concentration range of [CA125] from 0.1 to 10 6 ngmL -1 , there were a good linear relationship between NIR PL intensities of Ag 2 S QDs and Log[CA125], and a low limit of detection of 0.07ngmL -1 . Experimental results revealed the highly selective and sensitive NIR PL responses of this probe to CA125, over other potential interferences. In real human body fluids, this probe also exhibited superior analytical performance, together with high detection recoveries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  1. Label triangulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    Label Triangulation (LT) with neutrons allows the investigation of the quaternary structure of biological multicomponent complexes under native conditions. Provided that the complex can be fully separated into and reconstituted from its single - protonated and deuterated - components, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) can give selective information on shapes and pair distances of these components. Following basic geometrical rules, the spatial arrangement of the components can be reconstructed from these data. LT has so far been successfully applied to the small and large ribosomal subunits and the transcriptase of E. coli. (author)

  2. A Dynamic Combinatorial Approach for Identifying Side Groups that Stabilize DNA-Templated Supramolecular Self-Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Paolantoni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA-templated self-assembly is an emerging strategy for generating functional supramolecular systems, which requires the identification of potent multi-point binding ligands. In this line, we recently showed that bis-functionalized guanidinium compounds can interact with ssDNA and generate a supramolecular complex through the recognition of the phosphodiester backbone of DNA. In order to probe the importance of secondary interactions and to identify side groups that stabilize these DNA-templated self-assemblies, we report herein the implementation of a dynamic combinatorial approach. We used an in situ fragment assembly process based on reductive amination and tested various side groups, including amino acids. The results reveal that aromatic and cationic side groups participate in secondary supramolecular interactions that stabilize the complexes formed with ssDNA.

  3. High-efficiency combinatorial approach as an effective tool for accelerating metallic biomaterials research and discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.D. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, 410083 (China); Liu, L.B., E-mail: lbliu.csu@gmail.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Changsha, Hunan, 410083 (China); Zhao, J.-C. [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Changsha, Hunan, 410083 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Wang, J.L.; Zheng, F.; Jin, Z.P. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, 410083 (China)

    2014-06-01

    A high-efficiency combinatorial approach has been applied to rapidly build the database of composition-dependent elastic modulus and hardness of the Ti–Ta and Ti–Zr–Ta systems. A diffusion multiple of the Ti–Zr–Ta system was manufactured, then annealed at 1173 K for 1800 h, and water quenched to room temperature. Extensive interdiffusion among Ti, Zr and Ta has taken place. Combining nanoindentation and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA), the elastic modulus, hardness as well as composition across the diffusion multiple were determined. The composition/elastic modulus/hardness relationship of the Ti–Ta and Ti–Zr–Ta alloys has been obtained. It was found that the elastic modulus and hardness depend strongly on the Ta and Zr content. The result can be used to accelerate the discovery/development of bio-titanium alloys for different components in implant prosthesis. - Highlights: • High-efficiency diffusion multiple of Ti–Zr–Ta was manufactured. • Composition-dependent elastic modulus and hardness of the Ti–Ta and Ti–Zr–Ta systems have been obtained effectively, • The methodology and the information can be used to accelerate the discovery/development of bio-titanium alloys.

  4. Combinatorial effects of arginine and fluoride on oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X; Cheng, X; Wang, L; Qiu, W; Wang, S; Zhou, Y; Li, M; Li, Y; Cheng, L; Li, J; Zhou, X; Xu, X

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries is closely associated with the microbial disequilibrium between acidogenic/aciduric pathogens and alkali-generating commensal residents within the dental plaque. Fluoride is a widely used anticaries agent, which promotes tooth hard-tissue remineralization and suppresses bacterial activities. Recent clinical trials have shown that oral hygiene products containing both fluoride and arginine possess a greater anticaries effect compared with those containing fluoride alone, indicating synergy between fluoride and arginine in caries management. Here, we hypothesize that arginine may augment the ecological benefit of fluoride by enriching alkali-generating bacteria in the plaque biofilm and thus synergizes with fluoride in controlling dental caries. Specifically, we assessed the combinatory effects of NaF/arginine on planktonic and biofilm cultures of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis with checkerboard microdilution assays. The optimal NaF/arginine combinations were selected, and their combinatory effects on microbial composition were further examined in single-, dual-, and 3-species biofilm using bacterial species-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found that arginine synergized with fluoride in suppressing acidogenic S. mutans in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. In addition, the NaF/arginine combination synergistically reduced S. mutans but enriched S. sanguinis within the multispecies biofilms. More importantly, the optimal combination of NaF/arginine maintained a "streptococcal pressure" against the potential growth of oral anaerobe P. gingivalis within the alkalized biofilm. Taken together, we conclude that the combinatory application of fluoride and arginine has a potential synergistic effect in maintaining a healthy oral microbial equilibrium and thus represents a promising ecological approach to caries management. © International & American

  5. Estimating meme fitness in adaptive memetic algorithms for combinatorial problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J E

    2012-01-01

    Among the most promising and active research areas in heuristic optimisation is the field of adaptive memetic algorithms (AMAs). These gain much of their reported robustness by adapting the probability with which each of a set of local improvement operators is applied, according to an estimate of their current value to the search process. This paper addresses the issue of how the current value should be estimated. Assuming the estimate occurs over several applications of a meme, we consider whether the extreme or mean improvements should be used, and whether this aggregation should be global, or local to some part of the solution space. To investigate these issues, we use the well-established COMA framework that coevolves the specification of a population of memes (representing different local search algorithms) alongside a population of candidate solutions to the problem at hand. Two very different memetic algorithms are considered: the first using adaptive operator pursuit to adjust the probabilities of applying a fixed set of memes, and a second which applies genetic operators to dynamically adapt and create memes and their functional definitions. For the latter, especially on combinatorial problems, credit assignment mechanisms based on historical records, or on notions of landscape locality, will have limited application, and it is necessary to estimate the value of a meme via some form of sampling. The results on a set of binary encoded combinatorial problems show that both methods are very effective, and that for some problems it is necessary to use thousands of variables in order to tease apart the differences between different reward schemes. However, for both memetic algorithms, a significant pattern emerges that reward based on mean improvement is better than that based on extreme improvement. This contradicts recent findings from adapting the parameters of operators involved in global evolutionary search. The results also show that local reward schemes

  6. Combinatorial interpretations of binomial coefficient analogues related to Lucas sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Sagan, Bruce; Savage, Carla

    2009-01-01

    Let s and t be variables. Define polynomials {n} in s, t by {0}=0, {1}=1, and {n}=s{n-1}+t{n-2} for n >= 2. If s, t are integers then the corresponding sequence of integers is called a Lucas sequence. Define an analogue of the binomial coefficients by C{n,k}={n}!/({k}!{n-k}!) where {n}!={1}{2}...{n}. It is easy to see that C{n,k} is a polynomial in s and t. The purpose of this note is to give two combinatorial interpretations for this polynomial in terms of statistics on integer partitions in...

  7. First steps in combinatorial optimization on graphons: matchings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Martin; Hladký, J.; Hu, P.; Piguet, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, August (2017), s. 359-365 ISSN 1571-0653 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-07378S; GA ČR GJ16-07822Y EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 628974 - PAECIDM Institutional support: RVO:67985840 ; RVO:67985807 Keywords : graphon * graph limits * matching * combinatorial optimization Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics ; BA - General Mathematics (UIVT-O) OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics ; Pure mathematics (UIVT-O) http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1571065317301452

  8. Combinatorial synthesis of oxazol-thiazole bis-heterocyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murru, Siva; Nefzi, Adel

    2014-01-13

    A combinatorial library of novel oxazol-thiazole bis-heterocycles was synthesized in good to excellent overall yields with high purity using a solution and solid-phase parallel synthesis approach. Oxazole amino acids, prepared from serine methyl ester and amino acids via coupling and cyclodehydration, were treated with Fmoc-NCS and α-haloketones for the parallel synthesis of diverse bis-heterocycles. Fmoc-isothiocyanate is used as a traceless reagent for thiazole formation. Oxazole diversity can be achieved by using variety of amino acids, whereas thiazole diversity is produced with various haloketones.

  9. Advances in bio-inspired computing for combinatorial optimization problems

    CERN Document Server

    Pintea, Camelia-Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Bio-inspired Combinatorial Optimization Problems' illustrates several recent bio-inspired efficient algorithms for solving NP-hard problems.Theoretical bio-inspired concepts and models, in particular for agents, ants and virtual robots are described. Large-scale optimization problems, for example: the Generalized Traveling Salesman Problem and the Railway Traveling Salesman Problem, are solved and their results are discussed.Some of the main concepts and models described in this book are: inner rule to guide ant search - a recent model in ant optimization, heterogeneous sensitive a

  10. Proceedings of the 8th Nordic Combinatorial Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geil, Olav; Andersen, Lars Døvling

    The Nordic Combinatorial Conferences were initiated in 1981 by mathematicians from Stavanger. Held approximately every three years since then, the conferences have been able to sustain the interest from combinatorialists all over the Nordic countries. In 2004 the 8th conference is held in Aalborg......, Denmark. We are pleased that so many people have chosen to attend, and that lectures were offered from more participants than we had originally reserved time for. We asked two mathematicians to give special lectures and are happy that both accepted immediately. Andries Brouwer from the Technical...

  11. Combinatorial interpretation of Haldane-Wu fractional exclusion statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aringazin, A K; Mazhitov, M I

    2002-08-01

    Assuming that the maximal allowed number of identical particles in a state is an integer parameter, q, we derive the statistical weight and analyze the associated equation that defines the statistical distribution. The derived distribution covers Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein ones in the particular cases q=1 and q--> infinity (n(i)/q-->1), respectively. We show that the derived statistical weight provides a natural combinatorial interpretation of Haldane-Wu fractional exclusion statistics, and present exact solutions of the distribution equation.

  12. What Diagrams Argue in Late Imperial Chinese Combinatorial Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréard, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Attitudes towards diagrammatic reasoning and visualization in mathematics were seldom spelled out in texts from pre-modern China, although illustrations figure prominently in mathematical literature since the eleventh century. Taking the sums of finite series and their combinatorial interpretation as a case study, this article investigates the epistemological function of illustrations from the eleventh to the nineteenth century that encode either the mathematical objects themselves or represent their related algorithms. It particularly focuses on the two illustrations given in Wang Lai's (1768-1813) Mathematical Principles of Sequential Combinations, arguing that they reflect a specific mode of nineteenth-century mathematical argumentative practice and served as a heuristic model for later authors.

  13. Design of diversity and focused combinatorial libraries in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S Stanley; Ge, Nanxiang

    2004-05-01

    Using well-characterized chemical reactions and readily available monomers, chemists are able to create sets of compounds, termed libraries, which are useful in drug discovery processes. The design of combinatorial chemical libraries can be complex and there has been much information recently published offering suggestions on how the design process can be carried out. This review focuses on literature with the goal of organizing current thinking. At this point in time, it is clear that benchmarking of current suggested methods is required as opposed to further new methods.

  14. First steps in combinatorial optimization on graphons: matchings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Martin; Hladký, J.; Hu, P.; Piguet, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, August (2017), s. 359-365 ISSN 1571-0653 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-07378S; GA ČR GJ16-07822Y EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 628974 - PAECIDM Institutional support: RVO:67985840 ; RVO:67985807 Keywords : graphon * graph limits * matching * combinatorial optimization Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics; BA - General Mathematics (UIVT-O) OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics; Pure mathematics (UIVT-O) http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1571065317301452

  15. A novel calibration algorithm for five-hole pressure probe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Five-hole probes are used to measure the three components of velocity, inflow ... centre hole pressure labeled as 5. P and the off-axis holes labeled as 1. P , 2. P , 3 ..... of this study and is doing research in the flow control group of the institute.

  16. Tandem Oligonucleotide Probe Annealing and Elongation To Discriminate Viral Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Uhd, Jesper; Miotke, Laura

    2017-01-01

    opportunities in transcriptome analysis, virology, and other fields. Herein, we report for the first time a "click" chemistry approach to oligonucleotide probe elongation as a novel approach to specifically detect a viral sequence. We hybridized a library of short, terminally labeled probes to Ebola virus RNA...

  17. Gene probes : principles and protocols [Methods in molecular biology, v. 179

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rapley, Ralph; Aquino de Muro, Marilena

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  18. Enumeration of Combinatorial Classes of Single Variable Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    A vector field in the space of degree d monic, centered single variable complex polynomial vector fields has a combinatorial structure which can be fully described by a combinatorial data set consisting of an equivalence relation and a marked subset on the integers mod 2d-2, satisfying certain...

  19. Combinatorial enzyme technology for the conversion of agricultural fibers to functional properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concept of combinatorial chemistry has received little attention in agriculture and food research, although its applications in this area were described more than fifteen years ago (1, 2). More recently, interest in the use of combinatorial chemistry in agrochemical discovery has been revitalize...

  20. Validation of an Instrument and Testing Protocol for Measuring the Combinatorial Analysis Schema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staver, John R.; Harty, Harold

    1979-01-01

    Designs a testing situation to examine the presence of combinatorial analysis, to establish construct validity in the use of an instrument, Combinatorial Analysis Behavior Observation Scheme (CABOS), and to investigate the presence of the schema in young adolescents. (Author/GA)

  1. Solving the neutron diffusion equation on combinatorial geometry computational cells for reactor physics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Y. Y.

    2004-01-01

    An approach is developed for solving the neutron diffusion equation on combinatorial geometry computational cells, that is computational cells composed by combinatorial operations involving simple-shaped component cells. The only constraint on the component cells from which the combinatorial cells are assembled is that they possess a legitimate discretization of the underlying diffusion equation. We use the Finite Difference (FD) approximation of the x, y-geometry diffusion equation in this work. Performing the same combinatorial operations involved in composing the combinatorial cell on these discrete-variable equations yields equations that employ new discrete variables defined only on the combinatorial cell's volume and faces. The only approximation involved in this process, beyond the truncation error committed in discretizing the diffusion equation over each component cell, is a consistent-order Legendre series expansion. Preliminary results for simple configurations establish the accuracy of the solution to the combinatorial geometry solution compared to straight FD as the system dimensions decrease. Furthermore numerical results validate the consistent Legendre-series expansion order by illustrating the second order accuracy of the combinatorial geometry solution, the same as standard FD. Nevertheless the magnitude of the error for the new approach is larger than FD's since it incorporates the additional truncated series approximation. (authors)

  2. An Investigation into Post-Secondary Students' Understanding of Combinatorial Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulone, Vincent William

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to study aspects of how post-secondary students understand combinatorial problems. Within this dissertation, I considered understanding through two different lenses: i) student connections to previous problems; and ii) common combinatorial distinctions such as ordered versus unordered and repetitive versus…

  3. Combinatorial techniques to efficiently investigate and optimize organic thin film processing and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieberger, Florian; Kolb, Tristan; Neuber, Christian; Ober, Christopher K; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2013-04-08

    In this article we present several developed and improved combinatorial techniques to optimize processing conditions and material properties of organic thin films. The combinatorial approach allows investigations of multi-variable dependencies and is the perfect tool to investigate organic thin films regarding their high performance purposes. In this context we develop and establish the reliable preparation of gradients of material composition, temperature, exposure, and immersion time. Furthermore we demonstrate the smart application of combinations of composition and processing gradients to create combinatorial libraries. First a binary combinatorial library is created by applying two gradients perpendicular to each other. A third gradient is carried out in very small areas and arranged matrix-like over the entire binary combinatorial library resulting in a ternary combinatorial library. Ternary combinatorial libraries allow identifying precise trends for the optimization of multi-variable dependent processes which is demonstrated on the lithographic patterning process. Here we verify conclusively the strong interaction and thus the interdependency of variables in the preparation and properties of complex organic thin film systems. The established gradient preparation techniques are not limited to lithographic patterning. It is possible to utilize and transfer the reported combinatorial techniques to other multi-variable dependent processes and to investigate and optimize thin film layers and devices for optical, electro-optical, and electronic applications.

  4. Combinatorial Techniques to Efficiently Investigate and Optimize Organic Thin Film Processing and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Werner Schmidt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present several developed and improved combinatorial techniques to optimize processing conditions and material properties of organic thin films. The combinatorial approach allows investigations of multi-variable dependencies and is the perfect tool to investigate organic thin films regarding their high performance purposes. In this context we develop and establish the reliable preparation of gradients of material composition, temperature, exposure, and immersion time. Furthermore we demonstrate the smart application of combinations of composition and processing gradients to create combinatorial libraries. First a binary combinatorial library is created by applying two gradients perpendicular to each other. A third gradient is carried out in very small areas and arranged matrix-like over the entire binary combinatorial library resulting in a ternary combinatorial library. Ternary combinatorial libraries allow identifying precise trends for the optimization of multi-variable dependent processes which is demonstrated on the lithographic patterning process. Here we verify conclusively the strong interaction and thus the interdependency of variables in the preparation and properties of complex organic thin film systems. The established gradient preparation techniques are not limited to lithographic patterning. It is possible to utilize and transfer the reported combinatorial techniques to other multi-variable dependent processes and to investigate and optimize thin film layers and devices for optical, electro-optical, and electronic applications.

  5. Evaluation of F-18-labeled 5-iodocytidine ({sup 18}F-FIAC) as a new potential positron emission tomography probe for herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Pei-Chia; Wu, Chun-Yi; Chang, Wen-Yi; Chang, Wei-Ting [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Alauddin, Mian [Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, TX, 77054 (United States); Liu, Ren-Shan [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine and National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wuu-Jyh [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan, 32546, Taiwan (China); Chen, Fu-Du [College of Health and Leisure Science, TransWorld University, Yunlin, 64063, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chuan-Lin, E-mail: clchen2@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Wang, Hsin-Ell, E-mail: hewang@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-15

    Objective: Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene in combination with radiolabeled nucleoside substrates is the most widely used reporter system. This study characterized 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-iodocytosine ({sup 18}F-FIAC) as a new potential positron emission tomography (PET) probe for HSV1-tk gene imaging and compared it with 2'-deoxy-2'-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-5-iodo-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil ({sup 18}F-FIAU) and 2'-deoxy-2'-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-5-ethyl-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil({sup 18}F-FEAU) (thymidine analogues) in an NG4TL4-WT/STK sarcoma-bearing mouse model. Methods: A cellular uptake assay, biodistribution study, radioactive metabolites assay and microPET imaging of NG4TL4-WT/STK tumor-bearing mice post administration of {sup 18}F-FIAC, {sup 18}F-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FEAU were conducted to characterize the biological properties of these tracers. Results: Highly specific uptake of {sup 18}F-FIAC, {sup 18}F-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FEAU in tk-transfected [tk(+)] cells was observed. The tk(+)-to-tk(-) cellular uptake ratio after a 2-h incubation was 66.6{+-}25.1, 76.3{+-}18.2 and 247.2{+-}37.2, respectively. In biodistribution studies, {sup 18}F-FIAC showed significant tk(+) tumor specificity (12.6; expressed as the tk(+)-to-tk(-) tumor uptake ratio at 2 h postinjection) comparable with {sup 18}F-FIAU (15.8) but lower than {sup 18}F-FEAU (48.0). The results of microPET imaging also revealed the highly specific accumulation of these three radioprobes in the NG4TL4-tk(+) tumor. Conclusion: Our findings suggested that the cytidine analogue {sup 18}F-FIAC is a new potential PET probe for the imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression. {sup 18}F-FIAC may be regarded as the prodrug of {sup 18}F-FIAU in vivo.

  6. ON range searching in the group model and combinatorial discrepancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we establish an intimate connection between dynamic range searching in the group model and combinatorial discrepancy. Our result states that, for a broad class of range searching data structures (including all known upper bounds), it must hold that $t_u t_q=\\Omega(\\mbox{disc}^2......)$, where $t_u$ is the worst case update time, $t_q$ is the worst case query time, and disc is the combinatorial discrepancy of the range searching problem in question. This relation immediately implies a whole range of exceptionally high and near-tight lower bounds for all of the basic range searching...... problems. We list a few of them in the following: (1) For $d$-dimensional halfspace range searching, we get a lower bound of $t_u t_q=\\Omega(n^{1-1/d})$. This comes within an lg lg $n$ factor of the best known upper bound. (2) For orthogonal range searching, we get a lower bound of $t_u t...

  7. Combinatorial therapy discovery using mixed integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Kaifang; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Choi, William T; Donehower, Lawrence A; Sun, Jingchun; Pant, Dhruv; Liu, Zhandong

    2014-05-15

    Combinatorial therapies play increasingly important roles in combating complex diseases. Owing to the huge cost associated with experimental methods in identifying optimal drug combinations, computational approaches can provide a guide to limit the search space and reduce cost. However, few computational approaches have been developed for this purpose, and thus there is a great need of new algorithms for drug combination prediction. Here we proposed to formulate the optimal combinatorial therapy problem into two complementary mathematical algorithms, Balanced Target Set Cover (BTSC) and Minimum Off-Target Set Cover (MOTSC). Given a disease gene set, BTSC seeks a balanced solution that maximizes the coverage on the disease genes and minimizes the off-target hits at the same time. MOTSC seeks a full coverage on the disease gene set while minimizing the off-target set. Through simulation, both BTSC and MOTSC demonstrated a much faster running time over exhaustive search with the same accuracy. When applied to real disease gene sets, our algorithms not only identified known drug combinations, but also predicted novel drug combinations that are worth further testing. In addition, we developed a web-based tool to allow users to iteratively search for optimal drug combinations given a user-defined gene set. Our tool is freely available for noncommercial use at http://www.drug.liuzlab.org/. zhandong.liu@bcm.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. Causal gene identification using combinatorial V-structure search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ruichu; Zhang, Zhenjie; Hao, Zhifeng

    2013-07-01

    With the advances of biomedical techniques in the last decade, the costs of human genomic sequencing and genomic activity monitoring are coming down rapidly. To support the huge genome-based business in the near future, researchers are eager to find killer applications based on human genome information. Causal gene identification is one of the most promising applications, which may help the potential patients to estimate the risk of certain genetic diseases and locate the target gene for further genetic therapy. Unfortunately, existing pattern recognition techniques, such as Bayesian networks, cannot be directly applied to find the accurate causal relationship between genes and diseases. This is mainly due to the insufficient number of samples and the extremely high dimensionality of the gene space. In this paper, we present the first practical solution to causal gene identification, utilizing a new combinatorial formulation over V-Structures commonly used in conventional Bayesian networks, by exploring the combinations of significant V-Structures. We prove the NP-hardness of the combinatorial search problem under a general settings on the significance measure on the V-Structures, and present a greedy algorithm to find sub-optimal results. Extensive experiments show that our proposal is both scalable and effective, particularly with interesting findings on the causal genes over real human genome data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A combinatorial approach to diffeomorphism invariant quantum gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Quantum gauge theory in the connection representation uses functions of holonomies as configuration observables. Physical observables (gauge and diffeomorphism invariant) are represented in the Hilbert space of physical states; physical states are gauge and diffeomorphism invariant distributions on the space of functions of the holonomies of the edges of a certain family of graphs. Then a family of graphs embedded in the space manifold (satisfying certain properties) induces a representation of the algebra of physical observables. We construct a quantum model from the set of piecewise linear graphs on a piecewise linear manifold, and another manifestly combinatorial model from graphs defined on a sequence of increasingly refined simplicial complexes. Even though the two models are different at the kinematical level, they provide unitarily equivalent representations of the algebra of physical observables in separable Hilbert spaces of physical states (their s-knot basis is countable). Hence, the combinatorial framework is compatible with the usual interpretation of quantum field theory. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  10. A combinatorial approach to the design of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luis; Milanič, Martin; Legarreta, Leire; Medvedev, Paul; Malaina, Iker; de la Fuente, Ildefonso M

    2015-05-01

    We present two new problems of combinatorial optimization and discuss their applications to the computational design of vaccines. In the shortest λ-superstring problem, given a family S1,...,S(k) of strings over a finite alphabet, a set Τ of "target" strings over that alphabet, and an integer λ, the task is to find a string of minimum length containing, for each i, at least λ target strings as substrings of S(i). In the shortest λ-cover superstring problem, given a collection X1,...,X(n) of finite sets of strings over a finite alphabet and an integer λ, the task is to find a string of minimum length containing, for each i, at least λ elements of X(i) as substrings. The two problems are polynomially equivalent, and the shortest λ-cover superstring problem is a common generalization of two well known combinatorial optimization problems, the shortest common superstring problem and the set cover problem. We present two approaches to obtain exact or approximate solutions to the shortest λ-superstring and λ-cover superstring problems: one based on integer programming, and a hill-climbing algorithm. An application is given to the computational design of vaccines and the algorithms are applied to experimental data taken from patients infected by H5N1 and HIV-1.

  11. Device for preparing combinatorial libraries in powder metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shoufeng; Evans, Julian R G

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a powder-metering, -mixing, and -dispensing mechanism that can be used as a method for producing large numbers of samples for metallurgical evaluation or electrical or mechanical testing from multicomponent metal and cermet powder systems. It is designed to make use of the same commercial powders that are used in powder metallurgy and, therefore, to produce samples that are faithful to the microstructure of finished products. The particle assemblies produced by the device could be consolidated by die pressing, isostatic pressing, laser sintering, or direct melting. The powder metering valve provides both on/off and flow rate control of dry powders in open capillaries using acoustic vibration. The valve is simple and involves no relative movement, avoiding seizure with fine powders. An orchestra of such valves can be arranged on a building platform to prepare multicomponent combinatorial libraries. As with many combinatorial devices, identification and evaluation of sources of mixing error as a function of sample size is mandatory. Such an analysis is presented.

  12. Dissection of combinatorial control by the Met4 transcriptional complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Traci A; Jorgensen, Paul; Bognar, Andrew L; Peyraud, Caroline; Thomas, Dominique; Tyers, Mike

    2010-02-01

    Met4 is the transcriptional activator of the sulfur metabolic network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Lacking DNA-binding ability, Met4 must interact with proteins called Met4 cofactors to target promoters for transcription. Two types of DNA-binding cofactors (Cbf1 and Met31/Met32) recruit Met4 to promoters and one cofactor (Met28) stabilizes the DNA-bound Met4 complexes. To dissect this combinatorial system, we systematically deleted each category of cofactor(s) and analyzed Met4-activated transcription on a genome-wide scale. We defined a core regulon for Met4, consisting of 45 target genes. Deletion of both Met31 and Met32 eliminated activation of the core regulon, whereas loss of Met28 or Cbf1 interfered with only a subset of targets that map to distinct sectors of the sulfur metabolic network. These transcriptional dependencies roughly correlated with the presence of Cbf1 promoter motifs. Quantitative analysis of in vivo promoter binding properties indicated varying levels of cooperativity and interdependency exists between members of this combinatorial system. Cbf1 was the only cofactor to remain fully bound to target promoters under all conditions, whereas other factors exhibited different degrees of regulated binding in a promoter-specific fashion. Taken together, Met4 cofactors use a variety of mechanisms to allow differential transcription of target genes in response to various cues.

  13. A binary plasmid system for shuffling combinatorial antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, T A; Roben, P; O'Kennedy, R; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Lerner, R A

    1992-11-01

    We have used a binary system of replicon-compatible plasmids to test the potential for promiscuous recombination of heavy and light chains within sets of human Fab fragments isolated from combinatorial antibody libraries. Antibody molecules showed a surprising amount of promiscuity in that a particular heavy chain could recombine with multiple light chains with retention of binding to a protein antigen. The degree to which a given heavy chain productively paired with any light chain to bind antigen varied from 43% to 100% and depended strongly on the heavy-chain sequence. Such productive crosses resulted in a set of Fab fragments of similar apparent binding constants, which seemed to differ mainly in the amount of active Fab fragment produced in the bacterial cell. The dominance of the heavy chain in the antibody-antigen interaction was further explored in a set of directed crosses, in which heavy and light chains derived from antigen-specific clones were crossed with nonrelated heavy and light chains. In these crosses, an Fab fragment retained antigen binding only if it contained a heavy chain from an antigen-specific clone. In no case did the light chain confer detectable affinity when paired with indifferent heavy chains. The surprising promiscuity of heavy chains has ramifications for the evaluation of the diversity of combinatorial libraries made against protein antigens and should allow the combination of one such promiscuous heavy chain with an engineered light chain to form an Fab fragment carrying synthetic cofactors to assist in antibody catalysis.

  14. Simultaneous Disulfide and Boronic Acid Ester Exchange in Dynamic Combinatorial Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna L. Diemer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a promising tool for the discovery of complex receptors in supramolecular chemistry. At the heart of dynamic combinatorial chemistry are the reversible reactions that enable the exchange of building blocks between library members in dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs ensuring thermodynamic control over the system. If more than one reversible reaction operates in a single dynamic combinatorial library, the complexity of the system increases dramatically, and so does its possible applications. One can imagine two reversible reactions that operate simultaneously or two reversible reactions that operate independently. Both these scenarios have advantages and disadvantages. In this contribution, we show how disulfide exchange and boronic ester transesterification can function simultaneous in dynamic combinatorial libraries under appropriate conditions. We describe the detailed studies necessary to establish suitable reaction conditions and highlight the analytical techniques appropriate to study this type of system.

  15. Understanding Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy eating for girls Understanding food labels Understanding food labels There is lots of info on food ... need to avoid because of food allergies. Other food label terms top In addition to the Nutrition ...

  16. Development of combinatorial chemistry methods for coatings: high-throughput adhesion evaluation and scale-up of combinatorial leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; Chisholm, Bret J; Morris, William G; Cawse, James N; Flanagan, William P; Hassib, Lamyaa; Molaison, Chris A; Ezbiansky, Karin; Medford, George; Reitz, Hariklia

    2003-01-01

    Coupling of combinatorial chemistry methods with high-throughput (HT) performance testing and measurements of resulting properties has provided a powerful set of tools for the 10-fold accelerated discovery of new high-performance coating materials for automotive applications. Our approach replaces labor-intensive steps with automated systems for evaluation of adhesion of 8 x 6 arrays of coating elements that are discretely deposited on a single 9 x 12 cm plastic substrate. Performance of coatings is evaluated with respect to their resistance to adhesion loss, because this parameter is one of the primary considerations in end-use automotive applications. Our HT adhesion evaluation provides previously unavailable capabilities of high speed and reproducibility of testing by using a robotic automation, an expanded range of types of tested coatings by using the coating tagging strategy, and an improved quantitation by using high signal-to-noise automatic imaging. Upon testing, the coatings undergo changes that are impossible to quantitatively predict using existing knowledge. Using our HT methodology, we have developed several coatings leads. These HT screening results for the best coating compositions have been validated on the traditional scales of coating formulation and adhesion loss testing. These validation results have confirmed the superb performance of combinatorially developed coatings over conventional coatings on the traditional scale.

  17. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  18. Probe Techniques. Introductory Remarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emeleus, K. G. [School of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1968-04-15

    In this brief introduction to the session on probes, the history of theii development is first touched on briefly. Reference is then made to the significance of the work to be described by Medicus, for conductivity and recombination calculations, and by Lam and Su, for a wide range of medium and higher pressure plasmas. Finally, a number of other probe topics are mentioned, including multiple probes; probes in electronegative plasmas; resonance probes; probes in noisy discharges; probes as oscillation detectors; use of probes where space-charge is not negligible. (author)

  19. Design and Application of Synthetic Receptors for Recognition of Methylated Lysine and Supramolecular Affinity Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gober, Isaiah Nathaniel

    This dissertation involves the design and synthesis of new synthetic receptors and their application in the molecular recognition of methylated lysine and their use as tools for chemical biology. The dissertation is divided into four parts. The first section focuses on the development of a novel labeling method that is based on ligand-directed affinity labeling principles. In this labeling method, a synthetic receptor that binds to trimethyl lysine (Kme3) is attached through a linker to an electrophilic tag group that can react with a nucleophilic amine in a histone peptide. This affinity labeling probe, which we called CX4-ONBD, is equipped with an electrophilic tag that allows for turn-on fluorescence labeling of Kme3 histone peitdes. We show that the probe gives a pronounced turn-on fluorescence response when it is incubated with a histone peptide that contains Kme3 and a nearby reactive lysine. This probe also displays >5-fold selectivity in covalent labeling over an unmethylated lysine peptide. This represents the first time a synthetic receptor has been used for affinity labeling purposes, and it also expands on the chemical toolkit that is available for sensing PTMs like lysine methylation. In the second section, the supramolecular affinity labeling method that was optimized using CX4-ONBD was applied to the development of a real-time assay for measuring enzymatic activity. More specifically, the probe was used to create a turn-on fluorescence assay for histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and for inhibitor screening and IC50 determination. Most commercial kits for HDAC activity have limited substrate scope, and other common methods used for characterizing enzymatic activity often require chromatographic separation and are therefore not high-throughput. This small molecule receptor-mediated affinity labeling strategy allowed for facile readout of HDAC activity and inhibition. Overall, this application of supramolecular affinity labeling expands on the

  20. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both 32 P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis

  1. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  2. The construction of combinatorial manifolds with prescribed sets of links of vertices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaifullin, A A

    2008-01-01

    To every oriented closed combinatorial manifold we assign the set (with repetitions) of isomorphism classes of links of its vertices. The resulting transformation L is the main object of study in this paper. We pose an inversion problem for L and show that this problem is closely related to Steenrod's problem on the realization of cycles and to the Rokhlin-Schwartz-Thom construction of combinatorial Pontryagin classes. We obtain a necessary condition for a set of isomorphism classes of combinatorial spheres to belong to the image of L. (Sets satisfying this condition are said to be balanced.) We give an explicit construction showing that every balanced set of isomorphism classes of combinatorial spheres falls into the image of L after passing to a multiple set and adding several pairs of the form (Z,-Z), where -Z is the sphere Z with the orientation reversed. Given any singular simplicial cycle ξ of a space X, this construction enables us to find explicitly a combinatorial manifold M and a map φ:M→X such that φ * [M]=r[ξ] for some positive integer r. The construction is based on resolving singularities of ξ. We give applications of the main construction to cobordisms of manifolds with singularities and cobordisms of simple cells. In particular, we prove that every rational additive invariant of cobordisms of manifolds with singularities admits a local formula. Another application is the construction of explicit (though inefficient) local combinatorial formulae for polynomials in the rational Pontryagin classes of combinatorial manifolds

  3. Single-Labeled Oligonucleotides Showing Fluorescence Changes upon Hybridization with Target Nucleic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Tae Hwang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequence-specific detection of nucleic acids has been intensively studied in the field of molecular diagnostics. In particular, the detection and analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs is crucial for the identification of disease-causing genes and diagnosis of diseases. Sequence-specific hybridization probes, such as molecular beacons bearing the fluorophore and quencher at both ends of the stem, have been developed to enable DNA mutation detection. Interestingly, DNA mutations can be detected using fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes with only one fluorophore. This review summarizes recent research on single-labeled oligonucleotide probes that exhibit fluorescence changes after encountering target nucleic acids, such as guanine-quenching probes, cyanine-containing probes, probes containing a fluorophore-labeled base, and microenvironment-sensitive probes.

  4. Combinatorial Drug Screening Identifies Ewing Sarcoma-specific Sensitivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radic-Sarikas, Branka; Tsafou, Kalliopi P; Emdal, Kristina B.

    2017-01-01

    Improvements in survival for Ewing sarcoma pediatric and adolescent patients have been modest over the past 20 years. Combinations of anticancer agents endure as an option to overcome resistance to single treatments caused by compensatory pathways. Moreover, combinations are thought to lessen any...... associated adverse side effects through reduced dosing, which is particularly important in childhood tumors. Using a parallel phenotypic combinatorial screening approach of cells derived from three pediatric tumor types, we identified Ewing sarcoma-specific interactions of a diverse set of targeted agents...... including approved drugs. We were able to retrieve highly synergistic drug combinations specific for Ewing sarcoma and identified signaling processes important for Ewing sarcoma cell proliferation determined by EWS-FLI1 We generated a molecular target profile of PKC412, a multikinase inhibitor with strong...

  5. Combinatorial study of zinc tin oxide thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, M. G.; Sanderson, R. J.; Hill, I. G.

    2008-01-01

    Groups of thin-film transistors using a zinc tin oxide semiconductor layer have been fabricated via a combinatorial rf sputtering technique. The ZnO :SnO2 ratio of the film varies as a function of position on the sample, from pure ZnO to SnO2, allowing for a study of zinc tin oxide transistor performance as a function of channel stoichiometry. The devices were found to have mobilities ranging from 2to12cm2/Vs, with two peaks in mobility in devices at ZnO fractions of 0.80±0.03 and 0.25±0.05, and on/off ratios as high as 107. Transistors composed predominantly of SnO2 were found to exhibit light sensitivity which affected both the on/off ratios and threshold voltages of these devices.

  6. A Simple Combinatorial Codon Mutagenesis Method for Targeted Protein Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsare, Ketaki D; Andorfer, Mary C; Cardenas, Frida S; Chael, Julia R; Park, Hyun June; Lewis, Jared C

    2017-03-17

    Directed evolution is a powerful tool for optimizing enzymes, and mutagenesis methods that improve enzyme library quality can significantly expedite the evolution process. Here, we report a simple method for targeted combinatorial codon mutagenesis (CCM). To demonstrate the utility of this method for protein engineering, CCM libraries were constructed for cytochrome P450 BM3 , pfu prolyl oligopeptidase, and the flavin-dependent halogenase RebH; 10-26 sites were targeted for codon mutagenesis in each of these enzymes, and libraries with a tunable average of 1-7 codon mutations per gene were generated. Each of these libraries provided improved enzymes for their respective transformations, which highlights the generality, simplicity, and tunability of CCM for targeted protein engineering.

  7. Rationally reduced libraries for combinatorial pathway optimization minimizing experimental effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschek, Markus; Gerngross, Daniel; Panke, Sven

    2016-03-31

    Rational flux design in metabolic engineering approaches remains difficult since important pathway information is frequently not available. Therefore empirical methods are applied that randomly change absolute and relative pathway enzyme levels and subsequently screen for variants with improved performance. However, screening is often limited on the analytical side, generating a strong incentive to construct small but smart libraries. Here we introduce RedLibs (Reduced Libraries), an algorithm that allows for the rational design of smart combinatorial libraries for pathway optimization thereby minimizing the use of experimental resources. We demonstrate the utility of RedLibs for the design of ribosome-binding site libraries by in silico and in vivo screening with fluorescent proteins and perform a simple two-step optimization of the product selectivity in the branched multistep pathway for violacein biosynthesis, indicating a general applicability for the algorithm and the proposed heuristics. We expect that RedLibs will substantially simplify the refactoring of synthetic metabolic pathways.

  8. Discovery of DNA repair inhibitors by combinatorial library profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Benjamin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2011-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of DNA repair are emerging as potent and selective anti-cancer therapies, but the sheer magnitude of the protein networks involved in DNA repair processes poses obstacles to discovery of effective candidate drugs. To address this challenge, we used a subtractive combinatorial selection approach to identify a panel of peptide ligands that bind DNA repair complexes. Supporting the concept that these ligands have therapeutic potential, we show that one selected peptide specifically binds and non-competitively inactivates DNA-PKcs, a protein kinase critical in double-strand DNA break repair. In doing so, this ligand sensitizes BRCA-deficient tumor cells to genotoxic therapy. Our findings establish a platform for large-scale parallel screening for ligand-directed DNA repair inhibitors, with immediate applicability to cancer therapy. PMID:21343400

  9. A Robust Parallel Algorithm for Combinatorial Compressed Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Smith, Rodrigo; Tanner, Jared W.; Wechsung, Florian

    2018-04-01

    In previous work two of the authors have shown that a vector $x \\in \\mathbb{R}^n$ with at most $k Parallel-$\\ell_0$ decoding algorithm, where $\\mathrm{nnz}(A)$ denotes the number of nonzero entries in $A \\in \\mathbb{R}^{m \\times n}$. In this paper we present the Robust-$\\ell_0$ decoding algorithm, which robustifies Parallel-$\\ell_0$ when the sketch $Ax$ is corrupted by additive noise. This robustness is achieved by approximating the asymptotic posterior distribution of values in the sketch given its corrupted measurements. We provide analytic expressions that approximate these posteriors under the assumptions that the nonzero entries in the signal and the noise are drawn from continuous distributions. Numerical experiments presented show that Robust-$\\ell_0$ is superior to existing greedy and combinatorial compressed sensing algorithms in the presence of small to moderate signal-to-noise ratios in the setting of Gaussian signals and Gaussian additive noise.

  10. Statistical physics of hard combinatorial optimization: Vertex cover problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Typical-case computation complexity is a research topic at the boundary of computer science, applied mathematics, and statistical physics. In the last twenty years, the replica-symmetry-breaking mean field theory of spin glasses and the associated message-passing algorithms have greatly deepened our understanding of typical-case computation complexity. In this paper, we use the vertex cover problem, a basic nondeterministic-polynomial (NP)-complete combinatorial optimization problem of wide application, as an example to introduce the statistical physical methods and algorithms. We do not go into the technical details but emphasize mainly the intuitive physical meanings of the message-passing equations. A nonfamiliar reader shall be able to understand to a large extent the physics behind the mean field approaches and to adjust the mean field methods in solving other optimization problems.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of thin-film phosphor combinatorial libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordkovich, V. Z.; Jin, Zhengwu; Yamada, Y.; Fukumura, T.; Kawasaki, M.; Koinuma, H.

    2002-05-01

    The laser molecular beam epitaxy method was employed to fabricate thin-film combinatorial libraries of ZnO-based phosphors on different substrates. Fabrication of both pixel libraries, on the example of Fe-doped ZnO, and spread libraries, on the example of Eu-doped ZnO, has been demonstrated. Screening of the Fe-doped ZnO libraries led to the discovery of weak green cathodoluminescence with the maximum efficiency at the Fe content of 0.58 mol %. Screening of the Eu-doped ZnO libraries led to the discovery of unusual reddish-violet cathodoluminescence which is observed in a broad range of Eu concentration. No photoluminescence was registered in either system.

  12. Combinatorial and geometric aspects of Feynman graphs and Feynman integrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergbauer, Christoph

    2009-06-11

    The integrals associated to Feynman graphs must have been a source of frustration for particle physicists ever since. Indeed there is a delicate difference between being able to draw a Feynman graph and being able to compute the associated Feynman integral. Although perturbation theory has brought enormous breakthroughs, many physicists turned to more abstract developments in quantum field theory, looked for other ways to produce perturbational results, or left the field entirely. Nonetheless there is a significant number of physicists, computational and theoretical, who pursue the quest for concepts and algorithms to compute and understand those integrals to higher and higher orders. Their motivation is to help test the validity of the underlying physical theory. For a mathematician, Feynman graphs and their integrals provide a rich subject in their own right, independent of their computability. It was only recently though that the work of Bloch, Esnault and Kreimer has brought a growing interest of mathematicians from various disciplines to the subject. In fact it opened up a completely new direction of research: a motivic interpretation of Feynman graphs that unites their combinatorial, geometric and arithmetic aspects. This idea had been in the air for a while, based on computational results of Broadhurst and Kreimer, and on a theorem of Belkale and Brosnan related to a conjecture of Kontsevich about the generality of the underlying motives. A prerequisite for the motivic approach is a profound understanding of renormalization that was established less recently in a modern language by Connes and Kreimer. This dissertation studies the renormalization of Feynman graphs in position space using an adapted resolution of singularities, and makes two other contributions of mostly combinatorial nature to the subject. I hope this may serve as a reference for somebody who feels comfortable with the traditional position space literature and looks for a transition to the

  13. Combinatorial and geometric aspects of Feynman graphs and Feynman integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergbauer, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    The integrals associated to Feynman graphs must have been a source of frustration for particle physicists ever since. Indeed there is a delicate difference between being able to draw a Feynman graph and being able to compute the associated Feynman integral. Although perturbation theory has brought enormous breakthroughs, many physicists turned to more abstract developments in quantum field theory, looked for other ways to produce perturbational results, or left the field entirely. Nonetheless there is a significant number of physicists, computational and theoretical, who pursue the quest for concepts and algorithms to compute and understand those integrals to higher and higher orders. Their motivation is to help test the validity of the underlying physical theory. For a mathematician, Feynman graphs and their integrals provide a rich subject in their own right, independent of their computability. It was only recently though that the work of Bloch, Esnault and Kreimer has brought a growing interest of mathematicians from various disciplines to the subject. In fact it opened up a completely new direction of research: a motivic interpretation of Feynman graphs that unites their combinatorial, geometric and arithmetic aspects. This idea had been in the air for a while, based on computational results of Broadhurst and Kreimer, and on a theorem of Belkale and Brosnan related to a conjecture of Kontsevich about the generality of the underlying motives. A prerequisite for the motivic approach is a profound understanding of renormalization that was established less recently in a modern language by Connes and Kreimer. This dissertation studies the renormalization of Feynman graphs in position space using an adapted resolution of singularities, and makes two other contributions of mostly combinatorial nature to the subject. I hope this may serve as a reference for somebody who feels comfortable with the traditional position space literature and looks for a transition to the

  14. Combinatorial Pooling Enables Selective Sequencing of the Barley Gene Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardi, Stefano; Duma, Denisa; Alpert, Matthew; Cordero, Francesca; Beccuti, Marco; Bhat, Prasanna R.; Wu, Yonghui; Ciardo, Gianfranco; Alsaihati, Burair; Ma, Yaqin; Wanamaker, Steve; Resnik, Josh; Bozdag, Serdar; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Close, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    For the vast majority of species – including many economically or ecologically important organisms, progress in biological research is hampered due to the lack of a reference genome sequence. Despite recent advances in sequencing technologies, several factors still limit the availability of such a critical resource. At the same time, many research groups and international consortia have already produced BAC libraries and physical maps and now are in a position to proceed with the development of whole-genome sequences organized around a physical map anchored to a genetic map. We propose a BAC-by-BAC sequencing protocol that combines combinatorial pooling design and second-generation sequencing technology to efficiently approach denovo selective genome sequencing. We show that combinatorial pooling is a cost-effective and practical alternative to exhaustive DNA barcoding when preparing sequencing libraries for hundreds or thousands of DNA samples, such as in this case gene-bearing minimum-tiling-path BAC clones. The novelty of the protocol hinges on the computational ability to efficiently compare hundred millions of short reads and assign them to the correct BAC clones (deconvolution) so that the assembly can be carried out clone-by-clone. Experimental results on simulated data for the rice genome show that the deconvolution is very accurate, and the resulting BAC assemblies have high quality. Results on real data for a gene-rich subset of the barley genome confirm that the deconvolution is accurate and the BAC assemblies have good quality. While our method cannot provide the level of completeness that one would achieve with a comprehensive whole-genome sequencing project, we show that it is quite successful in reconstructing the gene sequences within BACs. In the case of plants such as barley, this level of sequence knowledge is sufficient to support critical end-point objectives such as map-based cloning and marker-assisted breeding. PMID:23592960

  15. Combinatorial pooling enables selective sequencing of the barley gene space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lonardi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available For the vast majority of species - including many economically or ecologically important organisms, progress in biological research is hampered due to the lack of a reference genome sequence. Despite recent advances in sequencing technologies, several factors still limit the availability of such a critical resource. At the same time, many research groups and international consortia have already produced BAC libraries and physical maps and now are in a position to proceed with the development of whole-genome sequences organized around a physical map anchored to a genetic map. We propose a BAC-by-BAC sequencing protocol that combines combinatorial pooling design and second-generation sequencing technology to efficiently approach denovo selective genome sequencing. We show that combinatorial pooling is a cost-effective and practical alternative to exhaustive DNA barcoding when preparing sequencing libraries for hundreds or thousands of DNA samples, such as in this case gene-bearing minimum-tiling-path BAC clones. The novelty of the protocol hinges on the computational ability to efficiently compare hundred millions of short reads and assign them to the correct BAC clones (deconvolution so that the assembly can be carried out clone-by-clone. Experimental results on simulated data for the rice genome show that the deconvolution is very accurate, and the resulting BAC assemblies have high quality. Results on real data for a gene-rich subset of the barley genome confirm that the deconvolution is accurate and the BAC assemblies have good quality. While our method cannot provide the level of completeness that one would achieve with a comprehensive whole-genome sequencing project, we show that it is quite successful in reconstructing the gene sequences within BACs. In the case of plants such as barley, this level of sequence knowledge is sufficient to support critical end-point objectives such as map-based cloning and marker-assisted breeding.

  16. Combinatorial pooling enables selective sequencing of the barley gene space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardi, Stefano; Duma, Denisa; Alpert, Matthew; Cordero, Francesca; Beccuti, Marco; Bhat, Prasanna R; Wu, Yonghui; Ciardo, Gianfranco; Alsaihati, Burair; Ma, Yaqin; Wanamaker, Steve; Resnik, Josh; Bozdag, Serdar; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Close, Timothy J

    2013-04-01

    For the vast majority of species - including many economically or ecologically important organisms, progress in biological research is hampered due to the lack of a reference genome sequence. Despite recent advances in sequencing technologies, several factors still limit the availability of such a critical resource. At the same time, many research groups and international consortia have already produced BAC libraries and physical maps and now are in a position to proceed with the development of whole-genome sequences organized around a physical map anchored to a genetic map. We propose a BAC-by-BAC sequencing protocol that combines combinatorial pooling design and second-generation sequencing technology to efficiently approach denovo selective genome sequencing. We show that combinatorial pooling is a cost-effective and practical alternative to exhaustive DNA barcoding when preparing sequencing libraries for hundreds or thousands of DNA samples, such as in this case gene-bearing minimum-tiling-path BAC clones. The novelty of the protocol hinges on the computational ability to efficiently compare hundred millions of short reads and assign them to the correct BAC clones (deconvolution) so that the assembly can be carried out clone-by-clone. Experimental results on simulated data for the rice genome show that the deconvolution is very accurate, and the resulting BAC assemblies have high quality. Results on real data for a gene-rich subset of the barley genome confirm that the deconvolution is accurate and the BAC assemblies have good quality. While our method cannot provide the level of completeness that one would achieve with a comprehensive whole-genome sequencing project, we show that it is quite successful in reconstructing the gene sequences within BACs. In the case of plants such as barley, this level of sequence knowledge is sufficient to support critical end-point objectives such as map-based cloning and marker-assisted breeding.

  17. Issues in Data Labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cowie, Roddy; Cox, Cate; Martin, Jeam-Claude; Batliner, Anton; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Karpouzis, Kostas; Cowie, Roddy; Pelachaud, Catherine; Petta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Labelling emotion databases is not a purely technical matter. It is bound up with theoretical issues. Different issues affect labelling of emotional content, labelling of the signs that convey emotion, and labelling of the relevant context. Linked to these are representational issues, involving time

  18. A Convergent Solid-Phase Synthesis of Actinomycin Analogues - Towards Implementation of Double-Combinatorial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Glenn; Nielsen, John

    1996-01-01

    The actinomycin antibiotics bind to nucleic acids via both intercalation and hydrogen bonding. We found this 'double-action attack' mechanism very attractive in our search for a novel class of nucleic acid binders. A highly convergent, solid-phase synthetic strategy has been developed for a class...... with the requirements for combinatorial synthesis and furthermore, the final segment condensation allows, for the first time, double-combinatorial chemistry to be performed where two combinatorial libraries can be reacted with each other. Copyright (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  19. Microscopic description of pair transfer between two superfluid Fermi systems: Combining phase-space averaging and combinatorial techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, David; Lacroix, Denis; Scamps, Guillaume; Hashimoto, Yukio

    2018-03-01

    In a mean-field description of superfluidity, particle number and gauge angle are treated as quasiclassical conjugated variables. This level of description was recently used to describe nuclear reactions around the Coulomb barrier. Important effects of the relative gauge angle between two identical superfluid nuclei (symmetric collisions) on transfer probabilities and fusion barrier have been uncovered. A theory making contact with experiments should at least average over different initial relative gauge-angles. In the present work, we propose a new approach to obtain the multiple pair transfer probabilities between superfluid systems. This method, called phase-space combinatorial (PSC) technique, relies both on phase-space averaging and combinatorial arguments to infer the full pair transfer probability distribution at the cost of multiple mean-field calculations only. After benchmarking this approach in a schematic model, we apply it to the collision 20O+20O at various energies below the Coulomb barrier. The predictions for one pair transfer are similar to results obtained with an approximated projection method, whereas significant differences are found for two pairs transfer. Finally, we investigated the applicability of the PSC method to the contact between nonidentical superfluid systems. A generalization of the method is proposed and applied to the schematic model showing that the pair transfer probabilities are reasonably reproduced. The applicability of the PSC method to asymmetric nuclear collisions is investigated for the 14O+20O collision and it turns out that unrealistically small single- and multiple pair transfer probabilities are obtained. This is explained by the fact that relative gauge angle play in this case a minor role in the particle transfer process compared to other mechanisms, such as equilibration of the charge/mass ratio. We conclude that the best ground for probing gauge-angle effects in nuclear reaction and/or for applying the proposed

  20. Mixed Map Labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Löffler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Point feature map labeling is a geometric visualization problem, in which a set of input points must be labeled with a set of disjoint rectangles (the bounding boxes of the label texts. It is predominantly motivated by label placement in maps but it also has other visualization applications. Typically, labeling models either use internal labels, which must touch their feature point, or external (boundary labels, which are placed outside the input image and which are connected to their feature points by crossing-free leader lines. In this paper we study polynomial-time algorithms for maximizing the number of internal labels in a mixed labeling model that combines internal and external labels. The model requires that all leaders are parallel to a given orientation θ ∈ [0, 2π, the value of which influences the geometric properties and hence the running times of our algorithms.

  1. KENO-IV/CG, the combinatorial geometry version of the KENO Monte Carlo criticality safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J.T.; Petrie, L.M.; Fraley, S.K.

    1979-09-01

    KENO-IV/CG was developed to merge the simple geometry input description utilized by combinatorial geometry with the repeating lattice feature of the original KENO geometry package. The result is a criticality code with the ability to model a complex system of repeating rectangular lattices inside a complicated three-dimensional geometry system. Furthermore, combinatorial geometry was modified to differentiate between combinatorial zones describing a particular KENO BOX to be repeated in a KENO array and those combinatorial zones describing geometry external to an array. This allows the user to maintain a simple coordinate system without any geometric conflict due to spatial overlap. Several difficult criticality design problems have been solved with the new geometry package in KENO-IV/CG, thus illustrating the power of the code to model difficult geometries with a minimum of effort

  2. Combinatorial thin film materials science: From alloy discovery and optimization to alloy design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebhardt, Thomas, E-mail: gebhardt@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Music, Denis; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2012-06-30

    This paper provides an overview of modern alloy development, from discovery and optimization towards alloy design, based on combinatorial thin film materials science. The combinatorial approach, combining combinatorial materials synthesis of thin film composition-spreads with high-throughput property characterization has proven to be a powerful tool to delineate composition-structure-property relationships, and hence to efficiently identify composition windows with enhanced properties. Furthermore, and most importantly for alloy design, theoretical models and hypotheses can be critically appraised. Examples for alloy discovery, optimization, and alloy design of functional as well as structural materials are presented. Using Fe-Mn based alloys as an example, we show that the combination of modern electronic-structure calculations with the highly efficient combinatorial thin film composition-spread method constitutes an effective tool for knowledge-based alloy design.

  3. Combinatorial computational chemistry approach to the design of metal catalysts for deNOx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endou, Akira; Jung, Changho; Kusagaya, Tomonori; Kubo, Momoji; Selvam, Parasuraman; Miyamoto, Akira

    2004-01-01

    Combinatorial chemistry is an efficient technique for the synthesis and screening of a large number of compounds. Recently, we introduced the combinatorial approach to computational chemistry for catalyst design and proposed a new method called ''combinatorial computational chemistry''. In the present study, we have applied this combinatorial computational chemistry approach to the design of precious metal catalysts for deNO x . As the first step of the screening of the metal catalysts, we studied Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, and Au clusters regarding the adsorption properties towards NO molecule. It was demonstrated that the energetically most stable adsorption state of NO on Ir model cluster, which was irrespective of both the shape and number of atoms including the model clusters

  4. Solidified self-nanoemulsifying formulation for oral delivery of combinatorial therapeutic regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Amit K; Thanki, Kaushik; Jain, Sanyog

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present work reports rationalized development and characterization of solidified self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for oral delivery of combinatorial (tamoxifen and quercetin) therapeutic regimen. METHODS: Suitable oil for the preparation of liquid SNEDDS was selected based...

  5. Performance analysis of demodulation with diversity -- A combinatorial approach I: Symmetric function theoretical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Dornstetter

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the presentation of a combinatorial approach, based on the theory of symmetric functions, for analyzing the performance of a family of demodulation methods used in mobile telecommunications.

  6. INdAM conference "CoMeTA 2013 - Combinatorial Methods in Topology and Algebra"

    CERN Document Server

    Delucchi, Emanuele; Moci, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Combinatorics plays a prominent role in contemporary mathematics, due to the vibrant development it has experienced in the last two decades and its many interactions with other subjects. This book arises from the INdAM conference "CoMeTA 2013 - Combinatorial Methods in Topology and Algebra,'' which was held in Cortona in September 2013. The event brought together emerging and leading researchers at the crossroads of Combinatorics, Topology and Algebra, with a particular focus on new trends in subjects such as: hyperplane arrangements; discrete geometry and combinatorial topology; polytope theory and triangulations of manifolds; combinatorial algebraic geometry and commutative algebra; algebraic combinatorics; and combinatorial representation theory. The book is divided into two parts. The first expands on the topics discussed at the conference by providing additional background and explanations, while the second presents original contributions on new trends in the topics addressed by the conference.

  7. Performance analysis of demodulation with diversity -- A combinatorial approach I: Symmetric function theoretical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Louis Dornstetter; Daniel Krob; Jean-Yves Thibon; Ekaterina A. Vassilieva

    2002-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the presentation of a combinatorial approach, based on the theory of symmetric functions, for analyzing the performance of a family of demodulation methods used in mobile telecommunications.

  8. Lexicographic goal programming and assessment tools for a combinatorial production problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NP-complete combinatorial problems often necessitate the use of near-optimal solution techniques including : heuristics and metaheuristics. The addition of multiple optimization criteria can further complicate : comparison of these solution technique...

  9. Combinatorial thin film materials science: From alloy discovery and optimization to alloy design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, Thomas; Music, Denis; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of modern alloy development, from discovery and optimization towards alloy design, based on combinatorial thin film materials science. The combinatorial approach, combining combinatorial materials synthesis of thin film composition-spreads with high-throughput property characterization has proven to be a powerful tool to delineate composition–structure–property relationships, and hence to efficiently identify composition windows with enhanced properties. Furthermore, and most importantly for alloy design, theoretical models and hypotheses can be critically appraised. Examples for alloy discovery, optimization, and alloy design of functional as well as structural materials are presented. Using Fe-Mn based alloys as an example, we show that the combination of modern electronic-structure calculations with the highly efficient combinatorial thin film composition-spread method constitutes an effective tool for knowledge-based alloy design.

  10. Phase Transitions in Combinatorial Optimization Problems Basics, Algorithms and Statistical Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Alexander K

    2005-01-01

    A concise, comprehensive introduction to the topic of statistical physics of combinatorial optimization, bringing together theoretical concepts and algorithms from computer science with analytical methods from physics. The result bridges the gap between statistical physics and combinatorial optimization, investigating problems taken from theoretical computing, such as the vertex-cover problem, with the concepts and methods of theoretical physics. The authors cover rapid developments and analytical methods that are both extremely complex and spread by word-of-mouth, providing all the necessary

  11. Combinatorial interpretations of particular evaluations of complete and elementary symmetric functions

    OpenAIRE

    Mongelli, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    The Jacobi-Stirling numbers and the Legendre-Stirling numbers of the first and second kind were first introduced in [6], [7]. In this paper we note that Jacobi-Stirling numbers and Legendre-Stirling numbers are specializations of elementary and complete symmetric functions. We then study combinatorial interpretations of this specialization and obtain new combinatorial interpretations of the Jacobi-Stirling and Legendre-Stirling numbers.

  12. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  13. Combinatorial and off-shell effects in new physics cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesler, Daniel

    2012-12-15

    Up to now, the Standard Model of elementary particle physics is in very good agreement with most data. However, it has various shortcomings which motivate the presence of new physics at the TeV scale. The first major step following a potential discovery of new particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the determination of their intrinsic properties, foremost masses and spins. Event topologies of new physics signals with a conserved parity motivated by precision data and the dark matter paradigm require for sophisticated measurement procedures, which have been developed in recent years. These techniques often rely on simplifying assumptions, albeit they need not necessarily be fulfilled. In this thesis we investigate the impact of combinatorial and off-shell effects on new physics cascades in three different contexts. A detailed understanding of these effects is essential for the topic of model parameter determination of new physics signatures at the LHC. First, we study the non-resonant contributions of a broad gluino on mass and spin measurements as a prime example for the importance of off-shell effects. A phenomenological scan over the gluino's width-to-mass ratio yields a severe smearing of invariant mass distributions and as a consequence thereof drastically shifted endpoint positions. Spin determinations, on the other hand, are barely affected and a model discrimination of the two prime candidates SUSY and UED is not at risk. In the second part, we assess the feasibility of the gluino dijet endpoint measurement in three fully inclusive scenarios at the LHC to investigate the impact of combinatorial and SUSY backgrounds on its precise determination. We develop a method to disentangle two major signal contributions and extract their associated edges with good accuracy. For this we use existent kinematic variables and propose new ones to overcome the former's deficiencies. The last part governs the issue of so-called 'fake combinatorics

  14. Application of computer assisted combinatorial chemistry in antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer agents design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burello, E.; Bologa, C.; Frecer, V.; Miertus, S.

    Combinatorial chemistry and technologies have been developed to a stage where synthetic schemes are available for generation of a large variety of organic molecules. The innovative concept of combinatorial design assumes that screening of a large and diverse library of compounds will increase the probability of finding an active analogue among the compounds tested. Since the rate at which libraries are screened for activity currently constitutes a limitation to the use of combinatorial technologies, it is important to be selective about the number of compounds to be synthesized. Early experience with combinatorial chemistry indicated that chemical diversity alone did not result in a significant increase in the number of generated lead compounds. Emphasis has therefore been increasingly put on the use of computer assisted combinatorial chemical techniques. Computational methods are valuable in the design of virtual libraries of molecular models. Selection strategies based on computed physicochemical properties of the models or of a target compound are introduced to reduce the time and costs of library synthesis and screening. In addition, computational structure-based library focusing methods can be used to perform in silico screening of the activity of compounds against a target receptor by docking the ligands into the receptor model. Three case studies are discussed dealing with the design of targeted combinatorial libraries of inhibitors of HIV-1 protease, P. falciparum plasmepsin and human urokinase as potential antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer drugs. These illustrate library focusing strategies.

  15. Succesful labelling schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Stacey, Julia

    2001-01-01

    . In the spring of 2001 MAPP carried out an extensive consumer study with special emphasis on the Nordic environmentally friendly label 'the swan'. The purpose was to find out how much consumers actually know and use various labelling schemes. 869 households were contacted and asked to fill in a questionnaire...... it into consideration when I go shopping. The respondent was asked to pick the most suitable answer, which described her use of each label. 29% - also called 'the labelling blind' - responded that they basically only knew the recycling label and the Government controlled organic label 'Ø-mærket'. Another segment of 6...

  16. Synthesizing labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.E.; Matwiyoff, N.A.; Unkefer, C.J.; Walker, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    A metabolic study is presented of the chemical reactions provided by isotopic labeling and NMR spectroscopy. Synthesis of 13 C-labeled D-glucose, a 6-carbon sugar, involves adding a labeled nitrile group to the 5-carbon sugar D-arabinose by reaction with labeled hydrogen cyanide. The product of this reaction is then reduced and hydrolyzed to a mixture of the labeled sugars. The two sugars are separated by absorption chromotography. The synthesis of 13 C-labeled L-tyrosine, an amino acid, is also presented

  17. Instant live-cell super-resolution imaging of cellular structures by nanoinjection of fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Simon; van de Linde, Sebastian; Lummer, Martina; Simonis, Matthias; Huser, Thomas; Sauer, Markus

    2015-02-11

    Labeling internal structures within living cells with standard fluorescent probes is a challenging problem. Here, we introduce a novel intracellular staining method that enables us to carefully control the labeling process and provides instant access to the inner structures of living cells. Using a hollow glass capillary with a diameter of <100 nm, we deliver functionalized fluorescent probes directly into the cells by (di)electrophoretic forces. The label density can be adjusted and traced directly during the staining process by fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate the potential of this technique by delivering and imaging a range of commercially available cell-permeable and nonpermeable fluorescent probes to cells.

  18. Integrated microfluidic probe station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, C M; Qasaimeh, M A; Brastaviceanu, T; Anderson, K; Kabakibo, Y; Juncker, D

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution--thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet--and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  19. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Using New Combinatorial Chemistry Derived Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Stucky, Galen D. (PI); McFarland, Eric W. (PI)

    2004-10-25

    Solar photoelectrochemical water-splitting has long been viewed as one of the “holy grails” of chemistry because of its potential impact as a clean, renewable method of fuel production. Several known photocatalytic semiconductors can be used; however, the fundamental mechanisms of the process remain poorly understood and no known material has the required properties for cost effective hydrogen production. In order to investigate morphological and compositional variations in metal oxides as they relate to opto-electrochemical properties, we have employed a combinatorial methodology using automated, high-throughput, electrochemical synthesis and screening together with conventional solid-state methods. This report discusses a number of novel, high-throughput instruments developed during this project for the expeditious discovery of improved materials for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Also described within this report are results from a variety of materials (primarily tungsten oxide, zinc oxide, molybdenum oxide, copper oxide and titanium dioxide) whose properties were modified and improved by either layering, inter-mixing, or doping with one or more transition metals. Furthermore, the morphologies of certain materials were also modified through the use of structure directing agents (SDA) during synthesis to create mesostructures (features 2-50 nm) that increased surface area and improved rates of hydrogen production.

  20. Individualized Pixel Synthesis and Characterization of Combinatorial Materials Chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Xiang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, an experimentally determined phase diagram requires studies of phase formation at a range of temperatures for each composition, which takes years of effort from multiple research groups. Combinatorial materials chip technology, featuring high-throughput synthesis and characterization, is able to determine the phase diagram of an entire composition spread of a binary or ternary system at a single temperature on one materials library, which, though significantly increasing efficiency, still requires many libraries processed at a series of temperatures in order to complete a phase diagram. In this paper, we propose a “one-chip method” to construct a complete phase diagram by individually synthesizing each pixel step by step with a progressive pulse of energy to heat at different temperatures while monitoring the phase evolution on the pixel in situ in real time. Repeating this process pixel by pixel throughout the whole chip allows the entire binary or ternary phase diagram to be mapped on one chip in a single experiment. The feasibility of this methodology is demonstrated in a study of a Ge-Sb-Te ternary alloy system, on which the amorphous-crystalline phase boundary is determined.

  1. Geometric differential evolution for combinatorial and programs spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraglio, A; Togelius, J; Silva, S

    2013-01-01

    Geometric differential evolution (GDE) is a recently introduced formal generalization of traditional differential evolution (DE) that can be used to derive specific differential evolution algorithms for both continuous and combinatorial spaces retaining the same geometric interpretation of the dynamics of the DE search across representations. In this article, we first review the theory behind the GDE algorithm, then, we use this framework to formally derive specific GDE for search spaces associated with binary strings, permutations, vectors of permutations and genetic programs. The resulting algorithms are representation-specific differential evolution algorithms searching the target spaces by acting directly on their underlying representations. We present experimental results for each of the new algorithms on a number of well-known problems comprising NK-landscapes, TSP, and Sudoku, for binary strings, permutations, and vectors of permutations. We also present results for the regression, artificial ant, parity, and multiplexer problems within the genetic programming domain. Experiments show that overall the new DE algorithms are competitive with well-tuned standard search algorithms.

  2. A Combinatorial Kin Discrimination System in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Nicholas A; Kraigher, Barbara; Stefanic, Polonca; Mandic-Mulec, Ines; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-03-21

    Multicellularity inherently involves a number of cooperative behaviors that are potentially susceptible to exploitation but can be protected by mechanisms such as kin discrimination. Discrimination of kin from non-kin has been observed in swarms of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, but the underlying molecular mechanism has been unknown. We used genetic, transcriptomic, and bioinformatic analyses to uncover kin recognition factors in this organism. Our results identified many molecules involved in cell-surface modification and antimicrobial production and response. These genes varied significantly in expression level and mutation phenotype among B. subtilis strains, suggesting interstrain variation in the exact kin discrimination mechanism used. Genome analyses revealed a substantial diversity of antimicrobial genes present in unique combinations in different strains, with many likely acquired by horizontal gene transfer. The dynamic combinatorial effect derived from this plethora of kin discrimination genes creates a tight relatedness cutoff for cooperation that has likely led to rapid diversification within the species. Our data suggest that genes likely originally selected for competitive purposes also generate preferential interactions among kin, thus stabilizing multicellular lifestyles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Combinatorial Drug Screening Identifies Ewing Sarcoma-specific Sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radic-Sarikas, Branka; Tsafou, Kalliopi P; Emdal, Kristina B; Papamarkou, Theodore; Huber, Kilian V M; Mutz, Cornelia; Toretsky, Jeffrey A; Bennett, Keiryn L; Olsen, Jesper V; Brunak, Søren; Kovar, Heinrich; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    Improvements in survival for Ewing sarcoma pediatric and adolescent patients have been modest over the past 20 years. Combinations of anticancer agents endure as an option to overcome resistance to single treatments caused by compensatory pathways. Moreover, combinations are thought to lessen any associated adverse side effects through reduced dosing, which is particularly important in childhood tumors. Using a parallel phenotypic combinatorial screening approach of cells derived from three pediatric tumor types, we identified Ewing sarcoma-specific interactions of a diverse set of targeted agents including approved drugs. We were able to retrieve highly synergistic drug combinations specific for Ewing sarcoma and identified signaling processes important for Ewing sarcoma cell proliferation determined by EWS-FLI1 We generated a molecular target profile of PKC412, a multikinase inhibitor with strong synergistic propensity in Ewing sarcoma, revealing its targets in critical Ewing sarcoma signaling routes. Using a multilevel experimental approach including quantitative phosphoproteomics, we analyzed the molecular rationale behind the disease-specific synergistic effect of simultaneous application of PKC412 and IGF1R inhibitors. The mechanism of the drug synergy between these inhibitors is different from the sum of the mechanisms of the single agents. The combination effectively inhibited pathway crosstalk and averted feedback loop repression, in EWS-FLI1-dependent manner. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(1); 88-101. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Combinatorial approaches to evaluate nanodiamond uptake and induced cellular fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldawud, Reem; Reitzig, Manuela; Opitz, Jörg; Rojansakul, Yon; Jiang, Wenjuan; Nangia, Shikha; Zoica Dinu, Cerasela

    2016-02-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are an emerging class of engineered nanomaterials that hold great promise for the next generation of bionanotechnological products to be used for drug and gene delivery, or for bio-imaging and biosensing. Previous studies have shown that upon their cellular uptake, NDs exhibit high biocompatibility in various in vitro and in vivo set-ups. Herein we hypothesized that the increased NDs biocompatibility is a result of minimum membrane perturbations and their reduced ability to induce disruption or damage during cellular translocation. Using multi-scale combinatorial approaches that simulate ND-membrane interactions, we correlated NDs real-time cellular uptake and kinetics with the ND-induced membrane fluctuations to derive energy requirements for the uptake to occur. Our discrete and real-time analyses showed that the majority of NDs internalization occurs within 2 h of cellular exposure, however, with no effects on cellular viability, proliferation or cellular behavior. Furthermore, our simulation analyses using coarse-grained models identified key changes in the energy profile, membrane deformation and recovery time, all functions of the average ND or ND-based agglomerate size. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for ND-cell membrane interactions could possibly advance their implementation in various biomedical applications.

  5. Combinatorial approaches to evaluate nanodiamond uptake and induced cellular fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldawud, Reem; Reitzig, Manuela; Opitz, Jörg; Rojansakul, Yon; Jiang, Wenjuan; Nangia, Shikha; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are an emerging class of engineered nanomaterials that hold great promise for the next generation of bionanotechnological products to be used for drug and gene delivery, or for bio-imaging and biosensing. Previous studies have shown that upon their cellular uptake, NDs exhibit high biocompatibility in various in vitro and in vivo set-ups. Herein we hypothesized that the increased NDs biocompatibility is a result of minimum membrane perturbations and their reduced ability to induce disruption or damage during cellular translocation. Using multi-scale combinatorial approaches that simulate ND-membrane interactions, we correlated NDs real-time cellular uptake and kinetics with the ND-induced membrane fluctuations to derive energy requirements for the uptake to occur. Our discrete and real-time analyses showed that the majority of NDs internalization occurs within 2 h of cellular exposure, however, with no effects on cellular viability, proliferation or cellular behavior. Furthermore, our simulation analyses using coarse-grained models identified key changes in the energy profile, membrane deformation and recovery time, all functions of the average ND or ND-based agglomerate size. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for ND-cell membrane interactions could possibly advance their implementation in various biomedical applications. PMID:26820775

  6. Quantum particle swarm approaches applied to combinatorial problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolau, Andressa dos S.; Schirru, Roberto; Lima, Alan M.M. de, E-mail: andressa@lmp.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Quantum Particle Swarm Optimization (QPSO) is a global convergence algorithm that combines the classical PSO philosophy and quantum mechanics to improve performance of PSO. Different from PSO it only has the 'measurement' of the position equation for all particles. The process of 'measurement' in quantum mechanics, obey classic laws while the particle itself follows the quantum rules. QPSO works like PSO in search ability but has fewer parameters control. In order to improve the QPSO performance, some strategies have been proposed in the literature. Weighted QPSO (WQPSO) is a version of QPSO, where weight parameter is insert in the calculation of the balance between the global and local searching of the algorithm. It has been shown to perform well in finding the optimal solutions for many optimization problems. In this article random confinement was introduced in WQPSO. The WQPSO with random confinement was tested in two combinatorial problems. First, we execute the model on Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP) to find the parameters' values resulting in good solutions in general. Finally, the model was tested on Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem, and the performance was compared with QPSO standard. (author)

  7. Combinatorial Approaches for the Identification of Brain Drug Delivery Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Charles C.; Zhang, Xiaobin; Shusta, Eric V.

    2018-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a large obstacle for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Targeting endogenous nutrient transporters that transcytose the BBB is one promising approach to selectively and noninvasively deliver a drug payload to the brain. The main limitations of the currently employed transcytosing receptors are their ubiquitous expression in the peripheral vasculature and the inherent low levels of transcytosis mediated by such systems. In this review, approaches designed to increase the repertoire of transcytosing receptors which can be targeted for the purpose of drug delivery are discussed. In particular, combinatorial protein libraries can be screened on BBB cells in vitro or in vivo to isolate targeting peptides or antibodies that can trigger transcytosis. Once these targeting reagents are discovered, the cognate BBB transcytosis system can be identified using techniques such as expression cloning or immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry. Continued technological advances in BBB genomics and proteomics, membrane protein manipulation, and in vitro BBB technology promise to further advance the capability to identify and optimize peptides and antibodies capable of mediating drug transport across the BBB. PMID:23789958

  8. Combinatorial set theory with a gentle introduction to forcing

    CERN Document Server

    Halbeisen, Lorenz J

    2017-01-01

    This book, now in a thoroughly revised second edition, provides a comprehensive and accessible introduction to modern set theory. Following an overview of basic notions in combinatorics and first-order logic, the author outlines the main topics of classical set theory in the second part, including Ramsey theory and the axiom of choice. The revised edition contains new permutation models and recent results in set theory without the axiom of choice. The third part explains the sophisticated technique of forcing in great detail, now including a separate chapter on Suslin’s problem. The technique is used to show that certain statements are neither provable nor disprovable from the axioms of set theory. In the final part, some topics of classical set theory are revisited and further developed in light of forcing, with new chapters on Sacks Forcing and Shelah’s astonishing construction of a model with finitely many Ramsey ultrafilters. Written for graduate students in axiomatic set theory, Combinatorial Set Th...

  9. Combinatorial MAPLE gradient thin film assemblies signalling to human osteoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Emanuel; Sima, Felix; Elena Sima, Livia; Serban, Natalia; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N; Erginer, Merve; Toksoy Oner, Ebru; Eroglu, Mehmet S; Petrescu, Stefana M

    2014-01-01

    There is increased interest in smart bioactive materials to control tissue regeneration for the engineering of cell instructive scaffolds. We introduced combinatorial matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (C-MAPLE) as a new method for the fabrication of organic thin films with a compositional gradient. Synchronized C-MAPLE of levan and oxidized levan was employed to assemble a two-compound biopolymer film structure. The gradient of the film composition was validated by fluorescence microscopy. In this study, we investigated the cell response induced by the compositional gradient using imaging of early osteoblast attachment and analysis of signalling phosphoprotein expression. Cells attached along the gradient in direct proportion to oxidized levan concentration. During this process distinct areas of the binary gradient have been shown to modulate the osteoblasts’ extracellular signal-regulated kinase signalling with different propensity. The proposed fabrication method results in the preparation of a new bioactive material, which could control the cell signalling response. This approach can be extended to screen new bioactive interfaces for tissue regeneration. (papers)

  10. Combinatorial chemoenzymatic synthesis and high-throughput screening of sialosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokhawala, Harshal A; Huang, Shengshu; Lau, Kam; Yu, Hai; Cheng, Jiansong; Thon, Vireak; Hurtado-Ziola, Nancy; Guerrero, Juan A; Varki, Ajit; Chen, Xi

    2008-09-19

    Although the vital roles of structures containing sialic acid in biomolecular recognition are well documented, limited information is available on how sialic acid structural modifications, sialyl linkages, and the underlying glycan structures affect the binding or the activity of sialic acid-recognizing proteins and related downstream biological processes. A novel combinatorial chemoenzymatic method has been developed for the highly efficient synthesis of biotinylated sialosides containing different sialic acid structures and different underlying glycans in 96-well plates from biotinylated sialyltransferase acceptors and sialic acid precursors. By transferring the reaction mixtures to NeutrAvidin-coated plates and assaying for the yields of enzymatic reactions using lectins recognizing sialyltransferase acceptors but not the sialylated products, the biotinylated sialoside products can be directly used, without purification, for high-throughput screening to quickly identify the ligand specificity of sialic acid-binding proteins. For a proof-of-principle experiment, 72 biotinylated alpha2,6-linked sialosides were synthesized in 96-well plates from 4 biotinylated sialyltransferase acceptors and 18 sialic acid precursors using a one-pot three-enzyme system. High-throughput screening assays performed in NeutrAvidin-coated microtiter plates show that whereas Sambucus nigra Lectin binds to alpha2,6-linked sialosides with high promiscuity, human Siglec-2 (CD22) is highly selective for a number of sialic acid structures and the underlying glycans in its sialoside ligands.

  11. Directed combinatorial mutagenesis of Escherichia coli for complex phenotype engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rongming; Liang, Liya; Garst, Andrew D.; Choudhury, Alaksh; Nogué, Violeta Sànchez i.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Gill, Ryan T.

    2018-05-01

    Strain engineering for industrial production requires a targeted improvement of multiple complex traits, which range from pathway flux to tolerance to mixed sugar utilization. Here, we report the use of an iterative CRISPR EnAbled Trackable genome Engineering (iCREATE) method to engineer rapid glucose and xylose co-consumption and tolerance to hydrolysate inhibitors in E. coli. Deep mutagenesis libraries were rationally designed, constructed, and screened to target ~40,000 mutations across 30 genes. These libraries included global and high-level regulators that regulate global gene expression, transcription factors that play important roles in genome-level transcription, enzymes that function in the sugar transport system, NAD(P)H metabolism, and the aldehyde reduction system. Specific mutants that conferred increased growth in mixed sugars and hydrolysate tolerance conditions were isolated, confirmed, and evaluated for changes in genome-wide expression levels. We tested the strain with positive combinatorial mutations for 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) production under high furfural and high acetate hydrolysate fermentation, which demonstrated a 7- and 8-fold increase in 3HP productivity relative to the parent strain, respectively.

  12. Combinatorial Models for Assembly and Decomposition of Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Bojko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the most popular combinatorial models that are used for the synthesis of design solutions at the stage of the assembly process flow preparation. It shows that while assembling the product the relations of parts can be represented as a structure of preferences, which is formed on the basis of objective design restrictions put in at the stage of the product design. This structure is a binary preference relation pre-order. Its symmetrical part is equivalence and describes the entry of parts into the assembly unit. The asymmetric part is a partial order. It specifies part- ordering time in in the course of the assembly process. The structure of preferences is a minimal description of the restrictions and constraints in the assembly process. It can serve as a source for generating multiple assembly sequences of a product and its components, which are allowed by design. This multiplicity increases the likelihood of rational choice under uncertainty, unpredictable changes in the properties of technological or industrial systems.Incomplete dominance relation gives grounds for further examination and better understanding of the project situation. Operation field of the study is limited to a set of disparate elements of the partial order. Different strategies for processing the disparate elements may be offered, e.g. selection of the most informative pairs, comparison of which foremost linearizes the original partial order.

  13. Combinatorial neural codes from a mathematical coding theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Carina; Itskov, Vladimir; Morrison, Katherine; Roth, Zachary; Walker, Judy L

    2013-07-01

    Shannon's seminal 1948 work gave rise to two distinct areas of research: information theory and mathematical coding theory. While information theory has had a strong influence on theoretical neuroscience, ideas from mathematical coding theory have received considerably less attention. Here we take a new look at combinatorial neural codes from a mathematical coding theory perspective, examining the error correction capabilities of familiar receptive field codes (RF codes). We find, perhaps surprisingly, that the high levels of redundancy present in these codes do not support accurate error correction, although the error-correcting performance of receptive field codes catches up to that of random comparison codes when a small tolerance to error is introduced. However, receptive field codes are good at reflecting distances between represented stimuli, while the random comparison codes are not. We suggest that a compromise in error-correcting capability may be a necessary price to pay for a neural code whose structure serves not only error correction, but must also reflect relationships between stimuli.

  14. On Some Algebraic and Combinatorial Properties of Dunkl Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Anatol N.

    2013-06-01

    We introduce and study a certain class of nonhomogeneous quadratic algebras together with the special set of mutually commuting elements inside of each, the so-called Dunkl elements. We describe relations among the Dunkl elements. This result is a further generalization of similar results obtained in [S. Fomin and A. N. Kirillov, Quadratic algebras, Dunkl elements and Schubert calculus, in Advances in Geometry (eds. J.-S. Brylinski, V. Nistor, B. Tsygan and P. Xu), Progress in Math. Vol. 172 (Birkhäuser Boston, Boston, 1995), pp. 147-182, A. Postnikov, On a quantum version of Pieri's formula, in Advances in Geometry (eds. J.-S. Brylinski, R. Brylinski, V. Nistor, B. Tsygan and P. Xu), Progress in Math. Vol. 172 (Birkhäuser Boston, 1995), pp. 371-383 and A. N. Kirillov and T. Maenor, A Note on Quantum K-Theory of Flag Varieties, preprint]. As an application we describe explicitly the set of relations among the Gaudin elements in the group ring of the symmetric group, cf. [E. Mukhin, V. Tarasov and A. Varchenko, Bethe Subalgebras of the Group Algebra of the Symmetric Group, preprint arXiv:1004.4248]. Also we describe a few combinatorial properties of some special elements in the associative quasi-classical Yang-Baxter algebra in a connection with the values of the β-Grothendieck polynomials for some special permutations, and on the other hand, with the Ehrhart polynomial of the Chan-Robbins polytope.

  15. Binary Cockroach Swarm Optimization for Combinatorial Optimization Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibidun Christiana Obagbuwa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Cockroach Swarm Optimization (CSO algorithm is inspired by cockroach social behavior. It is a simple and efficient meta-heuristic algorithm and has been applied to solve global optimization problems successfully. The original CSO algorithm and its variants operate mainly in continuous search space and cannot solve binary-coded optimization problems directly. Many optimization problems have their decision variables in binary. Binary Cockroach Swarm Optimization (BCSO is proposed in this paper to tackle such problems and was evaluated on the popular Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP, which is considered to be an NP-hard Combinatorial Optimization Problem (COP. A transfer function was employed to map a continuous search space CSO to binary search space. The performance of the proposed algorithm was tested firstly on benchmark functions through simulation studies and compared with the performance of existing binary particle swarm optimization and continuous space versions of CSO. The proposed BCSO was adapted to TSP and applied to a set of benchmark instances of symmetric TSP from the TSP library. The results of the proposed Binary Cockroach Swarm Optimization (BCSO algorithm on TSP were compared to other meta-heuristic algorithms.

  16. Quantum particle swarm approaches applied to combinatorial problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau, Andressa dos S.; Schirru, Roberto; Lima, Alan M.M. de

    2017-01-01

    Quantum Particle Swarm Optimization (QPSO) is a global convergence algorithm that combines the classical PSO philosophy and quantum mechanics to improve performance of PSO. Different from PSO it only has the 'measurement' of the position equation for all particles. The process of 'measurement' in quantum mechanics, obey classic laws while the particle itself follows the quantum rules. QPSO works like PSO in search ability but has fewer parameters control. In order to improve the QPSO performance, some strategies have been proposed in the literature. Weighted QPSO (WQPSO) is a version of QPSO, where weight parameter is insert in the calculation of the balance between the global and local searching of the algorithm. It has been shown to perform well in finding the optimal solutions for many optimization problems. In this article random confinement was introduced in WQPSO. The WQPSO with random confinement was tested in two combinatorial problems. First, we execute the model on Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP) to find the parameters' values resulting in good solutions in general. Finally, the model was tested on Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem, and the performance was compared with QPSO standard. (author)

  17. Peptide mimic for influenza vaccination using nonnatural combinatorial chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, John J.; Tan, Mai Ping; Dolton, Garry; Galloway, Sarah A.E.; Laugel, Bruno; Makinde, Julia; Matthews, Katherine K.; Watkins, Thomas S.; Wong, Yide; Clark, Richard J.; Pentier, Johanne M.; Attaf, Meriem; Lissina, Anya; Ager, Ann; Gallimore, Awen; Gras, Stephanie; Rossjohn, Jamie; Burrows, Scott R.; Cole, David K.; Price, David A.

    2018-01-01

    Polypeptide vaccines effectively activate human T cells but suffer from poor biological stability, which confines both transport logistics and in vivo therapeutic activity. Synthetic biology has the potential to address these limitations through the generation of highly stable antigenic “mimics” using subunits that do not exist in the natural world. We developed a platform based on D–amino acid combinatorial chemistry and used this platform to reverse engineer a fully artificial CD8+ T cell agonist that mirrored the immunogenicity profile of a native epitope blueprint from influenza virus. This nonnatural peptide was highly stable in human serum and gastric acid, reflecting an intrinsic resistance to physical and enzymatic degradation. In vitro, the synthetic agonist stimulated and expanded an archetypal repertoire of polyfunctional human influenza virus–specific CD8+ T cells. In vivo, specific responses were elicited in naive humanized mice by subcutaneous vaccination, conferring protection from subsequent lethal influenza challenge. Moreover, the synthetic agonist was immunogenic after oral administration. This proof-of-concept study highlights the power of synthetic biology to expand the horizons of vaccine design and therapeutic delivery. PMID:29528337

  18. Combinatorial approaches to evaluate nanodiamond uptake and induced cellular fate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldawud, Reem; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica; Reitzig, Manuela; Opitz, Jörg; Rojansakul, Yon; Jiang, Wenjuan; Nangia, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are an emerging class of engineered nanomaterials that hold great promise for the next generation of bionanotechnological products to be used for drug and gene delivery, or for bio-imaging and biosensing. Previous studies have shown that upon their cellular uptake, NDs exhibit high biocompatibility in various in vitro and in vivo set-ups. Herein we hypothesized that the increased NDs biocompatibility is a result of minimum membrane perturbations and their reduced ability to induce disruption or damage during cellular translocation. Using multi-scale combinatorial approaches that simulate ND-membrane interactions, we correlated NDs real-time cellular uptake and kinetics with the ND-induced membrane fluctuations to derive energy requirements for the uptake to occur. Our discrete and real-time analyses showed that the majority of NDs internalization occurs within 2 h of cellular exposure, however, with no effects on cellular viability, proliferation or cellular behavior. Furthermore, our simulation analyses using coarse-grained models identified key changes in the energy profile, membrane deformation and recovery time, all functions of the average ND or ND-based agglomerate size. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for ND-cell membrane interactions could possibly advance their implementation in various biomedical applications. (paper)

  19. Combinatorial quantization of the Hamiltonian Chern-Simons theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.Yu.; Grosse, H.; Schomerus, V.

    1996-01-01

    This paper further develops the combinatorial approach to quantization of the Hamiltonian Chern Simons theory. Using the theory of quantum Wilson lines, we show how the Verlinde algebra appears within the context of quantum group gauge theory. This allows to discuss flatness of quantum connections so that we can give a mathematically rigorous definition of the algebra of observables A CS of the Chern Simons model. It is a *-algebra of ''functions on the quantum moduli space of flat connections'' and comes equipped with a positive functional ω (''integration''). We prove that this data does not depend on the particular choices which have been made in the construction. The algebra A CS provides a deformation quantization of the algebra of functions on the moduli space along the natural Poisson bracket induced by the Chern Simons action. We evaluate a volume of the quantized moduli space and prove that it coincides with the Verlinde number. This answer is also interpreted as a partition partition function of the lattice Yang-Mills theory corresponding to a quantum gauge group. (orig.). With 1 fig

  20. Automated Implanter Endstation for Combinatorial Materials Science with Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosshans, I.; Karl, H.; Stritzker, B.

    2003-01-01

    The discovery, understanding and optimization of new complex functional materials requires combinatorial synthesis techniques and fast screening instrumentation for the measurement of the samples. In this contribution the synthesis of buried II-VI compound semiconductor nanocrystals by ion-implantation in SiO2 on silicon will be presented. For that we constructed a computer controlled implanter target end station, in which a 4-inch wafer can be implanted with a lateral pattern of distinct dose, composition or energy combinations. The chemical reaction of the constituents is initiated either during the implantation process or ex-situ by a rapid thermal process, where a reactive atmosphere can be applied. The resulting optical photoluminescence properties of the individual fields of the pattern can then be screened in rapid succession in an optical cryostat into which the whole wafer is mounted and cooled down. In this way, complex interdependences of the physical parameters can be studied on a single wafer and the technically relevant properties optimized

  1. Combinatorial approaches to evaluate nanodiamond uptake and induced cellular fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldawud, Reem; Reitzig, Manuela; Opitz, Jörg; Rojansakul, Yon; Jiang, Wenjuan; Nangia, Shikha; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-02-26

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are an emerging class of engineered nanomaterials that hold great promise for the next generation of bionanotechnological products to be used for drug and gene delivery, or for bio-imaging and biosensing. Previous studies have shown that upon their cellular uptake, NDs exhibit high biocompatibility in various in vitro and in vivo set-ups. Herein we hypothesized that the increased NDs biocompatibility is a result of minimum membrane perturbations and their reduced ability to induce disruption or damage during cellular translocation. Using multi-scale combinatorial approaches that simulate ND-membrane interactions, we correlated NDs real-time cellular uptake and kinetics with the ND-induced membrane fluctuations to derive energy requirements for the uptake to occur. Our discrete and real-time analyses showed that the majority of NDs internalization occurs within 2 h of cellular exposure, however, with no effects on cellular viability, proliferation or cellular behavior. Furthermore, our simulation analyses using coarse-grained models identified key changes in the energy profile, membrane deformation and recovery time, all functions of the average ND or ND-based agglomerate size. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for ND-cell membrane interactions could possibly advance their implementation in various biomedical applications.

  2. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electronic Submission of Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  4. Robust Active Label Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremer, Jan; Sha, Fei; Igel, Christian

    2018-01-01

    for the noisy data lead to different active label correction algorithms. If loss functions consider the label noise rates, these rates are estimated during learning, where importance weighting compensates for the sampling bias. We show empirically that viewing the true label as a latent variable and computing......Active label correction addresses the problem of learning from input data for which noisy labels are available (e.g., from imprecise measurements or crowd-sourcing) and each true label can be obtained at a significant cost (e.g., through additional measurements or human experts). To minimize......). To select labels for correction, we adopt the active learning strategy of maximizing the expected model change. We consider the change in regularized empirical risk functionals that use different pointwise loss functions for patterns with noisy and true labels, respectively. Different loss functions...

  5. Pesticide Product Label System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the...

  6. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossum, R.T. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  7. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  8. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dazomet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find information from the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for products such as Basamid G, manufactured by Amvac.

  9. Soil Fumigant Labels - Chloropicrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company name, and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details on each fumigant. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  10. In situ optical sequencing and structure analysis of a trinucleotide repeat genome region by localization microscopy after specific COMBO-FISH nano-probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhlmüller, M.; Schwarz-Finsterle, J.; Fey, E.; Lux, J.; Bach, M.; Cremer, C.; Hinderhofer, K.; Hausmann, M.; Hildenbrand, G.

    2015-10-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions (like (CGG)n) of chromatin in the genome of cell nuclei can cause neurological disorders such as for example the Fragile-X syndrome. Until now the mechanisms are not clearly understood as to how these expansions develop during cell proliferation. Therefore in situ investigations of chromatin structures on the nanoscale are required to better understand supra-molecular mechanisms on the single cell level. By super-resolution localization microscopy (Spectral Position Determination Microscopy; SPDM) in combination with nano-probing using COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH), novel insights into the nano-architecture of the genome will become possible. The native spatial structure of trinucleotide repeat expansion genome regions was analysed and optical sequencing of repetitive units was performed within 3D-conserved nuclei using SPDM after COMBO-FISH. We analysed a (CGG)n-expansion region inside the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. The number of CGG repeats for a full mutation causing the Fragile-X syndrome was found and also verified by Southern blot. The FMR1 promotor region was similarly condensed like a centromeric region whereas the arrangement of the probes labelling the expansion region seemed to indicate a loop-like nano-structure. These results for the first time demonstrate that in situ chromatin structure measurements on the nanoscale are feasible. Due to further methodological progress it will become possible to estimate the state of trinucleotide repeat mutations in detail and to determine the associated chromatin strand structural changes on the single cell level. In general, the application of the described approach to any genome region will lead to new insights into genome nano-architecture and open new avenues for understanding mechanisms and their relevance in the development of heredity diseases.

  11. MARCC (Matrix-Assisted Reader Chromatin Capture): an antibody-free method to enrich and analyze combinatorial nucleosome modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhangli

    2016-01-01

    Combinatorial patterns of histone modifications are key indicators of different chromatin states. Most of the current approaches rely on the usage of antibodies to analyze combinatorial histone modifications. Here we detail an antibody-free method named MARCC (Matrix-Assisted Reader Chromatin Capture) to enrich combinatorial histone modifications. The combinatorial patterns are enriched on native nucleosomes extracted from cultured mammalian cells and prepared by micrococcal nuclease digestion. Such enrichment is achieved by recombinant chromatin-interacting protein modules, or so-called reader domains, which can bind in a combinatorial modification-dependent manner. The enriched chromatin can be quantified by western blotting or mass spectrometry for the co-existence of histone modifications, while the associated DNA content can be analyzed by qPCR or next-generation sequencing. Altogether, MARCC provides a reproducible, efficient and customizable solution to enrich and analyze combinatorial histone modifications. PMID:26131849

  12. A Label to Regulate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoire, Aurélie; Boxenbaum, Eva; Laurent, Brice

    This paper examines the role labelling plays in the government of the contemporary economy.1Drawing on a detailed study of BBC-Effinergy, a French label for sustainable construction, we showhow the adoption and evolution of voluntary labels can be seen as emblematic of a governmentthrough experim...

  13. Labelling subway lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, M.A.; Iturriaga, C.; Márquez, A.; Portillo, J.R.; Reyes, P.; Wolff, A.; Eades, P.; Takaoka, T.

    2001-01-01

    Graphical features on map, charts, diagrams and graph drawings usually must be annotated with text labels in order to convey their meaning. In this paper we focus on a problem that arises when labeling schematized maps, e.g. for subway networks. We present algorithms for labeling points on a line

  14. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the consequences of improper labeling.

  15. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Lists types of labels that do not require review.

  16. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the importance of labels and the role in enforcement.

  17. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about positive effects from proper labeling.

  18. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about types of labels.

  19. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about what labels require review.

  20. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section discusses the types of labels.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 26

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about mandatory and advisory label statements.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is about which labels require review.

  3. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See examples of mandatory and advisory label statements.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section covers supplemental distributor labeling.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See an overview of the importance of labels.

  6. Radioactive probes for human gene localisation by in situ hybridisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennell, S.J.

    1980-07-01

    Radioactive probes of high specific activity have been used for human gene localisation on metaphase chromosome preparations. Human 5S ribosomal RNA was used as a model system, as a probe for the localisation of human 5S ribosomal genes. 125 I-labelled mouse 5S ribosomal RNA was used to study the 5S ribosomal gene content and arrangement in families with translocations on the long arm of chromosome 1 close to or containing the 5S ribosomal RNA locus, by in situ hybridisation to human metaphase chromosomes from peripheral blood cultures. This confirmed the chromosomal assignment of 5S ribosomal genes to 1q 42-43. In situ hybridisation probes were also prepared from recombinant plasmids containing Xenopus laevis oocyte 5S or 28S/18S gene sequences to give [ 3 H]-labelled cRNA and [ 3 H]-labelled nick-translated plasmid DNA. Studies on the kinetics of hybridisation of plasmid probes with and without ribosomal gene sequences questioned the role of plasmid DNA for amplification of signal during gene localisation. Gene localisation was obtained with nick-translated plasmid DNA containing the 28S/18S ribosomal DNA insert after short exposure times, but poor results were obtained using a [ 3 H]-labelled cRNA probe transcribed from the plasmid with the 5S gene insert. (author)

  7. Study on radioactive labeling of molecular probes for Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhe; Zhang Jinming

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, the pathological features of AD include neuritic plaques composed of beta-amyloid protein, neurofibrillary tangles. Direct imaging of amyloid load in patients with AD in vivo would be useful for the early diagnosis of AD and the development and assessment of new treatment strategies. Different strategies are being used to develop compounds suitable for in vivo imaging of amyloid deposits in human brains. Two compounds, 18 F-FDDNP and 11 C-PIB, both show more binding in the brains of patients with AD than in those of healthy people. Additional compounds will probably be developed that are suitable not only for PET but also for single photon emission CT(SPECT). (authors)

  8. Evaluation of the Optimum Composition of Low-Temperature Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts for Methanol Oxidation by Combinatorial Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolini, Ermete

    2017-02-13

    Combinatorial chemistry and high-throughput screening represent an innovative and rapid tool to prepare and evaluate a large number of new materials, saving time and expense for research and development. Considering that the activity and selectivity of catalysts depend on complex kinetic phenomena, making their development largely empirical in practice, they are prime candidates for combinatorial discovery and optimization. This review presents an overview of recent results of combinatorial screening of low-temperature fuel cell electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation. Optimum catalyst compositions obtained by combinatorial screening were compared with those of bulk catalysts, and the effect of the library geometry on the screening of catalyst composition is highlighted.

  9. Probe-diverse ptychography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, I., E-mail: isaac.russellpeterson@rmit.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, the University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Harder, R. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Robinson, I.K. [Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    We propose an extension of ptychography where the target sample is scanned separately through several probes with distinct amplitude and phase profiles and a diffraction image is recorded for each probe and each sample translation. The resulting probe-diverse dataset is used to iteratively retrieve high-resolution images of the sample and all probes simultaneously. The method is shown to yield significant improvement in the reconstructed sample image compared to the image obtained using the standard single-probe ptychographic phase-retrieval scheme.

  10. Synthesis of 13C and 2H labelled retinals: spectroscopic investigations on isotopically labelled rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardoen, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to develop probes of the structure of chromophores, the author introduces isotopic modifications at specific chromophoric positions as structural probes. To obtain bacteriorhodopsin, rhodopsin and their photoproducts labelled in the chromophore at selected positions, bacterioopsin and opsin were reacted with the appropriate labelled a11-trans and 11-cis retinals. The author describes the synthesis of a11-trans retinal selectively 13 C labelled at different positions. The characterization of these labelled a11-trans retinals by mass spectrometry, 300 MHz 1 H NMR and 75 MHz 13 C NMR spectroscopy is given. The photochemical preparation and isolation of the pure 9-, 11- and 13-cis forms is described in the experimental part. (Auth.)

  11. Some constructions on total labelling of m triangles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voon, Chen Huey, E-mail: chenhv@utar.edu.my; Hui, Liew How, E-mail: liewhh@utar.edu.my; How, Yim Kheng, E-mail: tidusyimhome@hotmail.com [Department of Mathematical and Actuarial Sciences, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-06-02

    Let mK{sub 3} = (V{sub m}, E{sub m}) be a finite disconnected graph consisting of m disjoint triangles K{sub 3}, where V{sub m} is the set of vertices, E{sub m} is the set of edges and both V{sub m} and E{sub m} are of the same size 3m. A total labelling of mK{sub 3} is a function f which maps the elements in V{sub m} and E{sub m} to positive integer values, i.e. f : V{sub m} ∪ E{sub m} → {1, 2, 3,···}. Let c be a positive integer. A triangle is said have a c-Erdősian triangle labelling if it is a total labelling f : V{sub m} ∪ E{sub m} → {c, c + 1, ···, c + 6m − 1} such that f (x) + f (y) = f (xy) for any x, y ∈ V{sub m} and an edge xy ∈ E{sub m} joining them. In order to find all the c-Erdősian triangle labelling, a straightforward is to use the exhaustive search. However, the exhaustive search is only able to find c-Erdősian triangle labelling for m ≤ 5 due to combinatorial explosion. By studying the constant sum of vertex labels, we propose a strong permutation approach, which allows us to generate a certain classes of c-Erdősian triangle labelling up until m = 8.

  12. Some constructions on total labelling of m triangles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voon, Chen Huey; Hui, Liew How; How, Yim Kheng

    2016-01-01

    Let mK_3 = (V_m, E_m) be a finite disconnected graph consisting of m disjoint triangles K_3, where V_m is the set of vertices, E_m is the set of edges and both V_m and E_m are of the same size 3m. A total labelling of mK_3 is a function f which maps the elements in V_m and E_m to positive integer values, i.e. f : V_m ∪ E_m → {1, 2, 3,···}. Let c be a positive integer. A triangle is said have a c-Erdősian triangle labelling if it is a total labelling f : V_m ∪ E_m → {c, c + 1, ···, c + 6m − 1} such that f (x) + f (y) = f (xy) for any x, y ∈ V_m and an edge xy ∈ E_m joining them. In order to find all the c-Erdősian triangle labelling, a straightforward is to use the exhaustive search. However, the exhaustive search is only able to find c-Erdősian triangle labelling for m ≤ 5 due to combinatorial explosion. By studying the constant sum of vertex labels, we propose a strong permutation approach, which allows us to generate a certain classes of c-Erdősian triangle labelling up until m = 8.

  13. Traversing probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashburn, D.N.; Stevens, R.H.; Woodall, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride. 10 claims, 6 figures

  14. Traversing probe system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  15. Electrical resistivity probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  16. Oriented matroids—combinatorial structures underlying loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnemann, Johannes; Rideout, David

    2010-10-01

    We analyze combinatorial structures which play a central role in determining spectral properties of the volume operator (Ashtekar A and Lewandowski J 1998 Adv. Theor. Math. Phys. 1 388) in loop quantum gravity (LQG). These structures encode geometrical information of the embedding of arbitrary valence vertices of a graph in three-dimensional Riemannian space and can be represented by sign strings containing relative orientations of embedded edges. We demonstrate that these signature factors are a special representation of the general mathematical concept of an oriented matroid (Ziegler G M 1998 Electron. J. Comb.; Björner A et al 1999 Oriented Matroids (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)). Moreover, we show that oriented matroids can also be used to describe the topology (connectedness) of directed graphs. Hence, the mathematical methods developed for oriented matroids can be applied to the difficult combinatorics of embedded graphs underlying the construction of LQG. As a first application we revisit the analysis of Brunnemann and Rideout (2008 Class. Quantum Grav. 25 065001 and 065002), and find that enumeration of all possible sign configurations used there is equivalent to enumerating all realizable oriented matroids of rank 3 (Ziegler G M 1998 Electron. J. Comb.; Björner A et al 1999 Oriented Matroids (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)), and thus can be greatly simplified. We find that for 7-valent vertices having no coplanar triples of edge tangents, the smallest non-zero eigenvalue of the volume spectrum does not grow as one increases the maximum spin jmax at the vertex, for any orientation of the edge tangents. This indicates that, in contrast to the area operator, considering large jmax does not necessarily imply large volume eigenvalues. In addition we give an outlook to possible starting points for rewriting the combinatorics of LQG in terms of oriented matroids.

  17. Development of a large peptoid-DOTA combinatorial library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaspal; Lopes, Daniel; Gomika Udugamasooriya, D

    2016-09-01

    Conventional one-bead one-compound (OBOC) library synthesis is typically used to identify molecules with therapeutic value. The design and synthesis of OBOC libraries that contain molecules with imaging or even potentially therapeutic and diagnostic capacities (e.g. theranostic agents) has been overlooked. The development of a therapeutically active molecule with a built-in imaging component for a certain target is a daunting task, and structure-based rational design might not be the best approach. We hypothesize to develop a combinatorial library with potentially therapeutic and imaging components fused together in each molecule. Such molecules in the library can be used to screen, identify, and validate as direct theranostic candidates against targets of interest. As the first step in achieving that aim, we developed an on-bead library of 153,600 Peptoid-DOTA compounds in which the peptoids are the target-recognizing and potentially therapeutic components and the DOTA is the imaging component. We attached the DOTA scaffold to TentaGel beads using one of the four arms of DOTA, and we built a diversified 6-mer peptoid library on the remaining three arms. We evaluated both the synthesis and the mass spectrometric sequencing capacities of the test compounds and of the final library. The compounds displayed unique ionization patterns including direct breakages of the DOTA scaffold into two units, allowing clear decoding of the sequences. Our approach provides a facile synthesis method for the complete on-bead development of large peptidomimetic-DOTA libraries for screening against biological targets for the identification of potential theranostic agents in the future. © 2016 The Authors. Biopolymers Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 673-684, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Biopolymers Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Combinatorial chemistry on solid support in the search for central nervous system agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdel, Paweł; Pawłowski, Maciej; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2009-08-01

    The advent of combinatorial chemistry was one of the most important developments, that has significantly contributed to the drug discovery process. Within just a few years, its initial concept aimed at production of libraries containing huge number of compounds (thousands to millions), so called screening libraries, has shifted towards preparation of small and medium-sized rationally designed libraries. When applicable, the use of solid supports for the generation of libraries has been a real breakthrough in enhancing productivity. With a limited amount of resin and simple manual workups, the split/mix procedure may generate thousands of bead-tethered compounds. Beads can be chemically or physically encoded to facilitate the identification of a hit after the biological assay. Compartmentalization of solid supports using small reactors like teabags, kans or pellicular discrete supports like Lanterns resulted in powerful sort and combine technologies, relying on codes 'written' on the reactor, and thus reducing the need for automation and improving the number of compounds synthesized. These methods of solid-phase combinatorial chemistry have been recently supported by introduction of solid-supported reagents and scavenger resins. The first part of this review discusses the general premises of combinatorial chemistry and some methods used in the design of primary and focused combinatorial libraries. The aim of the second part is to present combinatorial chemistry methodologies aimed at discovering bioactive compounds acting on diverse GPCR involved in central nervous system disorders.

  19. Combinatorial application of two aldehyde oxidoreductases on isobutanol production in the presence of furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyung-Min; Jeon, Jong-Min; Lee, Ju Hee; Song, Hun-Suk; Joo, Han-Byul; Park, Sung-Hee; Choi, Kwon-Young; Kim, Yong Hyun; Park, Kyungmoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Lee, Hongweon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Furfural is a toxic by-product formulated from pretreatment processes of lignocellulosic biomass. In order to utilize the lignocellulosic biomass on isobutanol production, inhibitory effect of the furfural on isobutanol production was investigated and combinatorial application of two oxidoreductases, FucO and YqhD, was suggested as an alternative strategy. Furfural decreased cell growth and isobutanol production when only YqhD or FucO was employed as an isobutyraldehyde oxidoreductase. However, combinatorial overexpression of FucO and YqhD could overcome the inhibitory effect of furfural giving higher isobutanol production by 110% compared with overexpression of YqhD. The combinatorial oxidoreductases increased furfural detoxification rate 2.1-fold and also accelerated glucose consumption 1.4-fold. When it compares to another known system increasing furfural tolerance, membrane-bound transhydrogenase (pntAB), the combinatorial aldehyde oxidoreductases were better on cell growth and production. Thus, to control oxidoreductases is important to produce isobutanol using furfural-containing biomass and the combinatorial overexpression of FucO and YqhD can be an alternative strategy.

  20. Steam explosion and its combinatorial pretreatment refining technology of plant biomass to bio-based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Zhang; Liu, Zhi-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Pretreatment is a key unit operation affecting the refinery efficiency of plant biomass. However, the poor efficiency of pretreatment and the lack of basic theory are the main challenges to the industrial implementation of the plant biomass refinery. The purpose of this work is to review steam explosion and its combinatorial pretreatment as a means of overcoming the intrinsic characteristics of plant biomass, including recalcitrance, heterogeneity, multi-composition, and diversity. The main advantages of the selective use of steam explosion and other combinatorial pretreatments across the diversity of raw materials are introduced. Combinatorial pretreatment integrated with other unit operations is proposed as a means to exploit the high-efficiency production of bio-based products from plant biomass. Finally, several pilot- and demonstration-scale operations of the plant biomass refinery are described. Based on the principle of selective function and structure fractionation, and multi-level and directional composition conversion, an integrated process with the combinatorial pretreatments of steam explosion and other pretreatments as the core should be feasible and conform to the plant biomass refinery concept. Combinatorial pretreatments of steam explosion and other pretreatments should be further exploited based on the type and intrinsic characteristics of the plant biomass used, the bio-based products to be made, and the complementarity of the processes. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.