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Sample records for column hip flexion

  1. Clinical Evaluation of Fused/Ankylosed Hip with Severe Flexion Deformity after Conversion to Total Hip Arthroplasty

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    Saroj Kumar Suwal

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: THA is an effective treatment for ankylosed hip with severe flexion deformity although complications are noted more than routine hip arthroplasties. Keywords: ankylosed hip; fused hip; severe flexion deformity; total hip arthroplasty. | PubMed

  2. The effect of asymmetrical limited hip flexion on seating posture, scoliosis and windswept hip distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ágústsson, Atli; Sveinsson, Þórarinn; Rodby-Bousquet, Elisabet

    2017-12-01

    Postural asymmetries with seating problems are common in adults with cerebral palsy. To analyse the prevalence of asymmetrical limited hip flexion (90°. Asymmetrical limited hip flexion affects the seating posture and is associated with scoliosis and windswept hip distortion. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of Hip Joint Position on Muscle Activity during Prone Hip Extension with Knee Flexion.

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    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhisa; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the selective activation of the gluteus maximus during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise, with the hip joint in different positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 healthy, male volunteers. [Methods] Activities of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise. Measurements were made with the hip joint in each of 3 positions: (1) a neutral hip joint position, (2) an abduction hip joint position, and (3) an abduction with external rotation hip joint position. [Results] Gluteus maximus activity was significantly higher when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. Gluteus maximus activity was also significantly higher in the abduction hip joint position than in the neutral hip joint position. Hamstring activity was significantly lower when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. [Conclusion] Abduction and external rotation of the hip during prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise selectively activates the gluteus maximus.

  4. Influence of the hip flexion angle on isokinetic hip rotator torque and acceleration time of the hip rotator muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldon, Rodrigo de M; Furlan, Leonardo; Serrão, Fábio V

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the influence of the hip flexion angle on isokinetic rotator torque and acceleration times of the hip medial and lateral rotator muscles. Twenty-one healthy women were included in this study. The hip rotator function was evaluated at 3 different hip flexion angles (10°, 40°, and 90°). The results showed that both eccentric and concentric hip lateral rotator torques were greater at 40° of hip flexion when compared with 90°. Moreover, both the eccentric and concentric hip medial rotator torques were greater at 90° of hip flexion than at 40° and 10°, and greater at 40° than at 10°. In addition, both the eccentric and concentric hip medial to lateral rotator torque ratios were greater at 90° of hip flexion than at 40° and 10°, and greater at 40° than at 10°. Finally, the acceleration times of the hip medial rotator muscles were smaller at 90° of hip flexion than at 10° and smaller at 40° than at 10°. The current results highlight the importance of evaluating the hip rotator muscles at different hip flexion angles to comprehensively assess their functions.

  5. Adult Hip Flexion Contracture due to Neurological Disease: A New Treatment Protocol—Surgical Treatment of Neurological Hip Flexion Contracture

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    Alberto Nicodemo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital, traumatic, or extrinsic causes can lead people to paraplegia; some of these are potentially; reversible and others are not. Paraplegia can couse hip flexion contracture and, consequently, pressure sores, scoliosis, and hyperlordosis; lumbar and groin pain are strictly correlated. Scientific literature contains many studies about children hip flexion related to neurological diseases, mainly caused by cerebral palsy; only few papers focus on this complication in adults. In this study we report our experience on surgical treatment of adult hip flexion contracture due to neurological diseases; we have tried to outline an algorithm to choose the best treatment avoiding useless or too aggressive therapies. We present 5 cases of adult hips flexion due to neurological conditions treated following our algorithm. At 1-year-follow-up all patients had a good clinical outcome in terms of hip range of motion, pain and recovery of walking if possible. In conclusion we think that this algorithm could be a good guideline to treat these complex cases even if we need to treat more patients to confirm this theory. We believe also that postoperation physiotherapy it is useful in hip motility preservation, improvement of muscular function, and walking ability recovery when possible.

  6. Influence of Hip Joint Position on Muscle Activity during Prone Hip Extension with Knee Flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhisa; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the selective activation of the gluteus maximus during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise, with the hip joint in different positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 healthy, male volunteers. [Methods] Activities of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise. Measurements were mad...

  7. Evaluation of hip flexion strength following lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Po; Regev, Gilad J; Chan, Justin; Zhang, Bing; Taylor, William; Kim, Choll W; Garfin, Steven R

    2013-10-01

    Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a minimally invasive procedure that is designed to achieve a solid interbody fusion while minimizing the damage to the surrounding soft tissue. Although short-term results have been promising, few data have been published to date regarding its risks and complication rate. The aim was to evaluate the extent of injury to the psoas muscle after the LIF procedure by measuring hip flexion strength. A prospective case series was used in the study. Hip flexion strength was measured using a handheld digital dynamometer while the patient was seated on a chair; the examiner held the device against the patient's attempt to flex the hip. Both sides were measured to compare the operated and nonoperated psoas muscles. Each side was measured three times and the average amount (in pounds) was recorded. Measurements were done before and after surgery on Day 2-3, at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and at 3 and 6 months. Thirty-three patients were recruited for this study. Mean preoperative hip flexion strength values were 20.7±3.47 lb and 21.3±4.31 lb for operated and nonoperated legs, respectively, with no significant difference (p=.85). With a mean of 11.2±2.24 lb postoperative measurements on Day 2, the operated side showed statistically significant reduction of strength (p=.0001). The nonoperated side was also weaker postoperatively, but not significantly (mean=19.12±1.74 lb; p=.097). From the first follow-up visit at 2 weeks, the values on the operated leg had returned to baseline values (20.6, p=.97) and were not significantly different from preoperative values on either side. Hip flexion was weakened immediately after the LIF procedure, which may be attributed to psoas muscle injury during the procedure. However, this damage was temporary, with almost complete return to baseline values by 2 weeks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In vivo moment arm lengths for hip extensor muscles at different angles of hip flexion.

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    Németh, G; Ohlsén, H

    1985-01-01

    Moment arm lengths of three hip extensor muscles, the gluteus maximus, the hamstrings and the adductor magnus, were determined at hip flexion angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees by combining data from ten autopsy specimens and from twenty patients, the latter examined by computed tomography. A straight-line muscle model for muscle force was used for the hamstrings and adductor magnus, and for the gluteus maximus a two-segment straight-line muscle force model was used. With the joint in its anatomical position the moment arm of the gluteus maximus to the bilateral motion axis averaged 79 mm, for the hamstrings 61 mm and for the adductor magnus 15 mm. The moment arm of gluteus maximus decreased with increasing hip flexion angle. The hamstrings showed an increase in moment arm length up to an average of 35 degrees hip flexion and then a decrease with increasing hip flexion angle. The corresponding figures for the adductor magnus moment arm showed an increase up to 75 degrees and then a decrease. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in moment arm length between men and women.

  9. Hip flexion deformity improves without psoas-lengthening after surgical correction of fixed knee flexion deformity in spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, Erich; Gaston, Mark S; Tirosh, Oren; Brunner, Reinald

    2012-01-01

    It is unclear if psoas lengthening surgery is required in the treatment of patients with cerebral palsy (CP) with hip flexion deformity and previous studies show equivocal results with regard to functional outcome. This study retrospectively assessed 12 patients with a diagnosis of spastic diplegia who underwent single event multilevel surgery in order to correct deformities in the sagittal plane distal to the hip. Both clinical and instrument gait analysis results were recorded preoperatively, at one year (short term) and at five years (mid term) postoperatively. Clinically measured hip and knee movement improved at both short and mid term follow up. Correlations of clinically measured maximum hip and knee extension were significant at all three time points. Angles at terminal stance/toe off for hip and knee from kinematic data also showed significant correlations at all three time points. Our study demonstrates that the hip flexion deformities encountered in these patients will improve spontaneously when the distal fixed knee flexion deformity is surgically corrected. Therefore correction at the knee allows the ground reaction force to assume a more normal position resulting in correction at the hip over time. This then removes the need for surgery at the hip level. This fact is especially important when applied to psoas lengthening as this procedure can cause significant reduction in propulsion power.

  10. Does lesser trochanter implication affect hip flexion strength in proximal femur fracture?

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    Aprato, A; Lo Baido, R; Crosio, A; Matteotti, R; Grosso, E; Massè, A

    2015-10-01

    In pertrochanteric and intertrochanteric femoral fractures, the avulsion of the lesser trochanter by the pull of the iliopsoas muscle is not uncommon. This fragment is not commonly fixed because the avulsion of the lesser is tough to not influence the clinical outcome but up to date there is no evidence to support this statement. The aim of this study is to evaluate if lesser trochanter implication affects psoas muscle strength in proximal femur fracture. Patients with a consolidated intertrochanteric or pertrochanteric fracture associated or not with lesser trochanter fracture were enrolled, respectively, in group A and group B. Criteria of inclusion were the achievement of an anatomic reduction with gamma nail and a complete consolidation of the fracture. Criteria of exclusion were a follow-up shorter than 6 months and age over 65 years old at surgery. Patients were retrospectively reviewed for the purpose of this study. Range of motion, modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), flexion strength with hip in neutral position, at 90° of flexion and in "figure four" position were evaluated on injured and healthy side. On the pre-operative X-rays, the vertical displacement of the lesser trochanter was calculated. Groups A and B showed no significant difference in age and follow-up. No statistical difference between the two groups was found in range of motion, mean mHHS, hip flexion strength at 90° of hip flexion. Lesser trochanter fracture group showed a significantly reduced strength in flexion with hip in neutral flexion (mean difference between two groups was 18.5 kgf). Lesser trochanter displacement showed a significant correlation with strength at 90° of flexion. Our results showed that lesser trochanter implication may result in decreased hip flexion strength. Lesser trochanter displacement is directly correlated with flexion strength. Further studies will be necessary to understand if lesser trochanter fixation may be a good solution for those patients.

  11. Flexion reminder device to discourage recurrent posterior dislocation of a total hip replacement: a case report

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    Wong King

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Recurrent dislocation of a total hip replacement prosthesis is a frustrating complication for both the surgeon and the patient. For positional dislocations with no indications for revision surgery, the current best treatment is physiotherapy, the use of abduction braces and avoidance of unsafe hip positions. Abduction braces can be cumbersome and have poor compliance. We report the successful use of a new lightweight flexion reminder device that can be used to treat people with this condition. Case presentation A 64-year-old British woman experienced recurrent positional posterior dislocation after primary hip replacement, particularly when involved in activities involving unsafe flexion of the operated hip. She disliked using an abduction brace and hence was given a simple 'flexion reminder device' that could be strapped to the thigh. Beyond the safe flexion limit, the padded top end of the device hitched against the groin crease and reminded her not to flex further, to avoid dislocation. She experienced no discomfort in wearing the device continuously throughout the day and was very satisfied. She has had no further dislocations in the 2 years since she began using it. Conclusion In cases of arthroplasty dislocation caused mainly by an unsafe hip position, and with no indication for revision surgery, this new lightweight and easily worn flexion reminder device may be a good option for avoiding such positional dislocations, particularly those caused by unsafe flexion.

  12. Development and testing of a pelvic goniometer designed to measure pelvic tilt and hip flexion.

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    Sprigle, Stephen; Flinn, Nannette; Wootten, Mary; McCorry, Stephanie

    2003-06-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of a pelvic goniometer designed to measure the pelvic tilt and hip flexion during seated posture. Assessment of the seated posture requires measurement of the pelvis and hip. Determining accurate pelvic tilt and hip flexion angles during sitting is often difficult using standard techniques. A pelvic goniometer has been designed to measure pelvic tilt and hip flexion angle of persons in a seated posture. VALIDATION of the pelvic goniometer was done radiographically. Ten male volunteers sat in three postures--erect, forward or anterior tilt, and posterior tilt. Pelvic tilt and hip angle were recorded using radiographs and the pelvic goniometer. Reliability of pelvic and conventional goniometers was done using seated nondisabled subjects with physical therapists performing measurements. the average differences and correlation between the pelvic goniometer and radiographic measures were as follows--pelvic tilt: -4.9 degrees, 0.93; hip angle 1.2 degrees, 0.81. Reliability: average range of hip angle across three measures was about 3 degrees for both goniometers. The data indicate that the pelvic goniometer has utility in measuring pelvic tilt and hip angle, especially within the seated posture. Because it measures both pelvic tilt and hip angle, the pelvic goniometer has an advantage over conventional goniometers that only measure the latter. A valid and reliable tool that measures pelvic tilt and hip angle of persons in a seated posture is needed for clinical research and practice. Its applications include wheelchair seating evaluations and ergonomic assessments of seated workers.

  13. The Immediate Effect of Neuromuscular Joint Facilitation (NJF) Treatment on Electromechanical Reaction Times of Hip Flexion.

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    Huo, Ming; Wang, Hongzhao; Ge, Meng; Huang, Qiuchen; Li, Desheng; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the change in electromechanical reaction times (EMG-RT) of hip flexion of younger persons after neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF) treatment. [Subjects] The subjects were 39 healthy young people, who were divided into two groups: a NJF group and a proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) group. The NJF group consisted of 16 subjects (7 males, 9 females), and the PNF group consisted of 23 subjects (10 males, 13 females). [Methods] Participants in the NJF group received NJF treatment. We measured the EMG-RT, the premotor time (PMT) and the motor time (MT) during hip flexion movement before and after the intervention in both groups. [Results] There were no significant differences among the results of the PNF group. For the NJF group, there were significant differences in PMT and EMG-RT after NJF treatment. [Conclusion] These results suggest that there is an immediate effect of NJF intervention on electromechanical reaction times of hip flexion.

  14. Effects of hamstring stretching on passive muscle stiffness vary between hip flexion and knee extension maneuvers.

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    Miyamoto, N; Hirata, K; Kanehisa, H

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the effects of hamstring stretching on the passive stiffness of each of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFl), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In 12 male subjects, before and after five sets of 90 s static stretching, passive lengthening measurements where knee or hip joint was passively rotated to the maximal range of motion (ROM) were performed. During the passive lengthening, shear modulus of each muscle was measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography. Both stretching maneuvers significantly increased maximal ROM and decreased passive torque at a given joint angle. Passive knee extension stretching maneuver significantly reduced shear modulus at a given knee joint angle in all of BFl, ST, and SM. In contrast, the stretching effect by passive hip flexion maneuver was significant only in ST and SM. The present findings indicate that the effects of hamstring stretching on individual passive muscles' stiffness vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In terms of reducing the muscle stiffness of BFl, stretching of the hamstring should be performed by passive knee extension rather than hip flexion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenti Erica E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Methods We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old. We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. Results There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. Conclusion There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers.

  16. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Erica E; Valenti, Vitor E; Ferreira, Celso; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; Moura Filho, Oseas F; de Carvalho, Tatiana Dias; Tassi, Nadir; Petenusso, Marcio; Leone, Claudio; Fujiki, Edison N; Junior, Hugo Macedo; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos B; Moreno, Isadora L; Gonçalves, Ana Clara Cr; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2011-08-05

    The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old). We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction) and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides) with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers.

  17. Effect of abduction and external rotation of the hip joint on muscle onset time during prone hip extension with knee flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of hip position on muscle onset time during prone hip extension with knee flexion. [Subjects] The study included 21 healthy male volunteers. [Methods] Muscle onset times of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during right hip extension with knee flexion in the prone position. Measurements were made with the hip in 3 positions: (1) ...

  18. Variability of ischiofemoral space dimensions with changes in hip flexion: an MRI study

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    Johnson, Adam C.; Howe, Benjamin M. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Hollman, John H.; Finnoff, Jonathan T. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2017-01-15

    The primary aim of this study was to determine if ischiofemoral space (IFS) dimensions vary with changes in hip flexion as a result of placing a bolster behind the knees during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A secondary aim was to determine if IFS dimensions vary between supine and prone hip neutral positions. The study employed a prospective design. Sports medicine center within a tertiary care institution. Five male and five female adult subjects (age mean = 29.2, range = 23-35; body mass index [BMI] mean = 23.5, range = 19.5-26.6) were recruited to participate in the study. An axial, T1-weighted MRI sequence of the pelvis was obtained of each subject in a supine position with their hips in neutral and flexed positions, and in a prone position with their hips in neutral position. Supine hip flexion was induced by placing a standard, 9-cm-diameter MRI knee bolster under the subject's knees. The order of image acquisition (supine hip neutral, supine hip flexed, prone hip neutral) was randomized. The IFS dimensions were then measured on a separate workstation. The investigator performing the IFS measurements was blinded to the subject position for each image. The main outcome measurements were the IFS dimensions acquired with MRI. The mean IFS dimensions in the prone position were 28.25 mm (SD 5.91 mm, standard error mean 1.32 mm). In the supine hip neutral position, the IFS dimensions were 25.1 (SD 5.6) mm. The mean difference between the two positions of 3.15 (3.6) mm was statistically significant (95 % CI of the difference = 1.4 to 4.8 mm, t{sub 19} = 3.911, p =.001). The mean IFS dimensions in the hip flexed position were 36.9 (SD 5.7) mm. The mean difference between the two supine positions of 11.8 (4.1) mm was statistically significant (95 % CI of the difference = 9.9 to 13.7 mm, t{sub 19} = 12.716, p <.001). Our findings demonstrate that the IFS measurements obtained with MRI are dependent upon patient positioning with respect to hip flexion and

  19. Superior dislocation hip with anterior column acetabular fracture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Superior variety of anterior dislocation of the hip is a rare injury. Its occurrence with acetabular fractures has been documented infrequently. We report a case of superior dislocation of the hip with anterior column acetabular fracture. Open reduction of the hip and internal fixation of the fracture was carried out using a twin ...

  20. Correlation of lumbar-hip kinematics between trunk flexion and other functional tasks.

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    Alqhtani, Raee S; Jones, Michael D; Theobald, Peter S; Williams, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the kinematic profiles of flexion of the upper lumbar and lower lumbar (LL) spine and hip and 3 sagittally dominant functional tasks (lifting, stand-to-sit, and sit-to-stand). Fifty-three participants were recruited for this study. Four sensors were attached to the skin over the S1, L3, T12, and lateral thigh. Relative angles between adjacent sensors were used to quantify the motion for the hip, LL, and upper lumbar spine. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to explore the relationship between the movements and more functional tasks. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine the significance of differences between the variables. Flexion resulted in a greater or similar range of motion (ROM) to the other tasks investigated for both spinal regions but less ROM for the hip. Strong correlations for ROM are reported between forward flexion tasks and lifting for the LL spine (r = 0.83) and all regions during stand-to-sit and sit-to-stand (r = 0.70-0.73). No tasks were strongly correlated for velocity (r = 0.03-0.55). Strong correlations were only evident for the LL spine ROM between lifting and flexion; all other tasks afforded moderate or weak correlations. This study suggests that sagittal tasks use different lumbar-hip kinematics and place different demands on the lumbar spine and hip. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Activation of the gluteus maximus and hamstring muscles during prone hip extension with knee flexion in three hip abduction positions.

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    Kang, Sun-Young; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Kwon, Ohyun; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Choi, Boram

    2013-08-01

    The direction of fiber alignment within a muscle is known to influence the effectiveness of muscle contraction. However, most of the commonly used clinical gluteus maximus (GM) exercises do not consider the direction of fiber alignment within the muscle. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of hip abduction position on the EMG (electromyography) amplitude and onset time of the GM and hamstrings (HAM) during prone hip extension with knee flexion (PHEKF) exercise. Surface EMG signals were recorded from the GM and HAM during PHEKF exercise in three hip abduction positions: 0°, 15°, and 30°. Thirty healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. The results show that GM EMG amplitude was greatest in the 30° hip abduction position, followed by 15° and then 0° hip abduction during PHEKF exercise. On the other hand, the HAM EMG amplitude at 0° hip abduction was significantly greater than at 15° and 30° hip abduction. Additionally, GM EMG onset firing was delayed relative to that of the HAM at 0° hip abduction. On the contrary, the GM EMG onset occurred earlier than the HAM in the 15° and 30° hip abduction positions. These findings indicate that performing PHEKF exercise in the 30° hip abduction position may be recommended as an effective way to facilitate the GM muscle activity and advance the firing time of the GM muscle in asymptomatic individuals. This finding provides preliminary evidence that GM EMG amplitude and onset time can be modified by the degree of hip abduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of abduction and external rotation of the hip joint on muscle onset time during prone hip extension with knee flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of hip position on muscle onset time during prone hip extension with knee flexion. [Subjects] The study included 21 healthy male volunteers. [Methods] Muscle onset times of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during right hip extension with knee flexion in the prone position. Measurements were made with the hip in 3 positions: (1) neutral, (2) abduction, and (3) abduction and external rotation. [Results] Gluteus maximus onset relative to the hamstrings was significantly earlier with hip abduction and with hip abduction and external rotation compared with that with the hip in the neutral position. Gluteus maximus onset relative to the hamstrings was significantly earlier with hip abduction and external rotation compared with that with hip abduction. The bilateral multifidus and left lumbar erector spinae onset times relative to the hamstrings were significantly earlier with hip abduction and external rotation compared with those with hip abduction and with the hip in the neutral position. [Conclusion] Abduction and external rotation of the hip during prone hip extension with knee flexion is effective for advancing the onset times of the gluteus maximus, bilateral multifidus, and contralateral lumbar erector spinae.

  3. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Zhao Wei

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Using the SFA, to evaluate RHF could prevent compromised measurements due to the movements of pelvis and lumbar spine during hip flexion, and is, therefore, a more accurate and objective method with reasonable reliability and validity.

  4. Effect of Ankle Positioning During Hamstring Stretches for Improving Straight Leg Hip Flexion Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudner, Kevin G; Benjamin, Peter J; Selkow, Noelle M

    2016-03-01

    To compare the effects of stretching the hamstrings with the ankle in either a plantar-flexed (PF) or dorsiflexed (DF) position for improving straight leg hip flexion range of motion (ROM) over a 4-week period. Randomized, single-blinded, pretest, posttest design. Athletic training facility. Each limb of 34 asymptomatic individuals (15 males, 19 females) was randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups. Twenty-four limbs received hamstring stretches with the ankle in DF, 24 limbs received hamstring stretches with the ankle in PF, and 20 limbs received no stretch (control). Ankle position (PF, DF) during hamstring stretching. We measured pretest and posttest passive straight leg hip flexion ROM with the test ankle in a neutral position. For the intervention groups, the test limb was passively stretched with the ankle held in end range DF or PF for their respective group. Each stretch was held for 30 seconds for a total of 3 applications. Two treatment sessions were completed per week for a total of 4 weeks. The control limbs received no stretching during the 4-week period. We conducted 1-way analyses of covariance to determine significant changes in ROM between groups (P hamstrings in either PF or DF improve straight leg hip ROM compared with a control group. The results of this study should be considered by clinicians when determining the optimal stretching techniques aimed at increasing hamstring length.

  5. Does Using a Chair Backrest or Reducing Seated Hip Flexion Influence Trunk Muscle Activity and Discomfort? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Máire; O'Sullivan, Leonard; O'Sullivan, Peter; Dankaerts, Wim; O'Sullivan, Kieran

    2015-11-01

    This paper systematically reviews the effect of chair backrests and reducing seated hip flexion on low back discomfort (LBD) and trunk muscle activation. Prolonged sitting commonly exacerbates low back pain (LBP). Several modifications to seated posture and chair design have been recommended, including using chairs with backrests and chairs that reduce hip flexion. Electronic databases were searched by two independent assessors. Part 1 of this review includes 26 studies comparing the effect of sitting with at least two different hip angles. In Part 2, seven studies that compared the effect of sitting with and without a backrest were eligible. Study quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. Significant confounding variables and a relatively small number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving people with LBP complicates analysis of the results. There was moderate evidence that chair backrests reduce paraspinal muscle activation, and limited evidence that chair backrests reduce LBD. There was no evidence that chairs involving less hip flexion reduce LBP or LBD, or consistently alter trunk muscle activation. However, participants in several studies subjectively preferred the modified chairs involving less hip flexion. The limited evidence to support the use of chairs involving less seated hip flexion, or the effect of a backrest, is consistent with the limited evidence that other isolated chair design features can reduce LBP. LBP management is likely to require consideration of several factors in addition to sitting position. Larger RCTs involving people with LBP are required. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  6. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xian-Zhao; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wang, Fei; Li, Ming; Wang, Zi-Min

    2015-09-05

    A quantitative and accurate measurement of the range of hip joint flexion (RHF) is necessarily required in the evaluation of disordered or artificial hip joint function. This study aimed to assess a novel method to measure RHF more accurately and objectively. Lateral radiographs were taken of 31 supine men with hip joints extended or flexed. Relevant angles were measured directly from the radiographs. The change in the sacrofemoral angle (SFA) (the angle formed between the axis of the femur and the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1) from hip joint extension to hip joint flexion, was proposed as the RHF. The validity of this method was assessed via concomitant measurements of changes in the femur-horizontal angle (between the axis of the femur and the horizontal line) and the sacrum-horizontal angle (SHA) (between the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1 and the horizontal line), the difference of which should equal the change in the SFA. The mean change in the SFA was 112.5 ± 7.4°, and was independent of participant age, height, weight, or body mass index. The mean changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs were 123.0 ± 6.4° and 11.4 ± 3.0°, respectively. This confirmed that the change of SFA between hip joint extension and hip joint flexion was equal to the difference between the changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs. Using the SFA, to evaluate RHF could prevent compromised measurements due to the movements of pelvis and lumbar spine during hip flexion, and is, therefore, a more accurate and objective method with reasonable reliability and validity.

  7. Cross-sectional area of psoas major muscle and hip flexion strength in youth soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshikawa, Yoshihiro; Iida, Tomomi; Ii, Nozomi; Muramatsu, Masataka; Nakajima, Yoshiharu; Chumank, Kentaro; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify the differences in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the psoas major (PM) muscle and hip flexion force (HFF) of the right (dominant) side between adolescent male soccer players and age-matched non-athletes. PM CSA at L4–L5 and HFF at 1.05 rad/s were determined in 22 early (12.8–13.6 years) and 27 late (16.1–17.9 years) adolescent soccer players and 11 early (12.6–13.5 years) and 20 late (16.0–17.7 years) adolescent non-athletes. Fat-free mass (FFM) was greater in late adolescent soccer players than in late adolescent non-athletes, but was similar between the two early adolescent groups. Without the effect of age, PM CSA and HFF were greater in soccer players than in non-athletes. PM CSA and HFF were significantly correlated to FFM (soccer players, r = 0.860, P < 0.0001; non-athletes, r = 0.709, P < 0.0001) and PM CSA (soccer players, r = 0.760, P < 0.0001; non-athletes, r = 0.777, P < 0.0001), respectively. The difference between soccer players and non-athletes in PM CSA was still significant even when PM CSA was covaried for FFM. On the other hand, HFF covaried for PM CSA was similar between the two groups. The current results indicate that, as compared to age-matched non-athletes: (1) not only late, but also early adolescent soccer players have a greater PM CSA even when the difference in FFM was adjusted, and (2) their superiority in hip flexion force can be attributed to the difference in PM CSA.

  8. Measurement of muscle length-related electromyography activity of the hip flexor muscles to determine individual muscle contributions to the hip flexion torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiroumaru, Takumi; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Isaka, Tadao

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate muscle length-related electromyography (EMG) of the iliopsoas (IL) and other hip flexor muscles to determine individual muscle contributions to the hip flexion torque. Ten healthy sedentary young men participated in the EMG experiment. A subgroup of six subjects underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement to confirm the region of the skin over the IL. Surface EMG signals were sampled from the IL, rectus femoris (RF), sartorius (SA), and tensor fasciae latae (TFL) using an active electrode. The subjects performed maximum voluntary isometric hip flexion with the right hip joint set at -10°, 0°, 30°, and 60°. The root mean square (RMS) value for the TFL at 30° (0.81 ± 0.19, p muscle length changes were significantly correlated in the IL (r =0.39, p muscles.

  9. Hip flexion weakness is associated with impaired mobility in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a retrospective study with implications for trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssof, Sarah; Schrader, Ronald; Bear, David; Morrison, Leslie

    2015-03-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a rare myopathy for which validated outcome measures are lacking, posing a barrier to clinical trials. Our goal was to identify factors associated with impaired mobility in OPMD in order to guide development of surrogate endpoints in future clinical trials. One hundred forty-four individuals with OPMD were included in this retrospective, single-center study. We made novel use of parametric time-to-event analysis to model age at initial use of assistive device for ambulation. We hypothesized that limb weakness and other markers of disease severity are associated with earlier use of assistive devices. 23.6% of individuals (34/144) progressed to use of assistive devices (mean age 66.0 ± 9.6 y). Earlier age at assistive device was associated with hip flexion Medical Research Council grade ≤3 (p hip flexion weakness and impaired mobility in OPMD, indicating that hip flexion strength could be explored as a surrogate endpoint for use in clinical trials. Since severity of disease features may be discordant within individuals, composite outcome measures are warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of effects of static, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and Mulligan stretching on hip flexion range of motion: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, M S; Ozyurek, S; Tosun, Oç; Uzer, S; Gelecek, N

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of static stretching, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and Mulligan technique on hip flexion range of motion (ROM) in subjects with bilateral hamstring tightness. A total of 40 students (mean age: 21.5±1.3 years, mean body height: 172.8±8.2 cm, mean body mass index: 21.9±3.0 kg · m(-2)) with bilateral hamstring tightness were enrolled in this randomized trial, of whom 26 completed the study. Subjects were divided into 4 groups performing (I) typical static stretching, (II) PNF stretching, (III) Mulligan traction straight leg raise (TSLR) technique, (IV) no intervention. Hip flexion ROM was measured using a digital goniometer with the passive straight leg raise test before and after 4 weeks by two physiotherapists blinded to the groups. 52 extremities of 26 subjects were analyzed. Hip flexion ROM increased in all three intervention groups (p<0.05) but not in the no-intervention group after 4 weeks. A statistically significant change in initial-final assessment differences of hip flexion ROM was found between groups (p<0.001) in favour of PNF stretching and Mulligan TSLR technique in comparison to typical static stretching (p=0.016 and p=0.02, respectively). No significant difference was found between Mulligan TSLR technique and PNF stretching (p=0.920). The initial-final assessment difference of hip flexion ROM was similar in typical static stretching and no intervention (p=0.491). A 4-week stretching intervention is beneficial for increasing hip flexion ROM in bilateral hamstring tightness. However, PNF stretching and Mulligan TSLR technique are superior to typical static stretching. These two interventions can be alternatively used for stretching in hamstring tightness.

  11. Increasing hip and knee flexion during a drop-jump task reduces tibiofemoral shear and compressive forces: implications for ACL injury prevention training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Liang-Ching; Ko, Yi-An; Hammond, Kyle E; Xerogeanes, John W; Warren, Gordon L; Powers, Christopher M

    2017-12-01

    Although most ACL injury prevention programmes encourage greater hip and knee flexion during landing, it remains unknown how this technique influences tibiofemoral joint forces. We examined whether a landing strategy utilising greater hip and knee flexion decreases tibiofemoral anterior shear and compression. Twelve healthy women (25.9 ± 3.5 years) performed a drop-jump task before and after a training session (10-15 min) that emphasised greater hip and knee flexion. Peak tibiofemoral anterior shear and compressive forces were calculated using an electromyography (EMG)-driven knee model that incorporated joint kinematics, EMG and participant-specific muscle volumes and patella tendon orientation measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants demonstrated a decrease in peak anterior tibial shear forces (11.1 ± 3.3 vs. 9.6 ± 2.7 N · kg -1 ; P = 0.008) and peak tibiofemoral compressive forces (68.4 ± 7.6 vs. 62.0 ± 5.5 N · kg -1 ; P = 0.015) post-training. The decreased peak anterior tibial shear was accompanied by a decrease in the quadriceps anterior shear force, while the decreased peak compressive force was accompanied by decreased ground reaction force and hamstring forces. Our data provide justification for injury prevention programmes that encourage greater hip and knee flexion during landing to reduce tibiofemoral joint loading.

  12. Electrical activity of external oblique and multifidus muscles during the hip flexion-extension exercise performed in the Cadillac with different adjustments of springs and individual positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss, Jefferson F; Melo, Monica O; Rosa, Cristina H; Santos, Artur B; La Torre, Marcelo; Silva, Yumie O

    2010-01-01

    Despite of the widepread use of Pilates in Physical Therapy, there are few studies that have assessed the muscle electrical activation during Pilates exercises. Verify the influence of different spring adjustments and individual positions on the electrical activation of multifidus (MU) and oblique external (OE) muscles during hip flexion-extension (HFE) exercise on the Cadillac. Eight women practicing Pilates exercises for at least six months performed 10 repetitions of HFE in the following situations: Lower Spring, spring fixed at 30 cm in relation to level which the individuals were positioned. Higher Spring, spring fixed at 90 cm in relation to level which the individuals were positioned. Near Position, distance of 10 cm from the fixed spring. Distant Position, distance of 30 cm from the fixed spring. Kinematic and eletromyographic data (EMG) were collected simultaneously and the MU and OE muscles were monitored. Each movement of HFE was splitted in two phases (extension and flexion). The EMG signal was calculated and normalized using the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The Wilcoxon test was used to investigate differences between the situations (p MVC, and the highest muscle activation in the lower spring and in the near position. OE muscles presented muscle activation values ranging from 20 to 45% MVC, and the highest values in the higher spring and in the distant position. MU and OE muscles presented a distinct electrical activation during different available spring adjustments and individual positions.

  13. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.’s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Usa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf—the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity—from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only.

  14. Comparison between Graf method and pubo-femoral distance in neutral and flexion positions to diagnose developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Sara R., E-mail: steixeira@hcrp.usp.br [Division of Radiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14049-090 (Brazil); Dalto, Vitor F., E-mail: fdalto@gmail.com [Division of Radiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14049-090 (Brazil); Maranho, Daniel A., E-mail: dacmaranho@gmail.com [Division of Pediatric Orthopaedics, Department of Biomechanics, Medicine, and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor System, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14049-090 (Brazil); Zoghbi-Neto, Orlando S., E-mail: zoghbi47@gmail.com [Division of Radiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14049-090 (Brazil); Volpon, José B., E-mail: jbvolpon@fmrp.usp.br [Division of Pediatric Orthopaedics, Department of Biomechanics, Medicine, and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor System, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14049-090 (Brazil); Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H., E-mail: marcello@fmrp.usp.br [Division of Radiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14049-090 (Brazil)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • The article adds information about the pubo-femoral distance (PFD) used as a simple tool to detect dysplastic hips in neonates. This articles shows that the PFD is comparable with the “gold standard” Graf method for the diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip and it can be used as a screening tool for its diagnosis, regardless the radiologists’ experience, with high accuracy. - Abstract: Purposes: To evaluate whether the pubo-femoral distance (PFD) can be used as an accurate screening test to diagnose developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in an at-risk population compared with the Graf method. Second, to determine whether PFD assessment is feasible and reproducible regardless of the observer's experience. Materials and methods: IRB approved this retrospective single-institution study. Written informed consent was waived. Between January 2010 and March 2012, 116 neonates at risk for DDH were included. Infants’ hips were distributed into two groups according to recommendation for treatment: non-dysplastic (ND; Graf I/IIA; 211 hips; 69 females/37 males) and dysplastic hip (DH; Graf IIB/IIC/III/D/IV; 21 hips; 8 females/3 males). One resident and one experienced radiologist reviewed ultrasonography images performed in the fourth week. To compare the groups, Student's t and Mann–Whitney tests for normally and non-normally distributed covariates were performed. Accuracy of PFD to diagnose DDH was calculated. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to assess inter-observer agreement. Results: Mean PFDs of ND group were 3.09 mm at neutral position and 3.64 mm with the hip flexed. Mean PFDs of DH group were 6.29 mm and 7.59 mm, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of PFD were 94.4%, 93.4%, and 97.2% (cut-off = 4.6 mm) at neutral position and 94.4%, 89.0%, and 95.5% (cut-off = 4.9 mm) with hip flexed. ICCs were 0.852 and 0.864, respectively. Conclusions: PFD is comparable with Graf method, enabling

  15. [The influence of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of the muscles of the lumbosacral region of the spine on the manifestations of the flexion contracture in the hip joint in the men at the age of 50-60 years following amputation of the lower limb at the hip level in the course of the rehabilitation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaev, M S; Malchevskiy, V A; Prokopev, N Y; Khrupa, D A

    2017-12-28

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the outcome the application of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of the muscles of the lumbosacral region of the spine and of the lumbosacral junction as a component of the combined rehabilitation on the manifestations of the flexion contracture in the hip joint in the men at the age of 50-60 years following amputation of the lower limb at the hip level throughout the course of the rehabilitative process. A total of 243 patients who had undergone ablation of a femur available for the examination. 153 of them were treatment with the use of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of the muscles of the lumbosacral region of the spine and of the lumbosacral junction. The control group was comprised of the remaining 90 patients treated without the application of the technique for post-isometric relaxation. The analysis of the degree of flexion contracture of the hip joint on the side of ablation was carried out by means of the Thomas test. The results of the study give evidence that that use of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of muscles of the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joint makes it possible to reduce the time needed to decrease the severity of contracture of the hip joint during the rehabilitation process. The data obtained provide a basis for recommending the inclusion of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of muscles of the lumbar spine and the lumbosacral junction into the program of the combined rehabilitation of the patients who had undergone ablation of a femur.

  16. Flexion Reflex Can Interrupt and Reset the Swimming Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, Matthew S; Berkowitz, Ari

    2016-03-02

    The spinal cord can generate the hip flexor nerve activity underlying leg withdrawal (flexion reflex) and the rhythmic, alternating hip flexor and extensor activities underlying locomotion and scratching, even in the absence of brain inputs and movement-related sensory feedback. It has been hypothesized that a common set of spinal interneurons mediates flexion reflex and the flexion components of locomotion and scratching. Leg cutaneous stimuli that evoke flexion reflex can alter the timing of (i.e., reset) cat walking and turtle scratching rhythms; in addition, reflex responses to leg cutaneous stimuli can be modified during cat and human walking and turtle scratching. Both of these effects depend on the phase (flexion or extension) of the rhythm in which the stimuli occur. However, similar interactions between leg flexion reflex and swimming have not been reported. We show here that a tap to the foot interrupted and reset the rhythm of forward swimming in spinal, immobilized turtles if the tap occurred during the swim hip extensor phase. In addition, the hip flexor nerve response to an electrical foot stimulus was reduced or eliminated during the swim hip extensor phase. These two phase-dependent effects of flexion reflex on the swim rhythm and vice versa together demonstrate that the flexion reflex spinal circuit shares key components with or has strong interactions with the swimming spinal network, as has been shown previously for cat walking and turtle scratching. Therefore, leg flexion reflex circuits likely share key spinal interneurons with locomotion and scratching networks across limbed vertebrates generally. The spinal cord can generate leg withdrawal (flexion reflex), locomotion, and scratching in limbed vertebrates. It has been hypothesized that there is a common set of spinal cord neurons that produce hip flexion during flexion reflex, locomotion, and scratching based on evidence from studies of cat and human walking and turtle scratching. We show

  17. Hip Muscle Activity during Isometric Contraction of Hip Abduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroto; Yamaguchi, Emi; Yoshiki, Hiromi; Wada, Yui; Watanabe, Aya

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of varying hip flexion angle on hip muscle activity during isometric contraction in abduction. [Subjects] Twenty-seven healthy men (mean age=21.5 years, SD=1.2) participated in this study. [Methods] Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded of the upper portion of the gluteus maximus (UGM), lower portion of the gluteus maximus (LGM), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and gluteus medius (GMed) during isometric contraction under two measurement conditions: hip flexion angle (0, 20, 40, 60, and 80 degrees) and abduction of the hip joint at 20, 40, 60, and 80% maximum strength. Integrated EMG (IEMG) were calculated and normalized to the value of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). [Results] Results indicated that the IEMG of both the UGM and LGM increased significantly with increases in hip flexion angle, whereas the IEMG of the TFL decreased significantly. The maximum activities of the UGM and the LGM were 85.7 ± 80.8%MVC and 38.2 ± 32.9%MVC at 80 degrees of hip flexion, respectively, and that of the TFL was 71.0 ± 39.0%MVC at 40 degrees of hip flexion. [Conclusion] The IEMG of the GMed did not change with increases in hip flexion angle. Hip flexion angle affected the activity of the GM and TFL during isometric contraction in abduction. PMID:24648628

  18. Hip Muscle Activity during Isometric Contraction of Hip Abduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroto; Yamaguchi, Emi; Yoshiki, Hiromi; Wada, Yui; Watanabe, Aya

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of varying hip flexion angle on hip muscle activity during isometric contraction in abduction. [Subjects] Twenty-seven healthy men (mean age=21.5 years, SD=1.2) participated in this study. [Methods] Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded of the upper portion of the gluteus maximus (UGM), lower portion of the gluteus maximus (LGM), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and gluteus medius (GMed) during isometric contraction under two measurement conditions: hip flexion angle (0, 20, 40, 60, and 80 degrees) and abduction of the hip joint at 20, 40, 60, and 80% maximum strength. Integrated EMG (IEMG) were calculated and normalized to the value of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). [Results] Results indicated that the IEMG of both the UGM and LGM increased significantly with increases in hip flexion angle, whereas the IEMG of the TFL decreased significantly. The maximum activities of the UGM and the LGM were 85.7 ± 80.8%MVC and 38.2 ± 32.9%MVC at 80 degrees of hip flexion, respectively, and that of the TFL was 71.0 ± 39.0%MVC at 40 degrees of hip flexion. [Conclusion] The IEMG of the GMed did not change with increases in hip flexion angle. Hip flexion angle affected the activity of the GM and TFL during isometric contraction in abduction.

  19. Flexion in Abell 2744

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, J. P.; Goldberg, D. M.

    2018-05-01

    We present the first flexion-focused gravitational lensing analysis of the Hubble Frontier Field observations of Abell 2744 (z = 0.308). We apply a modified Analytic Image Model technique to measure source galaxy flexion and shear values at a final number density of 82 arcmin-2. By using flexion data alone, we are able to identify the primary mass structure aligned along the heart of the cluster in addition to two major substructure peaks, including an NE component that corresponds to previous lensing work and a new peak detection offset 1.43 arcmin from the cluster core towards the east. We generate two types of non-parametric reconstructions: flexion aperture mass maps, which identify central core, E, and NE substructure peaks with mass signal-to-noise contours peaking at 3.5σ, 2.7σ, and 2.3σ, respectively; and convergence maps derived directly from the smoothed flexion field. For the primary peak, we find a mass of (1.62 ± 0.12) × 1014 h-1 M⊙ within a 33 arcsec (105 h-1 kpc) aperture, a mass of (2.92 ± 0.26) × 1013 h-1 M⊙ within a 16 arcsec (50 h-1 kpc) aperture for the north-eastern substructure, and (8.81 ± 0.52) × 1013 h-1 M⊙ within a 25 arcsec (80 h-1 kpc) aperture for the novel eastern substructure.

  20. Effect of position and alteration in synergist muscle force contribution on hip forces when performing hip strengthening exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara L; Sahrmann, Shirley A; Moran, Daniel W

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the magnitude and direction of joint forces generated by hip strengthening exercises is essential for appropriate prescription and modification of these exercises. The purpose of this study was to evaluate hip joint forces created across a range of hip flexion and extension angles during two hip strengthening exercises: prone hip extension and supine hip flexion. A musculoskeletal model was used to estimate hip joint forces during simulated prone hip extension and supine hip flexion under a control condition and two altered synergist muscle force conditions. Decreased strength or activation of specific muscle groups was simulated by decreasing the modeled maximum force values by 50%. For prone hip extension, the gluteal muscle strength was decreased in one condition and the hamstring muscle strength in the second condition. For supine hip flexion, the strength of the iliacus and psoas muscles was decreased in one condition, and the rectus femoris, tensor fascia lata, and sartorius muscles in the second condition. The hip joint forces were affected by hip joint position and partially by alterations in muscle force contribution. For prone hip extension, the highest net resultant force occurred with the hip in extension and the gluteal muscles weakened. For supine hip flexion, the highest resultant forces occurred with the hip in extension and the iliacus and psoas muscles weakened. Clinicians can use this information to select exercises to provide appropriate prescription and pathology-specific modification of exercise.

  1. Hip Strength Testing of Soccer Players With Long-Standing Hip and Groin Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafn, Bolette S; Tang, Lars; Nielsen, Peter Martin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether self-reported pain during hip strength testing correlates to a large degree with hip muscle strength in soccer players with long-standing unilateral hip and groin pain. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Clinical assessments at Sports Orthopaedic Research...... Center-Copenhagen (SORC-C), Arthroscopic Centre Amager, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-four male soccer players with unilateral long-standing hip and groin pain. INTERVENTIONS: The soccer players performed 5 reliable hip muscle strength tests (isometric hip flexion......, adduction, abduction, isometric hip flexion-modified Thomas test, and eccentric hip adduction). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Muscle strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer, and the players rated the pain during testing on a numerical rating scale (0-10). RESULTS: In 4 tests (isometric hip adduction...

  2. Hip Muscle Activity during Isometric Contraction of Hip Abduction

    OpenAIRE

    Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroto; Yamaguchi, Emi; Yoshiki, Hiromi; Wada, Yui; Watanabe, Aya

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of varying hip flexion angle on hip muscle activity during isometric contraction in abduction. [Subjects] Twenty-seven healthy men (mean age=21.5 years, SD=1.2) participated in this study. [Methods] Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded of the upper portion of the gluteus maximus (UGM), lower portion of the gluteus maximus (LGM), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and gluteus medius (GMed) during isometric contraction under two measurement con...

  3. Improved knee flexion following high-flexion total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionberger David R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of new techniques and materials in total knee arthroplasty (TKA continue to be a primary focus in orthopedic surgery. The primary aim of the present study is to evaluate post TKA total range of motion (ROM among a group of patients who received a gender specific high-flexion design modification implant compared to a control group of patients who received non-gender specific implants. Methods and results The control group was comprised of 39 TKAs that were recruited pre-operatively and received the non-gender specific implant while the study group consisted of 39 TKAs who received gender specific implants. The study group yielded an improvement in mean post-operative ROM of 21° at 12 months, whereas the mean improvement in ROM among the control group was 11°. Thus, the study group had a 10° increased ROM improvement (91% over the control group (p = 0.00060. In addition, 100% of the subjects with gender specific high-flexion implants achieved greater or equal ROM post-operatively compared to 82% for the control cohort. Lastly, women who exhibited greater pre-operative ROM and lower body mass index (BMI were found to benefit the most with the gender specific prosthesis. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that among subjects with a normal BMI, the gender specific high-flexion knee implant is associated with increased ROM as compared to the non-gender specific non-high-flexion implant designs.

  4. The kinematic relationship between sitting and standing posture and pelvic inclination and its significance to cup positioning in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Andrew; Munir, Selin; Shah, Siddarth; Walter, William Lindsay

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the influence of sitting and standing posture on sagittal pelvic inclination in total hip replacement patients to assist with correct acetabular component positioning. Lateral radiographs of the pelvis and lumbar spine in sitting and standing positions were extracted. Pelvic tilt was measured using the vertical inclination of a line from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) to pubic tubercle. Sacral inclination, Cobb angle of the lumbar spine and hip flexion were recorded. Sixty patients were identified with a mean age of 63. Men were more likely to flex the lumbar spine in sitting (p = 0.004); 80° of hip flexion is required for seated posture. Stiff hips required compensatory pelvic flexion and lumbar flexion in sitting. There is a linear relationship between hip flexion and pelvic tilt, hip flexion and lumbar lordosis. Pelvic orientation is determined by lumbar and hip stiffness. This impacts on acetabular version.

  5. Comparison of three methods to diagnose hip dysplasia in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Vikas; Mohindroo, J.

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to compare the usefulness of goniometry, radiography and distraction index in diagnosis of hip dysplasia in dogs. During the study 25 clinical cases (50 joints) suspected for hip dysplasia were evaluated. Norberg angle was found to have a significant positive correlation with extension, flexion, abduction, and adduction angles and a significant negative correlation with distraction index (DI) measurements. It could be inferred that all the six parameters (NA, DI, extension, flexion, abduction, and adduction) were reliable indicators for early diagnosis of hip dysplasia.Goniometry could be used as a safe and easy method for preliminary suspicion of hip dysplasia

  6. Large strengthening effect of a hip-flexor training programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Zebis, Mette

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect on hip-flexion strength of a 6-week hip-flexor training programme using elastic bands as resistance. We hypothesized that the training group, compared to a control group, would increase their hip-flexion strength more. METHODS: Thirty-three healthy subjects (45...... by 17 %, (p mean change of 0.34 (95 % CI 0.......17-0.52) Nm/kg, in favour of the strength training group (p external loading, for only 6 weeks, substantially improves hip-flexor muscle strength. This simple exercise programme seems promising for future prevention and treatment...

  7. The effect of accounting for biarticularity in hip flexor and hip extensor joint torque representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M G C; Yeadon, M R; King, M A

    2018-02-01

    Subject-specific torque-driven models have ignored biarticular effects at the hip. The aim of this study was to establish the contribution of monoarticular hip flexors and hip extensors to total hip flexor and total hip extensor joint torques for an individual and to investigate whether torque-driven simulation models should consider incorporating biarticular effects at the hip joint. Maximum voluntary isometric and isovelocity hip flexion and hip extension joint torques were measured for a single participant together with surface electromyography. Single-joint and two-joint representations were fitted to the collected torque data and used to determine the maximum voluntary joint torque capacity. When comparing two-joint and single-joint representations, the single-joint representation had the capacity to produce larger maximum voluntary hip flexion torque (larger by around 9% of maximum torque) and smaller maximum voluntary hip extension torque (smaller by around 33% of maximum torque) with the knee extended. Considering the range of kinematics found for jumping movements, the single-joint hip flexors had the capacity to produce around 10% additional torque, while the single joint hip extensors had about 70% of the capacity of the two-joint representation. Two-joint representations may overcome an over-simplification of single-joint representations by accounting for biarticular effects, while building on the strength of determining subject-specific parameters from measurements on the participant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Avaliação da confiabilidade e usabilidade de três diferentes programas computacionais para a análise fotogramétrica do ângulo de flexão de quadril Reliability and usability assessment of three different softwares for photogrammetric analysis of hip flexion angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Alves Guariglia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A análise fotogramétrica pode ser feita por meio de diferentes programas computacionais. Assim, o objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a confiabilidade e usabilidade de três diferentes programas em uma análise fotogramétrica durante a flexão do quadril e discutir aspectos qualitativos e quantitativos de cada um deles. Participaram do estudo 26 voluntários do gênero masculino, com idade entre 19 e 30 anos (x=25,4 anos, DP=2,5 que realizaram o teste do sentar e alcançar por meio do banco de Wells adaptado. Marcadores cutâneos foram posicionados nos processos ósseos: trocânter maior do fêmur e espinha ilíaca anterossuperior. A aquisição da imagem foi realizada no limite máximo da execução do teste. Todos os programas apresentaram uma alta confiabilidade entre as medidas, além disso, foram apresentadas vantagens e desvantagens específicas na adoção de cada um deles. O programa SAPO foi considerado com maiores vantagens para utilização na prática profissional, no entanto, para realização de análises em pesquisas científicas todos os programas apresentam pontos que devem ser considerados antes da sua adoção.The photogrammetric analysis can be done by using different softwares. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and the usability of three different softwares during the hip flexion photogrammetric analysis and to discuss the qualitative and quantitative aspects of each one. Twenty-six volunteers participated in this study with age between 19 and 30 years old (x=25.4 years, SD=2.5 who underwent the sit-to-reach test through adapted Wells´ bench. Reflective skin markers were positioned in the anterior superior iliac spine and greater trochanter. The image acquisition was collected in the maximum limit of test execution. All softwares showed a high reliability between measures, besides it was presented specifics advantages and disadvantages during adoption one of them. SAPO´s software was

  9. Hip Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hip replacement is surgery for people with severe hip damage. The most common cause of damage is osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis ... pain medicines, and exercise haven't helped, hip replacement surgery might be an option for you. During ...

  10. Function of the ligamentum teres in limiting hip rotation: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hal D; Hatem, Munif A; Kivlan, Benjamin R; Martin, RobRoy L

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to evaluate the function of the ligamentum teres (LT) in limiting hip rotation in 18 distinct hip positions while preserving the capsular ligaments. Twelve hips in 6 fresh-frozen pelvis-to-toes cadaveric specimens were skeletonized from the lumbar spine to the distal femur, preserving only the hip ligaments. Hip joints were arthroscopically accessed through a portal located between the pubofemoral and iliofemoral ligaments to confirm the integrity of the LT. Three independent measurements of hip internal and external rotation range of motion (ROM) were performed in 18 defined hip positions of combined extension-flexion and abduction-adduction. The LT was then arthroscopically sectioned and rotation ROM reassessed in the same positions. A paired sample t test was used to compare the average internal and external hip rotation ROM values in the intact LT versus resected conditions in each of the 18 positions. P hip positions tested (P hip was in 90° or 120° of flexion. The major function of the LT is controlling hip rotation. The LT functions as an end-range stabilizer to hip rotation dominantly at 90° or greater of hip flexion, confirming its contribution to hip stability. Ruptures of the LT contribute to hip instability dominantly in flexed hip positions. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reliability and Validity of the Hip Stability Isometric Test (HipSIT): A New Method to Assess Hip Posterolateral Muscle Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; das Neves Rodrigues, Helena Larissa; de Freitas, Bruno Wesley; de Paula Lima, Pedro Olavo

    2017-12-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Background The Hip Stability Isometric Test (HipSIT) evaluates the strength of the hip posterolateral stabilizers in a position that favors greater activation of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius and lower activation of the tensor fascia lata. Objectives To check the validity and reliability of the HipSIT and to evaluate the HipSIT in women with patellofemoral pain (PFP). Methods The HipSIT was evaluated with a handheld dynamometer. During testing, the participants were sidelying, with their legs positioned at 45° of hip flexion and 90° of knee flexion. Participants were instructed to raise the knee of the upper leg while keeping the upper and lower heels in contact. To establish reliability and validity, 49 women were tested with the HipSIT by 2 different evaluators on day 1, and then again 7 days later. The strength of the hip extensors, abductors, and external rotators was also evaluated. Twenty women with unilateral PFP were also evaluated. Results The HipSIT has excellent intrarater and interrater reliability. The standard error of measurement was 0.01 kgf/kg, and the minimal detectable change was 0.036 kgf/kg. The HipSIT showed good validity in isolated hip abduction, external rotation, and extension (Pstrength deficits in women with PFP. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(12):906-913. Epub 9 Oct 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7274.

  12. Palmar Flexion Creases Variants among Nigerians | Adetona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Line formations of the palm (palmar flexion creases) as part of field of dermatoglyphics can be used for non-invasive investigations of congenital abnormalities. Numerous studies have found correlation between line patterns, diseases and psychological conditions. The pattern of palmar flexion creases had been studied in ...

  13. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip fractures in people of all ages. In older adults, a hip fracture is most often a result of a fall from a standing height. In people with very weak bones, a hip fracture can occur simply by standing on the leg and twisting. Risk factors The rate of hip fractures increases substantially with ...

  14. Supracondylar correction osteotomy to prevent repetitive posterior dislocation of a hip prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, D.; Marti, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent dislocation of a total hip prosthesis can be a challenging and often disappointing problem. This case report describes a 78-year-old woman who had recurrent posterior dislocations of a revision total hip replacement (THR) that occurred on flexion and internal rotation of the hip. The

  15. Flexion and anterior knee pain after high flexion posterior stabilized or cruciate retaining knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Groes, Sebastiaan; van der Ven, Paul; Kremers-van de Hei, Keetie; Koëter, Sander; Verdonschot, Nico

    2015-12-01

    Special high-flexion prosthetic designs show a small increase in postoperative flexion compared to standard designs and some papers show increased anterior knee pain with these prosthesis. A prospective double blind randomized controlled trial investigates the difference in flexion and anterior knee pain between standard and high-flexion total knee arthroplasty. In total 47 patients were randomly allocated to a standard cruciate retaining fixed bearing design (CR) in 23 patients and to a high-flexion posterior stabilized mobile bearing design (HF-PS) in 24 patients. The HF-PS did show a significantly higher passive postoperative flexion; 120.8° (SD 10.3°) vs. 112.0° (SD 9.5°) for the CR group (p = 0.004). The active postoperative flexion, VAS-pain score and Feller score did not show significant differences between both groups. Sub analysis with the HF-PS group showed a higher VAS-pain for the patients achieving ≥130° of flexion; 30.5 (SD 32.2) vs. 12.2 (SD 12.5) (p = 0.16). The present study showed a significant higher passive flexion in the high-flexion prosthesis compared to the standard prosthesis. However this difference disappeared when comparing active flexion. No difference in anterior knee pain was found between both groups.

  16. Head flexion angle while using a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sojeong; Kang, Hwayeong; Shin, Gwanseob

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive or prolonged head flexion posture while using a smartphone is known as one of risk factors for pain symptoms in the neck. To quantitatively assess the amount and range of head flexion of smartphone users, head forward flexion angle was measured from 18 participants when they were conducing three common smartphone tasks (text messaging, web browsing, video watching) while sitting and standing in a laboratory setting. It was found that participants maintained head flexion of 33-45° (50th percentile angle) from vertical when using the smartphone. The head flexion angle was significantly larger (p smartphone, could be a main contributing factor to the occurrence of neck pain of heavy smartphone users. Practitioner Summary: In this laboratory study, the severity of head flexion of smartphone users was quantitatively evaluated when conducting text messaging, web browsing and video watching while sitting and standing. Study results indicate that text messaging while sitting caused the largest head flexion than that of other task conditions.

  17. The pattern and technique in the clinical evaluation of the adult hip: the common physical examination tests of hip specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hal D; Kelly, Bryan T; Leunig, Michael; Philippon, Marc J; Clohisy, John C; Martin, RobRoy L; Sekiya, Jon K; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Mohtadi, Nicholas G; Sampson, Thomas G; Safran, Marc R

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the technique and tests used in the physical examination of the adult hip performed by multiple clinicians who regularly treat patients with hip problems and identify common physical examination patterns. The subjects included 5 men and 6 women with a mean age (+/-SD) of 29.8 +/- 9.4 years. They underwent physical examination of the hip by 6 hip specialists with a strong interest in hip-related problems. All examiners were blind to patient radiographs and diagnoses. Patient examinations were video recorded and reviewed. It was determined that 18 tests were most frequently performed (>or=40%) by the examiners, 3 standing, 11 supine, 3 lateral, and 1 prone. Of the most frequently performed tests, 10 were performed more than 50% of the time. The tests performed in the supine position were as follows: flexion range of motion (ROM) (percentage of use, 98%), flexion internal rotation ROM (98%), flexion external rotation ROM (86%), passive supine rotation test (76%), flexion/adduction/internal rotation test (70%), straight leg raise against resistance test (61%), and flexion/abduction/external rotation test (52%). The tests performed in the standing position were the gait test (86%) and the single-leg stance phase test (77%). The 1 test in the prone position was the femoral anteversion test (58%). There are variations in the testing that hip specialists perform to examine and evaluate their patients, but there is enough commonality to form the basis to recommend a battery of physical examination maneuvers that should be considered for use in evaluating the hip. Patients presenting with groin, abdominal, back, and/or hip pain need to have a basic examination to ensure that the hip is not overlooked. A comprehensive physical examination of the hip will benefit the patient and the physician and serve as the foundation for future multicenter clinical studies. (c) 2010 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published

  18. Hip pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from a chair, walking, climbing stairs, and driving Hamstring strain Iliotibial band syndrome Hip flexor strain Hip ... and cool down afterward. Stretch your quadriceps and hamstrings. Avoid running straight down hills. Walk down instead. ...

  19. Hip joint mobility in dancers: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drężewska, Marlena; Gałuszka, Renata; Sliwiński, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of dancing on hip joint mobility and to assess the relationship between active movements of the hips and injuries among dancers, which may be important in planning rehabilitation in this group. The sample comprised 49 dancers (37 women and 12 men) aged 15 to 32 years. The participants were the professional dancers of the Kielce Dance Theatre and members of two youth jazz dance teams from the Kielce Dance Theatre. The active range of motion of the hips was measured in three planes using a goniometer in order to assess the influence of dance training on hip joint mobility. A questionnaire-based survey was also conducted. The range of flexion, extension and external rotation was significantly greater in the group of long-time dancers (p <0.05). There was a significantly greater range of flexion, abduction and external rotation in previously injured hip joints (p<0.05). 1. Injuries to hip joints in dancers may result in increased ranges of motion, which may lead to disturbances of joint stability. 2. Being a long-time dancer and the female gender were associated with an increased range of hip joint motion.

  20. Contribution of the Pubofemoral Ligament to Hip Stability: A Biomechanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hal D; Khoury, Anthony N; Schröder, Ricardo; Johnson, Eric; Gómez-Hoyos, Juan; Campos, Salvador; Palmer, Ian J

    2017-02-01

    To determine the isolated function of the pubofemoral ligament of the hip capsule and its contribution to hip stability in external/internal rotational motion during flexion greater than 30° and abduction. Thirteen hips from 7 fresh-frozen pelvis-to-toe cadavers were skeletonized from the lumbar spine to the distal femur with the capsular ligaments intact. Computed tomographic imaging was performed to ensure no occult pathological state existed, and assess bony anatomy. Specimens were placed on a surgical table in supine position with lower extremities resting on a custom-designed polyvinylchloride frame. Hip internal and external rotation was measured with the hip placed into a combination of the following motions: 30°, 60°, 110° hip flexion and 0°, 20°, 40° abduction. Testing positions were randomized. The pubofemoral ligament was released and measurements were repeated, followed by releasing the ligamentum teres. Analysis of the 2,106 measurements recorded demonstrates the pubofemoral ligament as a main controller of hip internal rotation during hip flexion beyond 30° and abduction. Hip internal rotation was increased up to 438.9% (P ligament was released and 412.9% (P ligament were released, compared with the native state. The hypothesis of the pubofemoral ligament as one of the contributing factors of anterior inferior hip stability by controlling external rotation of the hip in flexion beyond 30° and abduction was disproved. The pubofemoral ligament maintains a key function in limiting internal rotation in the position of increasing hip flexion beyond 30° and abduction. This cadaveric study concludes previous attempts at understanding the anatomical and biomechanical function of the capsular ligaments and their role in hip stability. The present study contributes to the understanding of hip stability and biomechanical function of the pubofemoral ligament. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  1. Invariant hip moment pattern while walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons hold significant potential for gait assistance and rehabilitation; however, we have a limited understanding of how people adapt to walking with robotic devices. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that people reduce net muscle moments about their joints when robotic assistance is provided. This reduction in muscle moment results in a total joint moment (muscle plus exoskeleton) that is the same as the moment without the robotic assistance despite potential differences in joint angles. To test this hypothesis, eight healthy subjects trained with the robotic hip exoskeleton while walking on a force-measuring treadmill. The exoskeleton provided hip flexion assistance from approximately 33% to 53% of the gait cycle. We calculated the root mean squared difference (RMSD) between the average of data from the last 15 minutes of the powered condition and the unpowered condition. After completing three 30-minute training sessions, the hip exoskeleton provided 27% of the total peak hip flexion moment during gait. Despite this substantial contribution from the exoskeleton, subjects walked with a total hip moment pattern (muscle plus exoskeleton) that was almost identical and more similar to the unpowered condition than the hip angle pattern (hip moment RMSD 0.027, angle RMSD 0.134, p<0.001). The angle and moment RMSD were not different for the knee and ankle joints. These findings support the concept that people adopt walking patterns with similar joint moment patterns despite differences in hip joint angles for a given walking speed. PMID:21333995

  2. Hip joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hip arthroplasty; Total hip replacement; Hip hemiarthroplasty; Arthritis - hip replacement; Osteoarthritis - hip replacement ... your activities. Most of the time, hip joint replacement is done in people age 60 and older. ...

  3. Effect of Posture on Hip Angles and Moments during Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara L.; Sahrmann, Shirley A.

    2014-01-01

    Anterior hip pain is common in young, active adults. Clinically, we have noted that patients with anterior hip pain often walk in a swayback posture, and that their pain is reduced when the posture is corrected. The purpose of this study was to investigate a potential mechanism for the reduction in pain by testing the effect of posture on movement patterns and internal moments during gait in healthy subjects. Fifteen subjects were instructed to walk while maintaining three postures: 1) natural, 2) swayback, and 3) forward flexed. Kinematic and force data were collected using a motion capture system and a force plate. Walking in the swayback posture resulted in a higher peak hip extension angle, hip flexor moment and hip flexion angular impulse compared to natural posture. In contrast, walking in a forward flexed posture resulted in a decreased hip extension angle and decreased hip flexion angular impulse. Based on these results, walking in a swayback posture may result in increased forces required of the anterior hip structures, potentially contributing to anterior hip pain. This study provides a potential biomechanical mechanism for clinical observations that posture correction in patients with hip pain is beneficial. PMID:25262565

  4. Effect of posture on hip angles and moments during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara L; Sahrmann, Shirley A

    2015-02-01

    Anterior hip pain is common in young, active adults. Clinically, we have noted that patients with anterior hip pain often walk in a swayback posture, and that their pain is reduced when the posture is corrected. The purpose of this study was to investigate a potential mechanism for the reduction in pain by testing the effect of posture on movement patterns and internal moments during gait in healthy subjects. Fifteen subjects were instructed to walk while maintaining three postures: 1) natural, 2) swayback, and 3) forward flexed. Kinematic and force data were collected using a motion capture system and a force plate. Walking in the swayback posture resulted in a higher peak hip extension angle, hip flexor moment and hip flexion angular impulse compared to natural posture. In contrast, walking in a forward flexed posture resulted in a decreased hip extension angle and decreased hip flexion angular impulse. Based on these results, walking in a swayback posture may result in increased forces required of the anterior hip structures, potentially contributing to anterior hip pain. This study provides a potential biomechanical mechanism for clinical observations that posture correction in patients with hip pain is beneficial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Flexion-relaxation response to gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Michael; Solomonow, Moshe; Li, Li

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this report was to study the influence of the orientation of gravitational loading on the behavior of anterior and posterior trunk muscles during anterior trunk flexion-extension. Participants (N=13) performed five (5) cycles of trunk flexion-extension while standing with gravity parallel to the body axis and five (5) cycles while in the supine condition (e.g. sit-ups) with gravity perpendicular to the body axis. Surface electromyographic (EMG) patterns from lumbar paraspinal, rectus abdominis, external oblique, rectus femoris, semimembranosis, and biceps femoris muscles were analyzed during each condition. EMG signals were synchronized with lumbar flexion and trunk inclination angles. Flexion-extension from the standing position resulted in a myoelectric silent period of the lumbar posterior muscles (e.g. flexion-relaxation phenomena (FRP)) as well as the hamstring muscles through deep angles during which activity was observed in abdominal muscles. Flexion-extension during sit-ups, however, resulted in a myoelectric silent period of the abdominal muscles and the quadriceps through deep angles during which the lumbar posterior muscles were active. In this condition, the FRP was not observed in posterior muscles. The new findings demonstrate the profound impact of the orientation of the gravity vector on the FRP, the abdominal muscles reaction to gravitational loads during sit-ups and its relationships with lumbar antagonists and thigh musculature. The new findings suggest that gravitational moments requirements dominate the FRP through the prevailing kinematics, load sharing and reflex activation-inhibition of muscles in various conditions. Lumbar kinematics or fixed sensory motor programs by themselves, however, are not the major contributor to the FRP. The new findings improve our insights into spinal biomechanics as well as understanding and evaluating low back disorders.

  6. Sagittal Plane Hip, Knee, and Ankle Biomechanics and the Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Mari; Pasanen, Kati; Krosshaug, Tron; Kannus, Pekka; Vasankari, Tommi; Kujala, Urho M; Bahr, Roald; Perttunen, Jarmo; Parkkari, Jari

    2017-12-01

    Stiff landings with less knee flexion and high vertical ground-reaction forces have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The literature on the association between other sagittal plane measures and the risk of ACL injuries with a prospective study design is lacking. To investigate the relationship between selected sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle biomechanics and the risk of ACL injury in young female team-sport athletes. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 171 female basketball and floorball athletes (age range, 12-21 years) participated in a vertical drop jump test using 3-dimensional motion analysis. All new ACL injuries, as well as match and training exposure data, were recorded for 1 to 3 years. Biomechanical variables, including hip and ankle flexion at initial contact (IC), hip and ankle ranges of motion (ROMs), and peak external knee and hip flexion moments, were selected for analysis. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs. The combined sensitivity and specificity of significant test variables were assessed using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A total of 15 noncontact ACL injuries were recorded during follow-up (0.2 injuries/1000 player-hours). Of the variables investigated, landing with less hip flexion ROM (HR for each 10° increase in hip ROM, 0.61 [95% CI, 0.38-0.99]; P < .05) and a greater knee flexion moment (HR for each 10-N·m increase in knee moment, 1.21 [95% CI, 1.04-1.40]; P = .01) was significantly associated with an increased risk of ACL injury. Hip flexion at IC, ankle flexion at IC, ankle flexion ROM, and peak external hip flexion moment were not significantly associated with the risk of ACL injury. ROC curve analysis for significant variables showed an area under the curve of 0.6, indicating a poor combined sensitivity and specificity of the test. Landing with less hip flexion ROM and a greater peak

  7. An improved method for measuring hip abduction in spica after surgical reduction for developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFrancesco, C J; Blumberg, T J; Chauvin, N A; Sankar, W N

    2017-08-01

    Excessive in-spica abduction is a risk factor for oste-onecrosis after surgical reduction for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). The traditional method for radiographically measuring hip abduction using axial imaging does not reflect the true angle, which usually lies in an oblique plane. The purpose of this study was to describe a novel method for measuring true hip position using advanced imaging. A trigonometric model was derived to define hip position based upon the femoral axis angular deviation from midline as measured on axial and coronal sequences of MRI studies. In-spica MRIs of 28 hips having undergone surgery for DDH were reviewed. On two separate occasions, the same three raters measured the femoral axis deviation from mid-line on axial and coronal imaging. Abduction was estimated using the traditional method of measurement and our novel method. Intra- and inter-rater reliability were assessed. The methods yielded different estimates (p 0.922, intra-rater ICC > 0.919). The traditional method is accurate at 90° of flexion, but it increasingly overestimates abduction as hip flexion decreases. All cases where hip flexion was ≤ 40° exhibited ≥ 10° of error. Decreasing hip flexion in spica modifies the perceived angle of abduction as measured using axial imaging. This inaccuracy can be overcome through assessment of orthogonal views using our new approach, which is accurate and reliable. It should be considered for future research investigating the effects of in-spica hip position on outcomes of DDH treatment.

  8. PULSE COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  9. Atividade elétrica dos músculos oblíquos externos e multífidos durante o exercício de flexoextensão do quadril realizado no Cadillac com diferentes regulagens de mola e posições do indivíduo Electrical activity of external oblique and multifidus muscles during the hip flexion-extension exercise performed in the Cadillac with different adjustments of springs and individual positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson F. Loss

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Apesar do amplo uso do Pilates na Fisioterapia, há poucos estudos que avaliaram a ativação elétrica dos músculos nos exercícios. OBJETIVO: Verificar a influência de diferentes regulagens de mola e posições do indivíduo sobre a ativação elétrica dos multífidos (MU e oblíquos externos (OE durante a flexoextensão do quadril (FEQ no Cadillac. MÉTODOS: Oito mulheres praticantes de Pilates por seis meses realizaram 10 repetições de FEQ nas situações: mola baixa (MB, mola fixada a 30 cm do nível em que estava o indivíduo; mola alta (MA, mola fixada a 90 cm do nível em que estava o indivíduo; posição próxima (PP, distância de 10 cm da fixação da mola; posição distante (PD, distância de 30 cm da fixação da mola. Dados cinemáticos e de eletromiografia (EMG foram coletados sincronizadamente, e os músculos monitorados bilateralmente foram os OE e os MU. Cada movimento de FEQ foi recortado em duas fases (extensão e flexão. O sinal de EMG foi calculado e normalizado usando a contração voluntária máxima (CVM. O Wilcoxon test foi usado para investigar diferenças entre as situações (pBACKGROUND: Despite of the widepread use of Pilates in Physical Therapy, there are few studies that have assessed the muscle electrical activation during Pilates exercises. OBJECTIVE: Verify the influence of different spring adjustments and individual positions on the electrical activation of multifidus (MU and oblique external (OE muscles during hip flexion-extension (HFE exercise on the Cadillac. METHODS: Eight women practicing Pilates exercises for at least six months performed 10 repetitions of HFE in the following situations: Lower Spring, spring fixed at 30 cm in relation to level which the individuals were positioned. Higher Spring, spring fixed at 90 cm in relation to level which the individuals were positioned. Near Position, distance of 10 cm from the fixed spring. Distant Position, distance of 30 cm from

  10. Shape, shear and flexion: an analytic flexion formalism for realistic mass profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, P. D.; Fluke, C. J.

    2009-07-01

    Flexion is a non-linear gravitational lensing effect that arises from gradients in the convergence and shear across an image. We derive a formalism that describes non-linear gravitational lensing by a circularly symmetric lens in the thin-lens approximation. This provides us with relatively simple expressions for first- and second-flexion in terms of only the surface density and projected mass distribution of the lens. We give details of exact lens models, in particular providing flexion calculations for a Sérsic-law profile, which has become increasingly popular over recent years. We further provide a single resource for the analytic forms of convergence, shear, first- and second-flexion for the following mass distributions: a point mass, singular isothermal sphere (SIS); Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile; Sérsic-law profile. We quantitatively compare these mass distributions and show that the convergence and first-flexion are better indicators of the Sérsic shape parameter, while for the concentration of NFW profiles the shear and second-flexion terms are preferred. Research undertaken as part of the Commonwealth Cosmology Initiative (CCI:http://www.thecci.org), an international collaboration supported by the Australian Research Council. E-mail: plasky@astro.swin.edu.au (PDL); cfluke@astro.swin.edu.au (CJF)

  11. The shape of the hip joint as a risk factor for osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saberi Hosnijeh, F; Zuiderwijk, M; Versteeg, M; Smeele, J; Hofman, A; Uitterlinden, A G; Agricola, R; Oei, E H; Waarsing, J H; Biermae Zeinstra, S M; Van Meurs, J B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cam-type femoroacetabular impingement characterized by extra bone formation at the anterolateral head-neck junction of the hip creates a non-spherical femoral head, known as a cam deformity. The cam deformity is forced into the acetabulum during flexion and internal rotation of the hip,

  12. THE ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN HIP STRENGTH AND HIP KINEMATICS DURING A SINGLE LEG HOP IN RECREATIONAL ATHLETES POST ACL RECONSTRUCTION COMPARED TO HEALTHY CONTROLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Jeremiah; Suckut, Tell; Wages, Jensen; Lyles, Heather; Perrin, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    Only a small amount of evidence exists linking hip abductor weakness to dynamic knee valgus during static and dynamic activities. The associations of hip extensor strength and hip kinematics during the landing of a single leg hop are not known. Purpose: To determine if relationships exist between hip extensor and abductor strength and hip kinematics in both involved and uninvolved limb during the landing phase of a single leg hop in recreational athletes post anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The presence of similar associations was also evaluated in healthy recreational athletes. Controlled Laboratory Study; Cross-sectional. Twenty-four recreational college-aged athletes participated in the study (12 post ACL reconstruction; 12 healthy controls). Sagittal and frontal plane hip kinematic data were collected for five trials during the landing of a single leg hop. Hip extensor and abductor isometric force production was measured using a hand-held dynamometer and normalized to participants' height and weight. Dependent and independent t-tests were used to analyze for any potential differences in hip strength or kinematics within and between groups, respectively. Pearson's r was used to demonstrate potential associations between hip strength and hip kinematics for both limbs in the ACL group and the right limb in the healthy control group. Independent t-tests revealed that participants post ACL reconstruction exhibited less hip extensor strength (0.18 N/Ht*BW vs. 0.25 N/Ht*BW, p=hip adduction (9.0 º vs. 0.8 º, p=hip extensor strength and maximum hip abduction/adduction angle in the involved limb. A moderate and direct relationship between hip abductor strength and maximum hip flexion angle was demonstrated in the both the involved ( r =.62) and uninvolved limb ( r =.65, p=.02). No significant associations were demonstrated between hip extensor or abductor strength and hip flexion and/or abduction/adduction angles in the healthy group. The

  13. Reproducibility of a knee and hip proprioception test in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvin, Mina; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Burger, Bart J; Verschueren, Sabine M P; van Dieën, Jaap H; Pijnappels, Mirjam

    2015-04-01

    Proprioception can be assessed by measuring joint position sense (JPS). Most studies have focused on JPS of the knee joint while literature for other joints especially for hip JPS is scarce. Although some studies have evaluated proprioception of the knee joint, the reproducibility of methods has rarely been investigated. To estimate intrasession reliability and agreement of an active-active JPS test for hip flexion/abduction and knee flexion in healthy older adults. Nineteen healthy older adults participated in this study. The proprioception of the hip (flexion and abduction) and knee (flexion) were assessed in both legs using the "active-active" reproduction technique. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM), and limits of agreement (LOA) were estimated for relative angular error (RE), absolute angular error (AE), and variable angular error (VE). Reliability of our JPS test was substantial to almost perfect for the RE for both joints and legs (ICC values ranging from 0.75 to 0.93). We also found that the ICC values for AE were substantial for knee flexion and hip abduction of the left and right leg. The ICC results of VE showed poor reliability for hip and knee joints. SEM and LOA values for hip abduction were generally lower than for hip and knee flexion, indicating lower measurement error or more precise scores for the proprioception test of hip abduction. Proprioceptive acuity of the knee and hip joints in healthy older adults can be reliably assessed with an active-active procedure in a standing position with respect to relative and absolute error.

  14. [Effect of ceramic on ceramic total hip arthroplasty in Crowe IV developmental dysplasia of the hip].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing-Yang; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Du, Yin-Qiao; Piao, Shang; Wang, Sen; Gao, Zhi-Sen; Wu, Wen-Ming; Ma, Hai-Yang

    2018-02-25

    To observe the clinical effect of ceramic on ceramic total hip arthroplasty(THA)in Crowe IV developmental dysplasia of the hip(DDH). From April 2008 to December 2015, 137 hips of 111 Crowe IV DDH patients received THA using Forte or Delta ceramic on ceramic by one senior surgeon, which consists of 85 unilateral hips and 26 bilateral hips. The average age of the patients was(38.88±10.83) years old ranging from 18 to 68 years old. The mean follow-up was(41.16±21.50) months ranging from 12 to 96 months. All the patients were evaluated by Harris Hip Score. Radiographic evaluations were made preoperatively and during follow-up. Harris scores, the incidence of complications such as ceramic fracture, squeaking, dislocation were observed. The mean preoperative Harris score was 56.54±15.67, the mean postoperative Harris score was 88.30±6.86( P =0.017). Periprosthetic osteolysis was not deteced around any cup. No ceramic fracture occurred. There were 3 cases of revision surgery due to infection, losening of the stem and limb length discrepancy, respectively; 3 cases of dislocation occurred. Seventy-seven patients were recorded the gait and the hip mobility, the hip flexion of 69 patients were above 120 degrees. Ceramic on ceramic bearing showed an encouraging result in Crowe IV DDH total hip arthroplasty. Copyright© 2018 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  15. Improving Pre-Operative Flexion in Primary TKA: A Surgical Technique Emphasizing Knee Flexion with 5-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward McPherson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study prospectively reviews a consecutive series of 228 primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA procedures utilizing a technique to optimize knee flexion. The main features include: (1the use of a “patellar friendly” femoral component and reduced thickness patellar components, (2 patient individualized adjustment of the femoral component rotation set strictly to the anterior-posterior femoral axis, (3a rigorous flexion compartment debridement to remove non-essential posterior femoral bone with a Z-osteotome, and (4incorporation of a rapid recovery protocol with features to promote knee flexion. Results were categorized into three groups: low pre-op flexion (90 degrees and below, regular pre-op flexion (91-125 degrees, and high pre-op flexion (126 degrees and above. Average flexion in the low flexion group improved by 20 degrees at 6 weeks, 28 degrees at 3 months, 31 degrees at 1 year, and 30 degrees at 5 years. In the regular flexion group, average flexion improved by 2 degrees at 6 weeks, 10 degrees at 3 months, 12 degrees at 1 year, and 13 degrees at 5 years. Finally, in the high flexion group, average flexion decreased by 7 degrees at 6 weeks, regained preoperative levels at 3 months, and increased by 3 degrees at 1 year and 4 degrees at 5 years. In summary, a technique that emphasizes patellofemoral kinematics can consistently improve flexion in TKA in short and long-term follow-up.

  16. Hip Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diagnosis and decision making. In: DeLee & Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/hip-pain/basics/definition/SYM-20050684 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  17. Rose Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shows that taking rose hip powder mixed with apple juice does not affect weight or blood sugar ... Rose, Phool Gulab, Pink Rose, Poire d'oiseaux, Rosa alba, Rosa canina, Rosa centifolia, Rosa damascena, Rosa ...

  18. Hip ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinoli, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.martinoli@libero.it [Radiologia, DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Garello, Isabella; Marchetti, Alessandra; Palmieri, Federigo; Altafini, Luisa [Radiologia, DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Valle, Maura [Radiologia, Gaslini Children Hospital, Genova (Italy); Tagliafico, Alberto [Radiologia, National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    In newborns, US has an established role in the detection and management of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Later in childhood, when the limping child is a major diagnostic dilemma, US is extremely helpful in the identification of the varied disease processes underlying this condition, as transient synovitis, septic arthritis, Perthes disease and slipped femoral capital epiphysis. In adolescent practicing sporting activities, US is an excellent means to identify apophyseal injures about the pelvic ring, especially when avulsions are undisplaced and difficult-to-see radiographically. Later on, in the adulthood, US is an effective modality to diagnose tendon and muscle injuries about the hip and pelvis, identify effusion or synovitis within the hip joint or its adjacent bursae and guide the treatment of these findings. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the most common pathologic conditions about the hip, in which the contribution of US is relevant for the diagnostic work-up.

  19. Does Capsular Laxity Lead to Microinstability of the Native Hip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuyang; Alexander, Jerry W; Thomas, Vijai S; Choi, Joshua; Harris, Joshua D; Doherty, David B; Jeffers, Jonathan R T; Noble, Philip C

    2018-03-01

    Hip "microinstability" is commonly cited as the cause of symptoms that occur in the presence of translation of the femoral head away from conformity with the acetabular fossa. However, there is still no consistent objective criteria defining its presence and biomechanical basis. One hypothesis is that abnormal motion of the articular surfaces occurs because of capsular laxity, ultimately leading to clinical symptoms. To determine the relationship between capsular laxity and abnormal rotation and translation of the hip. Controlled laboratory study. Eight cadaveric hips were dissected down to the capsule and mounted in a customized multiaxial hip activity simulator. Each specimen was loaded with 5 N·m of internal and external rotational torque in full extension and 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion. During testing, the relative position and rotation of the femur and the pelvis were monitored in real time with a 6-camera motion analysis system. The testing was repeated after capsular laxity was generated by placing a regular array of incisions ("pie crusting") in the iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments. Joint rotation and femoral head translation were calculated with specimen-specific models. A hip microinstability index was defined as the ratio between the length of the locus of the femoral head center and the radius of the femoral head during rotation from extension to 90° of flexion. In intact hips, the components of femoral head translation were within 0.5 mm in positions close to neutral (hips, the femoral head was inferiorly displaced during external rotation and anteroinferiorly during internal rotation. The length of the locus of the femoral head center increased from 3.61 ± 1.30 mm to 5.35 ± 1.83 mm for external rotation ( P hip microinstability index increased from 0.40 ± 0.08 for intact hips to 0.55 ± 0.09 for modified hips ( P hip approximates a concentric ball-and-socket joint within 30° of flexion; however, beyond 30° of

  20. A case study of gait compensations for hip muscle weakness in idiopathic inflammatory myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Karen Lohmann; Kepple, Thomas M; Stanhope, Steven J

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this case series was to quantify different strategies used to compensate in gait for hip muscle weakness. An instrumented gait analysis was performed of three females diagnosed with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies and compared to a healthy unimpaired subject. Lower extremity joint moments obtained from the gait analysis were used to drive an induced acceleration model which determined each moment's contribution to upright support, forward progression, and hip joint acceleration. Results showed that after midstance, the ankle plantar flexors normally provide upright support and forward progression while producing hip extension acceleration. In normal gait, the hip flexors eccentrically resist hip extension, but the hip flexor muscles of the impaired subjects (S1-3) were too weak to control extension. Instead S1-3 altered joint positions and muscle function to produce forward progression while minimizing hip extension acceleration. S1 increased knee flexion angle to decrease the hip extension effect of the ankle plantar flexors. S2 and S3 used either a knee flexor moment or gravity to produce forward progression, which had the advantage of accelerating the hip into flexion rather than extension, and decreased the demand on the hip flexors. Results showed how gait compensations for hip muscle weakness can produce independent (i.e. successful) ambulation, although at a reduced speed as compared to normal gait. Knowledge of these successful strategies can assist the rehabilitation of patients with hip muscle weakness who are unable to ambulate and potentially be used to reduce their disability.

  1. Parametric and cadaveric models of lumbar flexion instability and flexion restricting dynamic stabilization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Louis C; Alamin, Todd F; Voronov, Leonard I; Carandang, Gerard; Havey, Robert M; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2013-12-01

    Development of a dynamic stabilization system often involves costly and time-consuming design iterations, testing and computational modeling. The aims of this study were (1) develop a simple parametric model of lumbar flexion instability and use this model to identify the appropriate stiffness of a flexion restricting stabilization system (FRSS), and (2) in a cadaveric experiment, validate the predictive value of the parametric model. Literature was surveyed for typical parameters of intact and destabilized spines: stiffness in the high flexibility zone (HFZ) and high stiffness zone, and size of the HFZ. These values were used to construct a bilinear parametric model of flexion kinematics of intact and destabilized lumbar spines. FRSS implantation was modeled by iteratively superimposing constant flexion stiffnesses onto the parametric model. Five cadaveric lumbar spines were tested intact; after L4-L5 destabilization (nucleotomy, midline decompression); and after FRSS implantation. Specimens were loaded in flexion/extension (8 Nm/6 Nm) with 400 N follower load to characterize kinematics for comparison with the parametric model. To accomplish the goal of reducing ROM to intact levels and increasing stiffness to approximately 50 % greater than intact levels, flexion stiffness contributed by the FRSS was determined to be 0.5 Nm/deg using the parametric model. In biomechanical testing, the FRSS restored ROM of the destabilized segment from 146 ± 13 to 105 ± 21 % of intact, and stiffness in the HFZ from 41 ± 7 to 135 ± 38 % of intact. Testing demonstrated excellent predictive value of the parametric model, and that the FRSS attained the desired biomechanical performance developed with the model. A simple parametric model may allow efficient optimization of kinematic design parameters.

  2. Sonographic Assessment of Hip Swaddling Techniques in Infants With and Without DDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcke, Howard T; Karatas, Ali F; Cummings, Susan; Bowen, James R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this single-examination pilot study was to confirm the ability to perform hip sonography while swaddled and to ascertain whether the various swaddling techniques influenced hip position and dynamics. Dynamic sonography was used to evaluate 30 infants in both swaddled and unswaddled positions who were being seen in clinic for suspected or documented developmental dysplasia of the hip. A "treatment group" of 16 infants (32 hips) treated in a Pavlik harness and a "nontreatment group" of 14 untreated infants (28 hips) were studied.Criteria for comparing sonographic results between swaddled and unswaddled hip positions included femoral head position, instability, and range-of-motion restriction. Tight swaddling with a blanket was applied in 11 "nontreatment group" cases (20 hips; in 2 cases, only 1 hip studied) and produced limited flexion and abduction. One unstable left hip dislocated when tightly swaddled. Safe swaddling technique in 12 cases (24 hips) showed no limitation of flexion and abduction of the legs and no change in stability by sonography. Commercial swaddling products appeared to mildly restrict leg motion in 14 hips, but there was no change in hip position in the "nontreatment group." However, the commercial swaddling products changed the hip position in 3 Pavlik harness cases. Swaddling techniques that allow a free range of leg motion may not affect hip stability in normal infants or those being treated with Pavlik harness. Swaddling with restricted leg motion increases potential for hip instability. Tight swaddling dislocated 1 unstable hip, and commercial swaddling products judged to apply only mild restriction of leg motion negatively impacted 3 cases being treated for developmental dysplasia of the hip with Pavlik harness. On the basis of this pilot study, we advise caution when swaddling infants, especially with techniques that restrict leg motion. Further study of the long-term effects of swaddling is warranted. Level II.

  3. Bilaterally Primary Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty for Severe Hip Ankylosis with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dong-Xu; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yu-Min; Nian, Yue-Wen; Zhang, Jun; Kang, Xiao-Min; Wu, Shu-Fang; Zhu, Yang-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a reliable therapeutic intervention in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, in whom the aims of surgery are to reduce pain, restore hip function and improve quality of life. The current study is a retrospective analysis of the clinical and radiographic findings in a consecutive series of patients with hip ankylosis associated with severe ankylosing spondylitis who underwent bilateral primary total hip arthroplasty using non-cemented components. From June 2008 to May 2012, total hip arthroplasty was performed on 34 hips in 17 patients with bilateral ankylosis caused by ankylosing spondylitis. The study patients included 13 men and 4 women with a mean age of 24.2 years. The mean duration of disease was 8.3 years and the average duration of hip involvement was 7.6 years. All patients had severe hip pain and dysfunction with bilateral bony ankylosis and no range of motion preoperatively and all underwent bilateral cementless total hip arthroplasty performed by a single surgeon. Joint pain, range of motion (ROM), and Harris hip scores were assessed to evaluate the postoperative results. At a mean follow-up of 31.7 months, all patients had experienced significant clinical improvement in function, ROM, posture and ambulation. At the final follow-up, the mean postoperative flexion ROM was 134.4° compared with 0° preoperatively. Similar improvements were seen in hip abduction, adduction, internal rotation and external rotation. Postoperatively, 23 hips were completely pain-free, six had only occasional discomfort, three mild to moderate pain and two severe pain. The average Harris Hip Score improved from 23.7 preoperatively to 65.8 postoperatively. No stems had loosened at the final follow-up in any patient, nor had any revision surgery been required. Bilateral severe hip ankylosis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis can be treated with cementless bilateral synchronous total hip arthroplasty, which can greatly improve hip joint function and

  4. Influence of Power Delivery Timing on the Energetics and Biomechanics of Humans Wearing a Hip Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Aaron J; Foss, Jessica; Gannon, Hannah; Ferris, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    A broad goal in the field of powered lower limb exoskeletons is to reduce the metabolic cost of walking. Ankle exoskeletons have successfully achieved this goal by correctly timing a plantarflexor torque during late stance phase. Hip exoskeletons have the potential to assist with both flexion and extension during walking gait, but the optimal timing for maximally reducing metabolic cost is unknown. The focus of our study was to determine the best assistance timing for applying hip assistance through a pneumatic exoskeleton on human subjects. Ten non-impaired subjects walked with a powered hip exoskeleton, and both hip flexion and extension assistance were separately provided at different actuation timings using a simple burst controller. The largest average across-subject reduction in metabolic cost for hip extension was at 90% of the gait cycle (just prior to heel contact) and for hip flexion was at 50% of the gait cycle; this resulted in an 8.4 and 6.1% metabolic reduction, respectively, compared to walking with the unpowered exoskeleton. However, the ideal timing for both flexion and extension assistance varied across subjects. When selecting the assistance timing that maximally reduced metabolic cost for each subject, average metabolic cost for hip extension was 10.3% lower and hip flexion was 9.7% lower than the unpowered condition. When taking into account user preference, we found that subject preference did not correlate with metabolic cost. This indicated that user feedback was a poor method of determining the most metabolically efficient assistance power timing. The findings of this study are relevant to developers of exoskeletons that have a powered hip component to assist during human walking gait.

  5. Hip Problems in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A hip problem in infants is known as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). It is when the ball of the ... later in life? Resources International Hip Dysplasia Institute, Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) International Hip Dysplasia Institute, Hip-Healthy Swaddling ...

  6. Correlação entre a proporção de fibras rápidas do músculo bíceps braquial e o torque relativo da flexão do cotovelo em sujeitos com hipótese clínica de miopatia Correlation between the proportion of fast fibers in the biceps brachii muscle and the relative torque during elbow flexion in subjects with clinical hypothesis of myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CGN Back

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A produção de força muscular pode estar comprometida em pacientes portadores de miopatias. Estas representam um grupo heterogêneo de doenças com distintas características clínicas e morfológicas. Supõe-se que achados de desempenho funcional estejam relacionados com o tipo predominante de fibra expresso no músculo em análise. OBJETIVO: Correlacionar a proporção das fibras tipo 2 (FT2 do músculo bíceps braquial de sujeitos com hipótese clínica de miopatia (HCM com picos de torque isométrico e isocinético de flexão do cotovelo. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Participaram deste estudo sete sujeitos com HCM: quatro do sexo feminino com média de idade de 37 anos (dp= 9, peso de 73kg (dp= 26 e altura de 155cm (dp= 6; e três do sexo masculino com média de idade de 39 anos (dp= 1, peso de 88kg (dp= 5 e altura de 172cm (dp= 4. Pela técnica histoquímica de mATPase, foi realizada análise de proporção das fibras musculares. Após um mês da realização das biópsias, os sujeitos realizaram teste de força isométrica e isocinética concêntrica de flexão e extensão do cotovelo em dinamômetro isocinético. Avaliou-se o pico de torque (PT isométrico a 90°s-¹ e 180°s-¹ e calculou-se o torque relativo 90 (TR90 e 180 (TR180. Para análise estatística, utilizou-se correlação de Spearman (r. RESULTADOS: A proporção de FT2 se correlacionou positivamente com TR180 (r= 0,89, p= 0,01. Uma moderada correlação foi encontrada entre FT2 e TR90 (r= 0,75, p= 0,05. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados sugerem que o comportamento contrátil das FT2 não foi modificado nestes sujeitos. O dinamômetro isocinético mostrou ser um instrumento que pode avaliar, de forma não invasiva, a predominância do tipo de fibra muscular.Muscular strength production may be impaired in myopathic patients. Myopathies represent a heterogeneous group of diseases with distinct clinical and morphological characteristics. It has been hypothesized that functional performance

  7. The function of the hip capsular ligaments: a quantitative report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hal D; Savage, Adam; Braly, Brett A; Palmer, Ian J; Beall, Douglas P; Kelly, Bryan

    2008-02-01

    Our purpose was to analyze the anatomy and quantitative contributions of the hip capsular ligaments. The stabilizing roles of the medial and lateral arms of the iliofemoral ligament, pubofemoral ligament, and ischiofemoral ligament were examined in 12 matched pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric hips (6 male and 6 female hips). The motion at the hip joint was measured in internal and external rotation through ranges of motion from 30 degrees flexion to 10 degrees extension along a neutral swing path. The motion was standardized by use of frame stabilization and motion tracking. There is a clear and consistent ligamentous pattern within the hip corresponding to a distinct function and contribution to internal and external rotation. On releasing the ischiofemoral ligament, the greatest gain in range of motion was that of internal rotation. The largest increase of motion by releasing the pubofemoral ligament was observed in external rotation, especially during extension. The release of the medial and lateral arms of the iliofemoral ligament each gave the greatest increase of motion in external rotation, with the lateral arm release providing more range of motion in flexion and in a neutral position. The lateral arm release also showed a significant motion increase in internal rotation, primarily in extension. The ischiofemoral ligament controls internal rotation in flexion and extension. The lateral arm of the iliofemoral ligament has dual control of external rotation in flexion and both internal and external rotation in extension. The pubofemoral ligament controls external rotation in extension with contributions from the medial and lateral arms of the iliofemoral ligament. Together, these findings can have significant clinical applications. When abnormal muscular and osseous pathology can be eliminated as a cause of instability or restrictive range of motion, the understanding of the independent functions of the hip ligaments will aid in defining accurate assessment and

  8. The effect of hip position upon the location of the sciatic nerve: an MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke, Oliver; Mitchell, Piers D; Onikul, Ella; Little, David G

    2011-03-01

    Allowance for the positional changes of the sciatic nerve is important when considering the safest position of the leg to perform hip operations, specifically the ischial osteotomy during a pelvic triple or periacetabular osteotomy. As for its proximity to the osteotomy site the sciatic nerve can be injured during these operations with the consequence of severe functional impairment. This is the first in-vivo study that demonstrates the effect of hip position upon the location of the sciatic nerve. We determined how altering the position of the hip moves the nerve toward or away from the infracotyloid groove, the desired starting point of the ischial osteotomy site just inferior to the acetabulum when performing a pelvic triple or periacetabular osteotomy. Magnetic resonance imaging scans of the left hip in 3 different positions (neutral/supine, 30 to 45 degrees flexion, 30 to 45 degrees flexion/abduction/external rotation) were performed in 11 healthy children (5 boys and 6 girls, age 7 to 17 y) without prior hip surgery. The distance between the sciatic nerve and the infracotyloid groove was measured on the magnetic resonance images. Distance ratios based on the neutral position were calculated for flexion and flexion/abduction/external rotation for each of the participants. The sciatic nerve moves toward the ischium osteotomy site in hip flexion without abduction (mean flexion: neutral ratio 0.79, Pexternally rotated (mean flexion/abduction/external rotation: neutral ratio 1.34), meaning the distance from nerve to infracotyloid groove increases significantly (Pmean distances were 14.8 mm (11 to 20 mm) in neutral, 11.8 mm (9 to 16 mm) in flexion, and 20.0 mm (9 to 30 mm) in flexion/abduction/external rotation. The likely safest position of the hip/leg to perform the ischium osteotomy as part of a pelvic triple or periacetabular osteotomy is in flexion, abduction, and external rotation. In this position the osteotomy can be performed via a medial or anterior

  9. Skin movement errors in measurement of sagittal lumbar and hip angles in young and elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Liang; Tully, Elizabeth A; Galea, Mary P

    2008-02-01

    Errors in measurement of sagittal lumbar and hip angles due to skin movement on the pelvis and/or lateral thigh were measured in young (n = 21, age = 18.6 +/- 2.1 years) and older (n = 23, age = 70.9 +/- 6.4 years) age groups. Skin reference markers were attached over specific landmarks of healthy young and elderly subjects, who were videotaped in three static positions of hip flexion using the 2D PEAK Motus video analysis system. Sagittal lumbar and hip angles were calculated from skin reference markers and manually palpated landmarks. The elderly subjects demonstrated greater errors in lumbar angle due to skin movement on the pelvis only in the maximal hip flexion position. The traditional model (ASIS-PSIS-GT-LFE) underestimated sagittal hip angle and the revised model (ASIS-PSIS-2/3Th-1/4Th) provided more accurate measurement of sagittal hip angle throughout the full available range of hip flexion. Skin movement on the pelvis had a small counterbalancing effect on the larger errors from lateral thigh markers (GT-LFE), thereby decreasing hip angle error.

  10. [Hip fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisová, Drahomíra; Salášek, Martin; Pavelka, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Hip fractures are ranked among the frequent injuries. These fractures have been often coupled with high energy trauma in children and in patients with normal bone structure, low energy trauma and osteoporotic fracture (fragility fracture) is typical in elder patients. Hip fractures are divided into five groups: femoral head fracture, femoral neck fracture, pertrochanteric, intertrochateric and subtrochanteric fracture. Surgical treatment is indicated in all patients unless contraindications are present. Long bed rest has been accompanied by a high risk of development of thromboembolic disease, pneumonia and bed sore. Healing in the wrong position and nonunions are often the result of conservative treatment. Screw osteosynthesis is performed in isolated femoral head factures. Three cannulated screws or a DHS plate (dynamic hip screw) are used in fractures of the femoral neck with normal femoral head perfusion, total hip replacement is recommended in elder patients and in case of loss of blood supply of the femoral head. Pertrochanteric and intertrochanteric fractures can be stabilized by the femoral nails (PFN, PFN A, PFH - proximal femoral nail), nails are suitable for minimally invasive insertion and provide higher stability in the shaft, or plates (DHS) designed for stable pertronchanteric and intertrochanteric fractures. Subtrochanteric fractures can be fixed also intramedullary (nails - PFN long, PFN A long) and extramedullary (plates - DCS dynamic condylar screw, proximal femoral LCP - locking compression plate). Open reduction with internal plate fixation is advantageous for pathological fractures, as biopsy sampling can be performed. Hip fracture rehabilitation is integral part of the treatment, including walking on crutches or with a walker with partial weight bearing for at least six weeks.

  11. Hip strength and range of motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosler, Andrea B.; Crossley, Kay M.; Thorborg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the normal profiles for hip strength and range of motion (ROM) in a professional football league in Qatar, and examine the effect of leg dominance, age, past history of injury, and ethnicity on these profiles. Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Methods Participants...... and external rotation in 90° flexion, hip IR in prone, bent knee fall out and hip abduction in side-lying. Demographic information was collected and the effect on the profiles was analysed using linear mixed models with repeated measures. Results Strength values (mean ± SD) were: adduction = 3.0 ± 0.6 Nm....../kg, abduction = 2.6 ± 0.4 Nm/kg, adduction/abduction ratio = 1.2 ± 0.2, Squeeze test = 3.6 ± 0.8 N/kg. Range of motion values: internal rotation in flexion = 32 ± 8°, external rotation = 38 ± 8°, internal rotation in prone = 38 ± 8°, bent knee fall out = 13 ± 4.4 cm, abduction in side-lying = 50 ± 7.3°. Leg...

  12. Hip flexor muscle size, strength and recruitment pattern in patients with acetabular labral tears compared to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, M Dilani; Wilson, Stephen J; Hayes, David A; Watts, Mark C; Hides, Julie A

    2014-10-01

    Acetabular labral tears are a source of hip pain and are considered to be a precursor to hip osteoarthritis. Hip flexor muscles contribute to hip joint stability and function but it is unknown if their size and function is altered in the presence of labral pathology. This study aimed to investigate hip flexor muscle size, strength and recruitment pattern in patients with hip labral pathology compared to control subjects. 12 subjects diagnosed with an unilateral acetabular labral tear were compared to 12 control subjects matched for age and gender. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their lumbo-pelvic region. Average muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) of the iliacus, psoas, iliopsoas, sartorius, tensor fascia latae and rectus femoris muscles were measured. Hip flexion strength was measured by an externally fixed dynamometer. Individual muscle recruitment pattern during a resisted hip flexion exercise task was measured by muscle functional MRI. Hip flexor muscle strength was found to be decreased in patients with labral pathology compared to control subjects (p  0.17) and recruitment pattern (all p > 0.53). Decreased hip flexor muscle strength may affect physical function in patients with hip labral pathology by contributing to altered gait patterns and functional tasks. Clinical rehabilitation of these patients may need to include strengthening exercises for the hip flexor muscles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The incidence and pattern of supernumerary digital flexion creases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence and pattern of supernumerary digital flexion creases amongst the population of Ekpoma in Edo, Nigeria. ... This study on the incidence of supernumerary digital flexion crease was carried out among undergraduate students in the faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Ambrose Alli University, ...

  14. In vivo metacarpophalanageal joint collateral ligament length changes during flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y C; Sheng, X M; Chen, J; Qian, Z W

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the in vivo length changes of the collateral ligaments of metacarpophalangeal joint during flexion. We obtained computed tomography scans of index, middle, ring and little fingers at 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° of joint flexion from six hands of six healthy adult volunteers. Three of them had their dominant right hand studied, and the other three had their non-dominant left hand studied. We measured and analysed the radial and ulnar collateral ligaments of each metacarpophalangeal joint from the reconstructed images. We found that the dorsal and middle portions of the both radial and ulnar collateral ligament lengthened progressively during digital flexion and reached the maximum at 90° flexion. The length of the volar portion increased from 0° to 30° flexion and then decreased from 30° to 60° flexion, reaching the minimum at 90°. In conclusion, three portions of collateral ligaments on both sides of the metacarpophalangeal joint have variable length changes during flexion, which act to stabilize the joint through its flexion arc.

  15. Post-operative Hypertension following Correction of Flexion Deformity of the Knees in a Spastic Diplegic Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Mohan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An adolescent boy with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy presented with crouch gait. He had bilateral severe flexion deformities of knees and hips. He was treated with single event multilevel surgery for the correction of deformities. Surgical procedures included bilateral adductor release, iliopsoas lengthening, bilateral femoral shortening and patella plication. Persistent hypertension was noted in the post-operative period. All causes of secondary hypertension were ruled out. Having persistent hypertension following the femoral shortening procedure is unusual. Antihypertensive medication controlled his blood pressure 15 months after surgery. Hypertension following correction of knee flexion deformity and limb lengthening is well known. Hypertension has not been described with the shortening osteotomy of the femur. Hypertension is a rare complication following the corrective surgery for the treatment of crouch gait. Blood pressure should be monitored during the post-operative period to detect such a rare complication.

  16. Hip Replacement Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Hip Replacement Surgery Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download ... What is it? Points To Remember About Hip Replacement Surgery Hip replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased ...

  17. Hip replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Total hip replacement - discharge; Hip hemiarthroplasty - discharge; Osteoarthritis - hip replacement discharge ... such as downhill skiing or contact sports like football and soccer. But you should be able to ...

  18. Hip fracture - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 55. Read More Broken bone Hip fracture surgery Hip pain Leg MRI scan Osteoporosis - overview Patient Instructions Getting your home ready - knee or hip surgery Osteomyelitis - discharge Review ...

  19. Radiographic Hip Anatomy Correlates With Range of Motion and Symptoms in National Hockey League Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Christopher M; Ross, James R; Kuhn, Andrew W; Fuller, Donnie; Rowley, David M; Giveans, M Russell; Stone, Rebecca M; Bedi, Asheesh

    2017-06-01

    Hip disorders in athletes have been increasingly recognized. To characterize radiographic hip anatomy for National Hockey League (NHL) players and correlate it with hip range of motion and hip symptoms and/or surgery. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Fifty-nine professional hockey players (118 hips) with 1 NHL organization (mean age, 24.2 years; range, 18-36) prospectively underwent history and physician examination by 2 independent orthopaedic surgeons. Current or previous groin and/or hip pain or surgery was noted. Anteroposterior (AP) pelvis and bilateral Dunn lateral radiographs were obtained for all players with assessment of hip morphology by 2 blinded independent orthopaedic surgeons. Good to very good reliability of radiographic assessments was noted (intraclass correlation coefficients = 0.749-0.958). Sixty-four percent of athletes had a positive crossover sign, while 86% and 60% had a positive posterior wall sign and a prominent ischial spine sign, respectively. Twenty-one percent of hips demonstrated dysplastic acetabular features (lateral center edge angle 50° Dunn lateral) and head-neck offset, respectively. Good to very good reliability was noted for ROM assessments (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.69). Mean hip flexion was 107.4º ± 6.7º, and mean hip internal rotation was 26.1º ± 6.6º. Thirty-one percent of hips had a history of hip-related pain and/or surgery. Higher AP, Dunn lateral, and maximal alpha angles correlated with decreased hip internal rotation ( P = .004). Greater AP alpha angle correlated with decreased hip extension/abduction ( P = .025), and greater Dunn lateral and maximal alpha angle correlated with decreased hip flexion/abduction ( P = .001). A positive posterior wall sign correlated with increased straight hip abduction, while other radiographic acetabular parameters were not predictive of range of motion. Only decreased hip external rotation and total arc of motion correlated with an increased risk for

  20. Effect of hip braces on brake response time: Repeated measures designed study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammerer, Dietmar; Waidmann, Cornelia; Huber, Dennis G; Krismer, Martin; Haid, Christian; Liebensteiner, Michael C

    2017-08-01

    The question whether or not a patient with a hip brace should drive a car is of obvious importance because the advice given to patients to resume driving is often anecdotal as few scientific data are available on this specific subject. To assess driving ability (brake response time) with commonly used hip braces. Repeated measures design. Brake response time was assessed under six conditions: (1) without a brace (control), (2) with a typical postoperative hip brace with adjustable range of motion and the settings: unrestricted, (3) flexion limited to 70°, (4) extension blocked at 20° hip flexion, (5) both flexion and extension limited (20°/70°) and (6) an elastic hip bandage. Brake response time was assessed using a custom-made driving simulator as used in previous studies. The participants were a convenience sample of able-bodied participants. A total of 70 participants (35 women and 35 men) participated in our study. Mean age was 31.1 (standard deviation: 10.6; range: 21.7-66.4) years. A significant within-subject effect for brake response time was found ( p = 0.009), but subsequent post hoc analyses revealed no significant differences between control and the other settings. Based on our findings, it does not seem mandatory to recommend driving abstinence for patients wearing a hip orthosis. We suggest that our results be interpreted with caution, because (1) an underlying pathological hip condition needs to be considered, (2) the ability to drive a car safely is multifactorial and brake response time is only one component thereof and (3) brake response time measurements were performed only with healthy participants. Clinical relevance Hip braces are used in the context of joint-preserving and prosthetic surgery of the hip. Therefore, clinicians are confronted with the question whether to allow driving a car with the respective hip brace or not. Our data suggest that hip braces do not impair brake response time.

  1. Clinical outcome of increased flexion gap after total knee arthroplasty. Can controlled gap imbalance improve knee flexion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismailidis, P; Kuster, M S; Jost, B; Giesinger, K; Behrend, H

    2017-06-01

    Increased range of motion (ROM) while maintaining joint stability is the goal of modern total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A biomechanical study has shown that small increases in flexion gap result in decreased tibiofemoral force beyond 90° flexion. The purpose of this paper was to investigate clinical implications of controlled increased flexion gap. Four hundred and four TKAs were allocated into one of two groups and analysed retrospectively. In the first group (n = 352), flexion gap exceeded extension gap by 2.5 mm, while in the second group (n = 52) flexion gap was equal to the extension gap. The procedures were performed from 2008 to 2012. The patients were reviewed 12 months postoperatively. Objective clinical results were assessed for ROM, mediolateral and sagittal stability. Patient-reported outcome measures were the WOMAC score and the Forgotten Joint Score (FJS-12). After categorizing postoperative flexion into three groups (poor < 90°, satisfactory 91°-119°, good ≥ 120°) significantly more patients in group 1 achieved satisfactory or good ROM (p = 0.006). Group 1 also showed a significantly higher mean FJS-12 (group 1: 73, group 2: 61, p = 0.02). The mean WOMAC score was 11 in the first and 14 in the second group (n.s.). Increase in flexion gap did not influence knee stability. The clinical relevance of this study is that a controlled flexion gap increase of 2.5 mm may have a positive effect on postoperative flexion and patient satisfaction after TKA. Neither knee stability in the coronal and sagittal planes nor complications were influenced by a controlled increase in flexion gap. III.

  2. Effects of hip joint transverse plane range of motion with a modeled effusion and capsular tear: A cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Casey; Smyth, Mark P; Woodard, Erik; Bills, Collin C; Mihalko, Marc J; Mihalko, William M

    2017-02-01

    Multiple factors contribute to range of motion of the hip joint in the transverse plane: bony anatomy, hip capsule, corresponding ligaments, articular labrum, ligamentum teres, and negative intra-articular pressure. We hypothesized that violation of the negative pressure of the hip and simulation of an effusion would increase range of motion in the transverse plane in a cadaver model. Ten hip specimens were obtained and dissected with the femur and iliac wing mounted in a custom joint-testing rig in neutral position. Specimens were tested at 0 and at 90° of flexion with 1.5Nm internal and external rotational torque. Three conditions were assessed: (1) intact specimen, (2) an effusion modeled by a 10ml saline infusion, and (3) a capsular tear. The modeled effusion decreased rotational range of motion limits in both 0 and 90° of flexion, with a greater effect on the specimens at 0° flexion in external rotation with 4.1° less external rotation (p=0.009). A modeled capsular tear increased rotational motion limits in 0° of flexion in both internal and external rotation and in 90° flexion in internal rotation only (phip, and a capsular tear may increase its rotation. This should be considered in hips with traumatic capsular tears or arthroscopic portals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Late sequelae of hip septic arthritis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadi, Taghi; Saberi, Sadegh; Sobhani Eraghi, Amir; Arabzadeh, Aidin; Mardookhpour, Shirin

    2012-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the hip in children has multiple sequelae and may result in severe disability. Significant morbidity can be prevented by early recognition and treatment. The authors reviewed 13 children with 14 hips with sequelae of septic arthritis of the hip. All of children had history of hip septic arthritis before age of 4 years. Six were male subjects, and 7 were female subjects. We evaluated the history, clinical findings and radiographs of all children who had been treated at the Imam Khomeini hospital between 1986 and 2001 for septic arthritis of the hip. Final results of operations in patients include range of motion, presence or absence pain, joint stability, limb-length discrepancy were assessed. Three hips had mild pain in usual daily activities and one patient with cerebral palsy experienced hip instability. Most of patients (80%) had flexion contracture about 10-15 degrees .Final results showed average limb length discrepancy was about 2.8 cm. Septic arthritis of the hip in children may result in a spectrum of residual problems and the significant complications can be averted by early detection and treatment. Treatment in younger age cause better outcome.

  4. Intramuscular psoas lengthening during single-event multi-level surgery fails to improve hip dynamics in children with spastic diplegia. Clinical and kinematic outcomes in the short- and medium-terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, C; Simon, A-L; Ilharreborde, B; Presedo, A; Mazda, K; Penneçot, G-F

    2016-06-01

    In children with spastic diplegia, hip extension in terminal stance is limited by retraction of the psoas muscle, which decreases stride propulsion and step length on the contralateral side. Whether intramuscular psoas lengthening (IMPL) is effective remains controversial. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of IMPL as a component of single-event multi-level surgery (SEMLS) on spatial and temporal gait parameters, clinical hip flexion deformity, and hip flexion kinematics. IMPL as part of SEMLS does not significantly improve hip flexion kinematics. A retrospective review was conducted of the medical charts of consecutive ambulatory children with cerebral palsy who had clinical hip flexion deformity (>10°) with more than 10° of excess hip flexion in terminal stance and who underwent SEMLS. The groups with and without IMPL were compared. Preoperative values of the clinical hip flexion contracture, hip flexion kinematics in terminal stance, and spatial and temporal gait parameters were compared to the values recorded after a mean postoperative follow-up of 2.4±2.0 years (range, 1.0-8.7 years). Follow-up was longer than 3 years in 6 patients. Of 47 lower limbs (in 34 patients) included in the analysis, 15 were managed with IMPL. There were no significant between-group differences at baseline. Surgery was followed in all limbs by significant decreases in kinematic hip flexion and in the Gillette Gait Index. In the IMPL group, significant improvements occurred in clinical hip flexion deformity, walking speed, and step length. The improvement in kinematic hip extension was not significantly different between the two groups. Crouch gait recurred in 3 (8%) patients. The improvement in kinematic hip extension in terminal stance was not significantly influenced by IMPL but was, instead, chiefly dependent on improved knee extension and on the position of the ground reaction vector after SEMLS. IMPL remains indicated only when the clinical hip flexion

  5. Kinematics of rising from a chair: image-based analysis of the sagittal hip-spine movement pattern in elderly people who are healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotoohabadi, Mohammad R; Tully, Elizabeth A; Galea, Mary P

    2010-04-01

    Rehabilitation of elderly patients with sit-to-stand (STS) dysfunction includes retraining coordinated movement among participating body segments. Although trunk position is considered important, spinal movement has not been measured. The aim of this study was to describe the sagittal thoracolumbar kinematics and hip-lumbar interaction during the STS task in elderly people who were healthy in order to guide physical therapists in developing treatment strategies. This was an observational study. Ten retroreflective markers were attached to the midline thoracolumbar spine, pelvis, and right lower limb of 41 elderly people who were healthy. A 2-dimensional video analysis system was used to measure sagittal thoracic, lumbar, hip, and knee joint angles during the STS task. Maximal available flexion-extension angles in these joints and regions also were determined. Prior to buttocks lift-off, forward trunk lean comprised concurrent hip and lumbar flexion and thoracic extension. Hip flexion dominated, with a hip/lumbar ratio of 4.7:1 and a thoracic/lumbar ratio of 1.7:1. The hip and lumbar spine contributed 90% and 23% of their maximal available flexion angle, respectively, and the thoracic spine contributed 86% of its maximal extension range of movement. After lift-off, the hips and lumbar spine extended (ratio of 5.2:1), and the thoracic spine flexed (thoracic/lumbar ratio of 0.4:1). At lift-off, the hips and knees were similarly flexed (96 degrees ) and then locked together in a linear pattern of extension. Following lift-off, there was a brief transition phase (5% of STS duration) in which, although the hips, knees, and lumbar spine were extending, the trunk continued to flex forward a few degrees. Results may differ in elderly people who are less active. The revised model for image-based analysis demonstrated concurrent hip and thoracolumbar movement during the STS task. Close to full available hip flexion and thoracic extension were needed for optimal STS

  6. Changes in hip muscles after above-knee amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaegers, S M; Arendzen, J H; de Jongh, H J

    1995-10-01

    To learn about the changes appearing in hip muscles after an above-knee amputation, 3-dimensional reconstructions of the hip and thigh region of 12 patients with above-knee amputations were made based on transverse magnetic resonance images. In all patients, the amputations were done at least 2 years before the study and were necessitated by trauma or osteosarcoma. The results show that, at higher amputation levels, the geometry of the once-biarticular muscles was changed. The cleaved muscles (40%-60%) and the intact muscles (0-30%) at the amputated side were atrophied. The amount of atrophy of the intact muscles at the amputated side was related to stump length. To avoid an abduction contracture in 8 patients with amputations, the iliotibial tract was not fixed. In 4 of these 8 patients, a flexion contracture was visible. If the tract was not fixed, the hip extension torque of the gluteus maximus, which inserts into the tract, decreased. As a result, the risk of appearance of a flexion contracture increased because the strongest hip flexor (iliopsoas muscle) was not involved in the amputation. Abduction contracture could be avoided only if the hip adductors were fixed accurately, especially at higher amputation levels.

  7. Spinal reflex excitability changes after lumbar spine passive flexion mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbulian, Ronald; Burke, Jeanmarie; Dishman, J Donald

    2002-10-01

    Flexion distraction has gained increased credibility as a therapeutic modality for treatment of low back pain. Although important work in the area has elucidated the intradiskal pressure profiles during flexion distraction, the accompanying neural responses have yet to be described. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess neural reflex responses to motion with 3 degrees of freedom applied to the lumbar spine and to evaluate H-reflex responses of the soleus. Subjects (n = 12) were measured for H-maximum reflexes determined from stimulus response recruitment curves measured in neutral prone position. The mean of 10 evoked H-waves (at H-maximum stimulus intensity) were measured in neutral position, flexion, left and right lateral flexion, and axial rotation of the trunk on an adjusting table. H-reflexes were expressed as a percentage of maximal M-wave for the criterion measure. Spinal range of motion was quantified by digitization. The data showed variation in some movement ranges, notwithstanding identical table positioning for all subjects. Mean H-reflex amplitude was decreased (15.2 +/- 5.8 mV to 13.8 +/- 5.8 mV), and the H/M ratio was also decreased in flexion compared with neutral (55.0% +/- 19.1% to 50.3% +/- 19.4%; P <.05). Trunk flexion is accompanied by inhibition of the motor neuron pool. Slight perturbations in numerous afferent receptors are known to significantly alter the H-reflex. The absence of measurable changes in lateral flexion and trunk rotation may indicate that both slow- and fast-adapting receptors could be involved in lumbar motion. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further dynamic motion studies of the flexion distraction neurophysiologic condition.

  8. Strain on the human sciatic nerve in vivo during movement of the hip and knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, P; Lenehan, B; O'Rourke, S; McHugh, P; Kaar, K; McCabe, J P

    2003-04-01

    Injuries to the sciatic nerve are an occasional complication of surgery to the hip and acetabulum, and traction is frequently the causative mechanism. In vitro and animal experiments have shown that increased tensile strain on peripheral nerves, when applied for prolonged periods, impairs nerve function. We have used video-extensometry to measure strain on the human sciatic nerve during total hip replacement (THR). Ten consecutive patients with a mean age of 72 years undergoing primary THR by the posterior approach were recruited, and strains in the sciatic nerve were measured in different combinations of flexion and extension of the hip and knee, before dislocation of the hip. Significant increases (p = 0.02) in strain in the sciatic nerve were observed in flexion of the hip and extension of the knee. The mean increase was 26% (19% to 30%). In animal studies increases of this magnitude have been shown to impair electrophysiological function in peripheral nerves. Our results suggest that excessive flexion of the hip and extension of the knee should be avoided during THR.

  9. Reliability of handheld dynamometry in assessment of hip strength in adult male football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Mark L; Hanna, Chris M; Raina Elley, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the intra- and interrater reliability of handheld dynamometry (HHD) for measuring hip muscle strength in a sample of 30 healthy semi-professional adult male football players. The reliability of HHD had not been assessed in athletes who were likely to be stronger than populations tested previously. Maximal isometric strength of resisted hip flexion and adduction were measured. Mean strength ranged from 51.5 kg for dominant hip flexion to 26.7 kg for hip adduction at 90 degrees of hip flexion. Intrarater reliability intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) ranged from 0.70 to 0.89. ICCs for interrater reliability ranged from 0.66 to 0.87. As expected, muscle strength in this group of athletes was significantly higher than that of populations in which HHD reliability has been assessed. Despite this, muscle strength testing of hip flexor and adductor muscles can be performed with good to excellent intra- and interrater reliability in this population. Copyright (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Isolation of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids as COX-1 and -2 inhibitors in rose hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäger, Anna; Petersen, K N; Thomasen, G.

    2008-01-01

    Rose hip has previously shown clinical efficacy in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and organic solvent extracts of rose hip have showed inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2. A petroleum ether extract of rose hip was fractioned by VLC on silica; on a C-18 column and by HPLC. Each step was COX-1...

  11. Micromechanics of the human vertebral body for forward flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haisheng; Nawathe, Shashank; Fields, Aaron J; Keaveny, Tony M

    2012-08-09

    To provide mechanistic insight into the etiology of osteoporotic wedge fractures, we investigated the spatial distribution of tissue at the highest risk of initial failure within the human vertebral body for both forward flexion and uniform compression loading conditions. Micro-CT-based linear elastic finite element analysis was used to virtually load 22 human T9 vertebral bodies in either 5° of forward flexion or uniform compression; we also ran analyses replacing the simulated compliant disc (E=8 MPa) with stiff polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, E=2500 MPa). As expected, we found that, compared to uniform compression, forward flexion increased the overall endplate axial load on the anterior half of the vertebra and shifted the spatial distribution of high-risk tissue within the vertebra towards the anterior aspect of the vertebral body. However, despite that shift, the high-risk tissue remained primarily within the central regions of the trabecular bone and endplates, and forward flexion only slightly altered the ratio of cortical-to-trabecular load sharing at the mid-vertebral level (mean±SD for n=22: 41.3±7.4% compression; 44.1±8.2% forward flexion). When the compliant disc was replaced with PMMA, the anterior shift of high-risk tissue was much more severe. We conclude that, for a compliant disc, a moderate degree of forward flexion does not appreciably alter the spatial distribution of stress within the vertebral body. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Total hip arthroplasty through a minimal posterior approach using imageless computer-assisted hip navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixson, Richard L; MacDonald, Margot A

    2005-10-01

    With decreased exposure in a minimal posterior hip incision, navigation with computer assistance provides an alternative method to accurately place the components. This study compares the results of a series of 82 navigated total hips to a retrospective cohort of 50 hips done with conventional instruments. The surgical incision split the gluteus maximus but did not extend distally into the fascia. The goal of cup placement was 40 degrees to 45 degrees of abduction (ABD) and 17 degrees to 23 degrees of flexion (FLX). Postoperative radiographs were digitized and analyzed. In the study group, 82 hips were done with computer assistance and compared with 50 done with conventional methods (manual) through the same incision. Radiographic analysis showed that there were significantly fewer cases inside the desired range of ABD and FLX in the manual group (6%) compared with the navigation group (30%), P = .001, with significant differences in the variances of ABD and FLX (P = .011 and .028). Improved accuracy of cup placement was found with increased experience in the use of navigation by the surgeon over the time of the series. The use of a computer-assisted surgery navigation system with a minimal posterior incision for a total hip arthroplasty results in significantly more reproducible acetabular component placement.

  13. Modeling Stone Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Jorge

    2017-07-11

    This paper reviews the main modeling techniques for stone columns, both ordinary stone columns and geosynthetic-encased stone columns. The paper tries to encompass the more recent advances and recommendations in the topic. Regarding the geometrical model, the main options are the "unit cell", longitudinal gravel trenches in plane strain conditions, cylindrical rings of gravel in axial symmetry conditions, equivalent homogeneous soil with improved properties and three-dimensional models, either a full three-dimensional model or just a three-dimensional row or slice of columns. Some guidelines for obtaining these simplified geometrical models are provided and the particular case of groups of columns under footings is also analyzed. For the latter case, there is a column critical length that is around twice the footing width for non-encased columns in a homogeneous soft soil. In the literature, the column critical length is sometimes given as a function of the column length, which leads to some disparities in its value. Here it is shown that the column critical length mainly depends on the footing dimensions. Some other features related with column modeling are also briefly presented, such as the influence of column installation. Finally, some guidance and recommendations are provided on parameter selection for the study of stone columns.

  14. Incidence and treatment of developmental hip dysplasia in Mongolia: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayalag Munkhuu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Mongolia, adequate early diagnosis and treatment of developmental hip dysplasia (DDH have been unavailable and its incidence was unknown. We determined the incidence of ultrasonographic DDH in newborns and established adequate procedures for diagnosis and treatment of DDH at the largest maternity hospital in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During one year (Sept 2010 - Aug 2011 we assessed the hips newborns using ultrasound and Graf's classification of DDH. 8,356 newborns were screened; median age at screening was 1 day. We identified 14,873 Type 1 (89.0%, 1715 Type 2a (10.3%, 36 Type 2c (0.2%, 70 Type D (0.4%, 14 Type 3 (0.08%, and 4 Type 4 hips (0.02%. Children with Type 1 hips (normal were discharged. Children with Type 2a hips (physiologically immature received follow-up ultrasounds at monthly intervals. Children with Type 2c to 4 (DDH; deformed or misaligned hip joint hips were treated with a Tubingen hip flexion splint and also followed up. The hip abnormalities resolved to mature hips in all children who were followed up. There was no evidence for severe treatment related complications. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study suggests that the incidence of DDH in Mongolian neonates is comparable to that in neonates in Europe. Early ultrasound-based assessment and splinting treatment of DDH led to mature hips in all children followed up. Procedures are feasible and will be continued.

  15. Validity of gait parameters for hip flexor contracture in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang Hyeong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psoas contracture is known to cause abnormal hip motion in patients with cerebral palsy. The authors investigated the clinical relevance of hip kinematic and kinetic parameters, and 3D modeled psoas length in terms of discriminant validty, convergent validity, and responsiveness. Methods Twenty-four patients with cerebral palsy (mean age 6.9 years and 28 normal children (mean age 7.6 years were included. Kinematic and kinetic data were obtained by three dimensional gait analysis, and psoas lengths were determined using a musculoskeletal modeling technique. Validity of the hip parameters were evaluated. Results In discriminant validity, maximum psoas length (effect size r = 0.740, maximum pelvic tilt (0.710, maximum hip flexion in late swing (0.728, maximum hip extension in stance (0.743, and hip flexor index (0.792 showed favorable discriminant ability between the normal controls and the patients. In convergent validity, maximum psoas length was not significantly correlated with maximum hip extension in stance in control group whereas it was correlated with maximum hip extension in stance (r = -0.933, p Conclusions Maximum pelvic tilt, maximum psoas length, hip flexor index, and maximum hip extension in stance were found to be clinically relevant parameters in evaluating hip flexor contracture.

  16. ( Anogeissus leiocarpus ) timber columns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A procedure for designing axially loaded Ayin (Anogeissus leiocarpus) wood column or strut has been investigated. Instead of the usual categorization of columns into short, intermediate and slender according to the value of slenderness ratio, a continuous column formula representing the three categories was derived.

  17. Brief communication: Hip joint mobility in free-ranging rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Ashley S.; Johnson, Victoria P.; Higham, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to test for differences in hip joint range of motion (ROM) between captive and free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), particularly for hip joint abduction, which previous studies of captive macaques have found to be lower than predicted. Materials and Methods Hip ROM was assessed following standard joint measurement methodology in anesthetized adult free-ranging rhesus macaques (n=39) from Cayo Santiago, and compared to published ROM data from captive rhesus macaques (n=16) (Hammond 2014a, American Journal of Physical Anthropology). Significant differences between populations were detected using one-way analysis of variance (p<0.05). Results In a sample of pooled sexes and ages, free-ranging macaques are capable of increased hip abduction, flexion, and internal rotation compared to captive individuals. These differences in joint excursion resulted in free-ranging individuals having significantly increased ROM for hip adduction-abduction, rotation, flexion-extension, and the distance spanned by the knee during hip abduction. When looking at data for a smaller sample of age-matched males, fewer ROM differences are significant, but free-ranging males have significantly increased hip abduction, internal rotation, range of flexion-extension, and distance spanned by the knee during hip abduction compared to captive males of similar age. Discussion Our results suggest that a spatially restrictive environment results in decreased hip mobility in cage-confined animals and ultimately limits the potential limb postures in captive macaques. These results have implications for selection of animal samples in model validation studies, as well as laboratory animal husbandry practices. PMID:27731892

  18. Bilateral Hip Dislocation in Unrestrained Driver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Assaf

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 24-year-old male was brought in by paramedics status post motor vehicle collision (MVC into an electric pole and tree at high speed. The patient was an unrestrained driver who required extrication. The patient complained of left hip pain, left foot pain, and difficulty extending his bilateral lower extremities. He denied numbness or tingling to his lower extremities. The patient had normal vitals; his bilateral lower extremities were held in flexion at the hips, but otherwise had no obvious injuries. The patient’s pelvis was stable with palpable distal pulses and intact motor and sensory function of his distal lower extremities. Significant findings: The initial radiograph of the pelvis revealed bilateral hip dislocations. Small bony fragments were noted in the right hip joint, suggestive of an underlying fracture. The sacroiliac joints and the pelvic ring were intact. In the emergency department, bilateral hip reductions were performed using the Captain Morgan technique.1 The post-reduction film showed reduction of the bilateral hip dislocations with extensive comminuted and displaced fractures of the right and left acetabula. Discussion: Bilateral hip dislocations are extremely rare, occurring in only 1% of all hip dislocations,2 and require immense force, typically occurring in MVCs (74%.3-7 Associated injuries include fracture of the acetabulum or femoral head, sciatic nerve damage, and obstruction of the blood supply to the femoral head.8 X-ray imaging and CT scans are used to assess the injury and to detect intra-articular fragments.3 Definitive treatment is achieved by closed reduction if possible; otherwise open reduction is utilized.9 Post-reduction therapy includes a non-weight-bearing period of time. Complications include avascular necrosis of the femoral head, osteonecrosis, and posttraumatic arthritis, the occurrence of which can be decreased by early reduction.4,10-12 This patient underwent bilateral

  19. Common questions about developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jonathan C; Runge, Melissa M; Nye, Nathaniel S

    2014-12-15

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip is a common musculoskeletal condition in newborns. Infants with developmental dysplasia of the hip, whether treated or untreated, have a higher incidence of early-onset hip osteoarthritis in adulthood. Evidence to support universal screening by physical examination or ultrasonography is limited and often conflicting. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence that screening for developmental dysplasia of the hip prevents adverse outcomes. Physical examination screening is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America. These organizations recommend use of the Ortolani and Barlow maneuvers to screen infants up to three months of age. Several recent studies support starting assessment for limited hip abduction at eight weeks of age, which is the most sensitive test for developmental dysplasia of the hip from this age on. Infants with overtly dislocated or dislocatable hips should be referred to an orthopedist on a priority basis at the time of diagnosis. Infants with equivocal hip examination findings at birth can be reexamined in two weeks. If there is subluxation or dislocation at the follow-up examination, referral should be made at that time. If the examination findings are still equivocal, the infant can undergo ultrasonography of the hips or be reexamined every few weeks through the first six weeks of life. Although equivocal findings commonly resolve spontaneously, infants with persistent equivocal findings of developmental dysplasia of the hip longer than six weeks should be evaluated by an orthopedist. Treatment generally involves flexion-abduction splinting. The benefits of treatment are unclear, and there are risks to treatment, most notably an increased occurrence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  20. Delayed cementless total hip arthroplasty for neglected dislocation of hip combined with complex acetabular fracture and deficient bone stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavaskar Ashok S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Total hip arthroplasty (THA for an un-treated acetabular fracture is technically challenging and the long-term result is not so favorable. A 45-year-old fe-male patient with untreated column and comminuted poste-rior wall fracture of the acetabulum was treated in our insti-tution by reconstruction of the posterior wall using iliac strut autograft and plate stabilization of the posterior col-umn with cancellous grafting and cementless THA in a single stage. At 3 years’ follow-up, the patient was independently mobile without limb length discrepancy. Radiological evalu-ation showed well integrated components and bone grafts. No evidence of aseptic loosening or osteolysis was found. This report aims to emphasize that bony acetabular recon-struction allows the use of primary hip components, which improves prosthesis longevity and preserves bone stock for a future revision. Key words: Acetabulum; Fractures, bone; Hip dislocation; Arthroplasty, replacement, hip

  1. Position of the sciatic nerve and effect of gluteus maximus release during hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawati, Andrew J; Narulla, Rajpal; Lorentzos, Peter; Graham, Edward

    2017-06-01

    Eight Thiel embalmed hips were dissected. The distance between the sciatic nerve and the femoral neck was measured before and after hip dislocation, and before and after release of the gluteus maximus tendon. There was a significant reduction in the mean distance between the neck of femur and the sciatic nerve in both the gluteus maximus tendon release and the unreleased groups at 60° and 90° of hip flexion, p < 0.05. The mean distance between the neck of femur and sciatic nerve was greater in the release group for all positions.

  2. Arthroscopic treatment of iliopsoas impingement (IPI) after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch, Jorg; Neuhäuser, Christian; Sokkar, Sherif M

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to present our arthroscopic surgical technique and the results in patient with an iliopsoas impingement (IPI) syndrome after a hip replacement. Between 1999 and 2011, 35 patients with the clinical picture of an IPI after total hip replacement were diagnosed and treated arthroscopically. The age was ranged from 58 to 82 years. All patients underwent conservative treatment for at least 6 months without success. The indication for the arthroscopic procedure was the failure of the conservative therapy as well as typical clinical signs as painful hip flexion, a positive local anesthesia test and radiological evidence of the presence of a prominent anterior acetabular component. The arthroscopic treatment was performed in all patients with anterior capsulotomy and partial capsulectomy of the hip joint. After identification of the pathology an arthroscopic release of the iliopsoas tendon in the region of the proved lesion was performed. The average follow-up period was 3.6 years (6 months to 12 years). In all patients osseous integrated acetabular components were found. In six cases there was a surface replacement, in three cases it was a cementless screw-in cup and in the other three cases it was a cementless modular press-fit cup. 8 out of 12 patients suffered from a hip dysplasia with a secondary osteoarthritis. After establishing an anterior capsular window arthroscopically, the iliopsoas tendon could be visualized in all cases. In addition to multiple local tendinitis all patients already showed mechanical limitation with partial rupture of variable extent in the iliopsoas tendon. During the arthroscopy the lesion was detected at the level of the anterior prominent acetabular component as well as distal to it. 10 out of 12 patients reported immediately after postoperative mobilization that the typical preoperative complaints have disappeared. Two patients still had residual pain. In one of those patients this was relieved by the time

  3. Changes in uterine flexion caused by cesarean section: correlation between post-flexion and deficient cesarean section scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryo, Eiji; Sakurai, Rina; Kamata, Hideo; Seto, Michiharu; Morita, Masayoshi; Ayabe, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    To investigate changes in uterine flexion after cesarean delivery in comparison with vaginal delivery, and their relationship with the presence of deficient cesarean section scars. In 147 women who had a vaginal delivery and 101 women who had a cesarean delivery, transvaginal ultrasonographic photographs of the uterus were obtained at the first trimester of pregnancy and at 1 month postpartum, and they were reviewed to determine changes in uterine flexion. The presence of a deficient cesarean section scar was also reviewed in women with a cesarean section. Changes in uterine flexion were observed more frequently among the woman with a cesarean delivery than in those with a vaginal delivery. The incidence of post-flexed uterus during puerperium tended to increase depending on the number of cesarean sections the woman had undergone. In the women with a cesarean section, changes in uterine flexion were more frequently observed in the women with a deficient cesarean section scar than in those without one. Changes in uterine flexion after birth occurred more frequently in the women who had a cesarean delivery than in those who had a vaginal delivery, especially in the presence of a deficient cesarean section scar.

  4. Flexion/extension cervical spine views in blunt cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Sadaf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To examine the contribution of flexion and extension radiographs in the evaluation of ligamentous injury in awake adults with acute blunt cervical spine trauma, who show loss of cervical lordosis and neck pain. Methods: All patients who presented to our emer-gency department following blunt trauma were enrolled in this study, except those with schiwora, neurological defi-cits or fracture demonstrated on cross-table cervical spine X-rays, and those who were either obtunded or presented after cervical spine surgery. Adequacy of flexion and exten-sion views was checked by the neurosurgery and radiology team members. All these patients underwent cross-table cervical spine view followed by flexion/extension views based on the loss of lordosis on cross-table imaging and the presence of neck pain. Results: A total of 200 cases were reviewed, of whom 90 (45% underwent repeat X-rays because of either inadequate exposure or limited motion. None of the patients with loss of lordosis on cross-table view had positive flexion and extension views of cervical spine for instability. Conclusions: Our results show that in patients who underwent acute radiographic evaluation of blunt cervical spine trauma, flexion and extension views of the cervical spine are unlikely to yield positive results in the presence of axial neck pain and/or loss of cervical lordosis. We can also hypothesize that performing flexion and extension views will be more useful once the acute neck pain has settled. Key words: X-rays; Cervical vertebrae; Lordosis

  5. Hip joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100006.htm Hip joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hip Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  6. Hip replacement - precautions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. After you have hip replacement surgery, you will need to be careful how ... to Expect at Home After you have hip replacement surgery, you will need to be careful how ...

  7. Hip Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Orthopaedic Surgeons Information about Soft Tissue Imaging and Metal Ion Testing Information for All Health Care Professionals who Provide Treatment to Patients with a Metal-on-Metal Hip Implant Metal-on-Metal Hip ...

  8. [The relationship between chronic hip pain and femoroacetabular impingement: an evaluation with clinical signs and radiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Namik; Atici, Teoman; Oztürk, Alpaslan; Ozkaya, Güven; Avcu, Bülent; Ozkan, Yüksel

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the rate of the clinical and radiographic findings of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in patients with chronic hip pain and compared the findings with those of a control group. The clinical and radiographic findings of FAI in 38 patients (group 1) having hip pain for more than three months were analyzed and compared with 42 controls (group 2). Internal rotation degrees were measured while the hips were at 90° flexion and impingement test was performed by rotating the hips internally at 90° flexion and adduction. The FAI findings were investigated on anteroposterior pelvis radiographs and cross-table lateral radiographs of the hip joint in both groups. The collum-diaphyseal angle, alpha angle and anterior offset ratio on the femoral side and the center-edge angle, acetabular index, extrusion index and crossover sign on the acetabular side were evaluated. The internal rotation degree of the painful hips were less than 20 degree in 18 (47.4%) patients in group 1 and in one (2.4%) patient in group 2 (pcam type FAI was 76.3% (n=29) in group 1 and 42.9% (n=18) in group 2 (p=0.002). Femoroacetabular impingement is one of the causes of chronic hip pain and if evaluated with suitable clinical and radiographic parameters, the rates of diagnosis may increase.

  9. The other hip in unilateral hip dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Rømer, Lone; Søballe, Kjeld

    2006-01-01

    with apparently unilateral right developmental dysplasia (left hip center-edge angles greater than 20 degrees), 26 patients with apparently unilateral left developmental dysplasia (right hip center-edge angles greater than 20 degrees), 68 patients with bilateral developmental dysplasia, and 34 patients...... "gold" standard]). See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence....

  10. HIPs at Ten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuh, George; O'Donnell, Ken; Schneider, Carol Geary

    2017-01-01

    2017 is the anniversary of the introduction of what are now commonly known as high-impact practices (HIPs). Many of the specific activities pursued under the HIPs acronym have been around in some form for decades, such as study abroad, internships, and student-faculty research. It was about ten years ago that, after conferring HIPs at Ten with…

  11. Bursitis of the Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficile (C. diff.) InfectionHerpes Home Diseases and Conditions Bursitis of the Hip Condition Bursitis of the Hip Share Print Table of Contents1. ... Prevention5. Treatment6. Everyday Life7. Questions8. Resources What is bursitis of the hip? Bursitis is the painful swelling ...

  12. The Hip Restoration Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Allston Julius; Atilla, Halis Atil

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Despite the rapid advancement of imaging and arthroscopic techniques about the hip joint, missed diagnoses are still common. As a deep joint and compared to the shoulder and knee joints, localization of hip symptoms is difficult. Hip pathology is not easily isolated and is often related to intra and extra-articular abnormalities. In light of these diagnostic challenges, we recommend an algorithmic approach to effectively diagnoses and treat hip pain. Methods In this review, hip pain is evaluated from diagnosis to treatment in a clear decision model. First we discuss emergency hip situations followed by the differentiation of intra and extra-articular causes of the hip pain. We differentiate the intra-articular hip as arthritic and non-arthritic and extra-articular pain as surrounding or remote tissue generated. Further, extra-articular hip pain is evaluated according to pain location. Finally we summarize the surgical treatment approach with an algorithmic diagram. Conclusion Diagnosis of hip pathology is difficult because the etiologies of pain may be various. An algorithmic approach to hip restoration from diagnosis to rehabilitation is crucial to successfully identify and manage hip pathologies. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066734

  13. Hip and Lumbar Spine Physical Examination Findings in People Presenting With Low Back Pain, With or Without Lower Extremity Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Heidi; Cheng, Abby; Steger-May, Karen; Maheshwari, Vaibhav; Van Dillen, Linda

    2017-03-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study, cross-sectional design. Background The hip-spine syndrome is described in patients with known arthritis of the hip. This study describes the hip examination findings of people presenting with low back pain (LBP). Objectives To (1) report examination findings of the hip in patients with LBP and (2) compare pain and function in patients with positive hip examination findings to those in patients without positive hip examination findings. Methods An examination and validated questionnaires of spine and hip pain and function were completed. Pain and function scores were compared between patients with and without positive hip findings. Results Consecutive patients (68 women, 33 men) with a mean age of 47.6 years (range, 18.4-79.8 years) participated. On physical examination, 81 (80%) had reduced hip flexion; 76 (75%) had reduced hip internal rotation; and 25 (25%) had 1, 32 (32%) had 2, and 23 (23%) had 3 positive provocative hip tests. Patients with reduced hip flexion had worse LBP-related (mean modified Oswestry Disability Index, 35.3 versus 25.6; P = .04) and hip-related function (mean modified Harris Hip Score, 66.0 versus 82.0; P = .03). Patients with reduced hip internal rotation had worse LBP-related function (mean Roland-Morris questionnaire, 12.4 versus 8.2; P = .003). A positive provocative hip test was coupled with more intense pain (median, 9 versus 7; P = .05) and worse LBP-related (mean Roland-Morris questionnaire, 12.1 versus 8.5; P = .02) and hip-related function (mean modified Harris Hip Score, 65.8 versus 89.7; P = .005). Conclusion Physical examination findings indicating hip dysfunction are common in patients presenting with LBP. Patients with LBP and positive hip examination findings have more pain and worse function compared to patients with LBP but without positive hip examination findings. Level of Evidence Symptom prevalence, level 1b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):163-172. Epub 3 Feb 2017. doi:10

  14. Effects of hip joint position and intra-capsular volume on hip joint intra-capsular pressure: a human cadaveric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse Paul

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increase in hip intra-capsular pressure has been implicated in various hip pathologies, such as avascular necrosis complicating undisplaced femoral neck fracture. Our study aimed at documenting the relationship between intra-capsular volume and pressure in various hip positions. Methods Fifty-two cadaveric hips were studied. An electronic pressure-monitoring catheter recorded the intra-capsular hip pressure after each instillation of 2 ml of normal saline and in six hip positions. Results In neutral hip position, the control position for investigation, intra-capsular pressure remained unchanged when its content was below 10 ml. Thereafter, it increased exponentially. When the intra-capsular volume was 12 ml, full abduction produced a 2.1-fold increase (p = 0.028 of the intra-capsular hip joint pressure; full external rotation and full internal rotation increased the pressure by at least 4-fold (p Conclusion Intra-capsular pressure increases with its volume, but with a wide variation with different positions. It would be appropriate to recommend that hips with haemarthrosis or effusion should be positioned in 45-degree flexion.

  15. Cementless total hip arthroplasty for patients with Crowe type III or IV developmental dysplasia of the hip: two-stage total hip arthroplasty following skeletal traction after soft tissue release for irreducible hips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Kim, Jung Il; Kim, Dong Ok; Yu, Cheol Hwan; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Kim, Hee Joong; Yoon, Kang Sup

    2013-09-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) for severe developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a technically demanding procedure for arthroplasty surgeons, and it is often difficult to reduce the hip joint without soft tissue release due to severe flexion contracture. We performed two-stage THAs in irreducible hips with expected lengthening of the affected limb after THA of over 2.5 cm or with flexion contractures of greater than 30 degrees in order to place the acetabular cup in the true acetabulum and to prevent neurologic deficits associated with acute elongation of the limb. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of cementless THA in patients with severe DDH with a special focus on the results of two-stage THA. Retrospective clinical and radiological evaluations were done on 17 patients with Crowe type III or IV developmental DDH treated by THA. There were 14 women and 3 men with a mean age of 52.3 years. Follow-ups averaged 52 months. Six cases were treated with two-stage THA followed by surgical hip liberalization and skeletal traction for 2 weeks. The mean Harris hip score improved from 40.9 to 89.1, and mean leg length discrepancy (LLD) in 13 unilateral cases was reduced from 2.95 to 0.8 cm. In the patients who underwent two-stage surgery, no nerve palsy was observed, and the single one-stage patient with incomplete peroneal nerve palsy recovered fully 4 weeks postoperatively. The short-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of primary cementless THA for patients with Crowe type III or IV DDH were encouraging. Two-stage THA followed by skeletal traction after soft tissue release could provide alternative solutions to the minimization of limb shortenings or LLD without neurologic deficits in highly selected patients.

  16. Function after removal of various hip and thigh muscles for extirpation of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markhede, G; Stener, B

    1981-08-01

    Forty-six patients who had undergone excision of one or more well defined hip and/or thigh muscles because of a soft-tissue tumor or a tumoriform lesion were investigated with respect to the function of the operated limb and the isometric and isokinetic strength of the affected motion or motions, relative to the non-operated side (percentage). Hip flexion: Loss of the iliopsoas caused slight impairment of function. The flexion strength decreased with increasing flexion of the hip joint. Loss of the rectus femoris reduced the isometric strength by 37 and the isokinetic strength by 17 per cent. Hip abduction: The strength reduction was only about 50 per cent and the impairment of function only slight or moderate even in patients with extensive loss of abductor muscles. Hip adduction: Removal of all three prime adductors (longus, brevis, magnus) caused a strength reduction of about 70 per cent but the impairment of function was only slight or moderate. Hip extension: Loss of the gluteus maximus caused only a small strength reduction and no impairment or only slight impairment of function. Significant strength reduction was only seen when all hamstrings had been removed. Knee extension: Loss of one, two, and three of the quadriceps muscles reduced the isometric strength by 22, 33, and 55 per cent, respectively. The isokinetic strength was reduced somewhat more. The strength reduction usually had to exceed 50 per cent to cause more than slight impairment of function. Knee flexion: Loss of the semitendinosus, the biceps femoris, and all the hamstrings reduced the isometric strength by 24, 28, and 67 per cent, respectively. The isokinetic strength was reduced somewhat less. Loss of one of the hamstrings usually caused no impairment of function whereas loss of all three resulted in moderate impairment of function.

  17. Relationship between flexion contractures of the joints of the lower extremities and the sagittal profile of the spine in patients with cerebral palsy: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery V. Umnov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The considerable incidence of kyphosis in patients with cerebral palsy (CP causes back pain and aggravates movement disorders. However, few studies have investigated the pathogenesis of this condition. Aim. To identify the relationship between patient motor abilities, the severity of flexion contractures of the knee and hip joints and spinal sagittal profile changes, and the impact on the latter by surgical correction of flexion contracture of the knee joint. Material and methods. The study cohort included 17 pediatric CP patients (11 boys and 6 girls with a mean age of 13.1 ± 1.3 (range, 10–16 years and level 2–4 spastic diplegia according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System. The relationship between radiological indicators of the spine sagittal profile and motor abilities of children, as well as the severity of flexion contractures at the hip and knee, and the degree of insufficiency of the active extension of the knee were investigated. Of these 17 patients, 12 underwent surgery to correct flexion contracture of the knee, which involved lengthening of leg flexors, to analyze the impact of contracture on the sagittal profile of the spine. The following radiological indicators were assessed: angle of thoracic kyphosis (CC, lordosis angle (UL of the lumbar spine, and sacral inclination angle (SS. The study included patients with a CC of at least 30°. Results. Results of an X-ray study showed that the severity of kyphosis was 50.7° ± 2.1°, lordosis was 30.3° ± 4.3°, and SS was 30.5° ± 3.3°. There was a significant association between kyphosis and flexion contracture of the knee joint, as well as between lordosis and insufficient active extension of the knee joint. After elimination of the flexion contracture of the knee, the degree of severity of the CC (thoracic kyphosis was unchanged, while UL (lordosis angle and SS (sacral inclination angle increased by approximately 10°. Conclusion. The severity of

  18. Snapping hip caused by a venous hemangioma of the gluteus maximus muscle: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Cheng-Li

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Snapping hip, or coxa saltans, is defined as a clinical condition where a usually painful, audible snap occurs during hip flexion and extension. Its causes can be divided into external, internal or intra-articular origin. Accurate diagnosis is a prerequisite to successful treatment. We report a rare cause of snapping hip which is different from any previously reported cases. Case presentation A 23-year-old man presented to us with right hip pain of more than 10 years duration. Atrophy of the right gluteus maximus with snapping and tenderness were also noted. The imaging study revealed a focal intramuscular lesion in the lateral portion of the right gluteus maximus muscle. Surgery was performed and pathological examination concluded this mass to be a venous hemangioma. Conclusion Intramuscular hemangioma, though rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a snapping hip even though muscle fibrosis is most frequently encountered.

  19. Small Column Ion Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huff, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) leverages a suite of technologies developed by DOE across the complex to achieve lifecycle savings. Technologies are applicable to multiple sites. Early testing supported multiple sites. Balance of SRS SCIX testing supports SRS deployment. A forma Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) was performed and selected Small Column Ion Exchange columns containing Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) in a 2-column lead/lag configuration. SEE considered use of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF). Advantages of approach at SRS include: (1) no new buildings, (2) low volume of Cs waste in solid form compared to aqueous strip effluent; and availability of downstream processing facilities for immediate processing of spent resin.

  20. [History of hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płomiński, Janusz; Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof

    2007-02-01

    The authors present the history of hip prosthesis in treatment of coxarthrosis. Despite eighty years of experience the problem of gaining good and long-term results still exist and is difficult to solve. Even changing the way on cementless stabilization of prosthesis doesn't has result in solving the problem of aseptic loosening of hip arthroplasty. Problems of wear derbies made the producers find new to reduce particulate debris. The future of hip arthroplasty is connected with hip resurfacing. Moreover, the higher number of primary hip plasty the more prosthesis are loosening. The treatment is far more difficult and more expensive.

  1. [A man with a painful knee with restricted flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkering, L.J.; Zengerink, M.; Kampen, A. van

    2015-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with knee pain and limited knee flexion. MRI showed a mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (celery stalk sign). This rare condition can be treated with arthroscopic debridement with volume reduction of the anterior cruciate ligament. In severe cases,

  2. Comparison of hyperpronation and supination‑flexion techniques in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Radial head subluxation, also known as 'pulled elbow', 'dislocated elbow' or 'nursemaid's elbow', is one of the most common upper extremity injuries in young children and a common reason to visit Emergency Department (ED). Aim: To compare supination of the wrist followed by flexion of the elbow (the traditional ...

  3. Validity and test-retest reliability of manual goniometers for measuring passive hip range of motion in femoroacetabular impingement patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nussbaumer Silvio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the construct validity (known group, concurrent validity (criterion based and test-retest (intra-rater reliability of manual goniometers to measure passive hip range of motion (ROM in femoroacetabular impingement patients and healthy controls. Methods Passive hip flexion, abduction, adduction, internal and external rotation ROMs were simultaneously measured with a conventional goniometer and an electromagnetic tracking system (ETS on two different testing sessions. A total of 15 patients and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Results The goniometer provided greater hip ROM values compared to the ETS (range 2.0-18.9 degrees; P P Conclusions The present study suggests that goniometer-based assessments considerably overestimate hip joint ROM by measuring intersegmental angles (e.g., thigh flexion on trunk for hip flexion rather than true hip ROM. It is likely that uncontrolled pelvic rotation and tilt due to difficulties in placing the goniometer properly and in performing the anatomically correct ROM contribute to the overrating of the arc of these motions. Nevertheless, conventional manual goniometers can be used with confidence for longitudinal assessments in the clinic.

  4. Characterization of symptomatic hip impingement in butterfly ice hockey goalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James R; Bedi, Asheesh; Stone, Rebecca M; Sibilsky Enselman, Elizabeth; Kelly, Bryan T; Larson, Christopher M

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to characterize the radiographic deformity observed in a consecutive series of butterfly goalies with symptomatic mechanical hip pain and to use computer-based software analysis to identify the location of impingement and terminal range of motion. We also compared these analyses to a matched group of positional hockey players with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). A consecutive series of 68 hips in 44 butterfly-style hockey goalies and a matched group of 34 hips in 26 positional hockey players who underwent arthroscopic correction for symptomatic FAI were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient underwent preoperative anteroposterior (AP) and modified Dunn lateral radiographs and computed tomography (CT) of the affected hips. Common FAI measurements were assessed on plain radiographs. Patient-specific, CT-based 3-dimensional (3D) models of the hip joint were developed, and the femoral version, alpha angles at each radial clock face position, and femoral head coverage were calculated. Maximum hip flexion, abduction, internal rotation in 90° flexion (IRF), flexion/adduction/internal rotation (FADIR), and butterfly position were determined, and the areas of bony collision were defined. Butterfly goalies had an elevated mean alpha angle on both AP (61.3°) and lateral radiographs (63.4°) and a diminished beta angle (26.0°). The mean lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) measured 27.3° and acetabular inclination was 6.1°. A crossover sign was present in 59% of the hips. The maximum alpha angle on the radial reformatted computed tomographic scan was significantly higher among the butterfly goalies (80.9° v 68.6°; P hockey goalies have a high prevalence of FAI, characterized by a unique femoral cam-type deformity and noted by an elevated alpha angle and loss of offset, which is greater in magnitude and more lateral when compared with that in positional hockey players. Associated acetabular dysplasia is also common among hockey goalies. Level

  5. JCE Feature Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  6. Hip Resurfacing: An Alternative to Conventional Hip Replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is hip resurfacing a good alternative to hip replacement? Answers from Mark Spangehl, M.D. Hip resurfacing has lost favor with many surgeons ... women with poor bone quality. Unlike traditional hip replacement, hip resurfacing doesn't completely replace the "ball" ...

  7. Normative values of hip strength in adult male association football players assessed by handheld dynamometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Chris M; Fulcher, Mark L; Elley, C Raina; Moyes, Simon A

    2010-05-01

    Chronic groin pain is a common problem in association football players. Normative values for the strength of hip muscles, measured in an accurate and accessible manner, are needed to gauge strength and inform return to play decisions in this group. The purpose of this study was to define normative values of hip muscle strength using handheld dynamometry. A series of reliable clinical tests that are commonly used when making return to sport decisions in athletes with chronic adductor related groin pain have been selected. One hundred and twenty adult male association football players, free from injury, were recruited. Isometric strength of the hip flexors and adductor muscles was measured using a handheld dynamometer. Mean age was 24.9 years (SD 5.9). Eighty participants (67%) had experienced groin pain in the past. Mean strength for dominant leg hip flexion was 47.3 kg (95% confidence interval 45.6-49.0), non-dominant leg hip flexion was 42.5 kg (41.1-43.9), adduction at 0 degrees hip flexion was 35.6 kg (34.1-37.1), adduction at 45 degrees was 32.0 kg (30.9-33.1), and adduction at 90 degrees was 25.5 kg (24.4-26.5). This study establishes reference ranges and predictive equations for maximal isometric contraction strength of the hip muscles in non-injured adult male association football players. This information will assist assessment and management of an athlete's return to play following injury. 2009 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reliability of hip range of motion using goniometry in pediatric femur shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Janice; Stephens, Derek; Wright, James G

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the interrater reliability of the assessment of range of motion of the hip joint through goniometry. We included children aged 4 to 10 years with a femoral shaft fracture, from 4 study sites, who had had either an early hip spica cast or an external fixator. An assessor blind to treatment received at each site measured range of hip joints motion, using a standardized goniometric technique at 15 and 24 months postfracture. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to quantify concordance or agreement. Most ICCs for the different aspects of hip range were between 0.2 and 0.5, indicating only slight agreement. The most reliable measure was hip flexion, with an ICC of 0.48 (95% confidence interval 0.29-0.63). Goniometric measurement, using standardized protocols for the hip, has low reliability. Only when differences in rotation exceed at least 30 degrees and in flexion-extension exceed 50 degrees should clinicians conclude that true change has occurred.

  9. Hip extension during the come-out of multiple forward and inward pike somersaulting dives is controlled by eccentric contraction of the hip flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Pui W

    2010-03-01

    A modelling approach was used in the present study to investigate the role of the hip muscles during the come-out of forward and inward multiple somersaulting dives in a pike position. A planar two-segment model was used to simulate the somersault and come-out of three commonly performed dives from a 3-m springboard: forward two-and-one-half somersault pike dive (105B), forward three-and-one-half somersault pike dive (107B), and inward two-and-one-half somersault pike dive (405B). Three simulations were run for each dive: (1) hip angle was constrained to be constant, (2) hip torque was removed after 0.1 s, and (3) hip angle was constrained to a typical come-out time history used by elite divers. Simulation results indicated that hip flexion torque was required both to maintain a rigid pike position during somersault (range = 205.5-282.3 Nm) and to control the hip extension movement during the come-out (peak torque range = 355.8-548.1 Nm) in forward and inward multiple somersaulting dives. Coaches and divers should be aware that dry-land exercise drills producing hip extension movement by concentric actions of the hip extensor muscles do not replicate the neuromuscular control during the come-out of fast rotating dives.

  10. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Malfait

    Full Text Available The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ.Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM,vastus lateralis(VL}, {vastus medialis(VM,hamstring medialis(HM}, {hamstring medialis(HM,hamstring lateralis(HL} and the {vastus lateralis(VL,hamstring lateralis(HL}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping.The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (p<0.05. Small peak knee flexion angles were significantly associated with higher HM amplitudes during the preparatory and initial contact phase (p<0.001. The amplitudes of the {VM,VL} and {VL,HL} were significantly positively associated with the peak hip flexion angle during the peak loading phase (p<0.05. Small peak hip flexion angles were significantly associated with higher VL amplitudes during the peak loading phase (p = 0.001. Higher external knee abduction and flexion moments were found in participants landing with less flexed knee and hip joints (p<0.001.This study demonstrated clear associations between neuromuscular activation patterns and landing kinematics in the sagittal plane during specific parts of the landing. These findings have indicated that an erect landing pattern, characterized by less hip and knee flexion, was significantly associated with an increased medial and posterior

  11. Hip strength assessment using handheld dynamometry is subject to intertester bias when testers are of different sex and strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, K; Bandholm, T; Schick, M

    2013-01-01

    of this study was to examine the intertester reliability concerning strength assessments of hip abduction, adduction, external and internal rotation, flexion and extension using HHD, and to test whether systematic differences in test values exist between testers of different upper-extremity strength. Fifty...

  12. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid

  13. Nuclear reactor control column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest crosssectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor

  14. Validity and reliability of electroacoustic probe for diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Raygoza, Nicolas; Olvera-Villanueva, Georgina; Del Carmen Delgado-Sandoval, Silvia; Cordova-Fraga, Teodoro; Sosa-Aquino, Modesto Antonio; Beltran-Campos, Vicente

    2017-06-19

    Sound transmission is used in the diagnosis of hip dysplasia since the end of the 80's. Aim of this study is to quantify the validity and reliability of electroacoustic probe for the diagnosis of hip dysplasia in neonates. Diagnostic study included neonates aged 4-28 days, whose parents signed an informed consent. The probe was used three times for comparative sound transmission and with extension/flexion; hip ultrasound was performed with Graf technique as gold standard. Kappa was determined for intraobserver and interobserver reliability; validity was calculated with sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values. 100 neonates were included. For the comparative sound transmission, 0.80 and 0.81 Kappa were obtained for the intraobserver and interobserver respectively; with extension/flexion, Kappa 0.98 and 0.95 were obtained for the intraobserver and interobserver respectively. With comparative sound transmission, 44.8%, 97.7%, 76.5% and 91.3% for sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, respectively; with extension/flexion test, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values: 82.8%, 99.4%, 96.0%, and 97.1%, respectively. The electroacoustic probe is moderate valid and reliable for the diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Open Science framework https://osf.io/kpf5s/?view_only=0a9682c6w1c842ad8e1d9a66e8dcf038.

  15. Reliability and fatigue characteristics of a standing hip isometric endurance protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutchler, Jessica A; Weinhandl, Joshua T; Hoch, Matthew C; Van Lunen, Bonnie L

    2015-08-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common consideration when evaluating and rehabilitating athletic injuries. The presence of muscular fatigue has been previously determined by quantifying median frequency (MF) through a power spectral analysis on EMG signals collected throughout an endurance task. Research has not yet determined if a prolonged isometric test in a standing position generates muscular fatigue of the hip. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and fatigue characteristics of a standing hip isometric endurance test. Twenty healthy participants completed one 60-s Maximum Voluntary Isometric Contraction of standing hip flexion, extension, adduction, and abduction. MF of the participants' dominant limb rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), gluteus maximus (GMax), gluteus medius (GMed) and adductor longus (ADD) was determined via surface electromyography during two sessions, 30-min apart. Reliability values (ICC2,1) were moderate-to-excellent for all time intervals of each action (FlexionRF: >0.80; ExtensionBF: >0.89; ExtensionGMax: >0.60; AdductionADD: >0.78; AbductionGMed: >0.60) and MF significantly decreased over time for all actions. Results suggest the endurance test is a reliable technique to generate muscular fatigue for hip flexion, extension, adduction and abduction. It can be used as a time efficient fatigue protocol specific to the RF, BF, GMax, ADD and GMed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MR assessment of movement and morphologic change in the menisci during knee flexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Y.; Uetani, M.; Fuchi, K.; Eguchi, H.; Hayashi, K.

    1999-01-01

    To examine movement and morphologic alteration in the menisci during knee flexion. Twenty healthy knees were imaged at 0 degrees, 45 degrees, and 90 degrees of passive non-weight-bearing flexion in the sagittal plane with MR. In each meniscus, posterior movement distance during knee flexion and the ratio of anteroposterior (a.p.) diameter at flexion to that at extension were calculated. Each meniscus moved posteriorly during knee flexion. Movement was greater in the anterior horn than in the posterior horn, and greater in the medial meniscus than in the lateral meniscus (p<0.05). The a.p. diameter of each meniscus was reduced at flexion (p<0.05). Knee flexion normally leads to posterior movement and shortening of the a.p. diameter of the menisci, which may be related to the positioning and curvature of femoral condyles at the femorotibial contact point at knee flexion

  17. MR assessment of movement and morphologic change in the menisci during knee flexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Y.; Uetani, M.; Hayashi, K.; Fuchi, K.; Eguchi, H.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To examine movement and morphologic alteration in the menisci during knee flexion. Material and Methods: Twenty healthy knees were imaged at 0 , 45 , and 90 of passive non-weight-bearing flexion in the sagittal plane with MR. In each meniscus, posterior movement distance during knee flexion and the ratio of anteroposterior (a.p.) diameter at flexion to that at extension were calculated. Results: Each meniscus moved posteriorly during knee flexion. Movement was greater in the anterior horn than in the posterior horn, and greater in the medial meniscus than in the lateral meniscus (p<0.05). The a.p. diameter of each meniscus was reduced at flexion (p<0.05). Conclusion: Knee flexion normally leads to posterior movement and shortening of the a.p. diameter of the menisci, which may be related to the positioning and curvature of femoral condyles at the femorotibial contact point at knee flexion. (orig.)

  18. Hip arthrodesis in children: A review of 28 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banskota Ashok

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The best method of treating intractable hip pain in an unsalvageable hip joint in a child is still a subject open to debate. We believe that hip arthrodesis in such patients provides a painless and stable hip for most activities of daily living in our challenging rural terrain. Therefore, we conducted this study to assess the functional ability of children with painful hip arthrosis treated by arthrodesis of the hip. Materials and Methods: A retrospective evaluation of 28 children (out of 35 who had an arthrodesis of the hip performed between 1994 and 2008 was carried out. The average age was 14 years, with 12 males and 16 females. There was involvement of the right hip in 13 and left in 15 cases. The average duration of follow-up was 4.87 years. The preferred position of the hip for arthrodesis was 20-30° of flexion, neutral abduction-adduction, and neutral rotation, irrespective of the method of fixation. Results: The average duration of clinical and radiological arthrodesis was found to be 4 months (2-6 months. At the last follow-up, all patients were painfree and had good ambulatory capacity. The average Modified Harris Hip Score increased from 53 to 84 and the average post-surgical limb length discrepancy was 1.3 cm, which was well tolerated in all cases. Patients, however, had difficulty in squatting and had to modify their posture for foot care, putting on shoes, etc. Also, some patients complained of ipsilateral knee, contralateral hip, or low back pain with prolonged activity, but this was not severe enough to restrict activity except in one case that was known to have juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and needed ambulatory aid. Conclusion: In an environment where pathology generally presents very late and often in a dramatic manner, where the patient′s socioeconomic status, understanding, compliance, and the logistics of follow-up are consistently a challenge in management, hip arthrodesis has been an important procedure for

  19. Flexion-valgus unicondylar tibial plateau depression fracture pattern: Classification and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Song, Lijun; Li, Xiang; Fang, Jiahu

    2018-03-07

    The authors have identified a subset of unicondylar tibial plateau depression fracture patterns caused by a flexion-valgus force. The purpose of this study was to describe this fracture pattern and suggest a modified lateral approach that may allow for improved reduction and stabilization. The preoperative radiographs and CT scans of 102 patients who sustained unicondylar tibial plateau fractures (OTA 41B) were reviewed. Twenty-six fracture patients had posterolateral (PL) tibial plateau depression fractures. By medical record review and telephone follow-up, the injury mechanism of the 22 unicondylar tibial plateau fractures was confirmed as a flexion-valgus force. The radiographic features of those cases were analyzed and measured. To address this specific fracture pattern, a modified approach combined with a novel intra-articular osteotomy was applied. According to the morphological characteristics, this tibial plateau fracture pattern could be divided into two subtypes: type A was a confined, basin-like articular surface depression fracture located in the PL quadrant, and type B was a cancellous fracture involving the PL tibial plateau resulting in a decrease in the posterior slope. One radiographic hallmark of this fracture pattern is an anatomically or a mechanically intact posterior column wall. The novel approach was applied to both types. The postoperative radiographic measurements revealed excellent reduction quality. On axial scans, the distance between the most posterior rafting screw and the tangent line of the tibial plateau rim was 3.0 ± 2.07 mm (from -1.9 to 4.3), and the angulation between them was 8.9 ± 3.02° (from -7.3 to 15.6). These results indicated excellent PL quadrant coverage from the rafting screws. Flexion-valgus force-induced unicondylar tibial plateau depression fracture is a unique injury pattern. We suggest a novel surgical approach to address this injury's key features, which may facilitate exposure and enhance fixation

  20. Analytical shear and flexion of Einasto dark matter haloes

    OpenAIRE

    Retana-Montenegro, E.; Frutos-Alfaro, F.; Baes, M.

    2012-01-01

    N-body simulations predict that dark matter haloes are described by specific density profiles on both galactic- and cluster-sized scales. Weak gravitational lensing through the measurements of their first and second order properties, shear and flexion, is a powerful observational tool for investigating the true shape of these profiles. One of the three-parameter density profiles recently favoured in the description of dark matter haloes is the Einasto profile. We present exact expressions for...

  1. Load and speed effects on the cervical flexion relaxation phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Descarreaux Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP represents a well-studied neuromuscular response that occurs in the lumbar and cervical spine. However, the cervical spine FRP has not been investigated extensively, and the speed of movement and loading effects remains to be characterized. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the influence of load and speed on cervical FRP electromyographic (EMG and kinematic parameters and to assess the measurement of cervical FRP kinematic and EMG parameter repeatability. Methods Eighteen healthy adults (6 women and 12 men, aged 20 to 39 years, participated in this study. They undertook 2 sessions in which they had to perform a standardized cervical flexion/extension movement in 3 phases: complete cervical flexion; the static period in complete cervical flexion; and extension with return to the initial position. Two different rhythm conditions and 3 different loading conditions were applied to assess load and speed effects. Kinematic and EMG data were collected, and dependent variables included angles corresponding to the onset and cessation of myoelectric silence as well as the root mean square (RMS values of EMG signals. Repeatability was examined in the first session and between the 2 sessions. Results Statistical analyses revealed a significant load effect (P Conclusions The load increase evoked augmented FRP onset and cessation angles as well as heightened muscle activation. Such increments may reflect the need to enhance spinal stability under loading conditions. The kinematic and EMG parameters showed promising repeatability. Further studies are needed to assess kinematic and EMG differences between healthy subjects and patients with neck pain.

  2. Lumbopelvic flexibility modulates neuromuscular responses during trunk flexion-extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel; Artacho-Pérez, Carla; Biviá-Roig, Gemma

    2016-06-01

    Various stimuli such as the flexibility of lumbopelvic structures influence the neuromuscular responses of the trunk musculature, leading to different load sharing strategies and reflex muscle responses from the afferents of lumbopelvic mechanoreceptors. This link between flexibility and neuromuscular response has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between lumbopelvic flexibility and neuromuscular responses of the erector spinae, hamstring and abdominal muscles during trunk flexion-extension. Lumbopelvic movement patterns were measured in 29 healthy women, who were separated into two groups according to their flexibility during trunk flexion-extension. The electromyographic responses of erector spinae, rectus abdominis and biceps femoris were also recorded. Subjects with greater lumbar flexibility had significantly less pelvic flexibility and vice versa. Subjects with greater pelvic flexibility had a higher rate of relaxation and lower levels of hamstring activation during maximal trunk flexion. The neuromuscular response patterns of the hamstrings seem partially modulated by pelvic flexibility. Not so with the lumbar erector spinae and lumbar flexibility, despite the assertions of some previous studies. The results of this study improve our knowledge of the relationships between trunk joint flexibility and neuromuscular responses, a relationship which may play a role in low back pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A RARE CASE OF IPSILATERAL HIP AND KNEE DISLOCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High velocity road traffic accidents leads to complicated lower limb injuries. Such injuries demand highly experienced surgeon and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Hip or knee dislocations are two different orthopaedic emergencies. Concomitant fracture dislocation of the hip and knee is rare and very few cases have been reported in the literature. A 45 year old man with history of fall from motorcycle came to the casualty. He had ipsilateral hip and knee dislocation. Immediately patient was shifted to operation theatre and closed reduction was performed under general anaesthesia. Reduction was confirmed under fluoroscopy and post-operative x-rays were taken. The functional results were excellent. After 2 months patient made an uncomplicated recovery and had satisfactory functional outcome with right hip having 110⁰ flexion and right knee flexes to 120⁰.There was no neurological deficit. The urgency, that the treating surgeon shows in managing these injuries, significantly affects the prognosis and outcome finally achieved by these patients (golden period in reducing the hip joint has been described to be 6 hours.

  4. Validity of the three-column theory of thoracolumbar fractures. A biomechanic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, M M; Oxland, T R; Kifune, M; Arand, M; Wen, L; Chen, A

    1995-05-15

    This study validated the three-column theory of fractures by correlating the multidirectional instabilities and the vertebral injuries to each of the three columns, using a biomechanic trauma model. The objective was to validate the three-column theory as applied to the thoracolumbar fractures. The widely used three-column theory of fractures for classification and evaluation was based on retrospective analysis of radiographs. No biomechanic study, using realistic spinal fractures and multidirectional instability measurements, was available. Using 16 fresh cadaveric thoracolumbar human spine specimens, two groups of burst fractures were produced by either simple axial compression or flexion-compression, using a high-speed trauma model. Multidirectional flexibility was measured before and after the trauma, thus quantifying the instability of the burst fracture. Computed tomography scans were taken after the fracture, and a newly developed injury scoring scheme quantified the injuries to the anterior, middle, and posterior columns. Statistical correlations were obtained between the flexibility parameters and injuries to each of the three columns. In the axial compression group, the middle column injury, compared with the other two columns, showed the highest correlations to eight of the nine flexibility parameters (average R2 = 0.77). In the flexion-compression group, again the middle column injury showed the highest correlations to eight of the nine flexibility parameters (average R2 = 0.85). The results of this study supported the three-column theory of the thoracolumbar fractures and bolstered the concept of the middle column being the primary determinant of mechanical stability of this region of the spine.

  5. Buckling of liquid columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibi, M.; Rahmani, Y.; Bonn, D.; Ribe, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Under appropriate conditions, a column of viscous liquid falling onto a rigid surface undergoes a buckling instability. Here we show experimentally and theoretically that liquid buckling exhibits a hitherto unsuspected complexity involving three different modes—viscous, gravitational, and

  6. [Thrombosis of the superficial femoral vein due to psoas bursitis secondary to particle disease in total hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax-Pérez, R; Salinas-Gilabert, J E; Lajara-Marco, F; Lax-Pérez, A; Corraliza-Zamorano, A; García-Gálvez, A; Izquierdo-Plazas, L

    2011-01-01

    The case of a male 76 year-old patient with a history of total hip replacement surgery is presented herein. The patient had tumors in the iliac fossa with swelling of the thigh and pain upon hip flexion and extension. The complementary ultrasound and computed tomography show a large lobed cystic tumor in the left iliac fossa, 7 cm in diameter, close to the prosthesis. The diagnosis was psoas bursitis secondary to the release of polyethylene particles that caused compression and thrombosis of the superficial femoral vein. Cyst formation caused by polyethylene disease after total hip arthroplasty is infrequent.

  7. [Superficial femoral vein thrombosis due to large psoas bursitis secondary to particle disease in total hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax-Pérez, R; Salinas-Gilabert, J E; Lajara-Marco, F; Lax-Pérez, A; Corraliza-Zamorano, A; García-Gálvez, A; Izquierdo-Plazas, L

    2012-01-01

    Male, 76 year-old patient with a history of total hip arthroplasty who presents with a mass in the iliac fossa with swelling of the thigh and hip pain upon flexion and extension. Complementary ultrasound and computed tomography scan studies show a giant lobulated cystic mass in the left iliac fossa, 7 cm in diameter, near the prosthesis. Cyst formation caused by polyethylene disease after total hip arthroplasty is infrequent. We present a case of large psoas bursitis secondary to the release of polyethylene particles which caused superficial femoral vein compression and thrombosis.

  8. Test-retest reliability of cardinal plane isokinetic hip torque and EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claiborne, Tina L; Timmons, Mark K; Pincivero, Danny M

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to establish test-retest reliability of isokinetic hip torque and prime mover electromyogram (EMG) through the three cardinal planes of motion. Thirteen healthy young adults participated in two experimental sessions, separated by approximately one week. During each session, isokinetic hip torque was evaluated on the Biodex Isokinetic Dynamometer at a velocity of 60 deg/s. Subjects performed three maximal-effort concentric and eccentric contractions, separately, for right and left hip abduction/adduction, flexion/extension, and internal/external rotation. Surface EMGs were sampled from the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, adductor, medial and lateral hamstring, and rectus femoris muscles during all contractions. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC - 2,1) and standard errors of measurement (SEM) were calculated for peak torque for each movement direction and contraction mode, while ICCs were only computed for the EMG data. Motions that demonstrated high torque reliability included concentric hip abduction (right and left), flexion (right and left), extension (right) and internal rotation (right and left), and eccentric hip abduction (left), adduction (left), flexion (right), and extension (right and left) (ICC range=0.81-0.91). Motions with moderate torque reliability included concentric hip adduction (right), extension (left), internal rotation (left), and external rotation (right), and eccentric hip abduction and adduction (right), flexion (left), internal rotation (right and left), and external rotation (right and left) (ICC range=0.49-0.79). The majority of the EMG sampled muscles (n=12 and n=11 for concentric and eccentric contractions, respectively) demonstrated high reliability (ICC=0.81-0.95). Instances of low, or unacceptable, EMG reliability values occurred for the medial hamstring muscle of the left leg (both contraction modes) and the adductor muscle of the right leg during eccentric internal rotation. The major

  9. Biomechanical analysis of posterior cruciate ligament retaining high-flexion total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.; van der Zanden, A.C.; De Waal Malefijt, M.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Background High-flexion knee replacements have been developed to accommodate a large range of flexion (>120°) after total knee arthroplasty. Both posterior cruciate ligament retaining and sacrificing high-flexion knee designs have been marketed. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the

  10. Spine lateral flexion strength development differences between exercises with pelvic stabilization and without pelvic stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straton, Alexandru; Gidu, Diana Victoria; Micu, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Poor lateral flexor muscle strength can be an important source of lumbar/thoracic back pain in women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pelvic stabilization (PS) and no pelvic stabilization (NoPS) lateral flexion strength exercise training on the development of isolated right and left lateral flexion strength. Isometric torque of the isolated right and left lateral flexion muscles was measured at two positions (0° and 30° opposed angle range of motion) on 42 healthy women before and after 8 weeks of PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise training. Subjects were assigned in three groups, the first (n=14) trained 3 times/week with PS lateral flexion strength exercise, the second (n=14) trained 3 times/week with NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise and the third (control, n=14) did not train. Post training isometric strength values describing PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength improved in greater extent for the PS lateral flexion strength exercise group and in lesser extent for the NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise group, in both angles (pstrength exercises; NoPS lateral flexion strength exercises can be an effective way of training for the spine lateral flexion muscles, if there is no access to PS lateral flexion strength training machines.

  11. Solvent extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, P.; Smith, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    In pulsed columns for use in solvent extraction processes, e.g. the reprocessing of nuclear fuel, the horizontal perforated plates inside the column are separated by interplate spacers manufactured from metallic neutron absorbing material. The spacer may be in the form of a spiral or concentric circles separated by radial limbs, or may be of egg-box construction. Suitable neutron absorbing materials include stainless steel containing boron or gadolinium, hafnium metal or alloys of hafnium. (UK)

  12. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dislocation of the hip joint; Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital dislocation of ... during pregnancy can increase a baby's risk of DDH. Other risk factors include: Being the first child ...

  13. Altered flexion-relaxation responses exist during asymmetric trunk flexion movements among persons with unilateral lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Brad D; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2014-02-01

    Repetitive exposures to altered gait and movement following lower-limb amputation (LLA) have been suggested to contribute to observed alterations in passive tissue properties and neuromuscular control in/surrounding the lumbar spine. These alterations, in turn, may affect the synergy between passive and active tissues during trunk movements. Eight males with unilateral LLA and eight non-amputation controls completed quasi-static trunk flexion-extension movements in seven distinct conditions of rotation in the transverse plane: 0° (sagittally-symmetric), ±15°, ±30°, and ±45° (sagittally-asymmetric). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the bilateral lumbar erector spinae and lumbar kinematics were simultaneously recorded. Peak lumbar flexion and EMG-off angles were determined, along with the difference ("DIFF") between these two angles and the magnitude of peak normalized EMG activities. Persons with unilateral LLA exhibited altered and asymmetric synergies between active and passive trunk tissues during both sagittally-symmetric and -asymmetric trunk flexion movements. Specifically, decreased and asymmetric passive contributions to trunk movements were compensated with increases in the magnitude and duration of active trunk muscle responses. Such alterations in trunk passive and active neuromuscular responses may result from repetitive exposures to abnormal gait and movement subsequent to LLA, and may increase the risk for LBP in this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hip fracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allows your surgeon to use an x-ray machine to see how well the parts of your hip bone line up. The surgeon ... allows your surgeon to use an x-ray machine to see how well the parts of your hip bone line up. The surgeon ...

  15. TREATMENT OF HIP DYSPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian ICLEANU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this thesis, our purpose is to show that using physiotherapy on patients with hip dysplasia from the very beginning, in the first months of life, helps treating them faster. Common literature proposes to use physiotherapy on patients with hip dysplasia either after their recovery or in the terminal phase of recovery, claiming that any earlier intervention will prolong the hip recovery. The effects of hip dysplasia reflect over the whole musculoskeletal system, while it hinders the knees (genu valgum, the ankles (ankle valgus, calcaneal valgus and the spine (scoliosis especially at the lumbar level. The most spectacular are at the hip level, that is why we made an analytical evaluation only for this joint. To show the importance of physiotherapy for children with hip dysplasia we started from the hypothesis: untimely treatment for children with hip dysplasia has improved results in functional recovery and in obtaining a better stability, without the necessity of orthopedics or surgical interventions. The research methods used in this study are: the observation method, the bibliographic study method, the experimental method, the graphics method and the statistical mathematical method to process the data and to represent the results graphically. In the end, the results obtained are significantly different from the initial evaluations and we came to the conclusion that starting an untimely analytical kinetic treatment and globally personalizing it to every patient improves stability and biomechanical parameters for the hip.

  16. Bernese periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia: Surgical technique and indications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-01

    For young, active patients with healthy hip cartilage, pelvic osteotomy is a surgical option in to address hip pain and to improve mechanical loading conditions related to dysplasia. Hip dysplasia may lead to arthrosis at an early age due to poor coverage of the femoral head and abnormal loading of the joint articulation. In patients with symptomatic dysplasia and closed triradiate cartilage (generally over age 10), including adolescents and young adults (generally up to around age 40), the Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a durable technique for addressing underlying structural deformity. The PAO involves a modified Smith-Petersen approach. Advantages of the Bernese osteotomy include preservation of the weight-bearing posterior column of the hemi-pelvis, preservation of the acetabular blood supply, maintenance of the hip abductor musculature, and the ability to effect powerful deformity correction about an ideal center of rotation. There is an increasing body of evidence that preservation of the native hip can be improved through pelvic osteotomy. In contrast to hip osteotomy and joint preservation, the role of total hip arthroplasty in young, active patients with correctable hip deformity remains controversial. Moreover, the durability of hip replacement in young patients is inherently limited. Pelvic osteotomy should be considered the preferred method to address correctable structural deformity of the hip in the young, active patient with developmental dysplasia. The Bernese PAO is technically demanding, yet offers reproducible results with good long-term survivorship in carefully selected patients with preserved cartilage and the ability to meet the demands of rehabilitation. PMID:27190755

  17. Formed HIP Can Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Kester Diederik [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-27

    The intent of this report is to document a procedure used at LANL for HIP bonding aluminum cladding to U-10Mo fuel foils using a formed HIP can for the Domestic Reactor Conversion program in the NNSA Office of Material, Management and Minimization, and provide some details that may not have been published elsewhere. The HIP process is based on the procedures that have been used to develop the formed HIP can process, including the baseline process developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The HIP bonding cladding process development is summarized in the listed references. Further iterations with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) to refine the process to meet production and facility requirements is expected.

  18. Clinical assessment of hip strength using a hand-held dynamometer is reliable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, K; Petersen, J; Magnusson, S P

    2010-01-01

    Hip strength assessment plays an important role in the clinical examination of the hip and groin region. The primary aim of this study was to examine the absolute test-retest measurement variation concerning standardized strength assessments of hip abduction (ABD), adduction (ADD), external...... rotation (ER), internal rotation (IR), flexion (FLEX) and extension (EXT) using a hand-held dynamometer. Nine subjects (five males, four females), physically active for at least 2.5 h a week, were included. Twelve standardized isometric strength tests were performed twice with a 1-week interval in between...... by the same examiner. The test order was randomized to avoid systematic bias. Measurement variation between sessions was 3-12%. When the maximum value of four measurements was used, test-retest measurement variation was below 10% in 11 of the 12 individual hip strength tests and below 5% in five of the 12...

  19. Contracture of the hip secondary to fibrosis of the gluteus maximus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Y S

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-eight children were treated who had limited flexion of the hips and various degrees of contracture of the abductor and external rotator muscles because of fibrosis of the gluteus maximus muscle. Although the lesions could be classified as those associated with poliomyelitis, infection of the gluteus maximus muscle, and fibrosis of unknown etiology, all forty-five hips had a typical restriction of motion such that an affected hip could not be flexed in the usual sagittal plane, but had to be flexed in abduction. Poliomyelitis may have been adjunctive to the causative factor of the lesion in some cases but the probable primary etiology was multiple intramuscular injections. Excellent correction of the hip contracture was achieved in all patients by division of the fibrotic bands.

  20. The capsular ligaments provide more hip rotational restraint than the acetabular labrum and the ligamentum teres

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Arkel, R. J.; Amis, A. A.; Cobb, J. P.; Jeffers, J. R. T.

    2015-01-01

    In this in vitro study of the hip joint we examined which soft tissues act as primary and secondary passive rotational restraints when the hip joint is functionally loaded. A total of nine cadaveric left hips were mounted in a testing rig that allowed the application of forces, torques and rotations in all six degrees of freedom. The hip was rotated throughout a complete range of movement (ROM) and the contributions of the iliofemoral (medial and lateral arms), pubofemoral and ischiofemoral ligaments and the ligamentum teres to rotational restraint was determined by resecting a ligament and measuring the reduced torque required to achieve the same angular position as before resection. The contribution from the acetabular labrum was also measured. Each of the capsular ligaments acted as the primary hip rotation restraint somewhere within the complete ROM, and the ligamentum teres acted as a secondary restraint in high flexion, adduction and external rotation. The iliofemoral lateral arm and the ischiofemoral ligaments were primary restraints in two-thirds of the positions tested. Appreciation of the importance of these structures in preventing excessive hip rotation and subsequent impingement/instability may be relevant for surgeons undertaking both hip joint preserving surgery and hip arthroplasty. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015; 97-B:484–91. PMID:25820886

  1. Mechanics of hip dysplasia reductions in infants using the Pavlik harness: a physics-based computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Orlando J; Divo, Eduardo A; Moslehy, Faissal A; Rab, George T; Kassab, Alain J; Price, Charles T

    2013-05-31

    Biomechanical factors influencing the reduction of dislocated hips with the Pavlik harness in patients of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) were studied using a three-dimensional computer model simulating hip reduction dynamics in (1) subluxated and (2) fully dislocated hip joints. Five hip adductor muscles were identified as key mediators of DDH prognosis, and the non-dimensional force contribution of each in the direction necessary to achieve concentric hip reductions was determined. Results point to the adductor muscles as mediators of subluxated hip reductions, as their mechanical action is a function of the degree of hip dislocation. For subluxated hips in abduction and flexion, the Pectineus, Adductor Brevis, Adductor Longus, and proximal Adductor Magnus contribute positively to reduction, while the rest of the Adductor Magnus contributes negatively. In full dislocations all muscles contribute detrimentally to reduction, elucidating the need for traction to reduce Graf IV type dislocations. Reduction of dysplastic hips was found to occur in two distinct phases: (a) release phase and (b) reduction phase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Five points on columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen S Rockland

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract “Column,” like “gene,” has both conceptual and linguistic shortcomings. The simple question “what is a column” is not easy to answer and the word itself is not easy to replace. In the present article, I have selected five points, in no way comprehensive or canonical, but which may nevertheless serve as a prompt and aid for further discussions and reevaluation. These are: that anatomical columns are not solid structures, that they are part of locally interdigitating systems, that any delimited column also participates in a widely distributed network, that columns are not an obligatory cortical feature, and that columns (as “modules” occur widely in the brain in non-cortical structures. I focus on the larger scale macrocolumns, mainly from an anatomical perspective. My position is that cortical organization is inherently dynamic and likely to incorporate multiple processing styles. One can speculate that the distributed mappings within areas like piriform cortex may resemble at least one mode of neocortical processing strategy.

  3. Decoding the Pantheon Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Grasshoff

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study has been to reconstruct the design principles underlying the construction of the Pantheon’s portico columns as well as to demonstrate how digital investigation methods and models can be used to improve our understanding of ancient architectural knowledge. Thanks to the data of the Bern Digital Pantheon Model, a synthesis of all the scanned surface points obtained during a digitization campaign of the Karman Center for Advanced Studies in the Humanities of the University of Bern in 2005, we have been able to determine empirically the column profiles of the portico with unprecedented precision. A second stage of our investigation involved explaining the profile of the column shafts by a construction model that takes into account the parameters recommended by Vitruvius and design methods such as those that can be found in the construction drawings discovered at Didyma. Our analysis shows that the design principles of the portico’s columns can be successfully reconstructed, and has led to the surprising result that at least two different variants of a simple circle construction were used. Finally, we have been able to deduce from the distribution of the different profile types among the columns that the final profiles were designed and executed in Rome.

  4. Assembly for connecting the column ends of two capillary columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, B.; Auer, M.; Pospisil, P.

    1984-01-01

    In gas chromatography, the column ends of two capillary columns are inserted into a straight capillary from both sides forming annular gaps. The capillary is located in a tee out of which the capillary columns are sealingly guided, and to which carrier gas is supplied by means of a flushing flow conduit. A ''straight-forward operation'' having capillary columns connected in series and a ''flush-back operation'' are possible. The dead volume between the capillary columns can be kept small

  5. Examining the effects of altering hip orientation on gluteus medius and tensor fascae latae interplay during common non-weight-bearing hip rehabilitation exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Cambridge, Edward D J; McGill, Stuart M

    2014-11-01

    Improving activity and strength of the gluteus medius muscle is a common goal among clinicians aiming to rehabilitate lower extremity and low back injuries. The functional anatomy of the hip is complex, particularly how position-dependent the activity and strength of many muscles surrounding the hip are, and the optimal exercise technique to isolate gluteus medius remains controversial. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of altering hip orientation during side-lying clamshell and hip abduction exercises on the relative muscle activation profiles of gluteus medius and tensor fascae latae. The ratio of gluteus-medius-to-tensor-fascae-latae peak electromyography signal amplitude of 13 healthy, male participants was compared across variations of the clamshell and abduction exercises. The hip flexion angle was varied from 30°, 45°, and 60° for the clamshell, while hip rotation orientation was varied from internal, neutral, and external rotation for the abduction exercise. Varying hip angle - flexion in the clamshell exercise and internal/external rotation in the abduction exercise - did not significantly affect the interplay between gluteus medius and tensor fascae latae activation levels. Both exercises remained gluteus medius-dominant across all variations, but the gluteus-medius-to-tensor-fascae-latae ratio was far greater for the clamshell than for the abduction exercise; the clamshell may be the preferred rehabilitative exercise to prescribe when minimal tensor fascae latae muscle activation is desired by the clinician. These findings provide information for clinical decision-making pertaining to effective gluteus medius activation in lower extremity and low back exercise rehabilitation programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The envelope of passive motion allowed by the capsular ligaments of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Arkel, Richard J; Amis, Andrew A; Jeffers, Jonathan R T

    2015-11-05

    Laboratory data indicate the hip capsular ligaments prevent excessive range of motion, may protect the joint against adverse edge loading and contribute to synovial fluid replenishment at the cartilage surfaces of the joint. However, their repair after joint preserving or arthroplasty surgery is not routine. In order to restore their biomechanical function after hip surgery, the positions of the hip at which the ligaments engage together with their tensions when they engage is required. Nine cadaveric left hips without pathology were skeletonised except for the hip joint capsule and mounted in a six-degrees-of-freedom testing rig. A 5 N m torque was applied to all rotational degrees-of-freedom separately to quantify the passive restraint envelope throughout the available range of motion with the hip functionally loaded. The capsular ligaments allowed the hip to internally/externally rotate with a large range of un-resisted rotation (up to 50±10°) in mid-flexion and mid-ab/adduction but this was reduced towards the limits of flexion/extension and ab/adduction such that there was a near-zero slack region in some positions (pligamentous restraint averaged 0.8±0.3 N m/° and was greater in positions where there were large slack regions. These data provide a target for restoration of normal capsular ligament tensions after joint preserving hip surgery. Ligament repair is technically demanding, particularly for arthroscopic procedures, but failing to restore their function may increase the risk of osteoarthritic degeneration. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of target distance on pivot hip, trunk, pelvis, and kicking leg kinematics in Taekwondo roundhouse kicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woong; Kwon, Moon-Seok; Yenuga, Sree Sushma; Kwon, Young-Hoooo

    2010-06-01

    The study purpose was to investigate the effects of target distance on pivot hip, trunk, pelvis, and kicking leg movements in Taekwondo roundhouse kick. Twelve male black-belt holders executed roundhouse kicks for three target distances (Normal, Short, and Long). Linear displacements of the pivot hip and orientation angles of the pelvis, trunk, right thigh, and right shank were obtained through a three-dimensional video motion analysis. Select displacements, distances, peak orientation angles, and angle ranges were compared among the conditions using one-way repeated measure ANOVA (p well as the linear displacements of the pivot hip and the reach significantly changed in response to different target distances. It was concluded that the adjustment to different target distances was mainly accomplished through the pivot hip displacements, hip flexion, and pelvis left rotation. Target distance mainly affected the reach control function of the pelvis and the linear balance function of the trunk.

  8. Correlation between the elbow flexion and the hand and wrist flexion after neurotization of the fascicles of the ulnar nerve to the motor branch to the biceps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Boso Escudero

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Gain in elbow flexion in patients with brachial plexus injury is extremely important. The transfer of a fascicle from the ulnar nerve to the motor branch of the musculocutaneous nerve (Oberlin surgery is a treatment option. However, in some patients, gain in elbow flexion is associated with wrist and finger flexion. This study aimed to assess the frequency of this association and the functional behavior of the limb. METHODS: Case-control study of 18 patients who underwent the Oberlin surgery. Group 1 included patients without disassociation of range of elbow flexion and that of the fingers and wrist; Group 2 included patients in whom this disassociation was present. In the functional evaluation, the Sollerman and DASH tests were used. RESULTS: It was observed that 38.89% of the patients did not present disassociation of elbow flexion with flexion of the wrist and fingers. Despite the existence of a favorable difference in the group with disassociation of the movement, when the Sollerman protocol was applied to the comparison between both groups, this difference was not statistically significant. With the DASH test, however, there was a statistically significant difference in favor of the group of patients who managed to disassociate the movement. CONCLUSION: The association of elbow flexion with flexion of the wrist and fingers, in the group studied, was shown to be a frequent event, which influenced the functional result of the affected limb.

  9. Effects of the abdominal drawing-in maneuver on muscle activity, pelvic motions, and knee flexion during active prone knee flexion in patients with lumbar extension rotation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyue-Nam; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Lee, Won-Hwee; Ha, Sung-Min; Kim, Su-Jung; Weon, Jong-Hyuck

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the effects of performing an abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) during active prone knee flexion on the hamstrings and erector spinae muscle activity, the amounts of pelvic motion and knee flexion, and onset of pelvic movements. Comparative, repeated-measures study. University research laboratory. Men patients (N=18) with lumbar extension rotation syndrome. Subjects performed prone knee flexion in 2 conditions. To measure muscle activity, surface electromyogram (EMG) of both erector spinae and the medial and lateral hamstrings was performed. Kinematic data on the pelvic motion and knee flexion were measured using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Repeated 1-way analysis of variance was used for the statistical analysis. Significantly decreased electromyographic activity in the right and left erector spinae and significantly increased electromyographic activity in the medial and lateral hamstrings activity were shown during prone knee flexion in ADIM condition using the pressure biofeedback unit. In addition, the amounts of anterior pelvic tilt, pelvic rotation, knee flexion, and perceived pain decreased significantly during prone knee flexion in the ADIM condition compared with the same maneuver in the non-ADIM condition. The onset of anterior pelvic tilt and pelvic rotation occurred significantly earlier in the non-ADIM condition, compared with the ADIM condition. ADIM effectively increased activation of knee flexors, decreased activation of back extensors, and reduced the pelvic motions and low back pain during prone knee flexion in patients with lumbar extension rotation syndrome. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Slender CRC Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Aarup, Bendt; Jensen, Lars Rom; Ellegaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    CRC is a high-performance steel fibre reinforced concrete with a typical compressive strength of 150 MPa. Design methods for a number of structural elements have been developed since CRC was invented in 1986, but the current project set out to further investigate the range of columns for which current design guides can be used. The columns tested had a slenderness varying from 1.11 to 12.76 and a reinforcement ratio (area of rebar to area of concrete) ranging from 0 to 8.8 %. A total of 77 te...

  11. The recognition and evaluation of patterns of compensatory injury in patients with mechanical hip pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Sommer; Bedi, Asheesh; Voos, James E; Mauro, Craig S; Kelly, Bryan T

    2014-03-01

    In active individuals with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), the resultant reduction in functional range of motion leads to high impaction loads at terminal ranges. These increased forces result in compensatory effects on bony and soft tissue structures within the hip joint and hemipelvis. An algorithm is useful in evaluating athletes with pre-arthritic, mechanical hip pain and associated compensatory disorders. A literature search was performed by a review of PubMed articles published from 1976 to 2013. Level 4. Increased stresses across the bony hemipelvis result when athletes with FAI attempt to achieve supraphysiologic, terminal ranges of motion (ROM) through the hip joint required for athletic competition. This can manifest as pain within the pubic joint (osteitis pubis), sacroiliac joint, and lumbosacral spine. Subclinical posterior hip instability may result when attempts to increase hip flexion and internal rotation are not compensated for by increased motion through the hemipelvis. Prominence of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) at the level of the acetabular rim can result in impingement of the anterior hip joint capsule or iliocapsularis muscle origin against the femoral head-neck junction, resulting in a distinct form of mechanical hip impingement (AIIS subspine impingement). Iliopsoas impingement (IPI) has also been described as an etiology for anterior hip pain. IPI results in a typical 3-o'clock labral tear as well as an inflamed capsule in close proximity to the overlying iliopsoas tendon. Injury in athletic pubalgia occurs during high-energy twisting activities in which abnormal hip ROM and resultant pelvic motion lead to shearing across the pubic symphysis. Failure to recognize and address concomitant compensatory injury patterns associated with intra-articular hip pathology can result in significant disability and persistent symptoms in athletes with pre-arthritic, mechanical hip pain. B.

  12. Entretien sur la psychanalyse: réflexions en marge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Martini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available L’auteur propose ici un commentaire sur les points les plus importants de son entretien de février 2003 avec Paul Ricœur consacré aux rapports entre herméneutique et psychanalyse. Bien que le philosophe se situe dans une réelle continuité par rapport à sa contribution de 1965, il enrichit toutefois sa réflexion philosophique sur la psychanalyse en proposant plusieurs innovations, en ce qui concerne plus particulièrement les thèmes du récit, du soi et de l’éthique. Dans les conclusions de son commentaire, l’auteur souligne l’importance des concepts d’“irreprésentable” et d’“intraduisible”: non seulement, en effet, ces concepts sont dans la ligne de nombreuses contributions de la psychanalyse contemporaine, mais la profondeur de la réflexion ricœurienne augmente en outre leur potentiel théorique et même clinique.

  13. Do patients care about higher flexion in total knee arthroplasty?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten G; Husted, Henrik; Otte, Kristian Stahl

    2013-01-01

    result in a better patient perceived outcome. METHODS: The study is a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial in which 36 patients (mean age: 67.2 yrs) undergoing one-stage bilateral TKA randomly received a standard cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA in one knee and a high-flex posterior-stabilized (PS......) TKA in the contra lateral knee. At follow-up ROM, satisfaction, pain, "feel" of the knee and the abilities in daily activities were assessed. RESULTS: At 1-year follow-up we found an expected significantly higher degree of knee flexion of 7[degree sign] in the high-flex knees (p = 0.001). The high......-flex TKA's showed a mean active flexion of 121[degree sign]. In both TKA's the median VAS pain score was 0, the median VAS satisfaction score was 9, and the median VAS score of the patient "feel" of the knee was 9 at 1-year follow-up. Further, there were no significant differences between the knees...

  14. Facilitating Cervical Flexion Using a Feldenkrais Method: Awareness through Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, S; Kegerreis, S

    1992-01-01

    Feldenkrais methods appear to be gaining popularity and utilization by physical therapists. The need for scientific justification of their usage is indicated. The purpose of this study was to quantify the results of a Feldenkrais method-Awareness Through Movement-involving a neck flexion task. The study examined 30 normal subjects to determine if a Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement sequence would result in an increase in neck flexion range of motion and if the subjects would indicate a significantly lower level of perceived effort posttest. Measurements of range of motion were taken using a gravity-based cervical range of motion goniometer. The subjects recorded their perceived efforts on a visual analogue scale. The range of motion data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA. The visual analogue scale data were analyzed with a Mann-Whitney U test. The data supported both hypotheses. Based on these findings, further investigation of Feldenkrais methods in the treatment of patients appears warranted. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1992;16(1):25-29.

  15. Maximum Velocities in Flexion and Extension Actions for Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessop David M.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Speed of movement is fundamental to the outcome of many human actions. A variety of techniques can be implemented in order to maximise movement speed depending on the goal of the movement, constraints, and the time available. Knowing maximum movement velocities is therefore useful for developing movement strategies but also as input into muscle models. The aim of this study was to determine maximum flexion and extension velocities about the major joints in upper and lower limbs. Seven university to international level male competitors performed flexion/extension at each of the major joints in the upper and lower limbs under three conditions: isolated; isolated with a countermovement; involvement of proximal segments. 500 Hz planar high speed video was used to calculate velocities. The highest angular velocities in the upper and lower limb were 50.0 rad·s-1 and 28.4 rad·s-1, at the wrist and knee, respectively. As was true for most joints, these were achieved with the involvement of proximal segments, however, ANOVA analysis showed few significant differences (p<0.05 between conditions. Different segment masses, structures and locations produced differing results, in the upper and lower limbs, highlighting the requirement of segment specific strategies for maximal movements.

  16. Practical column design guide

    CERN Document Server

    Nitsche, M

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the aspects that need to be considered when designing distillation columns in practice. It discusses the influencing parameters as well as the equations governing them, and presents several numerical examples. The book is intended both for experienced designers and for those who are new to the subject.

  17. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  18. Steel column base classification

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspart, J.P.; Wald, F.; Weynand, K.; Gresnigt, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of the rotational characteristics of the column bases on the structural frame response is discussed and specific design criteria for stiffness classification into semi-rigid and rigid joints are derived. The particular case of an industrial portal frame is then considered. Peer reviewed

  19. European Analytical Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, B.; Grasserbauer, M.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2009-01-01

    The European Analytical Column has once more invited a guest columnist to give his views on various matters related to analytical chemistry in Europe. This year, we have invited Professor Manfred Grasserbauer of the Vienna University of Technology to present some of the current challenges for Eur...

  20. Medial rotation deformity of the hip in cerebral palsy: Surgical treatment by transposition of gluteal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čobeljić Goran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Medial rotation deformity of the hip is a problem to patients who are handicapped by cerebral palsy but able to walk, because the knees point inward during gait („kissing patellae" and cause falls and frequent injuries. Knees and ankles are subject to stress and, therefore, they assume compensating positions. Lower legs assume position of valgus and external rotation, whereas feet rotate either inwards or outwards. Secondary deformities make gait more difficult and cause rapid tear of footwear. AIM The purpose of the paper was to retrospectively analyze the effects of transposition of the gluteus medius and minimus muscles, a procedure introduced for the first time in our country in order to correct the deformity. A new method of binding the muscles by wire was described. There had been no previous experience with this method. METHOD This operation was indicated in patients with spastic form of cerebral palsy, who were able to walk, who had difficulties in gait and whose lateral rotation was less than 10° along with the medial rotation of over 70° of the hip on the side of the deformity. Additional prerequisite for the operation was the absence of flexion contracture of more than 15° of either the hip or the knee on the side of deformity, as there is possibility of aggravation of the flexion hip deformity due to transposed gluteal muscles (now in front of the hip joint. Fifteen hips of 10 patients were operated on. Five patients were operated on bilaterally at one time. The average age was 8 (6-12 years. The majority of patients, 8 (80% were aged between 6 and 8. The average follow-up was 5 years (3-8. The assessment of the results was based on the comparison of rotational abilities of both hips before and after the operation (in unilateral and bilateral deformities, as well as on individual complaints before and after the operation. In patients with unilateral deformity, their „healthy" hips were the control hips. The

  1. Sagittal plane gait characteristics in hip osteoarthritis patients with mild to moderate symptoms compared to healthy controls: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitzen Ingrid

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existent biomechanical studies on hip osteoarthritic gait have primarily focused on the end stage of disease. Consequently, there is no clear consensus on which specific gait parameters are of most relevance for hip osteoarthritis patients with mild to moderate symptoms. The purpose of this study was to explore sagittal plane gait characteristics during the stance phase of gait in hip osteoarthritis patients not eligible for hip replacement surgery. First, compared to healthy controls, and second, when categorized into two subgroups of radiographic severity defined from a minimal joint space of ≤/>2 mm. Methods Sagittal plane kinematics and kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle joint were calculated for total joint excursion throughout the stance phase, as well as from the specific events initial contact, midstance, peak hip extension and toe-off following 3D gait analysis. In addition, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, passive hip range of motion, and isokinetic muscle strength of hip and knee flexion and extension were included as secondary outcomes. Data were checked for normality and differences evaluated with the independent Student’s t-test, Welch’s t-test and the independent Mann–Whitney U-test. A binary logistic regression model was used in order to control for velocity in key variables. Results Fourty-eight hip osteoarthritis patients and 22 controls were included in the final material. The patients walked significantly slower than the controls (p=0.002, revealed significantly reduced joint excursions of the hip (pp=0.011, and a reduced hip flexion moment at midstance and peak hip extension (p2 mm suggested that the observed deviations were more pronounced in patients with greater radiographic severity. The biomechanical differences were, however, not reflected in self-reported symptoms or function. Conclusions Reduced gait velocity, reduced sagittal plane joint excursion, and

  2. Transient osteoporosis of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWalter, Patricia; Hassan Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip is an uncommon cause of hip pain, mostly affecting healthy middle-aged men and also women in the third trimester of pregnancy. We present a case of transient osteoporosis of the hip in a 33-year-old non-pregnant female patient. This case highlights the importance of considering a diagnosis of transient osteoporosis of the hip in patients who present with hip pain. (author)

  3. Endoscopic release of internal snapping hip: a review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Alessio Giai; Basile, Attilio; Wainer, Mauricio; Musa, Carlos; Padulo, Johnny; Mardones, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Internal snapping hip is a common clinical condition, characterized by an audible or palpable snap of the medial compartment of the hip. In most cases it is asymptomatic, while in a few patients, mostly in athletes who participate in activities requiring extremes of hip range of motion, the snap may become painful (internal snapping hip syndrome - ISHS). Materials and methods This is a review of current literature, focused on the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of ISHS. Conclusion The pathogenesis of ISHS is multifactorial, and it is traditionally believed to be caused by the tendon snapping over the anterior femoral head or the iliopectineal ridge. Most cases of ISHS resolve with conservative treatment, which includes avoidance of aggravating activities, stretching, and NSAIDs. In recalcitrant cases, surgery may be indicated. Better results have been reported with endoscopic iliopsoas tendon release compared with open techniques, which may be related to the treatment of concomitant intra-articular pathologies. Furthermore, endoscopic treatment showed fewer complications, decreased failure rate and postop erative pain. It is important to remember that in most cases, a multiple iliopsoas tendon may exist, and that the incomplete release of the iliopsoas tendon can be a reason for refractory pain and poor results. Then, even if of not clinical relevance at long term follow-up, patients should be told about the inevitable loss of flexion strength after iliopsoas tenotomy. Level of evidence II. PMID:28066743

  4. Role of the acetabular labrum and the iliofemoral ligament in hip stability: an in vitro biplane fluoroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Casey A; Register, Bradley C; Lertwanich, Pisit; Ejnisman, Leandro; Pennington, W Wes; Giphart, J Erik; LaPrade, Robert F; Philippon, Marc J

    2011-07-01

    Recent biomechanical reports have described the function of the acetabular labrum and iliofemoral ligament in providing hip stability, but the relative stability provided by each structure has not been well described. Both the iliofemoral ligament and acetabular labrum are important for hip stability by limiting external rotation and anterior translation, with increased stability provided by the iliofemoral ligament compared with the acetabular labrum. Controlled laboratory study. Fifteen fresh-frozen male cadaveric hips were utilized for this study. Each specimen was selectively skeletonized down to the hip capsule. Four tantalum beads were embedded into each femur and pelvis to accurately measure hip translations and rotations using biplane fluoroscopy while either a standardized 5 N·m external or internal rotation torque was applied. The hips were tested in 4 hip flexion angles (10° of extension, neutral, and 10° and 40° of flexion) in the intact state and then by sectioning and later repairing the acetabular labrum and iliofemoral ligament in a randomized order. External rotation significantly increased from the intact condition (41.5° ± 7.4°) to the sectioned iliofemoral ligament condition (54.4° ± 6.6°) and both-sectioned condition (61.5° ± 5.7°; P hip flexion angle decreased from 40° of flexion to 10° of extension (P ligament-sectioned (1.4 ± 0.5 mm), both-sectioned (2.2 ± 0.2 mm), and labrum-repaired (1.1 ± 0.2 mm) conditions all resulted in significantly greater anterior translation than the intact condition (-0.4 ± 0.1 mm) (P ligament had a significant role in limiting external rotation and anterior translation of the femur, while the acetabular labrum provided a secondary stabilizing role for these motions. These results suggest that, if injured, both the acetabular labrum and iliofemoral ligament should be surgically repaired to restore native hip rotation and translation. In addition, a careful repair of an arthroscopic capsulotomy

  5. Hip Labral Tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are often associated with sports participation. If your sport puts a lot of strain on your hips, condition the surrounding muscles with strength and flexibility exercises. Try to avoid loading your ...

  6. Imaging of hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Mayerhoefer, M.; Gottsauner-Wolf, F.; Krestan, C.; Imhof, H.; Toma, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    Hip arthroplasty has become a common and still increasing procedure for the treatment of osteoarthritis, advanced head necrosis, post-inflammatory arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.Radiography is the most important imaging modality for monitoring the normal, asymptomatic hip arthroplasty. Radiographs are obtained at the end of a surgical treatment, to exclude complications like fracture or component misplacement. In the follow-up radiographs are used for the diagnosis of loosening and infection of the hip arthroplasty as well as soft tissue ossification. Together with the history and clinical information, the analysis of morphological findings allows to find the grade of loosening. MRI has been advocated in the diagnosis of infection, in particular in the localisation of soft tissue involvement.Imaging, especially by radiographs, is used for the evaluation of the normal and complicated follow-up of hip arthroplasty. (orig.) [de

  7. Posterior hip instability relocation testing: a resident's case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Rich; Wallentine, Scott; Gerke, Dale; Crager, Sam; Stewart, Jessica

    2017-09-01

    Micro-instability (non-radiographic clinical instability) continues to gain recognition as a problem at the hip. Although most research has been directed to anterior hip instability, posterior hip instability (PHI) has also garnered attention. PHI is under recognized, difficult to identify, and confused with other hip pathologies such as a simple sprain or strain. A novel clinical test is introduced that may have helped identify PHI in this patient. Additionally, a conservative rehabilitation approach emphasizing stabilization exercises is described. A 29-year-old female presented with complaints of posterior lateral and anterior hip pain of 1.5 years duration. Upon initiating an aggressive stretching program, her pain worsened. Examination revealed limited and painful hip flexion, and positive anterior impingement testing for femoroacetabular impingement. Both tests were significantly less painful with more motion when retested with manual repositioning of the femoral head from posterior to anterior, referred to as posterior relocation testing. The patient was instructed to discontinue stretching. A stabilization plan was established including strengthening of the deep external rotators with trunk and lower quarter neuromuscular re-education. The patient completed 12 appointments over 2.5 months. At discharge, the patient reported improvements with pain and function. The Lower Extremity Functional Scale improved from 64/80 to 77/80 and Oswestry Disability Questionnaire improved from 8 to 0%. PHI may have contributed to this patient's symptoms. The posterior relocation test may assist clinicians with identification of PHI, thus directing treatment toward stabilization and neuromuscular control rather than interventions designed to increase mobility. 4.

  8. Athletic Hip Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, T Sean; Bedi, Asheesh; Larson, Christopher M

    2017-04-01

    Historically, athletic hip injuries have garnered little attention; however, these injuries account for approximately 6% of all sports injuries and their prevalence is increasing. At times, the diagnosis and management of hip injuries can be challenging and elusive for the team physician. Hip injuries are seen in high-level athletes who participate in cutting and pivoting sports that require rapid acceleration and deceleration. Described previously as the "sports hip triad," these injuries consist of adductor strains, osteitis pubis, athletic pubalgia, or core muscle injury, often with underlying range-of-motion limitations secondary to femoroacetabular impingement. These disorders can happen in isolation but frequently occur in combination. To add to the diagnostic challenge, numerous intra-articular disorders and extra-articular soft-tissue restraints about the hip can serve as pain generators, in addition to referred pain from the lumbar spine, bowel, bladder, and reproductive organs. Athletic hip conditions can be debilitating and often require a timely diagnosis to provide appropriate intervention.

  9. [Operative treatment of congenital hip osteoarthritis with high hip luxation (Crowe type IV)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhof, H; Ziebarth, K; Gravius, S; Wirtz, D C; Siebenrock, K A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the therapy is mechanical and functional stabilization of high dislocated hips with dysplasia coxarthrosis using total hip arthroplasty (THA). Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in adults, symptomatic dysplasia coxarthrosis, high hip dislocation according to Crowe type III/IV, and symptomatic leg length inequality. Cerebrospinal dysfunction, muscular dystrophy, apparent disturbance of bone metabolism, acute or chronic infections, and immunocompromised patients. With the patient in a lateral decubitus position an incision is made between the anterior border of the gluteus maximus muscle and the posterior border of the gluteus medius muscle (Gibson interval). Identification of the sciatic nerve to protect the nerve from traction disorders by visual control. After performing trochanter flip osteotomy, preparation of the true actetabulum if possible. Implantation of the reinforcement ring, preparation of the femur and if necessary for mobilization, resection until the trochanter minor. Test repositioning under control of the sciatic nerve. Finally, refixation of the trochanteric crest. During hospital stay, intensive mobilization of the hip joint using a continuous passive motion machine with maximum flexion of 70°. No active abduction and passive adduction over the body midline. Maximum weight bearing 10-15 kg for 8 weeks, subsequently, first clinical and radiographic follow-up and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis until full weight bearing. From 1995 to 2012, 28 THAs of a Crow type IV high hip-dislocation were performed in our institute. Until now 14 patients have been analyzed during a follow-up of 8 years in 2012. Mid-term results showed an improvement of the postoperative clinical score (Merle d'Aubigné score) in 86 % of patients. Good to excellent results were obtained in 79 % of cases. Long-term results are not yet available. In one case an iatrogenic neuropraxia of the sciatic nerve was observed and after trauma a redislocation of the

  10. Biomechanical gait features associated with hip osteoarthritis: Towards a better definition of clinical hallmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Christophe A G; Corten, Kristoff; Fieuws, Steffen; Deschamps, Kevin; Monari, Davide; Wesseling, Mariska; Simon, Jean-Pierre; Desloovere, Kaat

    2015-10-01

    Critical appraisal of the literature highlights that the discriminative power of gait-related features in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) has not been fully explored. We aimed to reduce the number of gait-related features and define the most discriminative ones comparing the three-dimensional gait analysis of 20 patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) with those of 17 healthy peers. First, principal component analysis was used to reduce the high-dimensional gait data into a reduced set of interpretable variables for further analysis, including tests for group differences. These differences were indicative for the selection of the top 10 variables to be included into linear discriminant analysis models (LDA). Our findings demonstrated the successful data reduction of hip osteoarthritic-related gait features with a high discriminatory power. The combination of the top variables into LDA models clearly separated groups, with a maximum misclassification error rate of 19%, estimated by cross-validation. Decreased hip/knee extension, hip flexion and internal rotation moment were gait features with the highest discriminatory power. This study listed the most clinically relevant gait features characteristics of hip OA. Moreover, it will help clinicians and physiotherapists understand the movement pathomechanics related to hip OA useful in the management and design of rehabilitation intervention. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Test-retest reliability of innovated strength tests for hip muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Meyer

    Full Text Available The burden of hip muscles weakness and its relation to other impairments has been well documented. It is therefore a pre-requisite to have a reliable method for clinical assessment of hip muscles function allowing the design and implementation of a proper strengthening program. Motor-driven dynamometry has been widely accepted as the gold-standard for lower limb muscle strength assessment but is mainly related to the knee joint. Studies focusing on the hip joint are less exhaustive and somewhat discrepant with regard to optimal participants position, consequently influencing outcome measures. Thus, we aimed to develop a standardized test setup for the assessment of hip muscles strength, i.e. flexors/extensors and abductors/adductors, with improved participant stability and to define its psychometric characteristics. Eighteen participants performed unilateral isokinetic and isometric contractions of the hip muscles in the sagittal and coronal plane at two separate occasions. Peak torque and normalized peak torque were measured for each contraction. Relative and absolute measures of reliability were calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient and standard error of measurement, respectively. Results from this study revealed higher levels of between-day reliability of isokinetic/isometric hip abduction/flexion peak torque compared to existing literature. The least reliable measures were found for hip extension and adduction, which could be explained by a less efficient stabilization technique. Our study additionally provided a first set of reference normalized data which can be used in future research.

  12. Acute and sub-acute effects of repetitive kicking on hip adduction torque in injury-free elite youth soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Bandholm, Thomas; Hölmich, Per

    2014-01-01

    strength, concerning isometric hip adduction, abduction and flexion torque of the kicking leg and the supporting leg. Ten injury-free male elite soccer players, mean ± s age of 15.8 ± 0.4 years participated. All players underwent a specific 20 min kicking drill session, comprising 45 kicks. The players...

  13. First experiences with the Fitmore® hip stem: Early results of the 16-month monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Marko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Fitmore® hip stem belongs to the group of short stem prostheses with the metaphysar stabilization, with its shape and form that protects the bone mass in the greater trochanter region and the distal part of the femur. The aim of this paper was to present the early postoperative results in patients with implanted Fitmore® hip stem and point out some of the advantages. Methods. A series of 10 patients with implanted Fitmore® hip stem, was included in this study. The average age of the patients was 54.5 (48–65 years. There were 5 women and 5 men. The total monitoring time was 16 months. To rate the condition of the hip joint we used The Western Ontario and Mc Master Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC score. We also monitored the degree of hip pain, hip flexion, heterotopic ossification and indentation in the stem of the prosthesis. Results. After 12 months of monitoring 9 (90% of the patients had no pain in the thigh region, and only 1 (10% experienced mild pain. The hip flexion rose from the average 89° to postoperative 114°. WOMAC score rose as well, from 49 to 94 average points. Indentation in the stem was registered 3 months after the operation in 2 (20% of the patients – in one of the patients the indentation was 3 mm and in the other patient 5 mm. After the 16-month monitoring, the results were excellent. The monitoring period was short though it should be continued and the results should be presented after 5 and then after 10 years. Conclusion. Early results of the implantation Fitmore stem showed good bone ingrowth with excellent functional result.

  14. First experiences with the Fitmore® hip stem: Early results of the 16-month monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenović, Marko; Micić, Ivan; Stojiljković, Predrag; Milenković, Saša; Mladenović, Desimir

    2017-01-01

    Fitmore® hip stem belongs to the group of short stem prostheses with the metaphysar stabilization, with its shape and form that protects the bone mass in the greater trochanter region and the distal part of the femur. The aim of this paper was to present the early postoperative results in patients with implanted Fitmore® hip stem and point out some of the advantages. A series of 10 patients with implanted Fitmore® hip stem, was included in this study. The average age of the patients was 54.5 (48–65) years. There were 5 women and 5 men. The total monitoring time was 16 months. To rate the condition of the hip joint we used The Western Ontario and Mc Master Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) score. We also monitored the degree of hip pain, hip flexion, heterotopic ossification and indentation in the stem of the prosthesis. After 12 months of monitoring 9 (90%) of the patients had no pain in the thigh region, and only 1 (10%) experienced mild pain. The hip flexion rose from the average 89° to postoperative 114°. WOMAC score rose as well, from 49 to 94 average points. Indentation in the stem was registered 3 months after the operation in 2 (20%) of the patients – in one of the patients the indentation was 3 mm and in the other patient 5 mm. After the 16-month monitoring, the results were excellent. The monitoring period was short though it should be continued and the results should be presented after 5 and then after 10 years. Early results of the implantation Fitmore stem showed good bone ingrowth with excellent functional result.

  15. Nine Words - Nine Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trempe Jr., Robert B.; Buthke, Jan

    2016-01-01

    of computational and mechanical processes towards an anesthetic. Each team received a single word, translating and evolving that word first into a double-curved computational surface, next a ruled computational surface, and then a physically shaped foam mold via a 6-axis robot. The foam molds then operated...... as formwork for the shaping of wood veneer. The resulting columns ‘wear’ every aspect of this design pipeline process and display the power of process towards an architectural resolution....

  16. Slender CRC Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarup, Bendt; Jensen, Lars Rom; Ellegaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    in standard fire conditions. The tests showed good correlation between test results and results calculated according to established deisgn guides. The fire tests demonstrate that the load capacity of slender columns can be reduced very quickly due to thermal stresses and a reduction of stiffness - also...... in cases where temperature at the rebar is still relatively low. However, guidelines for achieving acceptable fire resistance can be determined based on the test results....

  17. Nine Words - Nine Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trempe Jr., Robert B.; Buthke, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This book records the efforts of a one-week joint workshop between Master students from Studio 2B of Arkitektskolen Aarhus and Master students from the Harbin Institute of Technology in Harbin, China. The workshop employed nine action words to instigate team-based investigation into the effects o...... as formwork for the shaping of wood veneer. The resulting columns ‘wear’ every aspect of this design pipeline process and display the power of process towards an architectural resolution....

  18. Manual therapy intervention for a patient with a total hip arthroplasty revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Paul D; Levitsky, Beth

    2007-12-01

    Case report. A 73-year-old active woman with a total hip arthroplasty, who later had revision surgery, developed left hip and buttock pain 2 years after the revision surgery, subsequent to lifting her foot while seated. This movement was performed so that her spouse could assist her in putting on her sock and shoe. During the first physical therapy session, the patient exhibited a forward-flexed trunk posture and difficulty weight bearing on the involved lower limb. The patient was successfully treated with manual therapy techniques and a home exercise program. The manual therapy techniques included long-axis hip distraction, lateral hip distraction, posterior-to-anterior hip joint mobilization, and a contract-relax proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation technique. The patient's home program consisted of long-axis hip distraction, performed by her spouse, and standing lower limb pendular movements into flexion and extension. Pain scale ratings, posture and gait observations, strength, range of motion, and return to functional activities served as outcome measures. After 1 physical therapy visit, in which manual therapy techniques were utilized, the patient had a significant decrease in hip symptoms. The patient and spouse were compliant with the home exercise program and continued with physical therapy for 3 more visits, and the patient ultimately became symptom free. The patient returned to all previous activities, including household chores, cooking, and a walking program. The patient was contacted at 6 months, 1 year, and 4 years, and reported no recurrences of hip or buttock symptoms. Manual therapy techniques and home exercises described in this case report were apparently effective in eliminating symptoms and returning this patient, who had total hip arthroplasty and revision surgery 2 years earlier, to all previous functional activities after a dressing incident produced hip and buttock symptoms.

  19. Monolithic column in gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurganov, A

    2013-05-02

    Monolithic columns invented in chromatographic praxis almost 40 years ago gained nowadays a lot of popularity in separations by liquid chromatographic technique. At the same time, application of monolithic columns in gas chromatography is less common and only a single review published by Svec et al. covers this field of research. Since that time a lot of new findings on application and properties of monolithic columns in gas chromatography have been published in the literature deserving consideration and discussion. This review considers preparation of monolithic columns for GC, an impact of preparation conditions on column performance, optimization of separation conditions for GC analysis on monolithic columns and other important aspects of preparation and usage of monolithic capillary columns in GC. A final part of the review discusses the modern trends and possible applications in the future of capillary monolithic columns in GC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Complications in Hip Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Naoki; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recent developments in hip arthroscopic techniques and technology have made it possible in many cases to avoid open surgical dislocation for treating a variety of pathology in the hip. Although early reports suggest favourable results’ using hip arthroscopy and it has been shown to be a relatively safe procedure, complications do exist and can sometimes lead to significant morbidity. Methods This is a review article. The aim of this manuscript is to present the most frequent and/or serious complications that could occur at or following hip arthroscopy and some guidelines to avoid these complications. Conclusion Most complications of hip arthroscopy are minor or transient but serious complications can occur as well. A lot of complication e.g. acetabular labral puncture go unreported. Appropriate education and training, precise and meticulous surgical technique with correct instrumentation, the right indication in the right patient and adherence to advice from mentors and experienced colleagues are all essential factors for a successful outcome. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066747

  1. Effects of a combined inversion and plantarflexion surface on knee and hip kinematics during landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Kevin A; Bhaskaran, Divya; Hummer, Cicily; Schefano, Antonio; Zhang, Songning

    2016-11-01

    Although landing in a plantarflexion and inversion position is a well-known characteristic of lateral ankle sprains, the associated kinematics of the knee and hip is largely unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the changes in knee and hip kinematics during landings on an altered landing surface of combined plantarflexion and inversion. Participants performed five drop landings from 30 cm onto a trapdoor platform in three different conditions: flat landing surface, 25° inversion, or a combined 25° plantarflexion and 25° inversion. Kinematic data were collected using a seven camera motion capture system. A 2 × 3 (leg × surface) repeated measures ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. The combined surface showed decreased knee and hip flexion range of motion (ROM) and increased knee abduction ROM (p knee abduction. A stiff landing pattern is frequently related to increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury. It may be beneficial for athletes at risk to train for alternate methods of increasing their sagittal plane motion of the knee and hip with active knee or trunk flexion.

  2. Joint angles of the ankle, knee, and hip and loading conditions during split squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Pascal; List, Renate; Zemp, Roland; Schellenberg, Florian; Taylor, William R; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify how step length and the front tibia angle influence joint angles and loading conditions during the split squat exercise. Eleven subjects performed split squats with an additional load of 25% body weight applied using a barbell. Each subject's movements were recorded using a motion capture system, and the ground reaction force was measured under each foot. The joint angles and loading conditions were calculated using a cluster-based kinematic approach and inverse dynamics modeling respectively. Increases in the tibia angle resulted in a smaller range of motion (ROM) of the front knee and a larger ROM of the rear knee and hip. The external flexion moment in the front knee/hip and the external extension moment in the rear hip decreased as the tibia angle increased. The flexion moment in the rear knee increased as the tibia angle increased. The load distribution between the legs changed squat execution was varied. Our results describing the changes in joint angles and the resulting differences in the moments of the knee and hip will allow coaches and therapists to adapt the split squat exercise to the individual motion and load demands of athletes.

  3. Sonography for hip joint effusion in adults with hip pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); A.M. Bohnen (Arthur); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); A. Prins (Ad); J.S. Lameris; A.Z. Ginai (Abida)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence of ultrasonic hip joint effusion and its relation with clinical, radiological and laboratory (ESR) findings in adults with hip pain. METHODS: Patients (n = 224) aged 50 years or older with hip pain, referred by the general

  4. Sonography for hip joint effusion in adults with hip pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M.; Bohnen, A. M.; Verhaar, J. A.; Prins, A.; Ginai-Karamat, A. Z.; Laméris, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    To study the prevalence of ultrasonic hip joint effusion and its relation with clinical, radiological and laboratory (ESR) findings in adults with hip pain. Patients (n = 224) aged 50 years or older with hip pain, referred by the general practitioner for radiological investigation, underwent a

  5. HIP DYSPLASIA IN TORNJAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Milošević

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Canine hip dysplasia (CHD is a hereditary developmental anomaly, most frequent in large dog breeds. Clinical confirmation of the disorder is based on hip X-ray imaging. Twenty Tornjak dogs aged between 9-36 months, and weighted from 35-42 kg were examined for CHD. Scoring was performed according to six clearly defined radiographic parameters by Flueckiger method (5. Dysplastic changes of various severity were observed in 11 dogs, while in 9 dogs changes were absent. The study describes 4 CHD cases of varying degrees of severity. The results indicate the presence of CHD in Bosnian Tornjak. Determining the incidence of dysplasia in this autochthonous breed requires a more detailed study, which will enable determination of the prevalence of dysplasia and analysis of the relationship to other dog breeds. Key words: canine hip dysplasia, Bosnian Tornjak

  6. Column: Every Last Byte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Garfinkel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Inheritance powder is the name that was given to poisons, especially arsenic, that were commonly used in the 17th and early 18th centuries to hasten the death of the elderly. For most of the 17th century, arsenic was deadly but undetectable, making it nearly impossible to prove that someone had been poisoned. The first arsenic test produced a gas—hardly something that a scientist could show to a judge. Faced with a growing epidemic of poisonings, doctors and chemists spent decades searching for something better.(see PDF for full column

  7. Annular pulse column development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The capacity of critically safe cylindrical pulse columns limits the size of nuclear fuel solvent extraction plants because of the limited cross-sectional area of plutonium, U-235, or U-233 processing columns. Thus, there is a need to increase the cross-sectional area of these columns. This can be accomplished through the use of a column having an annular cross section. The preliminary testing of a pilot-plant-scale annular column has been completed and is reported herein. The column is made from 152.4-mm (6-in.) glass pipe sections with an 89-mm (3.5-in.) o.d. internal tube, giving an annular width of 32-mm (1.25-in.). Louver plates are used to swirl the column contents to prevent channeling of the phases. The data from this testing indicate that this approach can successfully provide larger-cross-section critically safe pulse columns. While the capacity is only 70% of that of a cylindrical column of similar cross section, the efficiency is almost identical to that of a cylindrical column. No evidence was seen of any non-uniform pulsing action from one side of the column to the other

  8. Hip joint pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tijssen, M; van Cingel, R E H; de Visser, E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to (a) describe the clinical presentation of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and hip labral pathology; (b) describe the accuracy of patient history and physical tests for FAI and labral pathology as confirmed by hip arthroscopy. Patients (18......-65 years) were included if they were referred to a physical therapist to gather pre-operative data and were then diagnosed during arthroscopy. Results of pre-operative patient history and physical tests were collected and compared to arthroscopy. Data of 77 active patients (mean age: 37 years) were...

  9. Resection Angulation Osteotomy in Treatment of Post- septic Ankylosis of the Hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DG Nabi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the results of the resection angulation osteotomy in post-septic ankylosis of hip. We performed the procedure in 19 patients, with average age of 26 years (range, 21-32 years and followed patients postoperatively for an average of 43 months (range 20-65 months. The osteotomy united in all patients with an average union time of 16 weeks (range 12-22 weeks. Average painless movement postoperatively was: flexion, 114 degrees; extension, 18 degrees; abduction, 35 degrees; adduction , 21 degrees; external rotation, 23 degrees; and internal rotation, 22 degrees. All the patients except one were able to sit cross- legged on the floor, offer prayers and use squat-type toilets. We conclude that this procedure is a good treatment option in patients with post-septic ankylosis of the hip, who need an alternative to more sophisticated procedures like total hip arthroplasty.

  10. Hip Arthroscopy in The Athlete

    OpenAIRE

    Byrd, J.W. Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Sports related injuries to the hip have received relatively little attention, in the part because the clinical assessment, imaging studies, and surgical techniques are less sophisticated. The evolution of hip arthroscopy has offered a less invasive technique that allows for recognition and treatment of hip pathologies that previously went unrecognized. The success of hip arthoscopy is dependent on proper patient selection based on the patient's history and diagnosis. The purpose of this clini...

  11. Study of nociceptive flexion reflex in healthy subjects and patients with chronic neuropathic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, S A; Turbina, L G; Zus'man, A A; Posokhov, S I

    2012-12-01

    Nociceptive flexion reflex was measured in healthy subjects and patients with chronic neuropathic pain (diabetic distal symmetric sensorimotor polyneuropathy). The study of nociceptive flexion reflex revealed reduction of subjective pain threshold and reflex threshold in patients compared with healthy persons reflecting deficit of descending antinociceptive influences in the CNS.

  12. Angioleiomyoma: A Rare Cause of Fixed Flexion Contracture of the Elbow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asterios Dramis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an unusual case of a patient presented with a painless fixed flexion contracture of the elbow due to an angioleiomyoma. This benign smooth muscle tumour should be considered in the differential diagnosis of flexion contractures of the elbow.

  13. An EMG-to-Force Processing approach for estimating in vivo hip muscle forces in normal human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogey, Ross A; Barnes, Lee A

    2016-10-12

    The force of a single muscle is not directly measurable without invasive methods. Yet invasive techniques are not appropriate for clinical use, thus a non-invasive technique that combined the electromyographic (EMG) signal and a neuromuscular model was developed to determine in vivo active muscle forces at the hip. The EMG-to-force processing (EFP) model included active and passive moment components, and the net EFP moment was compared with the hip moment obtained with standard inverse dynamics techniques ("gold standard"). The two methods were compared at percent gait cycle intervals, and the correlation coefficient between methods was excellent (r2=91). The closeness of fit confirms that the approach is a reasonable approximation of net moment and, possibly, individual muscle forces. The greatest estimated hip force was produced by a hip abductor. A novel finding was that the hip adductors did not behave a single synergistic group. The Adductor Magnus synergistically assisted other hip extensors, and produced forces that were out-of-phase with the other hip adductor forces. Rectus Femoris was only active during hip flexion (not knee extension).

  14. The capsular ligaments provide more hip rotational restraint than the acetabular labrum and the ligamentum teres : an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Arkel, R J; Amis, A A; Cobb, J P; Jeffers, J R T

    2015-04-01

    In this in vitro study of the hip joint we examined which soft tissues act as primary and secondary passive rotational restraints when the hip joint is functionally loaded. A total of nine cadaveric left hips were mounted in a testing rig that allowed the application of forces, torques and rotations in all six degrees of freedom. The hip was rotated throughout a complete range of movement (ROM) and the contributions of the iliofemoral (medial and lateral arms), pubofemoral and ischiofemoral ligaments and the ligamentum teres to rotational restraint was determined by resecting a ligament and measuring the reduced torque required to achieve the same angular position as before resection. The contribution from the acetabular labrum was also measured. Each of the capsular ligaments acted as the primary hip rotation restraint somewhere within the complete ROM, and the ligamentum teres acted as a secondary restraint in high flexion, adduction and external rotation. The iliofemoral lateral arm and the ischiofemoral ligaments were primary restraints in two-thirds of the positions tested. Appreciation of the importance of these structures in preventing excessive hip rotation and subsequent impingement/instability may be relevant for surgeons undertaking both hip joint preserving surgery and hip arthroplasty. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  15. Outcomes of hip resurfacing in a professional dancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Kim

    2012-02-01

    A new surgical option (hip resurfacing arthroplasty) is now available for younger patients with hip osteoarthritis. A more aggressive rehabilitation program than the typical total hip arthroplasty protocol is needed for active individuals. This case report describes interventions used to maximize function in a 46-year-old professional dancer after hip resurfacing with a progressive therapeutic exercise program. Exercise choices were selected to address dance-specific requirements while respecting healing of the posterior capsular incision. Strengthening focused on hip abduction, extension, and external rotation. Precautions included avoiding gluteal stretching until 6 months. Pelvic alignment and weight-bearing distribution were emphasized. The patient was able to return to rehearsal by 7 months, at which time strength was equivalent to the unaffected leg. Range of motion reached unaffected side values at week 8 for internal rotation, week 11 for extension, week 13 for adduction, and week 28 for flexion. External rotation and abduction were still limited at 1 year, which influenced pelvic alignment with resultant pain on the unaffected side. Functional and impairment outcomes are presented with timelines to provide a basis for postoperative benchmarks for active clients after hip resurfacing. Although this case report presents a dance-specific program, exercise progressions for other active individuals may benefit from similar exercise intensity and sports-specific focus. Future rehabilitation programs should take into account possible flexion and external rotation range limitations and the need for gluteal muscle strengthening along with symmetry and pelvic alignment correction. Long-term studies investigating intensity of rehabilitation are warranted for patients intending to participate in higher level athletic activity.

  16. Surgical treatment of hip ankylosis due to heterotopic ossification secondary to spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Muñoz, L M; Barriga-Martín, A; DeJuan-García, J

    2018-02-21

    To expose our experience in the diagnostic and surgical treatment of neurogenic heterotopic ossification of the hip. We designed an observational retrospective descriptive study including 20 patients (30 hips) with neurogenic heterotopic ossification of the hip secondary to spinal cord injury attended in our institution in the last 10 years, with a minimum of one year follow-up. Medical files and imaging studies were reviewed. The study variables analyzed were: type and localization of neurogenic heterotopic ossification, pre-post excision range of motion, level and aetiology of spinal cord injury, ASIA score, smoking history, surgical approach and complications associated with surgery. A total of 20 patients were treated with resection of heterotopic ossification in 30 hips. 16 patients presented ASIA A spinal cord injury and 4 ASIA B spinal cord injury. Preoperatively all the patients had severe ankylosis in the hip that made sitting in a wheel chair and activities such as repositioning and hygiene difficult. The average postoperative motion at the follow-up evaluation was 90° in flexion, 20° of internal rotation and 40° of external rotation. Immediately after surgery all the patients followed a specific intensive physiotherapy regime for the hip and celecoxib 200 mg was administrated daily orally for a month to prevent recurrence of heterotopic bone formation. None of the patients reviewed suffered a recurrence of heterotopic bone formation. Surgical excision of hip ossification in order to achieve functional ROM of the hip is the best treatment for patients with neurogenic heterotopic ossification of the hip. Copyright © 2018 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Acetabular Fractures in the Elderly: Midterm Outcomes of Column Stabilisation and Primary Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ortega-Briones

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Interest in arthroplasty techniques for periarticular or intra-articular fractures in the elderly/osteoporotic patient continues to rise, including for geriatric acetabular fractures. In line with this, many acetabular fracture surgeons are now undertaking acute total hip arthroplasty in elderly/osteoporotic patients. Little is known however of the outcomes of this procedure, beyond the first year after surgery. Questions/Purposes. We determined the clinical outcomes of a series of elderly osteoporotic patients (mean age at surgery 77.4 years treated for acetabular fractures with column fixation and simultaneous total hip arthroplasty, at a mean of 49 months after surgery. Methods. 24 patients (25 hips were reviewed at a mean of 49 months after surgery. The surgical technique employed has previously been described. Radiographs were obtained, and clinical outcomes were assessed using Harris Hip Scores and the Merle d’Aubigné score. Results. 14 hips were available for assessment (9 deceased, 2 lost to follow-up. No patient suffered any complications beyond the perioperative period, no acetabular components were loose clinically or on latest radiographs, and the mean Harris Hip Score was 92. All but one patient scored good or excellent on the Merle d’Aubigné score. Conclusions. Column fixation and simultaneous total hip arthroplasty are a viable option for complex geriatric acetabular fractures, with encouraging midterm results. We conclude that THR is a viable long-term solution in this situation provided that the acetabular columns are stabilised prior to implantation, but more research is needed to aid in overall management decision making.

  19. [Femoral superficial vein thrombosis due to a large iliopsoas bursitis secondary to polyethylene wear debris in total hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax Pérez, R; Salinas Gilabert, J E; Lajara Marco, F; Lax Pérez, A; Ferrero Manzanal, F; García-Gálvez, A; Izquierdo Plazas, L

    2012-01-01

    A 76 year old male patient with a history of implantation of a total hip arthroplasty Perfecta (Orthomet(®)), who presented with an iliac fossa mass, increased diameter of the thigh, and pain during hip flexion and extension. CT and ultrasound show the presence of a giant cystic mass in left iliac fossa about 7 cm in diameter next to the prosthesis. A pseudo-tumour secondary to wear debris after placement of a total arthroplasty is rare. We present a case of a large iliopsoas bursitis caused by polyethylene particles, which caused compression and thrombosis of the superficial femoral vein. Copyright © 2011 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. A resistance band increased internal hip abduction moments and gluteus medius activation during pre-landing and early-landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Boyi; Heinbaugh, Erika M; Ning, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Qin

    2014-11-28

    An increased knee abduction angle during jump-landing has been identified as a risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Activation of the hip abductors may decrease the knee abduction angle during jump-landing. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a resistance band on the internal hip abduction moment and gluteus medius activation during the pre-landing (100ms before initial contact) and early-landing (100ms after initial contact) phases of a jump-landing-jump task. Thirteen male and 15 female recreational athletes (age: 21.1±2.4yr; mass: 73.8±14.6kg; height: 1.76±0.1m) participated in the study. Subjects performed jump-landing-jump tasks with or without a resistance band applied to their lower shanks. During the with-band condition, subjects were instructed to maintain their movement patterns as performing the jump-landing task without a resistance band. Lower extremity kinematics, kinetics, and gluteus medius electromyography (EMG) were collected. Applying the band increased the average hip abduction moment during pre-landing (pgluteus medius EMG during pre-landing (pgluteus medius during jump-landing. Additional instructions and feedback regarding hip abduction, hip flexion, and knee flexion may be required to minimize negative changes to other kinematic variables. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. "Popeye muscle" morphology in OBPI elbow flexion contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Maizlin, Zeev V; DeMatteo, Carol; Gjertsen, Deborah; Bain, James R

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of elbow flexion contracture (EFC) in obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI) is not established. In basic science models, neonatal denervation leads to impaired muscle growth. In clinical studies, diminished growth is correlated with extent of denervation, and improved with surgical repair. In EFC, the biceps are clinically short and round vs the contralateral size, termed the "Popeye muscle". The objective of this study was to determine if the biceps morphology (muscle belly and tendon length) in arms with EFC secondary to OBPI is different vs the contralateral. This is a retrospective matched-cohort study. Patients with unilateral EFC (>20°) secondary to OBPI were identified (median = 6.6 years, range = 4.7-16.8). A blinded radiologist used computed tomography to measure length of the biceps short head muscle belly, and tendon bilaterally using standardised anatomical landmarks. Twelve patients were analyzed. The biceps muscle belly in the injured arm was shorter in all patients vs contralateral, mean difference = 3.6 cm (80%), p muscle belly and overall length, but longer tendon vs normal. This is termed the "Popeye muscle" for its irregular morphology. Findings are consistent with impaired limb growth in denervation.

  2. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the womb (breech position) babies with a family history of DDH Also, DDH occurs more frequently in girls than boys and among first-born infants. Doctors will consider all of these factors when deciding whether a baby's hips should be checked by ultrasound. In addition, a ...

  3. Column-to-column packing variation of disposable pre-packed columns for protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Susanne; Hinterberger, Stephan; Jungbauer, Alois

    2017-12-08

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, pre-packed columns are the standard for process development, but they must be qualified before use in experimental studies to confirm the required performance of the packed bed. Column qualification is commonly done by pulse response experiments and depends highly on the experimental testing conditions. Additionally, the peak analysis method, the variation in the 3D packing structure of the bed, and the measurement precision of the workstation influence the outcome of qualification runs. While a full body of literature on these factors is available for HPLC columns, no comparable studies exist for preparative columns for protein chromatography. We quantified the influence of these parameters for commercially available pre-packed and self-packed columns of disposable and non-disposable design. Pulse response experiments were performed on 105 preparative chromatography columns with volumes of 0.2-20ml. The analyte acetone was studied at six different superficial velocities (30, 60, 100, 150, 250 and 500cm/h). The column-to-column packing variation between disposable pre-packed columns of different diameter-length combinations varied by 10-15%, which was acceptable for the intended use. The column-to-column variation cannot be explained by the packing density, but is interpreted as a difference in particle arrangement in the column. Since it was possible to determine differences in the column-to-column performance, we concluded that the columns were well-packed. The measurement precision of the chromatography workstation was independent of the column volume and was in a range of±0.01ml for the first peak moment and±0.007 ml 2 for the second moment. The measurement precision must be considered for small columns in the range of 2ml or less. The efficiency of disposable pre-packed columns was equal or better than that of self-packed columns. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hip Arthroscopy: A Brief History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Abdurrahman; Safran, Marc R

    2016-07-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a fast-growing and evolving field. Like knee and shoulder arthroscopy, hip arthroscopy began as a diagnostic procedure and then progressed to biopsy and resection of abnormalities. Subsequently, it has evolved to repair of various tissues and treatment of underlying causes. As the understanding of the hip joint and its associated pathophysiology grows, indications will continue to expand for this diagnostic and therapeutic modality. This article outlines the historic developments of hip arthroscopy, including advancements in instrumentation and techniques from the days of the first hip arthroscopies to the present day. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effects of a Heel Wedge on Hip, Pelvis and Trunk Biomechanics During Squatting in Resistance Trained Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Jesse M; Hammond, Connor A; Cochrane, Christopher K; Hatfield, Gillian L; Hunt, Michael A

    2017-06-01

    Barbell back squats are a popular exercise for developing lower extremity strength and power. However, this exercise has potential injury risks, particularly to the lumbar spine, pelvis, and hip joint. Previous literature suggests heel wedges as a means of favorably adjusting trunk and pelvis kinematics with the intention of reducing such injury risks. Yet no direct biomechanical research exists to support these recommendations. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of heel wedges compared with barefoot on minimally loaded barbell back squats. Fourteen trained male participants performed a barbell back squat in bare feet or with their feet raised bilaterally with a 2.5-cm wooden block while 3-dimensional kinematics, kinetics, and electromyograms were collected. The heel wedge condition elicited significantly less forward trunk flexion angles at peak knee flexion, and peak external hip joint moments (p ≤ 0.05) compared with barefoot conditions. However, no significant differences were observed between conditions for trunk and pelvis angle differences at peak knee flexion (p > 0.05). Lastly, no peak or root mean square differences in muscle activity were elicited between conditions (p > 0.05). Our results lend support for the suggestions provided in literature aimed at using heel wedges as a means of reducing excessive forward trunk flexion. However, the maintenance of a neutral spine, another important safety factor, is not affected by the use of heel wedges. Therefore, heel wedges may be a viable modification for reduction of excessive forward trunk flexion but not for reduction in relative trunk-pelvis flexion during barbell back squats.

  6. Column: File Cabinet Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Garfinkel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers can spend their time reverse engineering, performing reverse analysis, or making substantive contributions to digital forensics science. Although work in all of these areas is important, it is the scientific breakthroughs that are the most critical for addressing the challenges that we face.Reverse Engineering is the traditional bread-and-butter of digital forensics research. Companies like Microsoft and Apple deliver computational artifacts (operating systems, applications and phones to the commercial market. These artifacts are bought and used by billions. Some have evil intent, and (if society is lucky, the computers end up in the hands of law enforcement. Unfortunately the original vendors rarely provide digital forensics tools that make their systems amenable to analysis by law enforcement. Hence the need for reverse engineering.(see PDF for full column

  7. Effect of Hip Abduction Maximal Voluntary Isometric Contraction on Lumbar Motion and Power Output During the Back Squat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F. Kelly

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-activation potentiation (PAP is a neuromuscular phenomenon that has been shown to augment muscular force generating attributes as well as neural and sensory recruitment. While PAP has demonstrated to acutely enhance muscular performance during high-intensity activities, the effect of PAP on lumbopelvic kinematics under load remains unknown. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the potential PAP effect of a hip abduction maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC on lumbar motion and power output during the barbell back squat.  Methods: Nine resistance-trained men (22.9±2.3 y; 85.0±13.8 kg; 174.3±5.1 cm performed a set of 5 repetitions of the barbell back squat using 80% one-repetition maximum with and without a hip abduction MVIC prior to performance.  Experimental and control trials were randomized and counterbalanced among participants.  MVIC was carried out via manual long-lever hip abduction.  During the back squat exercise, lumbar motion analysis was performed using wireless motion-sensor technology, and power output was assessed via an accelerometer.  Results: No significant differences were observed between trials for lumbar flexion range of motion (ROM (p=0.32, lumbar flexion maximum deviation (p=0.32, lumbar lateral flexion ROM (p=0.81, lumbar lateral flexion maximum deviation (p=0.98, lumbar rotation maximum deviation (p=0.70, average peak power (p=0.98, or average mean power output (p=0.99 during the squat protocol.  Conclusions: Implementation of a manual long-lever hip abduction MVIC prior to the back squat exercise did not significantly alter lumbar motion or augment power output in resistance trained males.

  8. Buckling of a holey column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihler-Puzović, D; Hazel, A L; Mullin, T

    2016-09-14

    We report the results from a combined experimental and numerical investigation of buckling in a novel variant of an elastic column under axial load. We find that including a regular line of centred holes in the column can prevent conventional, global, lateral buckling. Instead, the local microstructure introduced by the holes allows the column to buckle in an entirely different, internal, mode in which the holes are compressed in alternate directions, but the column maintains the lateral reflection symmetry about its centreline. The internal buckling mode can be accommodated within a smaller external space than the global one; and it is the preferred buckling mode over an intermediate range of column lengths for sufficiently large holes. For very short or sufficiently long columns a modification of the classical, global, lateral buckling is dominant.

  9. Cortical columns for quick brains

    OpenAIRE

    Stoop, Ralph L.; Saase, Victor; Wagner, Clemens; Stoop, Britta; Stoop, Ruedi

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that the particular wiring observed within cortical columns boosts neural computation. We use rewiring of neural networks performing real-world cognitive tasks to study the validity of this argument. In a vast survey of wirings within the column we detect, however, no traces of the proposed effect. It is on the mesoscopic inter-columnar scale that the existence of columns - largely irrespective of their inner organization - enhances the speed of information transfer and ...

  10. [Effect of anterior cruciate ligament rupture on hamstring: quadriceps ratio during isokinetic knee extension and flexion at 30 degrees of flexion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong-shi; Jiang, Yan-fang; Yang, Jie; Yu, Yuan-yuan; Wang, Yi; Xu, Yan; Ao, Ying-fang

    2015-10-18

    To evaluate the change in hamstring (H):quadriceps (Q) ratio following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture during isokinetic knee extension and flexion at 30 degrees of flexion which is important for knee dynamic function. A study was performed in 25 male complete unilateral ACL ruptures. Isokinetic concentric and eccentric quadriceps and hamstring muscle tests in both the deficient knees and intact knees were performed at 60°/s, respectively. At 30 degrees of flexion, the average torque of quadriceps and hamstring, Qe:Qc ratios (ratios of eccentric quadriceps to concentric quadriceps muscle torque), He:Hc ratios (eccentric hamstring to concentric hamstring), Hc:Qc ratios (concentric hamstring to concentric quadriceps), He:Qc ratios (eccentric hamstring to concentric quadriceps), and Hc:Qe ratios (concentric hamstring to eccentric quadriceps) were calculated. Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used. At 30 degrees of knee flexion, a significant reduction (Pquadriceps was observed at concentric and eccentric 60°/s produced by the deficient-side compared with the intact side. In addition, Hc:Qc, He:Qc, and Qe:Qc significantly increased on the ACL-deficient side. The change in H :Q ratio in the mode of isokinetic 60°/s at 30 degrees of knee flexion might therefore be a new tool to objectively document muscle function in ACL-deficient knee.

  11. [THE EFFECTS OF THE PILATES METHOD ON HAMSTRING EXTENSIBILITY, PELVIC TILT AND TRUNK FLEXION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero-Cristóbal, Raquel; López-Miñarro, Pedro A; Alacid Cárceles, Fernando; Esparza-Ros, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Pilates includes a high volume of hamstring stretching and maximal trunk flexion with knees extended exercises. to perform a systematic review about Pilates practice effects and a detraining period on hamstring extensibility, pelvic tilt and trunk flexion in maximal trunk flexion with knees extended. it was analysed all the experimental or quasi-experimental designs written in English, Spanish or Portuguese and included in the following databases: Pubmed, Sports Discus, ISI Web of Knowledge, Dialnet and Research Gate. twenty-one papers were analysed. Most of them used a pre-test-post-test design with control group. The intervention programs applied were heterogeneous. Samples were composed mainly of women, both young and old. It was found that the Pilates practice, with different volume, significantly increased hamstring muscle extensibility and pelvic tilt in maximal trunk flexion. At least three training sessions peer week during six weeks were necessary in order to obtain a high trunk inclination. Studies which involved athletes showed contradictory results. By inducing a detraining period it was noticed a decrease in hamstring extensibility and trunk flexion from the second week. there is a moderate evidence that Pilates is an effective method to increase hamstring extensibility, pelvic tilt and the degree of trunk flexion in maximal flexion positions in sedentary and recreational active people and also to increase hamstring extensibility in athletes. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomechanical Considerations in the Design of High-Flexion Total Knee Replacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Kung Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Typically, joint arthroplasty is performed to relieve pain and improve functionality in a diseased or damaged joint. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA involves replacing the entire knee joint, both femoral and tibial surfaces, with anatomically shaped artificial components in the hope of regaining normal joint function and permitting a full range of knee flexion. In spite of the design of the prosthesis itself, the degree of flexion attainable following TKA depends on a variety of factors, such as the joint’s preoperative condition/flexion, muscle strength, and surgical technique. High-flexion knee prostheses have been developed to accommodate movements that require greater flexion than typically achievable with conventional TKA; such high flexion is especially prevalent in Asian cultures. Recently, computational techniques have been widely used for evaluating the functionality of knee prostheses and for improving biomechanical performance. To offer a better understanding of the development and evaluation techniques currently available, this paper aims to review some of the latest trends in the simulation of high-flexion knee prostheses.

  13. Correlation between cervical flexor muscle thickness and craniocervical flexion torque in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Suehiro, Tadanobu; Watanabe, Susumu

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between the size of the cervical flexor muscles and craniocervical (CC) flexion torque. Thirty-eight healthy men participated in this study. Thickness of the deep cervical flexor (DCF) and sternocleidomastoid (SM) muscles were measured using ultrasonography. Maximal isometric CC flexion torque was measured using dynamometry. The DCF and SM muscle thickness and CC flexion torque were normalized relative to body weight. Correlations between normalized muscle thickness and normalized CC flexion torque were determined. A significant positive correlation was observed between normalized DCF muscle thickness and normalized CC flexion torque (r = 0.361, P = 0.028), whereas there was no significant correlation between normalized SM muscle thickness and normalized CC flexion torque (r = 0.233, P = 0.166). DCF muscle thickness appears to have potential clinical application in the performance of CC flexion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Does hip joint positioning affect maximal voluntary contraction in the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, tensor fasciae latae and sartorius muscles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, J; Beldame, J; Van Driessche, S; Brunel, H; Poirier, T; Guiffault, P; Matsoukis, J; Billuart, F

    2017-11-01

    .6, P=0.21) and TFL (69.5±61.7 vs. 65.9±51.3, P=0.50). Flexors showed no difference between hip flexion/abduction/lateral rotation performed in supine or sitting position: TFL (70.6±45.9 vs. 61.6±45.8, P=0.22) and S (101.1±67.9 vs. 72.6±44.6, P=0.21). The most effective tests to assess EMG signal during MVC were for the hip abductors: hip abduction performed in lateral decubitus (36.7% for GMax, 76.7% for GMed), and for hip flexors: hip flexion/abduction/lateral rotation performed in supine decubitus (50% for TFL, 76.7% for S). The study hypothesis was not confirmed, since hip joint positioning and the learning curve on an MVC test did not affect EMG signal during MVC of GMax, GMed, TFL and S muscles. Therefore, a single session and one specific test is enough to assess MVC in hip abductors (abduction in lateral decubitus) and flexors (hip flexion/abduction/lateral rotation in supine position). This method could be applied to assess muscle function after THA, and particularly to compare different approaches. III, case-matched study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Flexion-Type Supracondylar Humeral Fractures: Ulnar Nerve Injury Increases Risk of Open Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Kelly; Shah, Apurva S; Brusalis, Christopher M; Leddy, Kelly; Flynn, John M

    2017-09-06

    The vast majority of displaced pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures can be treated successfully with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. The need for open reduction is difficult to determine a priori and is typically due to the failure of closed reduction attempts or persistent limb ischemia. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of flexion-type supracondylar humeral fractures, the rate of open reduction for flexion-type fractures, and the predictive impact of ulnar nerve injury on the need for open reduction for flexion-type supracondylar humeral fractures. We developed a database of consecutive pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures treated operatively at a tertiary care pediatric trauma center from 2000 to 2015. Data recorded included age, mechanism of injury, fracture type (open or closed), fracture pattern (flexion-type or extension-type), concomitant skeletal injury, neurovascular injury, treatment, and surgeon. Radiographs of all flexion-type supracondylar humeral fractures were reviewed in order to confirm the classification of the injury pattern. The rate of open reduction for fractures with a flexion-type injury pattern and for such fractures with and without ulnar nerve injury at presentation was assessed. Of 2,783 consecutive pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures treated by surgeons at our center, 95 (3.4%) were flexion-type fractures. Ulnar nerve injury was noted for 10 (10.5%) of the 95 flexion-type fractures. Open injuries were identified at presentation in 3 (3.2%) of the 95 cases. Among closed fractures, 21 (22.8%) of 92 flexion-type fractures required open reduction compared with 50 (1.9%) of 2,647 extension-type fractures (odds ratio [OR] = 15.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.8 to 27.0; p nerve injury and in 15 (18.3%) of 82 fractures without ulnar nerve injury (OR = 6.7; 95% CI = 1.7 to 26.7; p = 0.003). Among closed supracondylar humeral fractures, the flexion-type injury pattern was associated with a 15

  16. ACL-reconstructed and ACL-deficient individuals show differentiated trunk, hip, and knee kinematics during vertical hops more than 20 years post-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markström, Jonas L; Tengman, Eva; Häger, Charlotte K

    2018-02-01

    Little is known regarding movement strategies in the long term following injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and even less about comparisons of reconstructed and deficient knees in relation to healthy controls. The present purpose was to compare trunk, hip, and knee kinematics during a one-leg vertical hop (VH) ~20 years post-ACL injury between persons treated with surgery and physiotherapy (ACL R ), solely physiotherapy (ACL PT ), and controls (CTRL). Between-leg kinematic differences within groups were also investigated. Sixty-six persons who suffered unilateral ACL injury on average 23 ± 2 years ago (32 ACL R , 34 ACL PT ) and 33 controls performed the VH. Peak trunk, hip, and knee angles during Take-off and Landing phases recorded with a 3D motion capture system were analysed with multivariate statistics. Significant group effects during both Take-off and Landing were found, with ACL PT differing from CTRL in Take-off with a combination of less knee flexion and knee internal rotation, and from both ACL R and CTRL in Landing with less hip and knee flexion, knee internal rotation, and greater hip adduction. ACL R also presented different kinematics to ACL PT and CTRL in Take-off with a combination of greater trunk flexion, hip flexion, hip internal rotation, and less knee abduction, and in Landing with greater trunk flexion and hip internal rotation. Further, different kinematics and hop height were found between legs within groups in both Take-off and Landing for both ACL groups, but not for CTRL. Different kinematics for the injured leg for both ACL groups compared to CTRL and between treatment groups, as well as between legs within treatment groups, indicate long-term consequences of injury. Compensatory mechanisms for knee protection seem to prevail over time irrespective of initial treatment, possibly increasing the risk of re-injury and triggering the development of osteoarthritis. Detailed investigation of movement strategies during the VH

  17. Thigh-calf contact: Does it affect the loading of the knee in the high-flexion range?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.; Barink, M.; De Waal Malefijt, M.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Recently, high-flexion knee implants have been developed to provide for a large range of motion (ROM>120°) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since knee forces typically increase with larger flexion angles, it is commonly assumed that high-flexion knee implants are subjected to larger loads than

  18. Plantar-flexion of the ankle joint complex in terminal stance is initiated by subtalar plantar-flexion: A bi-planar fluoroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seungbum; Lee, Kyoung Min; Cha, Young Joo

    2015-10-01

    Gross motion of the ankle joint complex (AJC) is a summation of the ankle and subtalar joints. Although AJC kinematics have been widely used to evaluate the function of the AJC, the coordinated movements of the ankle and subtalar joints are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to accurately quantify the individual kinematics of the ankle and subtalar joints in the intact foot during ground walking by using a bi-planar fluoroscopic system. Bi-planar fluoroscopic images of the foot and ankle during walking and standing were acquired from 10 healthy subjects. The three-dimensional movements of the tibia, talus, and calcaneus were calculated with a three-dimensional/two-dimensional registration method. The skeletal kinematics were quantified from 9% to 86% of the full stance phase because of the limited camera speed of the X-ray system. At the beginning of terminal stance, plantar-flexion of the AJC was initiated in the subtalar joint on average at 75% ranging from 62% to 76% of the stance phase, and plantar-flexion of the ankle joint did not start until 86% of the stance phase. The earlier change to plantar-flexion in the AJC than the ankle joint due to the early plantar-flexion in the subtalar joint was observed in 8 of the 10 subjects. This phenomenon could be explained by the absence of direct muscle insertion on the talus. Preceding subtalar plantar-flexion could contribute to efficient and stable ankle plantar-flexion by locking the midtarsal joint, but this explanation needs further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigating Strength and Range of Motion of the Hip Complex in Ice Hockey Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox C, R J; Osgood, Chad T; White H, S F; Vince, Rebecca V

    2015-08-01

    Ice hockey athletes frequently injure the hip complex via a noncontact mechanism. The authors investigated patterns of strength and range of motion (ROM) to establish major differences compared with soccer athletes. Soccer athletes were compared with ice hockey athletes due to similarities between the 2 sports with regard to the intermittent nature and high number of lower-limb injuries. To compare the differences in ROM and strength of the hip for both the dominant (Dom) and nondominant (Ndom) limbs in ice hockey and soccer athletes. Case-control study. Bilateral ROM in hip flexion in sitting (FS) and lying (FL), extension, abduction, adduction, and internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) were measured using a goniometer and assessed for strength using a handheld dynamometer on both the Dom and Ndom limbs. 24 male, active, uninjured NCAA Division III ice hockey (16) and soccer (8) athletes. ROM and strength for hip FS, FL, extension, abduction, adduction, IR, and ER. A mixed-model ANOVA was used to investigate interactions and main effects. Ice hockey athletes exhibited greater hip-adduction ROM than soccer athletes in the Dom leg (both P = .002) and when both limbs were combined (P = .010). Ice hockey athletes had less ROM in ER (P = .042) than soccer athletes. Ice hockey athletes displayed less strength in adduction in their Ndom leg than in their Dom leg (P = .02), along with less adduction than soccer players in their Ndom leg (P = .40). Ice hockey athletes displayed less strength in hip adduction (P = .030), FS (P = .023) and FL (P = .030) than soccer athletes. The findings suggest that ice hockey athletes may present an at-risk profile for noncontact hip injuries in comparison with soccer athletes with regard to strength and ROM of the hip.

  20. Comparison of High-Flexion Fixed-Bearing and High-Flexion Mobile-Bearing Total Knee Arthroplasties-A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Park, Jang-Won; Kim, Jun-Shik

    2018-01-01

    There is none, to our knowledge, about comparison of high-flexion fixed-bearing and high-flexion mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) in the same patients. The purpose of this study was to determine whether clinical results; radiographic and computed tomographic scan results; and the survival rate of a high-flexion mobile-bearing TKA is better than that of a high-flexion fixed-bearing TKA. The present study consisted of 92 patients (184 knees) who underwent same-day bilateral TKA. Of those, 17 were men and 75 were women. The mean age at the time of index arthroplasty was 61.5 ± 8.3 years (range 52-65 years). The mean body mass index was 26.2 ± 3.3 kg/m 2 (range 23-34 kg/m 2 ). The mean follow-up was 11.2 years (range 10-12 years). The Knee Society knee scores (93 vs 92 points; P = .531) and function scores (80 vs 80 points; P = 1.000), WOMAC scores (14 vs 15 points; P = .972), and UCLA activity scores (6 vs 6 points; P = 1.000) were not different between the 2 groups at 12 years follow-up. There were no differences in any radiographic and CT scan parameters between the 2 groups. Kaplan-Meier survivorship of the TKA component was 98% (95% confidence interval, 93-100) in the high-flexion fixed-bearing TKA group and 99% (95% confidence interval, 94-100) in the high-flexion mobile-bearing TKA group 12 years after the operation. We found no benefit to mobile-bearing TKA in terms of pain, function, radiographic and CT scan results, and survivorship. Longer-term follow-up is necessary to prove the benefit of the high-flexion mobile-bearing TKA over the high-flexion fixed-bearing TKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of hip and knee position on tensor fasciae latae elongation during stretching: An ultrasonic shear wave elastography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Jun; Ikezoe, Tome; Nishishita, Satoru; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Umegaki, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Fujita, Kosuke; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-12-01

    Decreased flexibility of the tensor fasciae latae is one factor that causes iliotibial band syndrome. Stretching has been used to improve flexibility or tightness of the muscle. However, no studies have investigated the effective stretching position for the tensor fasciae latae using an index to quantify muscle elongation in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hip rotation and knee angle on tensor fasciae latae elongation during stretching in vivo using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Twenty healthy men participated in this study. The shear elastic modulus of the tensor fasciae latae was calculated using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Stretching was performed at maximal hip adduction and maximal hip extension in 12 different positions with three hip rotation conditions (neutral, internal, and external rotations) and four knee angles (0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°). Two-way analysis of variance showed a significant main effect for knee angle, but not for hip rotation. The post-hoc test for knee angle indicated that the shear elastic modulus at 90° and 135° were significantly greater than those at 0° and 45°. Our results suggest that adding hip rotation to the stretching position with hip adduction and extension may have less effect on tensor fasciae latae elongation, and that stretching at >90° of knee flexion may effectively elongate the tensor fasciae latae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Frontal and transverse plane hip kinematics and gluteus maximus recruitment correlate with frontal plane knee kinematics during single-leg squat tests in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollman, John H; Galardi, Christy M; Lin, I-Hsuan; Voth, Brandon C; Whitmarsh, Crystal L

    2014-04-01

    Hip muscle dysfunction may be associated with knee valgus that contributes to problems like patellofemoral pain syndrome. The purpose of this study was to (1) compare knee and hip kinematics and hip muscle strength and recruitment between "good" and "poor" performers on a single-leg squat test developed to assess hip muscle dysfunction and (2) examine relationships between hip muscle strength, recruitment and frontal plane knee kinematics to see which variables correlated with knee valgus during the test. Forty-one active women classified via visual rating as "good" or "poor" performers on the test participated. Participants completed 5-repetition single-leg squat tests. Isometric hip extension and abduction strength, gluteus maximus and gluteus medius recruitment, and 3-dimensional hip and knee kinematics during the test were compared between groups and examined for their association with frontal plane knee motion. "Poor" performers completed the test with more hip adduction (mean difference=7.6°) and flexion (mean difference=6.3°) than "good" performers. No differences in knee kinematics, hip strength or hip muscle recruitment occurred. However, the secondary findings indicated that increased medial hip rotation (partial r=0.94) and adduction (partial r=0.42) and decreased gluteus maximus recruitment (partial r=0.35) correlated with increased knee valgus. Whereas hip muscle function and knee kinematics did not differ between groups as we'd hypothesized, frontal plane knee motion correlated with transverse and frontal plane hip motions and with gluteus maximus recruitment. Gluteus maximus recruitment may modulate frontal plane knee kinematics during single-leg squats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fate of the psoas muscle after open reduction for developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, G S; Engsberg, J R; McAlister, W H; Gordon, J E; Schoenecker, P L

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the anatomic and functional consequences of psoas lengthening during operative intervention for developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH). Possible anatomic changes were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and functional assessment included strength determination by an isokinetic dynamometer and gait analysis. Six girls and one boy, ranging in age from 15 to 20 months, had operative reduction of a unilateral DDH. One closed and six open reductions (three anteromedial and three anterolateral approaches) were performed. Follow-up ranged from 4 years 0 months to 9 years 2 months. The cross-sectional area determined by MRI of the lengthened psoas muscles was markedly reduced for all of the six open-reduction patients (three moderate and three severe). Atrophy of the iliacus muscle also was apparent by MRI in five of the six open-reduction patients. Maximum flexion torque, as determined by the isokinetic dynamometer, was diminished on the DDH side for the three patients whose hips were reduced open through the anteromedial approach. Average hip-flexion torque over the entire range of motion was decreased for both anteromedial and anterolateral groups on the operated-on side. Lengthening of the psoas tendon during open reduction of a DDH is associated with considerable atrophy of the psoas muscle.

  4. Gastrocnemius Myoelectric Control of a Robotic Hip Exoskeleton Can Reduce the User's Lower-Limb Muscle Activities at Push Off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Grazi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel assistive control strategy for a robotic hip exoskeleton for assisting hip flexion/extension, based on a proportional Electromyography (EMG strategy. The novelty of the proposed controller relies on the use of the Gastrocnemius Medialis (GM EMG signal instead of a hip flexor muscle, to control the hip flexion torque. This strategy has two main advantages: first, avoiding the placement of the EMG electrodes at the human–robot interface can reduce discomfort issues for the user and motion artifacts of the recorded signals; second, using a powerful signal for control, such as the GM, could improve the reliability of the control system. The control strategy has been tested on eight healthy subjects, walking with the robotic hip exoskeleton on the treadmill. We evaluated the controller performance and the effect of the assistance on muscle activities. The tuning of the assistance timing in the controller was subject dependent and varied across subjects. Two muscles could benefit more from the assistive strategy, namely the Rectus Femoris (directly assisted and the Tibialis Anterior (indirectly assisted. A significant correlation was found between the timing of the delivered assistance (i.e., synchronism with the biological hip torque, and reduction of the hip flexors muscular activity during walking; instead, no significant correlations were found for peak torque and peak power. Results suggest that the timing of the assistance is the most significant parameter influencing the effectiveness of the control strategy. The findings of this work could be important for future studies aimed at developing assistive strategies for walking assistance exoskeletons.

  5. Three-dimensional friction measurement during hip simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sonntag

    Full Text Available Wear of total hip replacements has been the focus of many studies. However, frictional effects, such as high loading on intramodular connections or the interface to the bone, as well as friction associated squeaking have recently increased interest about the amount of friction that is generated during daily activities. The aim of this study was thus to establish and validate a three-dimensional friction setup under standardized conditions.A standard hip simulator was modified to allow for high precision measurements of small frictional effects in the hip during three-dimensional hip articulation. The setup was verified by an ideal hydrostatic bearing and validated with a static-load physical pendulum and an extension-flexion rotation with a dynamic load profile. Additionally, a pendulum model was proposed for screening measurement of frictional effects based on the damping behavior of the angular oscillation without the need for any force/moment transducer. Finally, three-dimensional friction measurements have been realized for ceramic-on-polyethylene bearings of three different sizes (28, 36 and 40 mm.A precision of less than 0.2 Nm during three-dimensional friction measurements was reported, while increased frictional torque (resultant as well as taper torque was measured for larger head diameters. These effects have been confirmed by simple pendulum tests and the theoretical model. A comparison with current literature about friction measurements is presented.This investigation of friction is able to provide more information about a field that has been dominated by the reduction of wear. It should be considered in future pre-clinical testing protocols given by international organizations of standardization.

  6. The range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V: a comparison of active vs passive flexion mobilisation regimes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Panchal, J

    1997-10-01

    A number of early postoperative mobilisation regimes have been developed in an attempt to increase tendon excursion and gliding and thereby reduce formation of adhesions following repair of flexor tendons. Early active flexion mobilisation regimes are becoming more popular, and have replaced early passive flexion regimes in many centres. The aim of the present study was: (a) to determine the range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V, and (b) to compare the excursion ranges between active (Belfast) and passive (modified Duran) flexion mobilisation regimes postoperatively. This was done (a) in two cadavers, and (b) in two patients intraoperatively, and postoperatively at 10 days, 3 weeks and 6 weeks. With passive flexion, the mean tendon excursion in Zone V in cadavers was 1 mm for flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendons respectively. With simulated active flexion, the mean tendon excursion was 14 mm, 10 mm and 11 mm respectively. The mean tendon excursion in clinical cases intraoperatively following passive flexion was 2 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively; following simulated active flexion it was 10 mm, 11 mm and 11 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively. On the tenth day following repair, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL were 1 mm, 4 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 3 mm, 10 mm and 12 mm on active flexion respectively. Three weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 1 mm, 2 mm and 1 mm on passive flexion as compared to 5 mm, 15 mm on active flexion respectively. Six weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 9 mm, 7 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 12 mm, 33 mm and 20 mm on active flexion respectively. These results demonstrate an increased excursion of repaired flexor tendons in Zone V following an active flexion mobilisation regime as compared to a passive flexion mobilisation regime.

  7. Soft-tissue balance in short and straight stem total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhagen, Henning; Chincisan, Andra; Choi, Hon Fai; Thorey, Fritz

    2015-03-01

    The growing numbers of short stem hip implants have redefined total hip arthroplasty with new stem geometries and possible functional differences. Several systematic reviews have reported good clinical results with this new class of stems, although kinematic alterations are still unclear in many aspects. The good clinical results obtained at the authors' institution led to the current study. The authors hypothesized that the geometric alignment of the prosthetic components may be closer to the anatomy of the healthy hip joint, thus leading to better function and clinical satisfaction. An examination via finite element analysis was chosen to model the hip joint and virtually implant a short and a standard straight stem. Findings indicated that anchoring of the short stem allowed favorable positioning in the proximal femur, with the femoral head already in the center of the cup. This positioning was not possible for the straight stem, which required further reduction of the femur by a significant translation into the cup, leading to abnormal soft-tissue balancing. The results from the simulation showed an absolute average deviation of ligamentous fiber strains of 6% for the short stem in 30° of flexion and extension versus 29% and 36% for the standard straight stem in 30° of flexion and extension, respectively. A femoral neck guided orientation of the short stem implant seems to allow a more anatomical reconstruction and thus a more balanced hip in terms of the modeled soft tissues. In contrast, the straight stem alters the head position and induces nonphysiological capsular strains. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Serial casting for elbow flexion contractures in neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijnisveld, B J; Steenbeek, D; Nelissen, R G H H

    2016-09-02

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of serial casting of elbow flexion contractures in neonatal brachial plexus palsy. A prospective consecutive cohort study was performed with a median follow-up of 5 years. Forty-one patients with elbow flexion contractures ≥ 30° were treated with serial casting until the contracture was ≤ 10°, for a maximum of 8 weeks. Range of motion, number of recurrences and patient satisfaction were recorded and analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank and Cox regression tests. Passive extension increased from a median of -40° (IQR -50 to -30) to -15° (IQR -10 to -20, p contractures, although recurrences were frequent. The severity of elbow flexion contracture is a predictor of recurrence. We recommend more research on muscle degeneration and determinants involved in elbow flexion contractures to improve treatment strategies and prevent side-effects.

  9. Pelvis and hip three-dimensional kinematics in grand battement movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Shaw; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi

    2011-03-01

    Dancers frequently sustain hip injuries, including labral tears, coxa saltans, stress fractures, tendinosis, and joint disease. High velocity kicks (grand battement), with extreme abduction and external rotation (ER), may stress the hip, sacroiliac joint, and surrounding soft tissue. However, three-dimensional kinematic dance descriptions are limited. The purpose of this study was to describe the kinematics of the pelvis and hip in grand battement movements in healthy dancers. Seventeen advanced-level college dancers performed three battement conditions: battement devant to the front, à la seconde to the side, and derrière to the back. Data were collected with a 5-camera motion capture system. Repeated measures ANOVA (p < 0.05) compared peak pelvis and hip angular displacement and hip and toe velocity for all conditions and planes. Three-dimensional hip to pelvic ratios were calculated. There were differences in pelvic angular displacement between conditions in all planes (p < 0.00). Battement devant posterior pelvic tilt exceeded that of battement seconde. Both were opposite in direction from the anterior pelvic tilt of battement derrière. All conditions demonstrated pelvic obliquity toward the stance limb, with battement derrière greater than devant and seconde. Battement derrière transverse plane pelvic displacement exceeded that found in devant and seconde. There were also differences in hip angular displacement between conditions in all planes (p < 0.00). Battement derrière hip extension differed from battement devant and seconde flexion. The hip abducted in all conditions, with battement seconde exceeding devant and derrière. In the transverse plane, the hip rotated internally in battement seconde and externally in battement derrière and devant. In battement devant and seconde, peak hip ER decreased relative to baseline, while increasing at the peak of battement derrière. Battement peak velocities were relatively low. The ratio of hip to pelvic

  10. Studies of hip impingement diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdi Far, Mahshid

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Hip impingement is a hip associated abnormality which develops among young and middle-aged individuals. It reduces the activity of those affected and if it is not detected at early stage, it can result in osteoarthritis. In this thesis a reliable framework for studying impingement detection is developed. Current clinical methods in detecting hip impingement involve measuring three angles, fir...

  11. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  12. COMPARATIVE BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSES OF SQUAT JUMP WITHOUT AND WITH FLEXION IN KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Bubanj

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In sports hall of Faculty of sports and physical education in Niš, student demon- strated technique of squat jump – without and with flexion in knee joint. Elements of technique were recorded by using one digital video camera in sagital plane. By using comparative kinematics analyses, there were establish differences in values of kinema- tics parametres of different body segments. Bigger elevation of body centre of gravity was ascertain at bounce without flexion in knee joint.

  13. Modelling knee flexion effects on joint power absorption and adduction moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Hanatsu; Tatsumi, Ichiroh; Sarashina, Eri; Sparrow, W A; Begg, Rezaul K

    2015-12-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is commonly associated with ageing and long-term walking. In this study the effects of flexing motions on knee kinetics during stance were simulated. Extended knees do not facilitate efficient loading. It was therefore, hypothesised that knee flexion would promote power absorption and negative work, while possibly reducing knee adduction moment. Three-dimensional (3D) position and ground reaction forces were collected from the right lower limb stance phase of one healthy young male subject. 3D position was sampled at 100 Hz using three Optotrak Certus (Northern Digital Inc.) motion analysis camera units, set up around an eight metre walkway. Force plates (AMTI) recorded ground reaction forces for inverse dynamics calculations. The Visual 3D (C-motion) 'Landmark' function was used to change knee joint positions to simulate three knee flexion angles during static standing. Effects of the flexion angles on joint kinetics during the stance phase were then modelled. The static modelling showed that each 2.7° increment in knee flexion angle produced 2.74°-2.76° increments in knee flexion during stance. Increased peak extension moment was 6.61 Nm per 2.7° of increased knee flexion. Knee flexion enhanced peak power absorption and negative work, while decreasing adduction moment. Excessive knee extension impairs quadriceps' power absorption and reduces eccentric muscle activity, potentially leading to knee osteoarthritis. A more flexed knee is accompanied by reduced adduction moment. Research is required to determine the optimum knee flexion to prevent further damage to knee-joint structures affected by osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of head diameter on passive and active dynamic hip dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Adam; Colwell, Clifford W; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2014-11-01

    Hip dislocation is a major short-term complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). One factor thought to reduce the risk for dislocation is head size. We constructed subject-specific computer models to study the effect of head size on risk for postoperative dislocation. Femoral and acetabular geometry was constructed after segmenting CT scans of nine hips. CAD models of THA components with four head diameters (28, 32, 36, and 44 mm) were virtually implanted. Hip capsular ligaments were simulated using rigid-body ellipsoids connected by non-linear springs. Posterior dislocation was simulated during a rise from a low chair; anterior dislocation was simulated during a pivot activity. Intraoperative stability tests were simulated for anterior or posterior dislocation. While rising from a low chair (posterior dislocation) and during the pivot activity (anterior dislocation), increasing head size significantly increased hip flexion angle at dislocation and generated higher dislocation moments. Larger heads reduced the risk for dislocation. Intraoperative stability tests detected the relative increased resistance to dislocation despite differences in the absolute magnitude of moments. This model can be useful preclinical tool for assessing design changes, the effect of component placement, and the activity-based risk for dislocation. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Column-Oriented Database Systems (Tutorial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Abadi; P.A. Boncz (Peter); S. Harizopoulos

    2009-01-01

    textabstractColumn-oriented database systems (column-stores) have attracted a lot of attention in the past few years. Column-stores, in a nutshell, store each database table column separately, with attribute values belonging to the same column stored contiguously, compressed, and densely packed, as

  16. SIGN HIP construct: Achieving hip fracture fixation without using an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the 6 week follow-up, there was 1 (1.5%) case of infection and 8 (11.8%) cases of varus collapse. Conclusion: Using the SIGN Hip Construct, hip fracture fixation can be achieved safely without an image intensifier. This implant may be a good alternative in developing countries where access to fluoroscopy is limited or ...

  17. Nerve transfers for restoration of finger flexion in patients with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Jayme A; Ghizoni, Marcos F

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this paper was to report the authors' results with finger flexion restoration by nerve transfer in patients with tetraplegia. METHODS Surgery was performed for restoration of finger flexion in 17 upper limbs of 9 patients (8 male and 1 female) at a mean of 7.6 months (SD 4 months) after cervical spinal cord injury. The patients' mean age at the time of surgery was 28 years (SD 15 years). The motor level according to the ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) classification was C-5 in 4 upper limbs, C-6 in 10, and C-7 in 3. In 3 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachialis was transferred to the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN), which was separated from the median nerve from the antecubital fossa to the midarm. In 5 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachialis was transferred to median nerve motor fascicles innervating finger flexion muscles in the midarm. In 4 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachioradialis was transferred to the AIN. In the remaining 5 upper limbs, the nerve to the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) was transferred to the AIN. Patients were followed for an average of 16 months (SD 6 months). At the final evaluation the range of finger flexion and strength were estimated by manual muscle testing according to the British Medical Research Council scale. RESULTS Restoration of finger flexion was observed in 4 of 8 upper limbs in which the nerve to the brachialis was used as a donor. The range of motion was incomplete in all 5 of these limbs, and the strength was M3 in 3 limbs and M4 in 1 limb. Proximal retrograde dissection of the AIN was associated with better outcomes than transfer of the nerve to the brachialis to median nerve motor fascicles in the arm. After the nerve to the brachioradialis was transferred to the AIN, incomplete finger flexion with M4 strength was restored in 1 limb; the remaining 3 limbs did not show any recovery. Full finger flexion with M4 strength was demonstrated in all 5 upper limbs in which the nerve

  18. Erythrocyte Antioxidant Protection of Rose Hips (Rosa spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Widén

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rose hips are popular in health promoting products as the fruits contain high content of bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate whether health benefits are attributable to ascorbic acid, phenols, or other rose-hip-derived compounds. Freeze-dried powder of rose hips was preextracted with metaphosphoric acid and the sample was then sequentially eluted on a C18 column. The degree of amelioration of oxidative damage was determined in an erythrocyte in vitro bioassay by comparing the effects of a reducing agent on erythrocytes alone or on erythrocytes pretreated with berry extracts. The maximum protection against oxidative stress, 59.4±4.0% (mean ± standard deviation, was achieved when incubating the cells with the first eluted meta-phosphoric extract. Removal of ascorbic acid from this extract increased the protection against oxidative stress to 67.9±1.9%. The protection from the 20% and 100% methanol extracts was 20.8±8.2% and 5.0±3.2%, respectively. Antioxidant uptake was confirmed by measurement of catechin by HPLC-ESI-MS in the 20% methanol extract. The fact that all sequentially eluted extracts studied contributed to protective effects on the erythrocytes indicates that rose hips contain a promising level of clinically relevant antioxidant protection.

  19. Erythrocyte antioxidant protection of rose hips (Rosa spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widén, C; Ekholm, A; Coleman, M D; Renvert, S; Rumpunen, K

    2012-01-01

    Rose hips are popular in health promoting products as the fruits contain high content of bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate whether health benefits are attributable to ascorbic acid, phenols, or other rose-hip-derived compounds. Freeze-dried powder of rose hips was preextracted with metaphosphoric acid and the sample was then sequentially eluted on a C(18) column. The degree of amelioration of oxidative damage was determined in an erythrocyte in vitro bioassay by comparing the effects of a reducing agent on erythrocytes alone or on erythrocytes pretreated with berry extracts. The maximum protection against oxidative stress, 59.4 ± 4.0% (mean ± standard deviation), was achieved when incubating the cells with the first eluted meta-phosphoric extract. Removal of ascorbic acid from this extract increased the protection against oxidative stress to 67.9 ± 1.9%. The protection from the 20% and 100% methanol extracts was 20.8 ± 8.2% and 5.0 ± 3.2%, respectively. Antioxidant uptake was confirmed by measurement of catechin by HPLC-ESI-MS in the 20% methanol extract. The fact that all sequentially eluted extracts studied contributed to protective effects on the erythrocytes indicates that rose hips contain a promising level of clinically relevant antioxidant protection.

  20. Comparison of Lower Extremity Kinematics and Hip Muscle Activation During Rehabilitation Tasks Between Sexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Maureen K.; Boudreau, Samantha N.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Uhl, Timothy L.; Lattermann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Closed kinetic chain exercises are an integral part of rehabilitation programs after lower extremity injury. Sex differences in lower extremity kinematics have been reported during landing and cutting; however, less is known about sex differences in movement patterns and activation of the hip musculature during common lower extremity rehabilitation exercises. Objective: To determine whether lower extremity kinematics and muscle activation levels differ between sexes during closed kinetic chain rehabilitation exercises. Design: Cross-sectional with 1 between-subjects factor (sex) and 1 within-subjects factor (exercise). Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Participants included 21 women (age  =  23 ± 5.8 years, height  =  167.6 ± 5.1 cm, mass  =  63.7 ± 5.9 kg) and 21 men (age  =  23 ± 4.0 years, height  =  181.4 ± 7.4 cm, mass  =  85.6 ± 16.5 kg). Intervention(s): In 1 testing session, participants performed 3 trials each of single-leg squat, lunge, and step-up-and-over exercises. Main Outcome Measure(s): We recorded the peak joint angles (degrees) of knee flexion and valgus and hip flexion, extension, adduction, and external rotation for each exercise. We also recorded the electromyographic activity of the gluteus maximus, rectus femoris, adductor longus, and bilateral gluteus medius muscles for the concentric and eccentric phases of each exercise. Results: Peak knee flexion angles were smaller and peak hip extension angles were larger for women than for men across all tasks. Peak hip flexion angles during the single-leg squat were smaller for women than for men. Mean root-mean-square amplitudes for the gluteus maximus and rectus femoris muscles in both the concentric and eccentric phases of the 3 exercises were greater for women than for men. Conclusions: Sex differences were observed in sagittal-plane movement patterns during the rehabilitation exercises. Because of the sex differences

  1. Sagittal hip-knee coordination during a 45 degree cutting task

    OpenAIRE

    Stock, Holly; McLeod, Chris; ., Cassie Wilson; Van Emmerik, Richard E. A.; Preatoni, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    Background Hashemi et al. (2011) put forward a new theory of ACL injury mechanism, named the ‘hip extension knee flexion paradox’ that attempted to integrate itself with the most convincing findings in ACL research. This theory of mechanism stated that non-contact ACL injury would occur when the following four criteria are simultaneously met: 1) the tibial plateau has a posterior slope 2) the knee is near full extension upon application of a dynamic ground reaction force 3) activation of musc...

  2. Water Column Sonar Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The collection and analysis of water column sonar data is a relatively new avenue of research into the marine environment. Primary uses include assessing biological...

  3. Hip sonography in the newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riboni, G.; Serantoni, S.; De Simoni, M.; Bascape', P.; Facchini, R.; Pirovano, G.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report the data relative to 1507 cases studied with clinical and US examinations, in the neonatal period, in order to exclude hip dysplasia dislocation. US examination was carried out according to Graf's technique and the newborns were classified according to US hip type, to clinical examination and to possible risk factors. The patients were included in a protocol including orthopedic and US controls. Seventeen treated infants were considered as pathologic. Ten of them had IIc or D hips ar birth; the other 7, with IIa hips at birth, presented a X-ray pathologic hip after the 4th months of life. At about one year of age all infants could normally walk, excpet for one who was being treated with herness. No statistically significant differences were observed between the number of pathologic infants in the risk group (1.7%) and that in the no-risk group (0.8%). Clinical examination of the newborn has low sensitivity in detecting pathologic hips. On the basis of their results, thw authors belive US examination of the newborn to be a valuable screening method to diagnose hip dysplasia/dislocation. Moreover, Graf's morphologic method is the best one for US screening of the hip in the neonatal period

  4. Hip-Hop Education Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Marcella Runell

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop music and culture are often cited as being public pedagogy, meaning the music itself has intrinsic educational value. Non-profit organizations and individual educators have graciously taken the lead in utilizing hip-hop to educate. As the academy continues to debate its effectiveness, teachers and community organizers are moving forward.…

  5. Total hip arthroplasty in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Alma Becic; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Overgaard, Søren

    2005-01-01

    The annual number of total hip arthroplasties (THA) has increased in Denmark over the past 15 years. There is, however, limited detailed data available on the incidence of THAs.......The annual number of total hip arthroplasties (THA) has increased in Denmark over the past 15 years. There is, however, limited detailed data available on the incidence of THAs....

  6. A NEW CLINICAL MUSCLE FUNCTION TEST FOR ASSESSMENT OF HIP EXTERNAL ROTATION STRENGTH: AUGUSTSSON STRENGTH TEST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustsson, Jesper

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic clinical tests of hip strength applicable on patients, non-athletes and athletes alike, are lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to develop and evaluate the reliability of a dynamic muscle function test of hip external rotation strength, using a novel device. A second aim was to determine if gender differences exist in absolute and relative hip strength using the new test. Fifty-three healthy sport science students (34 women and 19 men) were tested for hip external rotation strength using a device that consisted of a strap connected in series with an elastic resistance band loop, and a measuring tape connected in parallel with the elastic resistance band. The test was carried out with the subject side lying, positioned in 45 ° of hip flexion and the knees flexed to 90 ° with the device firmly fastened proximally across the knees. The subject then exerted maximal concentric hip external rotation force against the device thereby extending the elastic resistance band. The displacement achieved by the subject was documented by the tape measure and the corresponding force production was calculated. Both right and left hip strength was measured. Fifteen of the subjects were tested on repeated occasions to evaluate test-retest reliability. No significant test-retest differences were observed. Intra-class correlation coefficients ranged 0.93-0.94 and coefficients of variation 2.76-4.60%. In absolute values, men were significantly stronger in hip external rotation than women (right side 13.2 vs 11.0 kg, p = 0.001, left side 13.2 vs 11.5 kg, p = 0.002). There were no significant differences in hip external rotation strength normalized for body weight (BW) between men and women (right side 0.17 kg/BW vs 0.17 kg/BW, p = 0.675, left side 0.17 kg/BW vs 0.18 kg/BW, p = 0.156). The new muscle function test showed high reliability and thus could be useful for measuring dynamic hip external rotation strength in patients, non-athletes and athletes

  7. Design and preliminary evaluation of a multi-robotic system with pelvic and hip assistance for pediatric gait rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Evelyn J; Kang, Jiyeon; Su, Hao; Stegall, Paul; Miranda, Daniel L; Hsu, Wen-Hao; Karabas, Mustafa; Phipps, Nathan; Agrawal, Sunil K; Goldfield, Eugene C; Walsh, Conor J

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a modular, computationally-distributed "multi-robot" cyberphysical system designed to assist children with developmental delays in learning to walk. The system consists of two modules, each assisting a different aspect of gait: a tethered cable pelvic module with up to 6 degrees of freedom (DOF), which can modulate the motion of the pelvis in three dimensions, and a two DOF wearable hip module assisting lower limb motion, specifically hip flexion. Both modules are designed to be lightweight and minimally restrictive to the user, and the modules can operate independently or in cooperation with each other, allowing flexible system configuration to provide highly customized and adaptable assistance. Motion tracking performance of approximately 2 mm root mean square (RMS) error for the pelvic module and less than 0.1 mm RMS error for the hip module was achieved. We demonstrate coordinated operation of the two modules on a mannequin test platform with articulated and instrumented lower limbs.

  8. Behavior of Confined Columns under Different Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Osman; Ata El-Kareim Shoeib Soliman

    2015-01-01

    Since columns are the most important elements of the structures, failure of one column in a critical location can cause a progressive collapse. In this respect, the repair and strengthening of columns is a very important subject to reduce the building failure and to keep the columns capacity. Twenty columns with different parameters is tested and analysis. Eleven typical confined reinforced concrete (RC) columns with different types of techniques are assessment. And also,...

  9. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  10. Hip Strength in Patients with Quadriceps Strength Deficits after ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David R; Trigsted, Stephanie M; Post, Eric G; Walden, Courtney E

    2016-10-01

    Quadriceps strength deficits persist for years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and patients with these deficits often shift torque demands away from the knee extensors to the hip during functional tasks. However, it is not clear how quadriceps strength deficits may affect hip strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate differences in lower extremity strength in individuals with ACL reconstruction with differing levels of quadriceps strength asymmetry. Isometric strength was recorded bilaterally in 135 participants (73 control and 62 with unilateral ACL reconstruction, time from surgery = 30.9 ± 17.6 months) from the knee extensors and flexors, hip extensors and abductors, and hip internal and external rotator muscle groups. Symmetry indices (limb symmetry index (LSI)) were created based on quadriceps strength, and subjects with ACL reconstruction were subdivided (high quadriceps (LSI ≥ 90%), n = 37; low quadriceps (LSI limb (reconstructed/nondominant vs healthy/dominant) repeated-measures ANOVA was used to compare strength (%BW) for each of the six joint motions of interest (knee extensors/flexors, hip abductors/extensors/external, and internal rotators) while controlling for time from surgery. An interaction was observed for quadriceps strength (P limb in the low quadriceps group was weaker than all other limbs. A main effect for group was observed with the low quadriceps group having greater hip extension (P = 0.007) strength in both limbs compared with the other groups. Knee flexion strength was weaker in the reconstructed limb of the high quadriceps group (P = 0.047) compared with all other groups and limbs. Individuals with ACL reconstruction and involved limb quadriceps weakness have greater hip extension strength in both limbs compared with patients with bilateral strength symmetry and controls.

  11. Influence of evolution on cam deformity and its impact on biomechanics of the human hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwander, Helen; Beck, Martin; Büchler, Lorenz

    2018-02-05

    Anatomy and biomechanics of the human hip joint are a consequence of the evolution of permanent bipedal gait. Habitat and behaviour have an impact on hip morphology and significant differences are present even within the same biological family. The forces acting upon the hip joint are mainly a function of gravitation and strength of the muscles. Acetabular and femoral anatomy ensure an inherently stable hip with a wide range of motion. The femoral head in first human ancestors with upright gait was spherical (coxa rotunda). Coxa rotunda is also seen in close human relatives (great apes) and remains the predominant anatomy of present-day humans. High impact sport during adolescence with open physis however can activate an underlying genetic predisposition for reinforcement of the femoral neck, causing an epiphyseal extension and the formation of an osseous asphericity at the antero-superior femoral neck (cam deformity). The morphology of cam deformity is similar to the aspherical hips of quadrupeds (coxa recta), with the difference that in quadrupeds the asphericity is posterior. It has been postulated that this is due to the fact that humans bear weight on the extended leg, while quadrupeds bear weight at 90-100° flexion. The asphericity alters the biomechanical properties of the joint and as it is forced into the acetabulum leading to secondary cartilage damage. It is considered a risk factor for later development of osteoarthritis of the hip. Clinically this presents as reduced range of motion, which can be an indicator for the structural deformity of the hip. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 9999:XX-XX, 2018. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Changes in the flexion relaxation response induced by lumbar muscle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantin Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP is an interesting model to study the modulation of lumbar stability. Previous investigations have explored the effect of load, angular velocity and posture on this particular response. However, the influence of muscular fatigue on FRP parameters has not been thoroughly examined. The objective of the study is to identify the effect of erector spinae (ES muscle fatigue and spine loading on myoelectric silence onset and cessation in healthy individuals during a flexion-extension task. Methods Twenty healthy subjects participated in this study and performed blocks of 3 complete trunk flexions under 4 different experimental conditions: no fatigue/no load (1, no fatigue/load (2, fatigue/no load(3, and fatigue/load (4. Fatigue was induced according to the Sorenson protocol, and electromyographic (EMG power spectral analysis confirmed that muscular fatigue was adequate in each subject. Trunk and pelvis angles and surface EMG of the ES L2 and L5 were recorded during a flexion-extension task. Trunk flexion angle corresponding to the onset and cessation of myoelectric silence was then compared across the different experimental conditions using 2 × 2 repeated-measures ANOVA. Results Onset of myoelectric silence during the flexion motion appeared earlier after the fatigue task. Additionally, the cessation of myoelectric silence was observed later during the extension after the fatigue task. Statistical analysis also yielded a main effect of load, indicating a persistence of ES myoelectric activity in flexion during the load condition. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the presence of fatigue of the ES muscles modifies the FRP. Superficial back muscle fatigue seems to induce a shift in load-sharing towards passive stabilizing structures. The loss of muscle contribution together with or without laxity in the viscoelastic tissues may have a substantial impact on post fatigue stability.

  13. Clinical diagnosis of hip pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Matthew; Wallace, Roxanne; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    This article reviews the evaluation of the hip including the clinical history and physical examination. As our understanding of hip pathology evolves, and arthroscopic and other minimally invasive operative techniques improve, the focus is shifting toward earlier identification of hip pathology. Risk factors for the development of arthritis are now well established and include femoral acetabular impingement, labral tearing, developmental dysplasia, and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Emerging treatment options may address these conditions in the early stages and prevent or slow the progression of hip degeneration. It is vitally important to elucidate intra-articular versus extra-articular pathology of hip pain in every step of the patient encounter: history, physical examination, and imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Total hip arthroplasty for surgical management of advanced tuberculous hip arthritis: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Shi Ming; Chin, Pak Lin

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) arthritis of the hip is a debilitating disease that often results in severe cartilage destruction and degeneration of the hip. In advanced cases, arthrodesis of the hip confers benefits to the young, high-demand and active patient. However, many of these patients go on to develop degenerative arthritis of the spine, ipsilateral knee and contralateral hip, necessitating the need for a conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Conversion of a previously fused hip to a total hip ar...

  15. Hip abductor muscle volume in hip osteoarthritis and matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, A; Pizzari, T; English, D J; Kapakoulakis, T; Green, R A

    2016-10-01

    Hip abductor muscle strength and function is negatively impacted by the presence of hip osteoarthritis (OA). This study aimed to quantify differences in hip abductor muscle volume, fatty infiltration and strength in a unilateral hip OA population when compared to a control group. Impact of radiographic severity of OA on these variables was also examined. Volumes of gluteus maximus (GMax), medius (GMed) minimus (GMin) and tensor fascia lata (TFL) was measured using MRI and muscle volume asymmetry between limbs was calculated. Fatty infiltrate within muscles was graded using the Goutallier classification system. Hip abduction and rotation strength was tested using a dynamometer. Differences between groups or limbs were analysed using t-tests and differences in fatty infiltration using non-parametric tests. A statistically significant decrease in muscle volume was identified in GMax (P abduction and internal rotation strength was reduced in the OA group. Increased levels of fatty infiltration were identified in the affected limbs of the OA group for GMax (P = 0.01) and GMin (P = 0.04). Gluteal muscle atrophy, increased gluteal fatty infiltration and hip strength deficits were evident in the affected hips of OA participants. Since severity of OA was related to the extent of atrophy and fatty deposits, rehabilitation programs targeting these muscles could reverse or halt the progression of these structural and functional deficits. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Results of total hip arthroplasty using a bionic hip stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokter, Samo K; Sarler, Taras; Strahovnik, Andrej; Repše-Fokter, Alenka

    2015-06-01

    The trabecular-orientated bionic hip stem was designed to mimic the natural force transmission through the femur in total hip arthroplasty, resulting in supposedly longer prosthesis survivability. The aim of this study was to compare the second-generation bionic hip stem to a standard uncemented hip stem. A group of 18 patients (21 hips) who underwent total hip arthroplasty with a bionic stem (bionic group) was compared with a historic group of 12 patients (12 hips) treated with standard anatomic hip stem (control group). During the first year after the procedure, the densitometric measurements of the bone around the prosthesis were taken. Radiographic and clinical assessments were additionally performed preoperatively and at the three month, six month, one year and three year follow-ups in the bionic group. In the bionic group, one patient was revised for aseptic loosening and 16 patients (19 hips) were available to the final follow-up. A significant decrease of bone mineral density was found in Gruen zones 3, 4 and 5 in the bionic group, and in zone 7 in both groups. The bionic group had a significantly higher bone mineral density in Gruen zone 1 at the one year follow-up. At the final follow-up, all prostheses were radiologically stable in both groups. Provided that a good implant position is achieved, comparable short-term results can be obtained using a bionic stem. Still, a decrease of bone mineral density in Gruen zone 7 occurred in both groups. Further studies are required to determine survivability of the bionic stem.

  17. Comparison of Intertrochanteric Fracture Fixation with Dynamic Hip Screw and Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Emami

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: At present, there is no consensus on an appropriate treatment modality for intertrochanteric fractures in the elderly with background diseases. The aim of the present study was to compare treatment outcomes of intertrochanteric fractures reduced with dynamic hip screws (DHS and bipolar hemiarthroplasty in elderly patients with background medical conditions. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 60 patients with intertrochanteric fractures, who were 45-60 years old, were randomly divided into DHS and bipolar groups. After treatment, the two groups were compared in relation to complications and mortality rates, functional status using the Harris Hip Score (HHS, range of movement and severity of pain using the visual analogue score (VAS. Results: HHS (86±9 vs. 75±7.6, range of flexion (105±11 degrees vs. 90±17 degrees and external rotation (35±7 degrees vs. 20±7 degrees were significantly higher in the bipolar group compared to the DHS group (P

  18. Is hip muscle strength the key to walking as a bilateral amputee, whatever the level of the amputations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Jma; McCarthy, I; Marks, L; Davis, R C

    2011-12-01

    Little data have been reported on the factors that are important in bilateral amputee walking ability especially the role of hip strength. Observational, case-control study where participants were evaluated at a single point in time. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors involved in bilateral amputee walking ability by assessment of walking speed, perceived exertion, exercise intensity, physiological cost index (PCI) and hip muscle strength. For a group of 10 bilateral amputees, with different levels of amputation, and a non-pathological reference group, walking ability was assessed using the two-minute walk test. Hip muscle strength was assessed using isokinetic strength tests. Bilateral amputees were found to have slower walking speeds and increased PCI of walking which were correlated to higher levels of amputation. Peak hip torques were reduced in the amputees, which was only significant for concentric extension torque (p = 0.029), and approaching significance for concentric flexion (p = 0.061) and abduction (p = 0.057). Bilateral amputee peak hip strength suggested a positive trend with increasing walking ability. Bilateral amputee walking ability was reduced and mainly related to level of amputation. The role of hip strength in bilateral amputee walking ability requires further investigation.

  19. Biceps brachii long head overactivity associated with elbow flexion contracture in brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Lindsey C; Lattanza, Lisa; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; James, Michelle A

    2012-02-15

    The etiology of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy remains unclear. We hypothesized that the long head of the biceps brachii muscle assists with shoulder stabilization in children with brachial plexus birth palsy and that overactivity of the long head during elbow and shoulder activity is associated with an elbow flexion contracture. Twenty-one patients with brachial plexus birth palsy-associated elbow flexion contracture underwent testing with surface electromyography. Twelve patients underwent repeat testing with fine-wire electromyography. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle belly, and fine-wire electrodes were inserted bilaterally into the long and short heads of the biceps brachii. Patients were asked to perform four upper extremity tasks: elbow flexion-extension, hand to head, high reach, and overhead ball throw. The mean duration of muscle activity in the affected limb was compared with that in the contralateral, unaffected limb, which was used as a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis, surface dynamometry, and validated function measures were used to evaluate upper extremity kinematics, elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, and function. The mean activity duration of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly higher in the affected limb as compared with the contralateral, unaffected limb during hand-to-head tasks (p = 0.02) and high-reach tasks (p = 0.03). No significant differences in mean activity duration were observed for the short head of the biceps brachii muscle between the affected and unaffected limbs. Isometric strength of elbow flexion was not significantly higher than that of elbow extension in the affected limb (p = 0.11). Overactivity of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is associated with and may contribute to the development of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Elbow flexion contracture may not be associated with an elbow

  20. Test-retest reliability of an active range of motion test for the shoulder and hip joints by unskilled examiners using a manual goniometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Gil; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze test-retest reliability of an active range of motion test using a manual goniometer by unskilled examiners. [Subjects and Methods] Active range of motion was measured in 30 students attending U university (4 males, 26 females). Range of motion during flexion and extension of the shoulder and hip joints were measured using a manual goniometer. [Results] Flexion and extension of the shoulder joint (ICC=0.906 and ICC=0.808) and (ICC=0.946 and ICC=0. 955) of the hip joint showed excellent reliabilities. [Conclusion] The active range of motion test using a manual goniometer showed very high test-retest reliability in unskilled examiners. When examiners are aware of the method of the test, an objective assessment can be conducted.

  1. Absolute reliability and concurrent validity of hand held dynamometry and isokinetic dynamometry in the hip, knee and ankle joint: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamorro Claudio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to establish absolute reliability and concurrent validity between hand-held dynamometers (HHDs and isokinetic dynamometers (IDs in lower extremity peak torque assessment. Medline, Embase, CINAHL databases were searched for studies related to psychometric properties in muscle dynamometry. Studies considering standard error of measurement SEM (% or limit of agreement LOA (% expressed as percentage of the mean, were considered to establish absolute reliability while studies using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC were considered to establish concurrent validity between dynamometers. In total, 17 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The COSMIN checklist classified them between fair and poor. Using HHDs, knee extension LOA (% was 33.59%, 95% confidence interval (CI 23.91 to 43.26 and ankle plantar flexion LOA (% was 48.87%, CI 35.19 to 62.56. Using IDs, hip adduction and extension; knee flexion and extension; and ankle dorsiflexion showed LOA (% under 15%. Lower hip, knee, and ankle LOA (% were obtained using an ID compared to HHD. ICC between devices ranged between 0.62, CI (0.37 to 0.87 for ankle dorsiflexion to 0.94, IC (0.91to 0.98 for hip adduction. Very high correlation were found for hip adductors and hip flexors and moderate correlations for knee flexors/extensors and ankle plantar/dorsiflexors.

  2. Absolute Reliability and Concurrent Validity of Hand Held Dynamometry and Isokinetic Dynamometry in the Hip, Knee and Ankle Joint: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Claudio; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; De la Fuente, Carlos; Fuentes, Javiera; Javier Chirosa, Luis

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to establish absolute reliability and concurrent validity between hand-held dynamometers (HHDs) and isokinetic dynamometers (IDs) in lower extremity peak torque assessment. Medline, Embase, CINAHL databases were searched for studies related to psychometric properties in muscle dynamometry. Studies considering standard error of measurement SEM (%) or limit of agreement LOA (%) expressed as percentage of the mean, were considered to establish absolute reliability while studies using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were considered to establish concurrent validity between dynamometers. In total, 17 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The COSMIN checklist classified them between fair and poor. Using HHDs, knee extension LOA (%) was 33.59%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 23.91 to 43.26 and ankle plantar flexion LOA (%) was 48.87%, CI 35.19 to 62.56. Using IDs, hip adduction and extension; knee flexion and extension; and ankle dorsiflexion showed LOA (%) under 15%. Lower hip, knee, and ankle LOA (%) were obtained using an ID compared to HHD. ICC between devices ranged between 0.62, CI (0.37 to 0.87) for ankle dorsiflexion to 0.94, IC (0.91to 0.98) for hip adduction. Very high correlation were found for hip adductors and hip flexors and moderate correlations for knee flexors/extensors and ankle plantar/dorsiflexors.

  3. Radiotracer Imaging of Sediment Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, W. W.; O'Neil, J. P.; Boutchko, R.; Nico, P. S.; Druhan, J. L.; Vandehey, N. T.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear medical PET and SPECT cameras routinely image radioactivity concentration of gamma ray emitting isotopes (PET - 511 keV; SPECT - 75-300 keV). We have used nuclear medical imaging technology to study contaminant transport in sediment columns. Specifically, we use Tc-99m (T1/2 = 6 h, Eγ = 140 keV) and a SPECT camera to image the bacteria mediated reduction of pertechnetate, [Tc(VII)O4]- + Fe(II) → Tc(IV)O2 + Fe(III). A 45 mL bolus of Tc-99m (32 mCi) labeled sodium pertechnetate was infused into a column (35cm x 10cm Ø) containing uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment from the Rifle, CO site. A flow rate of 1.25 ml/min of artificial groundwater was maintained in the column. Using a GE Millennium VG camera, we imaged the column for 12 hours, acquiring 44 frames. As the microbes in the sediment were inactive, we expected most of the iron to be Fe(III). The images were consistent with this hypothesis, and the Tc-99m pertechnetate acted like a conservative tracer. Virtually no binding of the Tc-99m was observed, and while the bolus of activity propagated fairly uniformly through the column, some inhomogeneity attributed to sediment packing was observed. We expect that after augmentation by acetate, the bacteria will metabolically reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), leading to significant Tc-99m binding. Imaging sediment columns using nuclear medicine techniques has many attractive features. Trace quantities of the radiolabeled compounds are used (micro- to nano- molar) and the half-lives of many of these tracers are short (Image of Tc-99m distribution in a column containing Rifle sediment at four times.

  4. Isolated flexor pollicis longus nerve fascicle lesion – a rare differential diagnosis of thumb flexion deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauser, Eva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A rare differential diagnosis of thumb flexion deficiency is an isolated flexor pollicis longus (FPL nerve fascicle lesion. We present a 42-year-old otherwise healthy female patient who developed a weak thumb-to-index pinch and deficient right thumb flexion following the removal of osteosynthesis plates after a forearm fracture. Clinically,the flexor pollicis longus function was absent, yet index flexion and sensibility were unimpaired. Tendon rupture was excluded using a tenodesis test and the electro-physiological result of isolated interosseus nerve fascicle lesion was confirmed intraoperatively by inspection and electrostimulation. Tendon transfer using the extensor carpi radialis longus reconstruct strong thumb flexion during pinch. In summary, due to its specific location and anatomy, the FPL branch is more prone to isolated neuropathy, e.g. by injections or operations, than to other fascicles of the anterior interosseus nerve. When confronted with sudden and isolated thumb flexion deficiency, specialists should be aware of this rare phenomenon.

  5. Reduced knee flexion is a possible cause of increased loading rates in individuals with patellofemoral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Danilo de Oliveira; Briani, Ronaldo Valdir; Pazzinatto, Marcella Ferraz; Ferrari, Deisi; Aragão, Fernando Amâncio; Azevedo, Fábio Mícolis de

    2015-11-01

    Stair ascent is an activity that exacerbates symptoms of individuals with patellofemoral pain. The discomfort associated with this activity usually results in gait modification such as reduced knee flexion in an attempt to reduce pain. Although such compensatory strategy is a logical approach to decrease pain, it also reduces the normal active shock absorption increasing loading rates and may lead to deleterious and degenerative changes of the knee joint. Thus, the aims of this study were (i) to investigate whether there is reduced knee flexion in adults with PFP compared to healthy controls; and (ii) to analyze loading rates in these subjects, during stair climbing. Twenty-nine individuals with patellofemoral pain and twenty-five control individuals (18-30 years) participated in this study. Each subject underwent three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic analyses during stair climbing on two separate days. Between-groups analyses of variance were performed to identify differences in peak knee flexion and loading rates. Intraclass correlation coefficient was performed to verify the reliability of the variables. On both days, the patellofemoral pain group demonstrated significantly reduced peak knee flexion and increased loading rates. In addition, the two variables obtained high to very high reliability. Reduced knee flexion during stair climbing as a strategy to avoid anterior knee pain does not seem to be healthy for lower limb mechanical distributions. Repeated loading at higher loading rates may be damaging to lower limb joints. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Extension and flexion in the upper cervical spine in neck pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Markus J; Crawford, Rebecca J; Schelldorfer, Sarah; Rausch-Osthoff, Anne-Kathrin; Barbero, Marco; Kool, Jan; Bauer, Christoph M

    2015-08-01

    Neck pain is a common problem in the general population with high risk of ongoing complaints or relapses. Range of motion (ROM) assessment is scientifically established in the clinical process of diagnosis, prognosis and outcome evaluation in neck pain. Anatomically, the cervical spine (CS) has been considered in two regions, the upper and lower CS. Disorders like cervicogenic headache have been clinically associated with dysfunctions of the upper CS (UCS), yet ROM tests and measurements are typically conducted on the whole CS. A cross-sectional study assessing 19 subjects with non-specific neck pain was undertaken to examine UCS extension-flexion ROM in relation to self-reported disability and pain (via the Neck Disability Index (NDI)). Two measurement devices (goniometer and electromagnetic tracking) were employed and compared. Correlations between ROM and the NDI were stronger for the UCS compared to the CS, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and the NDI-headache (r = -0.62). Correlations between UCS and CS ROM were fair to moderate, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and CS extension ROM (r = -0.49). UCS flexion restriction is related to headache frequency and intensity. Consistency and agreement between both measurement systems and for all tests was high. The results demonstrate that separate UCS ROM assessments for extension and flexion are useful in patients with neck pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. ARTHROMETRIC EVALUATION OF STABILIZING EFFECT OF KNEE FUNCTIONAL BRACING AT DIFFERENT FLEXION ANGLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Seyed Mohseni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous in-vivo investigations on the stabilizing efficacy of knee bracing for ACL reconstructed patients have been often limited to 20-30 degrees of knee flexion. In this study, the effectiveness of a uniaxial hinged functional brace to improve the knee stability was assessed at 30, 60 and 90 degrees of knee flexion. Arthrometry tests were conducted on 15 healthy subjects before and following wearing the brace and the tibial displacements were measured at up to 150 N anterior forces. Results indicated that functional bracing has a significant stabilizing effect throughout the range of knee flexion examined (p < 0.05. The rate of effectiveness, however, was not consistent across the flexion range, e.g., 50% at 30 degrees and only 4% at 90 degrees. It was suggested that accurate sizing and fitting as well as attention to correct hinge placement relative to the femoral condyles can limit brace migration and improve its effectiveness in mid and deep knee flexion. With using adaptive limb fittings, through flexible pads, and a polycentric joint a more significant improvement of the overall brace performance and efficacy might be obtained

  8. MR imaging of the knee extension and flexion. Diagnostic value for reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the value of extended and flexed knee positions in MR imaging of the surgically reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, knee joint was enabled to extend to a full-extension and bend vertically to a semi-flexion (average 45deg of flexion) within the confines of the magnet bore. Sets of 3-mm-thick oblique sagittal proton-weighted turbo spin echo MR images were obtained at both extended and flexed positions. Twenty-five knees with intact ACL grafts and three knees with arthroscopically proved graft tears were evaluated. Compared to the extended position, MR images of flexed knee provided better delineation of the intact and complicated ACL grafts with statistical significance. The intact graft appeared relaxed at the semi-flexion and taut at the extension. Overall lengths of the intact grafts were readily identified at the flexion. Stretched along the intercondylar roof, the grafts were poorly outlined at the extension. MR images with knee flexion delineated the disrupted site from the impingement more clearly than that with knee extension. (author).

  9. Target of physiological gait: Realization of speed adaptive control for a prosthetic knee during swing flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wujing; Yu, Hongliu; Zhao, Weiliang; Li, Jin; Wei, Xiaodong

    2017-10-13

    Prosthetic knee is the most important component of lower limb prosthesis. Speed adaptive for prosthetic knee during swing flexion is the key method to realize physiological gait. This study aims to discuss the target of physiological gait, propose a speed adaptive control method during swing flexion and research the damping adjustment law of intelligent hydraulic prosthetic knee. According to the physiological gait trials of healthy people, the control target during swing flexion is defined. A new prosthetic knee with fuzzy logical control during swing flexion is designed to realize the damping adjustment automatically. The function simulation and evaluation system of intelligent knee prosthesis is provided. Speed adaptive control test of the intelligent prosthetic knee in different velocities are researched. The maximum swing flexion of the knee angle is set between sixty degree and seventy degree as the target of physiological gait. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate that the prosthetic knee with fuzzy logical control is able to realize physiological gait under different speeds. The faster the walking, the bigger the valve closure percentage of the hydraulic prosthetic knee. The proposed fuzzy logical control strategy and intelligent hydraulic prosthetic knee are effective for the amputee to achieve physiological gait.

  10. Performance evaluation of a rectifier column using gamma column scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquino Denis D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rectifier columns are considered to be a critical component in petroleum refineries and petrochemical processing installations as they are able to affect the overall performance of these facilities. It is deemed necessary to monitor the operational conditions of such vessels to optimize processes and prevent anomalies which could pose undesired consequences on product quality that might lead to huge financial losses. A rectifier column was subjected to gamma scanning using a 10-mCi Co-60 source and a 2-inch-long detector in tandem. Several scans were performed to gather information on the operating conditions of the column under different sets of operating parameters. The scan profiles revealed unexpected decreases in the radiation intensity at vapour levels between trays 2 and 3, and between trays 4 and 5. Flooding also occurred during several scans which could be attributed to parametric settings.

  11. The pelvis and hips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.; Coventry, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic evaluation of joint replacements requires close communication between the radiologist and referring physician. Routine films, radioisotope scans, and subtraction arthrography (including aspiration and injection of the pseudocapsule) may be indicated in different clinical situations. This paper summarizes the accuracy of these modalities. Most patients present with pain. One must exclude loosening, infection, and other problems. The arthrogram is most useful in defining anatomy and most causes of hip pain. Culture studies and diagnostic injections add to the versatility of subtraction arthrography and increase its accuracy. If plain films are negative, a Tc-99m scan can be obtained. If this is negative, loosening is unlikely. If pain persists or if the scan is positive, an arthrogram should be performed. Pain may be secondary to bursitis rather than loosening, and the arthrogram will assist in diagnosis and treatment. When films suggest loosening, arthrography is the procedure of choice to confirm the diagnosis and to exclude infection

  12. Hip complications following chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, P.J.; Sebag Montefiore, D.J.; Arnott, S.J. [Saint Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-01

    Chemoradiotherapy protocols are a recent development in the management of tumours where preservation of organ function is important. It is now recognized that such combined treatment may produce adverse effects below the accepted dose thresholds for either modality. This enhancement of toxicity is generally thought to reflect depletion of stem cells within the tissue concerned. We report four patients who have developed avascular necrosis or fractures of the hip following chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva or anus. These complications developed after a radiation dose of 4500 cGy in 20 fractions. The possible role of cytotoxic agents in sensitizing bone to radiation damage is discussed, and a novel mechanism is proposed to account for this phenomenon. (author).

  13. Hip complications following chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, P.J.; Sebag Montefiore, D.J.; Arnott, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy protocols are a recent development in the management of tumours where preservation of organ function is important. It is now recognized that such combined treatment may produce adverse effects below the accepted dose thresholds for either modality. This enhancement of toxicity is generally thought to reflect depletion of stem cells within the tissue concerned. We report four patients who have developed avascular necrosis or fractures of the hip following chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva or anus. These complications developed after a radiation dose of 4500 cGy in 20 fractions. The possible role of cytotoxic agents in sensitizing bone to radiation damage is discussed, and a novel mechanism is proposed to account for this phenomenon. (author)

  14. Post column derivatisation analyses review. Is post-column derivatisation incompatible with modern HPLC columns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan; Dennis, Gary R; Shalliker, R Andrew

    2015-08-19

    Post Column derivatisation (PCD) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography is a powerful tool in the modern analytical laboratory, or at least it should be. One drawback with PCD techniques is the extra post-column dead volume due to reaction coils used to enable adequate reaction time and the mixing of reagents which causes peak broadening, hence a loss of separation power. This loss of efficiency is counter-productive to modern HPLC technologies, -such as UHPLC. We reviewed 87 PCD methods published from 2009 to 2014. We restricted our review to methods published between 2009 and 2014, because we were interested in the uptake of PCD methods in UHPLC environments. Our review focused on a range of system parameters including: column dimensions, stationary phase and particle size, as well as the geometry of the reaction loop. The most commonly used column in the methods investigated was not in fact a modern UHPLC version with sub-2-micron, (or even sub-3-micron) particles, but rather, work-house columns, such as, 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. columns packed with 5 μm C18 particles. Reaction loops were varied, even within the same type of analysis, but the majority of methods employed loop systems with volumes greater than 500 μL. A second part of this review illustrated briefly the effect of dead volume on column performance. The experiment evaluated the change in resolution and separation efficiency of some weak to moderately retained solutes on a 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. column packed with 5 μm particles. The data showed that reaction loops beyond 100 μL resulted in a very serious loss of performance. Our study concluded that practitioners of PCD methods largely avoid the use of UHPLC-type column formats, so yes, very much, PCD is incompatible with the modern HPLC column. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Do jumbo cups cause hip center elevation in revision THA? A computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Chima; Dong, Nick N; Heffernan, Christopher D; Ries, Michael D

    2014-02-01

    Acetabular revision THA with use of a large (jumbo) cup is an effective treatment for many cavitary and segmental peripheral bone defects. However, the jumbo cup may result in elevation of the hip center and protrusion through the anterior acetabular wall as a result of the oversized geometry of the jumbo cup compared with the physiologic acetabulum. The purpose of this computer simulation was to determine how much elevation of the hip center and anterior wall protrusion occurs in revision THA with use of a jumbo cup technique in which the inferior edge of the jumbo cup is placed at the inferior acetabular rim and the superior edge of the jumbo cup is placed against host bone at the superior margin of a posterosuperior bone defect. Two hundred sixty-five pelvic CT scans were analyzed by custom CT analytical software. The computer simulated oversized reaming. The vertical and anterior reamer center shifts were measured, and anterior column bone removal was determined. The computer simulation demonstrated that the hip center shifted 0.27 mm superiorly and 0.02 mm anteriorly, and anterior column bone removal increased 0.86 mm for every 1-mm increase in reamer diameter. Our results indicate that the jumbo cup technique results in hip center elevation despite placement of the cup adjacent to the inferior acetabulum. For a hypothetical increase from a 54-mm socket to a 72-mm socket, as one might see in the context of the revision of a failed THA, our model would predict an elevation of the hip center of approximately 5 mm and loss of approximately 15 mm of anterior column bone. This suggests that an increase in femoral head length may be needed to compensate for the hip center elevation caused by the use of a large jumbo cup in revision THA. A jumbo cup may also result in protrusion through the anterior wall.

  16. Posttraumatic immobilization in flexion of a congenital valgus elbow and cubital tunnel syndrome-case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rocco, Federico; Doglietto, Francesco; Tufo, Tommaso; Ciampini, Alessandro; Lauretti, Liverana; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    Elbow trauma, cubitus valgus deformity, and prolonged flexion of the elbow are recognized risk factors for ulnar nerve entrapment. The 3 conditions coincided in the present case. In fact, a 36-year-old woman had a bilateral severe congenital cubitus valgus. A trauma of the right elbow caused luxation and supracondylar humeral fracture for which the joint was fixed in flexion at 90 degrees for 1 month. The patient developed a severe ulnar nerve entrapment syndrome that did not respond to several months of physiotherapy and active mobilization of the elbow. The symptoms recovered after surgical decompression and anterior subcutaneous transposition of the nerve. The present case illustrates how the development of a cubital tunnel syndrome should be considered as the expected outcome of a long immobilization in flexion of an elbow with a severe cubitus valgus. A simple subcutaneous anterior transposition of the ulnar nerve might be recommended before a long immobilization of a cubitus valgus elbow is performed.

  17. Flexion synergy overshadows flexor spasticity during reaching in chronic moderate to severe hemiparetic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael D; Schut, Ingrid; Dewald, Julius P A

    2017-07-01

    Pharmaceutical intervention targets arm flexor spasticity with an often-unsuccessful goal of improving function. Flexion synergy is a related motor impairment that may be inadvertently neglected. Here, flexor spasticity and flexion synergy are disentangled to determine their contributions to reaching dysfunction. Twenty-six individuals participated. A robotic device systematically modulated shoulder abduction loading during ballistic reaching. Elbow muscle electromyography data were partitioned into windows delineated by elbow joint velocity allowing for the separation of synergy- and spasticity-related activation. Reaching velocity decreased with abduction loading (psynergy increased with abduction loading (psynergy is the predominant contributor to reaching dysfunction while flexor spasticity appears only relevant during unnaturally occurring passively supported movement. Interventions targeting flexion synergy should be leveraged in future stroke recovery trials. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [New opinion on the mechanism of Dazhu (BL 11) for gonalgia with flexion-extension dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Hang; Peng, Wannian

    2017-09-12

    The effect of Dazhu (BL 11) for gonalgia with flexion-extension dysfunction is remarkable, and its mechanism of action is interpreted as the influential point of bone treating bone diseases. However, through the exploration of a variety of literature, the relevant classical research, the views of senior experts, and combined with the author's experience, we put forward some new ideas and views for reference. Through in-depth analysis about pathogenesis of gonalgia with flexion-extension dysfunction and the functional attributes of Dazhu (BL 11), combining meridian tendons differentiation and myofascial meridians, we consider that Dazhu (BL 11), with its unique "location" advantage, plays the role of regulating multiple viscera, meridians, meridian tendons and myofascial meridians, which is the mechanism for gonalgia with flexion-extension dysfunction.

  19. Modelling and Analysis on Biomechanical Dynamic Characteristics of Knee Flexion Movement under Squatting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The model of three-dimensional (3D geometric knee was built, which included femoral-tibial, patellofemoral articulations and the bone and soft tissues. Dynamic finite element (FE model of knee was developed to simulate both the kinematics and the internal stresses during knee flexion. The biomechanical experimental system of knee was built to simulate knee squatting using cadaver knees. The flexion motion and dynamic contact characteristics of knee were analyzed, and verified by comparing with the data from in vitro experiment. The results showed that the established dynamic FE models of knee are capable of predicting kinematics and the contact stresses during flexion, and could be an efficient tool for the analysis of total knee replacement (TKR and knee prosthesis design.

  20. Traumatic injuries of the hip.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marshall, Nina

    2009-11-01

    Traumatic lesions of the hip in athletes may be clinically challenging because of the overlap in clinical presentation due to differing pathologies and the presence of multiple injuries. Imaging of the hip in the athlete has undergone a recent resurgence of interest and understanding related to the increasing accessibility and use of hip arthroscopy, which expands the treatment options available for intra-articular pathology. MR imaging and MR arthrography have a unique role in diagnosis of these pathologies, guiding the surgeon, arthroscopist, and referring clinician in their management of bony and soft tissue injury.

  1. High Rate of Return to Cycling After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Rachel M; Ukwuani, Gift; Clapp, Ian; Chahla, Jorge; Nho, Shane J

    2017-12-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) is most commonly diagnosed in athletes who sustain repetitive flexion and rotational loading to their hip. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a patient's ability to return to cycling after hip arthroscopy for FAIS. There is a high rate of return to cycling after hip arthroscopy. Retrospective analysis. Level 4. Consecutive patients who had identified themselves as cyclists and had undergone hip arthroscopy for the treatment of FAIS were reviewed. Pre- and postoperative physical examinations, imaging, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) scores, including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Hip Outcome Score Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sports-Specific (HOS-SS) subscales, and visual analog scale for pain, as well as a cycling-specific questionnaire, were assessed for all patients. A total of 58 patients (62% female; mean age, 30.0 ± 7.1 years; mean body mass index, 23.2 ± 2.7 kg/m 2 ) were included. Prior to surgery, patients averaged 30 ± 42 miles per week (range, 2-300 miles). Fifty-five patients (95%) were forced to discontinue cycling at an average of 7.5 ± 6.2 months prior to surgery due to hip pain. Fifty-six patients (97%) returned to cycling at an average of 4.5 ± 2.5 months after surgery, with 33 (59%) returning to a better level of cycling and 23 (41%) to the same cycling level. Postoperatively, there was no difference in the average number of miles patients completed per week compared with preoperative values ( P = 0.08). At a mean follow-up of 31.14 ± 0.71 months (range, 24-48 months), all patients experienced significant improvements in mHHS, HOS-ADL, and HOS-SS PROs (all P cycling 97% of the time after hip arthroscopy for FAIS, with most of these patients returning at an average of 4.5 months after surgery. This information is helpful in counseling patients on their expectations with regard to returning to cycling after hip arthroscopy for FAIS. Cyclists return to sport 97% of the

  2. Are magnetic resonance flexion views useful in evaluating the cervical spine of patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reijnierse, M.; Kroon, H.M.; Bloem, J.L.; Breedveld, F.C.; Hansen, B.; Pope, T.L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether MR imaging in flexion adds value relative to imaging in the neutral position with respect to displaying involvement of the subarachnoid space, brainstem and spinal cord. Design and patients. T1-weighted MR images of the cervical spine in 42 rheumatoid arthritis patients with cervical spine involvement were obtained and analyzed prospectively. We assessed changes between images obtained in the neutral position and following active flexion, especially horizontal atlantoaxial and subaxial motion, presence or absence of brainstem compression, subarachnoid space involvement at the atlantoaxial and subaxial level and the cervicomedullary angle. Vertical atlantoaxial subluxation and the amount of pannus were correlated with motion and change in subarachnoid space. Results. The flexion images showed horizontal atlantoaxial motion in 21 patients and subaxial motion in one patient. The flexion view displayed brainstem compression in only one patient. Involvement of the subarachnoid space increased at the atlantoaxial level in eight (19%) patients (P=0.004) and at the level below C2 in five (12%) patients (P=0.03). There were no patients with a normal subarachnoid space in neutral position and compression in the flexed position. The cervicomedullary angle changed significantly with flexion. Vertical atlantoaxial subluxation and the amount of pannus did not show a significant correlation with motion or subarachnoid space involvement. Conclusion. MR imaging in the flexed position shows a statistically significant narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the atlantoaxial level and below C2. Cord compression is only observed on flexion views if the subarachnoid space in neutral position is already decreased. MR imaging in the flexed position might be useful, since subarachnoid space involvement may be an indicator for the development of neurologic dysfunction. (orig.)

  3. Are magnetic resonance flexion views useful in evaluating the cervical spine of patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reijnierse, M.; Kroon, H.M.; Bloem, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Breedveld, F.C. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Hansen, B. [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Pope, T.L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem (United States)

    2000-02-01

    Objective. To determine whether MR imaging in flexion adds value relative to imaging in the neutral position with respect to displaying involvement of the subarachnoid space, brainstem and spinal cord. Design and patients. T1-weighted MR images of the cervical spine in 42 rheumatoid arthritis patients with cervical spine involvement were obtained and analyzed prospectively. We assessed changes between images obtained in the neutral position and following active flexion, especially horizontal atlantoaxial and subaxial motion, presence or absence of brainstem compression, subarachnoid space involvement at the atlantoaxial and subaxial level and the cervicomedullary angle. Vertical atlantoaxial subluxation and the amount of pannus were correlated with motion and change in subarachnoid space. Results. The flexion images showed horizontal atlantoaxial motion in 21 patients and subaxial motion in one patient. The flexion view displayed brainstem compression in only one patient. Involvement of the subarachnoid space increased at the atlantoaxial level in eight (19%) patients (P=0.004) and at the level below C2 in five (12%) patients (P=0.03). There were no patients with a normal subarachnoid space in neutral position and compression in the flexed position. The cervicomedullary angle changed significantly with flexion. Vertical atlantoaxial subluxation and the amount of pannus did not show a significant correlation with motion or subarachnoid space involvement. Conclusion. MR imaging in the flexed position shows a statistically significant narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the atlantoaxial level and below C2. Cord compression is only observed on flexion views if the subarachnoid space in neutral position is already decreased. MR imaging in the flexed position might be useful, since subarachnoid space involvement may be an indicator for the development of neurologic dysfunction. (orig.)

  4. Bilateral Distal Femoral Flexion Deformity After Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Chan Chun-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune systemic disease with predominant peripheral polyarthritis, often leading to severe joint destruction. This is a case report of an 81-year-old woman with long-standing severe rheumatoid arthritis requiring multiple orthopaedic operations for joint destruction since 2000. These operated joints improved her functional mobility until recently, when she found that her knees were fixed at around 70° of flexion with limited motion. There was chronic progressive flexion deformity of bilateral distal femurs, which was an extremely rare complication of total knee arthroplasty.

  5. A Textile-Based Wearable Sensing Device Designed for Monitoring the Flexion Angle of Elbow and Knee Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Wei Shyr

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work a wearable gesture sensing device consisting of a textile strain sensor, using elastic conductive webbing, was designed for monitoring the flexion angle of elbow and knee movements. The elastic conductive webbing shows a linear response of resistance to the flexion angle. The wearable gesture sensing device was calibrated and then the flexion angle-resistance equation was established using an assembled gesture sensing apparatus with a variable resistor and a protractor. The proposed device successfully monitored the flexion angle during elbow and knee movements.

  6. Clinical application of the modified medially-mounted motor-driven hip gear joint for paraplegics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, S; Imahori, R; Saitoh, E; Tomita, Y; Domen, K; Chino, N

    2000-04-15

    This paper describes a motor-driven orthosis for paraplegics which has been developed. This orthosis is composed of a medially-mounted motor-driven hip joint and bilateral knee-ankle-foot orthosis. With the gear mechanism, the virtual axis of the hip joint of this orthosis is almost as high as the anatomical hip joint. A paraplegic patient with an injury level of T10/11 walked using bilateral lofstrand crutches and this new orthosis with or without the motor system. The motor is initiated by pushing a button attached at the edge of the grab of the crutches. Faster cadence and speed and smaller rotation angle of the trunk was obtained in motor walking compared with non-motor walking. The patient did not feel fearful of falling. The benefit of motor orthosis is that it can be used even in patients with lower motor lesions and that it provides stable regulation of hip flexion movement in spastic patients. In conclusion, this motor orthosis will enhance paraplegic walking.

  7. EMG of the hip adductor muscles in six clinical examination tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Gregory A; Blanch, Peter D; Barnes, Christopher J

    2012-08-01

    To assess activation of muscles of hip adduction using EMG and force analysis during standard clinical tests, and compare athletes with and without a prior history of groin pain. Controlled laboratory study. 21 male athletes from an elite junior soccer program. Bilateral surface EMG recordings of the adductor magnus, adductor longus, gracilis and pectineus as well as a unilateral fine-wire EMG of the pectineus were made during isometric holds in six clinical examination tests. A load cell was used to measure force data. Test type was a significant factor in the EMG output for all four muscles (all muscles p magnus, adductor longus and gracilis. EMG activation for pectineus was highest in Hips 90. Injury history was a significant factor in the EMG output for the adductor longus (p magnus. For force data, clinical test type was a significant factor (p force. All other factors had no significant effect on the force outputs. Hip adduction strength assessment is best measured at hips 0 (which produced most force) or 45° flexion (which generally gave the highest EMG output). Muscle EMG varied significantly with clinical test position. Athletes with previous groin injury had a significant fall in some EMG outputs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Association of hip pain with radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis: diagnostic test study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Clancy, Mary M; Lane, Nancy E; Link, Thomas M; Vlad, Steven; Tolstykh, Irina; Jungmann, Pia M.; Felson, David T; Guermazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is there concordance between hip pain and radiographic hip osteoarthritis? Methods In this diagnostic test study, pelvic radiographs were assessed for hip osteoarthritis in two cohorts: the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study (community of Framingham, Massachusetts) and the Osteoarthritis Initiative (a multicenter longitudinal cohort study of osteoarthritis in the United States). Using visual representation of the hip joint, participants reported whether they had hip pain on most days and the location of the pain: anterior, groin, lateral, buttocks, or low back. In the Framingham study, participants with hip pain were also examined for hip pain with internal rotation. The authors analysed the agreement between radiographic hip osteoarthritis and hip pain, and for those with hip pain suggestive of hip osteoarthritis they calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiographs as the diagnostic test. Study answer and limitations In the Framingham study (n=946), only 15.6% of hips in patients with frequent hip pain showed radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis, and 20.7% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 36.7%, specificity 90.5%, positive predictive value 6.0%, and negative predictive value 98.9%. Results did not differ much for hip pain at other locations or for painful internal rotation. In the Osteoarthritis Initiative study (n=4366), only 9.1% of hips in patients with frequent pain showed radiographic hip osteoarthritis, and 23.8% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of definite radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 16.5%, specificity 94.0%, positive predictive value 7.1%, and negative predictive value 97.6%. Results also did not differ much for hip pain at other locations. What this

  9. Hip Fractures among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Home & Recreational Safety Older Adult Falls Important Facts about Falls Costs of Falls Hip Fractures Among Older Adults Older Adult Falls Programs Compendium of Effective Fall Interventions, 3rd Edition ...

  10. Social inequality and hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, N. C.; Hansen, L.; Judge, A.

    2015-01-01

    fracture (ICD10: S720, S721, S722 and S729) were identified from 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2011. Hip fracture patients were matched 1:1 on age, gender and year of fracture to a non-hip fracture control. An individual's education attainment was defined as basic, secondary or higher, and their income...... and year of fracture, and education and year of fracture, to describe whether the association of income or education with rates of hip fracture changed over time. Results: There were 69,774 hip fracture patients and 69,709 controls (both mean age 81.2 years) with complete data on income and education. Both...

  11. Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to deepen the hip socket (if it's too shallow) or to shorten the thighbone or realign it. ... and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours ...

  12. Monoarticular Hip Involvement in Pseudogout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Kocyigit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudogout is the acutest form of arthritis in the elderly. Although clinical manifestations vary widely, polyarticular involvement is typical mimicking osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Monoarticular involvement is relatively rare and is generally provoked by another medical condition. There are reported cases of hip involvement by pseudogout in monoarticular form. However, all of the cases were presented as septic arthritis. In this report, we present a case of monoarticular hip involvement mimicking soft tissue abscess. We confirmed the pseudogout diagnosis after ultrasonographic evaluation of the involved hip joint and pathological and biochemical analysis of synovial fluid analysis. Diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary medical and surgical treatment in cases of the bizarre involvement of hip in pseudogout.

  13. Weightlifting performance is related to kinematic and kinetic patterns of the hip and knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Kristof; Redden, Josh; Sabick, Michelle B; Harris, Chad

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between biomechanical outcome measures and weightlifting performance. Joint kinematics and kinetics of the hip, knee, and ankle were calculated while 10 subjects performed a clean at 85% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Kinematic and kinetic time-series patterns were extracted with principal components analysis. Discrete scores for each time-series pattern were calculated and used to determine how each pattern was related to body mass-normalized 1RM. Two hip kinematic and 2 knee kinetic patterns were significantly correlated with relative 1RM. The kinematic patterns captured hip and trunk motions during the first pull and hip joint motion during the movement transition between the first and second pulls. The first kinetic pattern captured a peak in the knee extension moment during the second pull. The second kinetic pattern captured a spatiotemporal shift in the timing and amplitude of the peak knee extension moment. The kinematic results suggest that greater lift mass was associated with steady trunk position during the first pull and less hip extension motion during the second-knee bend transition. Further, the kinetic results suggest that greater lift mass was associated with a smaller knee extensor moments during the first pull, but greater knee extension moments during the second pull, and an earlier temporal transition between knee flexion-extension moments at the beginning of the second pull. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of controlled trunk and hip motions during the first pull and rapid employment of the knee extensor muscles during the second pull in relation to weightlifting performance.

  14. Imaging of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karantanas, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Standard radiographs represent the basic tool of hip joint imaging. For detailed analysis of abnormalities related to bone marrow, articular cartilage, labrum and periarticular soft tissues, MRI has become the method of choice. MR arthrography is superior to standard MRI with regard to depicting the intra-articular abnormalities. CT is supporting plain radiographs for accurate depiction of subtle bone details. Ultrasound is commonly used in postoperative hematoma, bursitis, initial diagnosis of cysts and solid soft tissue tumors as well as for image guided injections and biopsies. Bone scintigraphy is suitable for the mapping of multifocal disease, such as osseous metastatic deposits. PET and PET/CT may be able to differentiate malignant neoplasm and infection from other abnormalities. A common disorder often requested for evaluation, is osteoarthritis. MRI is able to depict early degenerative changes which are occult on plain radiographs. CT- or MR arthrography provide a better evaluation of these changes but should only be performed in cases in which conservative surgery is considered to offer a significant clinical improvement for the patient. These cases include cam type femoroacetabular impingement and traumatic chondrolysis. MRI is an imaging technique that allows direct visualization of the bone marrow. Marrow disorders of the hip may induce a variety of imaging findings and frequently are not detected by conventional radiographic techniques until they have reached an advanced clinical stage. The excellent spatial and contrast resolution provided by MRI facilitates early detection and evaluation of various disorders allowing thus prompt treatment. Imaging findings may alter or guide the correct treatment. In addition, the association of marrow changes and pain such as in osteonecrosis and osteoarthritis is clinically relevant. For imaging the bone marrow, we use a combination of pulse sequences, including T1-w spin echo, PD/T2-w turbo spin echo

  15. Bubble columns : Structures or stability?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harteveld, W.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to contribute to the understanding of the hydrodynamics of the gravity driven bubbly flow that can be found in bubble columns. Special attention is paid to the large scale structures that have a strong impact on several key parameters such as the degree of mixing, mass and

  16. Changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after hip strength training for single-sided ankle dorsiflexion restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Hitoshi; Someya, Fujiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral ankle sprains are common injuries suffered while playing sports, and abnormal forward- and inward-directed ground reaction force occurs during a jumping task. However, the influence of hip muscle strength training on jumping performance after ankle injuries has not been fully examined. This study thus examined changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after training to strengthen hip muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Ten of 30 female high school basketball players were assigned as subjects who showed a difference of 7 or more degrees in dorsiflexion ranges between the bilateral ankles. The subjects underwent 12 weeks of training to strengthen hip abductors and external rotators. Comparisons between before and after training were made regarding ground reaction force components, hip and knee joint angles, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in leg muscles, and muscle strength of hip muscles during the rebound-jump task. [Results] After training, the subjects showed increased strength of external rotator muscles, increased percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in the gluteus medius muscle, decreased inward ground reaction force, and increased flexion angles of the hip and knee joints. [Conclusion] This study suggests that training to strengthen hip muscles may ameliorate the inward ground reaction force in athletes with ankle dorsiflexion restriction.

  17. Associations of maximal voluntary isometric hip extension torque with muscle size of hamstring and gluteus maximus and intra-abdominal pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayashiki, Kota; Hirata, Kosuke; Ishida, Kiraku; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Naokazu

    2017-06-01

    Muscle size of the hamstring and gluteus maximus (GM) as well as intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) are considered as factors affecting the torque development during hip extension. This study examined the associations of torque development during maximal voluntary isometric hip extension with IAP and muscle size of the hamstring and GM. Anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA) of the hamstring and thickness of GM were determined in 20 healthy young males using an ultrasonography apparatus (Experiment 1). Torque and IAP were simultaneously measured while subjects performed maximal voluntary isometric hip extension. The IAP was measured using a pressure transducer placed in the rectum and determined at the time at which the developed torque reached to the maximal. In Experiment 2, torque and IAP were measured during maximal voluntary isometric hip flexion in 18 healthy young males. The maximal hip extension torque was significantly correlated with the IAP (r = 0.504, P = 0.024), not with the ACSA of the hamstring (r = 0.307, P = 0.188) or the thickness of GM (r = 0.405, P = 0.076). The relationship was still significant even when the ACSA of the hamstring and the thickness of GM were adjusted statistically (r = 0.486, P = 0.041). The maximal hip flexion torque was not significantly correlated with the IAP (r = -0.118, P = 0.642). The current results suggest that IAP can contribute independently of the muscle size of the agonists to maximal voluntary hip extension torque.

  18. In vivo knee laxity in flexion and extension: a radiographic study in 30 older healthy subjects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesterbeek, P.J.C.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Wymenga, A.B.

    2008-01-01

    In order to determine how "tight" a total knee prosthesis should be implanted, it is important to know the amount of laxity in a healthy knee. The objective of this study was to determine knee laxity in extension and flexion in healthy, non-arthritic knees of subjects similar in age to patients

  19. The instantaneous torque-angular velocity relation in plantar flexion during jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ingen Schenau, G J; Bobbert, M F; Huijing, P A; Woittiez, R D

    Torques, angular velocities, and power of the ankle joint during plantar flexion were measured in jumping experiments in order to achieve insight into shape and magnitude of the instantaneous torque-angular velocity relation in a complex movement. Twelve trained subjects performed maximal vertical

  20. Influence of Stimulation Location and Posture on the Reliability and Comfort of the Nociceptive Flexion Reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwyn N Lewis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The lower limb nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR is commonly used to assess the function of the nociceptive system. Currently, there is a lack of standardized stimulation procedures to determine the NFR threshold, making comparisons of thresholds across studies difficult.

  1. Flexion-relaxation ratio in computer workers with and without chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Carina Ferreira; dos Santos, Marina Foresti; Chaves, Thais Cristina

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) and flexion-relaxation ratios (FR-ratios) using surface electromyography (sEMG) of the cervical extensor muscles of computer workers with and without chronic neck pain, as well as of healthy subjects who were not computer users. This study comprised 60 subjects 20-45years of age, of which 20 were computer workers with chronic neck pain (CPG), 20 were computer workers without neck pain (NPG), and 20 were control individuals who do not use computers for work and use them less than 4h/day for other purposes (CG). FRP and FR-ratios were analyzed using sEMG of the cervical extensors. Analysis of FR-ratios showed smaller values in the semispinalis capitis muscles of the two groups of workers compared to the control group. The reference FR-ratio (flexion relaxation ratio [FRR], defined as the maximum activity in 1s of the re-extension/full flexion sEMG activity) was significantly higher in the computer workers with neck pain compared to the CG (CPG: 3.10, 95% confidence interval [CI95%] 2.50-3.70; NPG: 2.33, CI95% 1.93-2.74; CG: 1.99, CI95% 1.81-2.17; pneck pain, and such results suggested that each FR-ratio could have a different application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Flexion Deformities of the Wrist and Fingers in Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Protocol of Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Tarek Hassan; Elbeshry, Shady Samir; Mahran, Mahmoud; Aly, Ahmad Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Literature is confusing regarding grading and treatment of flexion deformities of wrist and fingers in spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The most established classification is that described by Zancolli; unfortunately, it has its shortcomings which we experienced in the beginning of our approach to manage this rather difficult deformity. We thus modified Zancolli's classification and developed a classification system and treatment protocol. Thirty patients with spastic CP were operated upon due to flexion deformity of the wrist and fingers and were included in this study. Age ranged from 4 to 14 years, average 7 years. There were twenty boys and ten girls. The average followup was 18 months (range 9 months - 3 years). The power of wrist dorsiflexion, the "House's classification of upper extremity functional use" and the clinical assessment of hand function were used for evaluation; they improved in all patients and this improvement was statistically significant. In all patients, cosmetic appearance improved without any residual flexion deformity. This study introduces a new grading system for flexion deformity of wrist and fingers in spastic CP that correlates with severity of the condition and allows a treatment protocol to be established.

  3. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji [Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Arm flexion during ultrasound assists localization of an intramuscular etonogestrel contraceptive implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskamp, Connor; Kauffman, Robert P

    2016-03-01

    A nonpalpable etonogestrel implant was identified by high-frequency ultrasound in the biceps muscle 4-6mm below the skin. Active elbow flexion resulted in proximal movement of the implant relative to the ultrasound probe, suggesting localization in the muscle. This maneuver may assist in verifying intramuscular placement prior to surgical excision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prior Knowledge Improves Decoding of Finger Flexion from Electrocorticographic (ECoG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuoguan eWang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs use brain signals to convey a user's intent. Some BCI approaches begin by decoding kinematic parameters of movements from brain signals, and then proceed to using these signals, in absence of movements, to allow a user to control an output. Recent results have shown that electrocorticographic (ECoG recordings from the surface of the brain in humans can give information about kinematic parameters (eg{} hand velocity or finger flexion. The decoding approaches in these studies usually employed classical classification/regression algorithms that derive a linear mapping between brain signals and outputs. However, they typically only incorporate little prior information about the target movement parameter. In this paper, we incorporate prior knowledge using a Bayesian decoding method, and use it to decode finger flexion from ECoG signals. Specifically, we exploit the anatomic constraints and dynamic constraints that govern finger flexion and incorporate these constraints in the construction, structure, and the probabilistic functions of the prior model of a switched non-parametric dynamic system (SNDS. Given a measurement model resulting from a traditional linear regression method, we decoded finger flexion using posterior estimation that combined the prior and measurement models. Our results show that the application of the Bayesian decoding model, which incorporates prior knowledge, improves decoding performance compared to the application of a linear regression model, which does not incorporate prior knowledge. Thus, the results presented in this paper may ultimately lead to neurally controlled hand prostheses with full fine-grained finger articulation.

  6. flexions sur la politique du choix des langues nationales en ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    flexions sur la politique du choix des langues nationales en Afrique francophone: ses forces et ses faiblesses. I. Takassi. Abstract. (J. de la Recherche Scientifique de l'Université de Lomé, 1999, 3(2): 53-58). Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  7. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Sporer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION A user friendly reference for decision making in hip arthroplasty designed in a question formed clinical problem scenarios and answers format .The articles composed of the answers, containing current concepts and preferences of experts in primary and revision hip surgery are enhanced by several images, diagrams and references and written in the form of a curbside consultation by Scott M. Sporer, MD. and his collaborators. PURPOSE By this practical reference of hip arthroplasty, Scott M. Sporer, MD. and the contributors have aimed providing the reader practical and clinically relevant information, evidence-based advices, their preferences and opinions containing current concepts for difficult and controversial clinical situations in total hip replacement surgery which are often not addressed clearly in traditional references. FEATURES The book is composed of 9 sections and 49 articles each written by a different expert designed in a question and answers format including several images and diagrams and also essential references at the end of each article. In the first section preoperative questions is subjected. Second section is about preoperative acetabulum questions. Third section is about preoperative femur questions. Fourth section is about intraoperative questions. Intraoperative acetabulum question is subjected in the fifth section and the intraoperative femur questions in the sixth section. The seventh section is about postoperative questions. Eighth and ninth sections are about general questions about failure and failure of acetabulum in turn. AUDIENCE Mainly practicing orthopedic surgeons, fellows and residents who are interested in hip arthroplasty have been targeted but several carefully designed scenarios of controversial and difficult situations surrounding total hip replacement surgery and the current information will also be welcomed by experienced clinicians practicing in hip arthroplasty. ASSESSMENT Scott M. Sporer

  8. Model and in vivo studies on human trunk load partitioning and stability in isometric forward flexions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, N; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2006-01-01

    To resolve the trunk redundancy to determine muscle forces, spinal loads, and stability margin in isometric forward flexion tasks, combined in vivo-numerical model studies was undertaken. It was hypothesized that the passive resistance of both the ligamentous spine and the trunk musculature plays a crucial role in equilibrium and stability of the system. Fifteen healthy males performed free isometric trunk flexions of approximately 40 degrees and approximately 65 degrees +/- loads in hands while kinematics by skin markers and EMG activity of trunk muscles by surface electrodes were measured. A novel kinematics-based approach along with a nonlinear finite element model were iteratively used to calculate muscle forces and internal loads under prescribed measured postures and loads considered in vivo. Stability margin was investigated using nonlinear, linear buckling, and perturbation analyses under various postures, loads and alterations in ligamentous stiffness. Flexion postures significantly increased activity in extensor muscles when compared with standing postures while no significant change was detected in between flexed postures. Compression at the L5-S1 substantially increased from 570 and 771 N in upright posture, respectively, for +/-180 N, to 1912 and 3308 N at approximately 40 degrees flexion, and furthermore to 2332 and 3850 N at approximately 65 degrees flexion. Passive ligamentous/muscle components resisted up to 77% of the net moment. In flexion postures, the spinal stability substantially improved due both to greater passive stiffness and extensor muscle activities so that, under 180 N, no muscle stiffness was required to maintain stability. The co-activity of abdominal muscles and the muscle stiffness were of lesser concern to maintain stability in forward flexion tasks as compared with upright tasks. An injury to the passive system, on one hand, required a substantial compensatory increase in active muscle forces which further increased passive

  9. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum during cup insertion: posterior column stability is crucial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflamme, G-Yves; Belzile, Etienne L; Fernandes, Julio C; Vendittoli, Pascal A; Hébert-Davies, Jonah

    2015-02-01

    Periprosthetic hip fractures around acetabular components are rare with little information available to guide surgical management of these complex injuries. A retrospective review of intraoperative isolated acetabular periprosthetic fractures from three tertiary surgical units was done. A total of 32 patients were identified with 9 initially missed. Acetabular components were stable (type 1) in 11 patients with no failures; unstable (type 2) in 12 patients and treated with supplemental fixation. Non-union and displacement were correlated with absent posterior column plating. Missed fractures (type 3) had the highest reoperation rate. Anterior patterns all healed, whereas fractures with posterior column instability had a 67% failure rate. Periprosthetic acetabular fracture can heal successfully with posterior column stability. Plating is mandatory for large posterior wall fragments to achieve osteointegration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Does 'Kinesio tape' alter thoracolumbar fascia movement during lumbar flexion? An observational laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shihfan Jack; Woledge, Roger C; Morrissey, Dylan

    2016-10-01

    Changes in thoracolumbar fascial thickness, structure and shear strain are associated with lower back pain (LBP). Therapeutic taping techniques such as Kinesio-Taping (KT) are increasingly used to treat LBP, albeit with variable effects and unclear mechanisms. However, evidence for quantifying how treatment effects in vivo fascia properties is inadequate. We therefore aimed to explore taping mechanisms using an in vivo ultrasound measurement. Thoracolumbar ultrasound videos of known orientations and positions were taken from 12 asymptomatic participants (8 males and 4 females, aged 22.9 ± 3.59) while performing velocity-guided lumbar flexion with and without KT applied. An automated algorithm using cross-correlation to track contiguous tissue layers across sequential frames in the sagittal plane, was developed and applied to two movements of each subject in each taping condition. Differences of inter-tissue movements and paracutaneous translation at tissue boundaries were compared. Significant reduction in the mean movement of subcutaneous tissue during lumbar flexion before and after taping was found. There was no difference in other observed tissue layers. Tissue paracutaneous translations at three boundaries were significantly reduced during lumbar flexion when KT was applied (skin-subcutaneous: 0.25 mm, p < 0.01; subcutaneous-perimuscular tissue: 0.5 mm, p = 0.02; and perimuscular-muscle: 0.46, p = 0.05). No overall reduction in lumbar flexion was found (p = 0.10). KT reduced subcutaneous inter-tissue movement and paracutaneous translation in the superficial thoracolumbar fascia during lumbar flexion, and the relationship of such difference to symptomatic change merits exploration. Combining ultrasound data with muscle activation information may be useful to reveal potential mechanisms of therapeutic taping in patients with LBP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neck muscle fatigue alters the cervical flexion relaxation ratio in sub-clinical neck pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihhosseinian, Mahboobeh; Holmes, Michael W R; Ferguson, Brad; Murphy, Bernadette

    2015-06-01

    The cervical flexion relaxation ratio is lower in neck pain patients compared to healthy controls. Fatigue modulates the onset and offset angles of the silent period in both the lumbar and cervical spine in healthy individuals; however, this response has not been studied with neck pain patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if cervical extensor fatigue would alter the parameters of the cervical flexion relaxation more in a neck pain group than a healthy control group. Thirteen healthy and twelve neck pain patients participated. Cervical extensor activity was examined bilaterally and kinematics of the neck and head were collected. An isometric, repetitive neck extension task at 70% of maximum elicited fatigue. Participants performed 3 trials of maximal cervical flexion both pre and post fatigue. The healthy controls and neck pain groups fatigued after 56 (41) and 39 (31) repetitions, respectively. There was a significant interaction effect for the flexion relaxation ratio between the control and neck pain groups from pre to post fatigue trials (F1,96=22.67, P=0.0001), but not for onset and offset angles (F1, 96=0.017, P=0.897), although the onset and offset angles did decrease significantly for both groups following fatigue (F1,96=9.26, P=0.002). Individuals with mild to moderate neck pain have significant differences in their neuromuscular control relative to controls, experienced myoelectric fatigue with fewer repetitions in a shorter time, had a lower cervical flexion relaxation ratio at baseline and had an inability to decrease this ratio further in response to fatigue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High early failure rate of the Columbus posterior stabilized high-flexion knee prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woon-Hwa; Jeong, Jae-Heon; Ha, Yong-Chan; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2012-05-01

    Most studies report high survivorship rates for TKAs, however, we observed higher than anticipated rates of dislocation and femoral component loosening after implanting a Columbus posterior stabilized prosthesis. We therefore determined (1) the incidence of dislocation and aseptic loosening that occurred after implantation of posterior stabilized high-flexion prostheses in TKAs, (2) the causative factors of dislocation and aseptic femoral component loosening when comparing two designs of prostheses, and (3) the mechanisms of dislocation. We retrospectively reviewed 319 patients who underwent 384 TKAs from May 2007 to July 2008. These patients had been assigned alternately to receive a Scorpio posterior stabilized knee prosthesis (Group I, 158 patients, 187 knees) or a Columbus posterior stabilized knee prosthesis (Group II, 161 patients, 197 knees). We followed the patients with clinical and radiographic evaluations for a minimum of 24 months (mean, 26 months; range, 24-38 months). Ten retrieved prostheses were examined visually. Ten dislocations (5.1%; 10 of 197 knees) and seven aseptic loosenings of femoral components (3.6%; seven of 197 knees) occurred in Group II at a mean of 10.9 months postoperatively. However, no dislocation or loosening occurred in patients in Group I. Most dislocations were associated with varus flexion or flexion rotation movements during normal daily activities. The cam jump distance at 90º flexion for the Columbus prosthesis was lower than for the Scorpio prosthesis. We observed a high rate of early failure during short-term followup after implantation of a Columbus posterior stabilized prosthesis. It appears that early failures of the Columbus design were related to a different cam-post design attributable to a low jump distance during knee flexion. We no longer recommend using this device. Level II, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  13. Use of an Artificial Ligament Decreases Hip Dislocation and Improves Limb Function After Total Femoral Prosthetic Replacement Following Femoral Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhiye; Tang, Shun; Yang, Rongli; Tang, Xiaodong; Ji, Tao; Guo, Wei

    2017-12-27

    Hip dislocation is a major complication of total femoral prosthetic reconstruction (TFR) after femoral tumor resection. Hip dislocation can occur because of inadequate functional abductor musculature, inadequate hip capsule repair, or a long lever arm after total femur replacement. To eliminate the negative effects of these factors on the risk of hip dislocation, the use of artificial ligaments may help to increase the stability of the hip joint. We aimed to determine whether application of an artificial ligament would improve limb function and active range of movement (ROM) after TFR. Fifty-eight patients who underwent femoral tumor resection and TFR were included. A band-shaped artificial ligament was wrapped spirally around the proximal site of the total femur prosthesis for periacetabular soft tissue reconstruction in 12 patients. The other 46 patients did not consent to receiving the artificial ligament. Complications including hip dislocation and infection, limb function, and active hip ROM were compared between patients who did and did not receive the artificial ligament. The hip dislocation rate was lower in the patients who received the artificial ligament. The risk of deep infection did not differ between groups. The group that received the ligament also achieved better limb function and active ROM on flexion and abduction. Patients treated with total femur resection and endoprosthetic replacement with an artificial ligament for periacetabular soft tissue reconstruction had a more stable hip joint, better limb function, and greater active hip ROM than did patients who did not receive an artificial ligament. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, B. [Hoeglands Hospital, Eksjoe (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery; Jonsson, K. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology; Redlund-Johnell, I. [Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2003-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and radiological characteristics of osteochondritis dissecans (OD) of the hip and the outcome of this condition after treatment. Material and Methods: Twelve male and 3 female patients with OD were retrospectively studied. Six patients had a history of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD) and among them 2 also had had a trauma to the hip. A further 5 had had trauma and 1 a developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH). The remaining 3 patients had no history of previous hip disease or trauma. All patients were examined with plain radiography, 7 with MR, 3 with CT and 2 with hip arthrography. Results: All OD lesions were detected at plain radiography, and most of them were located near the fovea. At MR the lesions had low signal intensity at T1-weighted sequences, and 6/7 had edema or fluid collection in or adjacent to the lesion on T2-weighted sequences. The early treatment in 7 patients was surgery, 2 had had conservative treatment and 6 no treatment. At follow-up 12 years after radiological diagnosis, 5 patients had hip arthrosis, 4 of whom were treated with arthroplasty. All but 3 had reduced hip rotation and all but 2 (with arthroplasty) had load pain. Three of the patients with earlier surgery had not developed arthrosis. Conclusions: OD lesions are usually well seen with plain radiography. There is a great risk of developing early arthrosis and it seems that early surgery is connected with arthrosis development. Thus only symptomatic treatment is recommended.

  15. Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, B.; Jonsson, K.; Redlund-Johnell, I.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and radiological characteristics of osteochondritis dissecans (OD) of the hip and the outcome of this condition after treatment. Material and Methods: Twelve male and 3 female patients with OD were retrospectively studied. Six patients had a history of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD) and among them 2 also had had a trauma to the hip. A further 5 had had trauma and 1 a developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH). The remaining 3 patients had no history of previous hip disease or trauma. All patients were examined with plain radiography, 7 with MR, 3 with CT and 2 with hip arthrography. Results: All OD lesions were detected at plain radiography, and most of them were located near the fovea. At MR the lesions had low signal intensity at T1-weighted sequences, and 6/7 had edema or fluid collection in or adjacent to the lesion on T2-weighted sequences. The early treatment in 7 patients was surgery, 2 had had conservative treatment and 6 no treatment. At follow-up 12 years after radiological diagnosis, 5 patients had hip arthrosis, 4 of whom were treated with arthroplasty. All but 3 had reduced hip rotation and all but 2 (with arthroplasty) had load pain. Three of the patients with earlier surgery had not developed arthrosis. Conclusions: OD lesions are usually well seen with plain radiography. There is a great risk of developing early arthrosis and it seems that early surgery is connected with arthrosis development. Thus only symptomatic treatment is recommended

  16. Diabetic patients with and without peripheral neuropathy reveal different hip and ankle biomechanical strategies during stair descent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja P. Picon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The progression of diabetes and the challenge of daily tasks may result in changes in biomechanical strategies. Descending stairs is a common task that patients have to deal with, however it still has not been properly studied in this population. OBJECTIVES: We describe and compare the net joint moments and kinematics of the lower limbs in diabetic individuals with and without peripheral neuropathy and healthy controls during stair descent. METHOD: Forty-two adults were assessed: control group (13, diabetic group (14, and neuropathic diabetic group (15. The flexor and extensor net moment peaks and joint angles of the hip, knee, and ankle were described and compared in terms of effect size and ANOVAs (p<0.05. RESULTS: Both diabetic groups presented greater dorsiflexion [large effect size] and a smaller hip extensor moment [large effect size] in the weight acceptance phase. In the propulsion phase, diabetics with and without neuropathy showed a greater hip flexor moment [large effect size] and smaller ankle extension [large effect size]. CONCLUSION: Diabetic patients, even without neuropathy, revealed poor eccentric control in the weight acceptance phase, and in the propulsion phase, they showed a different hip strategy, where they chose to take the leg off the ground using more flexion torque at the hip instead of using a proper ankle extension function.

  17. Emerging topics on the hip: Ligamentum teres and hip microinstability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerezal, Luis; Arnaiz, Javier; Canga, Ana; Piedra, Tatiana; Altónaga, José R.; Munafo, Ricardo; Pérez-Carro, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Microinstability and ligament teres lesions are emergent topics on the hip pathology. These entities are an increasingly recognized cause of persistent hip pain and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the patient with hip pain. Conventional (non-arthrographic) CT and MR have a very limited role in the evaluation of these entities. CTa and MRa have emerged as the modalities of choice for pre-operative imaging of ligamentum teres injuries and microinstability. To date, pre-operative imaging detection of these pathologies is not widespread but with appropriate imaging and a high index of suspicion, preoperative detection should improve. This article discusses current concepts regarding anatomy, biomechanics, clinical findings, diagnosis and treatment of ligament teres lesions and microinstability.

  18. Emerging topics on the hip: ligamentum teres and hip microinstability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezal, Luis; Arnaiz, Javier; Canga, Ana; Piedra, Tatiana; Altónaga, José R; Munafo, Ricardo; Pérez-Carro, Luis

    2012-12-01

    Microinstability and ligament teres lesions are emergent topics on the hip pathology. These entities are an increasingly recognized cause of persistent hip pain and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the patient with hip pain. Conventional (non-arthrographic) CT and MR have a very limited role in the evaluation of these entities. CTa and MRa have emerged as the modalities of choice for pre-operative imaging of ligamentum teres injuries and microinstability. To date, pre-operative imaging detection of these pathologies is not widespread but with appropriate imaging and a high index of suspicion, preoperative detection should improve. This article discusses current concepts regarding anatomy, biomechanics, clinical findings, diagnosis and treatment of ligament teres lesions and microinstability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling of column apparatus processes

    CERN Document Server

    Boyadjiev, Christo; Boyadjiev, Boyan; Popova-Krumova, Petya

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new approach for the modeling of chemical and interphase mass transfer processes in industrial column apparatuses, using convection-diffusion and average-concentration models. The convection-diffusion type models are used for a qualitative analysis of the processes and to assess the main, small and slight physical effects, and then reject the slight effects. As a result, the process mechanism can be identified. It also introduces average concentration models for quantitative analysis, which use the average values of the velocity and concentration over the cross-sectional area of the column. The new models are used to analyze different processes (simple and complex chemical reactions, absorption, adsorption and catalytic reactions), and make it possible to model the processes of gas purification with sulfur dioxide, which form the basis of several patents.

  20. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahryar Noordin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH is a spectrum of anatomical abnormalities of the hip joint in which the femoral head has an abnormal relationship with the acetabulum. Most studies report an incidence of 1 to 34 cases per 1,000 live births and differences could be due to different diagnostic methods and timing of evaluation. Risk factors include first born status, female sex, positive family history, breech presentation and oligohydramnios. Clinical presentations of DDH depend on the age of the child. Newborns present with hip instability, infants have limited hip abduction on examination, and older children and adolescents present with limping, joint pain, and/or osteoarthritis. Repeated, careful examination of all infants from birth and throughout the first year of life until the child begins walking is important to prevent late cases. Provocative testing includes the Barlow and Ortolani maneuvers. Other signs, such as shorting of the femur with hips and knees flexed (Galeazzi sign, asymmetry of the thigh or gluteal folds, and discrepancy of leg lengths are potential clues. Treatment depends on age at presentation and outcomes are much better when the child is treated early, particularly during the first six months of life.

  1. Excess mortality following hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B; van Staa, T; Ariely, R

    2009-01-01

    Summary This systematic literature review has shown that patients experiencing hip fracture after low-impact trauma are at considerable excess risk for death compared with nonhip fracture/community control populations. The increased mortality risk may persist for several years thereafter, highlig......Summary This systematic literature review has shown that patients experiencing hip fracture after low-impact trauma are at considerable excess risk for death compared with nonhip fracture/community control populations. The increased mortality risk may persist for several years thereafter...... and excess mortality rates for hip fracture. Although a lack of consistent study design precluded any formal meta-analysis or pooled analysis of the data, we have shown that hip fracture is associated with excess mortality (over and above mortality rates in nonhip fracture/community control populations......) during the first year after fracture ranging from 8.4% to 36%. In the identified studies, individuals experienced an increased relative risk for mortality following hip fracture that was at least double that for the age-matched control population, became less pronounced with advancing age, was higher...

  2. Traumatic hip dislocations in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minhas, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate clinical features, treatment and relationship to the time period between dislocation, reduction and early complications of traumatic dislocation of hip in children. Methods: Case series conducted at Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Centre Karachi from July 2005 to August 2009. Children with traumatic hip dislocation up to fifteen years of age who presented in last four years were included in this study. Their clinical information, etiology, associated injuries, duration, method of reduction and early complications are evaluated through emergency room proforma and indoor record. Follow up of patient was updated in outpatient department. Results: We had eight patients, six boys and two girls. Youngest 2.4 years and eldest was 12 years with mean age of 6.2 +- 3.8 years. All presented with posterior hip dislocation. Etiology was road traffic accident in two and history of fall in remaining six patients. Average duration of time between dislocation and reduction was 19 hours range 3-72 hours. Dislocated hips were reduced under General Anaesthesia in two patients and under sedation analgesia in six patients. No complications were noted in eight cases with mean 18.75 +- 13.23 months follows up. Conclusion: Traumatic hip dislocation in children is not rare. Slight trauma causes dislocation in younger age and immediate closed reduction and Immobilization reduces complications. (author

  3. Evaluation of the patient with hip pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John J; Furukawa, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Hip pain is a common and disabling condition that affects patients of all ages. The differential diagnosis of hip pain is broad, presenting a diagnostic challenge. Patients often express that their hip pain is localized to one of three anatomic regions: the anterior hip and groin, the posterior hip and buttock, or the lateral hip. Anterior hip and groin pain is commonly associated with intra-articular pathology, such as osteoarthritis and hip labral tears. Posterior hip pain is associated with piriformis syndrome, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, lumbar radiculopathy, and less commonly ischiofemoral impingement and vascular claudication. Lateral hip pain occurs with greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Clinical examination tests, although helpful, are not highly sensitive or specific for most diagnoses; however, a rational approach to the hip examination can be used. Radiography should be performed if acute fracture, dislocations, or stress fractures are suspected. Initial plain radiography of the hip should include an anteroposterior view of the pelvis and frog-leg lateral view of the symptomatic hip. Magnetic resonance imaging should be performed if the history and plain radiograph results are not diagnostic. Magnetic resonance imaging is valuable for the detection of occult traumatic fractures, stress fractures, and osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance arthrography is the diagnostic test of choice for labral tears.

  4. Isolation of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids as COX-1 and -2 inhibitors in rose hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, A K; Petersen, K N; Thomasen, G; Christensen, S Brøgger

    2008-07-01

    Rose hip has previously shown clinical efficacy in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and organic solvent extracts of rose hip have showed inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2. A petroleum ether extract of rose hip was fractioned by VLC on silica; on a C-18 column and by HPLC. Each step was COX-1/2 activity-guided. The bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of linoleic acid (the IC50 for COX-1 was 85 microm and 0.6 microM for COX-2) and alpha-linolenic acid (the IC50 for COX-1 was 52 microM and 12 microM for COX-2). The COX-2/COX-1 ratio was 0.007 for linoleic acid and 0.2 for alpha-linolenic acid. Linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid contribute to the COX-1 and -2 inhibitory activity of rose hip.

  5. Knee and hip sagittal and transverse plane changes after two fatigue protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucci, Shawn; Cortes, Nelson; Van Lunen, Bonnie; Ringleb, Stacie; Onate, James

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue has been shown to alter the biomechanics of lower extremity during landing tasks. To date, no study has examined the effects of two types of fatigue on kinetics and kinematics. Objectives This study was conducted to assess biomechanical differences between two fatigue protocols [Slow Linear Oxidative Fatigue Protocol (SLO-FP) and Functional Agility Short-Term Fatigue Protocol (FAST-FP)]. Design Single-group repeated measures design. Methods Fifteen female collegiate soccer players had to perform five successful trials of unanticipated sidestep cutting (SS) pre- and post-fatigue protocols. The SLO-FP consisted of an initial VO2peak test followed by 5-min rest, and a 30-min interval run. The FAST-FP consisted of 4 sets of a functional circuit. Biomechanical measures of the hip and knee were obtained at different instants while performing SS pre- and post-fatigue. Repeated 2 × 2 ANOVAs were conducted to examine task and fatigue differences. Alpha level set a priori at 0.05. Results During the FAST-FP, participants had increased knee internal rotation at initial contact (IC) (12.5 ± 5.9°) when compared to the SLO-FP (7.9 ± 5.4°, p < 0.001). For hip flexion at IC, pre-fatigue had increased angles (36.4 ± 8.4°) compared to post-fatigue (30.4 ± 9.3°, p = 0.003), also greater knee flexion during pre-fatigue (25.6 ± 6.8°) than post-fatigue (22.4 ± 8.4°, p = 0.022). Conclusion The results of this study showed that hip and knee mechanics were substantially altered during both fatigue conditions. PMID:21636322

  6. Developmental hip dysplasia in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors define adolescence and developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH. Special attention is paid to pathological findings characteristic of DDH in adolescence (unrecognized and untreated DDH; treated DDH, but non-terminated treatment; DDH diagnosed with delay, inadequately treated, with complications. The authors emphasise that DDH treatment has to be successfully terminated well before the adolescence; possibilities are explained on management modes at the time of adolescence, and possible persons guilty for the persistence of later hip problems are indicated. Based on the authors' experience and having in mind all surgical possibilities for the treatment (pelvic osteotomies, femoral osteotomies, trochanteroplasties, leg length equalization procedures the authors propose treatment protocols. The intention is to provide better treatment results and to prevent secondary hip arthrosis. Furthermore, how to improve the struggle against DDH is suggested.

  7. MRI of the hip joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerny, C.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Imhof, H.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed to diagnose many pathologic conditions affecting the hip joint. Either conventional MRI (without contrast enhancement of the joint cavity) or MR arthrography is used to detect and most accurately differentiate hip joint pathologies. Conventional MRI is performed in cases of bone marrow edema, necrosis, arthrosis and especially the so-called ''activated arthrosis'', as well as in inflammatory and tumorous entities. MR arthography, which has only recently become available for use, is excellently suited for diagnosing lesions of the acetabular labrum, cartilage lesions, and free articular bodies. This article provides an overview about MRI characteristics and their accuracy of hip joint diseases and the impact on the therapeutic procedure. (orig.)

  8. Properties of Rose Hip Marmalades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Yildiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rose hip, also known as wild rose, is a summer fruit. The aim of this research is to present physical, chemical, rheological, sensory and antioxidant properties of rose hip marmalades. Rose hips cultivated in Turkey are processed into pulp and then marmalade is made by using vacuum evaporator or classical method. For the purposes of this investigation, marmalades produced on a factory scale using two methods were compared to commercial marmalades purchased on market. The marmalades exhibited high levels of antioxidant activity as well as total phenolic content. The consistency indices for the marmalades were determined to be between 64.2 and 321 Pa·s^n. Colour parameters, namely L, a, b, were measured and correlations between the examined parameters were calculated.

  9. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA, calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality.

  10. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  11. Temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-23

    A temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by the integration of a resistive heating element and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Additionally, means are provided to thermally isolate the heated column from their surroundings. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  12. Load-bearing evaluation of spinal posterior column by measuring surface strain from lumbar pedicles. An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peidong; Zhao, Weidong; Bi, Zhenyu; Wu, Changfu; Ouyang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of the load transfer within spinal posterior column of lumbar spine is necessary to determine the influence of mechanical factors on potential mechanisms of the motion-sparing implant such as artificial intervertebral disc and the dynamic spine stabilization systems. In this study, a new method has been developed for evaluating the load bearing of spinal posterior column by the surface strain of spinal pedicle response to the loading of spinal segment. Six cadaveric lumbar spine segments were biomechanically evaluated between levels L1 and L5 in intact condition and the strain gauges were pasted to an inferior surface of L2 pedicles. Multidirectional flexibility testing used the Panjabi testing protocol; pure moments for the intact condition with overall spinal motion and unconstrained intact moments of ±8 Nm were used for flexion-extension and lateral bending testing. High correlation coefficient (0.967-0.998) indicated a good agreement between the load of spinal segment and the surface strain of pedicle in all loading directions. Principal compressive strain could be observed in flexion direction and tensile strain in extension direction, respectively. In conclusion, the new method seems to be effective for evaluating posterior spinal column loads using pedicles' surface strain data collected during biomechanical testing of spine segments.

  13. Finger island flaps for treatment of dermato-desmogenic flexion contractures of proximal interphalangeal joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Antonova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue defect will form after operative treatment of the dermato-desmogenic flexion contractures of fingers interphalangeal joints of the 2–3 grades after excision of the scar. Using the island flaps (Littler at the central vascular pedicle is one of the classical methods of plastic closure of such defects. Goal. To study the effectiveness of the surgical treatment of dermato-desmogenic flexion contractures of proximal interphalangeal joints of the fingers by using finger island flaps at the central vascular or neuro-vascular pedicle. Materials and methods. 14 operations were carried out on 13 patients for removing dermato-desmogenic flexion contractures of proximal interphalangeal (PIP joints of triphalangeal fingers over a 2-year period (2013–2015. The group included patients with a flexion contracture of the 2–3 grades PIP joints of triphalangeal fingers. Operations were performed on average 5 months after the injury (from 1.5 up to 16 months. Finger island flap in all cases was taken from adjacent finger by using the blood supply of their common finger artery. In all cases the island flap on the central pedicel was used, in 9 cases digital nerve was included in the pedicle (Littler. Closure of donor wound was made with free-skin grafts. Permanent splinting of the hand with extension of the interphalangeal joints and moderate flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joints were performed during 7–8 days after surgery, then exercise therapy was prescribed. Results. The results were estimated 6 and 12 months after surgery. All the results were regarded as excellent. In 5 cases of using the flap on a vascular pedicle flap hypoesthesia was detected, that has not led to dysfunction of the hand. Contracture recurrence during follow-up was not observed. Conclusions. Using the surgery for treatment of dermato-desmogenic flexion contractures of proximal interphalangeal joints of the fingers with the island flaps at the central vascular or neuro

  14. Blood pressure and calf muscle oxygen extraction during plantar flexion exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, J Carter; Miller, Amanda J; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F; Proctor, David N; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Muller, Matthew D

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects 200 million people worldwide. Although PAD primarily affects large arteries, it is also associated with microvascular dysfunction, an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise, and high cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that fatiguing plantar flexion exercise that evokes claudication elicits a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation (SmO 2 ) and a higher rise in BP in PAD compared with age-matched healthy subjects, but low-intensity steady-state plantar flexion elicits similar responses between groups. In the first experiment, eight patients with PAD and eight healthy controls performed fatiguing plantar flexion exercise (from 0.5 to 7 kg for up to 14 min). In the second experiment, seven patients with PAD and seven healthy controls performed low-intensity plantar flexion exercise (2.0 kg for 14 min). BP, heart rate (HR), and SmO 2 were measured continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). SmO 2 is the ratio of oxygenated hemoglobin to total hemoglobin, expressed as a percent. At fatigue, patients with PAD had a greater increase in mean arterial BP (18 ± 2 vs. vs. 10 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.029) and HR (14 ± 2 vs. 6 ± 2 beats/min, P = 0.033) and a greater reduction in SmO 2 (-54 ± 10 vs. -12 ± 4%, P = 0.001). However, both groups had similar physiological responses to low-intensity, nonpainful plantar flexion exercise. These data suggest that patients with PAD have altered oxygen uptake and/or utilization during fatiguing exercise coincident with an augmented BP response. NEW & NOTEWORTHY In this laboratory study, patients with peripheral artery disease performed plantar flexion exercise in the supine posture until symptoms of claudication occurred. Relative to age- and sex-matched healthy subjects we found that patients had a higher blood pressure response, a higher heart rate response, and a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation as

  15. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 000368.htm Deciding to have knee or hip replacement To use the sharing features on this page, ... a decision. Who Benefits From Knee or hip Replacement Surgery? The most common reason to have a ...

  16. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lose blood during and after hip or knee replacement surgery. Some people need a blood transfusion during ... higher during and soon after hip or knee replacement surgery. Sitting or lying down for long periods ...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.755 - Column anchorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Column anchorage. 1926.755 Section 1926.755 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.755 Column anchorage. (a) General requirements for erection stability. (1) All columns shall be anchored by a minimum of 4 anchor...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3400 Section 888.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a portion of the hip joint...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3370 Section 888.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a portion of the hip joint...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3360 Section 888.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  1. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, J.D.; Jonkers, A.; Klasen, H.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Hillen, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Lab. voor Anatomie en Embryologie)

    1982-06-26

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip joint can be measured by means of computed tomography.

  2. Ultrasonography of the hip and lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard A; Dentico, Richard; Halperin, Jonathan S

    2010-08-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasonographic evaluation of the proximal lower limb includes the evaluation of the soft tissue structures, including tendons, ligaments, or muscles, and the bony structures of this region, include the hip, pubic symphysis, and sacroiliac joints. The evaluation of the hip or proximal lower limb region can be performed in an efficient and systematic manner. Ultrasonography of the lateral hip, intra-articular hip, medial thigh, and posterior thigh are discussed in the article. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hip and Ankle Kinematics in Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Situations: Video Analysis Using Model-Based Image Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hideyuki; Nakamae, Atsuo; Shima, Yosuke; Bahr, Roald; Krosshaug, Tron

    2018-02-01

    Detailed kinematic descriptions of real anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury situations are limited to the knee only. To describe hip and ankle kinematics as well as foot position relative to the center of mass (COM) in ACL injury situations through use of a model-based image-matching (MBIM) technique. The distance between the projection of the COM on the ground and the base of support (BOS) (COM_BOS) normalized to the femur length was also evaluated. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten ACL injury video sequences from women's handball and basketball were analyzed. Hip and ankle joint kinematic values were obtained by use of MBIM. The mean hip flexion angle was 51° (95% CI, 41° to 63°) at initial contact and remained constant over the next 40 milliseconds. The hip was internally rotated 29° (95% CI, 18° to 39°) at initial contact and remained unchanged for the next 40 milliseconds. All of the injured patients landed with a heel strike with a mean dorsiflexion angle of 2° (95% CI, -9° to 14°), before reaching a flatfooted position 20 milliseconds later. The foot position was anterior and lateral to the COM in all cases. However, none of the results showed larger COM_BOS than 1.2, which has been suggested as a criterion for ACL injury risk. Hip kinematic values were consistent among the 10 ACL injury situations analyzed; the hip joint remained unchanged in a flexed and internally rotated position in the phase leading up to injury, suggesting that limited energy absorption took place at the hip. In all cases, the foot contacted the ground with the heel strike. However, relatively small COM_BOS distances were found, indicating that the anterior and lateral foot placement in ACL injury situations was not different from what can be expected in noninjury game situations.

  4. The effect of gluteus medius training on hip kinematics in a runner with iliotibial band syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schreiber

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iliotibial  band  syndrome  (ITBS  is  a  common  clinical  presentation in  runners.  There  are  several  hypotheses  to  explain  this  condition  including  faulty  control of the hip joint in the frontal plane during the stance phase of running. It is postulated that improving activity in the gluteus medius muscle may assist in produc-ing  more  appropriate  stabilization and  therefore  reduce  the  stress  on  the  Iliotibial band  (ITB.  This  single  case  study  provides  an  interesting  clinical  scenario  where a single-subject with ITBS was measured for hip kinematics during running, before and after a trial period of classic gluteus medius exercises. The biomechanical data show an initial (pre-intervention increase in adduction position during the stance phase of running on the affected side (in contrast to the unaffected side. This was measured using a Moven motion analysis suit. After the trial intervention period, the relative position of the affected hip had reduced in adduction at both heel strike and at 30° knee flexion. This study provides support  for the theory that hip control in the frontal plane may be a contributing factor in ITBS. Clinicians are encouraged to monitor hip control as well as ITBS symptoms when they utilise this gluteus medius protocol. Further research to establish whether change in pelvic control results in decrease in ITBS symptoms is warranted.

  5. Friction of ceramic and metal hip hemi-endoprostheses against cadaveric acetabula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, L P; Degreif, J; Rudig, L; Mehler, D; Hely, H; Rommens, P M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of hip arthroplasty have dealt mainly with total endoprosthesis, while tribology measurement values of hemi-endoprosthetic implants are rare. The small amount of experimental tribological data concerning materials of hemi-endoprosthetic implants in the form of pendulum trials, animal experiments, in vivo measurements on human hip joints and pin on disc studies report friction coefficients between 0.014 and 0.57; the friction coefficients measured in fresh human cadaver hip joints were determined between 0.001 and 0.08. The HEPFlEx-hip simulator was constructed to test the friction coefficients of unipolar femur head hemi-endoprostheses made of metal or ceramic against fresh cadaveric acetabula. Its plane of movement is uniaxial with a flexion-extension movement of +30/-18 degrees . The force is produced pneumatically dynamic with amounts of 2.5 kN. Newborn calf serum serves as a lubricant. We mounted 20 fresh porcine acetabula and 10 fresh human cadaver acetabula in the HEPFlEx-hip simulator and compared the two unipolar femur head hemi-endoprostheses (metal vs. ceramic). The mean friction coefficients against porcine acetabula were micro=0.017-0.082 for ceramic and micro=0.020-0.101 for metal; against human cadaver acetabula micro=0.017-0.083 for ceramic and micro=0.019-0.118 for metal. The frictional coefficient deltas (metal-ceramic) values of all measurements were Deltamicro=0.004 for porcine acetabula and Deltamicro=0.001 for cadaver acetabula. Box-plots graphics document significantly lower frictional coefficients of the ceramics. The lower frictional coefficients of ceramic compared to metal against fresh cadaveric acetabula may have a clinical impact on the process of the protrusion of the corresponding femoral head through the acetabulum.

  6. Transverse plane rotation of the foot and transverse hip and pelvic kinematics in diplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, M S; Rutz, E; Dreher, T; Brunner, R

    2011-06-01

    External rotation of the foot associated with mid-foot break is a commonly observed gait abnormality in diplegic CP patients. Previous studies have shown a correlation between equinus and internal hip rotation in hemiplegic patients. This study aimed to determine if there was a correlation between the amount of transverse plane rotation in diplegic CP patients using kinematic data from standardised gait analysis. Lower limb data of 134 ambulant children with diplegic CP was analysed retrospectively determining the maximum change in foot, hip and pelvis rotation during loading response. Highly significant negative correlations (P=foot and hip movements and foot and pelvic movements. Equinus at initial contact diminished the foot:hip correlation while it enhanced the foot:pelvic correlation. There was less external rotation of the foot in equinus patients (P=0.012) and more external rotation of the pelvis in the equinus group (P=plane rotation at foot level to that at the hip and pelvis. The likely biomechanical explanation is relatively excessive transverse external rotation of the foot due to abnormalities such as mid-foot break. When under load, where the foot is fixed to the floor, internal rotation of the entire leg occurs. This is due to lever arm disease as a result of the relatively shortened foot and inefficiency of the plantar-flexion knee-extension couple. Equinus modulates the effect. When treating such patients, lever arm deformities at all levels must be considered to result in the best outcome and prevent recurrences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Capsular ligaments of the hip: anatomic, histologic, and positional study in cadaveric specimens with MR arthrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Felipe V; Negrão, José R; Campos, Juliana; Ward, Samuel R; Haghighi, Parviz; Trudell, Debra J; Resnick, Donald

    2012-04-01

    To demonstrate the anatomy of the capsular ligaments of the hip by using magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography. Institutional policies were followed regarding cadaver use. MR arthrographic images of 10 fresh human cadaveric hips were obtained by using a positioning device to arrange the hip joint in different controlled positions. MR appearances of the capsular structures were noted and correlated with those seen on anatomic slices and dissections. Two readers working in consensus graded the visibility of these structures. Tissue samples were collected for histologic analysis. An MR positional study was performed to evaluate the length of these capsular ligaments and the subjective classification of their appearance as either taut or lax in extension, flexion, abduction, adduction, and internal and external rotation. The hip capsule inserts proximally and continuously to the acetabular rim periosteum. Distally, it has a firm anterior insertion at the femoral intertrochanteric line and no posterior osseous insertion. The inferior band of the iliofemoral ligament was best evaluated in the sagittal, axial, and axial oblique planes, and it serves a restrictive function in extension; the superior band of the iliofemoral ligament was best evaluated in the coronal and axial oblique planes, and it serves a restrictive function in external rotation; the ischiofemoral ligament was best evaluated in the axial and axial oblique planes, and it serves a restrictive role in internal rotation; the pubofemoral ligament was best evaluated in the sagittal plane, and it serves a restrictive function in abduction; and the zona orbicularis could be evaluated equally well in any imaging plane. MR arthrography enables visualization of the capsular ligaments of the hip. © RSNA, 2012.

  8. Hip Dislocation or Subluxation After Hip Arthroscopy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplantier, Neil L; McCulloch, Patrick C; Nho, Shane J; Mather, Richard C; Lewis, Brian D; Harris, Joshua D

    2016-07-01

    To determine patient- and surgery-specific characteristics of patients sustaining postarthroscopic hip dislocation or subluxation. A systematic review of multiple medical databases was registered with PROSPERO and performed using Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. Level I to IV clinical outcome studies reporting the presence of hip dislocation or subluxation after hip arthroscopy were eligible. Length of follow-up was not an exclusion criterion. All patient- and surgery-specific variables were extracted from each, specifically evaluating osseous morphology and resection details; labral, iliopsoas, ligamentum teres, and capsular management; generalized ligamentous laxity; instability direction and mechanism; management; and outcome. Study authors were individually contacted to assess most recent outcome. Ten articles with 11 patients were analyzed (mean patient age: 36.6 ± 12.3 years). There were 9 hip dislocations and 2 subluxations. Mean time between surgery and dislocation was 3.2 ± 4.0 months (range: recovery room to 14 months). Anterior was the most frequent dislocation direction (8 cases). Acetabular undercoverage (preoperative dysplasia or iatrogenic rim over-resection) was observed in 5 cases. Labral debridement was performed in 5 cases, iliopsoas tenotomy in 3 cases, and ligamentum teres debridement in 1 case. A "T" capsulotomy was created in 1 case (isolated interportal in other 10 cases). Capsular closure was performed in 2 cases (both interportal). Generalized ligamentous laxity was diagnosed in 1 case. A combination of external rotation and extension was observed in 5 of the 6 cases reporting the mechanism of anterior dislocation. Four cases were successfully treated with closed reduction; 4 required total hip arthroplasty; and 3 required revision capsulorrhaphy. Postarthroscopic hip instability was observed in patients with acetabular undercoverage (including iatrogenic resection), labral debridement

  9. Treatment of tuberculosis of the hip.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Words: tuberculosis, hip, treatment. Between September 1986 and December 1993,. 57 patients were seen with tuberculosis of the hip at Kenyatta National Hospital. The diagnosis was proven by ... LA 7cetahtiltdm and femoral head with early subluxation. FIG 2 Radiograph showing stabltciation of a ttihercltlolu hip.

  10. Hip-Hop and the Academic Canon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Daudi

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the hip-hop movement has risen from the margins to become the preeminent force in US popular culture. In more recent times academics have begun to harness the power of hip-hop culture and use it as a means of infusing transformative knowledge into the mainstream academic discourse. On many college campuses, hip-hop's…

  11. Design of a wearable hand exoskeleton for exercising flexion/extension of the fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Inseong; Lee, Jeongsoo; Park, Yeongyu; Bae, Joonbum

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, design of a wearable hand exoskeleton system for exercising flexion/extension of the fingers, is proposed. The exoskeleton was designed with a simple and wearable structure to aid finger motions in 1 degree of freedom (DOF). A hand grasping experiment by fully-abled people was performed to investigate general hand flexion/extension motions and the polynomial curve of general hand motions was obtained. To customize the hand exoskeleton for the user, the polynomial curve was adjusted to the joint range of motion (ROM) of the user and the optimal design of the exoskeleton structure was obtained using the optimization algorithm. A prototype divided into two parts (one part for the thumb, the other for rest fingers) was actuated by only two linear motors for compact size and light weight.

  12. Pneumatic-type dynamic traction and flexion splint for treating patients with extension contracture of the metacarpophalangeal joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Jun; Horiki, Mituru; Denno, Kakurou; Ogawa, Kazunori; Oka, Hisao; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Collateral ligament shortening causes extension contractures of the metacarpophalangeal joint, and dynamic flexion splinting has been widely used to treat these contractures; however, there are various problems with these approaches. We developed a novel, pneumatic-type dynamic traction and flexion splint to solve these problems. A total of 25 fingers were treated with the dynamic traction and flexion splint for 8 weeks. Every 2 weeks, the average metacarpophalangeal joint flexion angle, total active motion, grasp strength, and pain scores were assessed. The finger flexion angle was significantly greater at the final evaluation, starting after 6 weeks of treatment (p < 0.05), than prior to treatment. Similarly, the total active motion results improved significantly over 8 weeks. Our results show that use of the dynamic traction and flexion splint improves patient finger functioning and flexural angle. The dynamic traction and flexion (DTF) splint appears to be effective for treating patients. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  13. Clicky hip alone is not a true risk factor for developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, K; Rymaruk, S; Paton, R W

    2017-11-01

    A clicky hip is a common referral for clinical and sonographic screening for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). There is controversy regarding whether it represents a true risk factor for pathological DDH. Therefore a 20-year prospective, longitudinal, observational study was undertaken to assess the relationship between the presence of a neonatal clicky hip and pathological DDH. A total of 362 infants from 1997 to 2016 were referred with clicky hips to our 'one-stop' paediatric hip screening clinic. Hips were assessed clinically for instability and by ultrasound imaging using a simplified Graf/Harcke classification. Dislocated or dislocatable hips were classified as Graf Type IV hips. The mean age at presentation was 13.8 weeks (12.8 to 14.7). In all 351 out of 362 children (97.0%) had Graf Type I hips (normal) that required no treatment. Nine children (2.5%) had Graf Type II hips but all resolved to Graf Type I hips on follow-up scans. One child (0.3%) had Graf Type III hip dysplasia and one child (0.3%) had an irreducible hip dislocation. The two pathological hips were associated with unilateral limited hip abduction. Mean referrals increased from 12.9 to 23.3 each year (p = 0.002) from the first decade of the study to the second, driven by increasing primary care referrals (5.5 versus 16.7 per year, p hips required no treatment other than reassurance to parents. Clicky hips with a normal hip examination should be considered a variant of normal childhood and not a risk factor for DDH. However, an abnormal hip examination including unilateral limited hip abduction should prompt urgent further investigations. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1533-6. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF BODY POSITION ON LOAD RANGE DURING ISOKINETIC KNEE EXTENSION/FLEXION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W. Findley

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Isokinetic range of motion (ROM has three distinct phases: rate of velocity development (RVD, load range (LR, and deceleration (DCC. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in isokinetic knee extension/flexion LR exist between body positions. Ten subjects (4 males and 6 females, age 29.3 ± 5.4 yrs, ht 1.71 ± 0.10 m, wt 71.9 ± 12.9 kg volunteered to participate in the seated vs. prone investigation and nine different subjects (4 males and 5 females, age 29.5 ± 6.9 yrs, ht 1.72 ± 0.09 m, wt 69.0 ± 13.8 kg volunteered to participate in the seated vs. supine study. Each subject completed 3 maximal reciprocal concentric/concentric repetitions of dominant knee extension/flexion on a Biodex System 2 isokinetic dynamometer at 60, 120, 180, 240 and 360 deg·sec-1 in the supine or prone and seated positions. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed that only seated flexion at 360 deg·sec-1 (57.6 ± 1.7 degrees elicited significantly (p < 0.05 greater LR than prone (49.2 ± 2.8 degrees. No significant differences in LR extension or flexion existed at any velocity between the supine vs. seated positions. ANOVA also demonstrated differences between seated vs. prone torque, work and power at most velocities while there was no difference between seated vs. supine. LR is the only phase of an isokinetic repetition where quantifiable resistance is maintained and this data appears to support that it may not be position-dependent but position may alter traditional performance variables

  15. Experimental and Simulation Based Dynamic Assessment of Flexion and Extension Movements of Torso

    OpenAIRE

    Gottipati, Pranitha

    2009-01-01

    Low back disorders (LBDs) comprise one of the major health issues in the United States. Previous research used isometric studies to understand the mechanisms that cause LBDs. Occupational tasks involving dynamic trunk movements, muscle fatigue, and spinal instability are identified as major risk factors for developing low back pain. Dynamic stability and muscle forces during trunk flexion-extension movements are studied in this dissertation. Torso muscle fatigue is known to affect th...

  16. Yoga spinal flexion positions and vertebral compression fracture in osteopenia or osteoporosis of spine: case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaki, Mehrsheed

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this report is to raise awareness of the effect of strenuous yoga flexion exercises on osteopenic or osteoporotic spines. We previously described subjects with known osteoporosis in whom vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) developed after spinal flexion exercise (SFE) and recommended that SFEs not be prescribed in patients with spinal osteoporosis. This report describes 3 healthy persons with low bone mass and yoga-induced pain or fracture. All 3 patients had osteopenia, were in good health and pain-free, and had started yoga exercises to improve their musculoskeletal health. New pain and fracture areas occurred after participation in yoga flexion exercises. The development of pain and complications with some flexion yoga positions in the patients with osteopenia leads to concern that fracture risk would increase even further in osteoporosis. Although exercise has been shown to be effective for improving bone mineral density and decreasing fracture risk, our subjects had development of VCFs and neck and back pain with yoga exercises. This finding suggests that factors other than bone mass should be considered for exercise counseling in patients with bone loss. The increased torque pressure applied to vertebral bodies during SFEs may be a risk. Exercise is effective and important for treatment of osteopenia and osteoporosis and should be prescribed for patients with vertebral bone loss. Some yoga positions can contribute to extreme strain on spines with bone loss. Assessment of fracture risk in older persons performing SFEs and other high-impact exercises is an important clinical consideration. © 2012 The Author. Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  17. Reliability of measurement of maximal isometric lateral trunk-flexion strength in athletes using handheld dynamometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Bram L; Pollock, Courtney L; Hunt, Michael A

    2012-08-16

    Lateral trunk-flexion strength is an important determinant of overall trunk stability and function, but the reliability in measuring this outcome clinically in athletic individuals is not known. To determine the interrater and intrarater reliability of lateral trunk-flexion strength measurement in athletic individuals using handheld dynamometry. Reliability study. Research laboratory. 12 healthy, athletic individuals. Lateral trunk-flexion strength was measured using handheld dynamometry across 2 different trunk placements (lateral aspect of the axilla and laterally at the level of the midtrunk) and 2 testing occasions by 2 therapists. Three maximum-effort trials during a "make test" at each placement were completed for each therapist on both occasions. Maximum force output was identified and converted to a torque. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) were calculated for each dynamometer placement, therapist, and test occasion to determine intrarater and interrater reliability. Intrarater reliability was moderate to good (ICC2,1= .53-.77), while interrater reliability was good to very good (ICC2,1 =.79-.81) at the axilla position. For the midtrunk position, intrarater reliability was good to very good (ICC2,1 = .80-.86), while interrater reliability was very good on both days (ICC2,1 = .87-.88). Finally, the standard errors of measurement were low for the axilla position (0.20 Nm/kg; 95% CI .15, .28) and midtrunk position (0.09 Nm/kg; 95% CI .07, .12). Maximum lateral trunk-flexion strength can be reliably measured in athletic individuals with greater overall strength. Based on the 2 positions used in this study, measurement with a dynamometer placement at the midtrunk may be more reliable than that obtained at the axilla.

  18. Axisymmetric collapses of granular columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lube, Gert; Huppert, Herbert E.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Hallworth, Mark A.

    2004-06-01

    Experimental observations of the collapse of initially vertical columns of small grains are presented. The experiments were performed mainly with dry grains of salt or sand, with some additional experiments using couscous, sugar or rice. Some of the experimental flows were analysed using high-speed video. There are three different flow regimes, dependent on the value of the aspect ratio a {=} h_i/r_i, where h_i and r_i are the initial height and radius of the granular column respectively. The differing forms of flow behaviour are described for each regime. In all cases a central, conically sided region of angle approximately 59(°) , corresponding to an aspect ratio of 1.7, remains undisturbed throughout the motion. The main experimental results for the final extent of the deposit and the time for emplacement are systematically collapsed in a quantitative way independent of any friction coefficients. Along with the kinematic data for the rate of spread of the front of the collapsing column, this is interpreted as indicating that frictional effects between individual grains in the bulk of the moving flow only play a role in the last instant of the flow, as it comes to an abrupt halt. For a {reach r_infty is given by t_infty {=} 3(h_i/g)(1/2} {=} 3(r_i/g)({1/2}a^{1/2)) , where g is the gravitational acceleration. The insights and conclusions gained from these experiments can be applied to a wide range of industrial and natural flows of concentrated particles. For example, the observation of the rapid deposition of the grains can help explain details of the emplacement of pyroclastic flows resulting from the explosive eruption of volcanoes.

  19. Mechanisms and factors involved in hip injuries during frontal crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A; Gennarelli, T A; Maltese, M R; Eppinger, R H

    2001-11-01

    This study was conducted to collect data and gain insights relative to the mechanisms and factors involved in hip injuries during frontal crashes and to study the tolerance of hip injuries from this type of loading. Unembalmed human cadavers were seated on a standard automotive seat (reinforced) and subjected to knee impact test to each lower extremity. Varying combinations of flexion and adduction/abduction were used for initial alignment conditions and pre-positioning. Accelerometers were fixed to the iliac wings and twelfth thoracic vertebral spinous process. A 23.4-kg padded pendulum impacted the knee at velocities ranging from 4.3 to 7.6 m/s. The impacting direction was along the anteroposterior axis, i.e., the global X-axis, in the body-fixed coordinate system. A load cell on the front of the pendulum recorded the impact force. Peak impact forces ranged from 2,450 to 10,950 N. The rate of loading ranged from 123 to 7,664 N/msec. The impulse values ranged from 12.4 to 31.9 Nsec. Injuries were not apparent in three tests. Eight tests resulted in trauma. Fractures involving the pelvis including the acetabulum and proximal femur occurred in five out of the eight tests, and distal femoral bone fracture occurred in one test. These results underscore the importance of leg pre-positioning and the orientation of the impacting axis to produce specific types of trauma to the pelvic region of the lower extremity.

  20. Hip Hip Hurrah! Hip size inversely related to heart disease and total mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, B L; Lissner, L

    2011-01-01

    obesity and/or waist circumference. These studies have been remarkable in terms of their consistency, and in the unexpected finding of an adverse effect of small hip size, after statistically correcting for differences in general and abdominal size. The hazard related to a small hip size may be stronger...... for women than men, but is evident in both genders. In this 'viewpoint', we wish to draw attention to the emerging body of evidence and to encourage researchers to continue collecting measures of lower body size in their surveys....

  1. Paraparesis in a patient with Crohn disease resulting from septic arthritis of the hip and psoas abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femminineo, A F; LaBan, M M

    1988-03-01

    A psoas abscess is a recognized complication of Crohn disease. Less commonly, septic arthritis has been described with this entity. The occurrence of both these complications together in Crohn disease is quite rare. A 56-year-old patient with Crohn disease presented with weakness and pain in both lower extremities. Computerized body tomograms demonstrated a large psoas abscess with fistulous connections to the bowel as well as extending into the capsule of the left hip joint. X-ray examination revealed evidence of acute septic arthritis. Electromyographic studies demonstrated lumbosacral plexus involvement bilaterally. The patient subsequently underwent ileocolectomy with drainage of the left psoas abscess, followed by extensive inpatient rehabilitation. Some immediate strength improvement was noted bilaterally. At discharge, the patient remained paraparetic. In patients with known history of Crohn disease, a psoas abscess should be considered when there are symptoms of lower extremity pain, hip flexion contractures, and progressive weakness.

  2. Decoding Finger Flexion From Band-specific ECoG Signals in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanying eLiang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the method that won the BCI competition IV addressed to the pre- diction of the finger flexion from ECoG signals. ECoG-based BCIs have recently drawn the attention from the community. Indeed, ECoG can provide a higher spatial resolution, a higher signal quality and is more suitable for long-term use than classical EEG recordings. These characteristics allow to decode precise brain activities and to realize efficient ECoG-based neu- roprostheses. Signal processing is a very important task in BCIs research for translating brain signals into commands. Here, we present a linear regression method based on the amplitude modulation of band-specific ECoG including a short term memory for individual finger flexion prediction. The effectiveness of the method was proven by achieving the highest value of corre- lation coefficient between the predicted and recorded finger flexion values on data set 4 during the BCI competition IV.

  3. Segmental lumbar spine instability at flexion-extension radiography can be predicted by conventional radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, M.T.; Manninen, H.I.; Lindgren, K.-A.J.; Sihvonen, T.A.; Airaksinen, O.; Soimakallio, S

    2002-07-01

    AIM: To identify plain radiographic findings that predict segmental lumbar spine instability as shown by functional flexion-extension radiography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Plain radiographs and flexion-extension radiographs of 215 patients with clinically suspected lumbar spine instability were analysed. Instability was classified into anterior or posterior sliding instability. The registered plain radiographic findings were traction spur, spondylarthrosis, arthrosis of facet joints, disc degeneration, retrolisthesis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis and vacuum phenomena. Factors reaching statistical significance in univariate analyses (P < 0.05) were included in stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Degenerative spondylolisthesis (P = 0.004 at L3-4 level and P = 0.017 at L4-5 level in univariate analysis and odds ratio 16.92 at L4-5 level in multiple logistic regression analyses) and spondylolytic spondylolisthesis (P = 0.003 at L5-S1 level in univariate analyses) were the strongest independent determinants of anterior sliding instability. Retrolisthesis (odds ratio 10.97), traction spur (odds ratio 4.45) and spondylarthrosis (odds ratio 3.20) at L3-4 level were statistically significant determinants of posterior sliding instability in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Sliding instability is strongly associated with various plain radiographic findings. In mechanical back pain, functional flexion-extension radiographs should be limited to situations when symptoms are not explained by findings of plain radiographs and/or when they are likely to alter therapy. Pitkaenen, M.T. et al. (2002)

  4. Segmental lumbar spine instability at flexion-extension radiography can be predicted by conventional radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, M.T.; Manninen, H.I.; Lindgren, K.-A.J.; Sihvonen, T.A.; Airaksinen, O.; Soimakallio, S.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To identify plain radiographic findings that predict segmental lumbar spine instability as shown by functional flexion-extension radiography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Plain radiographs and flexion-extension radiographs of 215 patients with clinically suspected lumbar spine instability were analysed. Instability was classified into anterior or posterior sliding instability. The registered plain radiographic findings were traction spur, spondylarthrosis, arthrosis of facet joints, disc degeneration, retrolisthesis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis and vacuum phenomena. Factors reaching statistical significance in univariate analyses (P < 0.05) were included in stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Degenerative spondylolisthesis (P = 0.004 at L3-4 level and P = 0.017 at L4-5 level in univariate analysis and odds ratio 16.92 at L4-5 level in multiple logistic regression analyses) and spondylolytic spondylolisthesis (P = 0.003 at L5-S1 level in univariate analyses) were the strongest independent determinants of anterior sliding instability. Retrolisthesis (odds ratio 10.97), traction spur (odds ratio 4.45) and spondylarthrosis (odds ratio 3.20) at L3-4 level were statistically significant determinants of posterior sliding instability in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Sliding instability is strongly associated with various plain radiographic findings. In mechanical back pain, functional flexion-extension radiographs should be limited to situations when symptoms are not explained by findings of plain radiographs and/or when they are likely to alter therapy. Pitkaenen, M.T. et al. (2002)

  5. Muscle changes in brachial plexus birth injury with elbow flexion contracture: an MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeyhiae, Tiina H.; Koivikko, Mika P.; Lamminen, Antti E.; Peltonen, Jari I.; Nietosvaara, A.Y.; Kirjavainen, Mikko O.

    2007-01-01

    Muscle pathology of the arm and forearm in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) with elbow flexion contracture has not been evaluated with MRI. To determine whether limited range of motion of the elbow in BPBI is correlated with specific patterns of muscular pathology. For 15 BPBI patients, total active motion (TAM) of the elbow (extension-flexion) and the forearm (pronation-supination) were measured. MRI of the elbow joints and musculature allowed assessment of elbow congruency. Fatty infiltration and size reduction of the muscles were graded semiquantitatively. Mean TAM of the elbow was 113 (50 -140 ) and that of the forearm 91 (10 -165 ). The greater the size reduction of the brachioradialis muscle, the more diminished was elbow TAM. The more extensive the BPBI and muscle pathology of the pronator teres muscle, the more limited was the TAM of the forearm. Pathology of the supinator and brachialis muscles was evident in every patient. Extensive BPBI may result in marked limitation of TAM. Elbow flexion contracture seems to be caused mainly by brachialis muscle pathology. Prosupination of the forearm is better preserved when the pronator teres is not severely affected. MRI can reliably show the extent of muscle pathology in BPBI. (orig.)

  6. Detection method of flexion relaxation phenomenon based on wavelets for patients with low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougarou, François; Massicotte, Daniel; Descarreaux, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) can be defined as a reduction or silence of myoelectric activity of the lumbar erector spinae muscle during full trunk flexion. It is typically absent in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Before any broad clinical utilization of this neuromuscular response can be made, effective, standardized, and accurate methods of identifying FRP limits are needed. However, this phenomenon is clearly more difficult to detect for LBP patients than for healthy patients. The main goal of this study is to develop an automated method based on wavelet transformation that would improve time point limits detection of surface electromyography signals of the FRP in case of LBP patients. Conventional visual identification and proposed automated methods of time point limits detection of relaxation phase were compared on experimental data using criteria of accuracy and repeatability based on physiological properties. The evaluation demonstrates that the use of wavelet transform (WT) yields better results than methods without wavelet decomposition. Furthermore, methods based on wavelet per packet transform are more effective than algorithms employing discrete WT. Compared to visual detection, in addition to demonstrating an obvious saving of time, the use of wavelet per packet transform improves the accuracy and repeatability in the detection of the FRP limits. These results clearly highlight the value of the proposed technique in identifying onset and offset of the flexion relaxation response in LBP subjects.

  7. Differences in the electromyographic activity of the hamstring muscles during maximal eccentric knee flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashihara, Ayako; Ono, Takashi; Kubota, Jun; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the knee joint angle and angular velocity on hamstring muscles' activation patterns during maximum eccentric knee flexion contractions. Ten healthy young males (23.4 +/- 1.3 years) performed eccentric knee flexion at constant velocities of 10, 60, 180, and 300 deg/s in random order. The eccentric knee flexion torque and the surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) muscles were measured. The results of torque during 10 deg/s were lower than the faster velocities. No significant change was found in eccentric torque output and the EMG amplitude with change in the faster test velocities, although those values showed a decreasing tendency as the knee approached extension. Furthermore, the EMG amplitude of the BF decreased significantly as the knee approached extension, although the EMG activity of the ST and SM remained constant. These results suggest that the neural inhibitory mechanism might be involved in decreasing in maximal voluntary force and hamstring muscles activation toward the knee extension during high-velocity eccentric movement and therefore subjects have difficulties to maintain high eccentric force level throughout the motion. Moreover, the possible mechanism reducing the BF muscle activation as the knee approaches extension was architectural differences in the hamstring muscles, which might reflect each muscle's function.

  8. An artery accompanying the sciatic nerve (arteria comitans nervi ischiadici) and the position of the hip joint: a comparative histological study using chick, mouse, and human foetal specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, A; Hayashi, S; Nasu, H; Abe, H; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Murakami, G

    2013-02-01

    Birds and reptiles always carry a long and thick artery accompanying the sciatic nerve (i.e., the sciatic artery), whereas mammals do not. We attempted to demonstrate a difference in courses of the nerve and artery in fetuses in relation with the hip joint posture. Eight mid-term human fetuses (15-18 weeks), five mouse fetuses (E18) and five chick embryos (11 days after incubation) were examined histologically. Thin feeding arteries in the sciatic nerve were consistently observed in human fetuses in spite of the long, inferiorly curved course of the nerve around the ischium. The tissue around the human sciatic nerve was not so tight because of the medial and inferior shift of the nerve away from the hip joint. The fetal hip joint position differed among the species, being highly flexed in humans and almost at right angle flexion in mice and chicks. Because of deep adduction of the hip joint in the mouse, the knee was located near the midline of the body. The mouse sciatic nerve ran through the tight tissue along the head of the femur, whereas the chick nerve ran through the loose space even in the gluteal region. In birds, evolution of the pelvis including the hip joint without adduction seemed to make the arterial development possible. In mammals, highly flexed or adducted hip joint seemed to be one of the disturbing factors against development of the long and thick artery. A slight change in posture may cause significant arterial variation.

  9. The effect of forearm posture on wrist flexion in computer workers with chronic upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson R Terry

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational computer use has been associated with upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs, but the etiology and pathophysiology of some of these disorders are poorly understood. Various theories attribute the symptoms to biomechanical and/or psychosocial stressors. The results of several clinical studies suggest that elevated antagonist muscle tension may be a biomechanical stress factor. Affected computer users often exhibit limited wrist range of motion, particularly wrist flexion, which has been attributed to increased extensor muscle tension, rather than to pain symptoms. Recreational or domestic activities requiring extremes of wrist flexion may produce injurious stress on the wrist joint and muscles, the symptoms of which are then exacerbated by computer use. As these activities may involve a variety of forearm postures, we examined whether changes in forearm posture have an effect on pain reports during wrist flexion, or whether pain would have a limiting effect on flexion angle. Methods We measured maximum active wrist flexion using a goniometer with the forearm supported in the prone, neutral, and supine postures. Data was obtained from 5 subjects with UEMSDs attributed to computer use and from 13 control subjects. Results The UEMSD group exhibited significantly restricted wrist flexion compared to the control group in both wrists at all forearm postures with the exception of the non-dominant wrist with the forearm prone. In both groups, maximum active wrist flexion decreased at the supine forearm posture compared to the prone posture. No UEMSD subjects reported an increase in pain symptoms during testing. Conclusion The UEMSD group exhibited reduced wrist flexion compared to controls that did not appear to be pain related. A supine forearm posture reduced wrist flexion in both groups, but the reduction was approximately 100% greater in the UEMSD group. The effect of a supine forearm posture on wrist

  10. Modification of Knee Flexion Angle Has Patient-Specific Effects on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Factors During Jump Landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Julien; Clancy, Caitlin; Dowling, Ariel V; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries may be decreased through the use of intervention programs that focus on increasing the knee flexion angle during jump landing, which decreases strain on the ACL. To investigate whether intervention training designed to change the knee flexion angle during landing causes secondary changes in other known measures associated with the risk of ACL injuries and to examine the time points when these secondary measures change. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 39 healthy recreational athletes performed a volleyball block jump task in an instrumented gait laboratory. The participants first completed the jumps without any modification to their normal landing technique. They were then given oral instruction to land softly and to increase their knee flexion angle during landing. Lower body kinematics and kinetics were measured before and after the modification using an optoelectronic motion capture system. The knee flexion angle after the modification significantly increased from 11.2° to 15.2° at initial contact and from 67.8° to 100.7° at maximum flexion, and the time between initial contact and maximum flexion increased from 177.4 to 399.4 milliseconds. The flexion modification produced a substantial reduction in vertical ground-reaction force (243.1 to 187.8 %BW) with a concomitant reduction in the maximum flexion moment. Interestingly, the flexion modification only affected the abduction angle and abduction moment for the group of participants that landed in an initial adducted position before the modification and had no significant effect on the group that landed in an abducted position. Increasing the knee flexion angle during jump landing may be an effective intervention to improve knee biomechanical risk factors associated with an ACL injury. However, the fact that the flexion modification only influenced critical risk factors (the abduction angle and abduction moment) in participants who initially

  11. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  12. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... darker. An X-ray technician takes the X-rays. An X-ray technician in the radiology department of a ...

  13. Reverse hybrid total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangen, Helge; Havelin, Leif I.; Fenstad, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    . Patients and methods - From the NARA, we extracted data on reverse hybrid THAs from January 1, 2000 until December 31, 2013. 38,415 such hips were studied and compared with cemented THAs. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analyses were used to estimate the prosthesis survival and the relative risk...

  14. Imaging of hip joint arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Fruehwald-Pallamar, J.; Czerny, C.

    2009-01-01

    The hip joint is the largest joint in the human body and consequently, its evaluation by diagnostic imaging is highly important. This includes imaging of hip joint arthroplasty, which is used to avoid joint immobility following a wide spectrum of diseases, such as end-stage degenerative disease, avascular necrosis of the femoral head or post-traumatic fractures. Conventional radiography is still the standard imaging modality for the evaluation of hip arthroplasty both directly following surgery and for periodical follow-up. In the majority of cases conventional radiography enables adequate assessment of early and late complications that can arise following hip arthroplasty, such as loosening, prosthetic or periprosthetic fracture, luxation, infection and soft tissue calcification. If the diagnosis cannot be established by means of radiography, advanced imaging methods such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with or without injection of contrast media, may provide additional information. This is particularly true for the depiction of inflammatory processes. Regardless of the imaging modality used patients' clinical symptoms must also be taken into account in order to establish the correct diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  15. HIP IMPLANT ANALYSIS WITH CATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin CIOFU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available CATIA V5R16 is a product of Dassault Systemes, one of the most widely used CAD/CAM/ CAE systems worldwide, with applications in various fields, from the automotive, aerospace, automotive and medical industries. The paper aims to improve the technical, technological and medical knowledge related to the activity of the hip prosthesis.

  16. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for calcific tendinitis at unusual sites around the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kwang-Jun; Yoon, Jung-Ro; Shin, David Sung-Joon; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2010-10-11

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been considered to be an effective treatment for various pathogenic orthopedic conditions. However, it is not generally recognized in treatment for calcific tendinitis around the hip region. This article presents 2 cases of calcific tendinitis at the hip, located in the pectineus muscle and the rectus femoris muscle, where successful treatment was achieved using extracorporeal shock wave therapy. In 1 case, a 60-year-old woman presented with pain in her right thigh of 1 month's duration that had become severe in intensity for 1 week. Physical examination revealed marked localized tenderness over the posterolateral aspect of the right thigh when positioned in flexion, abduction, and external rotation. Anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs revealed nodular-shaped calcium deposits at the posterolateral aspect of the proximal thigh. T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the hip joint revealed a 2.7×1.3-cm, low-signal density area near the femoral insertion of pectineus and gluteus maximus muscle with inflammatory infiltration in the surrounding soft tissue. Treatment was started in the form of extracorporeal shock wave therapy, doses of which were administered in 3 sessions with an interval of 7 days. Radiographs of the affected thigh taken 4 weeks after therapy showed disintegration of the calcium deposits. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Evaluation of ranges of motion of a new constrained acetabular prosthesis for canine total hip replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement (THR) is considered to be the most effective treatment option for advanced osteoarthritis of the hip in large breed dogs. However, a proportion of post-THR patients suffer prosthesis dislocation for various reasons, which may be addressed by a constrained acetabular prosthesis design. The study proposed a new THR with constrained acetabular component that aimed to decrease the incidence of postoperative dislocation while maintaining the necessary range of motion (ROM); and, through computer-simulated implantations, evaluated the ROM of the THR with and without malpositioning of the acetabular component. Methods A new THR with a constrained acetabular component that had an inward eccentric lining and a 60° cut-out on the dorsal side was designed, and its computer-aided design models were implanted into the pelvic and femoral models reconstructed from the computed tomography data of six healthy Labrador Retriever dogs. The allowable and functional ROM of the implanted THR were determined via computer simulations. The contact patterns between the bone or the prosthetic components at extreme positions of the THR were analyzed. Influence of malpositioning of the acetabular component on the ROM was assessed. Results The means (SD) of the functional ranges for flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, internal rotation and external rotation were 51.8° (6.6°), 163.3° (7.3°), 33.5° (5.7°), 74.0° (3.7°), 41.5° (8.3°) and 65.2° (9.9°), respectively. Malpositioning of the acetabular component by 20° in one direction was found to reduce ROM in other directions (reducing lateral opening: flexion: 12°, adduction: 20°, internal/external rotations: < 20°; increasing lateral opening: extension and abduction: < 16°; reducing retroversion: extension: < 20°, abduction: 15°, external rotation: < 20°; increasing retroversion: flexion: < 20°, abduction, adduction and internal rotation: 20°). Conclusions From the computer

  18. [Atraumatic hip pain in young adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Murillo, M; Turcu, V; De Nicolás Navas, M B; Yeguas Bermejo, A

    2016-01-01

    Hip pain in the young adult is a disabling pathophysiological process may be related to multiple etiologies. The process must be determined in order to make a diagnosis and follow-up treatment. The case is presented of a 29 year old woman with anemia, atraumatic hip pain on the right side, and a limp of one month onset. The differential diagnosis includes infectious, rheumatological, tumor, avascular necrosis of hip, hip impingement, hip dysplasia, osteoarthritis and other syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Alumina column Rb-82 generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Y.; Roth, E.P.

    1977-10-01

    The use of an alumina column for the adsorption of radioactive Sr for the generator production of 75-sec 82 Rb was evaluated in both batches and column experiments using 85 Sr and cyclotron-produced 82 Sr. Comparisons of alumina, Bio-Rex 70 and Chelex 100 ion exchangers were made to determine Sr adsorption, 82 Rb elution yield and Sr breakthrough. The adsorption of Sr is similar for alumina and Chelex 100 but different for Bio-Rex 70. Alumina and Chelex 100 exhibit a small fraction of poorly bound Sr which appears as higher breakthrough in the early elution volumes. The remaining Sr activity is strongly bound to these ion exchangers and the breakthrough remains stable at a lower breakthrough value through a large number of elutions. Bio-Rex 70 on the other hand does not exhibit the poorly bound Sr fraction and the breakthrough of Sr remains the lowest of the three ion exchangers through a moderate number of elutions and then the Sr breakthrough gradually increases with each additional elution

  20. Multi-Finger Interaction and Synergies in Finger Flexion and Extension Force Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaebum Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to discover finger interaction indices during single-finger ramp tasks and multi-finger coordination during a steady state force production in two directions, flexion, and extension. Furthermore, the indices of anticipatory adjustment of elemental variables (i.e., finger forces prior to a quick pulse force production were quantified. It is currently unknown whether the organization and anticipatory modulation of stability properties are affected by force directions and strengths of in multi-finger actions. We expected to observe a smaller finger independency and larger indices of multi-finger coordination during extension than during flexion due to both neural and peripheral differences between the finger flexion and extension actions. We also examined the indices of the anticipatory adjustment between different force direction conditions. The anticipatory adjustment could be a neural process, which may be affected by the properties of the muscles and by the direction of the motions. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC force was larger for flexion than for extension, which confirmed the fact that the strength of finger flexor muscles (e.g., flexor digitorum profundus was larger than that of finger extensor (e.g., extensor digitorum. The analysis within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM hypothesis was used to quantify the motor synergy of elemental variables by decomposing two sources of variances across repetitive trials, which identifies the variances in the uncontrolled manifold (VUCM and that are orthogonal to the UCM (VORT. The presence of motor synergy and its strength were quantified by the relative amount of VUCM and VORT. The strength of motor synergies at the steady state was larger in the extension condition, which suggests that the stability property (i.e., multi-finger synergies may be a direction specific quantity. However, the results for the existence of anticipatory adjustment; however, no difference

  1. The gymnasts' hip and groin: a magnetic resonance imaging study in asymptomatic elite athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavasiliou, A.; Sykaras, E.; Milosis, D.; Karantanas, A.

    2014-01-01

    Specific patterns of developmental adaptation of the proximal femur have been recognized in some sports. Gymnastics are characterized by repetitive axial loading and hip rotations in combination with extreme hip positions. It is unknown how and if these forces can affect an immature skeleton in the long term. We sought to evaluate this, by means of magnetic resonance imaging of the hip and groin of such elite asymptomatic athletes. We performed a case-control comparative MR imaging study of both hips and groin of 12 (7 male, 5 female) skeletally mature young (mean age 18.6 years) asymptomatic international level gymnasts with a minimum of 10 years' training with age-matched non-athletes. At the time of recruitment, none of the athletes had a recorded musculoskeletal complaint or injury in the anatomical area around the hip. The study showed that elite gymnasts share four common morphological characteristics on MRI that deviate from normal and are considered to be the result of adaptational changes to the specific sport: high centre-column-diaphysis angle (coxa valga140 on average), ligamentum teres hypertrophy, friction of the iliotibial band with oedema surrounding the greater trochanter, and a high incidence (62.5 %) of radiological appearances of ischiofemoral impingement. Our study showed that elite gymnasts share four common morphological characteristics on MRI that deviate from normal. These findings were in asymptomatic subjects; hence, radiologists and sports physicians should be aware of them in order to avoid unnecessary treatment. (orig.)

  2. The gymnasts' hip and groin: a magnetic resonance imaging study in asymptomatic elite athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavasiliou, A.; Sykaras, E. [Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece). Sport Injuries Lab.; Siatras, T. [Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece). Lab. of Excercise Physiology-Ergometry; Bintoudi, A. [Papageorgiu NHS General Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Milosis, D. [Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Physical Education and Sport Sciences; Lallas, V. [Euromedica Diagnostic Centre, Thessaloniki (Greece); Karantanas, A. [University Hospital Heraklion (Greece). Dept. of Medical Imaging

    2014-08-15

    Specific patterns of developmental adaptation of the proximal femur have been recognized in some sports. Gymnastics are characterized by repetitive axial loading and hip rotations in combination with extreme hip positions. It is unknown how and if these forces can affect an immature skeleton in the long term. We sought to evaluate this, by means of magnetic resonance imaging of the hip and groin of such elite asymptomatic athletes. We performed a case-control comparative MR imaging study of both hips and groin of 12 (7 male, 5 female) skeletally mature young (mean age 18.6 years) asymptomatic international level gymnasts with a minimum of 10 years' training with age-matched non-athletes. At the time of recruitment, none of the athletes had a recorded musculoskeletal complaint or injury in the anatomical area around the hip. The study showed that elite gymnasts share four common morphological characteristics on MRI that deviate from normal and are considered to be the result of adaptational changes to the specific sport: high centre-column-diaphysis angle (coxa valga140 on average), ligamentum teres hypertrophy, friction of the iliotibial band with oedema surrounding the greater trochanter, and a high incidence (62.5 %) of radiological appearances of ischiofemoral impingement. Our study showed that elite gymnasts share four common morphological characteristics on MRI that deviate from normal. These findings were in asymptomatic subjects; hence, radiologists and sports physicians should be aware of them in order to avoid unnecessary treatment. (orig.)

  3. The cat vertebral column: stance configuration and range of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, J. M.; Ye, Y.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the configuration of the vertebral column of the cat during independent stance and in various flexed positions. The range of motion in the sagittal plane is similar across most thoracic and lumbar joints, with the exception of a lesser range at the transition region from thoracic-type to lumbar-type vertebrae. The upper thoracic column exhibits most of its range in dorsiflexion and the lower thoracic and lumbar in ventroflexion. Lateral flexion is limited to less than 5 degrees at all segments. The range in torsion is almost 180 degrees and occurs primarily in the midthoracic region, T4-T11. Contrary to the depiction in most atlases, the standing cat exhibits several curvatures, including a mild dorsiflexion in the lower lumbar segments, a marked ventroflexion in the lower thoracic and upper lumbar segments, and a profound dorsiflexion in the upper thoracic (above T9) and cervical segments. The curvatures are not significantly changed by altering stance distance but are affected by head posture. During stance, the top of the scapula lies well above the spines of the thoracic vertebrae, and the glenohumeral joint is just below the bodies of vertebrae T3-T5. Using a simple static model of the vertebral column in the sagittal plane, it was estimated that the bending moment due to gravity is bimodal with a dorsiflexion moment in the lower thoracic and lumbar region and a ventroflexion moment in the upper thoracic and cervical region. Given the bending moments and the position of the scapula during stance, it is proposed that two groups of scapular muscles provide the major antigravity support for the head and anterior trunk. Levator scapulae and serratus ventralis form the lateral group, inserting on the lateral processes of cervical vertebrae and on the ribs. The major and minor rhomboids form the medial group, inserting on the spinous tips of vertebrae from C4 to T4. It is also proposed that the hypaxial muscles, psoas major, minor, and quadratus

  4. Evolution of the hip and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogervorst, Tom; Bouma, Heinse W; de Vos, John

    2009-08-01

    Man's evolution features two unique developments: growing a huge brain and upright gait. Their combination makes the pelvis the most defining skeletal element to read human evolution. Recent revival in joint preserving hip surgery have brought to attention morphological variations of the human hip that appear similar to hips of extant mammals. In man, such variations can produce hip osteoarthrosis through motion. We reviewed the evolution of the hip and pelvis with special interest in morphology that can lead to motion induced osteoarthrosis in man. The combination of giving birth to big brained babies and walking upright has produced marked differences between the sexes in pelvis and hip morphology, each having their characteristic mode of hip impingement and osteoarthrosis.

  5. Hip Imaging in Athletes: Sports Imaging Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Christoph A; Sutter, Reto; Buck, Florian M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2016-08-01

    Hip or groin pain in athletes is common and clinical presentation is often nonspecific. Imaging is a very important diagnostic step in the work-up of athletes with hip pain. This review article provides an overview on hip biomechanics and discusses strategies for hip imaging modalities such as radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MR arthrography and traction MR arthrography). The authors explain current concepts of femoroacetabular impingement and the problem of high prevalence of cam- and pincer-type morphology in asymptomatic persons. With the main focus on MR imaging, the authors present abnormalities of the hip joint and the surrounding soft tissues that can occur in athletes: intraarticular and extraarticular hip impingement syndromes, labral and cartilage disease, microinstability of the hip, myotendinous injuries, and athletic pubalgia. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  6. Both column fractures of the acetabulum: epidemiology, operative management and long-term-results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gänsslen, A; Frink, M; Hildebrand, F; Krettek, C

    2012-01-01

    Both column fractures, defined as an acetabular fracture with no articular fragment in connection with the axial skeleton account for approximately 20% of all acetabular fractures. The typical type of a both column acetabular fracture is the C1.2 fracture with a multifragmentary anterior column fracture extending to the iliac crest and a large posterior column fragment in more than half of the patients. The analysis of 135 surgically treated patients with both column fractures showed that more than half of these patients had associated injuries. The mean age was 40 years, and two thirds of these patients were male. A high energy trauma was the trauma mechanism in 87.4%. The mean ISS was 14.2 points. The mean articular fracture displacement was 14.8 mm. 65.9% of the patients showed a central femoral head dislocation. An associated posterior wall fracture was present in 34.8% and an acetabular roof comminution in 34.1%. 8.9% of patients had a fracture related nerve damage. Osteosynthesis was performed 9.6 days after trauma. Several approaches were used for stabilization with a combination of plate and screw fixation in 71.9%. The mean operative time was 287 minutes with a blood loss of 1796 ml. Post operatively the hip joint was congruent in 94.7% with anatomical or near-anatomical joint reconstruction in 75.6%. Iatrogenic nerve injury occurred in 12 patients (8.9%). 89 patients (66.4%) could be followed after a mean of 54.6 months. The average subjective Visual Analog Scale pain score was 27.6. Mild or no pain was seen in 60.7%. The mean Merle d'Aubigné score was 15 with 60.7% of patients having a functionally perfect or good result. 61.8% had no post-traumatic osteoarthritic changes of their hip joint. A joint failure was diagnosed in 25.8% of the patients. Analysing only patients with anatomically reconstructed hip joints patients had better results with 69,8% having no or mild pain and a good or excellent functional result. Post-traumatic arthrotic changes

  7. Evaluation of Packed Distillation Columns I - Atmospheric Pressure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, Thaine

    1951-01-01

    .... Four column-packing combinations of the glass columns and four column-packing combinations of the steel columns were investigated at atmospheric pressure using a test mixture of methylcyclohexane...

  8. Comparison of improved range of motion between cam-type femoroacetabular impingement and borderline developmental dysplasia of the hip -evaluation by virtual osteochondroplasty using computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, So; Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Choe, Hyonmin; Tezuka, Taro; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2017-10-16

    While cam resection is essential to achieve a good clinical result with respect to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), it is unclear whether it should also be performed in cases of borderline developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) with a cam deformity. The aim of this study was to evaluate improvements in range of motion (ROM) in cases of cam-type FAI and borderline DDH after virtual osteochondroplasty using a computer impingement simulation. Thirty-eight symptomatic hips in 31 patients (11male and 20 female) diagnosed with cam-type FAI or borderline DDH were analyzed. There were divided into a cam-type FAI group (cam-FAI group: 15 hips), borderline DDH without cam group (DDH W/O cam group: 12 hips), and borderline DDH with cam group (DDH W/ cam group: 11 hips). The bony impingement point on the femoral head-neck junction at 90° flexion and maximum internal rotation of the hip joint was identified using ZedHip® software. Virtual osteochondroplasty of the impingement point was then performed in all cases. The maximum flexion angle and maximum internal rotation angle at 90° flexion were measured before and after virtual osteochondroplasty at two resection ranges (i.e., slight and sufficient). The mean improvement in the internal rotation angle in the DDH W/ cam group after slight resection was significantly greater than that in the DDH W/O cam group (P = 0.046). Furthermore, the mean improvement in the internal rotation angle in the DDH W/ cam and cam-FAI groups after sufficient resection was significantly greater than that in the DDH W/O cam group (DDH W/ cam vs DDH W/O cam: P = 0.002, cam-FAI vs DDH W/O cam: P = 0.043). Virtual osteochondroplasty resulted in a significant improvement in internal rotation angle in DDH W/ cam group but not in DDH W/O cam group. Thus, borderline DDH cases with cam deformity may be better to consider performing osteochondroplasty.

  9. Hip fractures. Epidemiology, risk factors, falls, energy absorption, hip protectors, and prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B

    1997-01-01

    have a high risk of hip fracture (annual rate of 5-6%), and the incidence of falls is about 1,500 falls/1,000 persons/year. Most hip fractures are a result of a direct trauma against the hip. The incidence of falls on the hip among nursing home residents is about 290 falls/1,000 persons/year and about......%, corresponding to 9 out of 247 residents saved from sustaining a hip fracture. The review points to the essentials of the development of hip fracture, which constitutes; risk of fall, type of fall, type of impact, energy absorption, and lastly bone strength, which is the ultimate and last permissive factor......The present review summarizes the pathogenic mechanisms leading to hip fracture based on epidemiological, experimental, and controlled studies. The estimated lifetime risk of hip fracture is about 14% in postmenopausal women and 6% in men. The incidence of hip fractures increases exponentially...

  10. An analytical expression for the D.I.P.-P.I.P. flexion interdependence in human fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zwieten, Koos Jaap; Schmidt, Klaus P; Bex, Geert Jan; Lippens, Peter L; Duyvendak, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Empirical evidence shows that a strong correlation exists between the flexion angles of the distal and proximal interphalangeal (D.I.P., P.I.P.) joints of the human finger. Several authors measured this functional dependence, stating that the interdependence of D.I.P. and P.I.P. flexion is different for healthy individuals and patients displaying pathologies. The purpose of our study is to find an analytical expression for this correlation. Following closely the anatomical in situ relations, we developed a two-dimensional kinematical model which expresses analytically the D.I.P.-P.I.P. angle correlation. Numerical values for the model were extracted from one healthy and one pathological case data set. The analytical form of the model allows for any P.I.P. angle not only to calculate the corre- sponding D.I.P. angle, but after first order differentiation with respect to the P.I.P. angle, it also shows the rate of change of the D.I.P. flexion. The model reproduces well the differences in the angular correlation of D.I.P. flexion of the two healthy-pathological data sets. Displaying the rate of change of D.I.P. flexion versus P.I.P. flexion provides an additional, clear-cut discriminatory tool between normal and pathological states. Information on differences between normal and pathological flexion of fingers is more pronounced and easier accessible from the derivatives of the D.I.P.-P.I.P. flexion behaviour than from direct angular correlation data. The analytical form of our model allows one to establish the rate of change of the D.I.P. angles, resulting in a better analysis of the situations at hand.

  11. The Effect of Ankle Taping to Restrict Plantar Flexion on Ball and Foot Velocity During an Instep Kick in Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasadai, Junpei; Urabe, Yukio; Maeda, Noriaki; Shinohara, Hiroshi; Fujii, Eri

    2015-08-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a common disorder in soccer players and ballet dancers. In soccer players, it is caused by the repetitive stress of ankle plantar flexion due to instep kicking. Protective ankle dorsiflexion taping is recommended with the belief that it prevents posterior ankle impingement. However, the relationship between ankle taping and ball-kicking performance remains unclear. To demonstrate the relationship between the restrictions of ankle taping and performance of an instep kick in soccer. Laboratory-based repeated-measures. University laboratory. 11 male university soccer players. The subjects' ankle plantar flexion was limited by taping. Four angles of planter flexion (0°, 15°, 30°, and without taping) were formed by gradation limitation. The subjects performed maximal instep kicks at each angle. The movements of the kicking legs and the ball were captured using 3 high-speed cameras at 200 Hz. The direct linear-transformation method was used to obtain 3-dimensional coordinates using a digitizing system. Passive ankle plantar-flexion angle, maximal plantar-flexion angle at ball impact, ball velocity, and foot velocity were measured. The data were compared among 4 conditions using repeated-measures ANOVA, and the correlations between ball velocity and foot velocity and between ball velocity and toe velocity were calculated. Ankle dorsiflexion taping could gradually limit both passive plantar flexion and plantar flexion at the impact. Furthermore, limitation of 0° and 15° reduced the ball velocity generated by instep kicks. Plantar-flexion-limiting taping at 30° has a potential to prevent posterior ankle impingement without decreasing the ball velocity generated by soccer instep kicks.

  12. Oscillating water column structural model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Guild [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jepsen, Richard Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  13. Ultrasound-Guided Hip Arthrocentesis in a Child with Hip Pain and Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Moak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Children presenting to the emergency department with hip pain and fever are at risk for significant morbidity due to septic arthritis. Distinguishing between septic arthritis and other causes of hip pain may be challenging. Sonographic visualization of the hip with real-time ultrasound-guided arthrocentesis may allow faster differentiation between etiologies, hastening definitive therapy and improving analgesia. This report describes the use of hip sonography in a case of Lyme arthritis. The authors review the medical literature in support of bedside hip sonography and discuss how to perform ultrasound-guided hip arthrocentesis. Clinical findings in septic and Lyme arthritis are also described.

  14. BILATERAL PATHOLOGICAL HIP DISLOCATION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy E. Garkavenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pathological dislocation of the hip is one of the most severe complications of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis. The program of treatment for children with pathological hip dislocation is complex, but it has been sufficiently developed and implemented very successfully. At the same time, the available literature provides no cases of treating children with bilateral pathological hip dislocations after hematogenous osteomyelitis. There is no information on the incidence of such cases or in regards to remote functional results. Materials and methods. The results of the treatment of 18 children with bilateral pathological dislocation of the hip after hematogenous osteomyelitis are presented, which constituted 23.1% of the total number of patients (78 who underwent surgery in 2000–2016 for the diagnosis of pathological hip dislocation. Both hip joints were surgically operated on in 12 patients, while one hip joint was operated on in 6 patients. To assess the anatomical and functional state of hip joints, the clinical and roentgenological diagnostic techniques were used. Results and discussion. To stabilize and restore the function of the hip joints, 18 children underwent 30 surgical interventions: simple open hip reduction (19 and open hip reduction with hip arthroplasty with one (6 or two (5 demineralized osteochondral allogeneic grafts. The decision regarding the possibility of performing surgical intervention on the second hip joint was made only after a child's check-up examination was complete and after positive information about the anatomical and functional state of the operated hip joint was obtained. According to these criteria, 14 (77.8% children underwent surgical treatment of the second hip joint 1–1.5 years after the course of conservative measures to restore the range of motion in the previously operated hip joint. Over a period of 1–12 years, 17 patients were examined, 10 of which underwent an operation on both

  15. REDISTRIBUTOR FOR LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J.G.

    1957-10-29

    An improved baffle plate construction to intimately mix immiscible liquid solvents for solvent extraction processes in a liquid-liquid pulse column is described. To prevent the light and heavy liquids from forming separate continuous homogeneous vertical channels through sections of the column, a baffle having radially placed rectangular louvers with deflection plates opening upon alternate sides of the baffle is placed in the column, normal to the axis. This improvement substantially completely reduces strippiig losses due to poor mixing.

  16. Structural design of isolated column footings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi Abdrabbo

    2016-09-01

    The study showed that shear span to depth ratio of a footing and distributions of contact stress at footing–soil interface are key factors in the structural design of the footing. ECP203-11, ACI318-08, and EC2-2004 code provisions, underestimate the structural failure loads of isolated column footings, while BS 8110.1-1997 overpredicts the failure loads of isolated column footings, if punching provisions at perimeter of column are pulled out from the code.

  17. Chronic Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Jeppe; Troelsen, Anders; Søballe, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Limited information is available regarding the treatment strategy and prognosis of non-selected patients treated for chronic periprosthetic hip joint infection. Such information is important as no head-to-head studies on treatment strategies are available. The purpose of this study...... is to report on the treatment strategy and prognosis of a non-selected, consecutive patient population. METHODS: We identified 130 patients in the National Patient Registry, consecutively treated for a chronic periprosthetic hip joint infection between 2003-2008 at 11 departments of orthopaedic surgery. We...... chart review with a minimum of 5 years follow-up by the nationwide electronic patient record system. RESULTS: After primary revision surgery, 53 patients (41%) had a spacer in situ, 64 (50%) had a resection arthroplasty and 13 (9%) did not have the infected implant removed. 63% were re...

  18. Hip fractures in old men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Rondanelli, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Describe 289 hip fractures that were admitted at Hospital Universitario del Valle between November 1, 2003 and June 30, 2004. The patients had the first appointment at 2.7 days after the fallen, 60% the patients were women, at he age average were 75 years. In the hospital 228 patients were operated (79%). The surgery was realized in average at the twelve days after than they were admitted at the hospital. The days in the hospital were in average 17.5 days. The index of Katz at the admission was 3.96 and the Parker index was 6.56. The mortality in the hospital was of 30 patients (11%). The following during six months was in 114 patients of the people that were operated; we found loss of initial reduction the hip fracture in 10% and infection in 4%

  19. The Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundtoft, Per Hviid; Varnum, Claus; Pedersen, Alma Becic

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register (DHR) is to continuously monitor and improve the quality of treatment of primary and revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHR is a Danish nationwide arthroplasty register established in January 1995...... complications. Completeness of primary and revision surgery is evaluated annually and validation of a number of variables has been carried out. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: A total of 139,525 primary THAs and 22,118 revisions have been registered in the DHR between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2014. Since 1995....... All Danish orthopedic departments - both public and private - report to the register, and registration is compulsory. MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables in the register include civil registration number, indication for primary and revision surgery, operation date and side, and postoperative...

  20. Editorial Commentary: Anatomical Vandalism of the Hip? Hip Capsular Repair Seems a Sound Adjunct to Hip Arthroscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Arkel, Richard J; Jeffers, Jonathan R T; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-02-01

    The study "Contribution of the Pubofemoral Ligament to Hip Stability: A Biomechanical Study" by Martin, Khoury, Schröder, Johnson, Gómez-Hoyos, Campos, and Palmer found that cutting the hip capsular ligament allowed a large increase in femoral internal rotation, particularly in the flexed hip, causing subluxation to occur. In addition to providing new data on the role of the pubofemoral ligament, it raises the question of whether hip joint surgeons should repair the capsule-what are the likely consequences?-and whether any beneficial effects persist in long-term clinical follow-ups. For now, hip capsular repair seems a sound adjunct to hip arthroscopic surgery. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermally stable dexsil-400 glass capillary columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Olerich, G.

    1980-01-01

    The factors affecting efficiency, thermal stability, and reproducibility of Dexsil-400 glass capillary columns for gas chromatography in general, and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particular were investigated. Columns were drawn from Kimble KG-6 (soda-lime) glass or Kimox (borosilicate) glass. All silylation was carried out at 200 0 C. Columns were coated according to the static method. Freshly prepared, degassed solutions of Dexsil-400 in pentane or methylene chloride were used. Thermal stability of the Dexsil 400 columns with respect to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were tested. Column-to-column variability is a function of each step in the fabrication of the columns. The degree of etching, extent of silylation, and stationary phase film thickness must be carefully controlled. The variability in two Dexsil-400 capillary column prepared by etching, silylation with solution of hexa methyl disilazone (HMDS), and static coating is shown and also indicates the excellent selectivity of Dexsil-400 for the separation of alkylated aromatic compounds. The wide temperature range of Dexsil-400 and the high efficiency of the capillary columns also allow the analysis of complex mixtures with minimal prefractionation. Direct injection of a coal liquefaction product is given. Analysis by GC/MS indicated the presence of parent PAHs, alkylated PAHs, nitrogen and sulfur heterocycles, and their alkylated derivatives. 4 figures

  2. Preparation and application of hydrophilic monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhengjin; Smith, Norman William; Liu, Zhenghua

    2011-04-29

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) has experienced increasing attention in recent years. Much research has been carried out in the area of HILIC separation mechanisms, column techniques and applications. Because of their good permeability, low resistance to mass transfer and easy preparation within capillaries, hydrophilic monolithic columns represent a trend among novel HILIC column techniques. This review attempts to present an overview of the preparation and applications of HILIC monolithic columns carried out in the past decade. The separation mechanism of various hydrophilic monolithic stationary phases is also reviewed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancharoen, K.; Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency associated with body motion of patients. The prototype is designed based on the constrained volume available in a hip prosthesis and the challenge is to harvest energy from low frequency movements (< 1 Hz) which is an average frequency during free walking of a patient. The concept of magnetic-force-driven energy harvesting is applied to this prototype considering the hip movements during routine activities of patients. The magnetic field within the harvester was simulated using COMSOL. The simulated resonant frequency was around 30 Hz and the voltage induced in a coil was predicted to be 47.8 mV. A prototype of the energy harvester was fabricated and tested. A maximum open circuit voltage of 39.43 mV was obtained and the resonant frequency of 28 Hz was observed. Moreover, the power output of 0.96 μW was achieved with an optimum resistive load of 250Ω.

  4. Trunk Muscle Activation at the Initiation and Braking of Bilateral Shoulder Flexion Movements of Different Amplitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson Crommert, M; Halvorsen, K; Ekblom, M M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if trunk muscle activation patterns during rapid bilateral shoulder flexions are affected by movement amplitude. Eleven healthy males performed shoulder flexion movements starting from a position with arms along sides (0°) to either 45°, 90° or 180°. EMG was measured bilaterally from transversus abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus (OI) with intra-muscular electrodes, and from rectus abdominis (RA), erector spinae (ES) and deltoideus with surface electrodes. 3D kinematics was recorded and inverse dynamics was used to calculate the reactive linear forces and torque about the shoulders and the linear and angular impulses. The sequencing of trunk muscle onsets at the initiation of arm movements was the same across movement amplitudes with ES as the first muscle activated, followed by TrA, RA and OI. All arm movements induced a flexion angular impulse about the shoulders during acceleration that was reversed during deceleration. Increased movement amplitude led to shortened onset latencies of the abdominal muscles and increased level of activation in TrA and ES. The activation magnitude of TrA was similar in acceleration and deceleration where the other muscles were specific to acceleration or deceleration. The findings show that arm movements need to be standardized when used as a method to evaluate trunk muscle activation patterns and that inclusion of the deceleration of the arms in the analysis allow the study of the relationship between trunk muscle activation and direction of perturbing torque during one and the same arm movement.

  5. Effects of a 16-week Pilates exercises training program for isometric trunk extension and flexion strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliziene, Irina; Sipaviciene, Saule; Vilkiene, Jovita; Astrauskiene, Audrone; Cibulskas, Gintautas; Klizas, Sarunas; Cizauskas, Ginas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of Pilates exercises designed to improve isometric trunk extension and flexion strength of muscles in women with chronic low back pain (cLBP). Female volunteers with cLBP were divided into an experimental group (EG; n = 27) and a control group (CG; n = 27). Pilates exercises were performed twice per week by the EG; the duration of each session was 60 min. The program lasted for 16 weeks; thus patients underwent a total of 32 exercise sessions. The maximum isometric waist bending strength of the EG had improved significantly (p = 0.001) after 16 weeks of the Pilates program. The results of trunk flexion muscle endurance tests significantly depended on the trunk extension muscle endurance before the intervention, and at 1 month (r = 0.723, p Pilates exercise program. At the end of the 16-week exercise program, cLBP intensity decreased by 2.01 ± 0.8 (p Pilates exercise program the pain intensified and the functional state deteriorated much faster than the maximum trunk muscle strength. Therefore, it can be concluded that, to decrease pain and improve functional condition, regular exercise (and not only improved strength and endurance) is required. We established that, although the 16-week lumbar stabilization exercise program increased isometric trunk extension and flexion strength and this increase in strength persisted for 2 months, decreased LBP and improved functional condition endured for only 1 month. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Trunk Muscle Activation at the Initiation and Braking of Bilateral Shoulder Flexion Movements of Different Amplitudes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eriksson Crommert

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if trunk muscle activation patterns during rapid bilateral shoulder flexions are affected by movement amplitude. Eleven healthy males performed shoulder flexion movements starting from a position with arms along sides (0° to either 45°, 90° or 180°. EMG was measured bilaterally from transversus abdominis (TrA, obliquus internus (OI with intra-muscular electrodes, and from rectus abdominis (RA, erector spinae (ES and deltoideus with surface electrodes. 3D kinematics was recorded and inverse dynamics was used to calculate the reactive linear forces and torque about the shoulders and the linear and angular impulses. The sequencing of trunk muscle onsets at the initiation of arm movements was the same across movement amplitudes with ES as the first muscle activated, followed by TrA, RA and OI. All arm movements induced a flexion angular impulse about the shoulders during acceleration that was reversed during deceleration. Increased movement amplitude led to shortened onset latencies of the abdominal muscles and increased level of activation in TrA and ES. The activation magnitude of TrA was similar in acceleration and deceleration where the other muscles were specific to acceleration or deceleration. The findings show that arm movements need to be standardized when used as a method to evaluate trunk muscle activation patterns and that inclusion of the deceleration of the arms in the analysis allow the study of the relationship between trunk muscle activation and direction of perturbing torque during one and the same arm movement.

  7. Pneumatic Multi-Pocket Elastomer Actuators for Metacarpophalangeal Joint Flexion and Abduction-Adduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapio Veli Juhani Tarvainen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, interest has been rising towards developing fluidic fiber-reinforced elastomer actuators for wearable soft robotics used in hand rehabilitation and power-assist. However, they do not enable finger abduction-adduction, which plays an important role in activities of daily living, when grasping larger objects. Furthermore, the developed gloves often do not have separate control of joints, which is important for doing various common rehabilitation motions. The main obstacle for the development of a fully-assisting glove is moving a joint with multiple degrees of freedom. If the functions are built into the same structure, they are naturally coupled and affect each other, which makes them more difficult to design and complex to control than a simple flexion-extension actuator. In this study, we explored the key design elements and fabrication of pneumatic multi-pocket elastomer actuators for a soft rehabilitation glove. The goal was to gain more control over the metacarpophalangeal joint’s response by increasing the degree of actuation. Three main functional designs were tested for achieving both flexion and abduction-adduction. Five prototypes, with four different actuator geometries and four different reinforcement types, were designed and fabricated. They were evaluated by recording their free motion with motion capture and measuring their torque output using a dummy finger. Results showed the strengths and weaknesses of each design in separating the control of the two functions. We discuss the different improvements that are needed in order to make each design plausible for developing an actuator that meets the requirements for full assist of the hand’s motions. In conclusion, we show that it is possible to produce multi-pocket actuators for assisting MCP joint motion in both flexion and abduction-adduction, although coupling between the separate functions is still problematic and should be considered further.

  8. Age-related decreases in motor unit discharge rate and force control during isometric plantar flexion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallio, J; Søgaard, Karen; Avela, J

    2012-01-01

    Aging is related to multiple changes in muscle physiology and function. Previous findings concerning the effects of aging on motor unit discharge rate (DR) and fluctuations in DR and force are somewhat contradictory. Eight YOUNG and nine OLD physically active males performed isometric ramp (RECR......) and isotonic (ISO) plantar flexions at 10 and 20% of surface EMG at MVC. Motor unit (MU) action potentials were recorded with intramuscular fine-wire electrodes and decomposed with custom build software "Daisy". DR was lower in OLD in RECR-10% (17.9%, p...

  9. Comportement thermomécanique de l'alliage 600 en flexion 4 points ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ainsi, des essais de flexion 4 points sont effectués à l'aide d'un montage spécifique sous vide secondaire, dans un domaine de température répondant aux conditions réelles de fonctionnement des générateurs de vapeur s'étalant de 350 à 550°C. Le suivi de ces essais en conditions in situ par émission acoustique a ...

  10. Johannes Lohmann : une réflexion ontologique sur le sens et sur les langues

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Johannes Lohmann : une réflexion ontologique sur le sens et sur les langues Les recherches de l'universitaire allemand Johannes Lohmann (1895-1983), linguiste, philosophe et musicologue, se situent au confluent de plusieurs disciplines. Philologue de formation, il soutint son doctorat sur la philologie des langues slaves à Berlin en 1921 et reçut son habilitation en linguistique comparée sous la direction de Wilhelm Shulze. Elle fut suivie par une seconde en 1933 à l'université de Fribourg et...

  11. Cover Story: The Miseducation of Hip-Hop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Jamilah

    2000-01-01

    Some higher education officials believe that hip-hop music is eating away at the morals, and ultimately the classroom experience, of today's college students. Discusses why the gap exists between student and faculty attitudes toward hip-hop, how hip-hop music represents blackness, how people perceive hip-hop youth, the positive side of hip-hop,…

  12. Physiopathology and biomechanics of hip osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Several factors seem to play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of hip osteoarthritis. Among these, an altered biomechanic and neuromuscular integrity of the hip joint should be considered. This is a review of the recent international literature concerning the role of loads and strengths acting on the hip joint, in order to better understand the pathogenesis and the physiopathology of the hip osteoarthritis. The study of these factors might be important to prevent the development of the osteoarthritis and might suggest the conservative treatment. In particular, the role of the balance among the muscles working in maintaining the equilibrium of the acting strengths is matter of discussion. The articular and neuromuscular dysfunction might induce an altered load distribution in the hip, particularly on the articular cartilage surface, and seems to favour the development of hip osteoarthritis...

  13. A patient-specific model of the biomechanics of hip reduction for neonatal Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip: Investigation of strategies for low to severe grades of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huayamave, Victor; Rose, Christopher; Serra, Sheila; Jones, Brendan; Divo, Eduardo; Moslehy, Faissal; Kassab, Alain J; Price, Charles T

    2015-07-16

    A physics-based computational model of neonatal Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) following treatment with the Pavlik Harness (PV) was developed to obtain muscle force contribution in order to elucidate biomechanical factors influencing the reduction of dislocated hips. Clinical observation suggests that reduction occurs in deep sleep involving passive muscle action. Consequently, a set of five (5) adductor muscles were identified as mediators of reduction using the PV. A Fung/Hill-type model was used to characterize muscle response. Four grades (1-4) of dislocation were considered, with one (1) being a low subluxation and four (4) a severe dislocation. A three-dimensional model of the pelvis-femur lower limb of a representative 10 week-old female was generated based on CT-scans with the aid of anthropomorphic scaling of anatomical landmarks. The model was calibrated to achieve equilibrium at 90° flexion and 80° abduction. The hip was computationally dislocated according to the grade under investigation, the femur was restrained to move in an envelope consistent with PV restraints, and the dynamic response under passive muscle action and the effect of gravity was resolved. Model results with an anteversion angle of 50° show successful reduction Grades 1-3, while Grade 4 failed to reduce with the PV. These results are consistent with a previous study based on a simplified anatomically-consistent synthetic model and clinical reports of very low success of the PV for Grade 4. However our model indicated that it is possible to achieve reduction of Grade 4 dislocation by hyperflexion and the resultant external rotation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hip Surgery Candidates: A Comparative Study of Hip Osteoarthritis and Prior Hip Fracture Patient Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, Ray

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess similarities and differences in patient-related characteristics before and after surgery for painful disabling hip osteoarthritis among elderly subgroups with and without a trauma history. Method: First, a cohort of 1000 hospitalized patients were assessed for trends in: perceived duration of the condition, pain intensity, functional performance ability, walking distance, body mass, and comorbidity characteristics among other factors. Then, the most salient of these patient-rel...

  15. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES OF HIP ARTHROSCOPY IN AN ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY POPULATION UTILIZING A CRITERION-BASED EARLY WEIGHT BEARING PROGRESSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, K Aaron; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Evanson, J Richard; Pniewski, Josh; Dickston, Michelle L; Mueller, Terry; Bojescul, John A

    2017-10-01

    Hip arthroscopy allows surgeons to address intra-articular pathology of the hip while avoiding more invasive open surgical dislocation. However the post-operative rehabilitation protocols have varied greatly in the literature, with many having prolonged periods of limited motion and weight bearing. The purpose of this study was to describe a criterion-based early weight bearing protocol following hip arthroscopy and investigate functional outcomes in the subjects who were active duty military. Active duty personnel undergoing hip arthroscopy for symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement were prospectively assessed in a controlled environment for the ability to incorporate early postoperative weight-bearing with the following criteria: no increased pain complaint with weight bearing and normalized gait pattern. Modified Harris Hip (HHS) and Hip Outcome score (HOS) were performed preoperatively and at six months post-op. Participants were progressed with a standard hip arthroscopy protocol. Hip flexion was limited to not exceed 90 degrees for the first three weeks post-op, with progression back to running beginning at three months. Final discharge was dependent upon the ability to run two miles at military specified pace and do a single leg broad jump within six inches of the contralateral leg without an increase in pain. Eleven participants met inclusion criteria over the study period. Crutch use was discontinued at an average of five days following surgery based on established weight bearing criteria. Only one participant required continued crutch use at 15 days. Participants' functional outcome was improved postoperatively, as demonstrated by significant increases in HOS and HHS. At the six month follow up, eight of 11 participants were able to take and complete a full Army Physical Fitness Test. Following completion of the early weight bearing rehabilitation protocol, 81% of participants were able to progress to full weight bearing by four days post

  16. Imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Kyle [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Leslie, Michael [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, New Haven, CT (United States); Menn, Kirsten; Haims, Andrew [Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Anterior hip dislocations are rare orthopedic emergencies resulting from high-energy trauma and have unique imaging characteristics on radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging findings on CT and MRI allow for the prompt recognition and classification of anterior hip dislocations, which guides patient management and reduces complications. The purpose of this article is to review imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations, specifically focusing on CT and MRI. (orig.)

  17. Imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Kyle; Leslie, Michael; Menn, Kirsten; Haims, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Anterior hip dislocations are rare orthopedic emergencies resulting from high-energy trauma and have unique imaging characteristics on radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging findings on CT and MRI allow for the prompt recognition and classification of anterior hip dislocations, which guides patient management and reduces complications. The purpose of this article is to review imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations, specifically focusing on CT and MRI. (orig.)

  18. Resurfacing total hip replacement–a therapeutical approach in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and hip arthrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, D; Ene, R; Cirstoiu, C

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Patients with incipient hip arthrosis may benefit from a relatively new therapeutical approach using resurfacing total hip replacement, but in those with associated osteoporosis, this type of surgical intervention is contraindicated, given the poor quality of osteoporotic bones. We assessed the efficacy of the antiosteoporotic pharmacological therapy to improve bone quality and bone strength in postmenopausal women diagnosed with hip arthrosis and osteoporosis thus facilitating the hip s...

  19. Immediate Effect of Grade IV Inferior Hip Joint Mobilization on Hip Abductor Torque: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Makofsky, Howard; Panicker, Siji; Abbruzzese, Jeanine; Aridas, Cynthia; Camp, Michael; Drakes, Jonelle; Franco, Caroline; Sileo, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Joint mobilization and manipulation stimulate mechanoreceptors, which may influence the joint and surrounding muscles. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effect of grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization on hip abductor torque. Thirty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (grade I inferior hip joint mobilization) or an experimental group (grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization). Subjects performed a pre- and post-intervention test of five isometric re...

  20. Knee joint moments during high flexion movements: Timing of peak moments and the effect of safety footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Helen C; Tennant, Liana M; Kingston, David C; Acker, Stacey M

    2017-03-01

    (1) Characterize knee joint moments and peak knee flexion moment timing during kneeling transitions, with the intent of identifying high-risk postures. (2) Determine whether safety footwear worn by kneeling workers (construction workers, tile setters, masons, roofers) alters high flexion kneeling mechanics. Fifteen males performed high flexion kneeling transitions. Kinetics and kinematics were analyzed for differences in ascent and descent in the lead and trail legs. Mean±standard deviation peak external knee adduction and flexion moments during transitions ranged from 1.01±0.31 to 2.04±0.66% body weight times height (BW∗Ht) and from 3.33 to 12.6% BW∗Ht respectively. The lead leg experienced significantly higher adduction moments compared to the trail leg during descent, when work boots were worn (interaction, p=0.005). There was a main effect of leg (higher lead vs. trail) on the internal rotation moment in both descent (p=0.0119) and ascent (p=0.0129) phases. Peak external knee adduction moments during transitions did not exceed those exhibited during level walking, thus increased knee adduction moment magnitude is likely not a main factor in the development of knee OA in occupational kneelers. Additionally, work boots only significantly increased the adduction moment in the lead leg during descent. In cases where one knee is painful, diseased, or injured, the unaffected knee should be used as the lead leg during asymmetric bilateral kneeling. Peak flexion moments occurred at flexion angles above the maximum flexion angle exhibited during walking (approximately 60°), supporting the theory that the loading of atypical surfaces may aid disease development or progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfait, Bart; Dingenen, Bart; Smeets, Annemie; Staes, Filip; Pataky, Todd; Robinson, Mark A; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ). Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM),vastus lateralis(VL)}, {vastus medialis(VM),hamstring medialis(HM)}, {hamstring medialis(HM),hamstring lateralis(HL)} and the {vastus lateralis(VL),hamstring lateralis(HL)}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping. The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (phamstrings medialis activity) during the preparatory and initial contact phase and an increased lateral neuromuscular activation (dominant vastus lateralis activity) during the peak loading phase.

  2. Gaseous carbon dioxide absorbing column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harashina, Heihachi.

    1994-01-01

    The absorbing column of the present invention comprises a cyclone to which CO 2 gas and Ca(OH) 2 are blown to form CaCO 3 , a water supply means connected to an upper portion of the cyclone for forming a thin water membrane on the inner wall thereof, and a water processing means connected to a lower portion of the cyclone for draining water incorporating CaCO 3 . If a mixed fluid of CO 2 gas and Ca(OH) 2 is blown in a state where a flowing water membrane is formed on the inner wall of the cyclone, formation of CaCO 3 is promoted also in the inside of the cyclone in addition to the formation of CaCO 3 in the course of blowing. Then, formed CaCO 3 is discharged from the lower portion of the cyclone together with downwardly flowing water. With such procedures, solid contents such as CaCO 3 separated at the inner circumferential wall are sent into the thin water membrane, adsorbed and captured, and the solid contents are successively washed out, so that a phenomenon that the solid contents deposit and grow on the inner wall of the cyclone can be prevented effectively. (T.M.)

  3. Column: Factors Affecting Data Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fairbanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear physics, the phrase decay rate is used to denote the rate that atoms and other particles spontaneously decompose. Uranium-235 famously decays into a variety of daughter isotopes including Thorium and Neptunium, which themselves decay to others. Decay rates are widely observed and wildly different depending on many factors, both internal and external. U-235 has a half-life of 703,800,000 years, for example, while free neutrons have a half-life of 611 seconds and neutrons in an atomic nucleus are stable.We posit that data in computer systems also experiences some kind of statistical decay process and thus also has a discernible decay rate. Like atomic decay, data decay fluctuates wildly. But unlike atomic decay, data decay rates are the result of so many different interplaying processes that we currently do not understand them well enough to come up with quantifiable numbers. Nevertheless, we believe that it is useful to discuss some of the factors that impact the data decay rate, for these factors frequently determine whether useful data about a subject can be recovered by forensic investigation.(see PDF for full column

  4. Rasch models with exchangeable rows and columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt

    The article studies distributions of doubly infinite binary matrices with exchangeable rows and columns which satify the further property that the probability of any $m \\times n$ submatrix is a function of the row- and column sums of that matrix. We show that any such distribution is a (unique...

  5. The general packed column : an analytical solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, J.L.W.

    2000-01-01

    The transient behaviour of a packed column is considered. The column, uniformly packed on a macroscopic scale, is multi-structured on the microscopic level: the solid phase consists of particles, which may differ in incidence, shape or size, and other relevant physical properties. Transport in the

  6. Interaction Buckling Experiments of Box columns

    OpenAIRE

    永藤, 寿宮

    1988-01-01

    Box sections present very interesting properties in the field of compressed elements. The purpose of this experiment is to supply experimental data of interaction buckling (overall and local buckling). Test columns are classified into 4 types according to those columns length. Support conditions are pin-ended type by using new developed bowl shoe.

  7. Fringing-field effects in acceleration columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavor, M.I.; Weick, H.; Wollnik, H.

    1999-01-01

    Fringing-field effects in acceleration columns are investigated, based on the fringing-field integral method. Transfer matrices at the effective boundaries of the acceleration column are obtained, as well as the general transfer matrix of the region separating two homogeneous electrostatic fields with different field strengths. The accuracy of the fringing-field integral method is investigated

  8. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2014-11-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  9. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2015-07-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  10. COMPLEX FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF THE HIP JOINT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya S. Krastanova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In relation to the study reporting the effects of applying phased complex rehabilitation in patients with total hip arthroplasty, it has been concluded that the everyday clinical practice in Bulgaria does not apply complex examination, giving an objective picture about the extent of functional status of patients with trauma and diseases of the hip. Aim: The main goal of this report is to present a test which incorporates all known and routine research and in which the total number of points determines the functional status of patients with trauma and diseases of the hip. Material and Methods: Based on the Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, the Harris Hip Score modified test, scale D’Aubigne and Postel and Iowa’s test for complex functional evaluation of the hip joint, we have developed a test including information about the degree of pain; goniometry and manual muscle testing of the hip; locomotor test – type of gait and adjuvants; test for Daily Activities of Life. The test has been developed on the basis of expert assessment by doctors and physiotherapists of the proposed indicators for evaluation and determination of the weighting factors’ contribution to the general condition of the patient. Conclusion: The developed and tested method of complex functional assessment of the hip joint enables our colleagues, dealing with trauma and diseases of the hip, to use it in various research and scientific projects, as well as in general medical practice.

  11. Managing hip pain in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Heidi; Colorado, Berdale; Hunt, Devyani

    2014-11-01

    Hip and groin pain is commonly experienced by athletes. The differential diagnosis should include both intra-articular and extra-articular sources for pain and dysfunction. A comprehensive history and physical examination can guide the evaluation of hip pain and the potential need for further diagnostics. Treatment of athletes with hip disorders includes education, addressing activities of daily living, pain-modulating medications or modalities, exercise and sports modification, and therapeutic exercise. Surgical techniques for prearthritic hip disorders are expanding and can offer appropriate patients a successful return to athletic endeavors when conservative measures are not effective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Secondary capsular laxity of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakey, Caroline M; Field, Michael H; Singh, Parminder J; Tayar, Rene; Field, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    We describe a hip condition with a recognisable pattern of clinical signs and radiological findings thought to result from chronic capsular injury. Between June 2006 and October 2009, ten patients (11 hips), four men and six women, were identified with an abnormality of external rotation at the hip joint. A detailed history and clinical examination was undertaken for each patient. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of symptomatic and control hips were evaluated for bony and soft tissue appearances. The relative positions of the femoral head and the acetabulum were assessed through a range of hip rotation. In affected hips, a loss of normal log roll recoil was observed. Three distortions of the iliofemoral ligament were identified on axial MR images; thinning at the lateral insertion of the ligament, attenuation of the iliofemoral ligament most noticeably on maximum external rotation (60º) and the appearance of laxity despite full external rotation. Stability of the hip is dependent on the interaction of bony and soft tissue structures. Hip instability is recognised in dysplasia and is known to lead to premature degeneration of the joint. Chronic capsular injury may destabilise previously asymptomatic hips with subsequent development of pain in young, active patients.

  13. Eccentric hip abductor weakness in patients with symptomatic external snapping hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Julie Sandell; Thorborg, Kristian; Søballe, K

    2012-01-01

    . Eccentric hip abduction strength was 16% lower in patients with external snapping hip compared with healthy matched controls (1.50 ± 0.47 Nm/kg versus 1.82 ± 0.48 Nm/kg, P = 0.01). No other strength differences were measured between patients and controls (P > 0.05). Eccentric hip abductor weakness...

  14. Resolving controversies in hip fracture care: the need for large collaborative trials in hip fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Sprague, Sheila; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Einhorn, Thomas; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Haidukewych, George; Keating, John; Koval, Kenneth; Rosen, Clifford; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen D.; Motsitsi, Silas; Pei, Fuxing; Yang, Tian-fu; Zhou, Zong-ke; Arora, Shobha; Babhulkar, Sushrut; Bhargava, Rakesh; Desai, Mohan M.; Dhillon, Mandeep S.; Gill, Harpreet Singh; Goel, S. C.; Reddy, A. V. Gurava; Jain, Anil K.; Kalore, Niraj V.; Kammatkar, Nitin; Kumar, Vijay; Malhorta, Rajesh; Marthandam, S. S. K.; Pankaj, Amite; Patinharayil, Gopinathan; Rai, B. Sachidanand; Ramteke, Alankar Ambadas; Sancheti, Parag K.; Thakkar, Navin N.; Thomas, George S.; Robinson, Dror; Steinberg, Ely; Higuchi, Fujio; Kawamura, Sumito; Ohashi, Hirotsugu; Sawaguchi, Takeshi; Park, Myung-Sik; Yun, Ho Hyun; Poduval, Murali; Siddiqui, Ahmed; Chang, Je-Ken; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Fu, Yin-Chih; Lu, Yen-Mou; Acaroglu, Emre; Alpasian, Mumtaz; Atilla, Bulent; Ayvaz, Mehmet; Caglar, Omur; Tokgozoglu, Mazhar; Gray, Peter Campbell; Harris, Ian; O'Sullivan, Michael; Page, Richard Samuel; Parker, David; Richardson, Martin; Solomon, Michael; Tetsworth, Kevin; Walker, Richard; Williams, Simon; Devane, Peter; Broos, Paul; Djurdjevic, Dragan; Brink, Ole; Jalovaara, Pekka; Ristiniemi, Jukka; Blum, Jochen; Bonnaire, Felix; Gerich, Tosten G.; Herrwerth, Volker; Klein, Michael; Knopp, Werner; Krettek, Christian; Mueller-Daniels, Holger; Ochs, Uwe; Oestern, Hans-Joerg; Pohlemann, Tim; Schandelmaier, Peter; Schreiber, Thomas; Seekamp, Andreas; Stuermer, Klaus Michael; Walde, Tim; Walde, Hans-Joachim; Weise, Kuno; Synnott, Keith; Grosso, Elena; Moroni, Antonio; Albers, G. H. Robert; de Ridder, Victor; Goslings, J. Carel; Haaglanden, M. C.; Heetveld, Martin J.; Jukema, Gerolt N.; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Rhemrev, S.; Segers, Michiel J. M.; Simmermacher, Roger; van der Elst, Maarten; van der Vis, Harm; van Vugt, Arie; Verhofstad, Michael H. J.; Bugge, Wilhelm; Figved, Wender; Frihagen, Frede; Madsen, Jan Erik; Nordsletten, Lars; Solheim, Ludvig Fjeld; Giannoudis, Peter V.; Kanakaris, Nikolaos; Parker, Martyn; Willett, Keith; Ekholm, Carl; Larsson, Sune; Rogmark, Cecilia; Abuzgaya, Fathi Hadi; Ackerman, Carel W.; Adachi, Jonathan Rick; Adili, Anthony; Bogoch, Earl A.; Bohm, Eric; Botsford, Deke John; Bourne, Robert B.; Buckley, Richard E.; Coles, Chad P.; Daniels, Timothy; de Beer, Justin; Devereaux, P. J.; Duffy, Paul; Farrokhyar, Forough; Feibel, Robert J.; Flores, Luis A.; Frank, Cyril B.; Glazebrook, Mark; Goetz, Thomas J.; Gordon, John A.; Gross, Michael; Guyatt, Gordon; Heron, Tim; Hoey, Steven; Josefchak, Robert G.; Kaminker, Richard S.; Karanicolas, Paul Jack; Kendall, Richard; Kim, Paul R.; Korbyl, Robert; Korley, Robert; Kreder, Hans J.; Kwan, Stephen; Laflamme, Yves; Leighton, Ross K.; Leone, James; Lincoln, Lawrence; MacCon, Kieran; Martin, David C.; Mastogiacomo, Frank; Mathew, George; McAllister, Patrick; McCormack, Robert G.; McKerrell, Jeffrey G.; Moro, Jaydeep K.; Murnaghan, John J.; Naudie, Douglas; O'Brien, Peter J.; O'Farrell, Terrance A.; Ogilvie, Rick A.; Oliver, John; Panagiotopoulos, Kostantinos; Perey, Bertrand; Perlau, Robert J. R.; Peterson, Devin C.; Petrisor, Brad; Pototschnik, Ralph; Pugh, David; Puloski, Shannon K. T.; Rerri, Bernard E.; Rittenhouse, Bryan R.; Rogakou, Cleo C.; Rosen, Leonard; Russell, Robert; Salo, Paul T.; Sanders, David; Smit, Arno; Song, John Young; Southcott, W. Peter; Tountas, Apostolos; Venugopal, Vikram; Waddell, James P.; Wai, Eugene; Walter, Stephen; Willits, Kevin; Yach, Jeff D.; Zalzal, Paul; Zarzour, Zane; Agarwal, Animesh; Anglen, Jeffrey O.; Appel, Marc; Archdeacon, Michael T.; Ballard, William Timothy; Barzideh, Sam; Berry, Daniel J.; Bezwada, Hari P.; Bhattacharyya, Timothy; Blotter, Robert H.; Bouxsein, Mary Larsen; Brown, Gregory A.; Brown, Thomas E.; Camuso, Matthew R.; Cole, Peter A.; Conflitti, Joseph M.; Crist, Brett D.; Davila, Maria Guerrero; Della Rocca, Gregory; Devinney, Dennis Scott; DiMaio, Frank R.; Dirschl, Doug; Duffy, Gervan; Duwelius, Paul; Egol, Kenneth J.; Ellis, Thomas; Ferguson, Tania; Finnegan, Maureen; Garino, Jonathan P.; Gill, Gurdev S.; Gorczyca, John; Gruen, Gary S.; Haidukewych, George John; Hak, David J.; Hammerberg, Mark; Harris, Adam; Harris, Mitchel; Iorio, Richard; Jadhav, Avinash; Jennings, James E.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Jiranek, William; Karges, David; Kregor, Phil; Kwartowitz, Mark A.; Lammens, Peter; Le, Theodore Toan; Leach, Patrick B.; LeCroy, Charles Michael; Levin, Paul; Lewis, Courtland; Liporace, Frank; Lorich, Dean; Louis, Steven; Lozman, Jeffrey; Lyden, John; Macaulay, William B.; Mansour, Edward Shawn; Marcus, Randall Evan; Markel, David; Masonis, John; Meinberg, Eric; Meldrum, Daniel; Meldrum, Russell; Moon, Charles N.; Moore, Thomas; Mormino, Matthew A.; Navid, David; Obremskey, William; Parvizi, Javad; Patney, Michael J.; Phieffer, Laura S.; Prayson, Michael; Probe, Robert; Prokuski, Laura; Reddix, Robert N.; Reilly, Mark C.; Ricci, William; Roberts, Craig S.; Sems, Andy; Sekundiak, Todd; Schmidt, Andrew; Schwappach, John; Sirkin, Michael; Stewart, Rena L.; Strauss, Elton; Switzer, Julie A.; Taunt, Charles J.; Tejwani, Nirmal; Vallier, Heather A.; Waldman, Barry; Web, Larry; Williams, Joseph; Wilson, Frederic; Wright, George; Ziran, Bruce; Zura, Robert D.; Torga-Spak, Roger; Reyes, Mario; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Barquet, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Hip fractures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the burden of disability associated with hip fractures globally vindicate the need for high-quality research to advance the care of patients with hip fractures. Historically, large, multi-centre randomized controlled

  15. Effects of head flexion posture on the multidirectional static force capacity of the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Ian; Moglo, Kodjo; Storr, Michael; Pelland, Lucie

    2016-08-01

    Neck muscle force protects vertebral alignment and resists potentially injurious loading of osteoligamentous structures during head impacts. As the majority of neck muscles generate moments about all three planes of motion, it is not clear how the force capacity of the neck might be modulated by direction of force application and head posture. The aim of our study was to measure the multidirectional moment-generating capacity of the neck and to evaluate effects of 20° of head flexion, a common head position in contact sports, on the measured capacity. We conducted a cross-sectional study, with 25 males, 20-30years old, performing maximum voluntary contractions, with ballistic intent, along eight directions, set at 45° intervals in the horizontal plane of the head. Three-dimensional moments at C3 and T1 were calculated using equations of static equilibrium. The variable of interest was the impulse of force generated from 0-50ms. Effects of direction of force application and head posture, neutral and 20° flexion, were evaluated by two-way analysis of variance and linear regression. Impulse of force was lower along diagonal planes, at 45° from the mid-sagittal plane, compared to orthogonal planes (Pforce application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rites thérapeutiques : réflexion sur le terrain et les archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Radimilahy

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Rites thérapeutiques : réflexion sur le terrain et les archives. En comparant la façon dont l’écrit sert à noter et à fixer des pratiques de guérissage, d’une part dans les archives de L. Vig et d’autre part dans les carnets d’un guérisseur malgache contemporain, l’auteur esquisse une réflexion sur la stabilité apparente des formes du langage et des pratiques rituelles dans un contexte social transformé.Therapeutic rituals: consideration on fieldwork and archives. By comparing the way in which writing is used to record and establish traditional healing practices, on the one hand in the archives of L. Vig and on the other, in the notes of a contemporary Madagascan traditional healer, the author outlines her reflections on the apparent stability of language forms and ritual practices in a transformed social context.

  17. flexions sur les fondements éthiques de l'acte clinique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Gautier

    Full Text Available Dans le domaine de la prise en charge psychothérapeutique la réflexion éthique est aujourd’hui reléguée à un second plan par le discours de l’efficacité et de l’évaluation. Or cette réflexion reste essentielle même si on peut considérer qu’elle a parfois été réduite à une rhétorique. Partant de la description d’un suivi psychothérapeutique référé à la psychanalyse, les auteurs proposent une démarche de recherche susceptible de mettre en évidence de manière rigoureuse la dimension éthique des actes cliniques. Dans une situation d’inceste la catégorie éthique de l’intime apparaît comme une valeur fondant l’ensemble de l’attitude du clinicien, ce qui interroge la validité d’une approche strictement évaluatrice et qui donc ne prendrait pas en compte cette dimension de l’acte clinique.

  18. Compressive strength of elderly vertebrae is reduced by disc degeneration and additional flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquer, Ghislain; Schwiedrzik, Jakob; Huber, Gerd; Morlock, Michael M; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-02-01

    Computer tomography (CT)-based finite element (FE) models assess vertebral strength better than dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Osteoporotic vertebrae are usually loaded via degenerated intervertebral discs (IVD) and potentially at higher risk under forward bending, but the influences of the IVD and loading conditions are generally overlooked. Accordingly, magnetic resonance imaging was performed on 14 lumbar discs to generate FE models for the healthiest and most degenerated specimens. Compression, torsion, bending, flexion and extension conducted experimentally were used to calibrate both models. They were combined with CT-based FE models of 12 lumbar vertebral bodies to evaluate the effect of disc degeneration compared to a loading via endplates embedded in a stiff resin, the usual experimental paradigm. Compression and lifting were simulated, load and damage pattern were evaluated at failure. Adding flexion to the compression (lifting) and higher disc degeneration reduces the failure load (8-14%, 5-7%) and increases damage in the vertebrae. Under both loading scenarios, decreasing the disc height slightly increases the failure load; embedding and degenerated IVD provides respectively the highest and lowest failure load. Embedded vertebrae are more brittle, but failure loads induced via IVDs correlate highly with vertebral strength. In conclusion, osteoporotic vertebrae with degenerated IVDs are consistently weaker-especially under lifting, but clinical assessment of their strength is possible via FE analysis without extensive disc modelling, by extrapolating measures from the embedded situation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Flexion type supracondylar humerus fractures: 12 year experience of a pediatric orthopedics clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Ali; Kalenderer, Önder; Bozoğlan, Muhammet; Bacaksız, Tayfun; Ağuş, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to review flexion type supracondylar humerus fractures in children and treatment options. Forty-seven patients (26 males, 21 females; mean age 8.6±3.2 years; range 4 to 15 years) who admitted to and were hospitalized in a pediatric orthopedics clinic between January 2002 and January 2014 due to flexion type supracondylar humerus fracture were included in this retrospective study. Fractures were classified according to Wilkins modification of Gartland system. Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning (CRPP) were administered in all patients with type 2 and 3 fractures. An overhead traction or open reduction was applied when closed reduction could not be achieved with three manipulations. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically. The results were graded according to Flynn criteria. Four patients with type 1 fracture were treated conservatively. Of the remaining patients, we were able to perform CRPP successfully in 36 (83.7%). While six patients (14%) were treated with open reduction and internal fixation, one patient (2.1%) was treated with overhead traction. The results were excellent or good in 44 patients (93.7%). Compared with extension type fractures, these fractures are seen in older children and are rarer. One should be prepared to perform open reduction especially for type 3 fractures. In our study, results of patients with type 3 fractures treated with CRPP were superior.

  20. Criterion validity of the cervical range of motion (CROM) goniometer for cervical flexion and extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousignant, M; de Bellefeuille, L; O'Donoughue, S; Grahovac, S

    2000-02-01

    This study used a validity protocol. To estimate the criterion validity of the Cervical Range of Motion goniometer using a healthy population. The results of the 1994 study by Mayo et al show that there are no validated tools currently available for clinically measuring the cervical range of motion. Numerous decisions regarding patient status and treatment are based wholly or in part on joint motion measurements. Because of current budgetary restrictions, clinicians are being asked to justify their interventions objectively, and to do so, they will need validated tools. The population consisted of 31 healthy participants ranging in age from 18 to 45 years. None had experienced cervical problems in the previous 3 months or were pregnant. Data collection took place at the radiology department. After participants were positioned on a stool, the cervical range of motion goniometer frame was set on their head by the physiotherapist. With the participant in this neutral position, the physiotherapist took the first Cervical Range of Motion measurement. The radiograph technologist obtained the radiograph immediately afterward. This procedure was repeated with the participant in fully flexed and fully extended positions. A Pearson's r correlation test was used to evaluate the criterion validity of the Cervical Range of Motion goniometer versus the radiographic method. The two measurements proved to be highly correlated (flexion: r = 0.97, P goniometer was found to be valid for measurements of cervical flexion and extension. Further research is needed on the validity of this instrument for other cervical spine movements.

  1. The Effect of an Isometric Hip Muscle Strength Training Protocol on Valgus Angle During a Drop Vertical Jump in Competitive Female Volleyball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M. Jackson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hip muscle weakness is associated with higher peak knee valgus angles (VA during drop vertical jumps (DVJ and linked to ACL injury risk. Objective: To determine if isometric strengthening (IST of the hip extensor, abductor, and external rotator muscle groups would reduce VA exhibited during a DVJ. Methodology:  Fourteen female volleyball players (7 training (TG, 7 control (CG, VA≥9˚ during DVJ participated. Pre- and post-test gluteal, quadriceps and hamstring strength were measured with a digital force gauge. Three-dimensional kinematics were collected during 15 DVJ trials. TG participated in a 6-week IST program that targeted the hip extensor, abductor, and external rotator muscle groups. Two-way mixed ANOVAs compared mean differences of VA and strength. Single-participant analyses examined if athlete-specific adaptations went undetected in the analyses of aggregated data. Results: TG hip extension, abduction, and knee flexion strength increased, respectively, by 20.5%, 27.5% and 23.5% (P<0.05. No group-level changes in VA were detected. Unilateral VA decreased for 5 TG participants, and bilateral VA decreased in 2 TG participants. Conclusions: IST increased isometric hip muscle strength, but its effect on VA is inconclusive based on group-level analyses. Using single-participant designs, future studies should assess IST and/or dynamic resistance/neuromuscular training in a larger sample to determine its effect on ACL injury risk factors.

  2. Center column design of the PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citrolo, J.; Frankenberg, J.

    1975-01-01

    The center column of the PLT machine is a secondary support member for the toroidal field coils. Its purpose is to decrease the bending moment at the nose of the coils. The center column design was to have been a stainless steel casting with the toroidal field coils grouped around the casting at installation, trapping it in place. However, the castings developed cracks during fabrication and were unsuitable for use. Installation of the coils proceeded without the center column. It then became necessary to redesign a center column which would be capable of installation with the toroidal field coils in place. The final design consists of three A-286 forgings. This paper discusses the final center column design and the influence that new knowledge, obtained during the power tests, had on the new design

  3. Admittance Scanning for Whole Column Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamos, Brian N; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Ohira, Shin-Ichi

    2017-07-05

    Whole column detection (WCD) is as old as chromatography itself. WCD requires an ability to interrogate column contents from the outside. Other than the obvious case of optical detection through a transparent column, admittance (often termed contactless conductance) measurements can also sense changes in the column contents (especially ionic content) from the outside without galvanic contact with the solution. We propose here electromechanically scanned admittance imaging and apply this to open tubular (OT) chromatography. The detector scans across the column; the length resolution depends on the scanning velocity and the data acquisition frequency, ultimately limited by the physical step resolution (40 μm in the present setup). Precision equal to this step resolution was observed for locating an interface between two immiscible liquids inside a 21 μm capillary. Mechanically, the maximum scanning speed was 100 mm/s, but at 1 kHz sampling rate and a time constant of 25 ms, the highest practical scan speed (no peak distortion) was 28 mm/s. At scanning speeds of 0, 4, and 28 mm/s, the S/N for 180 pL (zone length of 1.9 mm in a 11 μm i.d. column) of 500 μM KCl injected into water was 6450, 3850, and 1500, respectively. To facilitate constant and reproducible contact with the column regardless of minor variations in outer diameter, a double quadrupole electrode system was developed. Columns of significant length (>1 m) can be readily scanned. We demonstrate its applicability with both OT and commercial packed columns and explore uniformity of retention along a column, increasing S/N by stopped-flow repeat scans, etc. as unique applications.

  4. Déficit bilateral nos movimentos de flexão e extensão de perna e flexão do cotovelo Déficit bilateral en los movimientos de flexion y extension de la pierna y flexion del codo Bilateral deficit in leg flexion and extension and elbow flexion movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianne Pereira Giesbrecht Chaves

    2004-12-01

    áxima (CM en la flexión y extensión de pierna e flexión del de codo aisladamente y entre la suma de esos dos resultados con aquel desarrollado simultaneamente por las dos piernas y los dos brazos, respectivamente. Sometemos a 60 indivíduos al ejercicio de flexión y extensión de pierna y a flexión de codo a un test de 1RM. Los resultados para los movimientos de flexión y extensión de pierna y flexión de codo izquierdos y derechos en la CM fueron de 31,6 (± 7,9, 32,0 (± 8,0, 20,2 (± 9,2, 20,2 (± 9,8, 29,3 (± 13,9 e 29,8 (± 14,1 kg respectivamente, y se mostraron similares (p > 0,05 y fuertemente asociados (r = 0,96, 0,96 e 0,98. Comparando la suma de los valores unilaterales con los de ejecución bilateral, la CM presentó una diferencia significativa para los movimientos de extensión de pierna (p = 0,04 y flexión de codo (p = 0,03, el mismo no fué observado en el movimiento de flexión de pierna (p = 0,75. Este resultado puede ser explicado por el menor incremento de carga - dos kilos y medio en este último movimiento en relación a los dos movimientos anteriores - cinco kilos. A pesar de la mayoría de los sujetos sean diestros, no hubo diferencias unilaterales en la CM a pesar de no todos estar entrenados. La suma de los resultados unilaterales fué mayor en 9,8% y 4,0% para los movimientos de extensión de la pierna y flexión del codo, respectivamente, de aquel obtenido bilateralmente, mostrando, probablemente una limitación central en la coordenación motora de un movimiento complejo hecho en máxima velocidad y con carga elevada. Por otro lado, en el movimiento de flexión de pierna, la suma de los resultados unilaterales fué inferior a la bilateral (-0,6%, presentando un posible aprendizage del movimiento y adaptación al entrenamiento con pesos a partir de las doce semanas.Endurance exercises (EE may be performed unilaterally and bilaterally. The objective was to compare the maximum load (ML in leg flexion and extension and elbow flexion alone

  5. Perceived loading and muscle activity during hip strengthening exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Thorborg, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Decreased hip muscle strength is frequently reported in patients with hip injury or pathology. Furthermore, soccer players suffering from groin injury show decreased strength of hip muscles. Estimating 10-repetition maximum can be time-consuming and difficult, thus, using the Borg...... hip muscle activity during hip abduction and hip adduction exercises using elastic resistance and isotonic machines, using electromyography (EMG). METHODS: EMG activity was recorded from 11 muscles at the hip, thigh and trunk during hip adduction and hip abduction exercises in 16 untrained women...... resistance training of the hip adductor and hip abductor muscles. Although elastic resistance and exercise machine seem equally effective for recruiting muscle activity of the hip adductors, the elastic resistance condition was able to demonstrate greater muscle recruitment than the exercise machine during...

  6. Surgical hip dislocation for treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind M Chaudhary

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Cam femoroacetabular Impingement causing pain and limitation of hip movements was treated by open osteochondroplasty after surgical hip dislocation. This reduced pain, improved hip motion and gave good to excellent results in the short term.

  7. In Vivo Kinematics of the Scaphoid, Lunate, Capitate, and Third Metacarpal in Extreme Wrist Flexion and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow, Michael J; Kamal, Robin N; Leventhal, Evan; Akelman, Edward; Moore, Douglas C; Wolfe, Scott W; Crisco, Joseph J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Insights into the complexity of active in vivo carpal motion have recently been gained using 3D imaging; however kinematics during extremes of motion have not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine motion of the carpus during extremes of wrist flexion and extension. Methods Computed tomography scans of 12 healthy wrists were obtained in neutral-grip, extreme loaded flexion, and extreme loaded extension. Three-dimensional bone surfaces and 6-degree-of-freedom kinematics were obtained for the radius and carpal bones. The flexion and extension rotation from neutral-grip to extreme flexion and extreme extension of the scaphoid and lunate was expressed as a percentage of capitate flexion and extension and then compared to previous studies of active wrist flexion and extension. We also tested the hypothesis that the capitate and third metacarpal function as a single rigid body. Finally, joint space metrics at the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints were used to describe arthrokinematics. Results In extreme flexion, the scaphoid and lunate flexed 70% and 46% of the amount the capitate flexed, respectively. In extreme extension, the scaphoid extended 74% and the lunate extended 42% of the amount the capitates extended, respectively. The third metacarpal extended 4° farther than the capitate in extreme extension. The joint contact area decreased at the radiocarpal joint during extreme flexion. The radioscaphoid joint contact center moved onto the radial styloid and volar ridge of the radius in extreme flexion from a more proximal and ulnar location in neutral. Conclusions The contributions of the scaphoid and lunate to capitate rotation were approximately 25% less in extreme extension compared to wrist motion through an active range of motion. More than half the motion of the carpus when the wrist was loaded in extension occured at the midcarpal joint. Clinical Relevance These findings highlight the difference in kinematics of the carpus during at

  8. Unilateral hip osteoarthritis: can we predict the outcome of the other hip?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vossinakis, I.C. [General Hospital of Volos, Orthopaedic Department, Volos (Greece); Georgiades, G. [General Hospital of Tripoli, Tripoli Greece, Orthopaedic Department, Athens (Greece); Hartofilakidis, G. [University of Athens Medical School, Department of Orthopaedics, Athens (Greece); Kafidas, D.

    2008-10-15

    The objective of this study was to define, in unilateral hip osteoarthritis (OA), factors predicting the outcome of the other hip. We examined the anteroposterior radiographs of the pelvis of 95 white patients with unilateral idiopathic (56 patients) or secondary to congenital hip diseases (39 patients) OA. The other hip was free from symptoms (pain or limping) at the initial examination and without radiographic evidence of OA; it was what we call a ''normal'' hip. Two parameters were evaluated: (1) the type of osteoarthritis of the involved hip and (2) the range of four radiographic indices of the contralateral hip: the sourcil inclination (weight-bearing surface), the acetabular angle, the Wiberg's center-edge angle, and the neck-shaft angle. Follow-up radiographs for the hips that remained OA-free were available for 10 to 35 years and for those that developed OA, at the time of initial symptoms, range 2 to 31 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of idiopathic OA in one hip had a statistically significant effect on the development of OA on the other hip (p<0.001). Minor deviations of radiographic indices of the contralateral hip is not a predictive factor for its outcome. When the radiographic indices are examined together with the pathology of the involved hip, only WBS was shown to have a significant effect to the development of OA and its type (p < 0.001). The following conclusions can be drawn from this study: 1. Patient with idiopathic OA of one hip is at increased risk of developing OA in the other hip. 2. The outcome of the other hip cannot be predicted only on the basis of the evaluation of its radiographic indices. 3. Among the different indices, WBS seems to have a strong influence toward the development of OA. (orig.)

  9. The association between hip fracture and hip osteoarthritis: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Englund Martin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been reports both supporting and refuting an inverse relationship between hip fracture and hip osteoarthritis (OA. We explore this relationship using a case-control study design. Methods Exclusion criteria were previous hip fracture (same side or contralateral side, age younger than 60 years, foreign nationality, pathological fracture, rheumatoid arthritis and cases were radiographic examinations were not found in the archives. We studied all subjects with hip fracture that remained after the exclusion process that were treated at Akureyri University Hospital, Iceland 1990-2008, n = 562 (74% women. Hip fracture cases were compared with a cohort of subjects with colon radiographs, n = 803 (54% women to determine expected population prevalence of hip OA. Presence of radiographic hip OA was defined as a minimum joint space of 2.5 mm or less on an anteroposterior radiograph, or Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or higher. Possible causes of secondary osteoporosis were identified by review of medical records. Results The age-adjusted odds ratio (OR for subjects with hip fracture having radiographic hip OA was 0.30 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.12-0.74 for men and 0.33 (95% CI 0.19-0.58 for women, compared to controls. The probability for subjects with hip fracture and hip OA having a secondary cause of osteoporosis was three times higher than for subjects with hip fracture without hip OA. Conclusion The results of our study support an inverse relationship between hip fractures and hip OA.

  10. Ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexion torques measured by dynamometry in healthy subjects from 5 to 80 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraux, Amélie; Canal, Aurélie; Ollivier, Gwenn; Ledoux, Isabelle; Doppler, Valérie; Payan, Christine; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2013-03-22

    Ankle strength is often impaired in some of the most common neuromuscular disorders. Consequently, strength generated around this joint is important to assess, because it has a great impact on balance and gait. The objectives of this study were to establish normative data and predictive equations for both ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexion strength from a population of healthy subjects (children and adults), to assess the reliability of the measurements and to study the feasibility of using a novel dynamometer on a group of patients with a neuromuscular disorder. Measurements of maximal isometric torque for dorsi- and plantar-flexion were performed on 345 healthy subjects from 5 to 80 years of age. The feasibility of the method was tested on nine patients diagnosed with type 2A limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The results documented normal strength values depending on gender and age on ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexion. The reliability of the technique was good with no evaluator effect and a small learning effect. The dynamometer was found suitable in the group of patients, even very weak. The device developed was both reliable and accurate in assessing both ankle dorsi-flexion and plantar-flexion torque measurements from weak patients and children to strong healthy adults. Norms and predictive equations are provided for these two muscle functions.

  11. Inter and intra-rater reliability of mobile device goniometer in measuring lumbar flexion range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedekar, Nilima; Suryawanshi, Mayuri; Rairikar, Savita; Sancheti, Parag; Shyam, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of range of motion (ROM) is integral part of assessment of musculoskeletal system. This is required in health fitness and pathological conditions; also it is used as an objective outcome measure. Several methods are described to check spinal flexion range of motion. Different methods for measuring spine ranges have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, a new device was introduced in this study using the method of dual inclinometer to measure lumbar spine flexion range of motion (ROM). To determine Intra and Inter-rater reliability of mobile device goniometer in measuring lumbar flexion range of motion. iPod mobile device with goniometer software was used. The part being measure i.e the back of the subject was suitably exposed. Subject was standing with feet shoulder width apart. Spinous process of second sacral vertebra S2 and T12 were located, these were used as the reference points and readings were taken. Three readings were taken for each: inter-rater reliability as well as the intra-rater reliability. Sufficient rest was given between each flexion movement. Intra-rater reliability using ICC was r=0.920 and inter-rater r=0.812 at CI 95%. Validity r=0.95. Mobile device goniometer has high intra-rater reliability. The inter-rater reliability was moderate. This device can be used to assess range of motion of spine flexion, representing uni-planar movement.

  12. [Modified mini-Hardinge access for hip prosthesis implantation in the supine position].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazoochian, F; Schmidutz, F; Fottner, A; Jansson, V

    2014-04-01

    Total hip arthroplasty with a minimal-incision technique that can be performed in the widely used supine position. The accustomed and good overview of this position allows safe positioning of the implant and combines this with the advantage of a soft tissue preserving technique. All standard instruments and implants can be further applied. Primary and secondary coxarthrosis, femoral head necrosis. Revision surgery, severe anatomic deformity, implantation of hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Supine position. The skin incision runs from the innominate tubercle proximally and falls slightly in the dorsal direction (20-30°). Incision of the iliotibial tract and exposure of the vastogluteal muscle sling. Starting from the greater trochanter, the sinewy onset of the minimal and medium gluteal muscle is split with an arched-shaped incision, which also falls proximally in the dorsal direction. Exposition of the joint capsule, longitudinal incision and resection of the ventrolateral parts. Dislocation of the hip by a combined adduction and external rotation movement. Osteotomy of the femoral neck and resection of the femoral head are performed in a figure-of-four position without adduction. To prepare the acetabulum and to insert the cup, the leg is placed in neutral position with a slight flexion of 20° in the hip. Preparation of the femur and implantation of the stem is again performed in a figure-of-four position in adduction. Reduction of the hip and stepwise wound closure. Mobilization on postoperative day 1. Starting with half weight bearing and after completed wound healing rapid increase to full weight bearing. Intensive physiotherapy and rehabilitation. Thrombosis prophylaxis according to guidelines. The mini-incision approach has successfully been used in our clinic for years. Between September 2004 and November 2005, the less-invasive technique was evaluated in a randomized controlled trial with 51 patients (52 hips). Compared to the standard approach a

  13. Conversion total hip arthroplasty: Primary or revision total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Baghoolizadeh, Mahta

    2015-11-18

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an increasingly common procedure among elderly individuals. Although conversion THA is currently bundled in a diagnosis related group (DRG) with primary THA, there is a lack of literature supporting this classification and it has yet to be identified whether conversion THA better resembles primary or revision THA. This editorial analyzed the intraoperative and postoperative factors and functional outcomes following conversion THA, primary THA, and revision THA to understand whether the characteristics of conversion THA resemble one procedure or the other, or are possibly somewhere in between. The analysis revealed that conversion THA requires more resources both intraoperatively and postoperatively than primary THA. Furthermore, patients undergoing conversion THA present with poorer functional outcomes in the long run. Patients undergoing conversion THA better resemble revision THA patients than primary THA patients. As such, patients undergoing conversion THA should not be likened to patients undergoing primary THA when determining risk stratification and reimbursement rates. Conversion THA procedures should be planned accordingly with proper anticipation of the greater needs both in the operating room, and for in-patient and follow-up care. We suggest that conversion THA be reclassified in the same DRG with revision THA as opposed to primary THA as a step towards better allocation of healthcare resources for conversion hip arthroplasties.

  14. Fasilitas Pelatihan dan Pergelaran Seni Tari Hip Hop di Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Yanuar, Sandy

    2014-01-01

    Fasilitas Pelatihan dan Pergelaran Seni Tari Hip Hop di Surabaya merupakan fasilitas yang disediakan bagi semua penari Hip Hop di Surabaya untuk berlatih menari dan mempertunjukan tarian Hip Hop. Fasilitas ini tersedia bagi semua penari Hip Hop termasuk penari difable, mengingat kaum difable juga dapat menari Hip Hop. Namun karena di Surabaya belum memiliki fasilitas yang memadai bagi semua penari Hip Hop termasuk penari difable untuk menari dan memiliki tempat pertunjukan yang berkarakter Hi...

  15. Development of a finite element model of the ligamentous cervical vertebral column of a Great Dane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, Marília de Albuquerque; Shah, Anoli; Goel, Vijay; Costa, Fabiano Séllos; da Costa, Ronaldo Casimiro

    2018-01-29

    Cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM), also known as wobbler syndrome, affects mainly large and giant-breed dogs, causing compression of the cervical spinal cord and/or nerve roots. Structural and dynamic components seem to play a role in the development of CSM; however, pathogenesis is not yet fully understood. Finite element models have been used for years in human medicine to study the dynamic behavior of structures, but it has been mostly overlooked in veterinary studies. To our knowledge, no specific ligamentous spine models have been developed to investigate naturally occurring canine myelopathies and possible surgical treatments. The goal of this study was to develop a finite element model (FEM) of the C 2 -C 7 segment of the ligamentous cervical vertebral column of a neurologically normal Great Dane without imaging changes. The FEM of the intact C 2 -C 7 cervical vertebral column had a total of 188,906 elements (175,715 tetra elements and 12,740 hexa elements). The range of motion (in degrees) for the FEM subjected to a moment of 2Nm was approximately 27.94 in flexion, 25.86 in extension, 24.14 in left lateral bending, 25.27 in right lateral bending, 17.44 in left axial rotation, and 16.72 in right axial rotation. We constructed a ligamentous FEM of the C 2 -C 7 vertebral column of a Great Dane dog, which can serve as a platform to be modified and adapted for studies related to biomechanics of the cervical vertebral column and to further improve studies on osseous-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.