WorldWideScience

Sample records for colorectal cancer meta-analysis

  1. Dairy products and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aune, D.; Lau, R.; Chan, D.S.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of the association between intake of dairy products and colorectal cancer risk have indicated an inverse association with milk, however, the evidence for cheese or other dairy products is inconsistent. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to

  2. Dairy products and colorectal cancer risk : a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aune, D.; Lau, R.; Chan, D.S.M.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous studies of the association between intake of dairy products and colorectal cancer risk have indicated an inverse association with milk, however, the evidence for cheese or other dairy products is inconsistent. Methods: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to

  3. Lycopene Consumption and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Yang, Hui-Hui; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Quan; Chen, Zi-Hua

    2016-10-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have explored the association between lycopene or lycopene-rich food intake and the risk of colorectal cancer, but the results of these studies have not been consistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies published in the PubMed and EMBASE databases to quantitatively assess the association between lycopene consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer. A total of 15 studies were included in the meta-analysis, and the summary relative risk (RR) for highest versus lowest category indicated no significant association between lycopene consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer [RR = 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.80-1.10]. However, a significant inverse association was observed between lycopene consumption and the site of cancer in the colon (RR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.81-0.96). We also found that the incidence of colon cancer and lycopene intake did not exhibit dose-response relationships. The Grades of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) quality in our study was very low. In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicates that lycopene consumption is not associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. Further research will be needed in this area to provide conclusive evidence.

  4. Red and processed meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhanwei; Feng, Quanxin; Yin, Zifang; Shuang, Jianbo; Bai, Bin; Yu, Pengfei; Guo, Min; Zhao, Qingchuan

    2017-10-10

    The associations between red and processed meat consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer types have not been conclusively defined. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to analyze these associations. We searched PubMed and EMBASE to identify studies published from inception through September 2016. Dose-response, subgroup and subtype analyses of colorectal cancer (colon cancer, proximal colon cancer, distal colon cancer and rectal cancer) were performed. We ultimately selected 60 eligible studies. Positive associations were observed for colorectal cancer in case-control studies (red meat, Pred meat, Pred meat and null results for proximal colon cancer in case-control studies (P=0.13) and cohort studies (P=0.39) for processed meat. Additionally, although the results of case-control studies were positive (red meat, Pred (P=0.34) and processed meat (P=0.06) consumption and the risk in cohort studies. In a systematic review and meta-analysis, we found consumption of red and processed meat was associated with the risk of overall colorectal cancer but not rectal cancer. Additionally, there were no associations between the consumption of red meat and distal colon cancer risk and between the consumption of processed meat and proximal colon cancer risk.

  5. [Meta-analysis of relationship between extranodal tumor deposits and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianxiang; Shao, Shihong; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Maoshen; Lu, Yun

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between extranodal tumor deposits and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. The literatures on extranodal tumor deposits and postoperative survival rate in patients with colorectal cancer published at home and abroad from 1990 to 2014 were retrieved in 15 English literature databases such as MEDLINE/PubMed, Web of Science, Directory of Open Access Journals(DOAJ), SpringerLink and Chinese literature databases such as Chinese Biomedical Literature Database CD-ROM, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) Database with the internet platform of Yonsei University Library. After screening for inclusion, data extraction and quality assessment, meta-analysis was conducted by the Review Manager 5.3 software. There were 10 studies meeting the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis. The total sample size of the studies was 4 068 cases with ENTD(+) 727 cases, while ENTD(-) 3 341 cases. Meta analysis showed that 5-year overall survival rate and 5-year relapse-free survival rate were significantly lower in ENTD(+) group than those in ENTD(-) group (OR 0.27, 0.23; 95% CI:0.18 to 0.43, 0.16 to 0.34 respectively, both P=0.000); the 5-year overall survival rates were both significantly lower in ENTD(+) group as compared to ENTD(-) group for patients with N0 and N(+) colorectal cancer (both P<0.05). Extranodal tumor deposits is a poor prognostic factor of patients with colorectal cancer.

  6. Garlic consumption and colorectal cancer risk in man: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavarini, Manuela; Minelli, Liliana; Fabiani, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer shows large incidence variations worldwide that have been attributed to different dietary factors. We conducted a meta-analysis on the relationship between garlic consumption and colorectal cancer risk. We systematically reviewed publications obtained by searching ISI Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE and EMBASE literature databases. We extracted the risk estimate of the highest and the lowest reported categories of intake from each study and conducted meta-analysis using a random-effects model. The pooled analysis of all fourteen studies, seven cohort and seven case-control, indicated that garlic consumption was not associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR=0·93; 95 % CI 0·82, 1·06, P=0·281; I 2=83·6 %, P≤0·001). Separate analyses on the basis of cancer sites and sex also revealed no statistically significant effects on cancer risk. However, when separately analysed on the basis of study type, we found that garlic was associated with an approximately 37 % reduction in colorectal cancer risk in the case-control studies (combined risk estimate=0·63, 95 % CI 0·48, 0·82, P=0·001; I 2=75·6 %, P≤0·001). Our results suggest that consumption of garlic is not associated with a reduced colorectal cancer risk. Further investigations are necessary to clarify the discrepancy between results obtained from different types of epidemiological studies.

  7. Consumption of garlic and risk of colorectal cancer: an updated meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ji-Yi; Hu, Yi-Wang; Zhou, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Meng-Wen; Li, Dan; Zheng, Shu

    2014-11-07

    To conduct an updated meta-analysis of prospective studies addressing the association between garlic consumption and colorectal cancer. Eligible cohort studies were identified by searching MEDLINE (PubMed) and screening the references of related articles published up to October 2013. Meta-analyses were conducted for colorectal cancer in relation to consumption of raw and cooked (RC) garlic and garlic supplements, separately. The summary relative risks (RR) with 95%CI were calculated using fixed-effects or random-effects model depending on the heterogeneity among studies. A total of 5 prospective cohort studies were identified. In contrast to the previous meta-analysis, no significant associations were found between consumption of RC garlic (RR: 1.06; 95%CI: 0.95-1.19) or garlic supplements (RR: 1.12; 95%CI: 0.96-1.31) and risk of colorectal cancer. A non-significant protective effect of garlic supplement intake against colorectal cancer was observed in females (RR: 0.84; 95%CI: 0.64-1.11), but the opposite was the case in males (RR: 1.24; 95%CI: 0.96-1.59). Consumption of RC garlic or garlic supplements is not significantly associated with reduced colorectal cancer risk.

  8. Diabetes mellitus and the incidence of colorectal cancer: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Longying; Gui, Zhifu; Zhao, Lianying; Wang, Jianping; Shen, Lizong

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Relevant studies were identified in MEDLINE and EMBASE (up until November 1st, 2011). Inclusion criteria were original, peer-reviewed publications, with case-control and cohort studies (for studies on diabetes mellitus and colorectal cancer). Summary relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were calculated with a random-effects model. Twenty-four studies including eight case-control and 16 cohort studies, with a total of 3,659,341 participants, were included in this updated systematic review and meta-analysis, and all involved diabetes mellitus and colorectal cancer risk. Meta-analysis of the 24 included studies indicated that diabetes was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, compared with no diabetes (summary RR of colorectal cancer incidence = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.20-1.31), without heterogeneity between studies (P(heterogeneity) = 0.296). Sub-group analyses found that these results were consistent between case-control and cohort studies and among studies conducted in different areas. The association between diabetes and colorectal cancer incidence did not differ significantly by sex and sub-sites. Insulin therapy was also positively associated with risk of colorectal cancer (summary RR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.18-1.35), with evidence of heterogeneity between studies (P(heterogeneity) = 0.014). Our findings further support a relationship between diabetes and increased risk of colon and rectal cancer in both women and men, and insulin therapy for diabetes may increase this risk.

  9. Passive Smoking and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Wang, Xin; Huang, Chang-Hao; Yuan, Wei-Jie; Chen, Zi-Hua

    2016-07-01

    We conducted this meta-analysis to explore the association between passive smoking and the risk of colorectal cancer. A literature search of online databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science was performed up to June 30, 2015. A fixed-effects meta-analysis using Stata 12.0 was carried out to estimate the relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations. Eleven articles, including 6 case-control studies and 6 cohort studies, were included in our analysis according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The pooled RR of all studies showed a statistically significant association between passive smoking and colorectal cancer (RR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.05-1.24). Results of subgroup analysis showed a positive association between passive smoking and rectal cancer ((RR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.15-1.53) and that male passive smokers were at greater risks of colorectal cancer (RR = 1.73; 95% CI = 1.37-2.19) than females. Results suggested that passive smoking is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. © 2016 APJPH.

  10. Meat subtypes and their association with colorectal cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Prudence R; Walter, Viola; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael

    2016-01-15

    Associations between specific red meat subtypes and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been investigated in a number of epidemiological studies. However, no publication to date has summarised the overall epidemiological evidence. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies (cohort, nested case-control or case-cohort studies), which reported relative risk (RR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between intake of meat subtypes with colorectal, colon or rectal cancer or colorectal adenoma risk. PubMed and ISI Web of Science were searched up until August 1, 2014. Nineteen studies examined meat subtypes (5 beef, 5 pork, 2 lamb, 1 veal and 19 poultry) and associations with colorectal, colon or rectal cancer risk and 4 studies examined associations with adenoma risk (1 beef and 4 poultry). Comparing highest versus lowest intake, beef consumption was associated with an increased risk of CRC (RR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.22) and colon cancer (RR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.07 to 1.44), but no association was found with rectal cancer (RR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.78 to 1.16). Higher consumption of lamb was also associated with increased risk of CRC (RR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.44). No association was observed for pork (RR = 1.07, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.27), but some between study heterogeneity was observed. No association was observed for poultry consumption and risk of colorectal adenomas or cancer. This meta-analysis suggests that red meat subtypes differ in their association with CRC and its sub sites. Further analysis of data from prospective cohort studies is warranted, especially regarding the role of pork. © 2015 UICC.

  11. Folic acid supplements and colorectal cancer risk: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Tingting; Du, Mulong; Du, Haina; Shu, Yongqian; Wang, Meilin; Zhu, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the effects of folic acid supplementation on colorectal cancer risk, but conflicting results were reported. We herein performed a meta-analysis based on relevant studies to reach a more definitive conclusion. The PubMed and Embase databases were searched for quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published before October 2014. Eight articles met the inclusion criteria and were subsequently analyzed. The results suggested that folic acid treatment was not associated with colorectal cancer risk in the total population (relative risk [RR] = 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82-1.22, P = 0.974). Moreover, no statistical effect was identified in further subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, gender, body mass index (BMI) and potential confounding factors. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was observed. In conclusion, our meta-analysis demonstrated that folic acid supplementation had no effect on colorectal cancer risk. However, this finding must be validated by further large studies.

  12. Carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aune, D.; Chan, D.S.; Lau, R.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load are thought to influence colorectal cancer risk through hyperinsulinemia. We review and quantitatively summarize in a meta-analysis the evidence from prospective cohort studies. METHODS: We searched the PubMed database for

  13. Carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and colorectal cancer risk : a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aune, D.; Chan, D.S.M.; Lau, R.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load are thought to influence colorectal cancer risk through hyperinsulinemia. We review and quantitatively summarize in a meta-analysis the evidence from prospective cohort studies. Methods We searched the PubMed database for prospective

  14. Alcohol drinking and the risk of colorectal cancer death: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shaofang; Li, Yingjun; Ding, Ye; Chen, Kun; Jin, Mingjuan

    2014-11-01

    A causal link between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer (CRC) was established only recently by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, the quantitative association between alcohol drinking and CRC mortality is still an open question. We performed a systemic review and meta-analysis on epidemiological studies to quantify the risk for CRC mortality at different levels of alcohol consumption. A literature search was carried out in PubMed and Web of Science to identify all relevant studies published from January 1966 to June 2013. The pooled relative risk (RR) and the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated by categorical meta-analysis. A dose-risk relation was also analyzed. Nine cohort studies exploring the association between CRC mortality and alcohol drinking were identified. Compared with non/occasional drinkers, the pooled RR was 1.03 (95% CI, 0.93-1.15) for any, 0.97 (95% CI, 0.86-1.10) for light (≤12.5 g/day of ethanol), 1.04 (95% CI, 0.94-1.16) for moderate (12.6-49.9 g/day of ethanol), and 1.21 (1.01-1.46) for heavy drinkers (≥50 g/day of ethanol). For heavy drinkers, the pooled estimate was apparently higher for men (RR=1.28; 95% CI, 1.13-1.46) than for women (RR=0.79; 95% CI, 0.40-1.54; P(heterogeneity)=0.007). The dose-response analysis showed a J-shaped relationship between alcohol consumption and CRC mortality. The present meta-analysis provides the evidence for an association between heavy alcohol drinking (≥50 g/day of ethanol) and CRC mortality.

  15. Meta-Analysis of Mismatch Repair Polymorphisms within the Cogent Consortium for Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Juan, Diego Morillas; Raquel, Muñoz; Marisa, Manzano; Francisco, Colina; Jose, Díaz; Carolina, Ibarrola; Guadalupe, López; Alberto, Ibáñez; Antoni, Castells; Virgínia, Piñol; Sergi, Castellví-Bel; Francesc, Balaguer; Victoria, Gonzalo; Teresa, Ocaña; María Dolores, Giráldez; Maria, Pellisé; Anna, Serradesanferm; Leticia, Moreira; Miriam, Cuatrecasas; Josep, M. Piqué; Ángel, Lanas; Javier, Alcedo; Javier, Ortego; Joaquin, Cubiella; Ma, Soledad Díez; Mercedes, Salgado; Eloy, Sánchez; Mariano, Vega; Montserrat, Andreu; Anna, Abuli; Xavier, Bessa; Mar, Iglesias; Agustín, Seoane; Felipe, Bory; Gemma, Navarro; Beatriz, Bellosillo; Josep, Ma Dedeu; Cristina, Álvarez; Marc, Puigvehí; Luis, Bujanda; Ángel, Cosme; Inés, Gil; Mikel, Larzabal; Carlos, Placer; María, del Mar Ramírez; Elisabeth, Hijona; Jose, M. Enríquez-Navascués; Jose, L. Elosegui; Artemio, Payá; Rodrigo, Jover; Cristina, Alenda; Laura, Sempere; Nuria, Acame; Estefanía, Rojas; Lucía, Pérez-Carbonell; Joaquim, Rigau; Ángel, Serrano; Anna, Giménez; Joan, Saló; Eduard, Batiste-Alentorn; Josefina, Autonell; Ramon, Barniol; Ana, María García; Fernando, Carballo; Antonio, Bienvenido; Eduardo, Sanz; Fernando, González; Jaime, Sánchez; Akiko, Ono; Mercedes, Latorre; Enrique, Medina; Jaime, Cuquerella; Pilar, Canelles; Miguel, Martorell; José, Ángel García; Francisco, Quiles; Elisa, Orti; Juan, Clofent; Jaime, Seoane; Antoni, Tardío; Eugenia, Sanchez; Ma, Luisa de Castro; Antoni, Tardío; Juan, Clofent; Vicent, Hernández; Xavier, Llor; Rosa, M. Xicola; Marta, Piñol; Mercè, Rosinach; Anna, Roca; Elisenda, Pons; José, M. Hernández; Miquel, A. Gassull; Fernando, Fernández-Bañares; Josep, M. Viver; Antonio, Salas; Jorge, Espinós; Montserrat, Forné; Maria, Esteve; Josep, M. Reñé; Carmen, Piñol; Juan, Buenestado; Joan, Viñas; Enrique, Quintero; David, Nicolás; Adolfo, Parra; Antonio, Martín; Lidia, Argüello; Vicente, Pons; Virginia, Pertejo; Teresa, Sala; Dolors, Gonzalez; Eva, Roman; Teresa, Ramon; Maria, Poca; Ma, Mar Concepción; Marta, Martin; Lourdes, Pétriz; Daniel, Martinez; Ángel, Carracedo; Clara, Ruiz-Ponte; Ceres, Fernández-Rozadilla; Ma, Magdalena Castro; Sabino, Riestra; Luis, Rodrigo; Javier, Fernández; Jose, Luis Cabriada; Luis, Carreño; Susana, Oquiñena; Federico, Bolado; Elena, Peña; José, Manuel Blas; Gloria, Ceña; Juan, José Sebastián; Antonio, Naranjo; Naccarati, Alessio; Pardini, Barbara; Vodickova, Ludmila; Müller, Heiko; Talseth-Palmer, Bente A.; Stibbard, Geoffrey; Peterlongo, Paolo; Nici, Carmela; Veneroni, Silvia; Li, Li; Casey, Graham; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Moreno, Victor; van Wezel, Tom; Wijnen, Juul; Dunlop, Malcolm; Radice, Paolo; Scott, Rodney J.; Vodicka, Pavel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Brenner, Hermann; Buch, Stephan; Völzke, Henry; Hampe, Jochen; Schafmayer, Clemens; Lindblom, Annika

    2013-01-01

    In the last four years, Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have identified sixteen low-penetrance polymorphisms on fourteen different loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). Due to the low risks conferred by known common variants, most of the 35% broad-sense heritability estimated by twin studies remains unexplained. Recently our group performed a case-control study for eight Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4 CRC genes. The present investigation is a follow-up of that study. We have genotyped six SNPs that showed a positive association and carried out a meta-analysis based on eight additional studies comprising in total more than 8000 cases and 6000 controls. The estimated recessive odds ratio for one of the SNPs, rs3219489 (MUTYH Q338H), decreased from 1.52 in the original Swedish study, to 1.18 in the Swedish replication, and to 1.08 in the initial meta-analysis. Since the corresponding summary probability value was 0.06, we decided to retrieve additional information for this polymorphism. The incorporation of six further studies resulted in around 13000 cases and 13000 controls. The newly updated OR was 1.03. The results from the present large, multicenter study illustrate the possibility of decreasing effect sizes with increasing samples sizes. Phenotypic heterogeneity, differential environmental exposures, and population specific linkage disequilibrium patterns may explain the observed difference of genetic effects between Sweden and the other investigated cohorts. PMID:24039736

  16. Primary tumor site and anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Fu, Qiang; Li, Man; Li, Jun; Yin, Can; Zhao, Jin; Li, Feng

    2017-05-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to document the impact of primary tumor site on anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb) benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer. Tumors with metastatic left-sided colorectal cancer (LCC) were compared with tumors with metastatic right-sided colon cancer (RCC) with respect to anti-EGFR mAb objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) benefit. Comparing LCC with RCC, LCC was found to have significantly superior anti-EGFR mAb ORR (p analysis demonstrated that LCC had markedly superior anti-EGFR mAb treatment benefit compared with RCC.

  17. Cholecystectomy can increase the risk of colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis of 10 cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Liu, Hao; Li, Li; Ai, Min; Gong, Zheng; He, Yong; Dong, Yunlong; Xu, Shuanglan; Wang, Jun; Jin, Bo; Liu, Jianping; Teng, Zhaowei

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the effects of cholecystectomy on the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) by conducting a meta-analysis of 10 cohort studies. The eligible cohort studies were selected by searching the PubMed and EMBASE databases from their origination to June 30, 2016, as well as by consulting the reference lists of the selected articles. Two authors individually collected the data from the 10 papers. When the data showed marked heterogeneity, we used a random-effects model to estimate the overall pooled risk; otherwise, a fixed effects model was employed. The final analysis included ten cohort studies. According to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS), nine papers were considered high quality. After the data of these 9 studies were combined, an increased risk of CRC was found among the individuals who had undergone cholecystectomy (risk ratio (RR) 1.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.38). In addition, we also found a promising increased risk for colon cancer (CC) (RR 1.30, 95% CI 1.07-1.58), but no relationship between cholecystectomy and rectum cancer (RC) (RR 1.09; 95% CI 0.89-1.34) was observed. Additionally, in the sub-group analysis of the tumor location in the colon, a positive risk for ascending colon cancer (ACC) was found (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.11-1.26). After combining the ACC, transverse colon cancer (TCC), sigmoid colon cancer (SCC) and descending colon cancer (DCC) patients, we found a positive relationship with cholecystectomy (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.11-1.26). Furthermore, after combining the ACC and DCC patients, we also found a positive relationship with cholecystectomy (RR 1.28; 95% CI 1.11-1.26) in the sub-group analysis. In an additional sub-group analysis of patients from Western countries, there was a positive relationship between cholecystectomy and the risk of CRC (RR 1.20; 95% CI 1.05-1.36). Furthermore, a positive relationship between female gender and CRC was also found (RR 1.17; 95% CI 1.03-1.34). However, there was no relationship

  18. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer in individuals with previous colorectal neoplasia: systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulai, Parambir S; Singh, Siddharth; Marquez, Evelyn; Khera, Rohan; Prokop, Larry J; Limburg, Paul J; Gupta, Samir; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-12-05

     To assess the comparative efficacy and safety of candidate agents (low and high dose aspirin, non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), calcium, vitamin D, folic acid, alone or in combination) for prevention of advanced metachronous neoplasia (that is, occurring at different times after resection of initial neoplasia) in individuals with previous colorectal neoplasia, through a systematic review and network meta-analysis.  Medline, Embase, Web of Science, from inception to 15 October 2015; clinical trial registries.  Randomized controlled trials in adults with previous colorectal neoplasia, treated with candidate chemoprevention agents, and compared with placebo or another candidate agent. Primary efficacy outcome was risk of advanced metachronous neoplasia; safety outcome was serious adverse events.  Two investigators identified studies and abstracted data. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed and relative ranking of agents was assessed with surface under the cumulative ranking (SUCRA) probabilities (ranging from 1, indicating that the treatment has a high likelihood to be best, to 0, indicating the treatment has a high likelihood to be worst). Quality of evidence was appraised with GRADE criteria.  15 randomized controlled trials (12 234 patients) comparing 10 different strategies were included. Compared with placebo, non-aspirin NSAIDs were ranked best for preventing advanced metachronous neoplasia (odds ratio 0.37, 95% credible interval 0.24 to 0.53; SUCRA=0.98; high quality evidence), followed by low-dose aspirin (0.71, 0.41 to 1.23; SUCRA=0.67; low quality evidence). Low dose aspirin, however, was ranked the safest among chemoprevention agents (0.78, 0.43 to 1.38; SUCRA=0.84), whereas non-aspirin NSAIDs (1.23, 0.95 to 1.64; SUCRA=0.26) were ranked low for safety. High dose aspirin was comparable with low dose aspirin in efficacy (1.12, 0.59 to 2.10; SUCRA=0.58) but had an inferior safety profile (SUCRA=0.51). Efficacy of

  19. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and the prognosis of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, XiangZhou; Wen, QiaoCheng; Wang, Ran; Chen, ZhiKang

    2017-11-01

    Recently, there has been a controversial discussion about the prognostic value of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) in colorectal cancer patients. Thus, a meta-analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between CIN and the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases to identify studies evaluating the association between CIN and colorectal cancer prognosis. Pooled random/fixed effect models were used to calculate pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the association. Eight studies were selected for the meta-analysis, for a total of 2,745 patients. There was significant improved survival among colorectal cancer patients with CIN (HR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.47-0.76). However, significant heterogeneity was found (p = 0.000, Ι2 = 75.0%). Through subgroup analysis, we could greatly eliminate the heterogeneity and found that neutropenia was associated with better survival in stage IV colorectal cancer patients, no matter the HR calculated by overall survival (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS). Meanwhile, the prognostic value of neutropenia in stage II/III colorectal cancer can be found when the HR is calculated by disease-free survival (DFS). Additionally, we observed significant differences after stratification according to various tumor stages, endpoints, and the use of G-CSF. Our results which, based on a cohort study, indicate that CIN is associated with improved survival in patients with colorectal cancer. However, further randomized controlled trials are warranted.

  20. Consumption of beer and colorectal cancer incidence: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhong, Min

    2015-04-01

    Several meta-analyses and reports from the World Cancer Research Fund supported a risk association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the association for beer consumption, the common type of alcoholic beverage, remains unclear. We identified studies by a literature search of PUBMED and EMBASE through 30 June 2014. Summary relative risks (SRRs) with their 95% CIs were calculated with a fixed or random effects model. Twelve case-control and nine cohort studies were included. Compared with non-alcohol drinkers or non-beer drinkers, any beer drinkers were associated with an increased risk of CRC (SRR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.06-1.37; p(heterogeneity) beer drinking was related to increased risk of CRC (SRR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.26-1.49), while light or moderate beer drinking was not. The dose-response analysis demonstrated that an increase of one drink per day in beer consumption was related to an increased risk of CRC (SRR = 1.13, 95% CI, 1.06-1.21). There was evidence of a potential nonlinear association between beer intake and CRC incidence (p = 0.002 for nonlinearity). The results from this meta-analysis suggest that heavy (≥ 2 drinks/day) beer drinking may be associated with increased CRC risk. More researches with improved control of confounding and actual measurement of beer consumption are needed to confirm these findings.

  1. Prognostic role of the lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio in colorectal cancer: An up-to-date meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingbin; Hu, Tao; Zheng, Erliang; Deng, Xiangbing; Wang, Ziqiang

    2017-06-01

    Although previous meta-analyses have proved that lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) is a prognostic factor in solid cancers, its prognostic role in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains controversial. We, therefore, conducted this up-to-date meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic role of the LMR in CRC. A systematic search was performed in PubMed and Embase for relevant studies in November 2016. Article assessing the prognostic role of LMR in CRC was enrolled in this meta-analysis. Data and characteristics of each study were extracted. A meta-analysis was performed to generate pooled hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival. Begg funnel plot was used to evaluate publication bias. Eleven studies published between 2014 and 2016 with a total of 9045 patients were enrolled in this meta-analysis. Our findings indicated that a low LMR predicted a worse OS (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.30-1.90, P up-to-date meta-analysis shows that a low LMR is associated with poor survival in patients with CRC, although the publication bias is existed. Large-sample multicenter prospective cohort is needed to assess the role of the LMR in CRC patients.

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor is a prognostic marker in patients with colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Zhou, Qian-Yi; Hu, Yue; Wen, Yi; Qiu, Zhen-Wen; Liang, Man-Guang; Mo, Jun-Ling; Xu, Jian-Hua; Sun, Cong; Liu, Feng-Bin; Chen, Xin-Lin

    2017-04-04

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a crucial factor associated with development, progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, its prognostic value remains unclear. Thus studies referring to the correlation between HGF and CRC patients' prognosis were included to explore the role of HGF in CRC. At last nine articles were included. The results showed that the over-expression of HGF was associated with a poor prognosis, presented through overall survival (OS, Hazard ratio (HR) = 2.50, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.12-2.96) and disease-free survival (DFS, HR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.59-2.50). Subgroup analysis indicated that no significant difference was found between the Asian countries (OS: HR = 2.37; DFS: HR = 2.02) and the non-Asian countries (OS: HR = 3.15; DFS: HR = 1.87), between the studies that used univariate analyses (OS: HR = 2.51; DFS: HR = 2.07) and those that used multivariate analyses (OS: HR = 2.65; DFS: HR = 1.78), and between metastatic CRC (OS: HR = 2.26; DFS: HR = 2.06) and stage I-IV CRC (OS: HR = 3.08; DFS: HR = 0.70). Our meta-analysis has shown that the over-expression of HGF is valuable in CRC prognosis evaluation. This conclusion should be further confirmed by large-sample cohort studies.

  3. Association of coffee consumption with risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yong; Wu, Jiang; Zhang, Shengchao; Li, Liqing; Cao, Shiyi; Mkandawire, Naomie; Ji, Kun; Herath, Chulani; Gao, Chao; Xu, Hong; Zhou, Yanfeng; Song, Xingyue; Chen, Shanquan; Chen, Yawen; Yang, Tingting; Li, Jing; Qiao, Yan; Hu, Sai; Yin, Xiaoxv; Lu, Zuxun

    2017-03-21

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the association of coffee consumption with colorectal cancer and to investigate the shape of the association. Relevant prospective cohort studies were identified by a comprehensive search of the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases from their inception through August 2015. Either a random-effects model or fixed-effects model was used to compute the pooled risk estimates when appropriate. Linear and nonlinear dose-response meta-analyses were also performed. Nineteen prospective cohort studies involving 2,046,575 participants and 22,629 patients with colorectal cancer were included. The risk of colon cancer was decreased by 7% for every 4 cups per day of coffee (RR=0.93, 95%CI, 0.88-0.99; P=0.199). There was a threshold approximately five cups of coffee per day, and the inverse association for colorectal cancer appeared to be stronger at a higher range of intake. However, a nonlinear association of rectal cancer with coffee consumption was not observed (P for nonlinearity = 0.214). In conclusion, coffee consumption is significantly associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer at ≥ 5 cups per day of coffee consumption. The findings support the recommendations of including coffee as a healthy beverage for the prevention of colorectal cancer.

  4. Association of coffee consumption with risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengchao; Li, Liqing; Cao, Shiyi; Mkandawire, Naomie; Ji, Kun; Herath, Chulani; Gao, Chao; Xu, Hong; Zhou, Yanfeng; Song, Xingyue; Chen, Shanquan; Chen, Yawen; Yang, Tingting; Li, Jing; Qiao, Yan; Hu, Sai; Yin, Xiaoxv; Lu, Zuxun

    2017-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the association of coffee consumption with colorectal cancer and to investigate the shape of the association. Relevant prospective cohort studies were identified by a comprehensive search of the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases from their inception through August 2015. Either a random-effects model or fixed-effects model was used to compute the pooled risk estimates when appropriate. Linear and nonlinear dose-response meta-analyses were also performed. Nineteen prospective cohort studies involving 2,046,575 participants and 22,629 patients with colorectal cancer were included. The risk of colon cancer was decreased by 7% for every 4 cups per day of coffee (RR=0.93, 95%CI, 0.88-0.99; P=0.199). There was a threshold approximately five cups of coffee per day, and the inverse association for colorectal cancer appeared to be stronger at a higher range of intake. However, a nonlinear association of rectal cancer with coffee consumption was not observed (P for nonlinearity = 0.214). In conclusion, coffee consumption is significantly associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer at ≥ 5 cups per day of coffee consumption. The findings support the recommendations of including coffee as a healthy beverage for the prevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:27078843

  5. Carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, D; Chan, D S M; Lau, R; Vieira, R; Greenwood, D C; Kampman, E; Norat, T

    2012-04-01

    Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load are thought to influence colorectal cancer risk through hyperinsulinemia. We review and quantitatively summarize in a meta-analysis the evidence from prospective cohort studies. We searched the PubMed database for prospective studies of carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load and colorectal cancer risk, up to October 2011. Summary relative risks were estimated by the use of a random effects model. We identified 14 cohort studies that could be included in the meta-analysis of carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load and colorectal cancer risk. The summary RR for high versus low intake was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.87-1.14, I2 = 31%) for carbohydrate, 1.07 (95% CI: 0.99-1.16, I2 = 28%) for glycemic index, and 1.00 (95% CI: 0.91-1.10, I2 = 39%) for glycemic load. In the dose-response analysis, the summary RR was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.84-1.07, I2 = 58%) per 100 grams of carbohydrate per day, 1.07 (95% CI: 0.99-1.15, I2 = 39%) per 10 glycemic index units, and 1.01 (95% CI: 0.95-1.08, I2 = 47%) per 50 glycemic load units. Exclusion of one or two outlying studies reduced the heterogeneity, but the results were similar. This meta-analysis of cohort studies does not support an independent association between diets high in carbohydrate, glycemic index, or glycemic load and colorectal cancer risk.

  6. Metformin therapy and risk of colorectal adenomas and colorectal cancer in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feifei; Yan, Lijing; Wang, Zhan; Lu, Yuanan; Chu, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiangyu; Liu, Yisi; Rui, Dongsheng; Nie, Shaofa; Xiang, Hao

    2017-02-28

    Recent evidence indicates that metformin therapy may be associated with a decreased colorectal adenoma/colorectal cancer risk in type 2 diabetes patients. However, results are not consistent. We therefore performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the association between metformin therapy and risk of colorectal adenomas/colorectal cancer in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. We searched the literature published before Aug 31, 2016 in four databases: PubMed, Embase database, CNKI and VIP Library of Chinese Journal. Summary risk estimates (adjusted OR/adjusted RR/adjusted HR) with their 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were obtained using a random effects model. Twenty studies (including 12 cohort studies, 7 case-control studies and 1 randomized controlled trial study) were selected in terms of data of colorectal adenomas or colorectal cancer incidence. Metformin therapy was found to be associated with a decreased incidence of colorectal adenomas (unadjusted OR=0.80, 95% CI: 0.71-0.90, p=0.0002). When the adjusted data were analyzed, the summary estimate decreased to 25% reduction in colorectal adenomas risk (adjusted OR=0.75, 95% CI: 0.59-0.97, p=0.03). Besides, a significant reduction of colorectal cancer risk was also observed (unadjusted OR=0.73, 95% CI: 0.62-0.86, p=0.0002). And when the adjusted data were analyzed, colorectal cancer risk for metformin users was decreased with a reduction of 22%, compared with non-metformin users and other treatment users (adjusted OR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.70-0.87, pmetformin therapy may be associated with a decreased risk of colorectal adenomas and colorectal cancer in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  7. A systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic and prognostic serum biomarkers of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongyu; Zhang, Yingchong; Niu, Yulong; Li, Ke; Liu, Xin; Chen, Huijuan; Gao, Chunfang

    2014-01-01

    Our systematic review summarizes the evidence concerning the accuracy of serum diagnostic and prognostic tests for colorectal cancer (CRC). The databases MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched iteratively to identify the relevant literature for serum markers of CRC published from 1950 to August 2012. The articles that provided adequate information to meet the requirements of the meta-analysis of diagnostic and prognostic markers were included. A 2-by-2 table of each diagnostic marker and its hazard ratio (HR) and the confidence interval (CI) of each prognostic marker was directly or indirectly extracted from the included papers, and the pooled sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic marker and the pooled HR and the CI of the prognostic marker were subsequently calculated using the extracted data. In total, 104 papers related to the diagnostic markers and 49 papers related to the prognostic serum markers of CRC were collected, and only 19 of 92 diagnostic markers were investigated in more than two studies, whereas 21 out of 44 prognostic markers were included in two or more studies. All of the pooled sensitivities of the diagnostic markers with > = 3 repetitions were less than 50%, and the meta-analyses of the prognostic markers with more than 3 studies were performed, VEGF with highest (2.245, CI: 1.347-3.744) and MMP-7 with lowest (1.099, CI: 1.018-1.187)) pooled HRs are presented. The quality of studies addressing the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of the tests was poor, and the results were highly heterogeneous. The poor characteristics indicate that these tests are of little value for clinical practice.

  8. Parity and risk of colorectal cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Bo Guan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Association between parity and colorectal cancer (CRC risk has been investigated by several epidemiological studies but results are controversial, yet a comprehensive and quantitative assessment of this association has not been reported so far. METHODS: Relevant published studies of parity and CRC were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science databases through end of April 2013. Two authors independently assessed eligibility and extracted data. Eleven prospective studies reported relative risk (RR estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs of CRC risk associated with parity. We pooled the RR from individual studies using fixed- or random-effects models and carried out heterogeneity and publication bias analyses. RESULTS: The summary RR for the ever parity vs. nulliparous was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.88-1.02, with no heterogeneity (Q = 9.04, P = 0.443, I (2 = 0.5%. Likewise, no significant association was yielded for the highest vs. lowest parity number (RR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.89-1.17, with moderate heterogeneity (Q = 17.48, P = 0.094, I (2 = 37.1%. Dose-response analysis still indicated no effect of parity on CRC risk and the summary RR of per one livebirth was 0.99 (95% CI: 0.96-1.02, with moderate of heterogeneity (Q = 16.50, P<0.021, I (2 = 57.6%. Similar results were observed among all the subgroup analyses. No evidence of publication bias and significant heterogeneity between subgroups were detected by meta-regression analyses. CONCLUSION: Results of this dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies found that there was little evidence of an association between parity and CRC risk.

  9. Vegetarianism and breast, colorectal and prostate cancer risk: an overview and meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godos, J; Bella, F; Sciacca, S; Galvano, F; Grosso, G

    2017-06-01

    Vegetarian diets may be associated with certain benefits toward human health, although current evidence is scarce and contrasting. In the present study, a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies was performed with respect to the association between vegetarian diets and breast, colorectal and prostate cancer risk. Studies were systematically searched in Pubmed and EMBASE electronic databases. Eligible studies had a prospective design and compared vegetarian, semi- and pesco-vegetarian diets with a non-vegetarian diet. Random-effects models were applied to calculate relative risks (RRs) of cancer between diets. Statistical heterogeneity and publication bias were explored. A total of nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. Studies were conducted on six cohorts accounting for 686 629 individuals, and 3441, 4062 and 1935 cases of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer, respectively. None of the analyses showed a significant association of vegetarian diet and a lower risk of either breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer compared to a non-vegetarian diet. By contrast, a lower risk of colorectal cancer was associated with a semi-vegetarian diet (RR = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.79-0.94; I(2) = 0%, Pheterogeneity = 0.82) and a pesco-vegetarian diet (RR = 0.67, 95% confidence interval = 0.53, 0.83; I(2) = 0%, Pheterogeneity = 0.46) compared to a non-vegetarian diet. The subgroup analysis by cancer localisation showed no differences in summary risk estimates between colon and rectal cancer. A summary of the existing evidence from cohort studies on vegetarian diets showed that complete exclusion of any source of protein from the diet is not associated with further benefits for human health. © 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  10. A Linear Dose-Response Relationship between Fasting Plasma Glucose and Colorectal Cancer Risk: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianguo; Xiong, Lijuan; Li, Jiaoyuan; Cao, Heng; Jiang, Wen; Liu, Bo; Chen, Xueqin; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Ke; Wang, Guobin; Cai, Kailin

    2015-12-01

    For many years, the question of whether hyperglycaemia, a manifestation of prediabetes, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome, is a risk factor for colorectal cancer has been intensely studied. In fact, even after the conclusion of several prospective studies, the topic is still controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the dose-response relationship between blood glucose concentration and the incidence of colorectal cancer. A linear (P = 0.303 for non-linearity) dose-response relationship was observed between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and colorectal cancer risk without significant heterogeneity. The relative risk (RR) for colorectal cancer per 20 mg/dL increase in FPG was 1.015 (95% CI: 1.012-1.019, P = 0.000). In subgroup analyses, the pooled RRs for colon cancer (CC) and rectal cancer (RC) studies were 1.035 (95% CI 1.008-1.062, P = 0.011) and 1.031 (95% CI: 0.189-5.628, P = 0.972), respectively; in the analysis comparing men and women, the pooled RRs were 1.016 (95% CI: 1.012-1.020, P = 0.000) and 1.011 (95% CI: 0.995-1.027, P = 0.164), respectively. Sensitivity analyses using two methods showed similar results. In conclusion, there is a significant linear dose-response relationship between FPG and the incidence risk of colorectal cancer. For people with diabetes or prediabetes, controlling blood glucose might be useful to prevent colorectal cancer.

  11. Red and processed meat and colorectal cancer incidence: meta-analysis of prospective studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chan, D.S; Lau, R; Aune, D; Vieira, R; Greenwood, D.C; Kampman, E; Norat, T

    2011-01-01

    .... Since then, ten prospective studies have published new results. Here we update the evidence from prospective studies and explore whether there is a non-linear association of red and processed meats with colorectal cancer risk...

  12. Continuous versus intermittent chemotherapy strategies in metastatic colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, S R; Cosby, R; Asmis, T; Chan, K; Hammad, N; Krzyzanowska, M K

    2015-03-01

    An important goal of intermittent strategies of delivering systemic treatment as first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is to maintain efficacy while improving patients' quality of life (QoL). Given the varying impact on efficacy demonstrated in individual randomized, controlled trials (RCTs), a systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs of these intermittent strategies was carried out. Relevant databases were systematically searched for the period 2000-2014. RCTs that compared a continuous versus intermittent strategy of delivering systemic treatment were identified by a systematic review. Overall survival (OS) hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted from the most recently reported trial results. The results of identified trials were clinically homogeneous so the data were pooled using Review Manager software (RevMan 5.1). Eleven RCTs were identified (n = 4 854). For the eight (n = 4508) trials with available HRs, the treatment patients received after induction was: none (five trials, n = 3036), fluoropyrimidine (one trial, n = 620), and biologic (two trials, n = 852). There were no statistically significant survival differences observed between the continuous and intermittent chemotherapy strategies. There was no statistically significant difference observed between continuous and intermittent strategies [HR = 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-1.10, P = 0.38)]. Subgroup analyses demonstrated results were generally robust across induction and maintenance regimens. One subgroup analysis of the three trials (CAIRO3, OPTIMOX2, COIN, n = 2403) with combination treatment induction and no maintenance until progression revealed a statistically, but nonclinically significant benefit for continuous treatment (HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.00-1.20, P = 0.049). QoL life was either the same in both arms in two trials (n = 912) or improved in the intermittent strategy arm in one trial (n = 1630). Intermittent strategies of delivering systemic treatment of mCRC do

  13. Red and processed meat and colorectal cancer incidence: meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Doris S M; Lau, Rosa; Aune, Dagfinn; Vieira, Rui; Greenwood, Darren C; Kampman, Ellen; Norat, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The evidence that red and processed meat influences colorectal carcinogenesis was judged convincing in the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research report. Since then, ten prospective studies have published new results. Here we update the evidence from prospective studies and explore whether there is a non-linear association of red and processed meats with colorectal cancer risk. Relevant prospective studies were identified in PubMed until March 2011. For each study, relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled with a random-effects model, weighting for the inverse of the variance, in highest versus lowest intake comparison, and dose-response meta-analyses. Red and processed meats intake was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. The summary relative risk (RR) of colorectal cancer for the highest versus the lowest intake was 1.22 (95% CI  =  1.11-1.34) and the RR for every 100 g/day increase was 1.14 (95% CI  =  1.04-1.24). Non-linear dose-response meta-analyses revealed that colorectal cancer risk increases approximately linearly with increasing intake of red and processed meats up to approximately 140 g/day, where the curve approaches its plateau. The associations were similar for colon and rectal cancer risk. When analyzed separately, colorectal cancer risk was related to intake of fresh red meat (RR(for 100 g/day increase)  =  1.17, 95% CI  =  1.05-1.31) and processed meat (RR (for 50 g/day increase)  =  1.18, 95% CI  =  1.10-1.28). Similar results were observed for colon cancer, but for rectal cancer, no significant associations were observed. High intake of red and processed meat is associated with significant increased risk of colorectal, colon and rectal cancers. The overall evidence of prospective studies supports limiting red and processed meat consumption as one of the dietary recommendations for the prevention of colorectal cancer.

  14. Red and processed meat and colorectal cancer incidence: meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris S M Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The evidence that red and processed meat influences colorectal carcinogenesis was judged convincing in the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research report. Since then, ten prospective studies have published new results. Here we update the evidence from prospective studies and explore whether there is a non-linear association of red and processed meats with colorectal cancer risk. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Relevant prospective studies were identified in PubMed until March 2011. For each study, relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CI were extracted and pooled with a random-effects model, weighting for the inverse of the variance, in highest versus lowest intake comparison, and dose-response meta-analyses. Red and processed meats intake was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. The summary relative risk (RR of colorectal cancer for the highest versus the lowest intake was 1.22 (95% CI  =  1.11-1.34 and the RR for every 100 g/day increase was 1.14 (95% CI  =  1.04-1.24. Non-linear dose-response meta-analyses revealed that colorectal cancer risk increases approximately linearly with increasing intake of red and processed meats up to approximately 140 g/day, where the curve approaches its plateau. The associations were similar for colon and rectal cancer risk. When analyzed separately, colorectal cancer risk was related to intake of fresh red meat (RR(for 100 g/day increase  =  1.17, 95% CI  =  1.05-1.31 and processed meat (RR (for 50 g/day increase  =  1.18, 95% CI  =  1.10-1.28. Similar results were observed for colon cancer, but for rectal cancer, no significant associations were observed. CONCLUSIONS: High intake of red and processed meat is associated with significant increased risk of colorectal, colon and rectal cancers. The overall evidence of prospective studies supports limiting red and processed meat consumption as one of the dietary recommendations for the

  15. Metformin as a risk factor of pathogenesis of colorectal cancer in type 2 diabetes patients: a Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying YAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the association between metformin therapy and the risk of pathogenesis of colorectal cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods PubMed, Embase, Medline, the Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, Wanfang Digital Journal Full-text Database, and database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (VIP till Nov. 2014 were searched for the cohort studies and case-control studies in evaluating the effect of metformin on colorectal cancer. A meta-analysis was performed using Rev Man5.2 software. The quality assessment of included studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS. Results A total of 11 original articles met the inclusion criteria, 8 of them were articles withcohort studies including 12 subgroup studies with 447 234 subjects, and the other 3 case-control studies with 24 032 subjects. Metaanalysis of cohort studies showed that metformin therapy reduced the risk of pathogenesis of colorectal cancer by 30% in type 2 diabetes patients compared with those with other oral glucose-lowering drugs (RR=0.70, 95%CI: 0.58-0.85, P=0.0002. The results from the case-control studies showed that metformin therapy may be associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes (OR=0.78, 95%CI: 0.71-0.86, P<0.00001. Conclusion Metformin therapy can lower the risk of pathogenesis of colorectal cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.14

  16. Is K-ras gene mutation a prognostic factor for colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, JiaoJiao; Li, GuangXiao; Ge, Jie; Li, Xia; Zhao, YaShuang

    2012-08-01

    : The K-ras gene is one of the commonly mutated oncogenes associated with colorectal cancer. However, its prognostic significance for patients with colorectal cancer remains inconclusive. : To derive a more precise estimation of the prognostic significance of K-ras gene mutations, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. : We searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane databases from January 1992 to November 2011. : The prognostic value of K-ras gene mutations was examined in patients with colorectal cancer who did not receive preoperative chemotherapy or radiation. : The effect of K-ras gene mutations on the overall survival was measured by the HR and 95% CIs. : The pooled HR for the association between K-ras gene mutations and overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.99-1.10, p = 0.11). Subgroup analysis showed significant reductions in the overall survival associated with mutations at K-ras codon 12, the articles that reported HR directly, and the studies published before and after 2005, although publication bias was present. All the associations disappeared after adjustment with the trim-and-fill method. The pooled HR of 3 studies examining mutations at K-ras codon 13 was 1.47 (95% CI: 1.09-1.97, p = 0.02), and no publication bias was observed. No significant association was observed in different study regions. : The heterogeneity in the study populations is a potential problem, the use of different staging systems or small groups of different stages may contribute to heterogeneity, and residual confounding may have influenced the results in those studies that did not completely adjust for other factors. : Overall K-ras gene mutations seem not to correlate with the prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer. The association remains to be confirmed with a more precise analysis of a large sample.

  17. Red and Processed Meat and Colorectal Cancer Incidence: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, D.S.M.; Lau, R.; Aune, D.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The evidence that red and processed meat influences colorectal carcinogenesis was judged convincing in the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research report. Since then, ten prospective studies have published new results. Here we update the evidence from

  18. Red and processed meat and colorectal cancer incidence: meta-analysis of prospective studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, D.S.; Lau, R.; Aune, D.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The evidence that red and processed meat influences colorectal carcinogenesis was judged convincing in the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research report. Since then, ten prospective studies have published new results. Here we update the evidence from

  19. 5-HTTLPR and use of antidepressants after colorectal cancer including a meta-analysis of 5-HTTLPR and depression after cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, N P; Bukh, J D; Moffitt, T E

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) is one of the most extensively investigated candidates to be involved in gene-environment interaction associated with depression. Nevertheless, the interaction remains controversial. In an original study, we tested the hypothesis...... that risk for use of antidepressants following a diagnosis of colorectal cancer is associated with bi- and triallelic genotypes of 5-HTTLPR. In addition, in an inclusive meta-analysis, we tested the hypothesis that depression following a diagnosis of cancer is associated with biallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype. We......-analysis. Nationwide registries provided information on dates of diagnosis of colorectal cancer and use of antidepressants. Unadjusted odds ratios of depression according to the biallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype were included in the meta-analysis. 5-HTTLPR genotypes were not associated with use of antidepressants after...

  20. Radiofrequency ablation versus resection for colorectal cancer liver metastases: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhe Weng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No randomized controlled trial (RCT has yet been performed to provide the evidence to clarify the therapeutic debate on liver resection (LR and radiofrequency ablation (RFA in treating colorectal liver metastases (CLM. The meta-analysis was performed to summarize the evidence mostly from retrospective clinical trials and to investigate the effect of LR and RFA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Systematic literature search of clinical studies was carried out to compare RFA and LR for CLM in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library Central databases. The meta-analysis was performed using risk ratio (RR and random effect model, in which 95% confidence intervals (95% CI for RR were calculated. Primary outcomes were the overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS at 3 and 5 years plus mortality and morbidity. 1 prospective study and 12 retrospective studies were finally eligible for meta-analysis. LR was significantly superior to RFA in 3 -year OS (RR 1.377, 95% CI: 1.246-1.522; 5-year OS (RR: 1.474, 95%CI: 1.284-1.692; 3-year DFS (RR 1.735, 95% CI: 1.483-2.029 and 5-year DFS (RR 2.227, 95% CI: 1.823-2.720. The postoperative morbidity was higher in LR (RR: 2.495, 95% CI: 1.881-3.308, but no significant difference was found in mortality between LR and RFA. The data from the 3 subgroups (tumor<3 cm; solitary tumor; open surgery or laparoscopic approach showed significantly better OS and DFS in patients who received surgical resection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: Although multiple confounders exist in the clinical trials especially the bias in patient selection, LR was significantly superior to RFA in the treatment of CLM, even when conditions limited to tumor<3 cm, solitary tumor and open surgery or laparoscopic (lap approach. Therefore, caution should be taken when treating CLM with RFA before more supportive evidences for RFA from RCTs are obtained.

  1. Clinical Importance of Streptococcus gallolyticus infection among colorectal cancer patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boleij, A.; Gelder, M.M.H.J. van; Swinkels, D.W.; Tjalsma, H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Streptococcus bovis has long been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). However, not all genospecies are as closely related to CRC. With this systematic review, we aim to increase the awareness of the association between S. bovis biotype I (Streptococcus gallolyticus) and CRC and urge

  2. Association of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the risk of colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guraya, Salman Yousuf

    2015-05-21

    To provide a quantitative assessment of the association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Systematic review was conducted thorough MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of knowledge databases till 31(st) January 2014. This meta-analysis included the cohort studies that illustrated relative risk (RR) or odds ratio estimates with 95%CI for the predictive risk of CRC by T2DM. Summary relative risks with 95%CI were analyzed by using an effects summary ratio model. Heterogeneity among studies was assessed by the Cochran's Q and I (2) statistics. The meta analysis of 8 finally selected studies showed a positive correlation of T2DM with the risk of CRC as depicted by effects summary RR of 1.21 (95%CI: 1.02-1.42). Diabetic women showed greater risk of developing CRC as their effect summary RR of 1.22 (95%CI: 1.01-49) with significant overall Z test at 5% level of significance was higher than the effect summary RR of 1.17 (95%CI: 1.00-1.37) of men showing insignificant Z test. The effect summary RR of 1.19 with 95%CI of 1.07-1.33 indicate a positive relationship between DM and increased risk of CRC with significant heterogeneity (I (2) = 92% and P-value diabetic people have an increased risk of CRC as compared to non-diabetics.

  3. Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs in Multiple Lines in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

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    R.-D. Hofheinz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, continuing antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression might provide clinical benefit. We synthesized the available evidence in a meta-analysis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies investigating the use of antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression. Eligible studies were randomized phase II/III trials. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Secondary endpoints were the impact of continuing antiangiogenic drugs (i in subgroups, (ii in different types of compounds targeting the VEGF-axis (monoclonal antibodies versus tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and (iii on remission rates and prevention of progression. Results. Eight studies (3,668 patients were included. Continuing antiangiogenic treatment beyond progression significantly improved PFS (HR 0.64; 95%-CI, 0.55–0.75 and OS (HR 0.83; 95%-CI, 0.76–0.89. PFS was significantly improved in all subgroups with comparable HR. OS was improved in all subgroups stratified by age, gender, and ECOG status. The rate of patients achieving at least stable disease was improved with an OR of 2.25 (95%-CI, 1.41–3.58. Conclusions. This analysis shows a significant PFS and OS benefit as well as a benefit regarding disease stabilization when using antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression in mCRC. Future studies should focus on the optimal sequence of administering antiangiogenic drugs.

  4. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of postoperative complications in colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

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    Xie H

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hai Xie,1 Yan-na Chang2 1Department of Emergency, The First Hospital of Lanzhou University, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Hospital of Gansu University of Chinese Medicine, Lanzhou, People’s Republic of China Objective: To evaluate systematically the clinical efficacy of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs in the prevention of postoperative complications in colorectal cancer (CRC patients.Materials and methods: Published articles were identified by using search terms in online databases – PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library – up to March 2016. Only randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of omega-3 PUFAs in CRC were selected and analyzed through a meta-analysis. Subgroup, sensitivity, and inverted funnel-plot analyses were also conducted. Results: Eleven articles with 694 CRC patients were finally included. Compared with control, omega-3 PUFA-enriched enteral or parenteral nutrition during the perioperative period reduced infectious complications (risk ratio [RR] 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47–0.86; P=0.004, tumor necrosis factor alpha (standard mean difference [SMD] -0.37, 95% CI -0.66 to -0.07; P=0.01, interleukin-6 (SMD -0.36, 95% CI -0.66 to -0.07; P=0.02, and hospital stay (MD -2.09, 95% CI -3.71 to -0.48; P=0.01. No significant difference was found in total complications, surgical site infection, or CD4+:CD8+ cell ratio. Conclusion: Short-term omega-3 PUFA administration was associated with reduced postoperative infectious complications, inflammatory cytokines, and hospital stay after CRC surgery. Due to heterogeneity and relatively small sample size, the optimal timing and route of administration deserve further study. Keywords: omega-3, fatty acids, fish oil, colorectal surgery, meta-analysis 

  5. Body weight gain and risk of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

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    Schlesinger, S; Lieb, W; Koch, M; Fedirko, V; Dahm, C C; Pischon, T; Nöthlings, U; Boeing, H; Aleksandrova, K

    2015-07-01

    While the relationship between body mass index as an indicator of excess body weight and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) is well established, the association between body weight gain in adulthood and risk of CRC remains unresolved. We quantified this association in a meta-analysis of 12 observational studies published until November 2014 with a total of 16,151 incident CRC cases. Random effect models were used to obtain summary relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using I(2) statistics. Overall, the summary RR (95% CI) was 1.22 (1.14-1.30) for high body weight gain (midpoint: 15.2 kg) compared with stable weight (P for heterogeneity = 0.182; I(2) = 21.2%). In a dose-response analysis, each 5 kg weight gain was associated with a 4% (95% CI: 2%-5%) higher risk of CRC. The association persisted after adjustment for body weight at younger age and was present for both men and women, as well as for colon and rectal cancer. Differences by sex were detected for colon cancer (P for interaction = 0.003, with higher risk for men than women), but not for rectal cancer (P for interaction = 0.613). In conclusion, these data underscore the importance of body weight management from early adulthood onwards for the prevention of CRC development. © 2015 World Obesity.

  6. The role of LINE-1 methylation in predicting survival among colorectal cancer patients: a meta-analysis.

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    Ye, Ding; Jiang, Danjie; Li, Yingjun; Jin, Mingjuan; Chen, Kun

    2017-08-01

    The prognostic value of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) methylation in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) remains uncertain. We have therefore performed a meta-analysis to elucidate this issue. The PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched for studies published up to 30 June 2016 which reported on an association between LINE-1 methylation and overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), or cancer-specific survival (CSS) among CRC patients. The reference lists of the identified studies were also analyzed to identify additional eligible studies. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using the fixed-effects or the random-effects model. Stratification analysis and meta-regression analysis were performed to detect the source of heterogeneity. Analyses of sensitivity and publication bias were also carried out. Thirteen independent studies involving 3620 CRC patients were recruited to the meta-analysis. LINE-1 hypomethylation was found to be significantly associated with shorter OS (HR 2.92, 95% CI 2.20-3.88, p LINE-1 hypomethylation and OS or DFS, with the exception being CSS. Moreover, meta-regression analysis suggested that one of the contributors to between-study heterogeneity on the association between LINE-1 methylation and CSS was statistical methodology. The subgroup analysis suggested that the association in studies using the Cox model statistical method (HR 2.76, 95% CI 1.90-4.01, p LINE-1 methylation is significantly associated with the survival of CRC patients and that it could be a predictive factor for CRC prognosis.

  7. Prognostic value of transforming growth factor-beta in patients with colorectal cancer who undergo surgery: a meta-analysis.

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    Chen, Xin-Lin; Chen, Zhuo-Qun; Zhu, Shui-Lian; Liu, Tian-Wen; Wen, Yi; Su, Yi-Sheng; Xi, Xu-Jie; Hu, Yue; Lian, Lei; Liu, Feng-Bin

    2017-04-04

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is associated with a higher incidence of distant metastasis and decreased survival. Whether TGF-β can be used as a prognostic indicator of colorectal cancer (CRC) remains controversial. The Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched from their inception to March 2016. The studies that focused on TGF-β as a prognostic factor in patients with CRC were included in this analysis. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were analysed separately. A meta-analysis was performed, and hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Twelve studies were included in the analysis, of which 8 were used for OS and 7 for DFS. In all, 1622 patients with CRC undergoing surgery were included. Combined HRs suggested that high expression of TGF-β had a favourable impact on OS (HR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.10-2.59) and DFS (HR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.03-1.19) in CRC patients. For OS, the combined HRs of Asian studies and Western studies were 1.50 (95% CI: 0.61-3.68) and 1.80 (95% CI: 1.33-2.45), respectively. For DFS, the combined HRs of Asian studies and Western studies were 1.42 (95% CI: 0.61-3.31) and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.03-1.20), respectively. This meta-analysis demonstrates that TGF-β can be used as a prognostic biomarker for CRC patients undergoing surgery, especially for CRC patients from Western countries.

  8. Microsatellite instability does not predict the efficacy of chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Des Guetz, Gaëtan; Uzzan, Bernard; Nicolas, Patrick; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Perret, Gerard-Yves; Morere, Jean-François

    2009-05-01

    Microsatellite Instability (MSI) status is a good prognostic factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) but its predictive value for chemosensitivity remains controversial. A previous meta-analysis (MA) in the adjuvant setting showed that MSI-high (H) status did not predict the efficacy of chemotherapy. The predictive value of MSI status on the effect of metastatic chemotherapy was investigated by MA. Studies were identified by electronic search through PubMed, Embase and ASCO proceedings online databases, using several key words (colorectal cancer, chemotherapy, microsatellite instability). For each study, the ratio of response rate (RR), complete (CR) and partial response (PR) divided by stable disease and progression was calculated. From 190 articles and 100 abstracts, only eight independent studies were selected. The data were analysed with a random-effect model (due to heterogeneity between studies) using EasyMA software. Statistical calculations were performed on six studies representing 964 patients (mean age 63 years; 91 MSI-H; 873 microsatellite stable (MSS) tumours). A total of 287 patients received 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemotherapy, whereas 678 patients received combinations of 5FU or capecitabine with oxaliplatin and/or irinotecan. No benefit of metastatic chemotherapy in terms of RR for MSI-H patients compared with MSS patients was found. The global hazard ratio (HR) for RR was 0.82 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.95; 0.65-1.03; p=0.09). MSI status does not predict the effect of chemotherapy which is similar in MSI-H and MSS metastatic CRC tumours.

  9. Tumor-infiltrating FoxP3+ Tregs predict favorable outcome in colorectal cancer patients: A meta-analysis

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    Hu, Guoming; Li, Zhi’an; Wang, Shimin

    2017-01-01

    FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (FoxP3+ Tregs) are considered to be a key mediator in immune escape and tumor progression. However, the role of FoxP3+ Tregs in human colorectal cancer (CRC) remains controversial. Herein, we conducted a meta-analysis including 17 published studies with 3811 patients identified from PubMed and EBSCO to assess the prognostic impact of tumor-infiltrating FoxP3+ Tregs in human CRC. We found FoxP3+ Tregs infiltrating into both intraepithelium and stroma within tumor were significantly positively correlated with 1, 3, 5 and 10-year overall survival (OS), but not with 1, 3, 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) of patients. Interestingly, in stratified analyses by compartments within tumor FoxP3+ Tregs infiltrating into, FoxP3+ Tregs invading stromal compartment significantly improved 3 and 5-year OS, yet OS wasn’t improved when FoxP3+ Tregs infiltrated into intraepithelium only. Furthermore, FoxP3+ Tregs invading both intraepithelium and stroma significantly inversely correlated with TNM stage of CRC. In conclusion, High density of FoxP3+ Tregs within tumor especially at stromal compartment leads to a favorable outcome in CRC, implicating FoxP3+ Tregs are one of valuable indexes for prognostic prediction in human CRC. PMID:29088871

  10. Coffee drinking and colorectal cancer risk: an evaluation based on a systematic review and meta-analysis among the Japanese population.

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    Akter, Shamima; Kashino, Ikuko; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Wakai, Kenji; Nagata, Chisato; Nakayama, Tomio; Sadakane, Atsuko; Tanaka, Keitaro; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Sugawara, Yumi; Sawada, Norie; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Sasazuki, Shizuka

    2016-08-01

    It remains unclear whether coffee drinking is associated with colorectal cancer risk. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies on this issue among the Japanese population. Original data were obtained from MEDLINE searches using PubMed or from searches of the 'Ichushi' database, complemented with manual searches. Meta-analysis was performed by using the random effects model to estimate the summary relative risk with 95% confidence interval according to the study design. The final judgment was made based on a consensus of the research group members with consideration for both epidemiological evidence and biological plausibility. We identified five cohort studies and nine case-control studies. Of these, one cohort study reported a strong inverse association (in women only), whereas three case-control studies reported a strong inverse association with colon or rectal cancer. In meta-analysis, high consumption of coffee was not appreciably associated with colorectal cancer risk among cohort studies, whereas it was associated with significantly lower risk of colorectal or colon cancer among case-control studies. The summary relative risk/odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for the highest versus lowest categories of coffee consumption was 0.95 (0.77-1.17) and 0.78 (0.65-0.95) for cohort and case-control studies, respectively. The evidence is insufficient to support that coffee drinking increases or decreases the risk of colorectal cancer among the Japanese population. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Dose-risk and duration-risk relationships between aspirin and colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of published cohort studies.

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    Xiaohua Ye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In previous meta-analyses, aspirin use has been associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer. However, uncertainty remains on the exact dose-risk and duration-risk relationships. METHODS: We identified studies by searching several English and Chinese electronic databases and reviewing relevant articles. The dose-response meta-analysis was performed by linear trend regression and restricted cubic spline regression. Subgroup analyses were conducted to explore possible heterogeneity among studies. Potential heterogeneity was calculated as Q statistic and I(2 value. Publication bias was evaluated using funnel plots and quantified by the Begg's and Egger's test. RESULTS: Twelve studies were included in this meta-analysis. An inverse association between aspirin use and colorectal cancer was observed in both the overall group (RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.64-0.83 for aspirin dose; RR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.75-0.85 for frequency of aspirin use; RR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.68-0.81 for years of aspirin use and subgroups stratified by sex and cancer site. The dose-response meta-analysis showed that there was a 20% statistically significant decreased risk of colorectal cancer for 325 mg aspirin per day increment, 18% decreased risk for 7 times aspirin per week increment and 18% decreased risk for 10 years aspirin increment. CONCLUSION: Long-term (>5 years, low-dose (75-325 mg per day and regular aspirin use (2-7 times per week can effectively reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.

  12. Association between allergic conditions and colorectal cancer risk/mortality: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

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    Ma, Wangqian; Yang, Jia; Li, Peiwei; Lu, Xinliang; Cai, Jianting

    2017-07-17

    We aimed to assess the association between allergic conditions and risk/mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC). A systematic literature search was conducted using Pubmed and Embase to identify relevant studies. Prospective studies assessing the association between allergic conditions and risk/mortality of CRC were included. Risk ratios (RRs) were pooled with either a fixed- or a random-effects model according to heterogeneity. A total of 515379 participants and 10345 CRC cases from 12 studies were included in the analysis of CRC risk, while four studies with 1484741 individuals and 30040 CRC deaths were included in the analysis of CRC mortality. The pooled RR for the association between allergic conditions and CRC risk was 0.88 (95% CI 0.83-0.92). The inverse association was observed both in colon cancer (pooled RR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.72-0.97) and rectal cancer (pooled RR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.74-0.93). Moreover, no gender difference was observed in the analysis of CRC risk (for males, pooled RR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.81-0.96; for females, pooled RR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.82-0.95). And allergic conditions were also found to be inversely associated with CRC mortality (pooled RR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.83-0.92). In conclusion, the current meta-analysis provides further evidence that allergic conditions were inversely associated with CRC risk and mortality.

  13. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the relationship between EPHX1 polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk.

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    Fei Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1 plays an important role in both the activation and detoxification of PAHs, which are carcinogens found in cooked meat and tobacco smoking. Polymorphisms at exons 3 and 4 of the EPHX1 gene have been reported to be associated with variations in EPHX1 activity. The aim of this study is to quantitatively summarize the relationship between EPHX1 polymorphisms and colorectal cancer (CRC risk. METHODS: Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase, CNKI, and Chinese Biomedicine Databases for studies published before June 2012. Summary odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for EPHX1 Tyr113His (rs1051740 and His139Arg (rs2234922 polymorphisms and CRC were calculated in a fixed-effects model and a random-effects model when appropriate. RESULTS: This meta-analysis yielded 14 case-control studies, which included 13 studies for Tyr113His (6395 cases and 7893 controls and 13 studies for His139Arg polymorphisms (5375 cases and 6962 controls. Overall, the pooled results indicated that EPHX1 Tyr113His polymorphism was not associated with CRC risk; while the His139Arg polymorphism was significantly associated with decreased CRC risk (Arg/His vs. His/His, OR = 0.90, 95%CI = 0.83-0.98; dominant model, OR = 0.92, 95%CI = 0.85-0.99. The statistically significant association between EPHX1 His139Arg polymorphism and CRC was observed among Caucasians and population-based case-control studies. This association showed little heterogeneity and remained consistently strong when analyses were limited to studies in which genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, or limited to studies with matched controls. When cumulative meta-analyses of the two associations were conducted by studies' publication time, the results were persistent and robust. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis suggests that EPHX1 Tyr113His polymorphism may be not associated with CRC development; while the

  14. Calcium intake and colorectal cancer risk: dose-response meta-analysis of prospective observational studies.

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    Keum, NaNa; Aune, Dagfinn; Greenwood, Darren C; Ju, Woong; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2014-10-15

    Mechanistic and epidemiologic studies provide considerable evidence for a protective association between calcium intake and incident colorectal cancer (CRC). While the relationship has not been substantiated by short-duration randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CRC, trials do show a benefit on adenomas, a precursor to CRC. To address some of this inconsistency, we conducted dose-response meta-analyses by sources of calcium intake, based on prospective observational studies published up to December 2013 identified from PubMed, Embase, and BIOSIS. Summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. For total calcium intake, each 300 mg/day increase was associated with an approximately 8% reduced risk of CRC (summary RR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.89-0.95, I(2)  = 47%, 15 studies with 12,305 cases, intake = 250-1,900 mg/day, follow-up = 3.3-16 years). While the risk decreased less steeply in higher range of total calcium intake (P(non-linearity)  = 0.04), the degree of curvature was mild and statistical significance of non-linearity was sensitive to one study. For supplementary calcium, each 300 mg/day increase was associated with an approximately 9% reduced risk of CRC (summary RR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.86-0.98, I(2)  = 67%, six studies with 8,839 cases, intake = 0-1,150 mg/day, follow-up = 5-10 years). The test for non-linearity was not statistically significant (P(non-linearity)  = 0.11). In conclusion, both dietary and supplementary calcium intake may continue to decrease CRC risk beyond 1,000 mg/day. Calcium supplements and non-dairy products fortified with calcium may serve as additional targets in the prevention of CRC. RCTs of calcium supplements with at least 10 years of follow-up are warranted to confirm a benefit of calcium supplements on CRC risk. © 2014 UICC.

  15. MicroRNA-92a as a potential biomarker in diagnosis of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Xin Yang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Previous studies demonstrated that MicroRNA-92a (miR-92a was significantly differential expressed between colorectal cancer (CRC patients and control cohorts, which provide timely relevant evidence for miR-92a as a novel promising biomarker in the colorectal cancer patients. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate potential diagnostic value of plasma miR-92a. METHODS: Relevant literatures were collected in PubMed, Embase, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI and Technology of Chongqing (VIP, and Wan Fang Data. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR for miR-92a in the diagnosis of CRC were pooled using random effects models. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC curve analysis and the area under the curve (AUC were used to estimate the overall test performance. RESULTS: This Meta-analysis included six studies with a total of 521 CRC patients and 379 healthy controls. For miR-92a, the pooled sensitivity, specificity and DOR to predict CRC patients were 76% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 72%-79%, 64% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 59%-69% and 8.05 (95% CI: 3.50-18.56, respectively. In addition, the AUC of miR-92a in diagnosis CRC is 0.7720. CONCLUSIONS: MicroRNA-92a might be a novel potential biomarker in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer, and more studies are needed to highlight the theoretical strengths.

  16. Addition of bevacizumab to first-line chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis, with emphasis on chemotherapy subgroups

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    Macedo Ligia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bevacizumab has an important role in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, clinical trials studying its effect have involved distinct chemotherapy regimens with divergent results. The aim of this meta-analysis is to gather current data and evaluate not only the efficacy of bevacizumab, but also the impact of divergent backbone regimens. Methods A wide search of randomized clinical trials using bevacizumab in first-line metastatic colorectal cancer was performed in Embase, MEDLINE, LILACS and Cochrane databases. Meeting presentations and abstracts were also investigated. The resulting data were examined and included in the meta-analysis according to the type of regimen. Results Six trials, totaling 3060 patients, were analyzed. There was an advantage to using bevacizumab for overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS (HR = 0.84; CI: 0.77-0.91; P Conclusions Bevacizumab has efficacy in first-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer, but the current data are insufficient to support efficacy in all regimens, especially infusional fluorouracil regimens, like FOLFIRI and FOLFOX.

  17. Prevalence of adenomas and colorectal cancer in average risk individuals: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Heitman, Steven J; Ronksley, Paul E; Hilsden, Robert J; Manns, Braden J; Rostom, Alaa; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2009-12-01

    There is an extensive yet inconsistent body of literature reporting on the prevalence of adenomatous polyps (adenomas) and colorectal cancer among average risk individuals. The objectives of our study were to determine the pooled prevalence of adenomas and colorectal cancer, as well as nonadvanced and advanced adenomas, among average risk North Americans. Articles were obtained by searching electronic databases (MEDLINE: 1950 through March 2008 and EMBASE: 1980 through March 2008), bibliographies, major journals, and conference proceedings, with no language restrictions. Two reviewers independently selected cross-sectional studies reporting adenoma and colorectal cancer prevalence rates in average risk individuals and assessed studies for inclusion and quality, and extracted the data for analysis. Pooled adenoma and colorectal cancer prevalence rates were estimated using fixed and random effects models. Stratification and metaregression was used to assess heterogeneity. Based on 18 included studies, the pooled prevalence of adenomas, colorectal cancer, nonadvanced adenomas, and advanced adenomas was 30.2%, 0.3%, 17.7%, and 5.7%, respectively. Heterogeneity was observed in the pooled prevalence rates for overall adenomas, advanced adenomas, and colorectal cancer and was explained by the mean age (> or = 65 years vs < 65 years) with older cohorts reporting higher prevalence rates. None of the study quality indicators was found to be significant predictors of heterogeneity. The high prevalence of advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer, especially among older screen-eligible individuals, provides impetus for expanding colorectal cancer screening programs. Furthermore, the pooled prevalence estimates can be used as quality indicators for established programs.

  18. Worldwide Incidence of Colorectal Cancer, Leukemia, and Lymphoma in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Chelle L. Wheat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC. In addition, there may be an association between leukemia and lymphoma and IBD. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the IBD literature to estimate the incidence of CRC, leukemia, and lymphoma in adult IBD patients. Methods. Studies were identified by a literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, EMBASE, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. Pooled incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years [py] were calculated through use of a random effects model, unless substantial heterogeneity prevented pooling of estimates. Several stratified analyses and metaregression were performed to explore potential study heterogeneity and bias. Results. Thirty-six articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. For CRC, the pooled incidence rate in CD was 53.3/100,000 py (95% CI 46.3–60.3/100,000. The incidence of leukemia was 1.5/100,000 py (95% CI −0.06–3.0/100,000 in IBD, 0.3/100,000 py (95% CI −1.0–1.6/100,000 in CD, and 13.0/100,000 py (95% CI 5.8–20.3/100,000 in UC. For lymphoma, the pooled incidence rate in CD was 0.8/100,000 py (95% CI −0.4–2.1/100,000. Substantial heterogeneity prevented the pooling of other incidence estimates. Conclusion. The incidence of CRC, leukemia, and lymphoma in IBD is low.

  19. Effectiveness of circulating tumor DNA for detection of KRAS gene mutations in colorectal cancer patients: a meta-analysis

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    Hao Y

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Xin Hao,1,* Qiang Fu,2,* Yan-Yan Guo,1 Ming Ye,1 Hui-Xia Zhao,1 Qi Wang,1 Xiu-Mei Peng,1 Qiu-Wen Li,1 Ru-Liang Wang,1 Wen-Hua Xiao1 1Department of Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology, People’s Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA can be identified in the peripheral blood of patients and harbors the genomic alterations found in tumor tissues, which provides a noninvasive approach for detection of gene mutations. We conducted this meta-analysis to investigate whether ctDNA can be used for monitoring KRAS gene mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC patients. Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Web of Science were searched for the included eligible studies in English, and data were extracted for statistical analysis according to the numbers of true-positive (TP, true-negative (TN, false-positive (FP and false-negative (FN cases. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR were calculated, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance. After independent searching and reviewing, 21 studies involving 1,812 cancer patients were analyzed. The overall sensitivity, specificity and DOR were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] =0.55–0.78, 0.96 (95% CI =0.93–0.98 and 53.95 (95% CI =26.24–110.92, respectively. The AUROC was 0.95 (95% CI =0.92–0.96, which indicated the high diagnostic accuracy of ctDNA. After stratified analysis, we found the higher diagnostic accuracy in subgroup of patients detected in blood sample of plasma. The ctDNA may be an ideal source for detection of KRAS gene mutations in CRC patients with high specificity and diagnostic value. Keywords: cancer, KRAS, mutation, circulating tumor DNA

  20. Increased risk of adenomas in individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer: results of a meta-analysis.

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    Wilschut, Janneke A; Habbema, J Dik F; Ramsey, Scott D; Boer, Rob; Looman, Caspar W N; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein

    2010-12-01

    It is unclear to what extent the increased risk of colorectal cancer in individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer and no known genetic disorders is associated with a higher adenoma prevalence. Our aim is to estimate the relative difference in adenoma prevalence and its age-pattern in individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer compared to those without. We performed a literature search to identify colonoscopy studies reporting the adenoma prevalence by age. Using multilevel logistic regression, we examined how the adenoma prevalence by age differed between individuals with and without a family history of colorectal cancer. We excluded members of families with a known genetic disorder. Thirteen colonoscopy studies were identified. The adenoma prevalence was significantly higher in individuals with a family history than in those without (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.4-3.5). The adenoma prevalence increased with age (OR per year of age 1.06, 95% CI 1.05-1.07). The age trend did not differ significantly between the two groups. Individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer have a considerably higher prevalence of adenomas compared to individuals without a family history. This is consistent with their increased risk of colorectal cancer.

  1. Relationship between single-nucleotide polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase-2 gene and colorectal cancer and gastric cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis

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    Wu ZS

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Zesheng Wu,1 Peng Jiang,2 Haider Zulqarnain,1 Hua Gao,1 Wenbin Zhang1 1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, 2Department of Oncology, Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, People’s Republic of China Background: Recently, the published data on the association between matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 (C-1306T polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC and gastric cancer (GC (gastrointestinal cancer risk remained controversial. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the risk of CRC and GC and single-nucleotide polymorphism of MMP-2(C-1306T.Methods: Medline, Embase, Science Citation Index, and PubMed were thoroughly searched to identify relevant studies. Odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence interval (CI was used to assess the strength of the association.Results: We performed a meta-analysis of 14 studies including 642 cases and 692 controls for CRC and 1,936 cases and 3,490 controls for GC. The result indicates that there is significant relationship between MMP-2(C-1306T polymorphism and CRC risk in recessive model and codominant model (TT vs CC/CT: OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.30–4.37, P=0.005; TT vs CC: OR: 2.36, 95% CI: 1.29–4.34, P=0.006. In subgroup analysis according to ethnicity, significant associations were found in Caucasians (TT vs CC/CT: OR: 2.87, 95% CI: 1.43–5.78, P=0.003; TT vs CC: OR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.41–5.80, P=0.003, but we did not find significant evidence with GC in all genetic models, and in stratified analysis according to ethnicity, no significant risk was found in the subgroup too.Conclusion: This meta-analysis considered that the MMP-2(C-1306T polymorphism is a risk factor for CRC susceptibility, especially in Caucasians, but it does not support any relationship to GC, and further studies are needed to explore the association. Keywords: matrix metalloproteinase-2, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer

  2. Narrow Band Imaging, Magnifying Chromoendoscopy, and Gross Morphological Features for the Optical Diagnosis of T1 Colorectal Cancer and Deep Submucosal Invasion: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, Y.; Moss, A.; Reitsma, J.B.; Siersema, P.D.; Moons, L.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Optical diagnosis of T1 colorectal cancer (CRC) and T1 CRC with deep submucosal invasion is important in guiding the treatment strategy. The use of advanced imaging is not standard clinical practice in Western countries. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted comparing the

  3. Value of symptoms and additional diagnostic tests for colorectal cancer in primary care: systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, Petra; van der Windt, Daniëlle A. W. M.; Bruinvels, David J.; Mallen, Christian D.; van Weyenberg, Stijn J. B.; Mulder, Chris J.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.

    2010-01-01

    To summarise available evidence on diagnostic tests that might help primary care physicians to identify patients with an increased risk for colorectal cancer among those consulting for non-acute lower abdominal symptoms. PubMed, Embase, and reference screening. Study eligibility criteria Studies

  4. Investigation of cyclin D1 rs9344 G>A polymorphism in colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis involving 13,642 subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu H

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hao Qiu,1,* Chengguo Cheng,2,* Yafeng Wang,3 Mingqiang Kang,4 Weifeng Tang,4,5 Shuchen Chen,4 Haiyong Gu,6 Chao Liu,5 Yu Chen7,8 1Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Jiangsu University, 2Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 3Department of Cardiology, The People’s Hospital of Xishuangbanna Dai Autonomous Prefecture, Jinghong, 4Department of Thoracic Surgery, Affiliated Union Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, 5Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Affiliated People’s Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 6Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, 7Department of Medical Oncology, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fujian Medical University Cancer Hospital, 8Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Translational Cancer Medicine, Fuzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The relationship between cyclin D1 (CCND1 rs9344 G>A polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC risk is still ambiguous. To obtain a precise estimation of the relationship, we performed an extensive meta-analysis based on the eligible studies. Crude odds ratios with their 95% confidence intervals were harnessed to determine the strength of correlation between CCND1 rs9344 G>A polymorphism and CRC risk under the allele, the homozygote, the dominant, and the recessive genetic models, respectively (28 studies with 5,784 CRC cases and 7,858 controls. Our results indicated evidence of the association between CCND1 rs9344 G>A polymorphism and the increased risk of CRC in four genetic models: A vs G, AA vs GG, AA+GA vs GG, and AA vs GA+GG. In a stratified analysis by cancer type of CRC, there was an increased risk of sporadic CRC found in three genetic models: A vs G, AA vs GG, and AA+GA vs GG. In a stratified analysis by ethnicity, there was an increased CRC risk found among Asians in allele comparison

  5. miR-203 as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye H

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Huajun Ye,1,* Haibin Hao,2,* Jincheng Wang,3 Renpin Chen,1 Zhiming Huang1 1Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Zhejiang, 2Department of General Surgery, Medical College of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 3Department of Medical Imaging, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We sought to systematically evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of miR-203 in patients with colorectal cancer. To explore the diagnostic performance of miR-203, eligible studies were identified from biomedical databases. Based on these results, 11 studies were pooled and included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratios of miR-203 were 0.83 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.78–0.86, 0.80 (95% CI: 0.77–0.83, and 19.27 (95% CI: 7.23–51.36 for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. The area under the curve for miR-203 for diagnosing colorectal cancer was 0.89. Patients with higher expression of tissue miR-203 had poor overall survival (pooled hazard ratio: 1.63; 95% CI: 1.03–2.57, P=0.04, but serum miR-203 was not predictive (pooled hazard ratio: 1.59; 95% CI: 0.31–8.12, P=0.58. The miR-203 values of tissue and serum merged together may perhaps predict superior overall survival (pooled hazard ratio: 1.62; 95% CI: 0.93–2.82, but the effect was not significant (P=0.09. Keywords: colorectal cancer, CRC, diagnosis, miR-203, prognosis

  6. CT colonography for surveillance of patients with colorectal cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porte, Francois; Burling, David [St. Mark' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harrow (United Kingdom); Uppara, Mallikarjuna; Malietzis, George; Faiz, Omar [Trials and Outcome Centre (SETOC) St Mark' s Hospital, Surgical Epidemiology, Harrow (United Kingdom); Halligan, Steve [University College London, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Athanasiou, Thanos [Imperial College London, Department of Surgery and Cancer, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    To review primary research evidence investigating performance of CT colonography for colorectal cancer surveillance. The financial impact of using CT colonography for surveillance was also estimated. We identified primary studies of CT colonography for surveillance of colorectal cancer patients. A summary ROC curve was constructed. Inter-study heterogeneity was explored using the I2 value. Financial impact was estimated for a theoretical cohort of patients, based on Cancer Research UK statistics. Seven studies provided data on 880 patients. Five of seven studies (765 patients) were included for qualitative analysis. Sensitivity of CT colonography for detection of anastomotic recurrence was 95 % (95 % CI 62 - 100), specificity 100 % (95 % CI 75 - 100) and sensitivity for metachronous cancers was 100 %. No statistical heterogeneity was detected (I2 = 0 %). We estimated that CT colonography as a 'single test' alternative to colonoscopy and standard CT for surveillance would potentially save EUR20,785,232 (pound 14,803,404) for an annual cohort of UK patients. CT colonography compares favourably to colonoscopy for detection of anastomotic recurrence and metachronous colorectal cancer, and appears financially beneficial. These findings should be considered alongside limitations of small patient numbers and high clinical heterogeneity between studies. (orig.)

  7. Hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery versus conventional open surgery in intraoperative and postoperative outcomes for colorectal cancer: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xubing; Wu, Qingbin; Gu, Chaoyang; Hu, Tao; Bi, Liang; Wang, Ziqiang

    2017-08-01

    This meta-analysis aims to compare hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery (HALS) and conventional open surgery (OS) for colorectal cancer (CRC) in terms of intraoperative and postoperative outcomes, and to explore the safety, feasibility of HALS for CRC surgery. A systematic literature search with no limits was performed in PubMed, Embase, and Medline. The last search was performed on April 23, 2017. The outcomes of interests included intraoperative outcomes (operative time, blood loss, length of incision, transfusion, and lymph nodes harvested), postoperative outcomes (length of hospital stay, length of postoperative hospital stay, time to first flatus, time to first liquid diet, time to first soft diet, time to first bowel movement, postoperative complications, reoperation, ileus, anastomotic leakage, wound infection, urinary complication, pulmonary infection, and mortality). Fifteen articles published between 2007 and 2017 with a total of 1962 patients with CRC were included in our meta-analysis. HALS was associated with longer operative time, less blood loss, smaller length of incision, shorter hospital days and postoperative hospital days, less time to first flatus, less wound infection, and less postoperative complications. There was no difference in blood transfusion, lymph node harvested, time to first liquid or soft diet, time to first bowel movement, reoperation, ileus, anastomotic leakage, pulmonary infection, urinary complications, or mortality. Our meta-analysis suggests that HALS in CRC surgery improves cosmesis and results in better postoperative recovery outcomes by reducing postoperative complications and hospital days. Furthermore, a large randomized control study is warranted to compare the short-term and long-term outcomes of those 2 techniques for CRC treatment.

  8. A Meta-Analysis of the Short- and Long-Term Results of Randomized Controlled Trials That Compared Laparoscopy-Assisted and Conventional Open Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ohtani, Yutaka Tamamori, Yuichi Arimoto, Yukio Nishiguchi, Kiyoshi Maeda, Kosei Hirakawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate and compare the short- and long-term results of laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCRS and conventional open surgery (OCRS for colorectal cancer (CRC.Methods: We searched relevant papers published between January 1990 and May 2011. We analyzed the outcomes of each type of surgery over the short- and long-term periods.Results: In the short-term period, we found no significant differences in overall perioperative complications and anastomotic leakage between LCRS and OCRS groups. We found no significant differences in overall, distant, local and wound-site recurrence, overall mortality, 3 and 5 year disease-free survival rate, and cancer-related mortality between the 2 groups.Conclusions: LCRS has the benefits of reducing intraoperative blood loss, earlier resumption of oral intake, and shorter duration of hospital stay in the short-term. The long-term outcomes of LCRS seem to be similar to those of OCRS.

  9. Vitamin and multiple-vitamin supplement intake and incidence of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Yu, Qiuyan; Zhu, Zhenli; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Meilan; Tang, Pingyi; Li, Ke

    2015-01-01

    This paper systematically evaluated the association of intake of different vitamins and multiple-vitamin supplements and the incidence of colorectal cancer. Relevant studies were identified in MEDLINE via PubMed (published up to April 2014). We extracted data from articles on vitamins A, C, D, E, B9 (folate), B2, B3, B6, and B12 and multiple-vitamin supplements. We used multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RRs) and a random-effects model for analysis and random effects. With heterogeneity, we looked for the source of heterogeneity or performed sensitivity and stratified analyses. We found 47 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The multivariable-adjusted RR for pooled studies for the association between the highest versus lowest vitamin B9 (folate) intake and colorectal cancer was 0.88 [95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 0.81-0.95]. Vitamin D was 0.87 (95 % CI 0.77-0.99); vitamin B6, 0.88 (95 % CI 0.79-0.99); vitamin B2, 0.86 (95 % CI, 0.76-0.97); vitamin A, 0.87 (95 % CI, 0.75-1.03); vitamin C, 0.92 (95 % CI, 0.80-1.06); vitamin E, 0.94 (95 % CI, 0.82-1.07); vitamin B12, 1.10 (95 % CI, 0.92-1.32); vitamin B3, 1.18 (95 % CI, 0.76-1.84). Vitamin B9 (folate), D, B6, and B2 intake was inversely associated with risk of colorectal cancer, but further study is needed. Our study featured unacceptable heterogeneity for studies of multiple-vitamin supplements, so findings were inconclusive.

  10. Meta-analysis of the association between COX-2 polymorphisms and risk of colorectal cancer based on case-control studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiliu Peng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 is an inducible enzyme converting arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and playing important roles in inflammatory diseases as well as tumor development. Previous studies investigating the association between COX-2 polymorphisms and colorectal cancer (CRC risk reported conflicting results. We performed a meta-analysis of all available studies to explore this association. METHODS: All studies published up to October 2013 on the association between COX-2 polymorphisms and CRC risk were identified by searching electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library. The association between COX-2 polymorphisms and CRC risk was assessed by odds ratios (ORs together with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs. RESULTS: Ten studies with 6,774 cases and 9,772 controls were included for -1195A>G polymorphism, 13 studies including 6,807 cases and 10,052 controls were available for -765G>C polymorphism, and 8 studies containing 5,121 cases and 7,487 controls were included for 8473T>C polymorphism. With respect to -765G>C polymorphism, we did not find a significant association with CRC risk when all eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis. However, in subgroup analyses by ethnicity and cancer location, with a Bonferroni corrected alpha of 0.05/2, statistical significant increased CRC risk was found in the Asian populations (dominant model CC+CG vs. GG: OR = 1.399, 95%CI: 1.113-1.760, P = 0.004 and rectum cancer patients (CC vs. GG: OR = 2.270, 95%CI: 1.295-3.980, P = 0.004; Recessive model CC vs. CG+GG: OR = 2.269, 95%CI: 1.297-3.970, P = 0.004. In subgroup analysis according to source of control, no significant association was detected. With respect to -1195A>G and 8473T>C polymorphisms, no significant association with CRC risk was demonstrated in the overall and subgroup analyses. CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis suggests that the COX-2 -765G>C polymorphism may be a risk factor for

  11. Peri-operative chemotherapy for the treatment of resectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The role of peri-operative chemotherapy in patients with resected stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) remains to be defined. This study was aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of peri-operative chemotherapy in patients with resected stage IV CRC by performing a meta-analysis of relevant trials. Methods We performed a literature search to identify trials comparing patients with stage IV CRC receiving peri-operative chemotherapy and surgery with patients undergoing surgery alone. The hazard ratio (HR) was estimated to assess any survival advantage of peri-operative chemotherapy. Results Eight trials conducted on a total of 1174 patients were identified by a literature search. In these trials, HR estimates suggested that peri-operative chemotherapy yielded no survival advantage over surgery alone (HR, 0.94; 95%CI, 0.8-1.10; p = 0.43). In a subset analysis on intra-arterial chemotherapy alone, no survival benefit was evident (HR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.84-1.21; p = 0.96; I2 = 30%), whereas in the trials involving systemic chemotherapy, the difference between the groups approached statistical significance (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.53-1.04; p = 0.08; I2 = 0%). Both peri-operative treatment groups had a significant recurrence-free survival benefit (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.65-0.95; P = 0.01 for hepatic arterial infusion; and HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.62-0.91; p = 0.003 for systemic therapy). The toxicities of chemotherapy were acceptable in most trials. Conclusions This is the first meta-analysis demonstrating the importance of peri-operative chemotherapy in the treatment of resected stage IV CRC. Although the results must be carefully interpreted because of some limitations, critical issues were identified that must be resolved by future studies. PMID:20565923

  12. Folate Intake, MTHFR Polymorphisms, and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective was to determine whether relationships exist between the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphisms and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC and examine whether the risk is modified by level of folate intake. Methods. MEDLINE, Embase, and SCOPUS were searched to May 2012 using the terms “folic acid,” “folate,” “colorectal cancer,” “methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase,” “MTHFR.” Observational studies were included which (1 assessed the risk of CRC for each polymorphism and/or (2 had defined levels of folate intake for each polymorphism and assessed the risk of CRC. Results. From 910 references, 67 studies met our criteria; hand searching yielded 10 studies. The summary risk estimate comparing the 677CT versus CC genotype was 1.02 (95% CI 0.95–1.10 and for 677TT versus CC was 0.88 (95% CI 0.80–0.96 both with heterogeneity. The summary risk estimates for A1298C polymorphisms suggested no reduced risk. The summary risk estimate for high versus low total folate for the 677CC genotype was 0.70 (95% CI 0.56–0.89 and the 677TT genotype 0.63 (95% CI 0.41–0.97. Conclusion. These results suggest that the 677TT genotype is associated with a reduced risk of developing CRC, under conditions of high total folate intake, and this associated risk remains reduced for both MTHFR 677 CC and TT genotypes.

  13. Integrative Medicine for Relief of Nausea and Vomiting in the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Using Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng Hua; May, Brian H; Zhou, Iris W; Zhang, Anthony L; Xue, Charlie C

    2016-05-01

    The management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) remains an issue in the treatment of colorectal cancer using oxaliplatin-based regimens. Certain traditional plant-based medicines (TMs) have histories of use for nausea and vomiting and have been integrated with conventional therapies for CINV. To assess the effectiveness of integrative management of CINV, meta-analysis was conducted of 27 randomised controlled studies (1843 participants) published from 2005 to 2013. The oxaliplatin plus TM groups showed significantly reduced CINV (risk ratio 0.65 [0.59, 0.71], I(2)  = 28%) compared with oxaliplatin controls, with or without the addition of conventional anti-emetics. Further sensitivity analyses based on the ingredients of the TMs identified six plants (Atractylodes macrocephala, Poria cocos, Coix lacryma-jobi, Astragalus membranaceus, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Panax ginseng) that were associated with significant reductions in CINV without important heterogeneity. Experimental studies of these six plants have reported inhibitory effects on nausea and vomiting (or its animal equivalent), regulation of gastrointestinal motility, gastroprotective effects and antioxidant actions, which may at least partially explain the effects identified in the meta-analyses of the clinical trial results. These plants warrant further clinical research as potential additions to chemotherapy regimens in patients whose CINV is not sufficiently well controlled by conventional therapies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Red and processed meat intake and risk of colorectal adenomas: a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aune, D.; Chan, D.S.; Vieira, A.R.; Navarro Rosenblatt, D.A.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current evidence indicates that red and processed meat intake increases the risk of colorectal cancer; however, the association with colorectal adenomas is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies of red and processed meat intake and

  15. Red and processed meat intake and risk of colorectal adenomas: a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aune, D.; Chan, D.S.M.; Vieira, A.; Navarro Rosenblatt, D.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Current evidence indicates that red and processed meat intake increases the risk of colorectal cancer; however, the association with colorectal adenomas is unclear. Objective To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies of red and processed meat intake and

  16. Use of Jianpi Jiedu Herbs in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaofan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To systematically review the effect of invigorating Pi and detoxification (Jianpi Jiedu, (JPJD herbs in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC patients receiving chemotherapy. Methods. Three English and four Chinese databases were searched. Literature was screened by EndNote X7 and data were analyzed by RevMan 5.2. Results. This review comprised 12 randomized clinical studies of 701 patients. The results showed that JPJD herbs improved the therapeutic effect on Chinese medicine symptoms [risk ratio (RR = 1.59; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.35~1.88] and Karnofsky performance score [RR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.52~2.82] for advanced CRC patients receiving chemotherapy, lowered the Chinese medicine symptoms’ score [weighted mean difference = −2.44; 95% CI: −3.23~−1.64], reduced the incidence of nausea and vomiting [RR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.11~0.49], improved platelet at toxicity grades III-IV [odds ratio = 0.29; 95% CI: 0.12~0.74] and I–IV [RR = 0.65; 95% CI: 0.51~0.82], and improved white blood cell at toxicity grades III-IV [RR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.23~0.58] and I–IV [RR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.60~0.79]. However, the results showed no significant effect on tumor response. Conclusion. JPJD herbs can improve quality of life, relieve symptoms, and reduce adverse events of advanced CRC patients receiving chemotherapy.

  17. The association of low penetrance genetic risk modifiers with colorectal cancer in lynch syndrome patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Neil; Malik, Salim; McGuire, Joshua L; Monahan, Kevin J

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is a highly penetrant inherited cancer predisposition syndrome accounting for approximately 1000 cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the UK annually. LS is characterised by autosomal dominant inheritance and germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. The penetrance is highly variable and the reasons for this have not been fully elucidated. This study investigates whether low penetrance genetic risk factors may result in phenotype modification in LS patients. To conduct a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to assess the association between low penetrance genetic risk modifiers and CRC in LS patients. A systematic review was conducted of the PubMed and HuGENet databases. Eligibility of studies was determined by pre-defined criteria. Included studies were analysed via the per-allele model and assessed by pooled odds ratios and establishing 95% confidence intervals. Study heterogeneity was assessed via Cochrane's Q statistic and I2 values. Publication bias was evaluated with funnel plots. Subgroup analysis was conducted on gender. Statistical software used was the Metafor package for the R programme version 3.1.3. Sixty-four polymorphisms were identified and sufficient data was available for analysis of ten polymorphisms, with between 279 and 1768 CRC cases per polymorphism. None demonstrated association with CRC risk in LS patients. However in sub-group analysis the polymorphism rs16892766 (8q23.3) was significant in males (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.12-2.10). The variable phenotype presentation of the disease still remains largely unexplained, and further investigation is warranted. Other factors may also be influencing the high variability of the disease, such as environmental factors, copy number variants and epigenetic alterations. Investigation into these areas is needed as well as larger and more definitive studies of the polymorphisms analysed in this study.

  18. Correlation Between CASC8, SMAD7 Polymorphisms and the Susceptibility to Colorectal Cancer: An Updated Meta-Analysis Based on GWAS Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kunhou; Hua, Long; Wei, Lunshou; Meng, Jiming; Hu, Junhong

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and a number of case-control studies have suggested that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs7837328, rs7014346, rs6983267, rs10505477 on CASC8 gene and rs4939827, rs4464148, rs12953717 on SMAD7 gene are significantly correlated with the susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC). For the sake of clarifying the association, a meta-analysis was conducted and population heterogeneity was considered in the study.A total of 34 articles including 90 studies (168,471 cases and 163,223 controls) that evaluated the relationship between the CASC8, SMAD7 genes and the risk of CRC under the allelic model were reviewed. Also subgroup analysis was performed by ethnicity (Caucasian, Asian, and African) and all of the analyses were implemented in R 3.2.1 software.Pooled data from the meta-analysis revealed that the A allele of rs7837328, the A allele of rs7014346, the G allele of rs6983267, the A allele of rs10505477, the T allele of rs4939827, the T of rs4464148, and the T of rs12953717 were significantly associated with an increased risk of CRC under the allelic model. Additionally, subgroup analyses of 6 SNPs by ethnicity (rs4464148 excepted) witnessed that the A allele of rs7837328, the G allele of rs6983267, and the T of rs12953717 were notably associated with an increased risk of CRC among Caucasian and Asian. Furthermore, the A allele of rs7014346, the A allele of rs10505477, and the T allele of rs4939827 were significantly related with an elevated risk of CRC only among Caucasian.Our study suggested that for CASC8 gene, SNP of rs7837328 and rs6983267 are risk factors for CRC among both Caucasian and Asian whereas rs7014346 and rs10505477 are risky gene polymorphisms only among Caucasian. For SMAD7 gene, rs4939827 and rs4464148 are risk factors for CRC among Caucasian whereas rs12953717 could elevate the susceptibility to CRC in both Caucasian and Asian.

  19. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  20. Fish Consumption, n-3 Fatty Acids, and Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelen, A.; Schouten, J.M.; Kamphuis, C.; Stam, B.E.; Burema, J.; Renkema, J.M.S.; Bakker, E.J.; Veer, van 't P.; Kampman, E.

    2007-01-01

    Animal studies show favorable effects of n-3 fatty acids on inflammation and cancer, but results from epidemiologic studies appear to be inconsistent. The authors conducted meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies that evaluated the association between fish consumption or n-3 fatty acids and

  1. What is the most accurate whole-body imaging modality for assessment of local and distant recurrent disease in colorectal cancer? A meta-analysis. Imaging for recurrent colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, Monique; Lambregts, Doenja M.J. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Rutten, Iris J.G.; Cappendijk, Vincent C.; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Nelemans, Patty J. [Maastricht University, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET), PET/CT, CT and MRI as whole-body imaging modalities for the detection of local and/or distant recurrent disease in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who have a (high) suspicion of recurrent disease, based on clinical findings or rise in carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). A meta-analysis was undertaken. PubMed and Embase were searched for studies on the accuracy of whole-body imaging for patients with suspected local and/or distant recurrence of their CRC. Additionally, studies had to have included at least 20 patients with CRC and 2 x 2 contingency tables had to be provided or derivable. Articles evaluating only local recurrence or liver metastasis were excluded. Summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed from the data on sensitivity and specificity of individual studies and pooled estimates of diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) and areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) were calculated. To test for heterogeneity the Cochran Q test was used. Fourteen observational studies were included which evaluated PET, PET/CT, CT and/or MRI. Study results were available in 12 studies for PET, in 5 studies for CT, in 5 studies for PET/CT and in 1 study for MRI. AUCs for PET, PET/CT and CT were 0.94 (0.90-0.97), 0.94 (0.87-0.98) and 0.83 (0.72-0.90), respectively. In patient based analyses PET/CT had a higher diagnostic performance than PET with an AUC of 0.95 (0.89-0.97) for PET/CT vs 0.92 (0.86-0.96) for PET. Both whole-body PET and PET/CT are very accurate for the detection of local and/or distant recurrent disease in CRC patients with a (high) suspicion of recurrent disease. CT has the lowest diagnostic performance. This difference is probably mainly due to the lower accuracy of CT for detection of extrahepatic metastases (including local recurrence). For clinical practice PET/CT might be the modality of choice when evaluating patients with a (high

  2. The effect of the 2-week wait referral system on the detection of and mortality from colorectal cancer: protocol of a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Mozdiak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer represents the fourth most common cancer in England and Wales; survival is high for early stage disease but declines sharply with advanced stage. UK figures suggest that cancer survival rates are lower than those of other Western European countries. Current 5-year survival is around 50 %. A rapid access strategy was introduced through the Department of Health in 2000. This 2-week wait (TWW referral pathway was devised to streamline referral for suspected cancer, allow diagnosis at an earlier stage, reduce cancer survival inequality and reduce cancer-related mortality. However, only around half of patients with colorectal cancer have symptoms that fit the TWW criteria plus there is a fourfold difference in referral rates across England and Wales. High-quality evidence of TWW outcome measures for colorectal cancer is lacking. This systematic review will collate and evaluate the latest evidence on colorectal cancer detection rate, stage at diagnosis and mortality. Methods English-language publications from 2000 reporting outcomes on the TWW referral system for suspected colorectal cancer will be eligible for inclusion. Cochrane, EMBASE, MEDLINE via PubMed, NHS Evidence, Trip and the British Library Catalogue databases will be searched. Two paired reviewers will independently screen all titles/abstracts and full text for eligibility, then extract data and assess for bias using standardised formats. They will hand review reference lists of eligible articles. Disagreement will be resolved via third party adjudication. Summary effect measures for post-referral diagnosis and mortality rates will be calculated and expressed as relative risk, hazard rate ratio or risk difference with corresponding 95 % confidence intervals. Where possible summary effect measures will be pooled, heterogeneity and its extent for pooled estimates will be assessed via visual inspection of forest plots and explored via sub-group analysis

  3. The SNP rs961253 in 20p12.3 is associated with colorectal cancer risk: a case-control study and a meta-analysis of the published literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiawen Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs961253 located in 20p12, was firstly described to be associated with the increased risk of CRC in a genome-wide association study; however, more recent replication studies yielded controversial results. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A hospital-based case-control study in a Chinese population was firstly performed, and then a meta-analysis combining the current and previously published studies were conducted to explore the real effect of rs961253 in CRC susceptibility. In the Chinese population including 641 cases and 1037 controls, per-A-allele conferred an OR of 1.60 (95% CI = 1.26-2.02 under additive model. In the meta-analysis including 29859 cases and 29696 controls, per-A-allele have an OR of 1.13 (95% CI = 1.09-1.18 under a random-effects model due to heterogeneity (P = 0.019. Nevertheless, the heterogeneity can be totally explained by ethnicity, with the tau(2 reduced to 0 after including ethnicity in meta-regression model. In stratified analysis by ethnicity, per-A-allele had ORs of 1.34 (95% CI = 1.20-1.50 and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14 for Asian and European, respectively, without heterogeneity. Modest influence of each study was observed on overall estimate in sensitive analysis, and evident tendency to significant association was seen in cumulative analysis over time, together indicating the robust stability of the current results. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results from our study and the meta-analysis provided firm evidence that rs961253 significantly contributed to CRC risk in both Asian and European population.

  4. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Status and Risk for Colorectal Cancer and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekcioglu, Cem; Haluza, Daniela; Kundi, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests an association between low vitamin D status and risk for various outcomes including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Analyzing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is the most established means to evaluate an individual’s vitamin D status. However, cutoff values for 25(OH)D insufficiency as well as for optimal 25(OH)D levels are controversial. This systematic review critically summarizes the epidemiological evidence regarding 25(OH)D levels and the risk for colorectal cancer and T2DM. The meta-analytical calculation revealed a pooled relative risk (RR) of 0.62 (CI 0.56–0.70; I2 = 14.7%) for colorectal cancer and an RR of 0.66 (CI 0.61–0.73; I2 = 38.6%) for T2DM when comparing individuals with the highest category of 25(OH)D with those in the lowest. A dose–response analysis showed an inverse association between 25(OH)D levels and RR for both outcomes up to concentrations of about 55 ng/mL for colorectal cancer and about 65 ng/mL for T2DM. At still higher 25(OH)D levels the RR increases slightly, consistent with a U-shaped association. In conclusion, a higher 25(OH)D status is associated with a lower risk for colorectal cancer and T2DM; however, this advantage is gradually lost as levels increase beyond 50–60 ng/mL. PMID:28134804

  5. The Association of Low-Penetrance Variants in DNA Repair Genes with Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Aggarwal, Nikhil; Donald, Neil D; Malik, Salim; Selvendran, Subothini S; McPhail, Mark JW.; Monahan, Kevin J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately 35% of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk is attributable to heritable factors known hereditary syndromes, accounting for 6%. The remainder may be due to lower penetrance polymorphisms particularly of DNA repair genes. DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), direct reversal repair (DRR), and double-strand break repair are complex, evolutionarily conserved, and critical in carcinogenesis. Germline m...

  6. Can K-ras gene mutation be utilized as prognostic biomarker for colorectal cancer patients receiving chemotherapy? A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yuan-Yi; Zhang, Dan; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Wang, Cun; Yang, Lie; Yu, Yong-Yang; Chen, Hai-Ning

    2013-01-01

    K-ras gene mutations were common in colorectal patients, but their relationship with prognosis was unclear. Verify prognostic differences between patient with and without mutant K-ras genes by reviewing the published evidence. Systematic reviews and data bases were searched for cohort/case-control studies of prognosis of colorectal cancer patients with detected K-ras mutations versus those without mutant K-ras genes, both of whom received chemotherapy. Number of patients, regimens of chemotherapy, and short-term or long-term survival rate (disease-free or overall) were extracted. Quality of studies was also evaluated. 7 studies of comparisons with a control group were identified. No association between K-ras gene status with neither short-term disease free-survival (OR=1.01, 95% CI, 0.73-1.38, P=0.97) nor overall survival (OR=1.06, 95% CI, 0.82-1.36, P=0.66) in CRC patients who received chemotherapy was indicated. Comparison of long-term survival between two groups also indicated no significant difference after heterogeneity was eliminated (OR=1.09, 95% CI, 0.85-1.40, P=0.49). K-ras gene mutations may not be a prognostic index for colorectal cancer patients who received chemotherapy.

  7. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  8. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detected by optical colonoscopy. Virtual colonoscopy uses virtual reality technology to produce three-dimensional images of the ... that if current trends in reducing risk factors, increased screening, and better treatment persist, colorectal cancer mortality ...

  9. Dietary acrylamide and cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelucchi, Claudio; Bosetti, Cristina; Galeone, Carlotta; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2015-06-15

    The debate on the potential carcinogenic effect of dietary acrylamide is open. In consideration of the recent findings from large prospective investigations, we conducted an updated meta-analysis on acrylamide intake and the risk of cancer at several sites. Up to July 2014, we identified 32 publications. We performed meta-analyses to calculate the summary relative risk (RR) of each cancer site for the highest versus lowest level of intake and for an increment of 10 µg/day of dietary acrylamide, through fixed-effects or random-effects models, depending on the heterogeneity test. Fourteen cancer sites could be examined. No meaningful associations were found for most cancers considered. The summary RRs for high versus low acrylamide intake were 0.87 for oral and pharyngeal, 1.14 for esophageal, 1.03 for stomach, 0.94 for colorectal, 0.93 for pancreatic, 1.10 for laryngeal, 0.88 for lung, 0.96 for breast, 1.06 for endometrial, 1.12 for ovarian, 1.00 for prostate, 0.93 for bladder and 1.13 for lymphoid malignancies. The RR was of borderline significance only for kidney cancer (RR = 1.20; 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.00-1.45). All the corresponding continuous estimates ranged between 0.95 and 1.03, and none of them was significant. Among never-smokers, borderline associations with dietary acrylamide emerged for endometrial (RR = 1.23; 95% CI, 1.00-1.51) and ovarian (RR = 1.39; 95% CI, 0.97-2.00) cancers. This systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies indicates that dietary acrylamide is not related to the risk of most common cancers. A modest association for kidney cancer, and for endometrial and ovarian cancers in never smokers only, cannot be excluded. © 2014 UICC.

  10. Metformin use and the risk of colorectal adenoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Chan Hyuk; Eun, Chang Soo; Park, Dong Il; Han, Dong Soo

    2017-05-01

    Although it is known that metformin can reduce risk of colorectal cancer, it is unclear whether it protects against colorectal adenoma. This study conducted a systematic literature search on MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library using the primary keywords "colorectal," "colon," "rectal," "rectum," "adenoma," "polyp," "neoplasia," "neoplasm," "metformin," and "diabetes." Studies were included if they evaluated the association between metformin use and colorectal adenoma and reported odds ratios (ORs) or provided data from which these could be estimated. Ten studies and a total of 8726 patients were evaluated. Across all studies, a median of 32.1% (range: 15.2-53.0%) of patients taking metformin also had adenoma; a median of 43.5% (range: 20.5-59.6%) of those not taking metformin had adenoma. In our meta-analysis, metformin use reduced the risk of adenoma (pooled OR = 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.63-0.92, I2  = 60%). Upon subgroup analyses, metformin use tended to reduce risk of adenoma in a high-risk population consisting of patients with a history of colorectal neoplasia (CRN) (pooled OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.34-1.10, I2  = 79%). In addition, metformin reduced the risk of adenoma in a high-risk population consisting of patients with diabetes mellitus (pooled OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.62-0.91, I2  = 57%). Metformin use seemed to be associated with a reduced risk of colorectal adenoma, especially in high-risk populations consisting of patients with diabetes mellitus or a history of CRN, although statistical power was not achieved in patients with a history of CRN. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common susceptibility polymorphisms for colorectal and endometrial cancer near SH2B3 and TSHZ1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Timothy HT; Thompson, Deborah; Painter, Jodie; O’Mara, Tracy; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Palles, Claire; Jones, Angela; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Giles, Graham G; Pharoah, Paul; Peto, Julian; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Couch, Fergus; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Salvesen, Helga B.; Kristensen, Vessela; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Tao; Lindblom, Annika; Hall, Per; de Polanco, Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Aguiar Jnr, Samuel; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Dunning, Alison M; Dennis, Joe; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Holliday, Elizabeth; Attia, John; Ashton, Katie; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Werner, Henrica MJ; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Tham, Emma; Mints, Miriam; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif; Czene, Kamila; Meindl, Alfons; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Annibali, Daniela; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Harris, Rebecca; Meyer, Brian F.; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J; Kinnersley, Ben; Farrington, Susan M.; Timofeeva, Maria; Tenesa, Albert; Campbell, Harry; Haile, Robert W.; Hodgson, Shirley; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Easton, Douglas; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Spurdle, Amanda; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    High-risk mutations in several genes predispose to both colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC). We therefore hypothesised that some lower-risk genetic variants might also predispose to both CRC and EC. Using CRC and EC genome-wide association series, totalling 13,265 cancer cases and 40,245 controls, we found that the protective allele [G] at one previously-identified CRC polymorphism, rs2736100 near TERT, was associated with EC risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.08, P = 0.000167); this polymorphism influences the risk of several other cancers. A further CRC polymorphism near TERC also showed evidence of association with EC (OR = 0.92; P = 0.03). Overall, however, there was no good evidence that the set of CRC polymorphisms was associated with EC risk, and neither of two previously-reported EC polymorphisms was associated with CRC risk. A combined analysis revealed one genome-wide significant polymorphism, rs3184504, on chromosome 12q24 (OR = 1.10, P = 7.23 × 10−9) with shared effects on CRC and EC risk. This polymorphism, a missense variant in the gene SH2B3, is also associated with haematological and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that it influences cancer risk through the immune response. Another polymorphism, rs12970291 near gene TSHZ1, was associated with both CRC and EC (OR = 1.26, P = 4.82 × 10−8), with the alleles showing opposite effects on the risks of the two cancers. PMID:26621817

  12. Association of 8q23-24 region (8q23.3 loci and 8q24.21 loci) with susceptibility to colorectal cancer: a systematic and updated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Lv, Li; Liang, Yuan; Shen, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Shishi; Zhu, Jia; Ma, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs16892766 in the 8q23.3 region and rs6983267, rs10505477, rs7014346 and rs7837328 in the 8q24.21 region, have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and a number of case-control studies to be closely associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, a meta-analysis was performed to confirm if these loci are risk factors for susceptibility to CRC, taking heterogeneity of population into consideration. The whole literature search was conducted via database of MEDLINE and Embase, through which 33 articles with 49 studies (141,899 cases and 157,536 controls) were finally included in this meta-analysis to evaluate the association between the 5 polymorphisms and risk of CRC under allelic model. A meta-analysis of the pooled data showed that the G allele of rs6983267, the A allele of rs7014346, the T allele of rs10505477, the C allele of rs16892766 and the A allele of rs7837328 were associated with significantly increased risk of CRC under allelic model. Additionally, subgroup analyses of four SNPs (rs7837328 excluded) by ethnicity witnessed a notable association between the G allele of rs6983267 and increased risk of CRC among Caucasians, Asians and Africans. Furthermore, the C allele of rs16892766 was strongly linked with elevated risk of CRC among Caucasians and Africans. However, the A allele of rs7014346 and T allele of rs10505477 only heightened risk for CRC among Caucasians and showed no effects among Asians. In summary, rs6983267 is a risk factor for CRC among Caucasians, Asians and Africans; rs7014346 and rs10505477 are risky genetic polymorphisms only among Caucasians; rs16892766 is a hazardous element among populations with Caucasian and African ancestry; and rs7837328 could elevate the susceptibility to CRC in a multinational group. However, more potential factors related with CRC risk should be investigated in further studies.

  13. The Association of Low-Penetrance Variants in DNA Repair Genes with Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Nikhil; Donald, Neil D; Malik, Salim; Selvendran, Subothini S; McPhail, Mark Jw; Monahan, Kevin J

    2017-07-27

    Approximately 35% of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk is attributable to heritable factors known hereditary syndromes, accounting for 6%. The remainder may be due to lower penetrance polymorphisms particularly of DNA repair genes. DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), direct reversal repair (DRR), and double-strand break repair are complex, evolutionarily conserved, and critical in carcinogenesis. Germline mutations in these genes are associated with high-penetrance CRC syndromes such as Lynch syndrome. However, the association of low-penetrance polymorphisms of DNA repair genes with CRC risk remains unclear. A systematic literature review of PubMed, Embase, and HuGENet databases was conducted. Pre-specified criteria determined study inclusion/exclusion. Per-allele, pooled odds ratios disclosed the risk attributed to each variant. Heterogeneity was investigated by subgroup analyses for ethnicity and tumor location; funnel plots and Egger's test assessed publication bias. Sixty-one polymorphisms in 26 different DNA repair genes were identified. Meta-analyses for 22 polymorphisms in 17 genes revealed that six polymorphisms were significantly associated with CRC risk within BER (APE1, PARP1), NER (ERCC5, XPC), double-strand break (RAD18), and DRR (MGMT), but none within MMR. Subgroup analyses revealed significant association of OGG1 rs1052133 with rectal cancer risk. Egger's test revealed no publication bias. Low-penetrance polymorphisms in DNA repair genes alter susceptibility to CRC. Future studies should therefore analyze whole-genome polymorphisms and any synergistic effects on CRC risk.Translational impact:This knowledge may enhance CRC risk assessment and facilitate a more personalized approach to cancer prevention.

  14. Colorectal Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peter Donald

    history, young age at onset and presence of other specific tumours and defects. Among these defects are ... medical advice. Only 2 (6.3%) patients completed their treatment regimen. Conclusion: The incidence of colorectal cancer is still low in our environment but treatment outcome remains poor due to late presentation.

  15. Systematic review with meta-analysis: alcohol consumption and the risk of colorectal adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J-Z; Wang, Y-M; Zhou, Q-Y; Zhu, K-F; Yu, C-H; Li, Y-M

    2014-08-01

    Studies on the relation between alcohol consumption and risk of colorectal adenoma (CRA), a precursor of colorectal cancer, have been inconsistent. A systematic review with meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the association and the dose-response of alcohol with CRA. A literature search was performed on PubMed to identify relevant studies published up to January 2014. A fixed or random effects model was used to estimate summarised relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between alcohol intake and CRA risk. Statistical heterogeneity between studies was assessed with the χ(2) statistic and quantified by I². Twenty-three case-control studies and two cohort studies were included in the meta-analysis. All drinkers were associated with 17% increased risk for CRA, compared with nondrinkers or occasional alcohol drinkers. The dose-response analysis demonstrated that for drinkers of 10, 25, 50 and 100 g/day alcohol consumption, the estimated RRs of CRA were 1.02 (95% CI 0.89-1.16), 1.06 (95% CI 0.92-1.20), 1.16 (95% CI 1.02-1.33) and 1.61 (95% CI 1.42-1.84) respectively, in comparison with non-/occasional drinkers. The risks were consistent in the subgroup analyses of gender and site of adenoma, while it was stronger in European studies than the studies in the US and Asia. This study suggests that alcohol intake is related to a significant increase of risk for colrectal adenoma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Dietary fiber intake reduces risk for colorectal adenoma: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Qiwen; Sun, Yunwei; Chai, Rui; Qian, Aihua; Xu, Bin; Yuan, Yaozong

    2014-03-01

    Reports on the association between dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal adenoma (CRA), the precursor of colorectal cancer, have been inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies to analyze this association. We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to identify relevant studies published through July 2013. A random-effects model was used to estimate summary relative risks (SRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between fiber intake and CRA risk. Heterogeneity among studies was assessed using the Cochran Q and I(2) statistics. Our meta-analysis included 20 studies involving 10,948 subjects with CRA. The SRRs of CRA for total dietary fiber were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.63-0.83) in a high- vs low-intake analysis and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.87-0.95) per 10-g/day increase in fiber intake in a dose-response model. Subgroup analyses indicated a significant inverse association between total fiber intake and CRA risk in case-control studies (SRR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56-0.77), but not in cohort studies (SRR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.76-1.10). The SRRs of CRA were 0.84 for fruit fiber (95% CI, 0.76-0.94; n = 6 studies), 0.93 for vegetable fiber (95% CI, 0.84-1.04; n = 6 studies), and 0.76 for cereal fiber (95% CI, 0.62-0.92; n = 9 studies) in high- vs low-intake analyses. Our findings support the hypothesis that high dietary fiber intake is associated inversely with CRA risk. Further studies with prospective designs that use validated questionnaires and control for important confounders are warranted. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Metallothionein - immunohistochemical cancer biomarker: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromir Gumulec

    Full Text Available Metallothionein (MT has been extensively investigated as a molecular marker of various types of cancer. In spite of the fact that numerous reviews have been published in this field, no meta-analytical approach has been performed. Therefore, results of to-date immunohistochemistry-based studies were summarized using meta-analysis in this review. Web of science, PubMed, Embase and CENTRAL databases were searched (up to April 30, 2013 and the eligibility of individual studies and heterogeneity among the studies was assessed. Random and fixed effects model meta-analysis was employed depending on the heterogeneity, and publication bias was evaluated using funnel plots and Egger's tests. A total of 77 studies were included with 8,015 tissue samples (4,631 cases and 3,384 controls. A significantly positive association between MT staining and tumors (vs. healthy tissues was observed in head and neck (odds ratio, OR 9.95; 95% CI 5.82-17.03 and ovarian tumors (OR 7.83; 1.09-56.29, and a negative association was ascertained in liver tumors (OR 0.10; 0.03-0.30. No significant associations were identified in breast, colorectal, prostate, thyroid, stomach, bladder, kidney, gallbladder, and uterine cancers and in melanoma. While no associations were identified between MT and tumor staging, a positive association was identified with the tumor grade (OR 1.58; 1.08-2.30. In particular, strong associations were observed in breast, ovarian, uterine and prostate cancers. Borderline significant association of metastatic status and MT staining were determined (OR 1.59; 1.03-2.46, particularly in esophageal cancer. Additionally, a significant association between the patient prognosis and MT staining was also demonstrated (hazard ratio 2.04; 1.47-2.81. However, a high degree of inconsistence was observed in several tumor types, including colorectal, kidney and prostate cancer. Despite the ambiguity in some tumor types, conclusive results are provided in the tumors of

  18. EGFR gene copy number as a predictive biomarker for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zu-Yao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number (EGFR GCN has been heavily investigated as a potential predictive biomarker for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (MAbs. The objective of this study was to systematically review current evidences on this issue. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Wanfang Data, and the conference abstracts of American Society of Clinical Oncology and European Society of Medical Oncology were comprehensively searched. Studies that reported the objective response rate (ORR, progression-free survival, and/or overall survival of mCRC patients treated with anti-EGFR MAbs, stratified by EGFR GCN status, were included. The effect measures for binary outcome (response and time-to-event outcomes (progression-free survival and overall survival were risk difference and hazard ratio, respectively. Statistical heterogeneity among the studies was assessed by the Cochran’s Q-test and the I2 statistic. If appropriate, a quantitative synthesis of data from different studies would be conducted with a random-effects model. Results Nineteen eligible studies were identified. The criteria for increased EGFR GCN (GCN+ were highly inconsistent across different studies. The prevalence of GCN + ranged from 6.9% to 88.9%, and the difference in ORR between patients with GCN + and those with non-increased EGFR GCN (GCN- varied from −28% to 84%. Because of the significant heterogeneity, no quantitative synthesis of data was performed. There was a general trend towards higher ORR in patients with GCN+. The difference in ORRs between patients with GCN + and those with GCN- was even greater in KRAS wild-type patients, while in KRAS mutated patients the difference often did not exist. Almost all patients with EGFR amplification responded to the treatment. However, the prevalence of EGFR amplification was

  19. Association of Vitamin D Receptor Cdx-2 Polymorphism With Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhi-Ming; Fei, Yu-Lang; Zhang, Wang-Gang; Liu, Jie; Cao, Xing-Mei; Qu, Qiu-Min; Li, Yan-Chun; Lin, Shuai; Wang, Meng; Dai, Zhi-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) Cdx-2 polymorphism (rs11568820) has been indicated to be associated to cancer susceptibility. However, published studies reported mixed results. This meta-analysis was conducted to get a more accurate estimation of the association between Cdx-2 polymorphism and cancer risk.We identified 25 independent studies with a total of 34,018 subjects published prior to March 2015. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the susceptibility to cancer. Separate analyses were conducted on features of the population such as ethnicity, source of controls, and cancer types.Meta-analysis results showed that Cdx-2 polymorphism significantly increased cancer risk in the homozygous model in overall analysis. According to the further stratified analysis, significant association was found between Cdx-2 variant and cancer risk in American-Africans in the homozygous, recessive, and dominant comparison models. However, no significant associations were found in Caucasians and Asians. When stratified by different cancer types, significant association was observed between Cdx-2 variant and an increased risk of colorectal cancer in the homozygous, recessive, and dominant models. In addition, ovarian cancer susceptibility increased based on the homozygous and dominant comparison models.Our study indicated that VDR Cdx-2 polymorphism was associated with an increased cancer risk, particularly in American-Africans, colorectal, and ovarian cancers. However, other factors may impact on the association. Further multicenter studies are needed to confirm the effects of Cdx-2 polymorphism on cancer susceptibility.

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  1. The incidence rate of cancer in patients with schizophrenia: A meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Li, Jiasi; Yu, Xiya; Zheng, Huiwen; Sun, Xu; Lu, Yue; Zhang, Yanbo; Li, Chunbo; Bi, Xiaoying

    2017-09-21

    Numerous studies report that cancer prevalence in patients with schizophrenia might be different from the general population, but findings remain controversial. Our updated meta-analysis of cohort studies aims to analyze the data from cohort studies concerning the incidence risk of overall cancer and some site-specific cancers in patients with schizophrenia. We performed a systemic search through electronic databases. Cohort studies evaluating and describing the cancer incidence among patients with schizophrenia were included. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) were calculated for assessing the incidence risk of cancer. There were 16 cohort studies included in this meta-analysis, which combined a total of 480,356 participants with schizophrenia and 41,999 cases of cancer. Results showed that there was a slight significant decreased overall risk ratio of cancer incidence among patients with schizophrenia (RR=0.90, 95% CI 0.81-0.99). When stratified by cancer site and gender, there were significant decreased incidence risk rates of colorectal cancer (RR=0.82, 95% CI 0.69-0.98) and prostate cancer (RR=0.55, 95% CI 0.42-0.71) in those patients, moreover, the incidence rate of colorectal cancer decreased significantly in male patients (RR=0.89, 95% CI 0.81-0.98), and the incidence rate of lung cancer increased significantly in female patients (RR=1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.25). The incidence risk of some cancers was reduced in patients with schizophrenia. Gender and type of cancer were two important confounding factors contributed to the heterogeneity that required adjustment in our cancer incidence meta-analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Light Alcohol Drinking and Risk of Cancer: A Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Jung; Myung, Seung-Kwon; Lee, Ji-Ho

    2017-05-22

    To determine whether light alcohol drinking increases the risk of cancer by using a meta-analysis of cohort studies because the newly revised 2015 European Code against Cancer 4th edition on alcohol and cancer was based on critical flaws in the interpretation and citation of the previous meta-analyses. PubMed and EMBASE were searched in April, 2016. Two authors independently reviewed and selected cohort studies on the association between very light (≤0.5 drink/day), light (≤1 drink/day), or moderate drinking (1-2 drinks/day) and the risk of cancer incidence and mortality. A pooled relative risk with its 95% confidence interval was calculated by a random-effects meta-analysis. Main outcome measures were cancer incidence and mortality. A total of 60 cohort studies from 135 articles were included in the final analysis. Very light drinking or light drinking was not associated with the incidence of most cancers except for female breast cancer in women and male colorectal cancer. Conversely, light drinking was associated with a decreased incidence of both female and male lung cancer significantly and both female and male thyroid cancer marginally significantly. Moderate drinking significantly increased the incidence of male colorectal cancer and female breast cancer, whereas it decreased the incidence of both female and male hematologic malignancy. We found that very light or light alcohol drinking was not associated with the risk of most of the common cancers except for the mild increase in the incidence of breast cancer in women and colorectal cancer in men.

  3. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer: Age Family history of colorectal cancer Personal history Inherited risk Alcohol Cigarette smoking Obesity The following protective factors decrease the risk of colorectal cancer: Physical activity Aspirin Combination hormone replacement therapy Polyp removal It is ...

  4. Human papillomavirus and gastrointestinal cancer in Iranian population: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani-Navai, Versa; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza; Yahyapour, Yousef; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Abediankenari, Saeid; Janbabaei, Ghasem; Toghani, Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies are the most common cancers and account for nearly half of all cancer-related deaths in Iran. There was a strong association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and urogenital cancers, in particular the cervix. However, there is no clear causal relationship in all types of cancers, including gastrointestinal cancers. Therefore, the present study as a systematic review and meta-analysis was designed to evaluate the prevalence and relation of HPV in GI cancers. This systematic review and meta-analysis study assess the prevalence of human papillomavirus in GI cancers in Iran. Data were collected by searching electronic databases, including PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, SID and Iranmedex by English and Persian key words up to August 2016. Key words included: Human Papillomavirus, HPV, Cancer, Neoplasm, Carcinoma, Esophageal, colorectal, Gastrointestinal and Iran articles were entered in the EndNote software and duplicate papers were excluded. Data were extracted and analyzed by comprehensive meta-analysis software, Version 2 (CMA.V2) and random effects model. Finally, we included 17 studies in this meta-analysis. The prevalence of HPV in Iranian patients with GI cancers was 16.4% (CI95%: 10.4-24.9). Considering all HPV types, the odds ratio of GI cancers in positive patients was 3.03 (CI95%: 1.42-6.45) while in patients with HPV-16 was 3.62 (CI: 1.43-4.82). The results show a strong relationship between HPV infection especially high-risk HPV type 16 and GI cancers in Iranian population.

  5. Work stress and risk of cancer: Meta-analysis of 5700 incident cancer events in 116 000 European men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heikkila, K.; Nyberg, S.T.; Theorell, T.; Fransson, E.I.; Alfredsson, L.; Bjorner, J.B.; Bonenfant, S.; Borritz, M.; Bouillon, K.; Burr, H.; Dragano, N.; Geuskens, G.A.; Goldberg, M.; Hamer, M.; Hooftman, W.E.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Joensuu, M.; Knutsson, A.; Koskenvuo, M.; Koskinen, A.; Kouvonen, A.; Madsen, I.E.H.; Hanson, L.L.M.; Marmot, M.G.; Nielsen, M.L.; Nordin, M.; Oksanen, T.; Pentti, J.; Salo, P.; Rugulies, R.; Steptoe, A.; Suominen, S.; Vahtera, J.; Virtanen, M.; Vaaanen, A.; Westerholm, P.; Westerlund, H.; Zins, M.; Ferrie, J.E.; Singh-Manoux, A.; David, G.; Kivimaki, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether work related stress, measured and defined as job strain, is associated with the overall risk of cancer and the risk of colorectal, lung, breast, or prostate cancers. Design Meta-analysis of pooled prospective individual participant data from 12 European cohort

  6. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  7. PCR-based assays versus direct sequencing for evaluating the effect of KRAS status on anti-EGFR treatment response in colorectal cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianfeng Shan

    Full Text Available The survival rate of colorectal cancer (CRC patients carrying wild-type KRAS is significantly increased by combining anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb with standard chemotherapy. However, conflicting data exist in both the wild-type KRAS and mutant KRAS groups, which strongly challenge CRC anti-EGFR treatment. Here we conducted a meta-analysis in an effort to provide more reliable information regarding anti-EGFR treatment in CRC patients.We searched full reports of randomized clinical trials using Medline, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO, and the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO. Two investigators independently screened the published literature according to our inclusive and exclusive criteria and the relative data were extracted. We used Review Manager 5.2 software to analyze the data.The addition of anti-EGFR mAb to standard chemotherapy significantly improved both progression-free survival (PFS and median overall survival (mOS in the wild-type KRAS group; hazard ratios (HRs for PFS and mOS were 0.70 [95% confidence interval (CI, 0.58-0.84] and 0.83 [95% CI, 0.75-0.91], respectively. In sub-analyses of the wild-type KRAS group, when PCR-based assays are employed, PFS and mOS notably increase: the HRs were 0.74 [95% CI, 0.62-0.88] and 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78-0.96], respectively. In sub-analyses of the mutant KRAS group, neither PCR-based assays nor direct sequencing enhance PFS or mOS.Our data suggest that PCR-based assays with high sensitivity and specificity allow accurate identification of patients with wild-type KRAS and thus increase PFS and mOS. Furthermore, such assays liberate patients with mutant KRAS from unnecessary drug side effects, and provide them an opportunity to receive appropriate treatment. Thus, establishing a precise standard reference test will substantially optimize CRC-targeted therapies.

  8. Robotic-assisted versus laparoscopic colorectal surgery: a meta-analysis of four randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Robotic-assisted laparoscopy is popularly performed for colorectal disease. The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare the safety and efficacy of robotic-assisted colorectal surgery (RCS) and laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) for colorectal disease based on randomized controlled trial studies. Methods Literature searches of electronic databases (Pubmed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library) were performed to identify randomized controlled trial studies that compared the clinical or oncologic outcomes of RCS and LCS. This meta-analysis was performed using the Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.2) that is provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. The data used were mean differences and odds ratios for continuous and dichotomous variables, respectively. Fixed-effects or random-effects models were adopted according to heterogeneity. Results Four randomized controlled trial studies were identified for this meta-analysis. In total, 110 patients underwent RCS, and 116 patients underwent LCS. The results revealed that estimated blood losses (EBLs), conversion rates and times to the recovery of bowel function were significantly reduced following RCS compared with LCS. There were no significant differences in complication rates, lengths of hospital stays, proximal margins, distal margins or harvested lymph nodes between the two techniques. Conclusions RCS is a promising technique and is a safe and effective alternative to LCS for colorectal surgery. The advantages of RCS include reduced EBLs, lower conversion rates and shorter times to the recovery of bowel function. Further studies are required to define the financial effects of RCS and the effects of RCS on long-term oncologic outcomes. PMID:24767102

  9. Association between the NFKB1-94ins/del ATTG polymorphism and cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wenyuan; Wang, Erli; Zhang, Fengquan; Wang, Tongjian; You, Xiangdong; Qiao, Bin

    2014-08-01

    To assess the effect of the NFKB1 -94ins/del polymorphism on cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis based on 25 studies including 8,750 cases and 9,170 controls. Overall, the -94ins/del polymorphism was associated with cancer risk in the pooled analysis and in Asian population, whereas no association was observed in Caucasian population. Stratified analysis by subtypes of cancer showed that the -94ins/del polymorphism was associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma and ovarian cancer risk, but had no association with colorectal cancer, bladder cancer, and renal cell cancer. Our meta-analysis suggests the NFKB1 -94ins/del polymorphism affects cancer susceptibility, and the association is ethnic-specific.

  10. Red and processed meat intake and risk of colorectal adenomas: a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, Dagfinn; Chan, Doris S M; Vieira, Ana Rita; Navarro Rosenblatt, Deborah A; Vieira, Rui; Greenwood, Darren C; Kampman, Ellen; Norat, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Current evidence indicates that red and processed meat intake increases the risk of colorectal cancer; however, the association with colorectal adenomas is unclear. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies of red and processed meat intake and risk of colorectal adenomas as part of the Continuous Update Project of the World Cancer Research Fund. PubMed and several other databases were searched for relevant studies from their inception up to 31 December 2011. Summary relative risks (RRs) were estimated using a random effects model. Nineteen case-control studies and seven prospective studies were included in the analyses. The summary RR per 100 g/day of red meat was 1.27 (95 % CI 1.16-1.40, I (2) = 5 %, n = 16) for all studies combined, 1.20 (95 % CI 1.06-1.36, I (2) = 0 %, n = 6) for prospective studies, and 1.34 (95 % CI 1.12-1.59, I (2) = 31 %, n = 10) for case-control studies. The summary RR per 50 g/day of processed meat intake was 1.29 (95 % CI 1.10-1.53, I (2) = 27 %, n = 10) for all studies combined, 1.45 (95 % CI 1.10-1.90, I (2) = 0 %, n = 2) for prospective studies, and 1.23 (95 % CI 0.99-1.52, I (2) = 37 %, n = 8) for case-control studies. There was evidence of a nonlinear association between red meat (p nonlinearity processed meat (p nonlinearity = 0.01) intake and colorectal adenoma risk. These results indicate an elevated risk of colorectal adenomas with intake of red and processed meat, but further prospective studies are warranted.

  11. Impact of mechanical bowel preparation in elective colorectal surgery: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Katie E; Javanmard-Emamghissi, Hannah; Lobo, Dileep N

    2018-01-28

    To analyse the effect of mechanical bowel preparation vs no mechanical bowel preparation on outcome in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies comparing adult patients receiving mechanical bowel preparation with those receiving no mechanical bowel preparation, subdivided into those receiving a single rectal enema and those who received no preparation at all prior to elective colorectal surgery. A total of 36 studies (23 randomised controlled trials and 13 observational studies) including 21568 patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery were included. When all studies were considered, mechanical bowel preparation was not associated with any significant difference in anastomotic leak rates (OR = 0.90, 95%CI: 0.74 to 1.10, P = 0.32), surgical site infection (OR = 0.99, 95%CI: 0.80 to 1.24, P = 0.96), intra-abdominal collection (OR = 0.86, 95%CI: 0.63 to 1.17, P = 0.34), mortality (OR = 0.85, 95%CI: 0.57 to 1.27, P = 0.43), reoperation (OR = 0.91, 95%CI: 0.75 to 1.12, P = 0.38) or hospital length of stay (overall mean difference 0.11 d, 95%CI: -0.51 to 0.73, P = 0.72), when compared with no mechanical bowel preparation, nor when evidence from just randomized controlled trials was analysed. A sub-analysis of mechanical bowel preparation vs absolutely no preparation or a single rectal enema similarly revealed no differences in clinical outcome measures. In the most comprehensive meta-analysis of mechanical bowel preparation in elective colorectal surgery to date, this study has suggested that the use of mechanical bowel preparation does not affect the incidence of postoperative complications when compared with no preparation. Hence, mechanical bowel preparation should not be administered routinely prior to elective colorectal surgery.

  12. [Aspirin and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancher, Adrien; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Sefrioui, David

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a worldwide public health problem. Aspirin has been identified as a protective factor against the apparition of colorectal cancer. There are several mechanisms about the actions by aspirin on colorectal tumorogenesis. These are not perfectly known nowadays. On one hand, there are direct mechanisms on colorectal mucosa, on the other hand there are indirect mechanisms through platelet functions. Aspirin also plays a role by its anti-inflammatory action and the stimulation of antitumor immunity. Several studies show that long-term treatment with low-doses of aspirin decreases the incidence of adenomas and colorectal cancers. In the United States, aspirin is currently recommended for primary prevention of the risk of colorectal cancer in all patients aged 50 to 59, with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular event greater than 10 %. However, primary prevention with aspirin should not be a substitute for screening in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, aspirin seems to be beneficial when used in post-diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It could actually decrease the risk of metastasis in case of a localized colorectal cancer, and increase the survival in particular, concerning PIK3CA mutated tumors. The association of aspirin with neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer by radiochimiotherapy seems to have beneficial effects. French prospective randomized study is currently being conducted to investigate postoperative aspirin in colorectal cancers with a PIK3CA mutation. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  14. Meta-Analysis of Massage Therapy on Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Yeop; Yeo, Sujung; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2015-07-01

    Cancer pain is the most common complaint among patients with cancer. Conventional treatment does not always relieve cancer pain satisfactorily. Therefore, many patients with cancer have turned to complementary therapies to help them with their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Massage therapy is increasingly used for symptom relief in patients with cancer. The current study aimed to investigate by meta-analysis the effects of massage therapy for cancer patients experiencing pain. Nine electronic databases were systematically searched for studies published through August 2013 in English, Chinese, and Korean. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Cochrane risk-of-bias scales. Twelve studies, including 559 participants, were used in the meta-analysis. In 9 high-quality studies based on the PEDro scale (standardized mean difference, -1.24; 95% confidence interval, -1.72 to -0.75), we observed reduction in cancer pain after massage. Massage therapy significantly reduced cancer pain compared with no massage treatment or conventional care (standardized mean difference, -1.25; 95% confidence interval, -1.63 to -0.87). Our results indicate that massage is effective for the relief of cancer pain, especially for surgery-related pain. Among the various types of massage, foot reflexology appeared to be more effective than body or aroma massage. Our meta-analysis indicated a beneficial effect of massage for relief of cancer pain. Further well-designed, large studies with longer follow-up periods are needed to be able to draw firmer conclusions regarding the effectiveness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. The prognostic value of survivin expression in patients with colorectal carcinoma: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Jing; Qi, Wei-Xiang; He, Ai-Na; Sun, Yuan-Jue; Shen, Zan; Yao, Yang

    2013-10-01

    The prognostic role of survivin in colorectal carcinoma remains controversial. This meta-analysis aimed to explore the association between survivin expression and survival outcomes in patients with colorectal carcinoma. A comprehensive literature search for relevant studies published up to April 2013 was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science. Only articles in which survivin was detected by immunohistochemical staining were included. This meta-analysis was done using STATA and Review Manager. A total of 1784 patients from 14 studies were included in the analysis. Our results showed that survivin overexpression in patients with colorectal carcinoma was significantly associated with poor overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.505; 95% confidence interval, 1.197-1.893; P = 0.000) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 2.323; 95% confidence interval, 1.687-3.199; P = 0.000). The results indicated that a significant relationship between survivin expression and overall survival was also exhibited in studies with an Asian country (hazard ratio, 1.684; 95% confidence interval, 1.477-1.921), patient number >100 (hazard ratio, 1.604; 95% confidence interval, 1.371-1.877), the cut-off level 50% (hazard ratio, 1.528; 95% confidence interval, 1.056-2.211) and the hazard ratio estimated (hazard ratio, 1.643; 95% confidence interval, 1.262-2.139). Moreover, upregulation of survivin was associated with stages (III/IV vs. I/II: odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-1.46), the depth of invasion (T3/T4 vs. T1/T2: odds ratio, 1.79; 95% confidence interval 0.67-4.74), lymph node metastasis (positive vs. negative: odds ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-2.26), distant metastasis (positive vs. negative: odds ratio, 2.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-5.72) and grade of differentiation (well/moderate vs. poor: odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-2.41), but without significance. The present meta-analysis indicated that upregulation of survivin was

  16. Dietary Patterns and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ying Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have examined the associations between dietary patterns and pancreatic cancer risk, but the findings have been inconclusive. Herein, we conducted this meta-analysis to assess the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of pancreatic cancer. MEDLINE (provided by the National Library of Medicine and EBSCO (Elton B. Stephens Company databases were searched for relevant articles published up to May 2016 that identified common dietary patterns. Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria and were finally included in this meta-analysis. A reduced risk of pancreatic cancer was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy patterns (odds ratio, OR = 0.86; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.77–0.95; p = 0.004 and light–moderate drinking patterns (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.83–0.98; p = 0.02. There was evidence of an increased risk for pancreatic cancer in the highest compared with the lowest categories of western-type pattern (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.06–1.45; p = 0.008 and heavy drinking pattern (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.10–1.48; p = 0.002. The results of this meta-analysis demonstrate that healthy and light–moderate drinking patterns may decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas western-type and heavy drinking patterns may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  17. Circulating levels of vitamin D and colorectal adenoma: A case-control study and a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Ji; Kim, Young Ha; Cho, Chang Ho; Kim, Sung Hi; Lee, Jung Eun

    2015-08-07

    To examine the association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and colorectal adenoma in a case-control study and a meta-analysis. We conducted a matched case-control study (112 cases and 112 matched controls) and combined 15 studies, including our study, in a meta-analysis. The study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using a random-effects model. In total, 5454 colorectal adenomas and 6656 controls were included in the meta-analysis. In a meta-analysis including 14 previous studies and our study, we observed a significant inverse association between circulating 25(OH)D levels and colorectal adenoma (OR = 0.68; 95%CI: 0.54-0.82) when comparing the highest category with the lowest category. Stratification by adenoma location (proximal or distal adenoma) showed similar estimates. When we stratified by study region, the ORs (95%CIs) were 0.70 (0.52-0.88) in the US and 0.66 (0.34-0.97) in Asia. These data suggest an inverse association between circulating 25(OH)D levels and colorectal adenoma in both Western and Asian populations.

  18. Prognostic value of PLR in various cancers: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, more and more studies investigated the association of inflammation parameters such as the Platelet Lymphocyte Ratio (PLR and the prognosis of various cancers. However, the prognostic role of PLR in cancer remains controversial. METHODS: We conducted a meta-analysis of published studies to evaluate the prognostic value of PLR in various cancers. In order to investigate the association between PLR and overall survival (OS, the hazard ratio (HR and its 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated. RESULTS: A total of 13,964 patients from 26 studies were included in the analysis. The summary results showed that elevated PLR was a negative predictor for OS with HR of 1.60 (95%CI: 1.35-1.90; Pheterogeneity <0.001. Subgroup analysis revealed that increased PLR was a negative prognostic marker in patients with gastric cancer (HR = 1.35, 95%CI: 0.80-2.25, Pheterogeneity = 0.011, colorectal cancer (HR = 1.65, 95%CI: 1.33-2.05, Pheterogeneity = 0.995, hepatocellular carcinoma (HR = 3.07, 95% CI: 2.04-4.62, Pheterogeneity = 0.133, ovarian cancer (HR = 1.57, 95%CI: 1.07-2.31, Pheterogeneity = 0.641 and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC (HR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.42-2.41, Pheterogeneity = 0.451 except for pancreatic cancer (HR = 1.00, 95%CI: 0.92-1.09, Pheterogeneity = 0.388. CONCLUSION: The meta-analysis demonstrated that PLR could act as a significant biomarker in the prognosis of various cancers.

  19. Meta-Analyses of Vitamin D Intake, 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Status, Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphisms, and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touvier, M.; Chan, D.S.M.; Lau, R.; Aune, D.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Riboli, E.; Hercberg, S.; Norat, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies on colorectal cancer (CRC) and vitamin D intake and 25-hydroxyvitamin D status, as part of the World Cancer Research Fund Continuous Update Project. We also aimed at conducting meta-analysis of all

  20. Meta-analyses of vitamin D intake, 25-hydroxyvitamin D status, vitamin D receptor polymorphisms, and colorectal cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touvier, M.; Chan, D.S.; Lau, R.; Aune, D.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Riboli, E.; Hercberg, S.; Norat, T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies on colorectal cancer (CRC) and vitamin D intake and 25-hydroxyvitamin D status, as part of the World Cancer Research Fund Continuous Update Project. We also aimed at conducting meta-analysis of all

  1. Periodontal disease, edentulism, and pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, P; Amar, S; Lowenfels, A B

    2017-05-01

    Periodontal disease (PD), now our commonest infectious disorder leads to tooth loss, and has been linked to various systemic diseases, including various types of cancer. The aim of this study is to provide a systematic review and a meta-analysis of the relationship between PD, edentulism, and pancreatic cancer (PC). From an initial review of 327 references we selected eight studies concerning periodontitis or edentulism with sufficient quantitative information to allow us to examine the risk of PC. We used relative risks (RRs), hazard ratios, or odds ratios to measure the association between periodontitis, edentulism, and PC. We employed random effects models to obtain summary risks, and we also provide measures of study differences and possible biases. The summary RR for periodontitis and PC was 1.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41-2.15] and 1.54 for edentulism (95% CI 1.16-2.05). There was no evidence of heterogeneity for either variable, and no evidence of publication bias. The studies included reports from three continents, suggesting that the association is generalizable. Most of the studies were adjusted for variables thought to be associated with PC, such as gender, smoking, BMI, diabetes, and alcohol. Using meta-analysis, both periodontitis and edentulism appear to be associated with PC, even after adjusting for common risk factors. As yet, the mechanisms linking oral disease and PC are uncertain, but could be related to changes in the oral microbiome-an area of current research.

  2. Increased risk of colorectal neoplasia in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory bowel disease: a meta-analysis of 16 observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Han-Han; Jiang, Xue-Liang

    2016-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with concomitant primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) carry an increased risk of colorectal neoplasia (dysplasia and cancer), whereas the association between PSC and the development of colorectal neoplasia in Crohn's disease (CD) is controversial. A meta-analysis was carried out to compare the risk of this neoplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with and without PSC. A systematic research of MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed to identify studies that compared the risk of colorectal neoplasia (dysplasia and cancer) in patients with IBD with and without PSC. Quality assessment was performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Pooled odds ratio (OR) was calculated using the random-effects model by STATA 12.0. A total of 16 studies (four cohort studies, 12 case-control studies; nine prospective studies and seven retrospective studies) were selected for further study. These studies included 13 379 IBD patients, of whom 1022 also had PSC. Patients with IBD and PSC were at an increased risk of colorectal dysplasia and cancer compared with patients with IBD alone [OR 3.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.14-4.90]. This increased risk was present even when the risk of colorectal cancer alone was analysed (OR 3.41; 95% CI: 2.13-5.48). Data only from patients with UC showed that PSC was associated with an increased risk for the development of colorectal neoplasia and cancer in patients with UC (OR 2.98; 95% CI: 1.54-5.76) (OR 3.01; 95% CI: 1.44-6.29), but there were high heterogeneity among studies (I=76.9 and 62.8%, respectively). Heterogeneity of the studies was affected by the study design (prospective or retrospective). The OR of colorectal neoplasia was 2.32 (95% CI: 0.70-7.70, P=0.133) and that of cancer was 2.91 (95% CI: 0.84-10.16, P=0.388) for patients with CD and concurrent PSC. Patients with IBD and PSC have a markedly higher risk for the development of colorectal

  3. Gallstones and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of gallstone disease in 145 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer was compared with gallstone prevalence in 4,159 subjects randomly selected from a population. The group of patients had a significantly higher prevalence of gallstone disease than the population (odds ratio = 1.......59; 95 percent confidence limits 1.04-2.45), whereas cholecystectomies occurred with equal frequency in the two groups. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more right-sided cancers in patients with gallstones than in patients without. These results, together with available literature, give...... substantial evidence for an association between gallstones and colorectal cancer, an association which is not due to cholecystectomy being a predisposing factor to colorectal cancer. Sporadic findings of an association between cholecystectomy and colorectal cancer can be explained by the above relationship....

  4. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  5. Prognostic Value of microRNA-224 in Various Cancers: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Guo, Cong-Cong; Guan, Dong-Hui; Yang, Chuan-Hua; Jiang, Yue-Hua

    2017-07-01

    During previous studies, microRNA-224 (miR-224) was frequently investigated and discovered to be of vital significance to prognosis of patients with various cancers. However, its accurate prognostic value has not been estimated worldwide. Herein, we performed meta-analysis to assess its potential predictive value in a variety of human tumors. Qualified researches were identified up to March 1, 2017 through performing online searches in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) or progression-free survival (PFS) as a prognosis for various cancers were extracted and calculated, if available. Pooled hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Stata version 13.0 (StataCorp, College Station, Texas, USA). 22 eligible studies with 3000 patients were ultimately brought into the current meta-analysis. It suggested that high miR-224 expression was significantly associated with poor OS in tissue (HR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.00-2.03). During multivariate analysis, high miR-224 expression was more significantly associated with OS in tissue (HR = 2.81, 95% CI = 1.91-4.13). Likewise, there were significant associations between tissue miR-224 expression and colorectal cancer (CRC), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and gastric cancer (GC) patients (p cancers, especially in CRC, DLBCL and GC. Due to the complicated pathogenesis of cancers, more large-scale and standard researches are requisite. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Dr. ... patients know to help determine the best colon cancer screening test for them? Colonoscopy is considered the gold ...

  7. Genetic variation of clock genes and cancer risk: a field synopsis and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benna, Clara; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Rajendran, Senthilkumar; Monticelli, Halenya; Pilati, Pierluigi; Nitti, Donato; Mocellin, Simone

    2017-04-04

    The number of studies on the association between clock genes' polymorphisms and cancer susceptibility has increased over the last years but the results are often conflicting and no comprehensive overview and quantitative summary of the evidence in this field is available. Literature search identified 27 eligible studies comprising 96756 subjects (cases: 38231) and investigating 687 polymorphisms involving 14 clock genes. Overall, 1025 primary and subgroup meta-analyses on 366 gene variants were performed. Study distribution by tumor was as follows: breast cancer (n=15), prostate cancer (n=3), pancreatic cancer (n=2), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n=2), glioma (n=1), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n=1), colorectal cancer (n=1), non-small cell lung cancer (n=1) and ovarian cancer (n=1).We identified 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with cancer risk: NPAS2 rs10165970 (mixed and breast cancer shiftworkers), rs895520 (mixed), rs17024869 (breast) and rs7581886 (breast); CLOCK rs3749474 (breast) and rs11943456 (breast); RORA rs7164773 (breast and breast cancer postmenopausal), rs10519097 (breast); RORB rs7867494 (breast cancer postmenopausal), PER3 rs1012477 (breast cancer subgroups) and assessed the level of quality evidence to be intermediate. We also identified polymorphisms with lower quality statistically significant associations (n=30). Our work supports the hypothesis that genetic variation of clock genes might affect cancer risk. These findings also highlight the need for more efforts in this research field in order to fully establish the contribution of clock gene variants to the risk of developing cancer. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence on the association between clock genes' germline variants and the risk of developing cancer. To assess result credibility, summary evidence was graded according to the Venice criteria and false positive report probability (FPRP) was calculated to further validate

  8. Adherence to Mediterranean Diet and Risk of Cancer: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Schwingshackl

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to gain further insight into the effects of adherence to Mediterranean Diet (MedD on risk of overall cancer mortality, risk of different types of cancer, and cancer mortality and recurrence risk in cancer survivors. Literature search was performed using the electronic databases PubMed, and Scopus until 25 August 2017. We included randomized trials (RCTs, cohort (for specific tumors only incidence cases were used studies, and case-control studies. Study-specific risk ratios, hazard ratios, and odds ratios (RR/HR/OR were pooled using a random effects model. Observational studies (cohort and case-control studies, and intervention trials were meta-analyzed separately. The updated review process showed 27 studies that were not included in the previous meta-analysis (total number of studies evaluated: 83 studies. An overall population of 2,130,753 subjects was included in the present update. The highest adherence score to a MedD was inversely associated with a lower risk of cancer mortality (RRcohort: 0.86, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.91, I2 = 82%; n = 14 studies, colorectal cancer (RRobservational: 0.82, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.88, I2 = 73%; n = 11 studies, breast cancer (RRRCT: 0.43, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.88, n = 1 study (RRobservational: 0.92, 95% CI 0.87 to 0.96, I2 = 22%, n = 16 studies, gastric cancer (RRobservational: 0.72, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.86, I2 = 55%; n = 4 studies, liver cancer (RRobservational: 0.58, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.73, I2 = 0%; n = 2 studies, head and neck cancer (RRobservational: 0.49, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.66, I2 = 87%; n = 7 studies, and prostate cancer (RRobservational: 0.96, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.00, I2 = 0%; n = 6 studies. Among cancer survivors, the association between the adherence to the highest MedD category and risk of cancer mortality, and cancer recurrence was not statistically significant. Pooled analyses of individual components of the MedD revealed that the protective effects appear to be

  9. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  10. XPA A23G polymorphism and risk of digestive system cancers: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Deng, Tao; Luo, Hesheng

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have reported an association between the A23G polymorphism (rs 1800975) in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) gene and risk of digestive system cancers. However, the results are inconsistent. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between XPA A23G polymorphism and the risk of digestive system cancers. Relevant studies were identified using the PubMed, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, WanFang, and VIP databases up to August 30, 2014. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using the fixed or random effects model. A total of 18 case-control studies from 16 publications with 4,170 patients and 6,929 controls were included. Overall, no significant association was found between XPA A23G polymorphism and the risk of digestive system cancers (dominant model: GA + AA versus GG, OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.74-1.08; recessive model: AA versus GA + GG, OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.74-1.20; GA versus GG, OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.77-1.03; and AA versus GG, OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.64-1.19). When the analysis was stratified by ethnicity, similar results were observed among Asians and Caucasians in all genetic models. In stratified analysis based on tumor type, we also failed to detect any association between XPA A23G polymorphism and the risk of esophageal, gastric, or colorectal cancers. This meta-analysis indicates that the XPA A23G polymorphism is not associated with a risk of digestive system cancers.

  11. Association between the FTOrs8050136 polymorphism and cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Huang, Xiaoyi; Yang, Mingyuan; Li, Ming; Zheng, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis on cancer risk relevant to FTOrs8050136 polymorphism. To investigate the comprehensive effect of FTOrs8050136 polymorphism on cancer risk based on a pooled result. Carcinogenesis is closely related to obesity. Both obesity and cancer share common pathogenic factors such as hereditary susceptibility and environmental predisposition. Recently, several studies had reported that the FTOrs8050136 polymorphism, a genetic variation highly associated with obesity, can be a potential cancer risk factor, while these results were inconsistent. With the help of PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure considerable research was done for potential studies without language restriction. Pooled odds ratio combined with 95 % confidence interval was employed to evaluate the potential correlations, and subgroup analyses were performed based on the cancer types and ethnic populations. There were eight articles comprising 21,810 cases and 85,070 controls met the eligibility criteria. Overall, there was no significant association between the FTOrs8050136 polymorphism and cancer risk (P = 0.163). Subgroup analysis illustrated that no association existed between the FTOrs8050136 polymorphism and cancer risk in Caucasians (P = 0.809), Asians (P = 0.412) and the mixed population (P = 0.093). With regard to cancer types, the result suggested that the FTOrs8050136 polymorphism had no connection with pancreatic cancer (P = 0.089), endometrial cancer (P = 0.353), prostate cancer (P = 0.578), colorectal cancer (P = 0.054) and melanoma (P = 0.357), while the inverse result was obtained in the subgroup of papillary thyroid cancer (P = 0.010). The FTOrs8050136 polymorphism may be not associated with carcinogenesis apart from papillary thyroid cancer, and further studies are needed to investigate the potential correlation.

  12. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. A meta-analysis of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svahn, Malene F; Faber, Mette Tuxen; Christensen, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue.......The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue....

  13. Association Between Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables and Risk of Colorectal Adenoma: A PRISMA-Compliant Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Qiwen; Zhong, Jie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lifu; Sun, Yunwei; Yv, Lifen; Yuan, Yaozong

    2015-10-01

    There have been contradictory results about the association of fruits and vegetables intake with colorectal adenoma (CRA) risk, the precursor lesion of colorectal cancer. Herein, we have conducted a meta-analysis of the published observational studies to have a clear understanding about this association.Eligible studies up to November 30, 2014, were identified and retrieved by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE databases along with the manual review of the reference list of the retrieved studies. The quality of the included studies was evaluated using Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale, and random-effects model was used to calculate summary relative risk (SRR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI).A total of 22 studies involving 11,696 CRA subjects were part of this meta-analysis. The SRR for the highest versus the lowest intake of vegetables alone was 0.91 (95% CI: 0.80-1.02, Pheterogeneity = 0.025), whereas for vegetables and fruits combined, it was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.75-0.91, Pheterogeneity = 0.369), and for fruits alone, it was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.71-0.88, Pheterogeneity = 0.111). In addition, linear dose-response analysis also showed similar results, for example, for per 100 g/d increment of fruits, the SRR was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.92-0.97) and for vegetables it was 0.98 (95% CI: 0.96-1.01). Nonlinear association was only observed for vegetables (Pnonlinearity = 0.024), but not for fruits (Pnonlinearity = 0.583).Thus, this meta-analysis suggested that fruits consumption have a significant protective effect on CRA risk, but not vegetables. Moreover, we recommend additional studies with prospective designs that use validated questionnaires and control for important confounders to further validate the overall results.

  14. Association between BHMT gene rs3733890 polymorphism and cancer risk: evidence from a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Y

    2016-08-01

    : Our results have shown no obvious evidence that rs3733890 polymorphism in BHMT gene affected the susceptibility of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, colorectal adenoma, and liver cancer. In contrast, we found the protective role of BHMT–742G>A polymorphism in uterine cervical cancer incidence. Future well-designed studies comprising larger sample size are warranted to verify our findings. Keywords: BHMT, polymorphism, cancer risk, susceptibility, meta-analysis

  15. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know before using this tool: The Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool was designed for use by doctors and other health providers with their patients. If you are not a health ... your personal risk of colorectal cancer. (Colorectal cancer is another way ...

  16. Synchronous colorectal liver metastasis: a network meta-analysis review comparing classical, combined, and liver-first surgical strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M E; Spolverato, G; Lê, G N; Mavros, M N; Doyle, F; Pawlik, T M; Winter, D C

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the management of synchronous colorectal liver metastasis has changed significantly. Alternative surgical strategies to the classical colorectal-first approach have been proposed. These include the liver-first and combined resections approaches. The objectives of this review were to compare the short- and long-term outcomes for all three approaches. A systematic review of comparative studies was performed. Evaluated endpoints included surgical outcomes (5-year overall survival, 30-day mortality, and post-operative complications). Pair-wise and network meta-analysis (NMA) were performed to compare survival outcomes. Eighteen studies were included in this review, reporting on 3,605 patients. NMA and pair-wise meta-analysis of the 5-year overall survival did not show significant difference between the three surgical approaches: combined versus colorectal-first, mean odds ratio (OR) 1.02 (95% CI 0.8-1.28, P = 0.93); liver-first versus colorectal-first, mean OR 0.81 (95% CI 0.53-1.26, P = 0.37); liver-first versus combined, mean OR 0.80 (95% CI 0.52-1.24, P = 0.41). In addition NMA of the 30-day mortality among the three approaches also did not observe statistical difference. Analysis of variance showed that mean post-operative complications of all approaches were comparable (P = 0.51). There are considerable differences in the peri-operative management of synchronous CLM patients. This meta-analysis demonstrated no clear statistical surgical outcome or survival advantage towards any of the three approaches. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Meta-analysis of the association between dietary inflammatory index (DII) and cancer outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Mackenzie E; Akinyemiju, Tomi F

    2017-12-01

    Proinflammatory dietary patterns have been associated with increased cancer risk and mortality. We present a systematic review and meta-analysis of the current published literature on a dietary inflammatory index (DII) score and its association with cancer risk and mortality outcomes. Published articles from online databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Embase) examining the association between DII and any cancer risk, incidence, or mortality between 1980 and November 2016 were selected for review. Results of studies meeting inclusion criteria were summarized and meta-analyzed using STATA to generate summary measures of association across studies. Sixty-three published articles were identified from the search, and following title, abstract and full-text review, twenty-four studies met inclusion criteria. All articles calculated DII scores based on study-specific food-frequency questionnaires using methodology from the same article. Of the 24 included studies, 13 were case-control, 6 were prospective cohort, 1 was a retrospective cohort, 3 were RCTs, and 1 did not specify study design. The most common cancers examined were colorectal, breast, lung, and prostate. Individuals in the highest versus lowest DII categories had 25% increased risk of overall cancer incidence (RR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.16-1.35), 75% higher odds of cancer (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.43-2.16) and 67% increased risk of cancer mortality (RR: 1.67, 95% CI: 1.13-2.48). Upon stratification for cancer type, positive associations remained (RRbreast : RR: 1.12, 95% CI: 1.03-1.22) (RRcolorectal : 1.33, 95% CI: 1.22-1.46) (RRlung : 1.30, 95% CI: 1.13-1.50). There were consistent and significant positive associations between higher DII and cancer incidence and mortality across cancer types, study populations, and study design. © 2017 UICC.

  18. Depression and cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y; Li, F; Liu, Y F; Zhao, J P; Leng, M M; Chen, L

    2017-08-01

    To assess the associations between depression and incident cancer risk. Systematic review and meta-analysis. The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, MEDLINE, and PubMed databases were searched to identify studies. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. Risk ratios (RRs) were used to measure effect size. A random-effects model was applied to synthesize the associations between depression and cancer risk. A forest plot was produced to visually assess RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity across studies was assessed using the I-squared statistic. A funnel plot was generated to assess potential publication bias, and Egger's regression was applied to test the symmetry of the funnel plot. In total, 1,469,179 participants and 89,716 incident cases of cancer from 25 studies were included. Depression was significantly associated with overall cancer risk (RR = 1.15, 95% CI: 1.09-1.22) and with liver cancer (RR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.01-1.43) and lung cancer (RR = 1.33, 95% CI: 1.04-1.72). Subgroup analysis of studies in North America resulted in a significant summary relative risk (RR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.15-1.48). No significant associations were found for breast, prostate, or colorectal/colon cancer. The average Newcastle Ottawa score was 7.56 for all included studies. Our findings showed a small and positive association between depression and the overall occurrence risk of cancer, as well as liver cancer and lung cancer risks. However, multinational and larger sample studies are required to further research and support these associations. Moreover, confounding factors such as cigarette smoking and alcohol use/abuse should be considered in future studies. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Meta-analysis of microRNA-183 family expression in human cancer studies comparing cancer tissues with noncancerous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-He; Sun, Hong-Min; Zheng, Rui-Zhi; Li, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Qian; Cheng, Pan; Tang, Zhen-Hai; Huang, Fen

    2013-09-15

    MicroRNA-183 (miR-183) family is proposed as promising biomarkers for early cancer detection and accurate prognosis as well as targets for more efficient treatment. The results of their expression feature in cancer tissues are inconsistent and controversy still exists in identifying them as new biomarkers of cancers. Therefore, to systemically evaluate the most frequently reported cancers in which miR-183 family members were up- or down-regulated is critical for further investigation on physiological impact of its aberrant regulation in specific cancers. The published studies that compared the level of miR-183 family expression in cancer tissues with those in noncancerous tissues were reviewed by the meta-analysis with a vote-counting strategy. Among the 49 included studies, a total of 18 cancers were reported, with 11 cancers reported in at least two studies. In the panel of miR-183 family members' expression analysis, colorectal cancer and prostate cancer ranked at the top among consistently reported cancer types with up-regulated feature. Bladder cancer, lung cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma were the third most frequently reported cancer types with significant over-expression of miR-96, miR-182 and miR-183 respectively. Breast cancer and gastric cancer were presented with inconsistent regulations and the members of this family had their own distinct regulated features in other different cancers. MiR-183 family, either individually or as a cluster, may be useful prognostic markers and/or therapeutic targets in several cancers. Further studies and repeat efforts are still required to determine the role of miR-183 family in various cancer progressions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of gum chewing on ameliorating ileus following colorectal surgery: A meta-analysis of 18 randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Jiang, Honglei; Xu, Dong; Jin, Junzhe

    2017-11-01

    Chewing gum, as an alternative to sham feeding, had been shown to hasten the recovery of gut function following abdominal surgery. However, conclusions remained contradictory. We sought to conduct an updated meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of gum chewing in alleviating ileus following colorectal surgery. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library Databases through February 2017 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy of the additional use of chewing gum following colorectal surgery. After screening for inclusion, data extraction, and quality assessment, meta-analysis was conducted by the Review Manager 5.3 software. The outcomes of interest were the time to first flatus, time to first bowel movement, length of hospital stay, and some clinically relevant parameters. We also performed subgroup analyses according to the type of surgical approaches or on trials that adopted enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol or sugared gum. A total of 18 RCTs, involving 1736 patients, were included. Compared with standardized postoperative care, Chewing gum resulted in a shorter passage to first flatus [WMD = -8.81, 95%CI: (-13.45, -4.17), P = 0.0002], earlier recovery of bowel movement [WMD = -16.43, 95%CI: (-22.68, -10.19), P safe and effective method to ameliorate ileus following colorectal surgery. However, tightly controlled, randomized and considerably larger multicenter trials are warranted to further validate our findings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism contributes to cancer susceptibility: evidence from meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangqian; Cao, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Li, Bingjie; Tang, Min; Yuan, Wanqing; Fang, Jianzheng; Qian, Jian; Qin, Chao; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is expressed in many cancer cell types and allows the modulation of cancer growth, invasion and angiogenesis. To date, studies investigated the association between a functional polymorphism in PAI-1 (4G/5G) and risk of cancer have shown inclusive results. A meta-analysis based on 25 case-control studies was performed to address this issue. Odds ratios (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the association. The statistical heterogeneity across studies was examined with I(2) test. Overall, a significant increased risk of cancer was associated with the PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism for the allele contrast (4G vs. 5G: OR = 1.10, CI = 1.03-1.18, I(2) = 49.5%), the additive genetic model (4G/4G vs. 5G/5G: OR = 1.21, CI = 1.06-1.39, I(2) = 51.9%), the recessive genetic model (4G/4G vs. 4G/5G+5G/5G: OR = 1.11, CI = 1.04-1.18, I(2) = 20.8%). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, the results indicated that individuals with 4G/4G genotype had a significantly higher cancer risk among Caucasians (4G/4G vs. 5G/5G: OR = 1.31, 95%CI = 1.09-1.59, I(2) = 59.6%; 4G/4G vs. 4G/5G: OR = 1.12, 95%CI = 1.04-1.21, I(2) = 3.6%; recessive model: OR = 1.12, 95%CI = 1.05-1.21, I(2) = 25.3%). The results of the present meta-analysis support an association between the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and increasing cancer risk, especially among Caucasians, and those with 4G allele have a high risk to develop colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer.

  2. ABO blood groups and risk of cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bai-Lin; He, Na; Huang, Yu-Bei; Song, Feng-Ju; Chen, Ke-Xin

    2014-01-01

    For decades, studies have been performed to evaluate the association between ABO blood groups and risk of cancer. However, whether ABO blood groups are associated with overall cancer risk remains unclear. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis of observational studies to assess this association. A search of Pubmed, Embase, ScienceDirect, Wiley, and Web of Knowledge databases (to May 2013) was supplemented by manual searches of bibliographies of key retrieved articles and relevant reviews. We included case-control studies and cohort studies with more than 100 cancer cases. The search yielded 89 eligible studies that reported 100,554 cases at 30 cancer sites. For overall cancer risk, the pooled OR was 1.12 (95%CI: 1.09-1.16) for A vs. non- A groups, and 0.84 (95%CI: 0.80-0.88) for O vs. non-O groups. For individual cancer sites, blood group A was found to confer increased risk of gastric cancer (OR=1.18; 95%CI: 1.13-1.24), pancreatic cancer (OR=1.23; 95%CI: 1.15-1.32), breast cancer (OR=1.12; 95%CI: 1.01-1.24), ovarian cancer (OR=1.16; 95%CI: 1.04-1.27), and nasopharyngeal cancer (OR=1.17; 95%CI: 1.00-1.33). Blood group O was found to be linked to decreased risk of gastric cancer (OR=0.84; 95%CI: 0.80-0.88), pancreatic cancer (OR=0.75; 95%CI: 0.70-0.80), breast cancer (OR=0.90; 95%CI: 0.85-0.95), colorectal cancer (OR=0.89; 95%CI: 0.81-0.96), ovarian cancer (OR=0.76; 95%CI: 0.53-1.00), esophagus cancer (OR=0.94; 95%CI: 0.89-1.00), and nasopharyngeal cancer (OR=0.81; 95%CI: 0.70-0.91). Blood group A is associated with increased risk of cancer, and blood group O is associated with decreased risk of cancer.

  3. Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be as fortunate as we are.” Reflecting what research has proven, Valvo’s message is clear. “Screening is so important! Early detection is early cure!” Read More "Colorectal Cancer" Articles Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey / The Importance of Early Detection / Developments in Colorectal ...

  4. Coffee consumption and risk of cancers: a meta-analysis of cohort studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Jian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coffee consumption has been shown to be associated with cancer of various sites in epidemiological studies. However, there is no comprehensive overview of the substantial body of epidemiologic evidence. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded and bibliographies of retrieved articles. Prospective cohort studies were included if they reported relative risks (RRs and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs of various cancers with respect to frequency of coffee intake. We did random-effects meta-analyses and meta-regressions of study-specific incremental estimates to determine the risk of cancer associated with 1 cup/day increment of coffee consumption. Results 59 studies, consisting of 40 independent cohorts, met the inclusion criteria. Compared with individuals who did not or seldom drink coffee per day, the pooled RR of cancer was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.82-0.92 for regular coffee drinkers, 0.89 (0.84-0.93 for low to moderate coffee drinkers, and 0.82 (0.74-0.89 for high drinkers. Overall, an increase in consumption of 1 cup of coffee per day was associated with a 3% reduced risk of cancers (RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.96-0.98. In subgroup analyses, we noted that, coffee drinking was associated with a reduced risk of bladder, breast, buccal and pharyngeal, colorectal, endometrial, esophageal, hepatocellular, leukemic, pancreatic, and prostate cancers. Conclusions Findings from this meta-analysis suggest that coffee consumption may reduce the total cancer incidence and it also has an inverse association with some type of cancers.

  5. Coffee consumption and risk of cancers: a meta-analysis of cohort studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Coffee consumption has been shown to be associated with cancer of various sites in epidemiological studies. However, there is no comprehensive overview of the substantial body of epidemiologic evidence. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded and bibliographies of retrieved articles. Prospective cohort studies were included if they reported relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of various cancers with respect to frequency of coffee intake. We did random-effects meta-analyses and meta-regressions of study-specific incremental estimates to determine the risk of cancer associated with 1 cup/day increment of coffee consumption. Results 59 studies, consisting of 40 independent cohorts, met the inclusion criteria. Compared with individuals who did not or seldom drink coffee per day, the pooled RR of cancer was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.82-0.92) for regular coffee drinkers, 0.89 (0.84-0.93) for low to moderate coffee drinkers, and 0.82 (0.74-0.89) for high drinkers. Overall, an increase in consumption of 1 cup of coffee per day was associated with a 3% reduced risk of cancers (RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.96-0.98). In subgroup analyses, we noted that, coffee drinking was associated with a reduced risk of bladder, breast, buccal and pharyngeal, colorectal, endometrial, esophageal, hepatocellular, leukemic, pancreatic, and prostate cancers. Conclusions Findings from this meta-analysis suggest that coffee consumption may reduce the total cancer incidence and it also has an inverse association with some type of cancers. PMID:21406107

  6. Metformin as an adjuvant treatment for cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, C.; Cafferty, F. H.; Vale, C.; Langley, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metformin use has been associated with a reduced risk of developing cancer and an improvement in overall cancer survival rates in meta-analyses, but, to date, evidence to support the use of metformin as an adjuvant therapy in individual cancer types has not been presented. Patients and methods We systematically searched research databases, conference abstracts and trial registries for any studies reporting cancer outcomes for individual tumour types in metformin users compared with non-users, and extracted data on patients with early-stage cancer. Studies were assessed for design and quality, and a meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the adjuvant effect of metformin on recurrence-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS), to inform future trial design. Results Of 7670 articles screened, 27 eligible studies were identified comprising 24 178 participants, all enrolled in observational studies. In those with early-stage colorectal cancer, metformin use was associated with a significant benefit in all outcomes [RFS hazard ratio (HR) 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47–0.85; OS HR 0.69, CI 0.58–0.83; CSS HR 0.58, CI 0.39–0.86]. For men with early-stage prostate cancer, metformin was associated with significant, or borderline significant, benefits in all outcomes (RFS HR 0.83, CI 0.69–1.00; OS HR 0.82, CI 0.73–0.93; CSS HR 0.58, CI 0.37–0.93); however, there was significant heterogeneity between studies. The data suggest that prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy may benefit more from metformin (RFS HR 0.45, CI 0.29–0.70). In breast and urothelial cancer, no significant benefits were identified. Sufficient data were not available to conduct analyses on the impact of metformin dose and duration. Conclusions Our findings suggest that metformin could be a useful adjuvant agent, with the greatest benefits seen in colorectal and prostate cancer, particularly in those receiving radical

  7. Meta-analysis of miRNA expression profiles for prostate cancer recurrence following radical prostatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Pashaei

    , common pathway analysis showed that TCF3, MAX, MYC, CYP26A1, and SREBF1 significantly interact with those DE miRNA genes. The identified genes have been known as tumor suppressors and biomarkers which are closely related to several cancer types, such as colorectal cancer, breast cancer, PCa, gastric, and hepatocellular carcinomas. Additionally, it was shown that the combination of DE miRNAs can assist in the more specific detection of the PCa and prediction of biochemical recurrence (BCR.We found that the identified miRNAs through meta-analysis are candidate predictive markers for recurrent PCa after radical prostatectomy.

  8. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  9. [Nationwide colorectal cancer screening].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, L.G.M. van; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Usually, colorectal cancer presents with complaints in a late stage, but can be detected in an earlier stage, with better prognosis, by colonoscopy. Using colonoscopy, also precancerous tumours, adenomas, can be detected and excised, but only in a national screening programme. However primary

  10. Prognostic value of circulating microRNA-21 in digestive system cancers: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ting-Ting; Yang, Yin-Long; Liu, Xin-Ying; Ji, Qian-Qing; Pan, Yi-Fei; Xiang, You-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs show aberrant expression in patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of circulating microRNA-21 (miR-21) in digestive system cancers. All the eligible studies were searched by Medline and EMBASE. The hazard ratios (HRs) for overall survival (OS), which compared the expression levels of circulating miR-21 in patients with digestive cancer was extracted and estimated. Pooled HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Then a meta-analysis was performed to clarify the prognostic value of the miR-21. A total of seven studies involving 907 subjects were included. The results suggested that higher circulating miR-21 could predict worse OS outcome with the pooled HR of 2.19 (95% CI 1.01-4.75, P = 0.05) in digestive system cancers. Subgroup analysis by ethnicity indicated circulating miR-21 was associated with OS in patients with digestive cancer among Asians with the pooled HR of 2.90 (95% CI 1.30-6.45, P = 0.009). However, subgroup analysis by digestive system site revealed that there is no associated with OS in patients with colorectal cancer with the pooled HR of 1.34 (95% CI 0.45-4.00, P = 0.60). The present findings suggest that circulating miR-21 is associated with poor survival in patients with digestive cancer and could be a prognostic biomarker for those patients.

  11. Association between chemokine receptor 5 delta32 polymorphism and susceptibility to cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ho; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2015-01-01

    To explore whether the functional chemokine receptor 5 delta32 (CCR5-Δ32) polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to cancer. A meta-analysis was conducted on the association between the CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism and cancer using (i) allele contrast and (ii) the dominant model. Thirteen articles, including 16 comparative studies on a total of 3087 patients and 3735 controls, were included in the meta-analysis. These studies encompassed breast cancer (n = 3), bladder cancer (n = 3), cervical cancer (n = 2), pancreatic cancer (n = 2), prostate cancer (n = 2), head and neck cancer (n = 2), lymphoma (n = 1), gallbladder cancer (n = 1), skin cancer (n = 1) and mixed cancer (n = 1). The meta-analysis revealed an association between cancer and the CCR5-Δ32 allele (OR = 1.368, 95% CI = 1.064-1.758, p = 0.014), and stratification by ethnicity showed an association between the CCR5-Δ32 allele and cancer in Indians (OR = 2.480, 95% CI = 1.247-4.932, p = 0.010). The meta-analysis also revealed an association between breast cancer and the CCR5-Δ32 allele (OR = 1.689, 95% CI = 1.012-2.821, p = 0.045). However, allele contrast and the dominant model failed to reveal an association between the CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism and bladder cancer, cervical cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, and head and neck cancer. This meta-analysis demonstrates that the CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to cancer in Indians and is associated with breast cancer.

  12. Potential biases in colorectal cancer screening using faecal occult blood test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riboe, Dea Grip; Dogan, Tilde Steen; Brodersen, John

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common types of cancer in European countries and associated with a high mortality rate. A 16% relative risk reduction (RRR) of mortality was found in a meta-analysis based on four randomized controlled trials (RCT) on CRC screening. The aim o...

  13. Prognostic value of cancer stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase in ovarian cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyan Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH has recently been reported as a marker of cancer stem-like cells in ovarian cancer. However, the prognostic role of ALDH in ovarian cancer still remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the association between the expression of ALDH and the outcome of ovarian cancer patients by performing a meta-analysis. METHODS: We systematically searched for studies investigating the relationships between ALDH expression and outcome of ovarian cancer patients. Only articles in which ALDH expression was detected by immunohistochemical staining were included. A meta-analysis was performed to generate combined hazard ratios (HRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs for overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS. RESULTS: A total of 1,258 patients from 7 studies (6 articles were included in the analysis. Our results showed that high ALDH expression in patients with ovarian cancer was associated with poor prognosis in terms of Os (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.07-1.47; P = 0.005 and DFS (HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.00-2.49; P = 0.052, though the difference for DFS was not statistically significant. In addition, there was no evidence of publication bias as suggested by Begg's and Egger's tests (Begg's test, P = 0.707; Egger's test, P = 0.355. CONCLUSION: The present meta-analysis indicated that elevated ALDH expression was associated with poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer.

  14. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of malignancies showing the greatest benefit from preventive measures, especially screening or secondary prevention. Several screening strategies are available with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency. The most widely used are the faecal occult blood test in countries with population-based screening programmes, and colonoscopy in those conducting opportunistic screening. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal cancer screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Washington in 2015, with special emphasis on the medium-term results of faecal occult blood testing strategies and determining factors and on strategies to reduce the development of interval cancer after colonoscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of chemopreventive agents on the incidence of recurrent colorectal adenomas: a systematic review with network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veettil SK

    2017-05-01

    ranked CPAs based on efficacy.Results: We identified 20 eligible RCTs enrolling 12,625 participants with a history of colorectal cancer or adenomas who were randomly assigned to receive either a placebo or one of 12 interventions. NMA using all trials demonstrated that celecoxib 800 mg/day (relative risk [RR] 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45–0.83, celecoxib 400 mg/day (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.55–0.87, low-dose aspirin (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.59–0.96 and calcium (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.69–0.96 were significantly associated with a reduction in the recurrence of any adenomas. NMA results were consistent with those from pairwise meta-analysis. The evidence indicated a high (celecoxib, moderate (low-dose aspirin and low (calcium Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE quality. NMA ranking showed that celecoxib 800 mg/day and celecoxib 400 mg/day were the best CPAs, followed by low-dose aspirin and calcium. Considering advanced adenoma recurrence, only celecoxib 800 mg/day and celecoxib 400 mg/day were demonstrated to have a protective effect (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.27–0.52 vs RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.38–0.60, respectively.Conclusion: The available evidence from NMA suggests that celecoxib is more effective in reducing the risk of recurrence of colorectal adenomas, followed by low-dose aspirin and calcium. Since cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors (eg, celecoxib are associated with important cardiovascular events and gastrointestinal harms, more attention is warranted toward CPAs with a favorable benefit-to-risk ratio, such as low-dose aspirin and calcium. Keywords: colorectal adenomas, chemoprevention, systematic review, meta-analysis, network meta-analysis, randomized controlled trials

  16. Assessment of the potential diagnostic value of serum p53 antibody for cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutant p53 protein over-expression has been reported to induce serum antibodies against p53. We assessed the diagnostic precision of serum p53 (s-p53 antibodies for diagnosis of cancer patients and compared the positive rates of the s-p53 antibody in different types of cancers. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed and Embase, through May 31, 2012. Studies were assessed for quality using QUADAS (quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy. The positive likelihood ratio (PLR and negative likelihood ratio (NLR were pooled separately and compared with overall accuracy measures using diagnostic odds ratios (DORs and Area under the curve(AUC. Meta regression and subgroup analyses were done, and heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. RESULTS: Of 1089 studies initially identified, 100 eligible studies with 23 different types of tumor met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis (cases = 15953, controls = 8694. However, we could conduct independent meta analysis on only 13 of 36 types of tumors. Approximately 56% (56/100 of the included studies were of high quality (QUADAS score≥8. The summary estimates for quantitative analysis of serum p53 antibody in the diagnosis of cancers were: PLR 5.75 (95% CI: 4.60-7.19, NLR 0.81 (95%CI: 0.79-0.83 and DOR 7.56 (95% CI: 6.02-9.50. However, for the 13 types of cancers on which meta-analysis was conducted, the ranges for PLR (2.33-11.05, NLR (0.74-0.97, DOR (2.86-13.80, AUC(0.29-0.81, and positive rate (4.47%-28.36% indicated significant heterogeneity. We found that breast, colorectal, esophageal, gastric, hepatic, lymphoma, lung and ovarian cancer had relatively reasonable diagnostic accuracy. The remaining results of the five types of cancers suggested that s-p53 antibody had limited value. CONCLUSIONS: The current evidence suggests that s-p53 antibody has potential diagnostic value for cancer, especially for breast, colorectal, esophageal, gastric, hepatic

  17. Microbiota, Inflammation and Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécily Lucas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, is a multifactorial disease involving genetic, environmental and lifestyle risk factors. In addition, increased evidence has established a role for the intestinal microbiota in the development of colorectal cancer. Indeed, changes in the intestinal microbiota composition in colorectal cancer patients compared to control subjects have been reported. Several bacterial species have been shown to exhibit the pro-inflammatory and pro-carcinogenic properties, which could consequently have an impact on colorectal carcinogenesis. This review will summarize the current knowledge about the potential links between the intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer, with a focus on the pro-carcinogenic properties of bacterial microbiota such as induction of inflammation, the biosynthesis of genotoxins that interfere with cell cycle regulation and the production of toxic metabolites. Finally, we will describe the potential therapeutic strategies based on intestinal microbiota manipulation for colorectal cancer treatment.

  18. Prognostic value of CD166 expression in cancers of the digestive system: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ni

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Many studies have reported the prognostic predictive value of CD166 as a cancer stem cell marker in cancers of the digestive system; however, its predictive value remains controversial. Here, we investigate the correlation between CD166 positivity in digestive system cancers and clinicopathological features using meta-analysis. METHODS: A comprehensive search in PubMed and ISI Web of Science through March of 2013 was performed. Only articles containing CD166 antigen immunohistochemical staining in cancers of the digestive system were included,including pancreatic cancer, esophageal cancer, gastric cancer and colorectal cancer. Data comparing 3- and 5-year overall survival along with other clinicopathological features were collected. RESULTS: Nine studies with 2553 patients who met the inclusion criteria were included for the analysis. The median rate of CD166 immunohistochemical staining expression was 56% (25.4%-76.3%. In colorectal cancer specifically, the results of a fixed-effects model indicated that CD166-positive expression was an independent marker associated with a smaller tumor burden (T category; RR = 0.93, 95%, CI: 0.88-0.98 but worse spread to nearby lymph nodes (N category; RR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.05-1.30. The 5-year overall survival rate was showed relationship with cytoplasmic positive staining of CD166 (RR = 1.47 95% 1.21-1.79, but no significant association was found in the pool or any other stratified analysis with 3- or 5- year overall survival rate. CONCLUSION: Based on the published studies, different cellular location of CD166 has distinct prognostic value and cytoplasmic positive expression is associated with worse prognosis outcome. Besides, our results also find CD166 expression indicate advanced T category and N-positive status in colorectal cancer specifically.

  19. Colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa Caserras, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    In the latest meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association, several clinical studies were presented that aimed to evaluate the various colorectal cancer screening strategies, although most assessed the various aspects of faecal immunochemical testing (FIT) and colonoscopy. Data were presented from consecutive FIT-based screening rounds, confirming the importance of adherence to consecutive screening rounds, achieving a similar or superior diagnostic yield to endoscopic studies. There was confirmation of the importance of not delaying endoscopic study after a positive result. Participants with a negative FIT (score of 0) had a low risk for colorectal cancer. Several studies seemed to confirm the importance of high-quality colonoscopy in colorectal cancer screening programmes. The implementation of high-quality colonoscopies has reduced mortality from proximal lesions and reduced interval cancers in various studies. Finally, participants with a normal colonoscopy result or with a small adenoma are at low risk for developing advanced neoplasms during follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Association between raf kinase inhibitor protein loss and prognosis in cancers of the digestive system: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Wang, Qian; Ding, Jiang-Wu; Yang, Zhen; Xie, Chuan; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Loss of Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) may contribute to metastasis in a variety of human cancers. Many studies have evaluated whether loss of RKIP expression is a prognostic factor for survival in cancers of the digestive system, however, its predictive value remains controversial. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to obtain a more comprehensive estimate of the prognostic value of RKIP expression in digestive system cancers. Studies were identified by searching multiple electronic databases through December 12, 2013, and by reviewing reference lists of obtained articles. Studies reported hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between RKIP and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in cancers of the digestive system were eligible, including esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Nineteen studies involving approximately 3700 participants were included in the final analysis. The pooled results suggested that loss of RKIP expression was associated with unfavorable OS (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.46-0.65) and DFS (HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.30-0.62) among patients with digestive system cancers, whereas the difference was not statistically significant in pancreatic cancer specifically (OS, HR 0.76; 95% CI 0.51-1.01; DFS, HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.28-1.13). Loss of RKIP expression might be an independent indicator of poor prognosis in patients with digestive tract cancers, which includes esophageal cancer, gastric cancer and colorectal cancer. More studies are needed to further clarify the prognostic value of RKIP in pancreatic cancer. Future studies, preferably large prospective studies utilizing formal marker assessment processes, are needed to establish the prognostic value of RKIP before these results can be clinically applied.

  1. Role of physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarigan, Erin L; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    This review summarizes the evidence regarding physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis in relation to quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. There have been extensive reports on adiposity, inactivity, and certain diets, particularly those high in red and processed meats, and increased risk of colorectal cancer. Only in the past decade have data emerged on how such lifestyle factors are associated with outcomes in colorectal cancer survivors. Prospective observational studies have consistently reported that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis reduces mortality. A meta-analysis estimated that each 15 metabolic equivalent task-hour per week increase in physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with a 38% lower risk of mortality. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to confirm that physical activity lowers risk of mortality among colorectal cancer survivors; however, trials have shown that physical activity, including structured exercise, is safe for colorectal cancer survivors (localized to metastatic stage, during and after treatment) and improves cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function. In addition, prospective observational studies have suggested that a Western dietary pattern, high carbohydrate intake, and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages after diagnosis may increase risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and mortality, but these data are limited to single analyses from one of two US cohorts. Additional data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed. Nonetheless, on the basis of the available evidence, it is reasonable to counsel colorectal cancer survivors to engage in regular physical activity and limit consumption of refined carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Screening for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans J; Jakobsen, Karen V; Christensen, Ib J

    2011-01-01

    Emerging results indicate that screening improves survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, screening programs are already implemented or are being considered for implementation in Asia, Europe and North America. At present, a great variety of screening methods are available including...... colono- and sigmoidoscopy, CT- and MR-colonography, capsule endoscopy, DNA and occult blood in feces, and so on. The pros and cons of the various tests, including economic issues, are debated. Although a plethora of evaluated and validated tests even with high specificities and reasonable sensitivities...... into improvements of screening for colorectal cancer includes blood-based biological markers, such as proteins, DNA and RNA in combination with various demographically and clinically parameters into a "risk assessment evaluation" (RAE) test. It is assumed that such a test may lead to higher acceptance among...

  3. Improving colorectal cancer referrals

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, Claire

    2018-01-01

    The colorectal services at The Royal Bournemouth Hospital needed to adapt to meet the extra demand on fast-track patient referrals to the outpatient department, as a consequence of the changes in the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance on cancer referrals in June 2015. Learning from other units, a telephone assessment clinic (TAC) triaging patients straight to colonoscopy was trialled. A Plan–Do–Study–Act (PDSA) methodology was used. A baseline study showed that ...

  4. Cancer risk associated with use of metformin and sulfonylurea in type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soranna, Davide; Scotti, Lorenza; Zambon, Antonella; Bosetti, Cristina; Grassi, Guido; Catapano, Alberico; La Vecchia, Carlo; Mancia, Giuseppe; Corrao, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Oral antidiabetic drugs (including metformin and sulfonylurea) may play a role in the relationship between type 2 diabetes and cancer. To quantify the association between metformin and sulfonylurea and the risk of cancer, we performed a meta-analysis of available studies on the issue. We performed a MEDLINE search for observational studies that investigated the risk of all cancers and specific cancer sites in relation to use of metformin and/or sulfonylurea among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fixed- and random-effect models were fitted to estimate the summary relative risk (RR). Between-study heterogeneity was tested using χ(2) statistics and measured with the I(2) statistic. Publication bias was evaluated using funnel plot and Egger's regression asymmetry test. Seventeen studies satisfying inclusion criteria and including 37,632 cancers were evaluated after reviewing 401 citations. Use of metformin was associated with significantly decreased RR of all cancers (summary RR 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54-0.70), colorectal cancer (0.64, 95% CI 0.54-0.76), and pancreatic cancer (0.38, 95% CI 0.14-0.91). With the exception of colorectal cancer, significant between-study heterogeneity was observed. Evidence of publication bias for metformin-cancer association was also observed. There was no evidence that metformin affects the risk of breast and prostate cancers, nor that sulfonylurea affects the risk of cancer at any site. Metformin, but not sulfonylurea, appears to reduce subsequent cancer risk. This has relevant implications in light of the exploding global epidemic of diabetes.

  5. Breast implants and the risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noels, Eline C.; Lapid, Oren; Lindeman, Jan H. N.; Bastiaannet, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of cosmetic breast augmentation and the incidence of breast cancer have been increasing worldwide. It has been hypothesized that the risk of breast cancer may be greater among patients who have undergone cosmetic breast implantation. The authors performed a meta-analysis of the

  6. SOX4 is a potential prognostic factor in human cancers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Ju, H L; Yuan, X Y; Wang, T J; Lai, B Q

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the this study was to analyze the status of sex-determining region Y-related high-mobility group box 4 (SOX4) expression in varied human cancers and its correlation with overall survival in patients with human cancers. To observe initially the expression status of SOX4 in twenty kinds of human cancers at protein database (The Human Protein Atlas). We systematically and carefully searched the studies from electronic databases and seriously identified according to eligibility criteria. The correlation between SOX4 expression and overall survival in human cancers was evaluated through Review Manager. We found that SOX4 expression was significantly positive in most types of human cancer tissues, and the positive rate of SOX4 expression was about 78 % in overall cancer tissues. Furthermore, a total of 10 studies which included 1348 cancer patients were included in the final analysis. Meta-analysis showed that SOX4 overexpression was correlated with a poor overall survival and the pooled hazard ratio (HR), and corresponding 95 % confidence interval (CI) was 1.67 (95 % CI 1.01-2.78). From subgroup analyses, we present evidence that SOX4 overexpression was an unfavorable prognostic factor for colorectal cancer patients' recurrence-free survival and gastric cancer patients' overall survival, and the pooled HRs (95 % CI) were 1.73 (95 % CI 1.04-2.88) and 3.74 (95 % CI 1.04-13.45), respectively. In summary, SOX4 is a potential prognostic biomarker in human cancers.

  7. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the paradigm of tumoral growth that is susceptible to preventive measures, especially screening. Various screening strategies with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency are currently available, notable examples being the fecal occult blood test and endoscopic tests. In addition, new modalities have appeared in the last few years that could become viable alternatives in the near future. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Orlando in May 2013, with special emphasis on the medium- and long-term results of strategies using the fecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy, as well as initial experiences with the use of new biomarkers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Dietary intake of vitamins A, C, and E and the risk of colorectal adenoma: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Yu, Enda; Liu, Lianjie; Zhang, Wei; Wei, Xubiao; Gao, Xianhua; Song, Ning; Fu, Chuangang

    2013-11-01

    To comprehensively summarize the association between dietary intake of vitamins A, C, and E and the risk of colorectal adenoma (CRA), the precursor of colorectal cancer, relevant studies were identified in MEDLINE and EMBASE up to 31 October 2012. Summary relative risks (SRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled with a random-effects model. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran's Q and I statistics. A total of 13 studies with 3832 CRA cases were included in this meta-analysis. On the basis of the highest versus lowest analysis, dietary intake of vitamin C reduced the risk of CRA by 22% (SRRs 0.78, 95% CIs: 0.62-0.98). Subgroup analyses showed that this relation was not modified by BMI, smoking status, and dietary energy intake. Further, dietary intake of β-carotene was also inversely associated with the risk of CRA. However, dietary intake of vitamins A and E was not associated with the risk of CRA in overall and subgroup analyses (vitamin A: SRRs 0.87, 95% CIs: 0.67-1.14; vitamin E: SRRs 0.87, 95% CIs: 0.69-1.10). Our results indicate that dietary intake of vitamin C and β-carotene, but not vitamins A and E, could reduce the risk of CRA. However, these associations seem to be limited. Further investigation using large samples and a rigorous methodology is warranted.

  9. Adherence to Mediterranean diet and risk of cancer: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingshackl, Lukas; Hoffmann, Georg

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies was to gain further insight into the effects of adherence to Mediterranean Diet (MD) on overall cancer mortality, incidence of different types of cancer, and cancer mortality risk in cancer survivors. Literature search was performed using the electronic databases PubMed, and EMBASE until 2 July 2015. We included either cohort (for specific tumors only incidence cases were used) or case-control studies. Study specific risk ratios, hazard ratios, and odds ratios (RR/HR/OR) were pooled using a random effect model. The updated review process showed 23 observational studies that were not included in the previous meta-analysis (total number of studies evaluated: 56 observational studies). An overall population of 1,784,404 subjects was included in the present update. The highest adherence score to an MD was significantly associated with a lower risk of all-cause cancer mortality (RR: 0.87, 95% CI 0.81-0.93, I(2) = 84%), colorectal cancer (RR: 0.83, 95% CI 0.76-0.89, I(2) = 56%), breast cancer (RR: 0.93, 95% CI 0.87-0.99, I(2) =15%), gastric cancer (RR: 0.73, 95% CI 0.55-0.97, I(2) = 66%), prostate cancer (RR: 0.96, 95% CI 0.92-1.00, I(2) = 0%), liver cancer (RR: 0.58, 95% CI 0.46-0.73, I(2) = 0%), head and neck cancer (RR: 0.40, 95% CI 0.24-0.66, I(2) = 90%), pancreatic cancer (RR: 0.48, 95% CI 0.35-0.66), and respiratory cancer (RR: 0.10, 95% CI 0.01-0.70). No significant association could be observed for esophageal/ovarian/endometrial/and bladder cancer, respectively. Among cancer survivors, the association between the adherence to the highest MD category and risk of cancer mortality, and cancer recurrence was not statistically significant. The updated meta-analyses confirm a prominent and consistent inverse association provided by adherence to an MD in relation to cancer mortality and risk of several cancer types. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Enhanced recovery pathways optimize health outcomes and resource utilization: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamina, Michel; Kehlet, Henrik; Tomlinson, George A

    2011-01-01

    in costs that threatens the stability of health care systems. Enhanced recovery pathways (ERP) have been proposed as a means to reduce morbidity and improve effectiveness of care. We have reviewed the evidence supporting the implementation of ERP in clinical practice. Methods Medline, Embase...... in the development and implementation of ERP. Results A random-effect Bayesian meta-analysis was performed, including 6 randomized, controlled trials totalizing 452 patients. For patients adhering to ERP, length of stay decreased by 2.5 days (95% credible interval [CrI] -3.92 to -1.11), whereas 30-day morbidity...... of health care processes. Thus, while accelerating recovery and safely reducing hospital stay, ERPs optimize utilization of health care resources. ERPs can and should be routinely used in care after colorectal and other major gastrointestinal procedures....

  11. Distinct role of CD86 polymorphisms (rs1129055, rs17281995 in risk of cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiliang Geng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous studies concerning the role of CD86 polymorphisms (rs1129055 and rs17281995 in cancer fail to provide compelling evidence. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of common polymorphisms in the risk of cancer by meta-analysis. METHODS: By using the search terms Cluster of Differentiation 86/CD86/B7-2/polymorphism/polymorphisms/cancer, we searched PubMed, Embase, CNKI, and Wanfang and identified four studies for rs1129055 (2137 subjects and rs17281995 (2856 subjects respectively. Cancer risk was estimated by odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (95% CI. MAJOR FINDINGS: Overall, we observed significant reduced risk of cancer in relation to rs1129055. Compared with the individuals with AA genotype, the individuals with GG genotype appeared to have 62% decreased risk to develop cancer (GG versus AA: OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.49-0.79; P(het., 0.996. Similar effects were indicated in the G versus A allele model and the GG versus GA+AA genetic model (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.74-0.93; P(het., 0.987; OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.50-0.79; P(het., 0.973. In addition, we found genotypes of rs17281995 had a major effect on overall cancer risk (CC versus GG: OR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.43-3.95; P(het., 0.433; C versus G: OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.06-1.43; P(het., 0.521; CC versus GC+GG: OR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.45-3.93; P(het., 0.443. The association was also observed in Caucasians and colorectal cancer. No obvious publication bias was detected in this meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: These data reveal that rs1129055 may have protective effects on cancer risk in Asians and that rs17281995 is likely to contribute to risk of cancer, particularly colorectal cancer in Caucasians.

  12. Epigenetics of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ajay; Boland, C Richard

    2012-12-01

    In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research was mainly focused on genetic changes (ie, those that altered DNA sequences). Although this has been extremely useful as our understanding of the pathogenesis and biology of cancer has grown and matured, there is another realm in tumor development that does not involve changing the sequence of cellular DNA. This field is called "epigenetics" and broadly encompasses changes in the methylation of cytosines in DNA, changes in histone and chromatin structure, and alterations in the expression of microRNAs, which control the stability of many messenger RNAs and serve as "master regulators" of gene expression. This review focuses on the epigenetics of colorectal cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-11-15

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has stimulated significant interest in lysyl oxidase as a strong candidate for developing and deploying inhibitors as functional efficacious cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the rapidly expanding body of knowledge concerning lysyl oxidase in solid tumor progression, highlighting recent advancements in the field of colorectal cancer.

  14. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2013-10-01

    Up to 5% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) are due to a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high degree of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has important consequences, not only for patients-for whom highly effective preventive measures are available-, but also for their relatives, who may be carriers of the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes and in the discovery of new causative genes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. [Epigenetics and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Pablo; Villarejo, Pedro; Padilla, David; Menéndez, José María; Rodríguez Montes, José Antonio

    2012-05-01

    The epigenetic and physiological mechanisms that alter the structure of chromatin include the methylation of DNA, changes in the histones, and changes in RNA. A literature review has been carried out using PubMed on the evidence published on the association between epigenetics and colorectal cancer. The scientific literature shows that epigenetic changes, such as genetic modifications may be very significant in the origin of neoplastic disease, contributing both to the development and progression of the disease. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Dietary vitamin B2 intake and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lanting; Tan, Yuyan; Zhu, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Epidemiological studies assessing the relationship between dietary vitamin B2 and the risk of breast cancer have produced inconsistent results. Thus, we conducted this meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies to evaluate this association. We searched English-language MEDLINE publications and conducted a manual search to screen eligible articles. A random-effect model was used to pool study-specific risk estimates. Egger's linear regression test was also used to detect publication bias in meta-analysis. In our meta-analysis, ten studies comprising totally 12,268 breast cancer patients were available in the analyses. Pooled relative risk (RR) comparing the highest to the lowest vitamin B2 intake and breast cancer incidence was 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.76-0.95]. No significant heterogeneity existed across the studies (P = 0.086, I 2  = 40.7%). No publication bias was found. The results of dose-response analysis also showed that an increment of 1 mg/day was inversely related to the risk of breast cancer (RR = 0.94; 95% CI = 0.90-0.99). Results from our meta-analysis indicated that dietary vitamin B2 intake is weakly related to the reduced risk of breast cancer. Additional research is also necessary to further explore this association.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of CASR and cancer risk: evidence from meta-analysis and HuGE review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sohyun Jeong, Jae Hyun Kim, Myeong Gyu Kim, Nayoung Han, In-Wha Kim, Therasa Kim, Jung Mi Oh College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea Background: CASR gene appears to be involved in cancer biology and physiology. However, a number of studies investigating CASR polymorphisms and cancer risks have presented inconclusive results. Thus, a systematic review and a meta-analysis of the effect of CASR polymorphisms on several cancer risks were performed to suggest a statistical evidence for the association of CASR polymorphisms with cancer risks.Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Scopus, and the HuGE databases were searched. Nineteen articles of case–control and cohort studies were included for the final analysis.Results: The colorectal cancer risk was reduced in proximal (odds ratio [OR] =0.679, P=0.001 and distal (OR =0.753, P=0.026 colon sites with GG genotype of CASR rs1042636 and increased in distal colon site (OR =1.418, P=0.039 with GG genotype of rs1801726 by additive genetic model. The rs17251221 demonstrated noticeable associations that carrying a homozygote variant increases breast and prostate cancer risk considerably.Conclusion: The significant association of CASR polymorphisms with several cancer risks was observed in this review. In particular, the act of CASR polymorphisms as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene differs by cancer site and can be the research target for tumorigenesis. Keywords: rs1042636, rs1801725, rs1801726, systematic review, colorectal cancer

  18. Tea consumption and the risk of five major cancers: a dose–response meta-analysis of prospective studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background We conducted a dose–response meta-analysis of prospective studies to summarize evidence of the association between tea consumption and the risk of breast, colorectal, liver, prostate, and stomach cancer. Methods We searched PubMed and two other databases. Prospective studies that reported risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of cancer risk for ≥3 categories of tea consumption were included. We estimated an overall RR with 95% CI for an increase of three cups/day of tea consumption, and, usingrestricted cubic splines, we examined a nonlinear association between tea consumption and cancer risk. Results Forty-one prospective studies, with a total of 3,027,702 participants and 49,103 cancer cases, were included. From the pooled overall RRs, no inverse association between tea consumption and risk of five major cancers was observed. However, subgroup analysis showed that increase in consumption of three cups of black tea per day was a significant risk factor for breast cancer (RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.05-1.32). Conclusion Ourresults did not show a protective role of tea in five major cancers. Additional large prospective cohort studies are needed to make a convincing case for associations. PMID:24636229

  19. Folate intake and the risk of upper gastrointestinal cancers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tio, Martin; Andrici, Juliana; Cox, Michael R; Eslick, Guy D

    2014-02-01

    There is conflicting evidence on the association between folate intake and the risk of upper gastrointestinal tract cancers. In order to further elucidate this relationship, we performed a systematic review and quantitative meta-analysis of folate intake and the risk of esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancer. Four electronic databases (Medline, PubMed, Embase, and Current Contents Connect) were searched to July 26, 2013, with no language restrictions for observational studies that measured folate intake and the risk of esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, or pancreatic cancer. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using a random effects model. The meta-analysis of dietary folate and esophageal cancer risk comprising of nine retrospective studies showed a decreased risk of esophageal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 0.59; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.51-0.69). The meta-analysis of dietary folate and gastric cancer risk comprising of 16 studies showed no association (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.78-1.14). The meta-analysis of dietary folate and pancreatic cancer risk comprising of eight studies showed a decreased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR 0.66; 95% CI 0.49-0.89). Dietary folate intake is associated with a decreased risk of esophageal and pancreatic cancer, but not gastric cancer. Interpretation of these relationships is complicated by significant heterogeneity between studies when pooled, and by small numbers of studies available to analyze when stratification is performed to reduce heterogeneity. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Striking life events associated with primary breast cancer susceptibility in women: a meta-analysis study

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Changjun; Zhong, Ying; Huang, Xin; Peng, Li; Shan, Guangliang; Wang, Ke; Sun, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The association between striking life events, an important stress and acute anxiety disorder, and the occurrence of primary breast cancer is unclear. The current meta-analysis was designed to assess the relationship between striking life events and primary breast cancer incidence in women. Methods Systematic computerized searching of the PubMed, ScienceDirect, Embase, and BMJ databases with the combinations of controlled descriptors from Mesh, including breast cancer, breast tumor, ca...

  1. Flavan-3-ols consumption and cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    OpenAIRE

    LEI, LEI; Yang, Ying; He, Hongjuan; Chen, Erfei; Du, Le; Dong, Jing; Yang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous in vitro studies and animal model data have suggested that flavan-3-ols, the most common subclass of flavonoids in the diet, may exert protective effects against cancer, epidemiologic studies have reported inconclusive results for the association between flavan-3-ols intake and cancer risk. Therefore, we conducted this meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies to investigate the preventive effects of flavan-3-ols on various types of cancers. A total of 43 epidemiologic studies,...

  2. Perineal wound healing after abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musters, Gijsbert D.; Buskens, Christianne J.; Bemelman, Willem A.; Tanis, Pieter J.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired perineal wound healing has become a significant clinical problem after abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer. The increased use of neoadjuvant radiotherapy and wider excisions might have contributed to this problem. The primary aim of this systematic review with meta-analysis was to

  3. DNA adducts and cancer risk in prospective studies: a pooled analysis and a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veglia, Fabrizio; Loft, Steffen; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    in which bulky DNA adducts have been measured in blood samples collected from healthy subjects (N = 1947; average follow-up 51-137 months). In addition, we have performed a meta-analysis by identifying all articles on the same subject published up to the end of 2006, including case-control studies......). The association was evident only in current smokers and was absent in former smokers. Also the meta-analysis, which included both lung and bladder cancers, showed a statistically significant association in current smokers, whereas the results in never smokers were equivocal; in former smokers, no association...

  4. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  5. Genetic Polymorphism of DNA Methyltransferase 3A rs1550117 A>G and Risk of Cancer: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Xu, Ying; Ma, Gui; Qi, Weidong; Gu, Haiyong; Jiang, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the association between DNMT3A rs1550117 A>G polymorphism and cancer risk, but the results are inconsistent. To obtain a more precise evaluation of the relationship, we performed a meta-analysis of 10 case-control studies involving a total of 2184 cancer cases and 3420 controls. Our findings demonstrated a significant association between DNMT3A rs1550117 A>G polymorphism and increased risk of cancer in three genetic models: AA vs. AG + GG (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.12-2.88; p = 0.015), AA vs. GG (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.11-2.95; p = 0.018) and AA vs. AG (OR 1.77; 95% CI 1.13-2.79; p = 0.013). In a stratified analysis by cancer type, significant association between DNMT3A rs1550117 A>G polymorphism and increased risk of colorectal cancer was identified in four genetic models: AA vs. AG + GG (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.56-6.06; p = 0.001), AA vs. GG (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.58-6.29; p = 0.001), AA vs. AG (OR, 2.87; 95% CI, 1.41-5.84; p = 0.004), A vs. G (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.11-1.83; p = 0.005). Furthermore, a stratified analysis by ethnicity, significant increased risk of cancer was found among Asians in three genetic models: AA vs. AG + GG (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.09-2.88; p = 0.022), AA vs. GG (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.08-2.96; p = 0.025), AA vs. AG (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.10-2.79; p = 0.019). No significant publication bias was revealed for the meta-analysis. Sensitivity analysis suggested the reliability of our findings. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that DNMT3A rs1550117 A>G polymorphism may be associated with cancer susceptibility.

  6. Rigid or flexible sigmoidoscopy in colorectal clinics? Appraisal through a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, Nasir Zaheer

    2012-06-01

    Rigid sigmoidoscopy is sometimes performed at first presentation in colorectal clinics. We assessed the feasibility of flexible sigmoidoscopy in similar situations by comparing it with rigid sigmoidoscopy as a first investigative tool.

  7. Epigenetics and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M

    2011-10-18

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells, which transforms them into adenocarcinomas. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in understanding cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to have a functional role in CRC. The assessment of methylated genes in CRCs has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of CRCs called CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. These advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in CRC have led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC.

  8. Association of OPN rs11730582 polymorphism with cancer risk: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He LL

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lanlan He,1,* Yong Wang2,* 1Emergency Department, Zhenjiang First People’s Hospital, Zhenjiang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Interventional Radiology and Vascular Surgery, Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *Both authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Several molecular epidemiological studies have investigated the association between OPN rs11730582 C>T polymorphism and cancer risk, but the results are inconsistent. Hence, a meta-analysis was conducted to determine the association of this polymorphism with cancer risk. Materials and methods: The related articles were searched in PubMed, Embase, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to evaluate the strength of the associations. A random-effects model or fixed-effects model was employed depending on the heterogeneity. Results: A total of ten case-control studies involving 2,749 cancer cases and 3,398 controls were included in the meta-analysis. In overall analysis, OPN rs11730582 C>T polymorphism was not associated with cancer risk. In a stratified analysis by cancer type, no significant association was found between OPN rs11730582 C>T polymorphism and the risk of glioma, gastric cancer, and other cancers. Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that OPN rs11730582 C>T polymorphism is not associated with cancer susceptibility. Keywords: osteopontin, polymorphism, cancer, risk 

  9. Risk of colorectal adenomas in patients with celiac disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, J; Rausch, A; Zubiaurre, I

    2018-02-05

    Whether celiac disease increases the risk of presenting with colorectal adenoma or not, has not been extensively evaluated. This question becomes relevant when considering early screening methods in patients with the disease. The aim of our article was to determine the risk of colorectal adenomas in celiac disease patients. A computer-assisted search of the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases was carried out, encompassing the time frame of 1966 to December 2016. The search strategy consisted of the following MESH terms: 'celiac disease' OR 'celiac sprue' AND 'colorectal' OR 'colorectal neoplasia' OR 'colorectal adenoma'. A fixed-effect model was used for the analyses. The first analysis dealt with the prevalence of all presentations of colorectal adenoma in patients with celiac disease and the second was on the prevalence of advanced adenomas. The outcomes were described as odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals. The search identified 480 bibliographic citations, 17 of which were chosen for evaluation. Fourteen of those studies were rejected, leaving a final total of three for the analysis. Those studies included 367 cases of celiac disease and 682 controls. No significant heterogeneity was observed (I 2 =26%). There was no increased prevalence of colorectal adenomas in the celiac disease patients, when compared with the controls (OR: 0.94 [0.65-1.38]), and no significant difference was observed when assessing the prevalence of advanced adenomas (OR: 0.97 [0.48-1.97]). Celiac disease was not associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas. However, due to the limited evidence available, more studies are necessary to determine whether there is an actual association. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Fried food and prostate cancer risk: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    We performed systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies that investigated the potential association between fried food consumption and prostate cancer risk. Four case-control studies were finally selected for this systematic literature review, totaling 2579 cancer patients and 2277 matched controls. In two of these studies, the larger intake of fried food was associated with a 1.3- to 2.3-fold increased risk of prostate cancer, no significant association was found in another, whereas an inverse relationship was observed in the remaining. The meta-analysis of published data showed that larger intake of fried food was associated with a 35% (95% CI 17-57%) increased risk of prostate cancer. The results of this systematic literature review support the notion that larger intake of fried foods may have a role in increasing the risk of prostate cancer.

  11. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Colorectal cancer statistics, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Rebecca L; Miller, Kimberly D; Fedewa, Stacey A; Ahnen, Dennis J; Meester, Reinier G S; Barzi, Afsaneh; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2017-05-06

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in the United States. Every 3 years, the American Cancer Society provides an update of CRC incidence, survival, and mortality rates and trends. Incidence data through 2013 were provided by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, the National Program of Cancer Registries, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data through 2014 were provided by the National Center for Health Statistics. CRC incidence rates are highest in Alaska Natives and blacks and lowest in Asian/Pacific Islanders, and they are 30% to 40% higher in men than in women. Recent temporal patterns are generally similar by race and sex, but differ by age. Between 2000 and 2013, incidence rates in adults aged ≥50 years declined by 32%, with the drop largest for distal tumors in people aged ≥65 years (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.50; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.48-0.52) and smallest for rectal tumors in ages 50 to 64 years (male IRR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.96; female IRR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.93-1.08). Overall CRC incidence in individuals ages ≥50 years declined from 2009 to 2013 in every state except Arkansas, with the decrease exceeding 5% annually in 7 states; however, rectal tumor incidence in those ages 50 to 64 years was stable in most states. Among adults aged history of CRC/advanced adenomas) and eliminating disparities in high-quality treatment. In addition, research is needed to elucidate causes for increasing CRC in young adults. CA Cancer J Clin 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:177-193. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  13. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed......, and other pathological risk factors. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal...... diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group provides high-quality data and has been documenting an increase in short- and long...

  14. Milk, yogurt, and lactose intake and ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Tang, Wenru; Sang, Lei; Dai, Xiaoli; Wei, Danping; Luo, Ying; Zhang, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Inconclusive information for the role of dairy food intake in relation to ovarian cancer risk may associate with adverse effects of lactose, which has been hypothesized to increase gonadotropin levels in animal models and ecological studies. Up to now, several studies have indicated the association between dairy food intake and risk of ovarian cancer, but no identified founding was reported. We performed this meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of the association between dairy food intake and ovarian cancer risk. Using the data from 19 available publications, we examined dairy food including low-fat/skim milk, whole milk, yogurt and lactose in relation to risk of ovarian cancer by meta-analysis. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the association. We observed a slightly increased risk of ovarian cancer with high intake of whole milk, but has no statistical significance (OR = 1.228, 95% CI = 1.031-1.464, P = 0.022). The results of other milk models did not provide evidence of positive association with ovarian cancer risk. This meta-analysis suggests that low-fat/skim milk, whole milk, yogurt and lactose intake has no associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer. Further studies with larger participants worldwide are needed to validate the association between dairy food intake and ovarian cancer.

  15. Diabetes mellitus and risk of thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Yohwan; Ma, Seung-Hyun; Hwang, Yunji; Horn-Ross, Pamela L; Hsing, Ann; Lee, Kyu-Eun; Park, Young Joo; Park, Do-Joon; Yoo, Keun-Young; Park, Sue K

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important risk factor for endocrine cancers; however, the association with thyroid cancer is not clear. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify the association between thyroid cancer and DM. We searched MEDLINE, PUBMED and EMBASE databases through July 2012, using search terms related to diabetes mellitus, cancer, and thyroid cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of the risk of incidence of thyroid cancer from pre-existing diabetes. Of 2,123 titles initially identified, sixteen articles met our inclusion criteria. An additional article was identified from a bibliography. Totally, 14 cohort and 3 case-control studies were selected for the meta-analysis. The risks were estimated using random-effects model and sensitivity test for the studies which reported risk estimates and used different definition of DM. Compared with individuals without DM, the patients with DM were at 1.34-fold higher risk for thyroid cancer (95% CI 1.11-1.63). However, there was heterogeneity in the results (pdiabetic counterparts, women with pre-existing DM have an increased risk of thyroid cancer.

  16. Serine/threonine kinase 15 gene polymorphism and risk of digestive system cancers: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianfei; Yan, Ruicheng; Zou, Li

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reported an association between the two coding polymorphisms (91T>A and 169G>A) of the serine/threonine kinase 15 (STK15) gene and the risk of digestive system cancers; however, the results are inconsistent. In the present study, a meta-analysis was carried out to assess the association between the two STK15 polymorphisms and the risk of digestive system cancers. Relevant studies were identified using PubMed, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, WanFang and VIP databases up to February 18, 2014. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using the fixed or random effects model. A total of 15 case-control studies from 14 publications were included. Of these, 15 studies concerned the 91T>A polymorphism and included 7,619 cases and 7,196 controls and four studies concerned the 161G>A polymorphism and included 826 cases and 713 controls. A significantly increased risk of digestive system cancers was observed for the 91T>A polymorphism (recessive model: OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.07-1.31). In subgroup analysis by ethnicity, a significant association was detected in Asian populations (recessive model: OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.08-1.36) but not in Caucasian and mixed populations. Stratification by tumor type indicated that the 91T>A polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of esophageal and colorectal cancers under the recessive model (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.03-1.38; and OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.04-1.46; respectively); however, no significant association was observed between the 169G>A polymorphism and the risk of digestive system cancers in any of the genetic models. Furthermore, in subgroup analysis by ethnicity, similar results were observed in the Asian and Caucasian populations. The present meta-analysis demonstrated that the STK15 gene 91T>A polymorphism, but not the 169G>A polymorphism, may be a risk factor for digestive system cancers, particularly for esophageal and colorectal cancers.

  17. A resampling-based meta-analysis for detection of differential gene expression in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergul Gulusan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accuracy in the diagnosis of breast cancer and classification of cancer subtypes has improved over the years with the development of well-established immunohistopathological criteria. More recently, diagnostic gene-sets at the mRNA expression level have been tested as better predictors of disease state. However, breast cancer is heterogeneous in nature; thus extraction of differentially expressed gene-sets that stably distinguish normal tissue from various pathologies poses challenges. Meta-analysis of high-throughput expression data using a collection of statistical methodologies leads to the identification of robust tumor gene expression signatures. Methods A resampling-based meta-analysis strategy, which involves the use of resampling and application of distribution statistics in combination to assess the degree of significance in differential expression between sample classes, was developed. Two independent microarray datasets that contain normal breast, invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC, and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC samples were used for the meta-analysis. Expression of the genes, selected from the gene list for classification of normal breast samples and breast tumors encompassing both the ILC and IDC subtypes were tested on 10 independent primary IDC samples and matched non-tumor controls by real-time qRT-PCR. Other existing breast cancer microarray datasets were used in support of the resampling-based meta-analysis. Results The two independent microarray studies were found to be comparable, although differing in their experimental methodologies (Pearson correlation coefficient, R = 0.9389 and R = 0.8465 for ductal and lobular samples, respectively. The resampling-based meta-analysis has led to the identification of a highly stable set of genes for classification of normal breast samples and breast tumors encompassing both the ILC and IDC subtypes. The expression results of the selected genes obtained through real

  18. The association between physical activity and renal cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, G; Leitzmann, M F

    2013-01-01

    Background: Physical activity may decrease renal cancer risk by reducing obesity, blood pressure, insulin resistance, and lipid peroxidation. Despite plausible biologic mechanisms linking increased physical activity to decreased risk for renal cancer, few epidemiologic studies have been able to report a clear inverse association between physical activity and renal cancer, and no meta-analysis is available on the topic. Methods: We searched the literature using PubMed and Web of Knowledge to identify published non-ecologic epidemiologic studies quantifying the relationship between physical activity and renal cancer risk in individuals without a cancer history. Following the PRISMA guidelines, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis, including information from 19 studies based on a total of 2 327 322 subjects and 10 756 cases. The methodologic quality of the studies was examined using a comprehensive scoring system. Results: Comparing high vs low levels of physical activity, we observed an inverse association between physical activity and renal cancer risk (summary relative risk (RR) from random-effects meta-analysis=0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.79–0.97). Summarising risk estimates from high-quality studies strengthened the inverse association between physical activity and renal cancer risk (RR=0.78; 95% CI=0.66–0.92). Effect modification by adiposity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, smoking, gender, or geographic region was not observed. Conclusion: Our comprehensive meta-analysis provides strong support for an inverse relation of physical activity to renal cancer risk. Future high-quality studies are required to discern which specific types, intensities, frequencies, and durations of physical activity are needed for renal cancer risk reduction. PMID:23412105

  19. Alcohol Intake and Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Hee; Myung, Seung-Kwon; Kim, Hyeon Suk

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether alcohol intake is associated with the risk of thyroid cancer by a meta-analysis of observational studies. We searched PubMed and EMBASE in June of 2015 to locate eligible studies. We included observational studies such as cross-sectional studies, case-control studies, and cohort studies reporting odd ratios (ORs) or relative risk (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We included 33 observational studies with two cross-sectional studies, 20 case-controls studies, and 11 cohort studies, which involved a total of 7,725 thyroid cancer patients and 3,113,679 participants without thyroid cancer in the final analysis. In the fixed-effect model meta-analysis of all 33 studies, we found that alcohol intake was consistently associated with a decreased risk of thyroid cancer (OR or RR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.83; I 2 =38.6%). In the subgroup meta-analysis by type of study, alcohol intake also decreased the risk of thyroid cancer in both case-control studies (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.92; I 2 =29.5%; n=20) and cohort studies (RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.82; I 2 =0%; n=11). Moreover, subgroup meta-analyses by type of thyroid cancer, gender, amount of alcohol consumed, and methodological quality of study showed that alcohol intake was significantly associated with a decreased risk of thyroid cancer. The current meta-analysis of observational studies found that, unlike most of other types of cancer, alcohol intake decreased the risk of thyroid cancer.

  20. Colorectal Cancer: The Importance of Early Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer The Importance of Early Detection Past Issues / Summer ... Cancer of the colon or rectum is called colorectal cancer. The colon and the rectum are part of ...

  1. Serum and tissue leptin in lung cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiang; Ma, Yao; Zhou, Qilong; He, Jie; Peng, Bo; Liu, Sitong; Yan, Zhipeng; Yang, Xin; Fan, Hong

    2017-03-21

    Many studies have found that leptin is involved in tumorigenesis and the progression of lung cancer. However, these studies were inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the role of leptin in the patients with lung cancer. A systematic literature search in the several databases and on commercial Internet search engines was carried out to identify studies published up to July 8, 2016. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to investigate the effect sizes. Finally, 21 eligible articles were included in the current meta-analysis. Overall, there is no relationship between levels of serum leptin and lung cancer. However, a subgroup analysis in high-study quality group found a weak association between serum leptin concentrations and lung cancer in Chinese (SMD=0.77, P=0.035). Additionally, the meta-analysis indicates that the serum leptin levels were lower in the weight-losing group than in the sustained weight group (SMD=-0.80, P=0.001). Further, there was evidence of a significant association between expression levels of leptin protein in tissue and lung cancer (OR=7.35, Pleptin may be involved in the pathogenesis of lung cancer and tumor metastasis, especially among Chinese. However, the leptin may not appear to play an important role in cancer cachexia development.

  2. [Colorectal cancer prevention by flavonoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoensch, Harald; Richling, Elke; Kruis, Wolfgang; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2010-08-01

    Valid, sustained and safe clinical means of colorectal cancer prevention are still lacking, but they are urgently needed to lower the incidence of colorectal cancer. Dietary factors and phytochemicals such as flavonoids play an important role for prevention. A selective search of the literature using PubMed was performed with the following key words: flavonoids, cancer, therapy, colorectal cancer focused on clinical queries. Results of clinical studies including the authors' own were compared. In vivo and in vitro studies with animals, cell cultures and subcellular components provide ample evidence for antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of flavonoids as shown for multiple biological and molecular endpoints. Isoflavonoids in vitro have been shown to induce proliferation of breast cancer cells. Epidemiologic trials (cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies) yielded inconsistent results for flavonoid protection. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses support the protective role of tea flavonoids on adenoma incidence. An interventional pilot study with sustained flavonoid supplementation was shown to reduce the rate of neoplasia in patients with resected colorectal cancer. Selected flavonoids possess antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic properties and could reduce the incidence of colorectal neoplasias as shown in epidemiologic trials. Randomized controlled clinical studies with flavonoid intervention are necessary to provide evidence for their role in colorectal cancer prevention.

  3. Obesity and Risk of Thyroid Cancer: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis of 21 Observational Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Jie; Huang, Min; WANG, LI; Ye, Wei; Tong, Yan; Wang, Hanmin

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have evaluated the association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. However, the results remain uncertain. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. Material/Methods Published literature from PubMed, EMBASE, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) were retrieved before 10 August 20...

  4. Interventions with Family Caregivers of Cancer Patients: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Northouse, Laurel L; Katapodi, Maria; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Lingling; Mood, Darlene W.

    2010-01-01

    Family caregivers of cancer patients receive little preparation, information, or support to carry out their caregiving role. However, their psychosocial needs must be addressed so they can maintain their own health and provide the best possible care to the patient. The purpose of this article was to analyze the types of interventions offered to family caregivers of cancer patients, and to determine the effect of these interventions on various caregiver outcomes. Meta-analysis was used to anal...

  5. Circulating adiponectin levels and risk of endometrial cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Jun; Yang, Xue-Ling; Yao, Yan; Han, Wei-Qing; Li, B O

    2016-06-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have presented conflicting results regarding associations between circulating adiponectin (APN) levels and the risk of endometrial cancer. Thus a meta-analysis was performed to investigate the association between these factors. Multiple electronic sources, including PubMed, SpringerLink and Google Scholar databases were searched to identify relevant studies for the present meta-analysis. All of the selected studies examined the correlation between circulating APN levels and endometrial cancer. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated and pooled using meta-analysis methods. Overall, 18 case-control studies met the inclusion criteria. A total of 5,692 participants and 2,337 cases of endometrial cancer were included in this meta-analysis. The SMD of the pooled analysis (95% CI) were -1.96 (-2.60, -1.31), P=0.000. When the cancer grades were compared, the APN values were not significantly different between the grades of endometrial cancer [G1 vs. G3, 1.02 (-0.68, 2.72), P>0.05; G1 vs. G2, 0.34 (-0.86, 1.54), P>0.05]. However, there was a significant association between high APN levels and postmenopausal endometrial cancer cases with an SMD (95% CI) of -2.27 (-4.36, -0.18) and P0.05. The low circulating APN level increases the risk of endometrial cancer, whereas the high APN level decreases this risk in postmenopausal women. Circulating APN as simple biomarkers may be a promising tool for the prevention, early diagnosis and disease monitoring of endometrial cancer.

  6. Prognostic significance of osteopontin expression in non-small-cell lung cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xue-Lin; Wang, Chun; Liu, K E; Nie, Wen; Ding, Zhen-Yu

    2015-05-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) plays an important role in the progression and metastasis of cancer. However, the role of OPN as a prognostic factor in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between OPN expression and prognosis in patients with NSCLC using a meta-analysis. Based on PubMed, Ovid Medline, Embase, ISI, ScienceDirect and SpringerLink databases, related articles published prior to January, 2013 were collected. A meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the association of OPN expression with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with NSCLC. Hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to assess the strength of this association. A total of 6 studies, including 776 patients, were found to be eligible for the meta-analysis. No heterogeneity was observed in OS or PFS, whereas low OPN expression was found to be correlated with better OS (HR=0.57, 95% CI: 0.46-0.70) and PFS (HR=0.62, 95% CI: 0.49-0.77). This meta-analysis demonstrated an association of OPN with poor prognosis in NSCLC patients. However, prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

  7. Cell-Free DNA in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Boysen, Anders K; Pallisgård, Niels

    2017-01-01

    of tumor-specific mutations, whereas the use of total cell-free DNA (cfDNA) quantification is somehow controversial and sparsely described in the literature, but holds important clinical information in itself. The purpose of the present report was to present a systematic review and meta...... independent investigators. Eligibility criteria were (a) total cfDNA analysis, (b) mCRC, and (c) prognostic value during palliative treatment. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed, and meta-analysis applied on both aggregate data extraction...... therapy. Small fragments of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) can be measured in a simple blood sample. This report presents the first meta-analysis of the prognostic value of total cfDNA measurement in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Data from 1,076 patients confirmed that patients...

  8. p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Liu, Fei; Li, Bo; Wei, Yong-Gang; Yan, Lv-Nan; Wen, Tian-Fu

    2011-03-07

    To evaluate the association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer risk by means of meta-analysis. Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase and Chinese Biomedicine databases. Summary odds ratios and 95% CI for p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer were calculated in fixed-effects model (Mantel-Haenszel method) and random-effects model (DerSimonian and Laird method) when appropriate. This meta-analysis included 1115 liver cancer cases and 1778 controls. The combined results based on all studies showed that there was a statistically significant link between Pro/Pro genotype and liver cancer, but not between Arg/Arg or Pro/Arg genotype and liver cancer. When stratifying for race, similar results were obtained, i.e. patients with liver cancer had a significantly higher frequency of Pro/Pro genotype than non-cancer patients among Asians. After stratifying the various studies by control source, gender, family history of liver cancer and chronic hepatitis virus infection, we found that (1) patients among hospital-based studies had a significantly higher frequency of Pro/Pro and a significantly lower frequency of Arg/Arg genotype than individuals without cancer; (2) female patients with liver cancer had a significantly lower frequency of Arg/Arg and a higher frequency of Pro/Arg+Pro/Pro genotypes than female individuals without cancer; (3) subgroup analyses for family history of liver cancer did not reveal any significant association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer development; and (4) patients with negative hepatitis virus infection had a significantly higher frequency of Pro/Pro and a significantly lower frequency of Arg/Arg genotype than individuals without cancer. This meta-analysis suggests that the p53 codon 72 polymorphism may be associated with liver cancer among Asians.

  9. A meta-analysis of alcohol intake and risk of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qiqi; Lin, Yiwei; Zheng, Xiangyi; Qin, Jie; Yang, Kai; Xie, Liping

    2010-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies have reported conflicting results relating alcohol intake to bladder cancer risk. A meta-analysis of cohort and case-control studies was conducted to pool the risk estimates of the association between alcohol intake and bladder cancer. Eligible studies were retrieved via both computer searches and review of references. We analyzed abstracted data with random effects models to obtain the summary risk estimates. Dose-response meta-analysis was performed for studies reporting categorical risk estimates for a series of exposure levels. Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria of the meta-analysis. No association with bladder cancer was observed in either overall alcohol intake group (OR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.89-1.10) or subgroups stratified by sex, study design, geographical region, or smoking status. However, in the analysis by specific beverages, both beer (OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.76-0.96) and wine (OR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.71-1.00) consumption exhibited a negative dose-response relationship with bladder cancer. The overall current literature on alcohol consumption and the risk of bladder cancer suggested no association, while the consumption of beer and wine was associated with reduced risk of bladder cancer. Further efforts should be made to confirm these findings and clarify the underlying biological mechanisms.

  10. The Effect of Hypnosis on Anxiety in Patients With Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Ying; Liu, Ying-Mei; Chen, Mei-Ling

    2017-06-01

    Anxiety is a common form of psychological distress in patients with cancer. One recognized nonpharmacological intervention to reduce anxiety for various populations is hypnotherapy or hypnosis. However, its effect in reducing anxiety in cancer patients has not been systematically evaluated. This meta-analysis was designed to synthesize the immediate and sustained effects of hypnosis on anxiety of cancer patients and to identify moderators for these hypnosis effects. Qualified studies including randomized controlled trials (RCT) and pre-post design studies were identified by searching seven electronic databases: Scopus, Medline Ovidsp, PubMed, PsycInfo-Ovid, Academic Search Premier, CINAHL Plus with FT-EBSCO, and SDOL. Effect size (Hedges' g) was computed for each study. Random-effect modeling was used to combine effect sizes across studies. All statistical analyses were conducted with Comprehensive Meta-Analysis, version 2 (Biostat, Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA). Our meta-analysis of 20 studies found that hypnosis had a significant immediate effect on anxiety in cancer patients (Hedges' g: 0.70-1.41, p anxiety of cancer patients, especially for pediatric cancer patients who experience procedure-related stress. We recommend therapist-delivered hypnosis should be preferred until more effective self-hypnosis strategies are developed. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Adiponectin and Endometrial Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangxin Zeng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluates the association between serum adiponectin concentrations and the risk of endometrial cancer through a comprehensive meta-analysis of currently available clinical data. Methods: PubMed, Embase, the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database and the Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Science were searched for studies that examined the association between blood adiponectin concentrations and the risk of endometrial cancer. Data from studies that met the inclusion criteria were systematically reviewed, and pooled analyses were performed according to the guidelines of Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology and PRIMSA. Results: Eight case-control studies (including 1257 endometrial cancer patients and 2008 controls and four nested case-control studies (including 659 endometrial cancer patients and 1398 controls were included. We found that serum adiponectin level was inversely correlated with the risk of endometrial cancer development after pooling the case-control studies (OR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.39-0.60; P P=0.060, particularly in postmenopausal women without current hormone replacement therapy (OR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.44-0.86; P = 0.004. Conclusions: Meta-analysis of currently available clinical evidence supports the association between high serum adiponectin concentration and reduced risk of endometrial cancer development, particularly in the group of postmenopausal women without current hormone replacement therapy. However, additional studies with prospective design are required to fully support this linkage.

  12. A Meta-Analysis of the Association between DNMT1 Polymorphisms and Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have examined the associations of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 polymorphisms, including single nucleotide polymorphisms rs16999593 (T/C, rs2228611 (G/A, and rs2228612 (A/G, with cancer risk. However, the results are inconclusive. The aim of this meta-analysis is to elucidate the associations between DNMT1 polymorphisms and cancer susceptibility. The PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched systematically to identify potentially eligible reports. Odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to evaluate the strength of association between three DNMT1 polymorphisms and cancer risk. A total of 16 studies were finally included in the meta-analysis, namely, nine studies of 3378 cases and 4244 controls for rs16999593, 11 studies of 3643 cases and 3866 controls for rs2228611, and three studies of 1343 cases and 1309 controls for rs2228612. The DNMT1 rs2228612 (A/G polymorphism was significantly related to cancer risk in the recessive model. The meta-analysis also suggested that DNMT1 rs16999593 (T/C may be associated with gastric cancer, while rs2228611 (G/A may be associated with breast cancer. In future research, large-scale and well-designed studies are required to verify these findings.

  13. Safety of pregnancy following breast cancer diagnosis: a meta-analysis of 14 studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azim, Hatem A; Santoro, Luigi; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    with a history of breast cancer are frequently advised against future conception for fear that pregnancy could adversely affect their breast cancer outcome. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis to understand the effect of pregnancy on overall survival of women with a history of breast cancer.......Due to the rising trend of delaying pregnancy to later in life, more women are diagnosed with breast cancer before completing their families. Therefore, enquiry into the feasibility and safety of pregnancy following breast cancer diagnosis is on the rise. Available evidence suggests that women...

  14. Safety of pregnancy following breast cancer diagnosis: a meta-analysis of 14 studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azim, Hatem A; Santoro, Luigi; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Due to the rising trend of delaying pregnancy to later in life, more women are diagnosed with breast cancer before completing their families. Therefore, enquiry into the feasibility and safety of pregnancy following breast cancer diagnosis is on the rise. Available evidence suggests that women...... with a history of breast cancer are frequently advised against future conception for fear that pregnancy could adversely affect their breast cancer outcome. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis to understand the effect of pregnancy on overall survival of women with a history of breast cancer....

  15. Drainage or nondrainage in elective colorectal anastomosis : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karliczek, A; Jesus, EC; Matos, D; Castro, AA; Atallah, AN; Wiggers, T

    Background There is little agreement on prophylactic use of drains in anastomoses in elective colorectal surgery despite many randomized clinical trials. Once anastomotic leakage occurs it is generally agreed that drains Should be used for therapeutic purposes. However, Oil prophylactic use no such

  16. Insulin glargine and cancer risk in patients with diabetes: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xulei Tang

    Full Text Available AIM: The role of insulin glargine as a risk factor for cancer is controversial in human studies. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the relationship between insulin glargine and cancer incidence. METHODS: All observational studies and randomized controlled trials evaluating the relationship of insulin glargine and cancer risk were identified in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library and the Chinese Biomedical Medical Literature Database, through March 2012. Odds ratios (ORs with corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated with a random-effects model. Confidence in the estimates of the obtained effects (quality of evidence was assessed by using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. RESULTS: A total of 11 studies including 448,928 study subjects and 19,128 cancer patients were finally identified for the meta-analysis. Insulin glargine use was associated with a lower odds of cancer compared with non-glargine insulin use (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.98, P = 0.03; very low-quality evidence. Glargine did not increase the odds of breast cancer (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.46, P = 0.966; very low-quality evidence. Compared with non-glargine insulin, no significant association was found between insulin glargine and prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer and respiratory tract cancer. Insulin glargine use was associated with lower odds of other site-specific cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Results from the meta-analysis don't support the link between insulin glargine and an increased risk of cancer and the confidence in the estimates of the effects is very low. Further studies are needed to examine the relation between insulin glargine and cancer risk, especially breast cancer.

  17. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested...... to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has...... stimulated significant interest in lysyl oxidase as a strong candidate for developing and deploying inhibitors as functional efficacious cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the rapidly expanding body of knowledge concerning lysyl oxidase in solid tumor progression, highlighting recent...

  18. Prognostic Role of Phospho-STAT3 in Patients with Cancers of the Digestive System: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mu-xing; Bi, Xin-yu; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Jian-jun; Han, Yue; Li, Zhi-Yu; Zhang, Ye-fan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Xiao; Hu, Xu-hui; Zhao, Hong; Cai, Jian-qiang

    2015-01-01

    The definite prognostic role of p-STAT3 has not been well defined. We performed a meta-analysis evaluating the prognostic role of p-STAT3 expression in patients with digestive system cancers. We searched the available articles reporting the prognostic value of p-STAT3 in patients with cancers of the digestive system, mainly including colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, esophagus cancer and pancreatic cancer. The pooled hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) of overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were used to assess the prognostic role of p-STAT3 expression level in cancer tissues. And the association between p-STAT3 expression and clinicopathological characteristics was evaluated. A total of 22 studies with 3585 patients were finally enrolled in the meta-analysis. The results showed that elevated p-STAT3 expression level predicted inferior OS (HR = 1.809, 95% CI: 1.442-2.270, P digestive system. Increased expression of p-STAT3 is significantly related with tumor cell differentiation (Odds ratio (OR) = 1.895, 95% CI: 1.364-2.632, P digestive system cancers. More well designed studies with adequate follow-up are needed to gain a thorough understanding of the prognostic role of p-STAT3.

  19. Correlation between periodontal disease and oral cancer risk: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lili; Jiang, Yinhua; Liu, Weidong; Tao, HaiBiao

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation between periodontal disease and oral cancer risk by meta-analysis. We searched the electronic databases of PubMed and Wanfang to include the articles related to periodontal disease and oral cancer risk. The association between periodontal disease and oral cancer risk was assessed by odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The publication bias was evaluated by Begg's funnel plot and Egger's line regression test. All the data analysis was done by STATA12.0 software (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA). Eleven case-control studies were included in our present meta-analysis. We found significant statistical heterogeneity was existed in our present meta-analysis (I2 = 99.8%, P periodontal disease and oral cancer risk was found with OR = 3.21 and the 95% CI = 2.25-4.16 (P periodontal disease can increase the oral cancer risk by nearly 2-fold.

  20. Cancer risk with folic acid supplements: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wien, Tale Norbye; Pike, Eva; Wisløff, Torbjørn; Staff, Annetine; Smeland, Sigbjørn

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore if there is an increased cancer risk associated with folic acid supplements given orally. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled studies of folic acid supplementation in humans reporting cancer incidence and/or cancer mortality. Studies on folic acid fortification of foods were not included. Data sources Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase and Centre of Reviews and Dissemination, clinical trial registries and hand-searching of key journals. Results From 4104 potential references, 19 studies contributed data to our meta-analyses, including 12 randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Meta-analysis of the 10 RCTs reporting overall cancer incidence (N=38 233) gave an RR of developing cancer in patients randomised to folic acid supplements of 1.07 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.14) compared to controls. Overall cancer incidence was not reported in the seven observational studies. Meta-analyses of six RCTs reporting prostate cancer incidence showed an RR of prostate cancer of 1.24 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.49) for the men receiving folic acid compared to controls. No significant difference in cancer incidence was shown between groups receiving folic acid and placebo/control group, for any other cancer type. Total cancer mortality was reported in six RCTs, and a meta-analysis of these did not show any significant difference in cancer mortality in folic acid supplemented groups compared to controls (RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.30). None of the observational studies addressed mortality. Conclusions A meta-analysis of 10 RCTs showed a borderline significant increase in frequency of overall cancer in the folic acid group compared to controls. Overall cancer incidence was not reported in the seven observational studies. Prostate cancer was the only cancer type found to be increased after folic acid supplementation (meta-analyses of six RCTs). Prospective studies of cancer development in populations where food is fortified with folic acid could indicate whether

  1. The effect of body mass index on endometrial cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenabi, E; Poorolajal, J

    2015-07-01

    Several epidemiological studies have investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and endometrial cancer in recent years. This up-to-date meta-analysis was conducted to obtain an overall effect estimate based on current evidence. A meta-analysis was conducted until March 2015. Major electronic databases including PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched. The reference lists and related scientific conference databases were searched for additional data. Cohort and case-control studies addressing the association between BMI and endometrial cancer were included. The exposure of interest was overweight and obesity. The outcome of interest was endometrial cancer of any type confirmed pathologically. The effect measure of choice was rate ratio (RR) for cohort studies and odds ratio (OR) for case-control studies. The random effect model was reported. Of 6241 retrieved references, 40 studies were included in the meta-analysis including 20 prospective cohort studies and 20 case-control studies involving 32,281,242 participants. The results of both cohort and case-control studies showed a significant association. Based on random effect model, compared to normal weight people, the estimated RR and OR of endometrial cancer was 1.34 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.48) and 1.43 (95% CI: 1.30, 1.56) for the overweight and 2.54 (95% CI: 2.27, 2.81) and 3.33 (95% CI: 2.87, 3.79) for the obese, respectively. The results of this meta-analysis indicated that BMI is strongly associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Further investigations are required to expect the pathophysiology of the endometrial cancer caused by overweight and obesity. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A meta-analysis of PTGS1 and PTGS2 polymorphisms and NSAID intake on the risk of developing cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Nagao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have investigated whether the polymorphisms in the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase 1 (PTGS1 and PTGS2 genes and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use are associated with cancer risk; however, those studies have produced mixed results. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between the PTGS1 and PTGS2 polymorphisms and the effect of NSAID use on the risk of developing cancer. METHODS: We conducted a comprehensive search in PubMed through March 2012. The odds ratios (ORs with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using the fixed-effect model or the random-effect model. RESULTS: The database search generated 13 studies that met the inclusion criteria. For PTGS1 rs3842787, NSAID users homozygous for the major allele (CC had a significantly decreased cancer risk compared with non-NSAID users (OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.59-0.89. For PTGS2 rs5275 and rs20417, there were no significant differences between the gene polymorphism and NSAID use on cancer risk among the 8 and 7 studies, respectively. However, in the stratified analysis by the type of cancer or ethnicity population, NSAID users homozygous for the major allele (TT in rs5275 demonstrated significantly decreased cancer risk compared with non-NSAID users in cancer type not involving colorectal adenoma (OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.59-0.83 and among the USA population (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.56-0.82. NSAID users homozygous for the major allele (GG in rs20417 displayed a significantly decreased cancer risk than non-NSAID users among the US population (OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.58-0.88. For the PTGS2 rs689466 and rs2745557 SNPs, there were no significant differences. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis suggests that the associations between PTGS polymorphisms and NSAID use on cancer risk may differ with regard to the type of cancer and nationality.

  3. HBV infection increases the risk of pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Hao, Ning-Bo; Hu, Chang-Jiang; Yong, Xin; Lü, Mu-Han; Cheng, Bo-Jun; Zhang, Yao; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is reported to be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (PaC), but it remains controversial whether this is a causal relationship. In addition, it is unclear whether the status of HBV infection also affects PaC risk. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to more closely examine the association between HBV infection and PaC. The studies included in the meta-analysis were identified and retrieved from PubMed and several other databases. The literature search was conducted up until August 2012. We adopted the Cochrane Collaboration's RevMan 5.1 in a combined analysis of pooled relative risk (RR) with their corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects and a fixed-effects model. Nine studies including 6 case-control and 3 cohort studies met eligibility criteria. The meta-analysis showed that the PaC risk was positively correlated with HBV infection when comparing with 'never exposed to HBV' subgroup, the pooled RR was 1.39 (95 % CI 1.22-1.59, p risk of PaC was independent of smoking, alcohol drinking, and diabetes. Findings from this meta-analysis strongly support that HBV infection is associated with an increased risk of PaC.

  4. Overweight, obesity and endometrial cancer risk: results from a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Huaizhen; Yang, Shengjie; Zhang, Jinjun; Qian, Liwei; Chen, Xiaowen

    2014-03-24

    Findings from recent studies suggest that obesity may be associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer, but several earlier studies were less conclusive. Here we strive to estimate this relationship in a meta-analysis of published data. We searched Pubmed and Embase for studies on body mass index and the risk of endometrial cancer, published from 1989 to 2011. Data were independently extracted and analyzed using random or fixed effects meta-analysis depending on the degree of heterogeneity. Seven cohort studies and 11 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the conditions of excess body weight ([EBW] defined as body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m²), obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m²) and overweight (25endometrial cancer (relative risk [RR] for EBW=1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-1.89; for obesity RR=2.54, 95% CI, 2.11-3.06; for overweight RR=1.32, 95% CI, 1.16-1.50). Subgroup analyses showed that the positive associations were independent of study design, geographic locations, self-reported BMI, alcohol use, smoking habit, history of diabetes, hormone therapy, age at menarche, age at menopause, parity, and age at first full term pregnancy. However, there was no statistically significant association between EBW and endometrial cancer risk for measured BMI (for EBW RR=1.29, 95% CI, 0.66-2.53). The findings from this meta-analysis strongly support that the conditions of EBW, overweight, and obesity are all associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Also, the strength of the association increases with increasing BMI.

  5. Diabetes mellitus and risk of thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohwan Yeo

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is an important risk factor for endocrine cancers; however, the association with thyroid cancer is not clear. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify the association between thyroid cancer and DM.We searched MEDLINE, PUBMED and EMBASE databases through July 2012, using search terms related to diabetes mellitus, cancer, and thyroid cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of the risk of incidence of thyroid cancer from pre-existing diabetes. Of 2,123 titles initially identified, sixteen articles met our inclusion criteria. An additional article was identified from a bibliography. Totally, 14 cohort and 3 case-control studies were selected for the meta-analysis. The risks were estimated using random-effects model and sensitivity test for the studies which reported risk estimates and used different definition of DM.Compared with individuals without DM, the patients with DM were at 1.34-fold higher risk for thyroid cancer (95% CI 1.11-1.63. However, there was heterogeneity in the results (p<0.0001. Sensitivity tests and studies judged to be high quality did not show heterogeneity and DM was associated with higher risk for thyroid cancer in these sub-analyses (both of RRs = 1.18, 95% CIs 1.08-1.28. DM was associated with a 1.38-fold increased risk of thyroid cancer in women (95% CI 1.13-1.67 after sensitivity test. Risk of thyroid cancer in men did not remain significant (RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.80-1.53.Compared with their non-diabetic counterparts, women with pre-existing DM have an increased risk of thyroid cancer.

  6. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Tárraga López

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most frequent cancer in men, after lung and prostate cancer, and is the second most frequent cancer in women after breast cancer. It is also the third cause of death in men and women separately, and is the second most frequent cause of death by cancer if both genders are considered together. CRC represents approximately 10% of deaths by cancer. Modifiable risk factors of CRC include smoking, physical inactivity, being overweight and obesity, eating processed meat, and drinking alcohol excessively. CRC screening programs are possible only in economically developed countries. However, attention should be paid in the future to geographical areas with ageing populations and a western lifestyle. 19 , 20 Sigmoidoscopy screening done with people aged 55-64 years has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of CRC by 33% and mortality by CRC by 43%. Objective To assess the effect on the incidence and mortality of CRC diet and lifestyle and to determine the effect of secondary prevention through early diagnosis of CRC. Methodology A comprehensive search of Medline and Pubmed articles related to primary and secondary prevention of CRC and subsequently, a meta-analysis of the same blocks are performed. Results 225 articles related to primary or secondary prevention of CRC were retrieved. Of these 145 were considered valid on meta-analysis: 12 on epidemiology, 56 on diet and lifestyle, and over 77 different screenings for early detection of CRC. Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. There is no doubt whatsoever which environmental factors, probably diet, may account for these cancer rates. Excessive alcohol consumption and cholesterol-rich diet are associated with a high risk of colon cancer. A diet poor in folic acid and vitamin

  7. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed......, and other pathological risk factors. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal...... cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001...

  8. Familial colorectal cancer type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Da Silva, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Heredity is a major cause of colorectal cancer, but although several rare high-risk syndromes have been linked to disease-predisposing mutations, the genetic mechanisms are undetermined in the majority of families suspected of hereditary cancer. We review the clinical presentation, histopathologi...... features, and the genetic and epigenetic profiles of the familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) syndrome with the aim to delineate tumor characteristics that may contribute to refined diagnostics and optimized tumor prevention.......Heredity is a major cause of colorectal cancer, but although several rare high-risk syndromes have been linked to disease-predisposing mutations, the genetic mechanisms are undetermined in the majority of families suspected of hereditary cancer. We review the clinical presentation, histopathologic...

  9. [Prevention of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdrini, Ubaldo Alfredo; Sambuelli, Alicia; Barugel, Mario; Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Avila, Karina Collia

    2005-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in Argentina. The cumulative lifetime risk of developing CRC for both men and women is 4-6%. Despite advances in the management of this disease, the 5-year survival rate is about 60% because only 35% of patients are diagnosed when the disease is localized. Risk factors for CRC include age, diet and life style factors, personal or family history of adenomas or CRC and personal history of inflammatory bowel disease. Scientific evidence shows that primary and secondary prevention, through screening programs, permit to reduce incidence and mortality significantly. Chemopreventive agents, including nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, folate, and calcium, have been shown to have some preventive effect. Physical inactivity and excess body weight are consistent risk factors for CRC. Tobacco exposure, diet high in red meat and low in vegetables and alcohol consumption, probably in combination with a diet low in folate, appear to increase risk. The dietary fiber and risk of CRC has been studied but the results are still inconclusive. Screening for CRC is cost-effective compared with no screening, but a single optimal strategy cannot be determined from the currently available data. The advantages and disadvantages or limitations of screening modalities for CRC are analyzed. The literature and clinical practice guidelines are reviewed, with an emphasis on advances and evolving screening methods and recommendations for patients with average, moderate and high-risk CRC.

  10. Molecular biology in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Manuel; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo

    2006-06-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease. Colorectal cancer is probably the type of cancer for which the most is known about the genes affected by cancer-causing mutations, their normal functions and their carcinogenic effects when mutated. Most cancer-causing mutations are somatic, occurring in the affected tissue during the course of carcinogenesis. However, most cancers also have a hereditary component that is caused by predisposing mutations that affect the germline, are heritable and contribute to the initiation of carcinogenesis. High-penetrance mutations confer predisposition to colorectal cancer mainly in Lynch syndrome (which involves mutations in mismatch-repair genes) and in familial adenomatous polyposis (which involves mutations in the APC tumour suppressor). Together, these conditions account for 5% or less of all cases of colorectal cancer. Low-penetrance mutations account for a high proportion of all the attributable risk of colorectal cancer, in both familial and sporadic cases. These mutations are more difficult to identify, but mainly due to the implementation of association studies, are increasingly being detected and characterized. The identification of both high- and low-penetrance mutations contributes significantly to our understanding of the molecular genetic processes occurring in cancer. This understanding facilitates the development of therapeutic drugs and preventive strategies.

  11. Dendritic cell based tumor vaccination in prostate and renal cell cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Draube, Andreas; Klein-González, Nela; Mattheus, Stefanie; Brillant, Corinne; Hellmich, Martin; Engert, Andreas; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael

    2011-01-01

    .... Prostate and renal cell cancer (RCC) have been extensively studied for DC-based immunotherapeutic interventions and were therefore chosen to address the above question by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis...

  12. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in qualitative diagnosis of sentinel lymph node metastasis in breast cancer: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xia Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Our meta-analysis suggests that CEUS may have high a diagnostic accuracy in testing for metastatic SLN in breast cancer. Thus, CEUS may be a good tool for differential diagnosis between metastatic and non-metastatic SLN.

  13. Milk Consumption and Mortality from All Causes, Cardiovascular Disease, and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larsson, Susanna C; Crippa, Alessio; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja; Michaëlsson, Karl

    2015-01-01

    .... We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies assessing the association of non-fermented and fermented milk consumption with mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer...

  14. Diabetes mellitus and breast cancer outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peairs, Kimberly S; Barone, Bethany B; Snyder, Claire F; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Stein, Kelly B; Derr, Rachel L; Brancati, Frederick L; Wolff, Antonio C

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the effect of pre-existing diabetes on breast cancer-related outcomes. We searched EMBASE and MEDLINE databases from inception through July 1, 2009, using search terms related to diabetes mellitus, cancer, and prognostic outcome. Studies were included if they reported a prognostic outcome by diabetes status, evaluated a cancer population, and contained original data published in the English language. We performed a meta-analysis of pre-existing diabetes and its effect on all-cause mortality in patients with breast cancer and qualitatively summarized other prognostic outcomes. Of 8,828 titles identified, eight articles met inclusion/exclusion criteria and described outcomes in patients with breast cancer and diabetes. Pre-existing diabetes was significantly associated with all-cause mortality in six of seven studies. In a meta-analysis, patients with breast cancer and diabetes had a significantly higher all-cause mortality risk (pooled hazard ratio [HR], 1.49; 95% CI, 1.35 to 1.65) compared with their nondiabetic counterparts. Three of four studies found pre-existing diabetes to be associated with more advanced stage at presentation. Diabetes was also associated with altered regimens for breast cancer treatment and increased toxicity from chemotherapy. Compared with their nondiabetic counterparts, patients with breast cancer and pre-existing diabetes have a greater risk of death and tend to present at later stages and receive altered treatment regimens. Studies are needed to investigate pathophysiologic interactions between diabetes and breast cancer and determine whether improvements in diabetes care can reduce mortality in patients with breast cancer.

  15. Association between alcohol consumption and cancers in the Chinese population--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption is increasing worldwide and is associated with numerous cancers. This systematic review examined the role of alcohol in the incidence of cancer in the Chinese population. METHODS: Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, CNKI and VIP were searched to identify relevant studies. Cohort and case-control studies on the effect of alcohol use on cancers in Chinese were included. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Data were independently abstracted by two reviewers. Odds ratios (OR or relative risks (RR were pooled using RevMan 5.0. Heterogeneity was evaluated using the Q test and I-squared statistic. P<.01 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Pooled results from cohort studies indicated that alcohol consumption was not associated with gastric cancer, esophageal cancers (EC or lung cancer. Meta-analysis of case-control studies showed that alcohol consumption was a significant risk factor for five cancers; the pooled ORs were 1.79 (99% CI, 1.47-2.17 EC, 1.40 (99% CI, 1.19-1.64 gastric cancer, 1.56 (99% CI, 1.16-2.09 hepatocellular carcinoma, 1.21 (99% CI, 1.00-1.46 nasopharyngeal cancer and 1.71 (99% CI, 1.20-2.44 oral cancer. Pooled ORs of the case-control studies showed that alcohol consumption was protective for female breast cancer and gallbladder cancer: OR 0.76 (99% CI, 0.60-0.97 and 0.70 (99% CI, 0.49-1.00 respectively. There was no significant correlation between alcohol consumption and lung cancer, colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, cancer of the ampulla of Vater, prostate cancer or extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Combined results of case-control and cohort studies showed that alcohol consumption was associated with 1.78- and 1.40-fold higher risks of EC and gastric cancer but was not significantly associated with lung cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Health programs focused on limiting alcohol intake may be important for cancer control in China. Further studies are needed to examine the

  16. Association between alcohol consumption and cancers in the Chinese population--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Yang, Huan; Cao, Jia

    2011-04-15

    Alcohol consumption is increasing worldwide and is associated with numerous cancers. This systematic review examined the role of alcohol in the incidence of cancer in the Chinese population. Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, CNKI and VIP were searched to identify relevant studies. Cohort and case-control studies on the effect of alcohol use on cancers in Chinese were included. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Data were independently abstracted by two reviewers. Odds ratios (OR) or relative risks (RR) were pooled using RevMan 5.0. Heterogeneity was evaluated using the Q test and I-squared statistic. Palcohol consumption was not associated with gastric cancer, esophageal cancers (EC) or lung cancer. Meta-analysis of case-control studies showed that alcohol consumption was a significant risk factor for five cancers; the pooled ORs were 1.79 (99% CI, 1.47-2.17) EC, 1.40 (99% CI, 1.19-1.64) gastric cancer, 1.56 (99% CI, 1.16-2.09) hepatocellular carcinoma, 1.21 (99% CI, 1.00-1.46) nasopharyngeal cancer and 1.71 (99% CI, 1.20-2.44) oral cancer. Pooled ORs of the case-control studies showed that alcohol consumption was protective for female breast cancer and gallbladder cancer: OR 0.76 (99% CI, 0.60-0.97) and 0.70 (99% CI, 0.49-1.00) respectively. There was no significant correlation between alcohol consumption and lung cancer, colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, cancer of the ampulla of Vater, prostate cancer or extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Combined results of case-control and cohort studies showed that alcohol consumption was associated with 1.78- and 1.40-fold higher risks of EC and gastric cancer but was not significantly associated with lung cancer. Health programs focused on limiting alcohol intake may be important for cancer control in China. Further studies are needed to examine the interaction between alcohol consumption and other risk factors for cancers in Chinese and other populations.

  17. Psychological treatments to improve quality of life in cancer contexts: A meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    de la Torre-Luque, Alejandro; Gambara, Hilda; López, Escarlata; Cruzado, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effects of psychological treatments on quality of life among cancer patients and survivors. Additionally, it was explored the moderating influence of some medical- and treatment-related features on these effects. Scientific studies published between 1970 and 2012 were analyzed. Seventy-eight studies were included in a meta-analysis. Concerns related to samples, interventions, and standard of methodological evidence were explored across the studies. A signifi...

  18. Brain metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagn-Hansen, Chris Aksel; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2001-01-01

    Brain metastases from colorectal cancer are rare. The prognosis for patients with even a single resectable brain metastasis is poor. A case of surgically treated cerebral metastasis from a rectal carcinoma is reported. The brain tumour was radically resected. However, cerebral, as well...... as extracerebral, disease recurred 12 months after diagnosis. Surgical removal of colorectal metastatic brain lesions in selected cases results in a longer survival time....

  19. Overweight, obesity and gastric cancer risk: results from a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Chen, Bo; Wan, Hong-Wei; Jia, Gui-Qing; Bai, Hai-Long; Wu, Xiao-Ting

    2009-11-01

    The relationship between excess body weight and gastric cancer risk has not been well studied to date. We therefore carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of published cohort studies to evaluate the association between excess body weight and gastric cancer risk. An electronic search of the MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE and Academic Search Premier (EBSCO) databases, which contain articles published from 1950 onwards, was conducted in order to select studies for this meta-analysis. Ten studies with a total number of 9492 gastric cancer cases and a studied population of 3,097,794 were identified. Overall, excess body weight [body mass index (BMI)25] was associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer [odds ratio (OR)=1.22; 95% confidence intervals (CIs)=1.06-1.41]. Specifically, a stratified analysis showed that excess body weight was associated with an increased risk of cardia gastric cancer [overweight and obese (BMI 25), OR=1.55, 95% CIs=1.31-1.84] and gastric cancer among non-Asians (overweight and obese, OR=1.24, 95% CIs=1.14-1.36); however, the stratified analysis also showed that there was no statistically significant link between excess body weight and gastric cancer in the following subgroups: males (overweight and obese, OR=1.22, 95% CIs=0.96-1.55), females (overweight and obese, OR=1.13, 95% CIs=0.65-1.94), non-cardia gastric cancer (overweight and obese, OR=1.18, 95% CIs=0.96-1.45) and Asians (overweight and obese, OR=1.17, 95% CIs=0.88-1.56). The combined results of this meta-analysis, however, do indicate that overweight and obesity are associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. The strength of the association also increases with increasing BMI.

  20. Living near nuclear power plants and thyroid cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Young [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Ye Jin; Ee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    There has been public concern regarding the safety of residing near nuclear power plants, and the extent of risk for thyroid cancer among adults living near nuclear power plants has not been fully explored. In the present study, a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was conducted to investigate the association between living near nuclear power plants and the risk of thyroid cancer. Our study does not support an association between living near nuclear power plants and risk of thyroid cancer but does support a need for well designed future studies given the conflicting results from sensitivity analysis.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); A.B. Knudsen (Amy); H. Brenner (Hermann)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer is an important public health problem. Several screening methods have been shown to be effective in reducing colorectal cancer mortality. The objective of this review was to assess the cost-effectiveness of the different colorectal cancer screening methods and to

  2. Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Heidi; Kennedy, Deborah; Fergusson, Dean; Fernandes, Rochelle; Cooley, Kieran; Seely, Andrew; Sagar, Stephen; Wong, Raimond; Seely, Dugald

    2011-01-01

    Background Selenium is a natural health product widely used in the treatment and prevention of lung cancers, but large chemoprevention trials have yielded conflicting results. We conducted a systematic review of selenium for lung cancers, and assessed potential interactions with conventional therapies. Methods and Findings Two independent reviewers searched six databases from inception to March 2009 for evidence pertaining to the safety and efficacy of selenium for lung cancers. Pubmed and EMBASE were searched to October 2009 for evidence on interactions with chemo- or radiation-therapy. In the efficacy analysis there were nine reports of five RCTs and two biomarker-based studies, 29 reports of 26 observational studies, and 41 preclinical studies. Fifteen human studies, one case report, and 36 preclinical studies were included in the interactions analysis. Based on available evidence, there appears to be a different chemopreventive effect dependent on baseline selenium status, such that selenium supplementation may reduce risk of lung cancers in populations with lower baseline selenium status (serumselenium (≥121.6 ng/mL). Pooling data from two trials yielded no impact to odds of lung cancer, OR 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.61–1.43); other cancers that were the primary endpoints of these trials, OR 1.51 (95%CI 0.70–3.24); and all-cause-death, OR 0.93 (95%CI 0.79–1.10). In the treatment of lung cancers, selenium may reduce cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and side effects associated with radiation therapy. Conclusions Selenium may be effective for lung cancer prevention among individuals with lower selenium status, but at present should not be used as a general strategy for lung cancer prevention. Although promising, more evidence on the ability of selenium to reduce cisplatin and radiation therapy toxicity is required to ensure that therapeutic efficacy is maintained before any broad clinical recommendations can be made in this context. PMID:22073154

  3. Colorectal Cancer Awareness and Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-06

    An oncologist (cancer doctor) shares her medical and personal advice for people between the ages of 50 and 75 about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 4/6/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2017.

  4. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could...

  5. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  6. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could ...

  7. A Bayesian network meta-analysis on second-line systemic therapy in advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofu; Ko, Yoo-Joung; Berry, Scott; Shah, Keya; Lee, Esther; Chan, Kelvin

    2017-07-01

    It is unclear which regimen is the most efficacious among the available therapies for advanced gastric cancer in the second-line setting. We performed a network meta-analysis to determine their relative benefits. We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) through the MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases and American Society of Clinical Oncology abstracts up to June 2014 to identify phase III RCTs on advanced gastric cancer in the second-line setting. Overall survival (OS) data were the primary outcome of interest. Hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted from the publications on the basis of reported values or were extracted from survival curves by established methods. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed with WinBUGS to compare all regimens simultaneously. Eight RCTs (2439 patients) were identified and contained extractable data for quantitative analysis. Network meta-analysis showed that paclitaxel plus ramucirumab was superior to single-agent ramucirumab [OS HR 0.51, 95 % credible region (CR) 0.30-0.86], paclitaxel (OS HR 0.81, 95 % CR 0.68-0.96), docetaxel (OS HR 0.56, 95 % CR 0.33-0.94), and irinotecan (OS HR 0.71, 95 % CR 0.52-0.99). Paclitaxel plus ramucirumab also had an 89 % probability of being the best regimen among all these regimens. Single-agent ramucirumab, paclitaxel, docetaxel, and irinotecan were comparable to each other with respect to OS and were superior to best supportive care. This is the first network meta-analysis to compare all second-line regimens reported in phase III gastric cancer trials. The results suggest the paclitaxel plus ramucirumab combination is the most effective therapy and should be the reference regimen for future comparative trials.

  8. Prognostic value of endocan expression in cancers: evidence from meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang X

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Xing Huang,1,* Chen Chen,2,* Xin Wang,3,* Jing-yuan Zhang,1 Bin-hui Ren,3,4 Da-wei Ma,1 Lei Xia,1 Xin-yu Xu,1 Lin Xu3,4 1Department of Pathology, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, 2Second Clinical College of Nanjing Medical University, 3Department of Thoracic Surgery, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, 4Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Translational Cancer Research, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Endocan is a 50 kDa dermatan sulfate proteoglycan. Numerous previous studies have indicated that endocan might be an attractive prognostic tumor biomarker. However, the results of different studies are inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to explore the association between endocan expression and cancer prognosis. A systematic, comprehensive search of the PubMed, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases was performed. Expression of endocan and its association with overall survival were evaluated by pooled hazard ratios (HRs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs. In total, 15 eligible studies of 1,464 patients were finally included in this meta-analysis. A significant association was found between elevated endocan expression and poorer overall survival (pooled HR: 2.48, 95% CI: 2.12–2.90, P<0.001. In the cancer-type subgroup, significant associations were detected for gastrointestinal (HR: 2.27, 95% CI: 1.77–2.91, P<0.001 and hepatocellular (HR: 2.61, 95% CI: 1.96–3.48, P<0.001 carcinoma. Our results demonstrate that endocan could be useful to exploit as a novel prognostic biomarker for patients with cancer. Keywords: endocan, ESM-1, biomarker, cancer, prognosis, meta-analysis 

  9. Effect of Body Mass Index on Overall Survival of Pancreatic Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu-Qi; Yang, Jing; Du, Peng; Xu, Ting; Zhuang, Xiao-Hui; Shen, Jia-Qing; Xu, Chun-Fang

    2016-04-01

    Although obesity has been identified as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the important question of whether obesity influences the prognosis of pancreatic cancer has not been explicated thoroughly. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and survival outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer.Studies that described the relationship between BMI and overall survival (OS) of pancreatic cancer were searched in PubMed, Embase, Ovid, and Cochrane Library Databases from the earliest available date to May 12, 2015. Hazard ratios (HRs) for OS in each BMI category from individual studies were extracted and pooled by a random-effect model. Dose-response meta-analysis was also performed to estimate summary HR and 95% confidence interval (CI) for every 5-unit increment. Publication bias was evaluated by Begg funnel plot and Egger linear regression test.Ten relevant studies involving 6801 patients were finally included in the meta-analysis. Results showed that obesity in adulthood significantly shortened OS of pancreatic cancer patients (HR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.17-1.41), whereas obesity at diagnosis was not associated with any increased risk of death (HR: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.78-1.42). For every 5-kg/m increment in adult BMI, the summary HR was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.05-1.18) for death risk of pancreatic cancer. However, no dose-response relationship was found in the BMI at diagnosis. Egger regression test and Begg funnel plot both revealed no obvious risk of publication bias.In conclusion, increased adult BMI is associated with increased risk of death for pancreatic cancer patients, which suggested that obesity in adulthood may be an important prognostic factor that indicates an abbreviated survival from pancreatic cancer. More studies are needed to validate this finding, and the mechanism behind the observation should be evaluated in further studies.

  10. A meta-analysis of the association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua-Feng, X; Yue-Ming, W; Hong, L; Junyi, D

    2015-12-01

    The association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and lung cancer risk was not clear with small number of cases in each study. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the correlation between pneumonia infection and lung cancer risk by pooling the open published papers. We searched the electronic databases of Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases for publications related to the association between pneumonia infection and lung cancer risk. Odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was used to assess the correlation. The data were pooled by Stata 11.0 software (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA). Thirteen publications, involving 2549 lung cancer patients and 2764 controls were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results indicated that the C. pneumoniae infection significant increased the risk of lung cancer OR = 2.07 (95% CI: 1.43-2.99) by random effect model. And for serum IgG, 12 publications reported the IgG positive rate in lung cancer patients and relative healthy controls. The pooled OR was 2.22 (95% CI: 1.41-3.50) by using the random effects model which indicated that the IgG positive rate was significantly higher in lung cancer patients than that of healthy controls. The sensitivity analysis indicated the pooled OR was not sensitive to a single study. However, Begger's funnel plot and Egger's line regression analysis indicated significant publications bias for this meta-analysis. According to the present published data, C. pneumoniae infection may increase the risk of lung cancer. However, for its significant publications and heterogeneity among the included studies, the conclusion should be interpreted cautiously.

  11. Diagnostic X-Ray Exposure and Thyroid Cancer Risk: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mi Ah; Kim, Jin Hwa

    2017-12-22

    Radiation exposure is a well-known risk factor for thyroid cancer. However, the specific effects of diagnostic radiation exposure on thyroid cancer risk are controversial. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effects of diagnostic radiation exposure on thyroid cancer risk. The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched to identify eligible studies. Summary odds ratio (OR) estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) were used to compute the risk of thyroid cancer using fixed- and random-effects models. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the potential heterogeneity. Nine studies from 12 publications were included in the meta-analysis. Overall exposure to diagnostic radiation exposure was associated with a significantly increased thyroid cancer risk (OR = 1.52 [CI 1.13-2.04]). The subgroup and sensitivity analyses revealed similar results. By type of exposure, exposure to computed tomography scans (OR = 1.46 [CI 1.27-1.68]) or dental x-rays (OR = 1.69 [CI 1.17-2.44]) were associated with an increased thyroid cancer risk. Head and neck (OR = 1.31 [CI 1.02-1.69]) and chest (OR = 1.71 [CI 1.09-2.69]) exposure to diagnostic radiation was associated with an increased thyroid cancer risk. The results of this meta-analysis indicate that diagnostic radiation exposure is associated with an increased thyroid cancer risk. Therefore, to the extent that it will not compromise the information being sought, radiation exposure to the thyroid should be minimized during diagnostic examinations.

  12. Safety of pregnancy after surgical treatment for breast cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Zeng, Jian; Li, Fu; He, Liusheng; Li, Tiangang

    2014-10-01

    Because of the rising trend of delayed pregnancies, more and more women remain nulliparous at the diagnosis of breast cancer, and approximately 71% of them desire to conceive after breast cancer treatment. Advances in breast cancer screening have made early diagnosis of breast cancer possible, and many patients have the opportunity to be treated by surgery. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of pregnancy on patient survival and prognosis after surgical treatment for breast cancer. An electronic search was performed in MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, and Web of Science to identify potentially eligible studies published before August 2013. Both fixed-effect and random-effect models were used to calculate the pooled relative risk (PRR). The Q test and I(2) statistics were used to assess the heterogeneity among the studies. A total of 5 studies were included in our meta-analysis. Five hundred fifty-four patients who become pregnant after surgical treatment for breast cancer were compared with a control group of 2354 patients for overall survival (OS). Our analysis demonstrated that pregnancy after surgical treatment for breast cancer had a significant beneficial effect on OS (PRR, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.95). The disease-free survival outcome also favored patients in the pregnancy group (PRR, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-1.08). This meta-analysis indicates that pregnancy after surgical treatment does not increase the risk of breast cancer recurrence and may actually improve OS.

  13. Vitamin D and Lung Cancer Risk: A Comprehensive Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Liqun Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Vitamin D has been suggested to have important roles against cancer development. There were several published studies on the association between vitamin D and lung cancer risk, but not conclusive results were available. Methods: To clarify the role of vitamin D in lung carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature and a meta-analysis to evaluate the association of serum vitamin D levels and dietary vitamin D intake with lung cancer risk. Twelve studies (9 prospective cohort and 3 nested case-control studies with a total of 288,778 individuals were included. The summary relative risk (RR with 95% confidence interval (CI was used to assess lung cancer risk. Results: Meta-analysis of total 12 studies showed that RR for the association of high vitamin D status with lung cancer was 0.84 (95%CI 0.78-0.90, P Conclusion: Current data suggest an inverse association between serum vitamin D and lung cancer risk. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of vitamin D intake on lung cancer risk and to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation can prevent lung cancer.

  14. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in endometrial cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Svahn, Malene Frøsig; Faber, Mette Tuxen; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Junge, Jette; Norrild, Bodil; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2014-07-01

    HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the pooled prevalence of HPV DNA in endometrial cancer. Using meta-regression, we further analyzed whether factors such as geographical region, HPV DNA detection method, publication year and tissue type were associated with HPV prevalence. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for studies providing data on HPV prevalence in cases with endometrial cancer and in controls with normal or hyperplastic endometrial tissue. We identified 28 papers (29 studies) examining the prevalence of HPV DNA in tumor tissue from endometrial cancer comprising altogether 1026 cases of endometrial cancer. The HPV prevalence varied considerably from 0% to 61.1%. From the random effects meta-analysis, the pooled prevalence of HPV DNA in endometrial cancer was 10.0% (95% CI: 5.2-16.2) with large between-study heterogeneity (I(2)=88.2%, pendometrial cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Selenium and lung cancer: a systematic review and meta analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Fritz

    Full Text Available Selenium is a natural health product widely used in the treatment and prevention of lung cancers, but large chemoprevention trials have yielded conflicting results. We conducted a systematic review of selenium for lung cancers, and assessed potential interactions with conventional therapies.Two independent reviewers searched six databases from inception to March 2009 for evidence pertaining to the safety and efficacy of selenium for lung cancers. Pubmed and EMBASE were searched to October 2009 for evidence on interactions with chemo- or radiation-therapy. In the efficacy analysis there were nine reports of five RCTs and two biomarker-based studies, 29 reports of 26 observational studies, and 41 preclinical studies. Fifteen human studies, one case report, and 36 preclinical studies were included in the interactions analysis. Based on available evidence, there appears to be a different chemopreventive effect dependent on baseline selenium status, such that selenium supplementation may reduce risk of lung cancers in populations with lower baseline selenium status (serum<106 ng/mL, but increase risk of lung cancers in those with higher selenium (≥ 121.6 ng/mL. Pooling data from two trials yielded no impact to odds of lung cancer, OR 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.61-1.43; other cancers that were the primary endpoints of these trials, OR 1.51 (95%CI 0.70-3.24; and all-cause-death, OR 0.93 (95%CI 0.79-1.10. In the treatment of lung cancers, selenium may reduce cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and side effects associated with radiation therapy.Selenium may be effective for lung cancer prevention among individuals with lower selenium status, but at present should not be used as a general strategy for lung cancer prevention. Although promising, more evidence on the ability of selenium to reduce cisplatin and radiation therapy toxicity is required to ensure that therapeutic efficacy is maintained before any broad clinical recommendations can be made in

  16. Extralevator abdominoperineal excision for low rectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the short-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Sun, T; Xie, H; Zhang, Y; Zeng, H; Fu, W

    2015-06-01

    The superiority of extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE) over conventional abdominoperineal excision (APE) remains controversial, despite the publication of many studies on this issue. The aim of this meta-analysis was to provide a clear, evidence-based comparison of the two procedures. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted through a comprehensive search of the PubMed, EMBASE/Medline and Cochrane Central Library databases for all studies comparing ELAPE with conventional APE for low rectal cancer. Pooled data on circumferential resection margin (CRM) positivity, intra-operative bowel perforation, perineal wound complications and local recurrence were analysed. Seven studies, involving a total of 2672 patients, were included. Analysis of the pooled data did not reveal a significant difference between the two operations regarding CRM positivity [risk ratio (RR) = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.40-1.57; P = 0.50, I(2)  = 86%] and perineal wound complications (RR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.71-1.16; P = 0.44, I(2)  = 49%), and showed a borderline reduced risk of intra-operative bowel perforation for ELAPE, but still did not reveal a significant difference between the two groups (RR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.37-1.00; P = 0.05, I(2)  = 58%). The current evidence does not indicate a statistically significant superiority of ELAPE over conventional APE in terms of CRM positivity and intra-operative bowel perforation. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  17. Association among Dietary Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses and Ovarian Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ruxu; Yang, Yu; Liao, Jing; Chen, Dongsheng; Yu, Lixiu

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have indicated that intake of dietary flavonoids or flavonoid subclasses is associated with the ovarian cancer risk, but presented controversial results. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of these associations. Methods We performed a search in PubMed, Google Scholar and ISI Web of Science from their inception to April 25, 2015 to select studies on the association among dietary flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses and ovarian cancer risk. The information was extracted by two independent authors. We assessed the heterogeneity, sensitivity, publication bias and quality of the articles. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates. Results Five cohort studies and seven case-control studies were included in the final meta-analysis. We observed that intake of dietary flavonoids can decrease ovarian cancer risk, which was demonstrated by pooled RR (RR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68–0.98). In a subgroup analysis by flavonoid subtypes, the ovarian cancer risk was also decreased for isoflavones (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.50–0.92) and flavonols (RR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.58–0.80). While there was no compelling evidence that consumption of flavones (RR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.71–1.03) could decrease ovarian cancer risk, which revealed part sources of heterogeneity. The sensitivity analysis indicated stable results, and no publication bias was observed based on the results of Funnel plot analysis and Egger’s test (p = 0.26). Conclusions This meta-analysis suggested that consumption of dietary flavonoids and subtypes (isoflavones, flavonols) has a protective effect against ovarian cancer with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer except for flavones consumption. Nevertheless, further investigations on a larger population covering more flavonoid subclasses are warranted. PMID:26960146

  18. Calcium Intake and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xingxing; Li, Zongyao; Ji, Xinqiang; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2017-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between calcium intake and the risk of ovarian cancer. However, the results of these studies remain controversial. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to explore the association between calcium intake and the risk of ovarian cancer. Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science were searched for eligible publications up to April 2017. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the random-effects model. Small-study effect was estimated using Egger’s test and the funnel plot. Among 15 epidemiological studies involving 493,415 participants and 7453 cases eligible for this meta-analysis, 13 studies were about dietary calcium intake, 4 studies about dairy calcium intake and 7 studies about dietary plus supplemental calcium intake. When comparing the highest with the lowest intake, the pooled RRs of ovarian cancer were 0.80 (95% CI 0.72–0.89) for dietary calcium, 0.80 (95% CI 0.66–0.98) for dairy calcium and 0.90 (95% CI 0.65–1.24) for dietary plus supplemental calcium, respectively. Dietary calcium was significantly associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among cohort studies (RR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.74–0.99) and among case-control studies (RR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.64–0.89). In subgroup analysis by ovarian cancer subtypes, we found a statistically significant association between the dietary calcium (RR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.69–0.88) and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). This meta-analysis indicated that increased calcium intake might be inversely associated with the risk of ovarian cancer; this still needs to be confirmed by larger prospective cohort studies. PMID:28665326

  19. Association among Dietary Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses and Ovarian Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xiaoli; Yu, Lili; You, Ruxu; Yang, Yu; Liao, Jing; Chen, Dongsheng; Yu, Lixiu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that intake of dietary flavonoids or flavonoid subclasses is associated with the ovarian cancer risk, but presented controversial results. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of these associations. We performed a search in PubMed, Google Scholar and ISI Web of Science from their inception to April 25, 2015 to select studies on the association among dietary flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses and ovarian cancer risk. The information was extracted by two independent authors. We assessed the heterogeneity, sensitivity, publication bias and quality of the articles. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates. Five cohort studies and seven case-control studies were included in the final meta-analysis. We observed that intake of dietary flavonoids can decrease ovarian cancer risk, which was demonstrated by pooled RR (RR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68-0.98). In a subgroup analysis by flavonoid subtypes, the ovarian cancer risk was also decreased for isoflavones (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.50-0.92) and flavonols (RR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.58-0.80). While there was no compelling evidence that consumption of flavones (RR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.71-1.03) could decrease ovarian cancer risk, which revealed part sources of heterogeneity. The sensitivity analysis indicated stable results, and no publication bias was observed based on the results of Funnel plot analysis and Egger's test (p = 0.26). This meta-analysis suggested that consumption of dietary flavonoids and subtypes (isoflavones, flavonols) has a protective effect against ovarian cancer with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer except for flavones consumption. Nevertheless, further investigations on a larger population covering more flavonoid subclasses are warranted.

  20. Obstructive sleep apnoea and the incidence and mortality of cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Peng, Li-Hong; Lyu, Zhi; Jiang, Xing-Tang; Du, Yan-Ping

    2017-03-01

    As there are conflicting reports regarding the association between obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and cancer incidence and mortality, a meta-analysis was performed to evaluate whether OSA is independently associated with cancer incidence and mortality. Pubmed, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched up until November 2014. Studies that assessed OSA and the future risk of cancer incidence or mortality were included. Pooled hazard ratios (HR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Subgroup analysis was conducted based on the polysomnographic variable, apnoea-hypopnoea index. Six studies, which involved 114 105 participants, were pooled in this meta-analysis. Fixed-effects analysis showed the pooled adjusted HR of cancer incidence as 0.91 (95% CI, 0.74-1.13; P = 0.408) for mild OSA, 1.07 (95% CI, 0.86-1.33; P = 0.552) for moderate OSA and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.85-1.26; P = 0.743) for severe OSA. Random-effects analysis demonstrated neither mild OSA (adjusted HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.46-1.34; P = 0.381), moderate OSA (adjusted HR, 1.92; 95% CI, 0.63-5.88; P = 0.251) nor severe OSA (adjusted HR, 2.09; 95% CI, 0.45-9.81; P = 0.349) correlated with cancer mortality. This meta-analysis indicates that OSA is not independently associated with cancer incidence and mortality according to currently available data. Additional experimental and human research is required to determine the exact association between OSA and cancer. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Calcium Intake and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Song

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Several epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between calcium intake and the risk of ovarian cancer. However, the results of these studies remain controversial. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to explore the association between calcium intake and the risk of ovarian cancer. Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science were searched for eligible publications up to April 2017. Pooled relative risks (RRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using the random-effects model. Small-study effect was estimated using Egger’s test and the funnel plot. Among 15 epidemiological studies involving 493,415 participants and 7453 cases eligible for this meta-analysis, 13 studies were about dietary calcium intake, 4 studies about dairy calcium intake and 7 studies about dietary plus supplemental calcium intake. When comparing the highest with the lowest intake, the pooled RRs of ovarian cancer were 0.80 (95% CI 0.72–0.89 for dietary calcium, 0.80 (95% CI 0.66–0.98 for dairy calcium and 0.90 (95% CI 0.65–1.24 for dietary plus supplemental calcium, respectively. Dietary calcium was significantly associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among cohort studies (RR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.74–0.99 and among case-control studies (RR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.64–0.89. In subgroup analysis by ovarian cancer subtypes, we found a statistically significant association between the dietary calcium (RR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.69–0.88 and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. This meta-analysis indicated that increased calcium intake might be inversely associated with the risk of ovarian cancer; this still needs to be confirmed by larger prospective cohort studies.

  2. Diabetes mellitus and risk of pancreatic cancer: A meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Qiwen; Xu, Maojin; Ning, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jun; Hong, Shangyou; Huang, Wen; Zhang, Huagao; Li, Zhaoshen

    2011-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is widely considered to be associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (PaC), however, whether DM is a cause or a consequence of PaC is still controversial. We examined this association by conducting a detailed meta-analysis of cohort studies. Studies were identified by searching Medline and Embase through November 30, 2010. Summary relative risks (RRs) with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. A total of thirty-five cohort studies were included in this meta-analysis. DM was associated with an increased risk of PaC (the summary RRs=1.94; 95% CI, 1.66-2.27), with significant evidence of heterogeneity among these studies (palcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI) and smoking status. In addition, the relative risk of PaC was correlated negatively with the duration of DM, with the highest risk of PaC found among patients diagnosed within less than 1 year. There was no significant publication bias (p=0.136 for Egger's regression asymmetry test). Findings from this meta-analysis strongly support that diabetes is associated with an increased risk of PaC in both males and females and that DM is both an early manifestation and an etiologic factor of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Defunctioning stoma in low anterior resection for rectal cancer: a meta- analysis of five recent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Dao-Rong; Yu, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Ze-Kun; Wang, Liu-Hua; Li, Yong-Kun

    2012-09-01

    The necessity of a defunctioning stoma in low anterior resection with total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer remains controversial. This meta-analysis evaluates the advantages of prophylactic stomas in patients undergoing low anterior resection and assesses postoperative outcomes of patients with or without a defunctioning stoma. Studies and relevant literatures regarding the formation of defunctioning stomas after low anterior resection were searched through PubMed and Embase. The rates of anastomotic leakage and re-operation related to leakage with or without defunctioning stoma were pooled and compared using a meta-analysis. The risk ratios were calculated with 95% confidence intervals to evaluate the influence of defunctioning stomas. Five recent studies including 878 patients in total were included in this meta-analysis. These studies demonstrated that defunctioning stomas significantly reduced the rate of postoperative anastomotic leakage and reoperation after low anterior resection, the pooled risk ratio was 0.34 (95% CI=0.22-0.53, pstomas can be useful to minimize the rate of anastomotic leakage and re-operation related to leakage. Furthermore, anorectal function was not affected. However, the influence of a defunctioning stoma on long-term mortality and the quality of life in patients treated for rectal cancer is inconclusive.

  4. Effects of resistance exercise in prostate cancer patients: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilani, M; Hasenoehrl, T; Baumann, L; Ristl, R; Schwarz, M; Marhold, M; Sedghi Komandj, T; Crevenna, R

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present meta-analysis was to quantify effects of resistance exercise (RE) on physical performance and function, body composition, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and fatigue in patients with prostate cancer. Trial data were obtained from the databases PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Library as of inception to 31st of December 2016. Thirty-two trials with 1199 patients were included. Results that were measured by using the same assessment method in five or more of the original studies were pooled in a meta-analysis. Pooled studies showed significant improvements of muscular strength in the upper and lower body (95% CI [2.52, 7.97] kg; p time was significant (95% CI [-21.55, -14.65] s; p best patient outcomes.

  5. The association between two microRNA variants (miR-499, miR-149 and gastrointestinal cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNA molecules that regulate the expression of corresponding messenger RNAs (mRNAs. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in miRNAs may contribute to cancer susceptibility due to changes in the microRNA's properties and/or maturation. The present study aimed to investigate the association between two miRNA polymorphisms (miR-499 rs3746444 and miR-149 rs2292832 and gastrointestinal (GI cancer risk. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a search of case-control studies in PubMed, Wiley Online Library, Web of Science and the CNKI database. Eleven rs3746444 studies and six rs2292832 studies were included in our meta-analysis. The only obvious association between the miR-499 polymorphism and colorectal cancer susceptibility was found in the homozygote comparison (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.02-2.70, P(h = 0.10, P = 0.04. No significant association was found in the subgroup analysis for ethnicity and risk of hepatocellular and gastric cancer. A marginally elevated GI cancer risk was discovered in the recessive model for miR-149 (TT vs. TC+CC: OR = 1.15, 95% CI: 1.03-1.30, P(h = 0.68, P = 0.02. Stratifying the results by ethnicity revealed a slight association between the recessive model and the Asian population (TT vs. TC+CC: OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.29, P(h = 0.79, P = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present meta-analysis indicates that miR-499 may be associated with the risk to colorectal cancer. MiR-149 may confer a marginally increased risk of susceptibility to gastrointestinal cancer, especially for Asians.

  6. Association of APE1 Gene Asp148Glu Variant with Digestive Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Zou, Jing; Mi, Jia; Wei, Xiaodan; Zhao, Dongmei; Zhang, Shuping; Tian, Geng

    2015-08-21

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1 (APE1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in DNA base excision repair and has been implicated in carcinogenesis. In this study, we summarize available data to examine the susceptibility of APE1 gene Asp148Glu variant to digestive cancer via a meta-analysis. Study selection and data abstraction were conducted independently by 2 authors. Random-effects model was utilized to pool effect estimates. Heterogeneity and publication bias were addressed. Sixteen articles involving 4916 digestive cancer patients and 7748 controls were qualified for this meta-analysis. Overall association showed an indicative association between Asp148Glu variant and digestive cancer under allelic (odds ratio or OR=1.11; 95% confidence interval or CI: 0.99-1.25; P=0.074) and dominant (OR=1.18; 95% CI: 1.00-1.40; P=0.056) models, with strong evidence of heterogeneity. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was an obvious source of heterogeneity. In subgroup analyses by cancer sites, this variant was significantly associated with the increased risk for hepatocellular cancer under allelic (OR=1.50; 95% CI: 1.25-1.80; P<0.001) and homozygous genotypic (OR=1.55; 95% CI: 1.02-2.29; P=0.028) models. There were low probabilities of publication bias for the above comparisons. The results of this meta-analysis collectively suggest that APE1 gene Asp148Glu variant is not a risk-conferring factor for digestive cancer. Further large and well-designed studies are required.

  7. Living near nuclear power plants and thyroid cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaeyoung; Bang, Yejin; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-02-01

    There has been public concern regarding the safety of residing near nuclear power plants, and the extent of risk for thyroid cancer among adults living near nuclear power plants has not been fully explored. In the present study, a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was conducted to investigate the association between living near nuclear power plants and the risk of thyroid cancer. A comprehensive literature search was performed on studies published up to March 2015 on the association between nuclear power plants and thyroid cancer risk. The summary standardized incidence ratio (SIR), standardized mortality ratio (SMR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect model of meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses were performed by study quality. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis, covering 36 nuclear power stations in 10 countries. Overall, summary estimates showed no significant increased thyroid cancer incidence or mortality among residents living near nuclear power plants (summary SIR=0.98; 95% CI 0.87-1.11, summary SMR=0.80; 95% CI 0.62-1.04). The pooled estimates did not reveal different patterns of risk by gender, exposure definition, or reference population. However, sensitivity analysis by exposure definition showed that living less than 20 km from nuclear power plants was associated with a significant increase in the risk of thyroid cancer in well-designed studies (summary OR=1.75; 95% CI 1.17-2.64). Our study does not support an association between living near nuclear power plants and risk of thyroid cancer but does support a need for well-designed future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Healthy Dietary Pattern Reduces Lung Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Yanlai Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diet and nutrients play an important role in cancer development and progress; a healthy dietary pattern has been found to be associated with several types of cancer. However, the association between a healthy eating pattern and lung cancer risk is still unclear. Objective: Therefore, we conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to evaluate whether a healthy eating pattern might reduce lung cancer risk. Methods: We identified relevant studies from the PubMed and Embase databases up to October 2015, and the relative risks were extracted and combined by the fixed-effects model when no substantial heterogeneity was observed; otherwise, the random-effects model was employed. Subgroup and publication bias analyses were also performed. Results: Finally, eight observational studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled relative risk of lung cancer for the highest vs. lowest category of healthy dietary pattern was 0.81 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.75–0.86, and no significant heterogeneity was detected. The relative risks (RRs for non-smokers, former smokers and current smokers were 0.89 (95% CI: 0.63–1.27, 0.74 (95% CI: 0.62–0.89 and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.79–0.93, respectively. The results remained stable in subgroup analyses by other confounders and sensitivity analysis. Conclusions: The results of our meta-analysis suggest that a healthy dietary pattern is associated with a lower lung cancer risk, and they provide more beneficial evidence for changing the diet pattern in the general population.

  9. Obesity and risk of thyroid cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis of 21 observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Huang, Min; Wang, Li; Ye, Wei; Tong, Yan; Wang, Hanmin

    2015-01-22

    Several studies have evaluated the association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. However, the results remain uncertain. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. Published literature from PubMed, EMBASE, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) were retrieved before 10 August 2014. We included all studies that reported adjusted risk ratios (RRs), hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of thyroid cancer risk. Thirty-two studies (n=12 620 676) were included in this meta-analysis. Obesity was associated with a significantly increased risk of thyroid cancer (adjusted RR=1.33; 95% CI, 1.24-1.42; I2=25%). In the subgroup analysis by study type, increased risk of thyroid cancer was found in cohort studies and case-control studies. In subgroup analysis by sex, both obese men and women were at significantly greater risk of thyroid cancer than non-obese subjects. When stratified by ethnicity, significantly elevated risk was observed in Caucasians and in Asians. In the age subgroup analysis, both young and old populations showed increased thyroid cancer risk. Subgroup analysis on smoking status showed that increased thyroid cancer risks were found in smokers and in non-smokers. In the histology subgroup analyses, increased risks of papillary thyroid cancer, follicular thyroid cancer, and anaplastic thyroid cancer were observed. However, obesity was associated with decreased risk of medullary thyroid cancer. Our results indicate that obesity is associated with an increased thyroid cancer risk, except medullary thyroid cancer.

  10. Meta-analysis of Cancer Gene Profiling Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Janine; Winter, Christof; Schroeder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement of thousands of genes gives the opportunity to personalize and improve cancer therapy. In addition, the integration of meta-data such as protein-protein interaction (PPI) information into the analyses helps in the identification and prioritization of genes from these screens. Here, we describe a computational approach that identifies genes prognostic for outcome by combining gene profiling data from any source with a network of known relationships between genes.

  11. Folate intake and pancreatic cancer risk: an overall and dose-response meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H L; An, Q Z; Wang, Q Z; Liu, C X

    2013-07-01

    Inconsistent findings of association between supplemental folate consumption and pancreatic cancer risk have been observed in the literature. This study aims to summarize the relationship between folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. Pertinent studies published before November 2011 were identified by searching PubMed and Embase and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved articles. The summary relative risks were estimated by the random effects model. A linear regression analysis of the natural logarithm of the relative risk (RR) was carried out to assess a possible dose-response relationship between folate intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Ten studies on dietary and supplemental folate intake and pancreatic cancer (4 case-control and 6 cohort studies) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RRs of pancreatic cancer for the highest vs lowest categories of dietary folate intake and supplemental folate intake were 0.66 (95% CI: 0.49-0.88) and 1.08 (95% CI, 0.82-1.41), respectively. The dose-response meta-analysis indicated that a 100 μg/day increment in dietary folate intake conferred a RR of 0.93 (95% CI: 0.90-0.97). These findings support the hypothesis that dietary folate may play a protective role in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Asthma and the risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yan-Liang; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Li-Xin; Wu, Chun-Min; Chu, Ai-Jie; Wen, Bao-Lei; Ma, Chao; Yan, Xu-Yan; Zhang, Xin; Wang, De-Ming; Lv, Xin; Hou, Shu-Jian

    2017-02-14

    Some studies found that there was a significant association between asthma and the risk of lung cancer. However, the results are inconclusive. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis. We searched the electronic databases for all relevant articles. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to calculate the strength of the association between asthma and lung cancer risk. Asthma was significantly associated with the increased risk of lung cancer (OR = 1.44; 95% CI 1.31-1.59; P risk. In the subgroup analysis of race and gender, Caucasians, Asians, male, and female patients with asthma showed the increased risk of lung cancer. However, asthma was not significantly associated with lung adenocarcinoma risk. In the stratified analysis by asthma definition, significant associations were found between asthma and lung cancer in self-reported subgroup, questionnaire subgroup, and register databases subgroup. However, no significant association was observed in physician-diagnosed asthma subgroup. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that asthma might be significantly associated with lung cancer risk.

  13. Risk of renal cancer in liver transplant recipients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xun; Wang, Jing-zhe; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Min; Chen, Pen; Wang, Cun-zu

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation is associated with a significantly increased risk of de novo malignancies, but for renal cancer this risk is less clear. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of published studies to determine whether renal cancer risk in liver transplant recipients (LTRs) was increased. To obtain a more precise conclusion, a systematic search was performed in PubMed and Web of Science databases until June 10, 2015. Standardized incidence ratio (SIR) corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to estimate risk of renal cancer in LTRs. Heterogeneity test, sensitivity analysis, and publishing bias were also performed. We identified 8 eligible studies and performed a meta-analysis on data of 49,654 LTRs with a total follow-up of 121,514.6 patient-years. The SIR for renal cancer was identified a 3.275-fold higher SIR (95% CI: 1.857-5.777; P renal cancer. Such association suggests that yearly routine post-transplant surveillance is need for renal cancer in LTRs. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Vasectomy and prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yonggang; Han, Guangwei; Li, Jia; Zhao, Jiang; Cui, Dong; Liu, Chengcheng; Yi, Shanhong

    2015-04-30

    Some studies have suggested that vasectomy is associated with the increased risk of prostate cancer, however, this conclusion is not supported by all the published studies. In order to examine the relationship between vasectomy and prostate cancer risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of cohort studies to clarify this controversial association. PubMed and Medline were used to identify the cohort studies that reported the association of vasectomy with prostate cancer risk from 1980 to January 2015. Based on a random effects model, the RR and 95% CI were used to assess the combined risk. In total, 10 cohort studies involving more than 7027 cases and 429914 participants were included. There was no significant relationship between vasectomy and prostate cancer risk, the pooled RR (95%CI) was 1.11[0.98, 1.27] (P = 0.109). In subgroup-analysis, the relationship between vasectomy and prostate cancer risk was not significantly modified by the length of follow-up and population distribution except Americans. Omission of any single study had little effect on the pooled risk estimate. Little evidence of publication bias was found. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggests that vasectomy is not associated with the increased risk of prostate cancer. More studies based on other populations including the Chinese are needed.

  15. Coffee consumption and risk of breast cancer: an up-to-date meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Juan Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This updated meta-analysis was conducted to assess the association between coffee consumption and breast cancer risk. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search updated July 2012 to identify observational studies providing quantitative estimates for breast cancer risk in relation to coffee consumption. Pooled relative risks (RRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using a random-effects model, and generalized least square trend estimation was used to assess dose-response relationships. RESULTS: A total of 26 studies (16 cohort and 10 case-control studies on coffee intake with 49497 breast cancer cases were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RR showed a borderline significant influence of highest coffee consumption (RR = 0.96; 95% CI 0.93-1.00, low-to moderate coffee consumption (RR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.95-1.04, or an increment of 2 cups/day of coffee consumption (RR = 0.98; 95% CI 0.97-1.00 on the risk of breast cancer. In stratified analysis, a significant inverse association was observed in ER-negative subgroup. However, no significant association was noted in the others. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that increased coffee intake is not associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer, but we observe an inverse association in ER-negative subgroup analysis. More large studies are needed to determine subgroups to obtain more valuable data on coffee drinking and breast cancer risk.

  16. Dairy consumption and lung cancer risk: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Yi Yu,1,* Hui Li,1,* Kaiwu Xu,2,* Xin Li,1 Chunlin Hu,1 Hongyan Wei,1 Xiaoyun Zeng,1 Xiaoli Jing1 1Emergency Department, 2Gastrointestinal Surgery Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Lung cancer risk is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between dairy consumption and lung cancer risk. Methods: The databases included EMBASE, Medline (PubMed, and Web of Science. The relationship between dairy consumption and lung cancer risk was analyzed by relative risk or odds ratio estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. We identified eight prospective cohort studies, which amounted to 10,344 cases and 61,901 participants. Results: For milk intake, relative risk was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.76–1.15; heterogeneity was 70.2% (P=0.003. For total dairy product intake, relative risk was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.89–1.03, heterogeneity was 68.4% (P=0.004. Conclusion: There was no significant association between dairy consumption and lung cancer risk. Keywords: lung cancer, meta-analysis, milk, dairy products

  17. Night-shift work and risk of breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Biren B; Tergas, Ana I; Mateen, Farrah J; Bhayani, Neil H; Oh, Jiwon

    2013-02-01

    A 2007 report by the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified night-shift work as possibly carcinogenic to humans, emphasizing, in particular, its association with breast cancer. Since this report and the publication of the last systematic review on this topic, several new studies have examined this association. Hence, to provide a comprehensive update on this topic, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science (Conference Proceedings), and ProQuest dissertations for studies published before March 1, 2012, along with a manual search of articles that cited or referenced the included studies. Included were observational case-control or cohort studies examining the association between night-shift work and breast carcinogenesis in women, which all ascertained and quantified night-shift work exposure. The search yielded 15 eligible studies for inclusion in the systematic review and meta-analysis. Using random-effects models, the pooled relative risk (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of breast cancer for individuals with ever night-shift work exposure was 1.21 (95 % CI, 1.00-1.47, p = 0.056, I (2) = 76 %), for short-term night-shift workers (work exposure and nurses working night-shifts long-term were at increased risk of breast cancer, however, these findings were limited by unmeasured confounding. Overall, given substantial heterogeneity observed between studies in this meta-analysis, we conclude there is weak evidence to support previous reports that night-shift work is associated with increased breast cancer risk.

  18. Coping with Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvillemo, Pia; Bränström, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The primary aim of this study was to examine the associations between different types of coping and psychological well-being and physical health among women with breast cancer. A second aim was to explore the potential moderating influences of situational and measurement factors on the associations between coping and psychological well-being and physical health. Methods On 14 February 2011, a literature search was made for articles published in the PubMed and PsycINFO databases before January 2010. On 5 September 2013, a repeated literature search was made for articles published before May 2013. In the final analyses, 78 studies with 11 948 participants were included. Results Efforts to facilitate adaptation to stress, such as Acceptance and Positive Reappraisal, were related to higher well-being and health. Disengagement and avoidance types of coping were associated with lower well-being and health. The analyses indicated that, in several circumstances, coping effectiveness was dependent on cancer stage, treatment, disease duration, and type of coping measure. Conclusions Use of coping targeting adjustment and avoiding use of disengagement forms of coping were related to better psychological well-being and physical health. Adaptive strategies and avoiding disengagement forms of coping seemed particularly beneficial for women undergoing treatment. PMID:25423095

  19. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Having a family health history of colorectal (colon) cancer can make you more likely to get colorectal ... Health History? If you have a family health history of colorectal cancer, your doctor may consider your family health history ...

  20. Association between the TERT Genetic Polymorphism rs2853676 and Cancer Risk: Meta-Analysis of 76,108 Cases and 134,215 Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lin Cao

    Full Text Available Several recent studies have identified that the TERT genetic polymorphism rs2853676 is associated with cancer risk, but presented inconsistent results. We investigated these inconclusive results by performing a meta-analysis to systematically evaluate the association.We conducted a search in PubMed, Google Scholar and ISI Web of Science to select studies on the association between TERT rs2853676 and cancer risk. We conducted a stratified analysis using cancer type, ethnicity and source of controls. We calculated the odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Article quality, heterogeneity, sensitivity, publication bias and statistical power were also assessed.26 articles covering 76,108 cases and 134,215 controls met our inclusion criteria. A significant association between TERT rs2853676 allele A and cancer susceptibility was demonstrated under a per-allele risk analysis (OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04-1.13. Stratification analysis revealed an increased cancer risk in subgroups of glioma, lung cancer and ovarian cancer. No significant increase was found in melanoma, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer and colorectal cancer. In a subgroup analysis of lung cancer, a statistically significant increase was only observed in adenocarcinoma. Moreover, a stratified analysis performed for ethnic groups revealed that the significant increase was only observed in Caucasians, whereas a non-significant increase was found in Asians.This meta-analysis suggests that the TERT genetic polymorphism rs2853676 is associated with increased risk of glioma, lung adenocarcinoma and ovarian cancer among Caucasians. Further functional studies are warranted to validate this association and investigate further.

  1. A Western Dietary Pattern Increases Prostate Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Fabiani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dietary patterns were recently applied to examine the relationship between eating habits and prostate cancer (PC risk. While the associations between PC risk with the glycemic index and Mediterranean score have been reviewed, no meta-analysis is currently available on dietary patterns defined by “a posteriori” methods. A literature search was carried out (PubMed, Web of Science to identify studies reporting the relationship between dietary patterns and PC risk. Relevant dietary patterns were selected and the risks estimated were calculated by a random-effect model. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs, for a first-percentile increase in dietary pattern score, were combined by a dose-response meta-analysis. Twelve observational studies were included in the meta-analysis which identified a “Healthy pattern” and a “Western pattern”. The Healthy pattern was not related to PC risk (OR = 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.88–1.04 while the Western pattern significantly increased it (OR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.08–1.65. In addition, the “Carbohydrate pattern”, which was analyzed in four articles, was positively associated with a higher PC risk (OR = 1.64; 95% CI: 1.35–2.00. A significant linear trend between the Western (p = 0.011 pattern, the Carbohydrate (p = 0.005 pattern, and the increment of PC risk was observed. The small number of studies included in the meta-analysis suggests that further investigation is necessary to support these findings.

  2. Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses, and Esophageal Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lingling; Liu, Xinxin; Tian, Yalan; Xie, Chen; Li, Qianwen; Cui, Han; Sun, Changqing

    2016-06-08

    Flavonoids have been suggested to play a chemopreventive role in carcinogenesis. However, the epidemiologic studies assessing dietary intake of flavonoids and esophageal cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. This study was designed to examine the association between flavonoids, each flavonoid subclass, and the risk of esophageal cancer with a meta-analysis approach. We searched for all relevant studies with a prospective cohort or case-control study design published from January 1990 to April 2016, using PUBMED, EMBASE, and Web of Science. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using fixed or random-effect models. In total, seven articles including 2629 cases and 481,193 non-cases were selected for the meta-analysis. Comparing the highest-intake patients with the lowest-intake patients for total flavonoids and for each flavonoid subclass, we found that anthocyanidins (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.49-0.74), flavanones (OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.49-0.86), and flavones (OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.64-0.95) were inversely associated with the risk of esophageal cancer. However, total flavonoids showed marginal association with esophageal cancer risk (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.59-1.04). In conclusion, our study suggested that dietary intake of total flavonoids, anthocyanidins, flavanones, and flavones might reduce the risk of esophageal cancer.

  3. Physical Activity and Gastric Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis; Tzanninis, Ioannis-Georgios; Kantzanou, Maria; Georgiadou, Despoina; Sergentanis, Theodoros N

    2016-11-01

    Physical activity represents a well-established way to prolong the life span; yet, it remains an unfulfilled goal for a great part of the population. In parallel, the burden of gastric cancer is considerable throughout the globe. In that context, the present meta-analysis aims to shed light on the association between physical activity and gastric cancer risk. Eligible observational studies were sought in PubMed up to June 01, 2015. In addition, a snowball procedure was conducted and contact with authors was implemented. Separate analyses were performed by type of physical activity (total; occupational; recreational), study design, published/provided data, anatomical site, and study location, along with stratification by gender. Ten cohort studies (7551 incident cases in a total cohort size of 1 541 208 subjects) and 12 case-control studies (5803 cases and 73 629 controls) were eligible. "Any" type of physical activity was associated with lower risk of gastric cancer [pooled relative risk (RR) = 0.81; 95% CI: 0.73 to 0.89], which was reproducible in men (pooled RR = 0.87; 95% CI: 0.77-0.99). The protective effect was significant in the subgroup analyses of published data, noncardia cancer (pooled RR = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.52-0.75), and studies stemming from Asia (pooled RR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.74-0.90). This meta-analysis suggests a protective effect of physical activity regarding gastric cancer risk, especially in Asian populations.

  4. Sleep duration and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yingyi; Zhou, Yuhao; Zhang, Xiao; Wei, Xin; He, Jia

    2014-03-01

    Studies on the association of short or long sleep duration with breast cancer risk have reported inconsistent results. We quantitatively assessed this association by conducting a meta-analysis based on the evidence from observational studies. In April 2013, we performed electronic searches in PubMed, EmBase and the Cochrane Library to identify studies examining the effect of sleep duration on breast cancer incidence. The odds ratio (OR) was used to measure any such association in a random-effects model. The analysis was further stratified by confounding factors that could bias the results. A total of six studies (two case-control and four cohort studies) involving 159,837 individuals were included in our meta-analysis. Our study did not show an association between either short or long sleep duration and breast cancer risk (short sleep duration data: pooled OR = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.90-1.14, p = 0.853; long sleep duration data: pooled OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.86-1.04, p = 0.251). Moreover, we did not identify any statistically significant association between sleep duration and breast cancer risk in all the subgroup analyses. In conclusion, our findings indicate that sleep duration has no effect on breast cancer risk. © 2013 UICC.

  5. Religion, Spirituality, and Physical Health in Cancer Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Heather S.L.; Pustejovsky, James; Park, Crystal L.; Danhauer, Suzanne C.; Sherman, Allen C.; Fitchett, George; Merluzzi, Thomas V.; Munoz, Alexis R.; George, Login; Snyder, Mallory A.; Salsman, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whereas religion/spirituality (R/S) is important in its own right for many cancer patients, a large body of research has examined whether R/S is also associated with better physical health outcomes. This literature has been characterized by heterogeneity in sample composition, measures of R/S, and measures of physical health. In an effort to synthesize previous findings, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relationship between R/S and patient-reported physical health in cancer patients. Methods A search of PubMed, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library yielded 2,073 abstracts, which were independently evaluated by pairs of raters. Meta-analysis was conducted on 497 effect sizes from 101 unique samples encompassing over 32,000 adult cancer patients. R/S measures were categorized into affective, behavioral, cognitive, and ‘other’ dimensions. Physical health measures were categorized into physical well-being, functional well-being, and physical symptoms. Average estimated correlations (Fisher's z) were calculated using generalized estimating equations with robust variance estimation. Results Overall R/S was associated with overall physical health (z=.153, p<.001); this relationship was not moderated by sociodemographic or clinical variables. Affective R/S was associated with physical well-being (z=.167, p<.001), functional well-being (z=.343, p<.001), and physical symptoms (z=.282, p<.001). Cognitive R/S was associated with physical well-being (z=.079, p<.05) and functional well-being (z=.090, p<.01). ‘Other’ R/S was associated with functional well-being (z=.100, p<.05). Conclusions Results of the current meta-analysis suggest that greater R/S is associated with better patient-reported physical health. These results underscore the importance of attending to patients’ religious and spiritual needs as part of comprehensive cancer care. PMID:26258868

  6. Green tea and the risk of prostate cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuming; Zhi, Fan; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Keke; Xiang, Han; Mao, Qi; Wang, Xinghuan; Zhang, Xinhua

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) now remains the 2nd most frequently diagnosed cancer. In recent years, chemoprevention for PCa becomes a possible concept. Especially, many phytochemicals rich foods are suggested to lower the risk of cancer. Among these foods, green tea is considered as effective prevention for various cancers. However, clinical trials and previous meta-analyses on the relationship between green tea consumption and the risk of PCa have produced inconsistent outcomes. This study aims to determine the dose-response association of green tea intake with PCa risk and the preventive effect of green tea catechins on PCa risk. Seven observational studies and 3 randomized controlled trials were retrieved from Cochrane Library, PubMed, Sciencedirect Online, and hand searching. The STATA (version 12.0) was applied to analyze the data. The relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals were pooled by fixed or random effect modeling. Dose-response relations were evaluated with categories of green tea intake. Although there was no statistical significance in the comparison of the highest versus lowest category, there was a trend of reduced incidence of PCa with each 1 cup/day increase of green tea (P = 0.08). Our dose-response meta-analysis further demonstrated that higher green tea consumption was linearly associated with a reduced risk of PCa with more than 7 cups/day. In addition, green tea catechins were effective for preventing PCa with an RR of 0.38 (P = 0.02). In conclusion, our dose-response meta-analysis evaluated the association of green tea intake with PCa risk systematically and quantitatively. And this is the first meta-analysis of green tea catechins consumption and PCa incidence. Our novel data demonstrated that higher green tea consumption was linearly reduced PCa risk with more than 7 cups/day and green tea catechins were effective for preventing PCa. However, further studies are required to substantiate these conclusions.

  7. Influence of Androgen Receptor Expression on the Survival Outcomes in Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonseok; Jae, Eunae; Yoon, Myunghee

    2015-06-01

    Despite the fact that the androgen receptor (AR) is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, its prognostic effect remains controversial. In this meta-analysis, we explored AR expression and its impact on survival outcomes in breast cancer. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink, and Ovid databases and references of articles to identify studies reporting data until December 2013. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by extracting the number of patients with recurrence and survival according to AR expression. There were 16 articles that met the criteria for inclusion in our meta-analysis. DFS and OS were significantly longer in patients with AR expression compared with patients without AR expression (odds ratio [OR], 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.90; OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.38-0.73, respectively). In addition, hormone receptor (HR) positive patients had a longer DFS when AR was also expressed (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.41-0.98). For patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), AR expression was also associated with longer DFS and OS (OR, 0.44, 95% CI, 0.26-0.75; OR, 0.26, 95% CI, 0.12-0.55, respectively). Furthermore, AR expression was associated with a longer DFS and OS in women (OR, 0.42, 95% CI, 0.27-0.64; OR, 0.47, 95% CI, 0.38-0.59, respectively). However, in men, AR expression was associated with a worse DFS (OR, 6.00; 95% CI, 1.46-24.73). Expression of AR in breast cancer might be associated with better survival outcomes, especially in patients with HR-positive tumors and TNBC, and women. Based on this meta-analysis, we propose that AR expression might be related to prognostic features and contribute to clinical outcomes.

  8. A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Berndt, Sonja I

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of > 10 million SNPs in 43,303 prostate cancer...

  9. Nutrients, Foods, and Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigation have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grain have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits and vegetables. Nutrients and foods may also interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of over-nutrition and obesity—risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:25575572

  10. Association of TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms with risk of cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Longbiao; Yuan, Hua; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Ruixia; Ma, Hongxia; Zhang, Shuangyue

    2013-01-01

    The activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) may be an important event in the immune evasion of tumor cell. Recently, numerous studies have investigated the associations between TLR2 -196 to -174 del and two SNPs of TLR4 (rs4986790 and rs4986791) and the susceptibility to different types of cancer; however, the results remain conflicting. The aim of this study was to assess the association between TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms and cancer risk in a meta-analysis with eligible published studies. A dataset composed of 14627 cases and 17438 controls from 34 publications were included in a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between overall cancer risk or cancer-specific risk and three SNPs of TLRs (TLR2 -196 to -174 del, TLR4 rs4986790 and rs4986791). The results showed that all of these three polymorphisms were significantly associated with the increased cancer risk (dominant model: OR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.04-2.60 for TLR2 -196 to -174 del; OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.01-1.41 for TLR4 rs4986790; and OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.120-1.80 for TLR4 rs4986791; respectively). In stratified analysis, we found the effect of TLR2 -196 to -174 del on cancer risk remained significant in the subgroup of Caucasians and South Asians, but not in East Asians. However, the association between rs4986791 and cancer risk was significant in both South Asians and East Asians, but not in Caucasians. Furthermore, the association between rs4986790 and cancer risk was statistically significant in digestive cancers (dominant model: OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.13-2.73) and female-specific cancers (dominant model: OR = 1.50, 95% CI: 1.16-1.94). However, no significant association with risk of digestive system cancers was observed for TLR2 -196 to -174 del and TLR4 rs4986791. This meta-analysis presented additional evidence for the association between TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms and cancer risk. Further well-designed investigations with large sample sizes are required to confirm this conclusion.

  11. Costs of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-04

    A health economist talks about studies on figuring out the costs of running a colorectal cancer screening program, and how this can lead to better screening.  Created: 4/4/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/4/2017.

  12. The Breast-Thyroid Cancer Link: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Sarah M.; White, Michael G.; Hong, Susan; Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Kaplan, Edwin L.; Angelos, Peter; Kulkarni, Swati A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Grogan, Raymon H.

    2015-01-01

    Rates of thyroid cancer in women with a history of breast cancer are higher than expected. Similarly, rates of breast cancer in those with a history of thyroid cancer are increased. Explanations for these associations include detection bias, shared hormonal risk factors, treatment effect, and genetic susceptibility. With increasing numbers of breast and thyroid cancer survivors clinicians should be particularly cognizant of this association. Here we perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature utilizing PubMed and Scopus search engines to identify all publications studying the incidence of breast cancer as a secondary malignancy following a diagnosis of thyroid cancer or thyroid cancer following a diagnosis of breast cancer. This demonstrated an increased risk of thyroid cancer as a secondary malignancy following breast cancer (OR=1.55, 95% CI [1.44,1.67]) and an increased risk of breast cancer as a secondary malignancy following thyroid cancer (OR= 1.32, 95% CI [1.23,1.42]). There is a clear increase in the odds of developing either thyroid or breast cancer as a secondary malignancy after diagnosis with the other. Here we review this association and current hypothesis as to the cause of this correlation. PMID:26908594

  13. Association between Occupational Exposure to Wood Dust and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Alonso-Sardón

    Full Text Available To perform a systematic review to analyze the association between occupational exposure to wood dust and cancer.A systematic literature search of entries made in the MEDLINE-PubMed database between 1957 and 2013 was conducted to identify studies that had assessed the relationship between occupational exposure to wood dust and different types of cancer. A meta-analysis of selected case-control and cohort studies was subsequently performed.A total of 114 studies were identified and 70 were selected for review. Of these, 42 studies focused on the relationship between wood dust and nasal cancer (n = 22, lung cancer (n = 11, and other types of cancer (n = 9. Low-to-moderate quality evidence that wood dust acts as a carcinogen was obtained, and a stronger association between wood dust and nasal adenocarcinoma was observed. A lesser association between wood dust exposure and lung cancer was also observed. Several studies suggested that there is a relationship between wood dust and the onset of other cancers, although there was no evidence to establish an association. A meta-analysis that included four case-controls studies showed that workers exposed to wood dust exhibited higher rates of nasal adenocarcinoma than other workers (odds ratio = 10.28; 95% confidence interval: 5.92 and 17.85; P<0,0001, although a large degree of heterogeneity was found.Low-to-moderate quality evidence supports a causal association between cancer and occupational exposure to wood dust, and this association was stronger for nasal adenocarcinoma than for lung cancer. There was no evidence of an association between wood dust exposure and the other cancers examined.

  14. Premorbid Obesity and Mortality in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Kaustav; Gupta, Arjun; Arora, Nivedita; Singh, Preet Paul; Singh, Siddharth

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for pancreatic cancer, but it is unclear whether it affects mortality. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the association between premorbid obesity and mortality from pancreatic cancer. We performed a systematic search through January 2015 and identified studies of the association between premorbid obesity (at least 1 year prior to pancreatic cancer diagnosis) and pancreatic cancer-related mortality. We estimated summary adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) with 95% confidence interval (CI), comparing data from obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m(2)) and overweight subjects (BMI, 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)) with those from individuals with a normal BMI (controls) by using random-effects model. We identified 13 studies (including 3 studies that pooled multiple cohorts); 5 studies included only patients with pancreatic cancer, whereas 8 studies evaluated pancreatic cancer-related mortality in cancer-free individuals at inception. In the meta-analysis, we observed increase in pancreatic cancer-related mortality among overweight (aHR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.11; I(2) = 0) and obese individuals (aHR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.20-1.42; I(2) = 43%), compared with controls; the association remained when we analyzed data from only subjects with pancreatic cancer. Each 1 kg/m(2) increase in BMI was associated with 10% increase in mortality (aHR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.05-1.15) with minimal heterogeneity (I(2) = 0). In the subgroup analysis, obesity was associated with increased mortality in Western populations (11 studies; aHR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.22-1.42) but not in Asia-Pacific populations (2 studies; aHR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.76-1.27). In a systematic review and meta-analysis, we associated increasing level of obesity with increased mortality in patients with pancreatic cancer in Western but not Asia-Pacific populations. Strategies to reduce obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities might be developed to treat patients with pancreatic cancer

  15. Association between two interleukin-2 gene polymorphisms and cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Meng Zhang,1,2,* Xiuxiu Tan,1,* Junjie Huang,3,* Lijuan Xie,1 Hao Wang,1 Jizhou Shi,4 Wei Lu,1 Zhaojie Lv,1 Hongbing Mei,1 Chaozhao Liang21Department of Urology, Shenzhen Second People’s Hospital, Clinical Medicine of Anhui Medical University, 2Department of Urology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 3Department of Hematology, Shenzhen Second People’s Hospital, the First Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 4Department of Urology, Shengli Oilfield Central Hospital, Dongying, Peoples Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Several epidemiological studies have illustrated that polymorphisms in interleukin-2 (IL-2 were associated with diverse cancer types. However, recently published statistics were inconsistent and inconclusive. Therefore, the current meta-analysis was performed to elaborate the effects of IL-2 polymorphisms (rs2069762 and rs2069763 on cancer susceptibility.Material and methods: A total of 5,601 cancer cases and 7,809 controls from 21 published case–control studies were enrolled in our meta-analysis. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated to assess the association between IL-2 polymorphisms and cancer susceptibility.Results: Our study demonstrated an increased susceptibility to cancer in rs2069762 (G vs T: OR =1.268, 95% CI =1.113–1.445; GG vs TT: OR =1.801, 95% CI =1.289–2.516; GT vs TT: OR =1.250, 95% CI =1.061–1.473; GG + GT vs TT: OR =1.329, 95% CI =1.118–1.579; GG vs GT + TT: OR =1.536, 95% CI =1.162–2.030. In the subgroup analysis, increased susceptibility to cancer was identified in the hospital-based group and PHWE<0.05 (P-value of the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium [HWE] group. In addition, a positive association with cancer susceptibility was observed among both Chinese and non-Chinese. However, no relationship was detected between the rs2069763 polymorphism of IL-2 and cancer susceptibility

  16. Acupuncture for treating hot flashes in breast cancer patients: an updated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Alireza; Marzban, Maryam; Zadeh, Abbas Rezian

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture for treatment of hot flash in women with breast cancer. The aspects considered in this study included searching for 12 data bases until April 2015 and consulting reference lists of reviews and related articles. Additional features studied comprised all articles on human patients with breast cancer treated with needle acupuncture with or without electrical stimulation for the treatment of hot flashes. The methodological quality was assessed using the modified Jadad score. The searches identified 12 relevant articles for inclusion. The meta-analysis without any subgroup or moderator failed to show favorable effects of acupuncture on reducing the frequency of hot flashes after intervention (n = 680, SMD = - 0.478, 95 % CI -0.397 to 0.241, P = 0.632) but exhibited marked heterogeneity of the results (Q value = 83.200, P = 0.000, I^2 = 83.17, τ^2 = 0.310). The meta-analysis used had contradictory results and yielded no convincing evidence to suggest that acupuncture was an effective treatment of hot flash in patients with breast cancer. Multi-central studies including large sample size are required to investigate the efficiency of acupuncture for treating hot flash in patients with breast cancer.

  17. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism in endometrial cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Jun; Xu, Li-Hui; Chen, Yue-Ming; Luo, Li; Tu, Qiao-Feng; Mei, Jin

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of case-controlled prospective or retrospective studies to assess the effect of MTHFR polymorphisms on the risk of developing endometrial cancer. PubMed, Cochrane, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched (up to March 2014) for prospective or retrospective case-controlled studies that investigated the association of three MTHFR polymorphisms (rs180113 [C677T], rs1801131 [A1289C], and rs2274976 [G1793A]) with endometrial cancer. The patient population included subjects from three separate countries: China, Spain, and the USA. Only one study reported quantitative findings for MTHFR G1793A and, consequently, this polymorphism was not evaluated in our analysis. There were no significant associations of any MTHFR C677T or MTHFR A1298C alleles or genotypes with endometrial cancer (all p > 0.300). This meta-analysis does not support the association of endometrial cancer with two common MTHFR polymorphisms from this patient population. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Use of benzodiazepine and risk of cancer: A meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Bae; Myung, Seung-Kwon; Park, Yon Chul; Park, Byoungjin

    2017-02-01

    Several observational epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent results on the association between the use of benzodiazepine and the risk of cancer. We investigated the association by using a meta-analysis. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and the bibliographies of relevant articles to locate additional publications in January 2016. Three evaluators independently reviewed and selected eligible studies based on predetermined selection criteria. Of 796 articles meeting our initial criteria, a total of 22 observational epidemiological studies with 18 case-control studies and 4 cohort studies were included in the final analysis. Benzodiazepine use was significantly associated with an increased risk of cancer (odds ratio [OR] or relative risk [RR] 1.19; 95% confidence interval 1.16-1.21) in a random-effects meta-analysis of all studies. Subgroup meta-analyses by various factors such as study design, type of case-control study, study region, and methodological quality of study showed consistent findings. Also, a significant dose-response relationship was observed between the use of benzodiazepine and the risk of cancer (p for trend analysis of observational epidemiological studies suggests that benzodiazepine use is associated with an increased risk of cancer. © 2016 UICC.

  19. Fruits, vegetables and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, D; Chan, D S M; Vieira, A R; Rosenblatt, D A Navarro; Vieira, R; Greenwood, D C; Norat, T

    2012-07-01

    Evidence for an association between fruit and vegetable intake and breast cancer risk is inconclusive. To clarify the association, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence from prospective studies. We searched PubMed for prospective studies of fruit and vegetable intake and breast cancer risk until April 30, 2011. We included fifteen prospective studies that reported relative risk estimates and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of breast cancer associated with fruit and vegetable intake. Random effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks. The summary relative risk (RR) for the highest versus the lowest intake was 0.89 (95 % CI: 0.80-0.99, I (2) = 0 %) for fruits and vegetables combined, 0.92 (95 % CI: 0.86-0.98, I (2) = 9 %) for fruits, and 0.99 (95 % CI: 0.92-1.06, I (2) = 20 %) for vegetables. In dose-response analyses, the summary RR per 200 g/day was 0.96 (95 % CI: 0.93-1.00, I (2) = 2 %) for fruits and vegetables combined, 0.94 (95 % CI: 0.89-1.00, I (2) = 39 %) for fruits, and 1.00 (95 % CI: 0.95-1.06, I (2) = 17 %) for vegetables. In this meta-analysis of prospective studies, high intake of fruits, and fruits and vegetables combined, but not vegetables, is associated with a weak reduction in risk of breast cancer.

  20. Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Bladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhoujun; Zhong, Shan; Wang, Xianjin; Lu, Yingli; Xu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that diabetes mellitus (DM) may be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. To provide a quantitative assessment of this association, we evaluated the relation between DM and incidence and mortality of bladder cancer in an updated meta-analysis of cohort studies. Methods We identified cohort studies by searching the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, through 31 March 2012. Summary relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with random-effects models. Results A total of 29 cohort studies (27 articles) were included in this meta-analysis. DM was associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer (RR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.08–1.54), with significant evidence of heterogeneity among these studies (pstudies (p = 0.002, I2 = 63.3%). The positive association was observed for both men (RR 1.54, 95% CI: 1.30–1.82) and women (RR 1.50, 95% CI: 1.05–2.14). Conclusion These findings suggest that compared to non-diabetic individuals, diabetic individuals have an increased incidence and mortality of bladder cancer. PMID:23437204

  1. Subnuclear proteomics in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C; Piersma, Sander R

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in nuclear phenotype and chromosome structure are key features of cancer cells. Investigation of the protein determinants of nuclear subfractions in cancer may yield molecular insights into aberrant chromosome function and chromatin organization and in addition may yield biomarkers...... for early cancer detection. Here we evaluate a proteomics work flow for profiling protein constituents in subnuclear domains in colorectal cancer tissues and apply this work flow to a comparative analysis of the nuclear matrix fraction in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissue samples. First, we...... established the reproducibility of the entire work flow. In a reproducibility analysis of three nuclear matrix fractions independently isolated from the same colon tumor homogenate, 889 of 1,047 proteins (85%) were reproducibly identified at high confidence (minimally two peptides per protein at 99...

  2. CD24 overexpression in cancer development and progression: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Han; Kim, Seo-Hee; Lee, Eung-Seok; Kim, Young-Sik

    2009-11-01

    CD24 has emerged as a new oncogene and metastasis promoter. However, there is a controversy as to whether CD24 expression is a prognostic factor for poor outcomes in many human cancers. To shed light on this controversy, we performed a meta-analysis of the relationship between CD24 expression and prognostic parameters in different carcinomas. Studies published in the period 1990-2009 were reviewed for the meta-analysis and selected according to defined criteria. The effect sizes of prognostic parameters and overall survival were calculated by an odds ratio (OR) or an adjusted hazard ratio (HR). Twenty-eight studies reported CD24 expression for 2,925 cases. The frequency of CD24 expression by immunohistochemistry was 68% in all the carcinomas of the breast, female genital tract, gastrointestinal tract, biliary tract and pancreas, urinary system, prostate and skin. Overall, CD24 was more frequently overexpressed in their carcinomas than their benign lesions (OR=4.21; 95% CI, 1.826-9.731; P=0.001) and was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (OR=2.41; CI, 1.013-5.720; P=0.047), advanced clinical stages (OR=1.59; 95% CI, 1.244-2.032; Povarian carcinomas (OR=35.92; CI, 7.156-180.311; P<0.001), than in their benign counterparts. In conclusion, the meta-analysis strongly supports the idea that CD24 is an important marker of malignancy and poor prognosis in various cancers. In particular, CD24 may promote cancer development and progression in the breast, ovary and urinary bladder.

  3. Meta-analysis of two computer-assisted screening methods for diagnosing oral precancer and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaojing; Zhang, Jing; Tan, Yaqin; Chen, Guanying; Zhou, Gang

    2015-11-01

    The early diagnosis of oral precancer and cancer is crucial and could have the highest impact on improving survival rates. A meta-analysis was conducted to compare the accuracy between the OralCDx brush biopsy and DNA-image cytometry in diagnosing both conditions. Bibliographic databases were systematically searched for original relevant studies on the early diagnosis of oral precancer and oral cancer. Study characteristics were evaluated to determine the accuracy of the two screening strategies. Thirteen studies (eight of OralCDx brush biopsy and five of DNA-image cytometry) were identified as having reported on 1981 oral mucosa lesions. The meta-analysis found that the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves of the OralCDx brush biopsy and DNA-image cytometry were 0.8879 and 0.9885, respectively. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratio of the OralCDx brush biopsy were 86% (95% CI 81-90), 81% (95% CI 78-85), and 20.36 (95% CI 2.72-152.67), respectively, while these modalities of DNA-image cytometry were 89% (95% CI 83-94), 99% (95% CI 97-100), and 446.08 (95% CI 73.36-2712.43), respectively. Results of a pairwise comparison between each modality demonstrated that specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and Q(∗) index of DNA-image cytometry was significantly higher than that of the OralCDx brush biopsy (Z=2.821, p0.05). In conclusion, the meta-analysis of the published studies indicated that DNA-image cytometry is more accurate than the OralCDx brush biopsy in diagnosing oral precancer and oral cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Harmonic Scalpel versus Electrocautery Dissection in Modified Radical Mastectomy for Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinbo; Yu, Yinghua; Wei, Changyuan; Qin, Qinghong; Mo, Qinguo; Yang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Despite the common use of conventional electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, the harmonic scalpel is recently emerging as a dominant surgical instrument for dissection and haemostasis, which is thought to reduce the morbidity, such as seroma and blood loss. But the results of published trials are inconsistent. So we made the meta-analysis to assess the intraoperative and postoperative endpoints among women undergoing modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery. A comprehensive literature search of case-control studies from PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases involving modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery was performed. We carried out a meta-analysis of primary endpoints including postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and secondly endpoints including operative time and wound complications. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the effect size for categorical outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes. A total of 11 studies with 702 patients were included for this meta-analysis. There was significant difference in total postoperative drainage (SMD: -0.74 [95%CI: -1.31, -0.16]; Pharmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. No difference was found as for operative time between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery (SMD: 0.04 [95%CI: -0.41, 0.50]; P = 0.85). Compared to standard electrocautery, harmonic scalpel dissection presents significant advantages in decreasing postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and wound complications in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, without increasing operative time. Harmonic scalpel can be recommended as a preferential surgical instrument in modified radical mastectomy.

  5. Immunotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2012-01-01

    Although no immunotherapeutic treatment is approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, promising results from clinical trials suggest that several immunotherapeutic strategies may prove efficacious and applicable to this group of patients. This review describes the immunogenicity of CRC...... and presents the most interesting strategies investigated so far: cancer vaccination including antigen-defined vaccination and dendritic cell vaccination, chemo-immunotherapy, and adoptive cell transfer. Future treatment options as well as the possibility of combining existing therapies will be discussed along...

  6. Red meat and colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nuri Faruk Aykan

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association...

  7. Colorectal cancer family history assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia Paul

    2011-10-01

    This article describes family history assessment for colorectal cancer in three outpatient gastroenterology units and examines gastroenterology unit nurses' knowledge and attitudes about family history assessments. Eighty-eight colonoscopy records were surveyed, and 16 RNs were interviewed. The medical record documentation was surveyed using a researcher-developed tool to identify type of cancer, age at disease onset, family relationship, and number of family members with cancer. Gastroenterology unit nurses were interviewed to assess knowledge and attitudes about family history assessment regarding colorectal cancer. Findings indicate that limited family history documentation was present in the medical record and that important age-at-disease-onset information was missing in 95% of patients with a family history of colorectal cancer and in 85% of patients with a family history of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. No documentation was found in any charts about the number of affected relatives within the same family. Inconsistencies in family history documentation within the same medical record were noted, and family history information was found in multiple chart forms. Gastroenterology nurses rated family history as very important but gave a lower rating to personal knowledge about and resources for family history assessment.

  8. The Mendelian colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-11-01

    A small minority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) (≤5%) are caused by a single, inherited faulty gene. These diseases, the Mendelian colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes, have been central to our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in general. Most of the approximately 13 high-penetrance genes that predispose to CRC primarily predispose to colorectal polyps, and each gene is associated with a specific type of polyp, whether conventional adenomas (APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, NTHL1), juvenile polyps (SMAD4, BMPR1A), Peutz-Jeghers hamartomas (LKB1/STK11) and mixed polyps of serrated and juvenile types (GREM1). Lynch syndrome (MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2), by contrast, is associated primarily with cancer risk. Major functional pathways are consistently inactivated in the Mendelian CRC syndromes: certain types of DNA repair (proofreading of DNA replication errors, mismatch repair and base excision repair) and signalling (bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Wnt signalling and mTOR). The inheritance of the CRC syndromes also varies: most are dominant but some of the DNA repair deficiencies are recessive. Some of the Mendelian CRC genes are especially important because they play a role through somatic inactivation in sporadic CRC (APC, MLH1, SMAD4, POLE). Additional Mendelian CRC genes may remain to be discovered and searches for these genes are ongoing, especially in patients with multiple adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Role of Epidural Analgesia within an ERAS Program after Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Borzellino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Epidural analgesia has been a cornerstone of any ERAS program for open colorectal surgery. With the improvements in anesthetic and analgesic techniques as well as the introduction of the laparoscopy for colorectal resection, the role of epidural analgesia has been questioned. The aim of the review was to assess through a meta-analysis the impact of epidural analgesia compared to other analgesic techniques for colorectal laparoscopic surgery within an ERAS program. Methods. Literature research was performed on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All randomised clinical trials that reported data on hospital stay, postoperative complications, and readmissions rates within an ERAS program with and without an epidural analgesia after a colorectal laparoscopic resection were included. Results. Five randomised clinical trials were selected and a total of 168 patients submitted to epidural analgesia were compared to 163 patients treated by an alternative analgesic technique. Pooled data show a longer hospital stay in the epidural group with a mean difference of 1.07 (95% CI 0.06–2.08 without any significant differences in postoperative complications and readmissions rates. Conclusion. Epidural analgesia does not seem to offer any additional clinical benefits to patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery within an ERAS program.

  10. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001-2003 to database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group provides high-quality data and has been documenting an increase in short- and long

  11. The association between BMI and cervical cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorolajal, Jalal; Jenabi, Ensiyeh

    2016-05-01

    The association between BMI and cervical cancer risk is not clear. This meta-analysis was carried out to estimate the association between overweight and obesity and cervical cancer risk. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, ScienceDirect, LILACS, and SciELO for observational studies addressing the association between BMI and cervical cancer until February 2015. Data were independently extracted and analyzed using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), on the basis of random-effects models. We identified a total of 3543 references and included nine studies with 128 233 participants. On the basis of the results of case-control and cohort studies, the association between cervical cancer and overweight was estimated to be 1.03 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.25) and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.17), respectively. According to the results of case-control and cohort studies, the association between cervical cancer and obesity was estimated to be 1.40 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.71) and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.52), respectively. No evidence of heterogeneity and publication bias was observed. The findings from this meta-analysis indicate that overweight is not associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer, but obesity is weakly associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer. However, more evidence, based on large prospective cohort studies, is required to provide conclusive evidence on whether or not BMI is associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer.

  12. Body mass index and risk of gastric cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xue-Jun; Wang, Chun-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Kang-Kang; Li, Shuang; Bao, Hong-Hong; Zhao, Long-Yu; Liu, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Overweight and obesity, indicated as increased body mass index, are associated with the risk of some cancers. We carried out a meta-analysis on published cohort and case-control studies to assess the strength of association between body mass index and gastric cancer. Relevant studies were identified through PubMed, Web of Science and Medline electronic databases. Adjusted relative risks (odds ratios) with 95% confidence interval were used to assess the strength of association between body mass index and gastric cancer. Sixteen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) was associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer (odds ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.24) compared with normal weight (body mass index = 18.5 to obesity and the increased risk of gastric cancer for males (odds ratio = 1.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.09-1.48), non-Asians (odds ratio = 1.14, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.28) and both cohort studies (odds ratio = 1.10, 95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.22) and case-control studies (odds ratio = 1.29, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.60). Both overweight (odds ratio = 1.22, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.42) and obesity (odds ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval = 1.15-2.24) were associated with the increased risk of gastric cardia cancer. The results indicated that obesity was associated with the risk of gastric cancer, especially for males and among non-Asians. Both overweight and obesity were associated with the risk of gastric cardia cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mi Ah; Kim, Jin Hwa

    2017-01-27

    An inverse association has been reported between coffee consumption and the risk of several cancers. However, the association between coffee and thyroid cancer is controversial. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the association between coffee consumption and the risk of thyroid cancer through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Published studies were examined from PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central, and the reference lists of the retrieved articles. The summary odds ratio (OR) for the association between coffee consumption was categorized as highest versus lowest consumption, and thyroid cancer risk was calculated using a fixed effects model. Subgroup analyses by study design, geographic location, source of controls, and adjusted variables were performed. A total of 1039 thyroid cancer cases and 220,816 controls were identified from five case-control studies and two cohort studies. The summary OR for the association between coffee consumption and thyroid cancer risk was 0.88 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.71-1.07). There was no significant heterogeneity among the study results (I² = 0%, p = 0.79). However, the beneficial effect of coffee consumption on thyroid cancer was found only in hospital-based case-control studies (OR= 0.59, 95% CI= 0.37-0.93). There was no significant association between coffee consumption and thyroid cancer risk according to our meta-analysis results. These findings should be interpreted with caution because of potential biases and confounding variables. Further prospective studies with a larger number of cases are encouraged to confirm these results.

  14. Tea and coffee consumption and risk of laryngeal cancer: a systematic review meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangbo; Long, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    Tea and coffee are the most commonly consumed beverages in the worldwide. The relationship between tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer was still unclear. Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic database (Medline and EMBASE) and reviewing the reference lists of relevant articles until Oct. 2013. Observational studies that reported RRs and 95% CIs for the link of tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer were eligible. A meta-analysis was obtained to combine study-specific RRs with a random-effects model. A total of 2,803 cases and 503,234 controls in 10 independent studies were identified. The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66-1.61). However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03-2.11). A dose-response relationship between coffee intake and laryngeal carcinoma was detected; however, no evidence of dose-response link between tea consumption and laryngeal carcinoma risk was detected. The results from this meta-analysis of observational studies demonstrate that coffee consumption would increase the laryngeal cancer risk, while tea intake was not associated with risk of laryngeal carcinoma.

  15. Interventions with family caregivers of cancer patients: meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel L; Katapodi, Maria C; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Lingling; Mood, Darlene W

    2010-01-01

    Family caregivers of cancer patients receive little preparation, information, or support to perform their caregiving role. However, their psychosocial needs must be addressed so they can maintain their own health and provide the best possible care to the patient. The purpose of this article is to analyze the types of interventions offered to family caregivers of cancer patients, and to determine the effect of these interventions on various caregiver outcomes. Meta-analysis was used to analyze data obtained from 29 randomized clinical trials published from 1983 through March 2009. Three types of interventions were offered to caregivers: psychoeducational, skills training, and therapeutic counseling. Most interventions were delivered jointly to patients and caregivers, but they varied considerably with regard to dose and duration. The majority of caregivers were female (64%) and Caucasian (84%), and ranged in age from 18 to 92 years (mean age, 55 years). Meta-analysis indicated that although these interventions had small to medium effects, they significantly reduced caregiver burden, improved caregivers' ability to cope, increased their self-efficacy, and improved aspects of their quality of life. Various intervention characteristics were also examined as potential moderators. Clinicians need to deliver research-tested interventions to help caregivers and patients cope effectively and maintain their quality of life. Copyright 2010 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  16. Tea and Coffee Consumption and Risk of Laryngeal Cancer: A Systematic Review Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangbo; Long, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    Background Tea and coffee are the most commonly consumed beverages in the worldwide. The relationship between tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer was still unclear. Methods Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic database (Medline and EMBASE) and reviewing the reference lists of relevant articles until Oct. 2013. Observational studies that reported RRs and 95% CIs for the link of tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer were eligible. A meta-analysis was obtained to combine study-specific RRs with a random-effects model. Results A total of 2,803 cases and 503,234 controls in 10 independent studies were identified. The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66–1.61). However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03–2.11). A dose-response relationship between coffee intake and laryngeal carcinoma was detected; however, no evidence of dose-response link between tea consumption and laryngeal carcinoma risk was detected. Conclusions The results from this meta-analysis of observational studies demonstrate that coffee consumption would increase the laryngeal cancer risk, while tea intake was not associated with risk of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:25502726

  17. Electromagnetic field exposure and male breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of 18 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing-Wen; Li, Xiao-Rong; Gao, Hong-Yu; Yin, Jie-Yun; Qin, Qin; Nie, Shao-Fa; Wei, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that electromagnetic fields (EMF) exposure may increase male breast cancer risk has been discussed for a long time. However, arguments have been presented that studies limited by poor quality could have led to statistically significant results by chance or bias. Moreover, data fo the last 10 years have not been systematically summarized. To confirm any possible association, a meta-analysis was performed by a systematic search strategy. Totals of 7 case-control and 11 cohort studies was identified and pooled ORs with 95% CIs were used as the principal outcome measures. Data from these studies were extracted with a standard meta-analysis procedure and grouped in relation to study design, cut-off point, exposure assessment method, adjustment and exposure model. A statistical significant increased risk of male breast cancer with EMF exposure was defined (pooled ORs = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.14 -1.52, P EMF exposure may be associated with the increase risk of male breast cancer despite the arguments raised.

  18. a meta-analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Prostate cancer; XRCC3 gene; Genetic variant; Meta-analysis ... Pubmed, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and. Chinese National ... indicated a lack of heterogeneity among the studies17. The fixed .... able quality. Third, the ...

  19. Cancer in numbers: Do preventive measures for colorectal cancer apply?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Tárraga López

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Introduction: Cancer is a global problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second most common cancer in men, after lung cancer, and is the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. It is also the second leading cause of death in men and women separately, and is the second most common cause of cancer death if both genders are considered together. CRC accounts for approximately 10% of cancer deaths. Modifiable risk factors for CRC include smoking, physical inactivity, overweight and obesity, processed meat consumption, and excessive alcohol consumption. CRC screening programs are possible in economically developed countries. However, attention should be paid in the future to geographically populated areas and western lifestyles. Objective: To evaluate the effect on the incidence and mortality of diet and lifestyle of CRC and to determine the effect of secondary prevention through the early diagnosis of CRC. Methodology: An exhaustive search of Medline and Pubmed articles related to primary and secondary prevention of CRC is carried out and a meta-analysis of the same blocks is carried out. Results: 301 items related to primary or secondary prevention of CRC were recovered. Of these, 177 were considered valid in the meta-analysis: 12 in epidemiology, 56 in diet and lifestyle, and over 77 different projections for the early detection of CRC. Cancer is a global problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. There is no question of which environmental factors, probably diet, may explain these cancer rates. Excessive consumption of alcohol and high cholesterol diet are associated with a high risk of colon cancer. A diet low in folic acid and vitamin B6 is also associated with an increased risk of developing colon cancer with overexpression of p53. Eating pulses at least three times a week reduces the risk of

  20. [Effects of Psychoeducational Intervention for Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hee; Bae, Sun Hyoung

    2017-04-01

    This study was a systematic review and meta-analysis designed to investigate effects of psychoeducational intervention for cancer survivors. Ten databases were searched. Two reviewers independently performed the selection of the studies, data extraction and assessment. The risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane Collaboration's tool. To estimate the effect size, meta-analysis of the studies was performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis and RevMan programs. Of 18,781 publications identified, 35 met inclusion criteria, and 25 studies were used to estimate effect size of psychoeducational intervention. Effect sizes (standardized mean difference [SMD]) were heterogeneous and random effects models were used in the analyses. Psychoeducational intervention was effective for quality of life (n=2,410, ES=0.23; 95% CI: 0.09~0.37), coping and self-efficacy (n=179, ES=0.68; 95% CI: 0.26~1.11), anxiety (n=1,786, ES=-0.26; 95% CI: -0.37~-0.15), depression (n=1,910, ES=-0.28; 95% CI: -0.37~-0.18), and psychological distress (n=2,242, ES=-0.31; 95% CI: -0.46~-0.17). Subgroup analysis showed that counseling was the most effective intervention for quality of life, and behavioral therapy was an effective intervention for all positive and negative outcomes. Publication bias was not detected except for psychological distress. Psychoeducational intervention appears to be effective in improving quality of life and coping and self-efficacy, and it is effective in reducing psychological symptoms in cancer survivors. Behavioral therapy, especially, is commonly effective in improving psychosocial outcomes. However, low-quality evidence, variability in the designs of existing studies, and publication bias suggest that additional high-quality trials should be conducted in the future.

  1. Sphingosine kinase 1 and cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1 is a key regulator of the dynamic ceramide/sphingosine 1-phosphate rheostat balance and important in the pathological cancer genesis, progression, and metastasis processes. Many studies have demonstrated SK1 overexpressed in various cancers, but no meta-analysis has evaluated the relationship between SK1 and various cancers. METHODS: We retrieved relevant articles from the PubMed, EBSCO, ISI, and OVID databases. A pooled odds ratio (OR was used to assess the associations between SK1 expression and cancer; hazard ratios (HR were used for 5-year and overall survival. Review Manager 5.0 was used for the meta-analysis, and publication bias was evaluated with STATA 12.0 (Egger's test. RESULTS: Thirty-four eligible studies (n=4,673 patients were identified. SK1 positivity and high expression were significantly different between cancer, non-cancer, and benign tissues. SK1 mRNA and protein expression levels were elevated in the cancer tissues, compared with the normal tissues. SK1 positivity rates differed between various cancer types (lowest [27.3%] in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and highest [82.2%] in tongue squamous cell carcinoma. SK1 positivity and high expression were associated with 5-year survival; the HR was 1.86 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-2.94 for breast cancer, 1.58 (1.08-2.31 for gastric cancer, and 2.68 (2.10-3.44 for other cancers; the total cancer HR was 2.21 (95% CI, 1.83-2.67; P < 0.00001. The overall survival HRs were 2.09 (95% CI, 1.35-3.22, 1.56 (1.08-2.25, and 2.62 (2.05-3.35 in breast, gastric, and other cancers, respectively. The total effect HR was 2.21 (95% CI, 1.83-2.66; P < 0.00001. CONCLUSIONS: SK1 positivity and high expression were significantly associated with cancer and a shorter 5-year and overall survival. SK1 positivity rates vary tremendously among the cancer types. It is necessary to further explore whether SK1 might be a predictive biomarker of outcomes in

  2. CTLA-4 polymorphisms associate with breast cancer susceptibility in Asians: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have investigated the association between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility, but the results remained inconsistent. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between four common CTLA-4 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk by a meta-analysis, aiming to derive a comprehensive and precise conclusion. We searched EMBASE, Pubmed, Web of Science, CNKI, and Wanfang databases until July 18th, 2016. Finally, ten eligible studies involving 4,544 breast cancer patients and 4,515 cancer-free controls were included; all these studies were from Asia. Odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI were used to evaluate the breast cancer risk in five genetic models. The results indicated that the CTLA-4 +49A>G (rs231775 polymorphism had a significant association with decreased breast cancer risk in allelic, homozygous, dominant and recessive models. Also, the +6230G>A (rs3087243 polymorphism reduced breast cancer risk especially in the Chinese population under homozygous and recessive models. In contrast, the −1661A>G (rs4553808 polymorphism increased breast cancer risk in allelic, heterozygous and dominant models, whereas −1722 T>C (rs733618 did not relate to breast cancer risk. In conclusion, CTLA-4 polymorphisms significantly associate with breast cancer susceptibility in Asian populations, and different gene loci may have different effects on breast cancer development. Further large-scale studies including multi-racial populations are required to confirm our findings.

  3. Myeloperoxidase polymorphism, menopausal status, and breast cancer risk: an update meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Qin

    Full Text Available Myeloperoxidase (MPO is a metabolic/oxidative lysosomal enzyme secreted by reactive neutrophils at the sites of inflamed organs and tissues during phagocytosis. MPO has been either directly or indirectly linked to neoplasia, which is a well-established risk factor for many types of cancer. A large number of studies have reported the role of MPO G-463A polymorphism regarding breast-cancer risk. However, the published findings are inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to determine more precise estimations for the relationship. Eligible studies were identified by searching several electronic databases for relevant reports published before June 2012. According to the inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria, a total of five eligible studies were included in the pooled analyses. When the five eligible studies concerning MPO G-463A polymorphism were pooled into this meta-analysis, there was no evidence found for a significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk in any genetic model. We also categorized by ethnicity (Caucasian or Asian for subgroup analysis; according to this subgroup analysis, we found no significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk in any genetic model. However, in the stratified analysis for the premenopausal group, women carrying the AA genotype were found to have a significantly reduced risk (OR = 0.56, 95% CI 0.34-0.94, p = 0.027. Under the recessive model, there was a significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk (OR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.34-0.93, p = 0.025. We conclude that MPO-G463A polymorphism might not be a good predictor of breast-cancer risk, though menopausal status modified women's risk of developing breast cancer.

  4. The Association between Leptin Level and Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingping Niu

    Full Text Available Contradictory results have been reported regarding the association between leptin level and breast cancer. Therefore, a meta-analysis was performed to investigate this issue.Published literature from PubMed and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI Database was retrieved. This study was performed based on different cases and control groups. The combined effect ([Formula: see text] with 95% confidence interval (CI was calculated using fixed-effects or random-effects model analysis.Overall, the mean serum leptin level of case groups was significantly higher than that of control groups. A For 9 studies comparing breast cancer cases and healthy controls the combined effect [Formula: see text] was 0.58 with 95% CI (0.48, 0.68. B For 4 studies comparing premenopausal breast cancer cases and healthy controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.32 (0.12, 0.52. C For 5 studies comparing postmenopausal cases and healthy controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.65 (0.46, 0.84. D For 4 studies comparing breast cancer cases and breast benign controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.38 (0.17, 0.59. E For 2 studies comparing premenopausal breast cancer cases and breast benign controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.33 (-0.25, 0.91. F For 6 studies comparing postmenopausal breast cancer cases and breast benign controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.39 (0.19, 0.60. G For 4 studies comparing lymph node metastasis positive cases and negative controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.72 (0.45, 1.00. H For 3 studies comparing breast benign cases and healthy controls the [Formula: see text] was 0.71 (0.41, 1.01.This meta-analysis suggests that leptin level plays a role in breast cancer and has potential for development as a diagnostic tool.

  5. Environmental Polychlorinated Biphenyl Exposure and Breast Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Zhang

    Full Text Available Association between polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB exposure and breast cancer risk has been widely studied, but the results remain controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the evidences from observational studies on PCB exposure and breast cancer risk.Relevant studies with data on internal PCB dose were identified from PubMed, EMBASE, CBM and CNKI databases through November 2014. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were applied to assess the association between PCB exposure and breast cancer risk. Heterogeneity test, sensitivity analysis, subgroup analysis and publication bias test were also performed. To further explore the association between specific groups of PCB congeners and breast cancer, we examined the PCB congeners classified, according to their structural, biological and pharmacokinetics properties, as group I (potentially estrogenic, group II (potentially anti-estrogenic and immunotoxic, dioxin-like, and group III (phenobarbital, CYP1A and CYP2B inducers, biologically persistent.Of 660 studies screened, 25 studies which met criteria were selected, involving a total of 12866 participants (6088 cases and 6778 controls from eight countries. The results showed that the risk of breast cancer was associated with group II (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.08-1.40 and group III (OR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.09-1.43 PCBs, but not with group I (OR = 1.10, 95%CI: 0.97-1.24 PCBs or total PCB exposure (OR = 1.09, 95%CI: 0.97-1.22.Our meta-analysis based on the selected studies found group II and group III PCB exposure might contribute to the risk of breast cancer. More studies in developing countries with higher PCB levels are needed, as well as studies to explore the relationships between mixtures of organochlorine compounds and breast cancer risk.

  6. Meta-analysis of the effects of beta blocker on survival time in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chel Hun; Song, Taejong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Choi, Jun Kuk; Park, Jin-Young; Yoon, Aera; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Tae-Joong; Bae, Duk-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2014-07-01

    This study was to elucidate the potential benefit of beta blockers on cancer survival. We comprehensively searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from their inception to April 2013. Two authors independently screened and reviewed the eligibility of each study and coded the participants, treatment, and outcome characteristics. The primary outcomes were overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Twelve studies published between 1993 and 2013 were included in the final analysis. Four papers reported results from 10 independent groups, resulting in a total of 18 comparisons based on data obtained from 20,898 subjects. Effect sizes (hazard ratios, HR) were heterogeneous, and random-effects models were used in the analyses. The meta-analysis demonstrated that beta blocker use is associated with improved OS (HR 0.79; 95 % CI 0.67-0.93; p = 0.004) and DFS (HR 0.69; 95 % CI 0.53-0.91; p = 0.009). Although statistically not significant, the effect size was greater in patients with low-stage cancer or cancer treated primarily with surgery than in patients with high-stage cancer or cancer treated primarily without surgery (HR 0.60 vs. 0.78, and 0.60 vs. 0.80, respectively). Although only two study codes were analyzed, the studies using nonselective beta blockers showed that there was no overall effect on OS (HR 0.52, 95 % CI 0.09-3.04). This meta-analysis provides evidence that beta blocker use can be associated with the prolonged survival of cancer patients, especially patients with early-stage cancer treated primarily with surgery.

  7. Association between CD14 gene polymorphisms and cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two polymorphisms, -260C/T and -651C/T, in the CD14 gene have been implicated in susceptibility to cancer. However, the results remain inconclusive. This meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between the two polymorphisms and risk of cancer. METHODS: All eligible case-control studies published up to March 2014 were identified by searching PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI and WanFang database. Pooled odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence interval (CI were used to access the strength of this association in fixed- or random-effects model. RESULTS: 17 case-control studies from fourteen articles were included. Of those, there were 17 studies (4198 cases and 4194 controls for -260C/T polymorphism and three studies (832 cases and 1190 controls for -651C/T polymorphism. Overall, no significant associations between the two polymorphisms of CD14 gene and cancer risk were found. When stratified by ethnicity, cancer type and source of control, similar results were observed among them. In addition, in further subgroups analysis by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection status and tumor location in gastric cancer subgroup, we found that the CD14 -260C/T polymorphism may increase the risk of gastric cancer in H. pylori-infected individuals. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggests that the CD14 -260C/T polymorphism may increase the risk of gastric cancer in H. pylori-infected individuals. However, large and well-designed studies are warranted to validate our findings.

  8. Association between Breastfeeding and Endometrial Cancer Risk: Evidence from a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianlian Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of the association between breastfeeding and risk of endometrial cancer is still conflicting. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between breastfeeding and endometrial cancer risk. Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed and Web of Knowledge through April 2015. A random effect model was used to combine the data for analysis. Sensitivity analysis and publication bias were conducted. Dose-response relationships were assessed by restricted cubic spline and variance-weighted least squares regression analysis. Fourteen articles involving 5158 endometrial cancer cases and 706,946 participants were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled results suggested that breastfeeding significantly reduced the risk of endometrial cancer (summary relative risk (RR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.62–0.96, I2: 63.0%, especially in North America (summary RR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.79–0.95. A linear dose-response relationship was found, with the risk of endometrial cancer decreased by 2% for every one-month increase in the duration of breastfeeding (summary RR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97–0.99. Our analysis suggested that breastfeeding, particularly a longer duration of breastfeeding, was inversely associated with the risk of endometrial cancer, especially in North America, but not in Europe and Asia, probably due to the small number of cases included. Due to this limitation, further studies originating in other countries are required to assess the association between breastfeeding and endometrial cancer risk.

  9. Distress in Couples Coping with Cancer: A Meta-Analysis and Critical Review of Role and Gender Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedoorn, Mariet; Sanderman, Robbert; Bolks, Hilde N.; Tuinstra, Jolanda; Coyne, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Research concerning distress in couples coping with cancer was integrated using meta-analysis and narrative critical appraisal. Individual levels of distress were determined more by gender than by the role of being the person with cancer versus that person's partner. That is, women reported consistently more distress than men regardless of their…

  10. CHRNA5 risk variant predicts delayed smoking cessation and earlier lung cancer diagnosis--a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, L.S.; Hung, R.J.; Baker, T.; Horton, A.; Culverhouse, R.; Saccone, N.; Cheng, I.; Deng, B.; Han, Y.; Hansen, H.M.; Horsman, J.; Kim, C.; Lutz, S.; Rosenberger, A.; Aben, K.K.H.; Andrew, A.S.; Breslau, N.; Chang, S.C.; Dieffenbach, A.K.; Dienemann, H.; Frederiksen, B.; Han, J.; Hatsukami, D.K.; Johnson, E.O.; Pande, M.; Wrensch, M.R.; McLaughlin, J.; Skaug, V.; Heijden, H.F. van der; Wampfler, J.; Wenzlaff, A.; Woll, P.; Zienolddiny, S.; Bickeboller, H.; Brenner, H.; Duell, E.J.; Haugen, A.; Heinrich, J.; Hokanson, J.E.; Hunter, D.J.; Kiemeney, B.; Lazarus, P.; Marchand, L. Le; Liu, G.; Mayordomo, J.; Risch, A.; Schwartz, A.G.; Teare, D.; Wu, X.; Wiencke, J.K.; Yang, P.; Zhang, Z.F.; Spitz, M.R.; Kraft, P.; Amos, C.I.; Bierut, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent meta-analyses show strong evidence of associations among genetic variants in CHRNA5 on chromosome 15q25, smoking quantity, and lung cancer. This meta-analysis tests whether the CHRNA5 variant rs16969968 predicts age of smoking cessation and age of lung cancer diagnosis. METHODS:

  11. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  12. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2011-05-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  13. IL-1α -889 C/T polymorphism and cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Daye; Hao, Yiwen; Zhou, Wenling

    2014-01-01

    The -889 C/T polymorphism in the interleukin-1α (IL-1α) gene has been implicated in the risk of cancer, but the results are inconclusive. The present meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between the -889 C/T polymorphism and cancer risk. A literature search in PubMed, Embase™, Web of Science™, Science Direct(®), SpringerLink, EBSCO, Wanfang, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases was carried out to identify studies investigating the association between IL-1α -889 C/T polymorphism and cancer risk. The odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the strength of association. A total of 20 publications, involving 6,782 cases and 7,767 controls, were included in this meta-analysis. Combined analysis revealed a significant association between -889 C/T polymorphism and cancer risk under an allele model (OR =1.12, 95% CI =1.02-1.24, P=0.02), recessive model (OR =1.34, 95% CI =1.06-1.68, P=0.01), and homozygous comparison (OR =1.38, 95% CI =1.10-1.74, P<0.01). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity showed there was significant association between cancer risk and IL-1α -889C/T polymorphism in Asian populations under a recessive model (OR =2.57, 95% CI =1.11-5.98, P=0.03) and homozygous comparison (OR =2.60, 95% CI =1.12-6.04, P=0.03). Moreover, a subgroup analysis was conducted by source of control, and a statistically increased cancer risk was found in the hospital-based group, under a recessive model (OR =1.62, 95% CI =1.03-2.56, P=0.04) and homozygous comparison (OR =1.67, 95% CI =1.04-2.68, P=0.03). This meta-analysis suggests that IL-1α -889 C/T polymorphism contributes to cancer susceptibility. Further large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm this association.

  14. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Feng; ZHANG, ZHEN-HAI; Wang, Shu-Bao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level.

  15. Association between the ERCC5 Asp1104His polymorphism and cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Ling Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excision repair cross complementing group 5 (ERCC5 or XPG plays an important role in regulating DNA excision repair, removal of bulky lesions caused by environmental chemicals or UV light. Mutations in this gene cause a rare autosomal recessive syndrome, and its functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may alter DNA repair capacity phenotype and cancer risk. However, a series of epidemiological studies on the association between the ERCC5 Asp1104His polymorphism (rs17655, G>C and cancer susceptibility generated conflicting results. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To derive a more precise estimation of the association between the ERCC5 Asp1104His polymorphism and overall cancer risk, we performed a meta-analysis of 44 published case-control studies, in which a total of 23,490 cases and 27,168 controls were included. To provide additional biological plausibility, we also assessed the genotype-gene expression correlation from the HapMap phase II release 23 data with 270 individuals from 4 ethnic populations. When all studies were pooled, we found no statistical evidence for a significantly increased cancer risk in the recessive genetic models (His/His vs. Asp/Asp: OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.92-1.06, P = 0.242 for heterogeneity or His/His vs. Asp/His + Asp/Asp: OR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.03, P = 0.260 for heterogeneity, nor in further stratified analyses by cancer type, ethnicity, source of controls and sample size. In the genotype-phenotype correlation analysis from 270 individuals, we consistently found no significant correlation of the Asp1104His polymorphism with ERCC5 mRNA expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This meta-analysis suggests that it is unlikely that the ERCC5 Asp1104His polymorphism may contribute to individual susceptibility to cancer risk.

  16. Systematic meta-analysis on association of human papilloma virus and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, Nallan C S K; Allam, Neeharika Satya Jyothi; Gandhi Babu, D B; Waghray, Shefali; Badam, R K; Lavanya, Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is a disease with complex etiology. There is a strong evidence for the role of smoking, alcohol, genetic susceptibility, and indications that DNA viruses could also be involved in oral cancer. Recognized initially as sexually transmitted agent, human papilloma virus (HPV) is now considered a human carcinogen. Papilloma viruses are epitheliotropic viruses. A strong association of cervical cancer has been implicated with high-risk HPV16 and HPV18 infections, establishing the viral pathogenesis of the carcinoma. The etiopathogenesis is still unclear referring mainly to conflicting evidences in the detection of such viruses in oral carcinoma in spite of few studies suggesting their positive correlation. This systematic meta-analysis aimed to provide evidence-based analysis of literature relating oral cancer and HPV, along with identification of reliable diagnostic methodology for identifying HPV in oral and oropharyngeal cancer. A systematic review was performed using PubMed (from the year 1995 to 2015), Medline, Cochrane, ScienceDirect, and the Internet search. Reviewed literature included randomized control trials, cross sectional and cohort studies. Pooled data were analyzed by calculating relative risk and odds ratios (ORs), using a binary random-effects model. Out of 1497 cases, 588 patients were positive for HPV DNA, detected by various methods. About 39.27% of case samples were positive for HPV DNA. The calculated OR was 2.82 and 95% confidence interval, which showed significantly an increased risk of HPV among case group when compared to that of controls. The present meta-analysis suggests a potentially significant casual relation between HPV and oral and oropharyngeal cancers.

  17. Age at puberty and risk of testicular cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, M; Malavassi, J L; Richiardi, L

    2012-12-01

    Testicular cancer is one of the most rapidly increasing tumour types but its aetiology is still largely unexplained. Cryptorchidism and familial testicular cancer, established risk factors, explain less than 10% of all cases. Among investigated post-natal factors, early puberty was suggested as a potential risk factor but the topic has been poorly investigated. We undertook a meta-analysis of the effect of age at puberty on testicular cancer risk, attempting at enhancing the homogeneity in the definition of the exposure among studies to obtain valid pooled estimates. Search strategies were conducted in PubMed on December 2011. All markers of puberty onset (age at voice change, age when started shaving and reported age at onset) were considered. We re-categorized age at puberty from all studies into a common three-level variable: younger than peers, same age as peers, older than peers. A total of 391 references were retrieved, of which 12 met the inclusion criteria. Later puberty appeared to be protective. In particular late vs. same age at start shaving gave an OR of 0.84 (95% CI: 0.75-0.95, five studies); late vs. same age at voice change gave an OR of 0.87 (95% CI: 0.75-1.01, five studies); and later age than peers at reported onset of puberty gave an OR of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.73-0.89, eight studies). Early puberty showed no effect on testicular cancer risk. This meta-analysis has found consistent evidence of a decreased risk of testicular cancer in association with later puberty, suggesting that post-natal factors may contribute to testicular cancer risk. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2012 European Academy of Andrology.

  18. Analgesic use and the risk of kidney cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiri, Toni K.; Je, Youjin; Cho, Eunyoung

    2013-01-01

    Analgesics are the most commonly used over-the-counter drugs worldwide with certain analgesics having cancer prevention effect. The evidence for an increased risk of developing kidney cancer with analgesic use is mixed. Using a meta-analysis design of available observational epidemiologic studies, we investigated the association between analgesic use and kidney cancer risk. We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to identify eligible case-control or cohort studies published in English until June 2012 for 3 categories of analgesics: acetaminophen, aspirin or other Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). Study-specific effect estimates were pooled to compute an overall relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) using a random effects model for each category of the analgesics. We identified 20 studies (14 with acetaminophen, 13 with aspirin, and 5 with other NSAIDs) that were performed in 6 countries, including 8,420 cases of kidney cancer. Use of acetaminophen and non-aspirin NSAIDs were associated with an increased risk of kidney cancer (pooled RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.44 and 1.25; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.46, respectively). For aspirin use, we found no overall increased risk (pooled RR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.28), except for non-US studies (5 studies, pooled RR=1.17, 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.33). Similar increases in risks were seen with higher analgesic intake. In this largest meta-analysis to date, we found that acetaminophen and non-aspirin NSAIDs are associated with a significant risk of developing kidney cancer. Further work is needed to elucidate biologic mechanisms behind these findings. PMID:23400756

  19. Coffee is protective against oral and pharyngeal cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J; Monteiro, L; Albuquerque, R; Pacheco, J-J; Khan, Z; Lopez-Lopez, J; Warnakulasuryia, S

    2017-09-01

    Coffee is one of the most popular and consumable drinks worldwide. However, there are conflicting results on the influence of this drink in oral and pharyngeal cancer risk. To clarify this, we aimed to systemically review and carry out a meta-analysis of the relevant literature on the association between coffee and oral and pharyngeal cancer. We carried out an electronic search of publications up to August 2016 from PubMed, National Library of Medicines Medline, Embase, Science Direct and the Cochrane Central Register. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale was used to address the quality of the studies a meta-analysis was carried out using random-effects models. From the 22,515 entries identified in the search, 13 case-control and 4 cohort studies were selected. With regards to quality on the Newcastle-Ottawa scale, an overall value of 6.06 was obtained. The analysis for oral and pharyngeal cancer grouped together indicated a pooled OR of .69 (95% CI of .57-.84; pcancers we observed a pooled OR of 0.82; 95% CI =.58-1.16; p=.257) and for pharyngeal cancers a pooled OR of .72 (95% CI of 0.54-.95; p=.019). There was no significant publication bias. The results show an inverse association between high coffee consumption and the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancers, which indicates that coffee may have a protective role against these cancers. Further larger prospective observational cohort studies are needed to address any effect of other possible co-factors.

  20. Consumption of red and processed meat and esophageal cancer risk: meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yuni; Song, Sujin; Song, Yoonju; Lee, Jung Eun

    2013-02-21

    To summarize the evidence about the association between red and processed meat intake and the risk of esophageal cancer, we systematically searched the PubMed and EMBASE databases up to May 2012, with a restriction to English publications, and the references of the retrieved articles. We combined the study-specific relative risks (RRs) and 95%CI, comparing the highest with the lowest categories of consumption by using a random-effects model. A total of 4 cohort studies and 23 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. The combined RRs (95%CI) of the cohort studies comparing the highest and lowest categories were 1.26 (1.00-1.59) for red meat and 1.25 (0.83-1.86) for processed meat. For the case-control studies, the combined RRs (95%CI) comparing the highest and lowest categories were 1.44 (1.16-1.80) for red meat and 1.36 (1.07-1.74) for processed meat. Findings from this meta-analysis suggest that a higher consumption of red meat was associated with a greater risk of esophageal cancer.

  1. Alcohol drinking and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of the dose-risk relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Irene; Scotti, Lorenza; Jenab, Mazda; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Bellocco, Rino; Rota, Matteo; Corrao, Giovanni; Bravi, Francesca; Boffetta, Paolo; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2010-03-15

    In order to provide a more precise quantification of the association between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer risk, we performed a meta-analysis of relevant dose-risk results. We conducted a PubMed search of all case-control (N=21) and cohort (N=11) studies published up to March 2009. We computed summary relative risk (RR) estimates using either fixed- or, in the presence of heterogeneity, random-effects models. The pooled RR was 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 0.86-0.97) for or = 3 drinks/day. The increased risk for heavy drinking was similar in women and men, but apparently stronger in cohort studies (RR=1.29), in studies with high quality index (RR=1.30), and did not appear to be explained by residual confounding by either history of pancreatitis or tobacco smoking. This meta-analysis provides strong evidence for the absence of a role of moderate drinking in pancreatic carcinogenesis, coupled to an increased risk for heavy alcohol drinking. Given the moderate increase in risk and the low prevalence of heavy drinkers in most populations, alcohol appears to be responsible only for a small fraction of all pancreatic cancers.

  2. Preoperative mechanical bowel preparation in elective colorectal surgery: an update of systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Ferreira Güenaga

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The belief that mechanical bowel preparation is related to the reduction of complications in elective colorectal surgery is based on observational studies and expert opinion. This question led the authors to a systematic literature review, with the completion of meta-analysis, followed by three updates. METHOD: The sources of information were EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, IBECS, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and letters to the authors. The studies were included according to the randomization criteria. The studied variables were: anastomotic dehiscence, mortality and operatory wound infection. The analysis was divided into two comparisons: one group with mechanical preparation (Group A compared with a group without preparation (Group B (Comparison I and a group submitted to rectal enema (Comparison II. RESULTS: We analyzed 5,805 patients in 20 clinical trials. In comparison I, anastomotic leak occurred in 4.4% (101/2,275 patients in Group A and 4.5% (103/2,258 patients in Group B. In comparison II, anastomotic leak occurred in 4.4% (27/601 patients in Group A and 3.4% (21/609 patients in Group B. CONCLUSION: Despite the inclusion of more studies, evidences found in studies did not show any benefit obtained from the use of preoperative mechanical bowel preparation or rectal cleansing enemas in elective colorectal surgery.A crença de que o preparo mecânico do cólon está relacionado à diminuição de complicações na cirurgia colorretal eletiva é baseada em estudos observacionais e opinião de especialistas. Seu questionamento motivou os autores na busca sistemática da literatura, com a realização de meta-análise, seguida de três atualizações. MÉTODO: Fontes de informação foram EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, IBECS, Registros de Ensaios Clínicos Casualizados da Colaboração Cochrane e cartas para os autores. Os estudos foram incluídos de acordo com os critérios de casualização. Os desfechos clínicos estudados foram: deisc

  3. Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase gene polymorphism (Ser326Cys) and cancer risk: updated meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae Jeong; Chung, Joo-Ho; Ban, Ju Yeon

    2017-01-01

    Genetic polymorphism of human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) has been reported to have a relationship with the risk of the development of various cancers. Many studies have described the influence of Ser326Cys polymorphism of the hOGG1 gene on cancer susceptibility. However, the results have remained inconclusive and controversial. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to more precisely determine the relationship between the hOGG1 polymorphism and the development of cancer. Electronic databases including PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, and the Korean Studies Information Service System (KISS) were searched. The odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI), and p value were calculated to assess the strength of the association with the risk of cancer using Comprehensive Meta-analysis software (Corporation, NJ, USA). The 127 studies including 38,757 cancer patients and 50,177 control subjects were analyzed for the meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis revealed that G allele of Ser326Cys polymorphism of the hOGG1 gene statistically increased the susceptibility of cancer (all population, OR = 1.092, 95% CI = 1.051-1.134, p polymorphism may be a candidate marker of cancer. PMID:28415770

  4. Microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer: clinicopathological significance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Setaffy, Lisa; Langner, Cord

    2015-01-01

    Although often viewed as a single disease, colorectal cancer more accurately represents a constellation of heterogeneous subtypes that result from different combinations of genetic events and epigenetic alterations...

  5. Coffee consumption and bladder cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weixiang; Tong, Yeqing; Zhao, Qiang; Yu, Guangxia; Wei, Xiaoyun; Lu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Controversial results of the association between coffee consumption and bladder cancer (BC) risk were reported among epidemiological studies. Therefore, we conducted this meta-analysis to clarify the association. Relevant studies were identified according to the inclusion criteria. Totally, 34 case-control studies and 6 cohort studies were included in our meta-analysis. The overall odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) between coffee consumption and BC risk was 1.33 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.48). The summary ORs of BC for an increase of 1 cup of coffee per day were 1.05 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.06) for case-control studies and 1.03 (95% CI 0.99 to 1.06) for cohort studies. The overall ORs for male coffee drinkers, female coffee drinkers and coffee drinkers of both gender were 1.31 (95% CI: 1.08 to 1.59), 1.30 (95% CI: 0.87 to 1.96) and 1.35 (95% CI: 1.20 to 1.51). Compared with smokers (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.70), non-smokers had a higher risk (OR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.25 to 2.35) for BC. Results of this meta-analysis suggested that there was an increased risk between coffee consumption and BC. Male coffee drinkers and non-smoking coffee drinkers were more likely to develop BC. PMID:25761588

  6. Diagnostic Ultrasound in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2014-01-01

    tumour stage and whether there is distant spread of the disease at the time of diagnosis. Ultrasound Diagnostics is non-unionized and less costly than MDCT, MRI and PET/CT. Although MRI in recent years has gained ground in diagnostics in Denmark, there are still patients who have contraindications to MRI...... or are non-compliant. Also, patient movement during the MRI sequence acquisition degrades image quality on MRI and decreases accuracy. Over the last years, the ultrasound technique has improved further by Power Doppler, intravenous contrast enhancement, and elastography. Ultrasound diagnostics has...... the potential to contribute to the staging of colorectal cancer. The purpose of these studies was to determine the usefulness of ultrasound diagnostics in patients with colorectal cancer.The purpose of the TRUS studies was to compare staging of rectal carcinomas using digital rectal exploration...

  7. Comparison of virtual cystoscopy and ultrasonography for bladder cancer detection: A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu Xinhua; Huang Xiaolu [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Department of Ultrasonic, Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Wu Lianming [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Huang Gang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Ping Xiong, E-mail: pxiong6@126.com [Department of Ultrasonic, Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Yan Weili, E-mail: wl_yan67@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Background and purpose: Bladder cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in patients presenting with haematuria. Early detection is crucial for improving patient prognosis. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to evaluate and compare the detection validity (sensitivity and specificity) of virtual cystoscopy (VC) and ultrasonography (US). Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed and the Cochrane Library for studies evaluating diagnosis validity of VC and US between January 1966 and December 2009. Meta-analysis methods were used to pool sensitivity and specificity and to construct a summary receiver-operating characteristic (SROC) curve. Results: A total of 26 studies that included 3084 patients who fulfilled all of the inclusion criteria were considered for inclusion in the analysis. The pooled sensitivity for bladder cancer detection using CT virtual cystoscopy (CTVC), MR virtual cystoscopy (MRVC) and US was 0.939 (95% CI, 0.919-0.956), 0.908 (95% CI, 0.827-0.959) and 0.779 (95% CI, 0.744-0.812), respectively. The pooled specificity for bladder cancer detection using CTVC, MRVC and US was 0.981 (95% CI, 0.973-0.988), 0.948 (95% CI, 0.884-0.983) and 0.962 (95% CI, 0.953-0.969), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odd ratio (DOR) estimate for CTVC (604.22) were significantly higher than for MRVC (144.35, P < 0.001) and US (72.472, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Our results showed that both CTVC and MRVC are better imaging methods for diagnosing bladder cancer than US. CTVC has higher diagnostic value (sensitivity, specificity and DOR) for the detection of bladder cancer than either MRCT or US.

  8. Exploring association between statin use and breast cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mohaimenul; Yang, Hsuan-Chia; Nguyen, Phung-Anh; Poly, Tahmina Nasrin; Huang, Chih-Wei; Kekade, Shwetambara; Khalfan, Abdulwahed Mohammed; Debnath, Tonmoy; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Abdul, Shabbir Syed

    2017-12-01

    The benefits of statin treatment for preventing cardiac disease are well established. However, preclinical studies suggested that statins may influence mammary cancer growth, but the clinical evidence is still inconsistent. We, therefore, performed an updated meta-analysis to provide a precise estimate of the risk of breast cancer in individuals undergoing statin therapy. For this meta-analysis, we searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Embase, and CINAHL for published studies up to January 31, 2017. Articles were included if they (1) were published in English; (2) had an observational study design with individual-level exposure and outcome data, examined the effect of statin therapy, and reported the incidence of breast cancer; and (3) reported estimates of either the relative risk, odds ratios, or hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We used random-effect models to pool the estimates. Of 2754 unique abstracts, 39 were selected for full-text review, and 36 studies reporting on 121,399 patients met all inclusion criteria. The overall pooled risks of breast cancer in patients using statins were 0.94 (95% CI 0.86-1.03) in random-effect models with significant heterogeneity between estimates (I 2  = 83.79%, p = 0.0001). However, we also stratified by region, the duration of statin therapy, methodological design, statin properties, and individual stain use. Our results suggest that there is no association between statin use and breast cancer risk. However, observational studies cannot clarify whether the observed epidemiologic association is a causal effect or the result of some unmeasured confounding variable. Therefore, more research is needed.

  9. Meta-analysis: Does garlic intake reduce risk of gastric cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodali, R T; Eslick, Guy D

    2015-01-01

    In the past 2 decades, various epidemiological studies investigated whether garlic can positively modify the risk of gastric cancer. Garlic contains numerous sulfide compounds, including diallyl trisulfide, which have anticarcinogenic properties. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine if garlic intake reduces the risk of gastric cancer. An electronic search of MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE to June 2014 was completed. There were 14 case control studies, 2 randomized controlled studies, and 1 cohort study that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. We used a random effects model to calculate pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of gastric cancer with garlic consumption. Meta-analysis of a total of 8,621 cases and 14,889 controls was conducted. Significant variability in duration of garlic intake and reference categories for amount of intake was noted. High, low, and any garlic intake were all associated with reduced risk of gastric cancer. High intake had the most significant risk reduction, OR = 0.49 (95% CI: 0.38-0.62). Heterogeneity was low (I² = 30.85, P = 0.17). A more modest risk reduction was associated with low intake, OR = 0.75 (95% CI: 0.58-0.97). Half of the studies did not separate garlic intake into high or low amounts, intake was only noted as consumption vs. non-consumption. Any amount of consumption still showed a risk reduction similar to low intake, OR = 0.77 (95% CI: 0.60-1.00). Low and any amount of consumption showed moderate heterogeneity (58% and 45%, respectively). Garlic intake appears to be associated with reduced risk of gastric cancer. Further high quality studies are required to confirm this finding and to assess the amount of garlic that needs to be consumed for protective effect.

  10. LINE-1 hypomethylation in blood and tissue samples as an epigenetic marker for cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchitta, Martina; Quattrocchi, Annalisa; Maugeri, Andrea; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Agodi, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review and a meta-analysis were carried out in order to summarize the current published studies and to evaluate LINE-1 hypomethylation in blood and other tissues as an epigenetic marker for cancer risk. A systematic literature search in the Medline database, using PubMed, was conducted for epidemiological studies, published before March 2014. The random-effects model was used to estimate weighted mean differences (MDs) with 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs). Furthermore, subgroup analyses were conducted by sample type (tissue or blood samples), cancer types, and by assays used to measure global DNA methylation levels. The Cochrane software package Review Manager 5.2 was used. A total of 19 unique articles on 6107 samples (2554 from cancer patients and 3553 control samples) were included in the meta-analysis. LINE-1 methylation levels were significantly lower in cancer patients than in controls (MD: -6.40, 95% CI: -7.71, -5.09; psamples (MD -7.55; 95% CI: -9.14, -65.95; psamples (MD: -0.26, 95% CI: -0.69, 0.17; p = 0.23). LINE-1 methylation levels were significantly lower in colorectal and gastric cancer patients than in controls (MD: -8.33; 95% CI: -10.56, -6.10; psamples, especially in certain cancer types. This result was confirmed in tissue samples, both fresh/frozen or FFPE specimens, but not in blood. Further studies are needed to better clarify the role of LINE-1 methylation in specific subgroups, considering both cancer and sample type, and the methods of measurement.

  11. Association between matrix metalloproteinases polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Ming Zhu

    Full Text Available Published data on the relationship between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk have implicated inconclusive results. To evaluate the role of MMPs polymorphisms in ovarian cancer risk, a meta-analysis and systematic review were performed.MMPs polymorphisms which could be quantitatively synthesized were involved in meta-analysis. Five comparison models (homozygote model, heterozygote model, dominant model, recessive model, additive model were carried out, a subgroup analysis was performed to clarify heterogeneity source. The remaining polymorphisms which could not be quantitatively synthesized were involved in systematic review.10 articles with 20 studies were included in this paper. Among those studies, 8 studies involving MMP1 rs1799750 and MMP3 rs34093618 could be meta-analyzed and 12 studies involving 12 polymorphisms could not. Meta-analysis showed that no associations were found between MMP1 rs1799750 (homozygote model: OR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.70-1.23, POR = 0.60; heterozygote model: OR = 1.09, 95%CI = 0.78-1.54, POR = 0.61; dominant model: OR = 1.02, 95%CI = 0.83-1.25, POR = 0.84; recessive model: OR = 0.95, 95%CI = 0.75-1.21, POR = 0.67; additive model: OR = 1.00, 95%CI = 0.85-1.17, POR = 0.99, MMP3 rs34093618 (homozygote model: OR = 1.25, 95%CI = 0.70-2.24, POR = 0.46; heterozygote model: OR = 1.08, 95%CI = 0.51-2.31, POR = 0.84; dominant model: OR = 0.97, 95%CI = 0.68-1.38, POR = 0.85; recessive model: OR = 1.12, 95%CI = 0.69-1.80, POR = 0.65; additive model: OR = 1.01, 95%CI = 0.79-1.31, POR = 0.91 and ovarian cancer. Furthermore, similar results were detected in subgroup analysis. The systematic review on 12 polymorphisms suggested that MMP2 C-735T, MMP7 A-181G, MMP8 rs11225395, MMP9 rs6094237, MMP12 rs2276109, MMP20 rs2292730, MMP20 rs12278250, MMP20 rs9787933 might have a potential effect on ovarian cancer risk.In summary, polymorphisms of MMPs might not be associated with ovarian cancer risk. However

  12. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    OpenAIRE

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentra...

  13. ASGE Technology Committee systematic review and meta-analysis assessing the ASGE PIVI thresholds for adopting real-time endoscopic assessment of the histology of diminutive colorectal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Thosani, Nirav; Konda, Vani; Wallace, Michael B; Rex, Douglas K; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Hwang, Joo Ha; Komanduri, Sri; Manfredi, Michael; Maple, John T; Murad, Faris M; Siddiqui, Uzma D; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-03-01

    In vivo real-time assessment of the histology of diminutive (≤5 mm) colorectal polyps detected at colonoscopy can be achieved by means of an "optical biopsy" by using currently available endoscopic technologies. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) Technology Committee to specifically assess whether acceptable performance thresholds outlined by an ASGE Preservation and Incorporation of Valuable endoscopic Innovations (PIVI) document for clinical adoption of these technologies have been met. We conducted direct meta-analyses calculating the pooled negative predictive value (NPV) for narrow-band imaging (NBI), i-SCAN, and Fujinon Intelligent Color Enhancement (FICE)-assisted optical biopsy for predicting adenomatous polyp histology of small/diminutive colorectal polyps. We also calculated the pooled percentage agreement with histopathology when assigning postpolypectomy surveillance intervals based on combining real-time optical biopsy of colorectal polyps 5 mm or smaller with histopathologic assessment of polyps larger than 5 mm. Random-effects meta-analysis models were used. Statistical heterogeneity was evaluated by means of I(2) statistics. Our meta-analyses indicate that optical biopsy with NBI, exceeds the NPV threshold for adenomatous polyp histology, supporting a "diagnose-and-leave" strategy for diminutive predicted nonneoplastic polyps in the rectosigmoid colon. The pooled NPV of NBI for adenomatous polyp histology by using the random-effects model was 91% (95% confidence interval [CI], 88-94). This finding was associated with a high degree of heterogeneity (I(2) = 89%). Subgroup analysis indicated that the pooled NPV was greater than 90% for academic medical centers (91.8%; 95% CI, 89-94), for experts (93%; 95% CI, 91-96), and when the optical biopsy assessment was made with high confidence (93%; 95% CI, 90-96). Our meta-analyses also indicate that the agreement in

  14. Blood lipids profile and lung cancer risk in a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaojing; Lu, Lei; Liu, Lingli; Wei, Siyu; He, Yunyun; Chang, Jing; Lian, Xuemei

    Emerging evidence has connected lipid metabolism disturbance with lung diseases, but the relationship between blood lipid profile and lung cancer risk is controversial and inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to evaluate the relationship between blood lipids profile and lung cancer incidence. Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, EBSCO, Ovid, CNKI, VIP, and WANGFANG MED through August 2016. Nine prospective cohort studies were included in the meta-analysis, and fixed or random effects model was used to calculate pooled relative risk (RRs). The RR was calculated using either highest vs lowest categories, or upper quantile vs lowest quantile. The thresholds were determined by the authors of each original publication, based on either predefined cut-offs or the distributions within their study population. Analysis of 18,111 lung cancer cases among 1,832,880 participants showed that serum total cholesterol levels were inverse associated with lung cancer risk (RR = 0.93, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85-1.03). Further analysis considered the lag time and excluded the effects of preclinical cancer, with totally 1,239,948 participants and 14,052 lung cancer cases, found a significantly inverse association between total cholesterol and lung cancer risk (RR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.83-0.94). Analysis of 3067 lung cancer cases among 59,242 participants found that the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (RR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.59-0.97) was negatively associated with lung cancer risk and 4673 lung cancer cases among 685,852 participants showed that the total triglyceride (RR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.44-1.96) was positively associated with lung cancer risk. Cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism might present different and specific mechanism on lung cancer etiology and needs further elucidation. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Kooshyar, Mohammad Mahdi; Roudbar, Zahra; Mahdavi, Morteza; Doosti, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The incidence of colorectal cancer has increased in Iran in the past three decades and is now considered as a serious problem for our society. This cancer has two types hereditary and non-hereditary, 80% of cases being the latter. Considering that the relationship between SNPs with diseases is a concern, many researchers believed that they offer valuable markers for identifying genes responsible for susceptibility to common diseases. In some cases, they are direct causes of human disease. One SNP can increase risk of cancer, but when considering the rate of overlap and frequency of DNA repair pathways, it might be expected that SNP alone cannot affect the final result of cancer, although several SNPs together can exert a significant influence. Therefore identification of these SNPs is very important. The most important loci which include mutations are: MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, APC, MUTYH, SMAD7, STK11, XRCC3, DNMT1, MTHFR, Exo1, XRCC1 and VDR. Presence of SNPs in these genes decreases or increases risk of colorectal cancer. In this article we reviewed the Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary of colorectal cancer that recently were reported from candidate gene y, meta-analysis and GWAS studies. As with other cancers, colorectal cancer is associated with SNPs in gene loci. Generally, by exploring SNPs, it is feasible to predict the risk of developing colorectal cancer and thus establishing proper preventive measures. SNPs of genes associated with colorectal cancer can be used as a marker SNP panel as a potential tool for improving cancer diagnosis and treatment planning.

  16. Glucose transporter-1 as an independent prognostic marker for cancer: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zheng-Xiao; Lu, Lin-Wei; Qiu, Jian; Li, Qiu-Ping; Xu, Fei; Liu, Bao-Jun; Dong, Jing-Cheng; Gong, Wei-Yi

    2018-01-01

    Objective Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) as the major glucose transporter present in human cells is found overexpressed in a proportion of human malignancies. This meta-analysis is attempted to assess the prognostic significance of GLUT-1 for survival in various cancers. Materials and Methods We conducted an electronic search using the databases PubMed, Embase and Web of Science, from inception to Oct 20th, 2016. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results Fourty-one studies with a total of 4794 patients were included. High GLUT-1 expression was significantly associated with poorer prognosis [overall survival: HR = 1.833 (95% CI: 1.597–2.069, P GLUT-1 expression may be an independent prognostic marker to predict poor survival in various types of cancers. Further clinical trials with high quality need to be conducted to confirm our conclusion. PMID:29416806

  17. Dietary fiber, source foods and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Kazuhiro; Kono, Suminori; Yin, Guang; Toyomura, Kengo; Nagano, Jun; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2010-10-01

    Despite much evidence from laboratory work, epidemiological evidence remains elusive regarding the role of dietary fiber in colorectal carcinogenesis. We investigated associations of dietary fiber and source foods with colorectal cancer risk in the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study, a community-based case-control study. The study subjects were 816 incident cases of colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Nutrient and food intakes were estimated on the basis of a computer-assisted interview regarding 148 dietary items. Odds ratios of colorectal cancer according to quintile categories of energy-adjusted intakes of dietary fiber and food groups were obtained with adjustment for non-dietary factors and dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 fatty acids. Total, soluble and insoluble dietary fibers were not measurably associated with overall risk or subsite-specific risk of colorectal cancer. By contrast, rice consumption was associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (trend p = 0.03), particularly of distal colon and rectal cancer (trend p = 0.02), and high intake of non-rice cereals tended to be related to an increased risk of colon cancer (trend p = 0.07). There was no association between vegetable consumption and colorectal cancer, whereas individuals with the lowest intake of fruits tended to have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The present study did not corroborate a protective association between dietary fiber and colorectal cancer, but suggested a decreased risk of distal colorectal cancer associated with rice consumption.

  18. Lung Cancer and Exposure to Nitrogen Dioxide and Traffic: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamra, Ghassan B; Laden, Francine; Cohen, Aaron J; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Brauer, Michael; Loomis, Dana

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to traffic-related air pollutants is an important public health issue. Here, we present a systematic review and meta-analysis of research examining the relationship of measures of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and of various measures of traffic-related air pollution exposure with lung cancer. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses of studies examining exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and NOx and its association with lung cancer. We identified 20 studies that met inclusion criteria and provided information necessary to estimate the change in lung cancer per 10-μg/m3 increase in exposure to measured NO2. Further, we qualitatively assessed the evidence of association between distance to roadways and traffic volume associated with lung cancer. The meta-estimate for the change in lung cancer associated with a 10-μg/m3 increase in exposure to NO2 was 4% (95% CI: 1%, 8%). The meta-estimate for change in lung cancer associated with a 10-μg/m3 increase in NOx was similar and slightly more precise, 3% (95% CI: 1%, 5%). The NO2 meta-estimate was robust to different confounding adjustment sets as well as the exposure assessment techniques used. Trim-and-fill analyses suggest that if publication bias exists, the overall meta-estimate is biased away from the null. Forest plots for measures of traffic volume and distance to roadways largely suggest a modest increase in lung cancer risk. We found consistent evidence of a relationship between NO2, as a proxy for traffic-sourced air pollution exposure, with lung cancer. Studies of lung cancer related to residential proximity to roadways and NOx also suggest increased risk, which may be attributable partly to air pollution exposure. The International Agency for Research on Cancer recently classified outdoor air pollution and particulate matter as carcinogenic (Group 1). These meta-analyses support this conclusion, drawing particular attention to traffic-sourced air pollution. Hamra GB, Laden F, Cohen AJ, Raaschou-Nielsen O

  19. Association between promoter polymorphisms of OPN gene and cancer risk: a meta-analysis

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    Liu JW

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jingwei Liu,1–2 Caiyun He,1–2 Quan Yuan,1–2 Zhenning Wang,1–2 Chengzhong Xing,1–2 Yuan Yuan1–2 1Tumor Etiology and Screening Department of Cancer Institute and General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, 2Key Laboratory of Cancer Etiology and Prevention, China Medical University, Liaoning Provincial Education Department, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Background: Results of the association between polymorphisms of osteopontin (OPN gene promoter region and risk of cancer were inconclusive. The aim of this meta-analysis was to elucidate whether OPN promoter polymorphisms were associated with cancer risk.Methods: Electronic databases including PubMed, Web of Science, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure were systematically searched. Odd ratios (ORs and their 95% confidential interval (CI were used to assess the strength of association between OPN promoter polymorphisms and cancer risks.Results: Nine studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. For OPN rs17524488 polymorphism, carriers of GG or -/G genotype were significantly associated with increased cancer risk compared with wild-type -/- carriers, respectively (GG vs -/-: OR =1.40, 95% CI =1.03–1.91, P=0.033; -/G vs -/-: OR =1.22, 95% CI =1.07–1.40, P=0.002. Additionally, G allele was significantly associated with increased cancer risk compared with (- allele (OR =1.21, 95% CI =1.04–1.40, P=0.016. However, no significant association was observed of OPN rs11730582 polymorphism and cancer risk (CC vs TT: OR =0.98, 95% CI =0.49–1.97, P=0.964; CT vs TT: OR =0.88, 95% CI =0.54–1.43, P=0.610.Conclusion: Carriers of GG or -/G genotype of OPN promoter rs17524488 (-156-/G polymorphism might be associated with increased risk of cancer compared with wild-type -/- carriers, respectively. However, no significant association was observed between OPN promoter rs11730582 (-443C/T polymorphism and risk of cancer. Keywords: OPN

  20. Kind of blue: A systematic review and meta-analysis of music interventions in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bro, Margrethe Langer; Jespersen, Kira Vibe; Hansen, Julie Bolvig; Vuust, Peter; Abildgaard, Niels; Gram, Jeppe; Johansen, Christoffer

    2017-06-18

    Music may be a valuable and low-cost coping strategy for cancer patients. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify the psychological and physical effects of music interventions in cancer treatment. We included randomized, controlled trials with adult patients in active cancer treatment exposed to different music interventions versus control conditions. Qualitative studies and systematic reviews were excluded. We identified a total of 2624 records through 2 systematic searches (June 2015 and September 2016) in PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Cinahl, Web of Science, Cochrane, and PsycINFO and used Risk of Bias Assessment, GRADE and Checklist for Reporting Music-Based Interventions to evaluate the music applied and quality of the studies. We conducted meta-analyses using Review Manager (version 5.3). PROSPERO reg. no. CRD42015026024. We included 25 RCT's (N = 1784) of which 20 were eligible for the meta-analysis (N = 1565). Music reduced anxiety (SMD -0·80 [95% CI, -1.35 to -0.25]), pain (SMD -0.88 [95% CI -1.45 to -0.32]), and improved mood (SMD -0.55 [95% CI, -0.98 to -0.13]). However, studies were hampered by heterogeneity with I2 varying between 54% and 96%. Quality of the studies ranged from very low to low. The most effective mode of music intervention appeared to be passive listening to self-selected, recorded music in a single session design. Music may be a tool in reducing anxiety, pain, and improving mood among patients with cancer in active treatment. However, methodological limitations in the studies conducted so far prevent firm conclusions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Lung Cancer Prognosis: A PRISMA-compliant Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linhai; Cao, Hongxin; Zhang, Tiehong; Shen, Hongchang; Dong, Wei; Wang, Liguang; Du, Jiajun

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies suggested that diabetes mellitus (DM) was associated with risk and mortality of cancer, but studies investigating the correlation between DM and lung cancer prognosis remain controversial. Herein, a meta-analysis was performed to derive a more precise estimate of the prognostic role of DM in lung cancer.Medline and Embase were searched for eligible articles from inception to October 25, 2015. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) with its 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was calculated to evaluate the correlation between DM and lung cancer prognosis. Subgroup meta-analysis was performed based on the histology and the treatment methods.A total of 20 cohort studies from 12 articles were included in the meta-analysis. Also, 16 studies investigated the overall survival (OS) and 4 studies investigated the progression-free survival (PFS). DM was significantly associated with the inferior OS of lung cancer with the pooled HR 1.28 (95% CI: 1.10-1.49, P = 0.001). The association was prominent in the nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) subgroup (HR 1.35, 95%CI: 1.14-1.60, P = 0.002), whereas the association was not significant in the small cell lung cancer (SCLC) subgroup (HR 1.33, 95% CI: 0.87-2.03, P = 0.18). When NSCLC patients were further stratified by treatment methods, DM had more influence on the surgically treated subgroup than the nonsurgically treated subgroup. There was no obvious evidence for publication bias by Begg's and Egger's test.The results of this meta-analysis exhibit an association of DM with inferior prognosis amongst lung cancer patients, especially the surgically treated NSCLC patients. Given the small number of studies included in this meta-analysis, the present conclusion should be consolidated with more high-quality prospective cohort studies or randomized controlled trials.

  2. Preeclampsia and maternal risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meizhen; Fan, Yongling; Hou, Yuanyuan; Fan, Yanyan

    2017-07-17

    Pregnancy-related hypertensive disorders, including preeclampsia (PE) and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), may influence the maternal risk of breast cancer. However, results of the cohort studies were inconsistent. An updated meta-analysis of cohort studies was performed to evaluate the association between PE, PIH and maternal breast cancer incidence. Relevant studies were identified via searching of PubMed and Embase databases. A random effect model was applied to synthesize the results. Stratified analyses were performed to evaluate the potential influence of parity, gender of offspring, and study design on the association between PE and maternal breast cancer incidence. Ten cohort studies with 2,417,899 pregnant women were included. Maternal risk of breast cancer was not significantly affected by PE (risk ration [RR] = 0.93, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.82-1.06, p = .27), or PIH (RR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.81-1.12, p = .54). Interestingly, PE was associated with significantly lowered maternal incidence of breast cancer in women who give birth to male offspring (RR = 0.79, p cohort studies (RR = 0.87, p cohorts. Current evidence did not support a conclusive association between PE, PIH and the maternal risk of breast cancer. Gender of the offspring may influence the association between PE and maternal breast cancer incidence.

  3. Glutathione S-transferase M1 Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Risk: a Meta-Analysis in the Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chen-Xin; He, Xiang-Ming; Zou, De-Hong

    2016-11-01

    Published data on the association between present/null polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and breast cancer risk are inconclusive. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a meta-analysis in the Chinese population was performed. PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) were searched. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of association between the GSTM1 present/ null polymorphism and breast cancer risk. A total of 17 studies including 5323 breast cancer cases and 7196 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. Overall, a significant association (OR = 1.28, 95%CI: 1.09 - 1.51) was found between the null GSTM1 and breast cancer risk when all studies in Chinese population were pooled into the meta-analysis. In subgroup analyses stratified by geographic areas and source of controls, the same results were observed in mainland China (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.12 - 1.81) and hospital-based studies (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.20 - 2.00). This meta-analysis suggests that the GSTM1 null genotype is a low-penetrant risk factor for developing breast cancer in the Chinese population.

  4. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  5. Red meat and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Faruk Aykan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented.

  6. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykan, Nuri Faruk

    2015-02-10

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented.

  7. Association Between WRN Cys1367Arg (T>C) and Cancer Risk: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Guifang; Sun, Fei; Dong, Nan; Sun, Zhenguo; Jiang, Dehua

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that aberration of the DNA repair pathway significantly contributes to tumorigenesis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA repair-related genes such as WRN have been implicated in cancer risk. However, the results of published studies remain inconclusive. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of all available and relevant published studies to clarify the role of this polymorphism in cancer. We performed a computerized search of PubMed for publications on WRN Cys1367Arg (T>C) polymorphism and cancer risk and analyzed the genotype data. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated to assess the association. Sensitivity analysis, heterogeneity test, cumulative meta-analysis, and bias assessment were performed using STATA software 11.0. No association was found between WRN Cys1367Arg (T>C) polymorphism and cancer risk in all genetic models. When stratified by cancer type, results showed that this polymorphism increased the risk of breast cancer (2CC+CT vs 2TT+CT: perallele OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03-1.26, P trend = .012; CC vs TT: OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.04-1.95, P value = .026; CC+CT vs TT: OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.02-1.28, P value = .027). In another analysis stratified by ethnicity, WRN Cys1367Arg (T>C) polymorphism was significantly associated with cancer susceptibility in Europeans (2CC+CT vs 2TT+CT: perallele OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.00-1.19, P trend = .042; CT vs TT: OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.01-1.27, P value = .032; and CC+CT vs TT: OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.02-1.26, P value = .025). Our study suggests that WRN Cys1367Arg (T>C) polymorphism is not associated with overall cancer risk, although subgroup analyses suggested an association with breast cancer and overall cancer specifically in European populations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. The clinical significance of snail protein expression in gastric cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoya; Li, Jinjun; Hu, Ling; Yang, William; Lu, Lili; Jin, Hongyan; Wei, Zexiong; Yang, Jack Y; Arabnia, Hamid R; Liu, Jun S; Yang, Mary Qu; Deng, Youping

    2016-07-25

    Snail is a typical transcription factor that could induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer progression. There are some related reports about the clinical significance of snail protein expression in gastric cancer. However, the published results were not completely consistent. This study was aimed to investigate snail expression and clinical significance in gastric cancer. A systematic review of PubMed, CNKI, Weipu, and Wanfang database before March 2015 was conducted. We established an inclusion criterion according to subjects, method of detection, and results evaluation of snail protein. Meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan4.2 software. And merged odds ratio (OR) and 95 % CI (95 % confidence interval) were calculated. Also, forest plots and funnel plot were used to assess the potential of publication bias. A total of 10 studies were recruited. The meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the positive rate of snail protein expression. OR and 95 % CI for different groups were listed below: (1) gastric cancer and para-carcinoma tissue [OR = 6.15, 95 % CI (4.70, 8.05)]; (2) gastric cancer and normal gastric tissue [OR = 17.00, 95 % CI (10.08, 28.67)]; (3) non-lymph node metastasis and lymph node metastasis [OR = 0.40, 95 % CI (0.18, 0.93)]; (4) poor differentiated cancer, highly differentiated cancer, and moderate cancer [OR = 3.34, 95 % CI (2.22, 5.03)]; (5) clinical stage TI + TII and stage TIII + TIV [OR = 0.38, 95 % CI (0.23, 0.60)]; (6) superficial muscularis and deep muscularis [OR = 0.18, 95 % CI (0.11, 0.31)]. Our results indicated that the increase of snail protein expression may play an important role in the carcinogenesis, progression, and metastasis of gastric cancer. And this result might provide instruction for the diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of gastric cancer.

  9. Chemotherapy versus support cancer treatment in advanced gastric cancer: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Casaretto

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of chemotherapy and support treatment in patients with advanced non-resectable gastric cancer in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials that included a comparison of chemotherapy and support care treatment in patients diagnosed with gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of their age, gender or place of treatment. The search strategy was based on the criteria of the Cochrane Base, using the following key words: 1 randomized clinical trials and antineoplastic combined therapy or gastrointestinal neoplasm, 2 stomach neoplasm and drug therapy, 3 clinical trial and multi-modality therapy, 4 stomach neoplasm and drug therapy or quality of life, 5 double-blind method or clinical trial. The search was carried out using the Cochrane, Medline and Lilacs databases. Five studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria, for a total of 390 participants, 208 (53% receiving chemotherapy, 182 (47% receiving support care treatment and 6 losses (1.6%. The 1-year survival rate was 8% for support care and 20% for chemotherapy (RR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.00-4.57, P = 0.05; 30% of the patients in the chemotherapy group and 12% in the support care group attained a 6-month symptom-free period (RR = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.41-3.87, P < 0.01. Quality of life evaluated after 4 months was significantly better for the chemotherapy patients (34%; RR = 2.07, 95% CI = 1.31-3.28, P < 0.01 with tumor mass reduction (RR = 3.32, 95% CI = 0.77-14.24, P = 0.1. Chemotherapy increased the 1-year survival rate of the patients and provided a longer symptom-free period of 6 months and an improvement in quality of life.

  10. Robotic versus open gastrectomy for gastric cancer: a meta-analysis.

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    Guixiang Liao

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of robotic gastrectomy versus open gastrectomy for gastric cancer. METHODS: A comprehensive search of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Web of Knowledge was performed. Systematic review was carried out to identify studies comparing robotic gastrectomy and open gastrectomy in gastric cancer. Intraoperative and postoperative outcomes were also analyzed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the surgery. A fixed effects model or a random effects model was utilized according to the heterogeneity. RESULTS: Four studies involving 5780 patients with 520 (9.00% cases of robotic gastrectomy and 5260 (91.00% cases of open gastrectomy were included in this meta-analysis. Compared to open gastrectomy, robotic gastrectomy has a significantly longer operation time (weighted mean differences (WMD =92.37, 95% confidence interval (CI: 55.63 to 129.12, P<0.00001, lower blood loss (WMD: -126.08, 95% CI: -189.02 to -63.13, P<0.0001, and shorter hospital stay (WMD = -2.87; 95% CI: -4.17 to -1.56; P<0.0001. No statistical difference was noted based on the rate of overall postoperative complication, wound infection, bleeding, number of harvested lymph nodes, anastomotic leakage and postoperative mortality rate. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this meta-analysis suggest that robotic gastrectomy is a better alternative technique to open gastrectomy for gastric cancer. However, more prospective, well-designed, multicenter, randomized controlled trials are necessary to further evaluate the safety and efficacy as well as the long-term outcome.

  11. SATB1 is Correlated with Progression and Metastasis of Breast Cancers: A Meta-Analysis

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    Zhongya Pan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Several researches have evaluated the significance of SATB1 (Special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1 expression in breast cancers (BCs, but the results have been disputed, especially in the aspects of clinicopathological features and prognosis. Therefore, our study aimed to use a meta-analysis to summarize the clinical and prognostic relevance of SATB1 gene expression in BCs. Methods: A literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, Chinese Wanfang and CNKI was performed to identify eligible studies. Ten studies total, comprising 5,185 patients (1,699 SATB1-positive and 3,486 SATB1-negative, were enrolled in our study, which was performed using Revman5.3 Software and Stata11.0 Software. Results: This meta-analysis showed that the expression of SATB1 was significantly higher in breast cancer than in normal tissues (OR = 12.28; 95%CI = 6.01-25.09, and was statistically related to several clinicopathological parameters, including lymph node metastasis (OR = 1.55, 95%CI = 1.01-2.39 and Tumor Node Metastasis(TNM stage (OR = 0.35, 95%CI = 0.22-0.56. However, the level of SATB1 was not statistically associated with the age (OR = 1.13, 95%CI = 0.87-1.46, tumour size (OR = 0.72, 95%CI = 0.44-1.19, estrogen receptor (OR = 0.78, 95%CI = 0.55-1.09, progesterone receptor (OR = 0.64, 95%CI = 0.32-1.29, HER2 status (OR=1.98, 95%CI = 0.74-5.30, and histological type (OR = 0.49, 95%CI = 0.22-1.11. Conclusion: High expression of SATB1 was significantly correlated with tumourigenesis and metastasis of BCs, indicating poor prognosis for patients. SATB1 could serve as a potential marker for detection and prognosis evaluation of breast cancers.

  12. Dietary fiber and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, D; Chan, D S M; Greenwood, D C; Vieira, A R; Rosenblatt, D A Navarro; Vieira, R; Norat, T

    2012-06-01

    Evidence from case-control studies suggest that dietary fiber may be inversely related to breast cancer risk, but it is unclear if this is supported by prospective data. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence from prospective studies. PubMed was searched for prospective studies of fiber intake and breast cancer risk until 31st August 2011. Random effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs). Sixteen prospective studies were included. The summary RR for the highest versus the lowest intake was 0.93 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-0.98, I(2) = 0%] for dietary fiber, 0.95 (95% CI 0.86-1.06, I(2) = 4%) for fruit fiber, 0.99 (95% CI 0.92-1.07, I(2) = 1%) for vegetable fiber, 0.96 (95% CI 0.90-1.02, I(2) = 5%) for cereal fiber, 0.91 (95% CI 0.84-0.99, I(2) = 7%) for soluble fiber and 0.95 (95% CI 0.89-1.02, I(2) = 0%) for insoluble fiber. The summary RR per 10 g/day of dietary fiber was 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98, I(2) = 0%, P(heterogeneity) = 0.82). In stratified analyses, the inverse association was only observed among studies with a large range (≥13 g/day) or high level of intake (≥25 g/day). In this meta-analysis of prospective studies, there was an inverse association between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk.

  13. An updated meta-analysis of fatal adverse events caused by bevacizumab therapy in cancer patients.

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    Hongxin Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of fatal adverse events (FAEs due to bevacizumab-based chemotherapy has not been well described; we carried out an updated meta-analysis regarding this issue. METHODS: An electronic search of Medline, Embase and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was conducted to investigate the effects of randomized controlled trials on bevacizumab treatment on cancer patients. Random or fixed-effect meta-analytical models were used to evaluate the risk ratio (RR of FAEs due to the use of bevacizumab. RESULTS: Thirty-four trials were included. Allocation to bevacizumab therapy significantly increased the risk of FAEs; the RR was 1.29 (95% CI:1.05-1.57. This association varied significantly with tumor types (P=0.002 and chemotherapeutic agents (P=0.005 but not with bevacizumab dose (P=0.90. Increased risk was seen in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancer. However, FAEs were lower in breast cancer patients treated with bevacizumab. In addition, bevacizumab was associated with an increased risk of FAEs in patients who received concomitant agents of taxanes and/or platinum. CONCLUSION: Compared with chemotherapy alone, the addition of bevacizumab was associated with an increased risk of FAEs among patients with special tumor types, particularly when combined with chemotherapeutic agents such as platinum.

  14. The Effects of Expressive Writing Interventions for Patients With Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Pok-Ja; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of expressive writing (EW) interventions in patients with cancer.
. Electronic databases searched included both international and Korean databases through January 2015.
. Of the 20 trials that met the eligibility criteria of this review, a meta-analysis was conducted of 14 articles involving 13 randomized and 1 nonrandomized trials with 1,718 patients with cancer. EW interventions were compared with a neutral writing intervention or usual care (no writing). A significant small effect was noted on relieving cancer symptoms; however, the effects on psychological and cognitive outcomes were not significant. When subgroup analysis by control condition was performed, a significant effect on health-related quality of life was found between the EW intervention group and the usual care group. 
. EW had significant small effects only on cancer symptoms. The findings suggest that the traditional EW intervention protocol may need to be intensified to confirm its effect on patients with cancer.
. Current evidence for EW as a nursing intervention for improving physical, psychological, and cognitive outcomes among patients with cancer is promising, but not conclusive.

  15. Metabolic Syndrome Is Associated with Increased Breast Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although individual metabolic risk factors are reported to be associated with breast cancer risk, controversy surrounds risk of breast cancer from metabolic syndrome (MS. We report the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between MS and breast cancer risk in all adult females. Methods. Studies were retrieved by searching four electronic reference databases [PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, Web of Science, and ProQuest through June 30, 2012] and cross-referencing retrieved articles. Eligible for inclusion were longitudinal studies reporting associations between MS and breast cancer risk among females aged 18 years and older. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each study and pooled using random-effects models. Publication bias was assessed quantitatively (Trim and Fill and qualitatively (funnel plots. Heterogeneity was examined using Q and I2 statistics. Results. Representing nine independent cohorts and 97,277 adult females, eight studies met the inclusion criteria. A modest, positive association was observed between MS and breast cancer risk (RR: 1.47, 95% CI, 1.15–1.87; z=3.13; p=0.002; Q=26.28, p=0.001; I2=69.55%. No publication bias was observed. Conclusions. MS is associated with increased breast cancer risk in adult women.

  16. Periodontal Disease and Incident Lung Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian-Tao; Xia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Li, Sheng; Leng, Wei-Dong; Kwong, Joey S W

    2016-10-01

    Periodontal disease is linked to a number of systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus. Recent evidence has suggested periodontal disease might be associated with lung cancer. However, their precise relationship is yet to be explored. Hence, this study aims to investigate the association of periodontal disease and risk of incident lung cancer using a meta-analytic approach. PubMed, Scopus, and ScienceDirect were searched up to June 10, 2015. Cohort and nested case-control studies investigating risk of lung cancer in patients with periodontal disease were included. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated, as were their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a fixed-effect inverse-variance model. Statistical heterogeneity was explored using the Q test as well as the I(2) statistic. Publication bias was assessed by visual inspection of funnel plots symmetry and Egger's test. Five cohort studies were included, involving 321,420 participants in this meta-analysis. Summary estimates based on adjusted data showed that periodontal disease was associated with a significant risk of lung cancer (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.36; I(2) = 30%). No publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that the association of periodontal disease and lung cancer remained significant in the female population. Evidence from cohort studies suggests that patients with periodontal disease are at increased risk of developing lung cancer.

  17. Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The rate of people getting colorectal cancer or dying from colorectal cancer varies by race and ethnicity. Incidence Rates by Race/Ethnicity and Sex “Incidence rate” means how many people out of a given number ...

  18. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  19. Vitamin D, inflammation, and colorectal cancer progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harten-Gerritsen, van Suzanne; Balvers, Michiel G.J.; Witkamp, Renger F.; Kampman, Ellen; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Survival from colorectal cancer is positively associated with vitamin D status. However, whether this association is causal remains unclear. Inflammatory processes may link vitamin D to colorectal cancer survival, and therefore investigating inflammatory markers as potential mediators may be a

  20. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  1. Coffee consumption and the risk of gastric cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liqing; Gan, Yong; Wu, Chunmei; Qu, Xianguo; Sun, Gang; Lu, Zuxun

    2015-10-19

    Several observational studies suggest that coffee consumption may be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer, but the results are inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship of coffee consumption with gastric cancer risk and quantify the dose-response relationship between them. Relevant prospective studies were identified by a search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science to May 2015 and by reviewing the references of retrieved articles. Two independent reviewers extracted data and performed the quality assessment. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). The heterogeneity was assessed using the I (2) statistic. Publication bias was assessed by using funnel plot, the Begg test and the Egger test. Thirteen prospective cohort studies with 20 independent reports involving 3,368 patients with gastric cancer and 1,372,811 participants during a follow-up period ranging from 4.3-8 years were included. Compared with the lowest consumption level of coffee, the pooled relative risk (RR) was 1.13 (95 % CI: 0.94-1.35). The dose-response analysis indicated that, the RR of gastric cancer was 1.03 (95 % CI; 0.95-1.11) for per 3 cups/day of coffee consumption. Any nonlinear association of gastric cancer risk with coffee consumption was not found (P for nonlinearity = 0.68). Subgroup analyses indicated that the pooled RR for participants from the United States comparing the highest with the lowest coffee consumption was 1.36 (95 % CI, 1.06-1.75, I (2) = 0 %). In addition, people with higher coffee consumption was associated with 25 % higher risk of gastric cancer in equal to or less than 10 years follow-up group (RR = 1.25; 95 % CI, 1.01-1.55, I (2) = 0 %). Visual inspection of a funnel plot and the Begg's and the Egger's tests did not indicate evidence of publication bias. This meta-analysis does not support the hypothesis that coffee consumption is associated with the risk of

  2. Green tea consumption and risk of esophageal cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ping

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green tea has shown the role of chemoprevention for cancer. Recently, several studies suggested that green tea intake may have effect on esophageal cancer risk, whereas the results were inconsistent. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of all English and Chinese language studies of green tea consumption and esophageal cancer risk indexed in Medline, Embase, the Science Citation Index, the Chinese Biomedical Database and Wanfang Data from 1980 to June 2012. After reviewing each study, extracting data, and evaluating heterogeneity (Chi-square-based Q test and Ι2 and publication bias (Begg and Egger test, a meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the association between high/medium/low green tea consumption and non-drinking esophageal cancer risk. Pooled relative risk (RR or odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using the fixed- or random-effect models. Results Ten eligible epidemiologic studies including 33731 participants and 3557 cases for esophageal cancer were included. Eight of which were case–control studies, and two were cohort studies. Overall, there were no association between high/medium/low green tea consumption and non-drinking risk of esophageal cancer (High: highest vs non-drinker: RR/OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.49 to 1.02. Medium: drinker vs non-drinker: RR/OR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.03. Low: lowest vs non-drinker: RR/OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.58 to 1.08. When stratified analyses according to study design (case–control and cohort studies, country (China and Japan, participates source (population-based and hospital-based case–control, and gender (female and male, there were significant association between high/medium/low green tea consumption and non-drinking risk of esophageal cancer among female (High: RR/OR = 0.32, 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.54. Medium: RR/OR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.21 to 0.66. Low: RR/OR = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.79, but not the others. Conclusions We did not found significant

  3. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant setting of breast cancer therapy--effect on survival: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Ben-Aharon

    Full Text Available The role of bisphosphonates (BP in early breast cancer (BC has been considered controversial. We performed a meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials (RCTs that appraised the effects of BP on survival in early BC.RCTs were identified by searching the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE databases and conference proceedings. Hazard ratios (HRs of overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS and relative risks of adverse events were estimated and pooled.Thirteen trials met the inclusion criteria, evaluating a total of 15,762 patients. Meta-analysis of ten trials which reported OS revealed no statistically significant benefit in OS for BP (HR 0.89, 95% CI = 0.79 to 1.01. Meta-analysis of nine trials which reported the DFS revealed no benefit in DFS (HR 0.95 (0.81-1.12. Meta-analysis upon menopausal status showed a statistically significant better DFS in the BP-treated patients (HR 0.81(0.69-0.95. In meta-regression, chemotherapy was negatively associated with HR of survival.Our meta-analysis indicates a positive effect for adjuvant BP on survival only in postmenopausal patients. Meta-regression demonstrated a negative association between chemotherapy use BP effect on survival. Further large scale RCTs are warranted to unravel the specific subgroups that would benefit from the addition of BP in the adjuvant setting.

  4. Combining aneuploidy and dysplasia for colitis' cancer risk assessment outperforms current surveillance efficiency: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Rüdiger; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; Blindow, Silke; Büning, Jürgen; Habermann, Jens K

    2017-02-01

    Cancer risk assessment for ulcerative colitis patients by evaluating histological changes through colonoscopy surveillance is still challenging. Thus, additional parameters of high prognostic impact for the development of colitis-associated carcinoma are necessary. This meta-analysis was conducted to clarify the value of aneuploidy as predictor for individual cancer risk compared with current surveillance parameters. A systematic web-based search identified studies published in English that addressed the relevance of the ploidy status for individual cancer risk during surveillance in comparison to neoplastic mucosal changes. The resulting data were included into a meta-analysis, and odds ratios (OR) were calculated for aneuploidy or dysplasia or aneuploidy plus dysplasia. Twelve studies addressing the relevance of aneuploidy compared to dyplasia were comprehensively evaluated and further used for meta-analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that aneuploidy (OR 5.31 [95 % CI 2.03, 13.93]) is an equally effective parameter for cancer risk assessment in ulcerative colitis patients as dysplasia (OR 4.93 [1.61, 15.11]). Strikingly, the combined assessment of dysplasia and aneuploidy is superior compared to applying each parameter alone (OR 8.99 [3.08, 26.26]). This meta-analysis reveals that aneuploidy is an equally effective parameter for individual cancer risk assessment in ulcerative colitis as the detection of dysplasia. More important, the combined assessment of dysplasia and aneuploidy outperforms the use of each parameter alone. We suggest image cytometry for ploidy assessment to become an additional feature of consensus criteria to individually assess cancer risk in UC.

  5. Colorectal Cancer Awareness for Women via Facebook: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Kelly; Pennings Kamp, Kendra J; Salaysay, Zachary

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death among U.S. women. Women report being screened for colorectal cancer less often than men, and if colorectal cancer screening guidelines were routinely followed, approximately 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented. Many colorectal cancer screening interventions have not used Facebook, which is the most popular social media site among women. Little is known about engaging women in colorectal cancer screening and risk reduction information using Facebook. The "Colorectal Cancer Screening Awareness for Women" Facebook page was created to promote colorectal cancer screening and risk reduction awareness among women. Facebook posts targeted women aged 45-64 years and highlighted colorectal cancer screening methods, guidelines, and colorectal cancer risk reduction strategies. Demographics and data about the women's interactions with the page were collected using Facebook analytics and analyzed. The majority of the 391 users of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Awareness for Women Facebook page were women aged 45-54 years (56.5%). The most "liked" posts were related to colorectal cancer risk reduction behaviors. In an effort to increase routine colorectal cancer screening and colorectal cancer risk reduction behaviors, gastroenterology nurses and practices should consider Facebook as a good method to regularly engage women in colorectal cancer screening and colorectal cancer risk reduction information.

  6. [Burden of colorectal cancer in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Shi, Jufang; Huang, Huiyao; Ren, Jiansong; Li, Ni; Dai, Min

    2015-07-01

    To understand the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in China. The data from GLOBOCAN 2012, Chinese Cancer Registry Annual Report 2012, Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5), the Three National Death Cause Surveys in China and WHO Mortality Database were used to learn about the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer and related trends in China. It was estimated by GLOBOCAN 2012 that in 2012 the age-standardized incidence of colorectal cancer in China was 16.9 per 100 000 in males and 11.6 per 100 000 in females, and the age-standardized mortality was 9.0 per 100 000 in males and 6.1 per 100 000 in females. GLOBOCAN 2012 estimated that colorectal cancer incidence and mortality would increase with the level of human development index. China's human development level was high, suggesting that the burden of colorectal cancer would be more serious in China with the development of social economy. The data from CI5 Volume IV and GLOBOCAN 2012 indicated that the incidence of colorectal cancer began to increase obviously at age of 50 years in China. Chinese Cancer Registry Annual Report 2012 showed that the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in urban population were two times higher than those in rural population in 2009, the proportions of colon cancer among colorectal and anus cancers, which was 49.0% in males and 54.2% in females, 53.4% in urban population and 41.7% in rural population. CI5 Volumes IV-X showed that colon cancer and rectum and anus cancer incidence in Shanghai for both males and females were increasing during the period 1973-2007. The percentage change in colon cancer and rectum and anus cancer incidence between 1973-1977 and 2003-2007 increased by 138.8% and 31.1% in males, 146.7% and 49.1% in females, respectively. The data from the Three National Death Cause Surveys showed that the crude mortality of colorectal cancer increased by 77.9% form mid 1970's (1973-1975) to mid 2000's (2004-2005). WHO Mortality Database showed

  7. Test Sensitivity in the Computer-Aided Detection of Breast Cancer from Clinical Mammographic Screening: a Meta-analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Levman, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess evaluative methodologies for comparative measurements of test sensitivity in clinical mammographic screening trials of computer-aided detection (CAD) technologies. Materials and Methods: This meta-analysis was performed by analytically reviewing the relevant literature on the clinical application of computer-aided detection (CAD) technologies as part of a breast cancer screening program based on x-ray mammography. Each clinical study's method for measuring the CAD system's improvement in test sensitivity is examined in this meta-analysis. The impact of the chosen sensitivity measurement on the study's conclusions are analyzed. Results: This meta-analysis demonstrates that some studies have inappropriately compared sensitivity measurements between control groups and CAD enabled groups. The inappropriate comparison of control groups and CAD enabled groups can lead to an underestimation of the benefits of the clinical application of computer-aided detection technologies. Conclusions: The po...

  8. Narrow-band imaging does not improve detection of colorectal polyps when compared to conventional colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial and meta-analysis of published studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aponte Diego

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A colonoscopy may frequently miss polyps and cancers. A number of techniques have emerged to improve visualization and to reduce the rate of adenoma miss. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT in two clinics of the Gastrointestinal Department of the Sanitas University Foundation in Bogota, Colombia. Eligible adult patients presenting for screening or diagnostic elective colonoscopy were randomlsy allocated to undergo conventional colonoscopy or narrow-band imaging (NBI during instrument withdrawal by three experienced endoscopists. For the systematic review, studies were identified from the Cochrane Library, PUBMED and LILACS and assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results We enrolled a total of 482 patients (62.5% female, with a mean age of 58.33 years (SD 12.91; 241 into the intervention (NBI colonoscopy and 241 into the conventional colonoscopy group. Most patients presented for diagnostic colonoscopy (75.3%. The overall rate of polyp detection was significantly higher in the conventional group compared to the NBI group (RR 0.75, 95%CI 0.60 to 0.96. However, no significant differences were found in the mean number of polyps (MD -0.1; 95%CI -0.25 to 0.05, and the mean number of adenomas (MD 0.04 95%CI -0.09 to 0.17. Meta-analysis of studies (regardless of indication did not find any significant differences in the mean number of polyps (5 RCT, 2479 participants; WMD -0.07 95% CI -0.21 to 0.07; I2 68%, the mean number of adenomas (8 RCT, 3517 participants; WMD -0.08 95% CI -0.17; 0.01 to I2 62% and the rate of patients with at least one adenoma (8 RCT, 3512 participants, RR 0.96 95% CI 0.88 to 1,04;I2 0%. Conclusion NBI does not improve detection of colorectal polyps when compared to conventional colonoscopy (Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000456055.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy and impact on management of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET/CT in colorectal liver metastasis: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffione, Anna Margherita; Rubello, Domenico [S.M. della Misericordia Hospital, PET Unit, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rovigo (Italy); Lopci, Egesta [Humanitas Research Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milano (Italy); Bluemel, Christina; Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Giammarile, Francesco [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud Biophysique, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lyon (France)

    2015-01-15

    The first aim of the review (aim 1) was to obtain the diagnostic performance values of {sup 18}F-FDG PET for the detection and staging of liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), the second aim (aim 2) was to compare PET and conventional imaging modalities, and the third aim (aim 3) was to evaluate the impact of PET on patient management. The incidence of extrahepatic disease (EHD) detected by PET is also reviewed. A comprehensive search was performed on PubMed/MEDLINE for studies evaluating PET and PET/CT in CRC patients with liver metastases up to June 2014. For inclusion PET had to have been performed prior to surgery, there had to be at least 18 patients in the study, and the reported data had to allow calculation of 2 x 2 contingency tables (for aim 1). A total of 18 studies were eligible for at least one of the three intended subanalyses including a total of 1,059 patients. Pooled sensitivity, specificity and accuracy and the corresponding 95 % confidence intervals were derived from the contingency tables on a patient basis (patient-based analysis, PBA) and a lesion basis (lesion-based analysis, LBA) for eight studies. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of PET on PBA were both 93 %. Corresponding values for LBA were 60 % and 79 %, respectively. Areas under the summary ROC were 0.97 for PBA and 0.67 for LBA. Regarding aim 2, PET had a slightly lower sensitivity than MRI and CT on PBA (93 %, 100 % and 98 %, respectively) and LBA (66 %, 89 % and 79 %, respectively) but appeared to be more specific than MRI and CT (86 %, 81 % and 67 %, respectively). PET findings resulted in changes in the management of a mean of 24 % of patients. The mean incidence of PET-based EHD was 32 %. This meta-analysis suggests that FDG PET/CT is highly accurate for the detection of liver metastases on a patient basis but less accurate on a lesion basis. Compared to MRI, PET is less sensitive but more specific and affects the management of about one-quarter of patients

  10. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Kruse, Torben

    2008-01-01

    studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our purpose has been to investigate pathways and transcription factors involved in metastasis by use of gene expression data sets. METHODS: We have...... tumors compared to non-metastasizing tumors. Meta-analysis has been used to determine overrepresentation of pathways and transcription factors targets, concordant deregulated in metastasizing breast tumors, in several data sets. RESULTS: The major findings are upregulation of cell cycle pathways......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Metastasis is believed to progress in several steps including different pathways but the determination and understanding of these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in breast tumors has been used to predict outcome in recent...

  11. Abdominal obesity and gastroesophageal cancer risk: systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xuan; Hidayat, Khemayanto; Shi, Bi-Min

    2017-06-30

    To systematically and quantitatively review the relation of abdominal obesity, as measured by waist circumference (WC) and waist to hip ratio (WHR), to total gastroesophageal cancer, gastric cancer (GC), and esophageal cancer. PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched for studies assessing the association between abdominal obesity and gastroesophageal cancer (GC and/or esophageal cancer) up to August 2016. A random-effect model was used to calculate the summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven prospective cohort studies - one publication included two separate cohorts - from six publications were included in the final analysis. A total of 2130 gastroesophageal cancer cases diagnosed amongst 913182 participants. Higher WC and WHR were significantly associated with increased risk of total gastroesophageal cancer (WC: RR 1.68, 95% CI: 1.38, 2.04; WHR: RR 1.49, 95% CI: 1.19, 1.88), GC (WC: RR 1.48, 95% CI: 1.24, 1.78; WHR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.70), and esophageal cancer (WC: RR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.30, 3.24; WHR: RR 1.99, 95% CI: 1.05, 3.75).Findings from our subgroup analyses showed non-significant positive associations between gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA) and both measures of abdominal adiposity, while gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) was positively associated with WC but not with WHR. On analysis restricted to studies that adjusted for body mass index (BMI), WC was positively associated with GC and esophageal cancer, whereas WHR was positively associated with risk of GC only. Although limited, the findings from our meta-analysis suggest the potential role of abdominal obesity in the etiology of gastric and esophageal cancers. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy in Early Stage Cervical Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Hang, Bo; Xiong, Guang-Wu; Zhang, Xiao-Wei

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the value of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (LRH) in the treatment of early stage cervical cancer by comparing intraoperative and postoperative outcomes with abdominal radical hysterectomy (ARH). We searched the Medline, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, through February 2, 2016 with keywords of "laparoscopic OR laparoscopy" AND "radical hysterectomy OR early cervical cancer OR stage IB, stage IB1, stage IB2, stage IIA, stage IIA1, stage IIA2, stage IIA cervical cancer" to identify all relevant studies that compared LRH with ARH in treating early cervical cancer. Two reviewers evaluated the quality of literature independently. Standardized tables were used to extract data (study or participant details and results) from the texts, tables, figures, or any other attachments of eligible publications. Weighted mean differences (MDs) and odds ratios (ORs) were pooled with the random effects model. Then we conducted meta-analysis using the RevMan5.3 software. A total of 615 studies were initially identified. After screening, 23 studies, including 4205 patients were recruited. LRH was associated with lower estimated blood loss (mL) (MD = -178.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -214.89 to -141.94, P early stage cervical cancer in most essential aspects, which should arouse sufficient attention.

  13. Antihypertensive drug use and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Haibo; Rui, Qin; Zhu, Xiaojue; Yu, Zhenquan; Gao, Rong; Liu, Huixiang

    2017-09-22

    We conducted a meta-analysis of observational studies to examine the hypothesized association between breast cancer and antihypertensive drug (AHT) use. Fixed- or random- effect models were used to calculate pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all AHTs and individual classes (i.e., angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, [ACEi]; angiotensin-receptor blockers, [ARBs]; calcium channel blockers, [CCBs]; beta-blockers, [BBs], and diuretics). Twenty-one studies with 3,116,266 participants were included. Overall, AHT use was not significantly associated with breast cancer risk (RR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.98-1.06), and no consistent association was found for specific AHT classes with pooled RRs of 1.02 (95% CI: 0.96-1.09) for BBs, 1.07 (95% CI: 0.99-1.16) for CCBs, 0.99 (95% CI: 0.93-1.05) for ACEi/ARBs, and 1.05 (95% CI: 0.99-1.12) for diuretics. When stratified by duration of use, there was a significantly reduced breast cancer risk for ACEi/ARB use ≥10 years (RR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.67-0.95). Although there was no significant association between AHT use and breast cancer risk, there was a possible beneficial effect was found for long-term ACEi/ARB. Large, randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up are needed to further test the effect of these medications on breast cancer risk.

  14. Dietary fat intake and ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wenlong; Lu, Heng; Qi, Yana; Wang, Xiuwen

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies assessing the association of dietary fat and risk of ovarian cancer yield discrepant results. Pertinent prospective cohort studies were identified by a PubMed search from inception to December 2015. Sixteen independent case-control and nine cohort studies on dietary fat intake were included, with approximately 900,000 subjects in total. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals were pooled using a random effects model. Heterogeneity, sensitivity analysis and publication bias were assessed; subgroup analysis and analysis stratified by EOC histology were conducted. The reported studies showed a significant increase of ovarian cancer risk with high consumption of total-, saturated-, and trans-fats, while serous ovarian cancer was more susceptible to dietary fat consumption than other pathological subtypes. No evidence of positive association between dietary fat intake and ovarian cancer risk was provided by cohort studies. Menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy, body mass index (BMI), and pregnancy times, modified the objective associations. In conclusion, the meta-analysis findings indicate that high consumption of total, saturated and trans-fats increase ovarian cancer risk, and different histological subtypes have different susceptibility to dietary fat. PMID:27119509

  15. A meta analysis of pancreatic microarray datasets yields new targets as cancer genes and biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin C W Goonesekere

    Full Text Available The lack of specific symptoms at early tumor stages, together with a high biological aggressiveness of the tumor contribute to the high mortality rate for pancreatic cancer (PC, which has a five year survival rate of less than 5%. Improved screening for earlier diagnosis, through the detection of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers provides the best hope of increasing the rate of curatively resectable carcinomas. Though many serum markers have been reported to be elevated in patients with PC, so far, most of these markers have not been implemented into clinical routine due to low sensitivity or specificity. In this study, we have identified genes that are significantly upregulated in PC, through a meta-analysis of large number of microarray datasets. We demonstrate that the biological functions ascribed to these genes are clearly associated with PC and metastasis, and that that these genes exhibit a strong link to pathways involved with inflammation and the immune response. This investigation has yielded new targets for cancer genes, and potential biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. The candidate list of cancer genes includes protein kinase genes, new members of gene families currently associated with PC, as well as genes not previously linked to PC. In this study, we are also able to move towards developing a signature for hypomethylated genes, which could be useful for early detection of PC. We also show that the significantly upregulated 800+ genes in our analysis can serve as an enriched pool for tissue and serum protein biomarkers in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 as a potential novel biomarker in digestive system cancers: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Zhang, Run J; Zou, Shu B

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), a newly discovered long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), has been reported to be overexpressed in various cancers. However, the clinical value of MALAT1 in digestive system cancers is unclear. This study was designed to investigate the potential value of MALAT1 as a prognostic biomarker in digestive system cancers. We searched the Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. All studies that explored the correlation between lncRNA MALAT1 expression and survival in digestive system tumors were selected. A quantitative meta-analysis was performed for the correlation between lncRNA MALAT1 expression and survival in digestive system tumors. Five studies were eligible for analysis, which included 547 patients. Meta-analysis showed that high expression of MALAT1 could predict poor overall survival (OS) in digestive system cancers (pooled HR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.41-2.43, Pdigestive system cancers.

  17. Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Meng, Qingyang; Xi, Qiulei; Zhuang, Qiulin; Han, Yusong; Gao, Ying; Ding, Qiurong; Wu, Guohao

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Consumption of dietary fat has been reported to be associated with gastric cancer risk, but the results of epidemiologic studies remain inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence regarding the association between dietary fat intake and gastric cancer risk. Methods A comprehensive search of PubMed and EMBASE was performed to identify observational studies providing quantitative estimates between dietary fat and gastric cancer risk. Random effects model was used to calculate the summary relative risk(SRR) in the highest versus lowest analysis. Categorical dose-response analysis was conducted to quantify the association between dietary fat intake and gastric cancer risk. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated using I2 and tau2(between study variance)statistics. Subgroup analysis and publication bias analysis were also performed. Results Twenty-two articles were included in the meta-analysis. The SRR for gastric cancer was 1.18 for individuals with highest intake versus lowest intake of total fat (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.999–1.39; n = 28; Pfat intake (20 g/d) (95%CI: 1.02–1.14; n = 6; P = 0.09; tau2 = 0.002; I2 = 46.8%, 95% CI: 0%-79%). Positive association between saturated fat intake (SRR = 1.31; 95%CI: 1.09–1.58;n = 18;Pfat intake (SRR = 0.77; 95%CI: 0.65–0.92; n = 16; P = 0.003; tau2 = 0.06; I2 = 56.2%, 95% CI: 23%-75%) and vegetable fat intake (SRR = 0.55; 95%CI: 0.41–0.74; n = 4;P = 0.12; tau2 = 0.04; I2 = 48.6%, 95% CI: 0%-83%), and no association between monounsaturated fat intake (SRR = 1.00; 95%CI: 0.79–1.25; n = 14; Pfat intake (SRR = 1.10; 95%CI: 0.90–1.33; n = 6; P = 0.13;tau2 = 0.02; I2 = 42.0%, 95% CI: 0%-70%) and gastric cancer risk were observed. Conclusions Our results suggest that intake of total fat is potentially positively associated with gastric cancer risk, and specific subtypes of fats account for different effects. However, these findings should be confirmed by

  18. The association between MTHFR polymorphisms and cervical cancer risk: a system review and meta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ke; Yang, LingYun; Lan, Zhu; Xi, MingRong

    2016-09-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) plays an important role in determining the proportions of folate coenzymes for DNA synthesis or DNA methylation. Published data on the association between the MTHFR polymorphisms and cervical risk are controversial. A meta-analysis was performed to assess whether the polymorphisms of MTHFR are associated with cervical cancer risk. Medline, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and Chinese Biomedicine Databases were searched to identify eligible studies. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms and cervical cancer were appropriately derived from fixed-effects or random effects models. Five different ORs were calculated: (1) allele contrast (C vs. T), (2) homozygous comparison (CC vs. TT), (3) heterozygous comparison (CC vs. CT), (4) dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT) and (5) recessive model (CC+CT vs. TT). A total of 13 studies, which included 12 studies for MTHFR C677T (2332 cases and 3000 controls) and five studies for A1298C polymorphisms (677 cases and 1191 controls), were enrolled in this meta-analysis. The pooled analyses revealed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was not associated with cervical cancer risk; while the A1298C polymorphism had a significant association with increased cervical cancer risk in allele contrast, heterozygote comparison and dominant model (A C, OR = 0.84, 95 % CI = 0.71-0.98; AA vs. CC OR = 0.72, 95 % CI = 0.59-0.89; AA vs. AC+CC, OR = 0.72, 95 % CI = 0.59-0.88). The significant associations between MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and cervical cancer were found among Asians and population-based case-control studies. This study indicated that the MTHFR C677T may be no associated with cervical cancer risk, and yet the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism may be a risk factor for cervical cancer.

  19. GENOTYPE ASSOCIATION GSTM1 NULL AND GASTRIC CANCER: EVIDENCE-BASED META-ANALYSIS

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    Rívian Xavier RIBEIRO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men and the sixth among women, except for non-melanoma skin tumors, in Brazil. Epidemiological evidences reveal the multifactorial etiology of this cancer, highlighting risk factors such as: infection by the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, advanced age, smoking, chronic alcohol abuse, eating habits and genetic polymorphisms. Considering the context of genetic polymorphisms, there is the absence of the GSTM1 gene. The lack of GSTM1 function to detoxify xenobiotics and promote defense against oxidative stress leads to increased DNA damage, promoting gastric carcinogenesis. This process is multifactorial and the development of gastric cancer results from a complex interaction of these variables. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the association of GSTM1 null polymorphism in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. METHODS A meta-analysis was conducted from 70 articles collected in SciELO and PubMed databases, between September 2015 and July 2016. In order to evaluate a possible association, we used the odds ratio (OR and confidence interval of 95% (CI 95%. To assess the heterogeneity of the studies was used the chi-square test. Statistical analysis was performed using the BioEstat® 5.3. RESULTS This study included 70 studies of case-control, including 28,549 individuals, which were assessed for the null polymorphism of the GSTM1 gene, and of which 11,208 (39.26% were cases and 17,341 (60.74% were controls. The final analysis showed that the presence of the GSTM1 gene acts as a protective factor against the development of gastric cancer (OR=0.788; 95%CI 0.725-0.857; P<0.0001. Positive statistical association was found in Asia (OR=0.736; 95%CI 0.670-0.809; P<0.0001 and Eurasia (OR=0.671; 95%CI 0.456-0.988; P=0.05. However, statistically significant data was not obtained in Europe (OR=1.033; 95%CI 0.873-1.222; P=0.705 and America (OR=0.866; 95%CI 0.549-1.364; P=0

  20. Supracricoid laryngectomy for recurrent laryngeal cancer after chemoradiotherapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, C A; Capasso, P; Topazio, D; Russo, G

    2016-12-01

    Residual or recurrent laryngeal cancer after irradiation is a difficult clinical problem with a rate that ranges from 13% to 36% of cases. Supracricoid laryngectomy (SCL) with cricohyoidopexy (CHP) or cricohyoidoepiglottopexy (CHEP) provide reliable oncological and functional results for selected primary and recurrent patients with glottic and supraglottic carcinomas. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the oncological and functional outcomes of patients treated with open partial horizontal laryngectomy types IIa and IIb (CHEP, CHP) in terms of the recurrence of squamocellular cancer of the larynx after radiotherapy failure. The databases searched included MEDLINE, PubMed and EMBASE (from January 1990 to December 2015, English language). The meta-analysis was performed with a mixed random effects model using the DerSimonian and Laird method. The heterogeneity was measured with the I2 statistic. Fourteen papers out of 276 were included and comprised a total of 291 patients. The five-year overall survival was 80.2% (CI 0.719-0.885; I2 = 62%; p = 0.003), and the 5-year disease-free survival was 89.5% (CI 0.838-0.952; I2 = 52%; p = 0.022). The indications for SCL after the failure of radiation therapy (RT) were similar to those specified for previously untreated patients. We therefore hypothesised that careful assessment of tumour extension might be responsible for the high 5-year OS and 5-year DFS. The early postoperative recovery outcomes indicated that the mean time until decannulation was 35.6 days (CI 24.3-46.9; I2 = 95%; p food that might be present. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  1. The updated network meta-analysis of neoadjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashoji, Ayako; Hayashida, Tetsu; Yokoe, Takamichi; Maeda, Hinako; Toyota, Tomoka; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Watanuki, Rurina; Nagayama, Aiko; Seki, Tomoko; Takahashi, Maiko; Abe, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2018-01-01

    We previously described a systematic assessment of the neoadjuvant therapies for human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) positive breast cancer, using network meta-analysis. Accumulation of new clinical data has compelled us to update the analysis. Randomized trials comparing different anti-HER2 regimens in the neoadjuvant setting were included, and odds ratio for pathologic complete response (pCR) in seven treatment arms were assessed by pooling effect sizes. Direct and indirect comparisons using a Bayesian statistical model were performed. All statistical tests were two-sided. A database search identified 993 articles with 13 studies meeting the eligibility criteria, including three new studies with lapatinib (lpnb). In an indirect comparison, dual anti-HER2 agents with CT achieved a better pCR rate than other arms. The credibility intervals of CT + tzmb + lpnb arm were largely reduced compared to our former report, which we added sufficient clinical evidence by this update. Values of surface under the cumulative ranking (SUCRA) suggested that CT + tzmb + pzmb had the highest probability of being the best treatment arm for pCR, widening the difference between the top two dual-HER2 blockade arms compared to our former report. The overall consistency with our first report enhanced the credibility of the results. Network meta-analysis using new clinical data firmly establish that combining two anti-HER2 agents with CT is most effective against HER2-positive breast cancer in the neoadjuvant setting. New pzmb related trials are required to fully determine the best neoadjuvant dual-HER2 blockade regimen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Oncologic Management of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoub, George; Nagalla, Srikanth; Aklilu, Mebea

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in females and the third most common cancer diagnosed in males. Familial CRC comprises ~20 to 30% of all CRC cases. Lynch syndrome (LS), previously called hereditary nonpolyposis CRC (HNPCC), is the most common of the hereditary CRC syndromes. In this review, the oncological management of hereditary colorectal cancer from the medical oncologist perspective is discussed with special emphasis on Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is character...

  3. History and present status of pulmonary metastasectomy in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom; Milošević, Mišel; Fiorentino, Francesca; Pfannschmidt, Joachim

    2014-10-28

    Clinical practice with respect to metastatic colorectal cancer differs from the other two most common cancers, breast and lung, in that routine surveillance is recommended with the specific intent of detecting liver and lung metastases and undertaking liver and lung resections for their removal. We trace the history of this approach to colorectal cancer by reviewing evidence for effectiveness from the 1950s to the present day. Our sources included published citation network analyses, the documented proposal for randomised trials, large systematic reviews, and meta-analysis of observational studies. The present consensus position has been adopted on the basis of a large number of observational studies but the randomised trials proposed in the 1980s and 1990s were either not done, or having been done, were not reported. Clinical opinion is the mainstay of current practice but in the absence of randomised trials there remains a possibility of selection bias. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are now routine before adoption of a new practice but RCTs are harder to run in evaluation of already established practice. One such trial is recruiting and shows that controlled trial are possible.

  4. Comparison of general obesity and measures of body fat distribution in older adults in relation to cancer risk: meta-analysis of individual participant data of seven prospective cohorts in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freisling, Heinz; Arnold, Melina; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; O'Doherty, Mark George; Ordóñez-Mena, José Manuel; Bamia, Christina; Kampman, Ellen; Leitzmann, Michael; Romieu, Isabelle; Kee, Frank; Tsilidis, Konstantinos; Tjønneland, Anne; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Boffetta, Paolo; Benetou, Vassiliki; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Huerta, José María; Brenner, Hermann; Wilsgaard, Tom; Jenab, Mazda

    2017-05-23

    We evaluated the associations of anthropometric indicators of general obesity (body mass index, BMI), an established risk factor of various cancer, and body fat distribution (waist circumference, WC; hip circumference, HC; and waist-to-hip ratio, WHR), which may better reflect metabolic complications of obesity, with total obesity-related and site-specific (colorectal and postmenopausal breast) cancer incidence. This is a meta-analysis of seven prospective cohort studies participating in the CHANCES consortium including 18 668 men and 24 751 women with a mean age of 62 and 63 years, respectively. Harmonised individual participant data from all seven cohorts were analysed separately and alternatively for each anthropometric indicator using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. After a median follow-up period of 12 years, 1656 first-incident obesity-related cancers (defined as postmenopausal female breast, colorectum, lower oesophagus, cardia stomach, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, endometrium, ovary, and kidney) had occurred in men and women. In the meta-analysis of all studies, associations between indicators of adiposity, per s.d. increment, and risk for all obesity-related cancers combined yielded the following summary hazard ratios: 1.11 (95% CI 1.02-1.21) for BMI, 1.13 (95% CI 1.04-1.23) for WC, 1.09 (95% CI 0.98-1.21) for HC, and 1.15 (95% CI 1.00-1.32) for WHR. Increases in risk for colorectal cancer were 16%, 21%, 15%, and 20%, respectively per s.d. of BMI, WC, HC, and WHR. Effect modification by hormone therapy (HT) use was observed for postmenopausal breast cancer (Pinteractionobesity-related cancers combined and with colorectal cancer in older adults. For postmenopausal breast cancer we report evidence for effect modification by HT use.

  5. Coffee Decreases the Risk of Endometrial Cancer: A Dose–Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

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    Alessandra Lafranconi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis of the association between coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer. Methods: Eligible studies were identified by searching the PubMed and EMBASE databases. The dose–response relationship as well as the risk of endometrial cancer for the highest versus the lowest categories of coffee consumption were assessed. Subgroup analyses considering the menopausal and receptor statuses, the smoking status, and the BMI (Body Mass Index were performed in order to identify potential confounders. Results: We identified a total of 12 studies eligible for meta-analysis. A dose–response meta-analysis showed a decreased risk of endometrial cancer. Moreover, a subgroup analysis indicated that coffee consumption is significantly associated with a decreased risk of postmenopausal cancer. Increasing coffee consumption by four cups per day was associated with a 20% reduction in endometrial cancer risk (relative risk (RR 0.80; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.72 to 0.89 and with a 24% reduction in postmenopausal cancer risk (RR 0.76; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.83. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that increased coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of endometrial cancer, and this association is observed also for postmenopausal cancer.

  6. Prognostic role of common microRNA polymorphisms in cancers: evidence from a meta-analysis.

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    Lingzi Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The morbidity and mortality of cancer increase remarkably every year. It's a heavy burden for family and society. The detection of prognostic biomarkers can help to improve the theraputic effect and prolong the lifetime of patients. microRNAs have an influential role in cancer prognosis. The results of articles discussing the relationship between microRNA polymorphisms and cancer prognosis are inconsistent. METHODS: We conduct a meta-analysis of 19 publications concerning the association of four common polymorphisms, mir-146a rs2910164, mir-149 rs2292832, mir-196a2 rs11614913 and mir-499 rs3746444, with cancer prognosis. Pooled Hazard Ratios with 95% Confidence Intervals for the relationship between four genetic polymorphisms and Overall Survival, Recurrence-free Survival, Disease-free survival, recurrence are calculated. Subgroup analysis by population and type of tumor are conducted. RESULTS: GG genotype of mir-146a may be the protective factor for overall survival, especially in Caucasian population. C-containing genotypes of mir-196a2 act as a risk role for overall survival. The same result exists in Asian population, in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and digestive cancer. The patients with C allele of mir-149 have a better overall survival, especially in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. No significant results are obtained for mir-499 polymorphisms. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic polymorphisms in mir-146a, mir-196a2 and mir-149 may be associated with overall survival. This effect varies with different types of cancer. Genetic polymorphism in mir-499 may have nothing to do with cancer prognosis.

  7. AB103. Prostatectomy versus active surveillance for early stage prostate cancer: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, You; Fu, Shengjun; Yang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the survival effect between radical prostatectomy (RP) and active surveillance (AS) for the treatment of early stage prostate cancer. Method Randomized controlled trials were computerized searched from Medline, Cochrane Library, ISI web of knowledge, Science Direct, Google scholar, CBM database for the evaluation of prognosis of treatment for early stage prostate cancer—RP versus AS. Prognosis of the treatment includes all-cause mortality, prostate cancer specific mortality and cancer metastasis. The latest retrieval date was May 2014. The data was extracted and the quality of included studies was independently assessed by two reviewers and RevMan5.2 software was used to perform data synthesis. Result Three RCTs involving 1,537 patients (772 RP vs. 765 AS) were included finally. The results of meta-analysis displayed that the hazard of all-cause mortality in RP group was significantly lower than AS group, HR =0.79 (95% CI, 0.69-0.90, P=0.0005), no significant difference was seen in <65 years group or ≥65 years group. Prostate cancer specific mortality risk was HR =0.58 (95% CI, 0.44-0.76), P=0.0001). And subgroup analysis showed RP protect patients from cancer specific mortality by age under 65 years, HR=0.46 (95% CI, 0.31-0.68, P=0.0001), no significant difference in patients above 65 years. Hazard of tumor metastasis was lower in RP group than in AS group regardless of age stratification, HR =0.54 (95% CI, 0.42-0.68, P<0.00001). Conclusions Radical prostatectomy reduced hazard of all-cause mortality, cancer specific mortality and cancer metastasis, and the benefit to prostate cancer survival was mainly manifested in patients under age 65 years. After combining patient expectant survival assessment and quality of life, active surveillance was still an effective management protocol for early stage prostate cancer.

  8. DNA repair gene XRCC1 polymorphisms, smoking, and bladder cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

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    Shan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1 protein plays a crucial role in base excision repair (BER pathway by acting as a scaffold for other BER enzymes. Variants in the XRCC1 gene might alter protein structure or function or create alternatively spliced proteins which may influence BER efficiency and hence affect individual susceptibility to bladder cancer. Recent epidemiological studies have shown inconsistent associations between these polymorphisms and bladder cancer. To clarify the situation, a comprehensive meta-analysis of all available studies was performed in this study. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, and Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM databases have been systematically searched to identify all relevant studies for the period up to February 2013. Data were abstracted independently by two reviewers and Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed mainly by ethnicity and smoking status. RESULTS: A total of 26 case-control studies, including 24 studies for R399Q polymorphism, 15 studies for R194W polymorphism, and 7 studies for R280H polymorphism met the inclusion criteria and were selected. With respect to R399Q polymorphism, significantly decreased bladder cancer risk was found among smokers (AA vs. GG: OR=0.693, 95%CI= 0.515-0.932, P=0.015 and recessive model AA vs. GA+GG: OR=0.680, 95%CI= 0.515-0.898, P=0.007, respectively. With respect to R194W and R280H polymorphism, significantly increased bladder cancer risk were observed among Asians (TT+CT vs. CC:OR = 1.327, 95% CI 1.086-1.622, P=0.006 for R194W, and AA+GA vs. GG: OR=2.094, 95% CI 1.211-3.621, P=0.008 for R280H, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggests that the XRCC1 R399Q polymorphism may play a protective role against bladder cancer among smokers. However, the XRCC1 R194W and R280H polymorphisms were both associated with increased bladder cancer risk among Asians

  9. Estrogen and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavasani, Sayeh; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Prentice, Ross L; Kato, Ikuko; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Johnson, Karen C; Young, Alicia; Rodabough, Rebecca; Hubbell, F Allan; Mahinbakht, Ali; Simon, Michael S

    2015-09-15

    The preponderance of observational studies describe an association between the use of estrogen alone and a lower incidence of colorectal cancer. In contrast, no difference in the incidence of colorectal cancer was seen in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) randomized, placebo-controlled trial with estrogen alone after a mean intervention of 7.1 years and cumulative follow-up of 13.2 years. This study extends these findings by providing detailed analyses of the effects of estrogen alone on the histology, grade, and stage of colorectal cancer, relevant subgroups, and deaths from and after colorectal cancer. The WHI study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 10,739 postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy. Participants were assigned to conjugated equine estrogen at 0.625 mg/d (n = 5279) or a matching placebo (n = 5409). Rates of colorectal cancer diagnoses and deaths from and after colorectal cancer were assessed throughout the study. Colorectal cancer rates in the estrogen-alone and placebo groups were comparable: 0.14% and 0.12% per year, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.58; P = .43). Bowel screening examinations were comparable between the 2 groups throughout the study. The grade, stage, and location of colorectal cancer did not differ between the randomization groups. There were more colorectal cancer deaths in the estrogen-alone group (34 [0.05%] vs 24 [0.03%]; HR, 1.46, 95% CI, 0.86-2.46; P = .16), but the difference was not statistically significant. The colorectal cancer incidence was higher for participants with a history of colon polyp removal in the estrogen-alone group (0.23% vs 0.02%; HR, 13.47; nominal 95% CI, 1.76-103.0; P colorectal cancer or deaths from or after colorectal cancer. A possibly higher risk of colorectal cancer in women with prior colon polyp removal who use estrogen alone requires confirmation. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  10. Wnt Signaling and Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatoff, Emma M; Leach, Benjamin I; Dow, Lukas E

    2017-04-01

    The WNT signaling pathway is a critical mediator of tissue homeostasis and repair, and frequently co-opted during tumor development. Almost all colorectal cancers (CRC) demonstrate hyperactivation of the WNT pathway, which in many cases is believed to be the initiating and driving event. In this short review, we provide a focused overview of recent developments in our understanding of the WNT pathway in CRC, describe new research tools that are enabling a deeper understanding of WNT biology, and outline ongoing efforts to target this pathway therapeutically.

  11. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each......%). Fifteen nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins were all down-regulated in CRC. We identified several chromosomal locations with clusters of either potential oncogenes or potential tumor suppressors. Some of these, such as aminopeptidase N/CD13 and sigma B3 protein on chromosome 15q25, coincided...

  12. Flavonoids intake and risk of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, K; Liang, Z; Liu, L; Li, F; Wang, H

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the association between total flavonoids/flavonoid subclasses intake and prostate cancer risk. Several databases were searched to select eligible studies with predefined criteria. Risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used as the effect size. Publication bias and sensitivity analysis were performed. A total of five studies including four prospective cohort studies and one case-control study were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled result demonstrated a significantly increased risk of prostate cancer with higher intake of total flavonoids (RR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02-1.23, P = 0.013). However, sensitivity analysis indicated that there lacked a significant association after removing the study of Wang et al. (RR = 1.17, 95% CI: 0.94-1.46). Subgroup analysis stratified by flavonoids subclasses found that higher intake of anthocyanidins and flavan-3-ols were significantly associated with increased prostate cancer risk (RR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.03-1.21, P = 0.011; RR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.10-1.32, P flavonoids may not be associated with prostate cancer risk. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Prognostic Indications of Elevated MCT4 and CD147 across Cancer Types: A Meta-Analysis

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    Cory D. Bovenzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metabolism in the tumor microenvironment can play a critical role in tumorigenesis and tumor aggression. Metabolic coupling may occur between tumor compartments; this phenomenon can be prognostically significant and may be conserved across tumor types. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs play an integral role in cellular metabolism via lactate transport and have been implicated in metabolic synergy in tumors. The transporters MCT1 and MCT4 are regulated via expression of their chaperone, CD147. Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of existing publications on the relationship between MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 expression and overall survival and disease-free survival in cancer, using hazard ratios derived via multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results. Increased MCT4 expressions in the tumor microenvironment, cancer cells, or stromal cells were all associated with decreased overall survival and decreased disease-free survival (p<0.001 for all analyses. Increased CD147 expression in cancer cells was associated with decreased overall survival and disease-free survival (p<0.0001 for both analyses. Few studies were available on MCT1 expression; MCT1 expression was not clearly associated with overall or disease-free survival. Conclusion. MCT4 and CD147 expression correlate with worse prognosis across many cancer types. These results warrant further investigation of these associations.

  14. Smoking Before the First Pregnancy and the Risk of Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRoo, Lisa A.; Cummings, Peter; Mueller, Beth A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a meta-analysis of the association between smoking before a first pregnancy, when undifferentiated breast tissue may be vulnerable to tobacco carcinogens, and the risk of breast cancer. A search of the published literature through August 2010 identified 23 papers reporting on associations between smoking before a first pregnancy and breast cancer. Odds ratios or hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for known or suspected breast cancer risk factors, were abstracted from each study. Data were pooled using both fixed- and random-effects models. The fixed-effect summary risk ratio for breast cancer among the women who smoked before their first pregnancy versus women who had never smoked was 1.10 (95% confidence interval: 1.07, 1.14); the random-effects estimate was similar. The separate fixed-effect risk ratios for smoking only before the first pregnancy (5 studies) or only after the first pregnancy (16 studies) were both 1.07, providing no evidence that breast tissue is more susceptible to malignant transformation from smoking before the first pregnancy. While these small summary risk ratios may represent causal effects, residual confounding could readily produce estimates of this size in the absence of any causal effect. PMID:21719745

  15. XRCC3 Thr241Met gene polymorphisms and lung cancer risk: a meta-analysis

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    Zhan Ping

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many studies have examined the association between the XRCC3 Thr241Met gene polymorphism and lung cancer risk in various populations, but their results have been inconsistent. To assess this relationship more precisely, a meta-analysis was performed. The PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and CNKI database was searched for case–control studies published up to July 2012. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. Ultimately, 17 studies, comprising 4123 lung cancer cases and 5597 controls were included. Overall, for T allele carriers (TC + TT versus the wild-type homozygotes (CC, the pooled OR was 0.95 (95% CI = 0.87-1.04 P = 0.228 for heterogeneity, for TT versus CC the pooled OR was 0.99 (95% CI = 0.86-1.15 P = 0.315 for heterogeneity. In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, histological types of lung cancer and smoking status, no any significantly risks were found for (C/T + T/T vs C/C or T/T vs C/C. No publication bias was found by using the funnel plot and Egger's test. Overall, there is no evidence showing a significant correlation between XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism and lung cancer risk stratified analysis by ethnicity, histology and smoking status.

  16. An Up-to-date Meta-analysis of Coffee Consumption and Risk of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiadong; Chen, Jie; Xue, Jian-Xin; Yang, Jie; Wang, Zeng-Jun

    2017-08-29

    Results of the association between coffee consumption (CC) and the risk of prostate cancer (PC) are still controversy. Based on published relevant studies, we conducted an up-to-date meta-analysis to investigatethis issue. The protocol used in this article is in accordance with the PRISMA checklist. Eligible studies were screened and retrieved by using PUBMED and EMBASE as well as manual review of references up to July 2016. We calculated the pooled relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) with random effect models. The dose-response relationship was assessed by generalized least-squares trend estimation analysis. Totally, we included twenty-eight studies (14 case-control and 14 cohort studies) on CC with 42399 PC patients for the final meta-analysis. No significant association of PC was found for high versus non/lowestCC, with RR = 1.07 (95% CI: 0.96-1.18). In subgroup meta-analysis by study design, there were no significant positive associations between CC and PC in case-control studies (RR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.05-1.35) or in the cohort studies (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.84-1.12). Additionally, RR with different quality of studies were respectively 1.15 (95% CI: 0.99-1.34) and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.03-1.58) for high and low quality in the case-control studies; while were respectively 1.02 (95% CI: 0.88-1.20) and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.57-1.14) in the cohort studies. When analyzed by geographic area, we found no association between CC and PC, with RR = 1.06 (95% CI: 0.86-1.30) for 10 studies from Europe, 1.06 (95% CI: 0.94-1.20) for 13 studies conducted in America; 1.12 (95% CI: 0.70-1.79) for 4 studiesfrom Asia. However, in subgroup analysis by subtype of the disease, there was a significant negative (beneficial) association in the localized PC (RR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.84-0.97), but not for the advanced PC (RR = 0.90, 95%CI: 0.70-1.16). Additionally, RR = 0.99 (95% CI: 0.98-0.99) for an increment of one cup per day of coffee intake shows significant association with the

  17. Colorectal Cancer: Genetics is Changing Everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuch, Joshua C; Ahnen, Dennis J

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease caused by mutational or epigenetic alterations in DNA. There has been a remarkable expansion of the molecular understanding of colonic carcinogenesis in the last 30 years and that understanding is changing many aspects of colorectal cancer care. It is becoming increasingly clear that there are genetic subsets of colorectal cancer that have different risk factors, prognosis, and response to treatment. This article provides a general update on colorectal cancer and highlights the ways that genetics is changing clinical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Associations between ghrelin and ghrelin receptor polymorphisms and cancer in Caucasian populations: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabalan, Noel A; Seim, Inge; Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Chopin, Lisa K

    2014-11-07

    There is growing evidence that the ghrelin axis, including ghrelin (GHRL) and its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), play a role in cancer progression. Ghrelin gene and ghrelin receptor gene polymorphisms have been reported to have a range of effects in cancer, from increased risk, to protection from cancer, or having no association. In this study we aimed to clarify the role of ghrelin and ghrelin receptor polymorphisms in cancer by performing a meta-analysis of published case-control studies. In the overall analysis, homozygous and recessive associations indicated that the minor alleles of rs696217 and rs2075356 GHRL polymorphisms conferred reduced cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] 0.61-0.78). The risk was unchanged for breast cancer patients when analysed separately (OR 0.73-0.83). In contrast, the rs4684677 GHRL and the rs572169 GHSR polymorphisms conferred increased breast cancer risk (OR 1.97-1.98, p = 0.08 and OR 1.42-1.43, p = 0.08, respectively). All dominant and co-dominant effects showed null effects (OR 0.96-1.05), except for the rs572169 co-dominant effect, with borderline increased risk (OR 1.08, p = 0.05). This study suggests that the rs696217 and rs2075356 ghrelin gene (GHRL) polymorphisms may protect carriers against breast cancer, and the rs4684677 GHRL and rs572169 GHSR polymorphisms may increase the risk among carriers. In addition, larger studies are required to confirm these findings.

  19. Vitamin C and survival among women with breast cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Holly R; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-05-01

    The association between dietary vitamin C intake and breast cancer survival is inconsistent and few studies have specifically examined vitamin C supplement use among women with breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to summarise results from prospective studies on the association between vitamin C supplement use and dietary vitamin C intake and breast cancer-specific mortality and total mortality. Studies were identified using the PubMed database through February 6, 2014 and by examining the references of retrieved articles. Prospective studies were included if they reported relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for at least two categories or as a continuous exposure. Random-effects models were used to combine study-specific results. The ten identified studies examined vitamin C supplement use (n=6) and dietary vitamin C intake (n=7) and included 17,696 breast cancer cases, 2791 total deaths, and 1558 breast cancer-specific deaths. The summary RR (95% CI) for post-diagnosis vitamin C supplement use was 0.81 (95% CI 0.72-0.91) for total mortality and 0.85 (95% CI 0.74-0.99) for breast cancer-specific mortality. The summary RR for a 100mg per day increase in dietary vitamin C intake was 0.73 (95% CI 0.59-0.89) for total mortality and 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.94) for breast cancer-specific mortality. Results from this meta-analysis suggest that post-diagnosis vitamin C supplement use may be associated with a reduced risk of mortality. Dietary vitamin C intake was also statistically significantly associated with a reduced risk of total mortality and breast cancer-specific mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Association between Helicobacter pylori infection and pancreatic cancer development: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjia Xiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is one of the most troublesome malignancies with dismal prognosis. H. pylori has been recognized as a type I carcinogen. Several studies have evaluated the association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer development, however, the conclusions are inconsistent. METHODS: Literature search was carried out in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and CNKI databases to identify eligible researches. We performed overall meta-analysis of all studies included and subgroup analysis based on regional distribution. Quality of the studies (assessed by Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale for case-control studies and CagA+ strains of H. pylori were taken into consideration, and we conducted additional analyses including high-quality researches and those concerning CagA+ H. pylori respectively. RESULTS: 9 studies involving 3033 subjects (1083 pancreatic cancer cases, 1950 controls were included. Summary OR and 95%CI of the overall meta-analysis of all included studies were 1.47 and 1.22-1.77, pooled data of the 4 high-quality studies were OR 1.28, 95%CI 1.01-1.63. OR of the 5 studies examined CagA+ strains was 1.42, corresponding 95%CI was 0.79 to 2.57. Summary estimates of subgroup analysis based on regional distribution are as follows, Europe group: OR 1.56, 95%CI 1.15-2.10; East Asia group: OR 2.01, 95%CI 1.33-3.02; North America group: OR 1.17, 95%CI 0.87-1.58. There was not obvious heterogeneity across the 9 studies. No publication bias was detected. CONCLUSION: H. pylori infection is significantly, albeit weakly, associated with pancreatic cancer development. The association is prominent in Europe and East Asia, but not in North America. CagA+ H. pylori strains appear not to be associated with pancreatic cancer. However, more studies, especially prospective studies, are needed to validate our results.

  1. Serum IL-10 Predicts Worse Outcome in Cancer Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pin; Wang, Zhen; Huang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background IL–10 is an important immunosuppressive cytokine which is frequently elevated in tumor microenvironment. Some studies have reported that overexpression of serous IL–10 is correlated with worse outcome in patients with malignant tumor. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the prognostic impact of serous IL–10 expression in cancer patients. Methods We searched PubMed and EBSCO for studies in evaluating the association of IL–10 expression—in serum and clinical outcome in cancer patients. Overall survival (OS) was the primary prognostic indicator and disease-free survival (DFS) was the secondary indicator. Extracted data were computed into odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) or a P value for survival at 1, 3 and 5 years. Pooled data were weighted using the Mantel–Haenszel Fixed-effect model. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results A total of 1788 patients with cancer from 21 published studies were incorporated into this meta-analysis. High level of serum IL–10 was significantly associated with worse OS at 1-year (OR = 3.70, 95% CI = 2.81 to 4.87, P < 0.00001), 3-year (OR = 3.33, 95% CI = 2.53 to 4.39, P < 0.0001) and 5-year (OR = 2.80, 95% CI = 1.90 to 4.10, P < 0.0001) of cancer. Subgroup analysis showed that the correlation between serous IL–10 expression and outcome of patients with solid tumors and hematological malignancies are consistent. The association of IL–10 with worse DFS at 1-year (OR = 3.34, 95% CI = 1.40 to 7.94, P = 0.006) and 2-year (OR = 3.91, 95% CI = 1.79 to 8.53, P = 0.0006) was also identified. Conclusions High expression of serous IL–10 leads to an adverse survival in most types of cancer. IL–10 is a valuable biomarker for prognostic prediction and targeting IL–10 treatment options for both solid tumors and hematological malignancies. PMID:26440936

  2. Genetic association between HER2 and ESR2 polymorphisms and ovarian cancer: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang L

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Liang Tang,1,2 Jianming Li,1,3 Meihua Bao,1,2 Ju Xiang,1,2 Yiwei Chen,1,2 Yan Wang1,2,4 1Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Institute of Neuroscience, Changsha Medical University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Human Anatomy, School of Basic Medical Science, Changsha Medical University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Neurology, Xiang-ya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Human Anatomy, Experiment Center for Function, Changsha Medical University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China Objective: The estrogen receptor (ER and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 each play an important role in female cancers. This study aimed to investigate the genetic association between three common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and the risk of ovarian cancer. The SNPs investigated in this study were ESR2 rs1271572 and rs3020450 and HER2 rs1801200.Methods: In this study, databases were electronically searched in a meta-analysis. Databases used were PubMed, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, Wanfang and Cochrane library. Case–control studies on the association between ESR2 and HER2 polymorphisms were selected according to inclusion and exclusion standard. Articles were evaluated for quality, and data were extracted.Results: A total of 13 articles with 5,461 cases and 7,603 controls were included in this meta-analysis. The recessive model of ESR2 rs1271572 was shown to be significantly associated with the risk of ovarian cancer (p = 0.008, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval {CI}] = 1.13 [1.03, 1.24], and this significant association still existed in a subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity (Asian: p = 0.04, OR [95% CI] = 1.92 [1.04, 3.56]; Caucasian: p = 0.02, OR [95% CI] = 1.12 [1.02, 1.23]. In addition, the distribution of the dominant model of ESR2 rs3020450 was significantly different in

  3. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Wijnen, JT; Menko, FH; Kleibeuker, JH; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; MeijersHeijboer, EH; Bertario, L; Varesco, L; Bisgaard, ML; Mohr, J; Fodde, R; Khan, PM

    Background & Aims: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers, The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of

  4. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H. F.; Wijnen, J. T.; Menko, F. H.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Taal, B. G.; Griffioen, G.; Nagengast, F. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. H.; Bertario, L.; Varesco, L.; Bisgaard, M. L.; Mohr, J.; Fodde, R.; Khan, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers. The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of carriers within

  5. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase A1298C Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Risk: A Meta-analysis of 33 Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, V

    2014-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) enzyme is essential for DNA synthesis and DNA methylation, and its gene polymorphisms have been implicated as risk factors for birth defects, neurological disorders, and different types of cancers. Several studies have investigated the association between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and breast cancer (BC) risk, but the results were inconclusive. To assess the risk associated with MTHFR A1298C polymorphism, a comprehensive meta-analysis was perform...

  6. Diet and cancer risk in the Korean population: a meta- analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hae Dong; Park, Sohee; Oh, Kyungwon; Kim, Hyun Ja; Shin, Hae Rim; Moon, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jeongseon

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have found links between diet and cancer. The summary estimates of the association between dietary factors and cancer risk were investigated using previously reported studies of the Korean population. Gastric cancer risk was inversely associated with the high intake of soy foods [OR (95% CI): 0.32 (0.25-0.40) for soybean, 0.56 (0.45-0.71) for soybean curd, and 0.67 (0.46-0.98) for soymilk], allium vegetables [OR (95% CI): 0.37 (0.26-0.53) for green onion, 0.54 (0.40-0.73) for garlic, and 0.54 (0.35-0.85) for onion], fruits [OR (95% CI): 0.61 (0.42-0.88)], and mushrooms [OR (95% CI): 0.43 (0.21-0.88)]. Salt and Kimchi were associated with an increased gastric cancer risk [OR (95% CI): 1.92 (1.52-2.43) and 2.21 (1.29-3.77), respectively]. Colorectal cancer risk was positively associated with meat intake [OR (95% CI): 1.25 (1.15-1.36)]. Total soy products, soybean curd, and soymilk showed an inverse association with breast cancer risk [OR (95% CI): 0.61 (0.38-0.99), 0.47 (0.34-0.66), and 0.75 (0.57-0.98), respectively]. Green/yellow and light colored vegetables were associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer [OR (95% CI): 0.34 (0.23-0.49) and 0.44 (0.21-0.90), respectively]. Mushroom intake was inversely associated in pre-menopausal women only [OR (95% CI): 0.47 (0.26-0.86)]. In conclusion, soy foods, fruits and vegetables might reduce cancer risk in the Korean population. High salt food might be risk factor for gastric cancer, and intake of high amount of meat might cause colorectal cancer.

  7. Obesity and risk of colorectal cancer: a systematic review of prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlei Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mounting evidence indicates that obesity may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC. To conduct a systematic review of prospective studies assessing the association of obesity with the risk of CRC using meta-analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Relevant studies were identified by a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases before January 2012, with no restrictions. We also reviewed reference lists from retrieved articles. We included prospective studies that reported relative risk (RR estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the association between general obesity [measured using body mass index (BMI] or central obesity [measured using waist circumference (WC] and the risk of colorectal, colon, or rectal cancer. Approximately 9, 000, 000 participants from several countries were included in this analysis. 41 studies on general obesity and 13 studies on central obesity were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RRs of CRC for the obese vs. normal category of BMI were 1.334 (95% CI, 1.253-1.420, and the highest vs. lowest category of WC were 1.455 (95% CI, 1.327-1.596. There was heterogeneity among studies of BMI (P<0.001 but not among studies of WC (P=0.323. CONCLUSIONS: Both of general and central obesity were positively associated with the risk of CRC in this meta-analysis.

  8. Folate intake, MTHFR polymorphisms, and risk of esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Giovannucci, Edward; Wolk, Alicja

    2006-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that a low folate intake and impaired folate metabolism may be implicated in the development of gastrointestinal cancers. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies evaluating the association of folate intake or genetic polymorphisms in 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a central enzyme in folate metabolism, with risk of esophageal, gastric, or pancreatic cancer. A literature search was performed using MEDLINE for studies published through March 2006. Study-specific relative risks were weighted by the inverse of their variance to obtain random-effects summary estimates. The summary relative risks for the highest versus the lowest category of dietary folate intake were 0.66 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53-0.83) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (4 case-control), 0.50 (95% CI, 0.39-0.65) for esophageal adenocarcinoma (3 case-control), and 0.49 (95% CI, 0.35-0.67) for pancreatic cancer (1 case-control, 4 cohort); there was no heterogeneity among studies. Results on dietary folate intake and risk of gastric cancer (9 case-control, 2 cohort) were inconsistent. In most studies, the MTHFR 677TT (variant) genotype, which is associated with reduced enzyme activity, was associated with an increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, noncardia gastric cancer, gastric cancer (all subsites), and pancreatic cancer; all but one of 22 odds ratios were >1, of which 13 estimates were statistically significant. Studies of the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism were limited and inconsistent. These findings support the hypothesis that folate may play a role in carcinogenesis of the esophagus, stomach, and pancreas.

  9. Does gender affect self-perceived pain in cancer patients? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Yusuf; Popovic, Marko; Wan, Bo Angela; Lam, Michael; Lam, Henry; Ganesh, Vithusha; Milakovic, Milica; DeAngelis, Carlo; Malek, Leila; Chow, Edward

    2017-09-12

    Pain is reported in approximately 50-70% of cancer patients. Studies on gender differences in perceived pain generally report lower pain thresholds and increased pain prevalence in women, which may be attributed to gender-specific behaviors, stereotypes, and unknown etiological factors. There are sparse and inconclusive results on gender differences in self-perceived pain in the cancer setting. The aim of this article was to examine the effect of gender on baseline perceived pain intensity in cancer patients through a meta-analysis. A literature search was conducted using Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials [1947-2016] to identify observational studies and controlled trials that reported on gender-specific pain intensity in cancer patients. Using random-effects modeling, weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to estimate the effect of gender on pain severity in cancer patients. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Of the 1,911 search results reviewed, 13 studies were included. The weighted mean difference (95% CI) in pain intensity was as follows: -0.26 (95% CI: -0.57 to 0.04, P=0.09) for the 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) group (n=3,752, 9 studies). When restricted to only patients with advanced cancer, the weighted mean difference was -0.08 (95% CI: -0.36 to 0.20, P=0.58) (n=2,762, 4 studies). The weighted mean difference in the Brief Pain Inventory scores between males and females was 0.03 (95% CI: -1.23 to 1.29, P=0.96) (n=521, 4 studies). Baseline perceived pain intensity in cancer patients did not significantly differ based on gender.

  10. Fruits, vegetables, and bladder cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ana R; Vingeliene, Snieguole; Chan, Doris S M; Aune, Dagfinn; Abar, Leila; Navarro Rosenblatt, Deborah; Greenwood, Darren C; Norat, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is estimated to cause about half of all bladder cancer cases. Case-control studies have provided evidence of an inverse association between fruit and vegetable intake and bladder cancer risk. As part of the World Cancer Research/American Institute for Cancer Research Continuous Update Project, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies to assess the dose-response relationship between fruit and vegetables and incidence and mortality of bladder cancer. We searched PubMed up to December 2013 for relevant prospective studies. We conducted highest compared with lowest meta-analyses and dose-response meta-analyses using random effects models to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and used restricted cubic splines to examine possible nonlinear associations. Fifteen prospective studies were included in the review. The summary RR for an increase of 1 serving/day (80 g) were 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95-0.99) I(2)  = 0%, eight studies for fruits and vegetables, 0.97 (95% CI: 0.94-1.00, I(2)  = 10%, 10 studies) for vegetables and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.96-1.00, I(2)  = 0%, 12 studies) for fruits. Results were similar in men and women and in current, former and nonsmokers. Amongst fruits and vegetables subgroups, for citrus fruits the summary RR for the highest compared with the lowest intake was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.76-0.99, I(2)  = 0%, eight studies) and for cruciferous vegetables there was evidence of a nonlinear relationship (P = 0.001). The current evidence from cohort studies is not consistent with a role for fruits and vegetables in preventing bladder cancer. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Aspirin for the primary prevention of skin cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Cheng, Yang; Luo, Rong-Cheng; Li, Ai-Min

    2015-03-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. There are three major skin cancer types: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma. General risk factors for skin cancer include fair skin, a history of tanning and sunburn, family history of skin cancer, exposure to ultraviolet rays and a large number of moles. The incidence of skin cancer has increased in the USA in recent years. Aspirin intake is associated with chemoprotection against the development of a number of types of cancer. However, whether aspirin intake can reduce the risk of development of skin cancer is unclear. The present meta-analysis of available human studies is aimed at evaluating the association between aspirin exposure and the risk of skin cancer. All available human observational studies on aspirin intake for the primary prevention of skin cancer were identified by searching MEDLINE (Pubmed), BIOSIS, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and China National Knowledge Infrastructure prior to March 2013. The heterogeneity and publication bias of all studies were evaluated using Cochran's Q and I2 statistics, followed by a random-effect model where applicable. The pooled data were analyzed by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of eight case-control and five prospective cohort studies from 11 publications were selected for this analysis. There was no evidence of publication bias in these studies. Statistical analyses of the pooled data demonstrated that that a daily dose of 50-400 mg aspirin was significantly associated with a reduced risk of skin cancers (OR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.90-0.99; P=0.02). Stratification analysis indicated that the continual intake of low dose aspirin (≤150 mg) reduced the risk of developing skin cancer (OR, 0.95; CI, 0.90-0.99; P=0.15) and that aspirin intake was significantly associated with a reduced risk of non-melanoma skin cancers (OR, 0.97; CI, 0.95-0.99; P=0.22). Overall, these findings indicated that aspirin intake

  12. Alcohol consumption and site-specific cancer risk: a comprehensive dose-response meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnardi, V; Rota, M; Botteri, E; Tramacere, I; Islami, F; Fedirko, V; Scotti, L; Jenab, M; Turati, F; Pasquali, E; Pelucchi, C; Galeone, C; Bellocco, R; Negri, E; Corrao, G; Boffetta, P; La Vecchia, C

    2015-02-03

    Alcohol is a risk factor for cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, colorectum, liver, larynx and female breast, whereas its impact on other cancers remains controversial. We investigated the effect of alcohol on 23 cancer types through a meta-analytic approach. We used dose-response meta-regression models and investigated potential sources of heterogeneity. A total of 572 studies, including 486 538 cancer cases, were identified. Relative risks (RRs) for heavy drinkers compared with nondrinkers and occasional drinkers were 5.13 for oral and pharyngeal cancer, 4.95 for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 1.44 for colorectal, 2.65 for laryngeal and 1.61 for breast cancer; for those neoplasms there was a clear dose-risk relationship. Heavy drinkers also had a significantly higher risk of cancer of the stomach (RR 1.21), liver (2.07), gallbladder (2.64), pancreas (1.19) and lung (1.15). There was indication of a positive association between alcohol consumption and risk of melanoma and prostate cancer. Alcohol consumption and risk of Hodgkin's and Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas were inversely associated. Alcohol increases risk of cancer of oral cavity and pharynx, oesophagus, colorectum, liver, larynx and female breast. There is accumulating evidence that alcohol drinking is associated with some other cancers such as pancreas and prostate cancer and melanoma.

  13. Effects of physical exercise during adjuvant breast cancer treatment on physical and psychosocial dimensions of cancer-related fatigue : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vulpen, Jonna K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413986322; Peeters, Petra H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074099655; Velthuis, Miranda J.; van der Wall, Elsken|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/142344532; May, Anne M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818658

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue has a multidimensional nature and complaints typically increase during adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Physical exercise might prevent or reduce cancer-related fatigue. So far, no meta-analysis has investigated the effects of physical exercise on different dimensions of

  14. Quantification of the smoking-associated cancer risk with rate advancement periods: meta-analysis of individual participant data from cohorts of the CHANCES consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez-Mena, José Manuel; Schöttker, Ben; Mons, Ute; Jenab, Mazda; Freisling, Heinz; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; O'Doherty, Mark G; Scott, Angela; Kee, Frank; Stricker, Bruno H; Hofman, Albert; de Keyser, Catherine E; Ruiter, Rikje; Söderberg, Stefan; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Freedman, Neal D; Wilsgaard, Tom; de Groot, Lisette Cpgm; Kampman, Ellen; Håkansson, Niclas; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Tjønneland, Anne; Pająk, Andrzej; Malyutina, Sofia; Kubínová, Růžena; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Bobak, Martin; Katsoulis, Michail; Orfanos, Philippos; Boffetta, Paolo; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-04-05

    Smoking is the most important individual risk factor for many cancer sites but its association with breast and prostate cancer is not entirely clear. Rate advancement periods (RAPs) may enhance communication of smoking related risk to the general population. Thus, we estimated RAPs for the association of smoking exposure (smoking status, time since smoking cessation, smoking intensity, and duration) with total and site-specific (lung, breast, colorectal, prostate, gastric, head and neck, and pancreatic) cancer incidence and mortality. This is a meta-analysis of 19 population-based prospective cohort studies with individual participant data for 897,021 European and American adults. For each cohort we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for the association of smoking exposure with cancer outcomes using Cox regression adjusted for a common set of the most important potential confounding variables. RAPs (in years) were calculated as the ratio of the logarithms of the HRs for a given smoking exposure variable and age. Meta-analyses were employed to summarize cohort-specific HRs and RAPs. Overall, 140,205 subjects had a first incident cancer, and 53,164 died from cancer, during an average follow-up of 12 years. Current smoking advanced the overall risk of developing and dying from cancer by eight and ten years, respectively, compared with never smokers. The greatest advancements in cancer risk and mortality were seen for lung cancer and the least for breast cancer. Smoking cessation was statistically significantly associated with delays in the risk of cancer development and mortality compared with continued smoking. This investigation shows that smoking, even among older adults, considerably advances, and cessation delays, the risk of developing and dying from cancer. These findings may be helpful in more effectively communicating the harmful effects of smoking and the beneficial effect of smoking cessation.

  15. Incidence and Risk of Proteinuria with Aflibercept in Cancer Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xianghua; Zhou, Yun; Hu, Danna; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Background Aflibercept is a human recombinant fusion protein with antiangiogenic effects that functions as a decoy receptor to bind vascular endothelial growth factor A. Proteinuria is one of its major adverse effects with a substantial variation in the incidence rate, and the overall risk of proteinuria has not been systematically studied. We performed a meta-analysis of published clinical trials to quantify the incidence and relative risk of proteinuria in cancer patients treated with aflibercept. Methods The electronic databases were searched, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane databases, and ASCO (American Society of Clinical Oncology) abstracts. Eligible studies were phase II and III prospective clinical trials of cancer patients treated with aflibercept with toxicity data on proteinuria. Overall incidence rates, relative risk (RR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using fixed or random effects models depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Results A total of 4,596 patients with a variety of solid tumors from 16 prospective clinical trials were included for the meta-analysis. The overall incidences of all-grade and high-grade proteinuria in cancer patients were 33.9% (95% CI: 27.3–42.1%) and 7.9% (95% CI: 6.1–10.2%). The relative risks of proteinuria of aflibercept compared to control were increased for all-grade (RR = 1.41, 95% CI: 1.13–1.77) and high-grade (RR = 6.18, 95% CI: 3.78–10.12) proteinuria. The risk of developing all-grade and high-grade proteinuria with aflibercept was substantially higher than that of bevacizumab (all-grade: RR 1.85, 95% CI: 1.63–2.11; high-grade: RR 2.37, 95% CI: 1.84–3.05). Conclusions Aflibercept is associated with an increased risk of developing proteinuria. Appropriate monitoring and treatment is strongly recommended to prevent potential renal damage. Future studies are still needed to investigate the risk reduction and possible use of aflibercept in cancer patients. PMID

  16. A meta-analysis on dose-response relationship between night shift work and the risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Yeung, K L; Chan, W C; Kwok, C C H; Leung, S L; Wu, C; Chan, E Y Y; Yu, I T S; Yang, X R; Tse, L A

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to conduct a systematic review to sum up evidence of the associations between different aspects of night shift work and female breast cancer using a dose-response meta-analysis approach. We systematicly searched all cohort and case-control studies published in English on MEDLINE, Embase, PSYCInfo, APC Journal Club and Global Health, from January 1971 to May 2013. We extracted effect measures (relative risk, RR; odd ratio, OR; or hazard ratio, HR) from individual studies to generate pooled results using meta-analysis approaches. A log-linear dose-response regression model was used to evaluate the relationship between various indicators of exposure to night shift work and breast cancer risk. Downs and Black scale was applied to assess the methodological quality of included studies. Ten studies were included in the meta-analysis. A pooled adjusted relative risk for the association between 'ever exposed to night shift work' and breast cancer was 1.19 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.35]. Further meta-analyses on dose-response relationship showed that every 5-year increase of exposure to night shift work would correspondingly enhance the risk of breast cancer of the female by 3% (pooled RR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.05; Pheterogeneity breast cancer risk. This systematic review updated the evidence that a positive dose-response relationship is likely to present for breast cancer with increasing years of employment and cumulative shifts involved in the work.

  17. Examining racial disparities in colorectal cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jamillah; Bumpers, Kevin; Ogunlade, Vickie; Glover, Roni; Davis, Sharon; Counts-Spriggs, Margaret; Kauh, John; Flowers, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately burdened with colorectal cancer. Although incidence and mortality rates have declined in the past two decades, the disparity in health outcomes has progressively increased. This comprehensive review examines the existing literature regarding racial disparities in colorectal cancer screening, stage at diagnosis, and treatment to determine if differences exist in the quality of care delivered to African Americans. A comprehensive review of relevant literature was performed. Two databases (EBSCOHOST Academic Search Premier and Scopus) were searched from 2000 to 2007. Articles that assessed racial disparities in colorectal cancer screening, stage of disease at diagnosis, and treatment were selected. The majority of studies identified examined colorectal cancer screening outcomes. Although racial disparities in screening have diminished in recent years, African American men and women continue to have higher colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and are diagnosed at more advanced stages. Several studies regarding stage of disease at diagnosis identified socioeconomic status (SES) and health insurance status as major determinants of disparity. However, some studies found significant racial disparities even after controlling for these factors. Racial disparities in treatment were also found at various diagnostic stages. Many factors affecting disparities between African Americans and Whites in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality remain unexplained. Although the importance of tumor biology, genetics, and lifestyle risk factors have been established, prime sociodemographic factors need further examination to understand variances in the care of African Americans diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

  18. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  19. Breast Cancer and Internal Mammary Sentinel Nodes: A Meta-Analysis

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    Khaldoun Bekdache

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of internal mammary (IM nodes in breast cancer lacks a well-defined consensus. Lymphoscintigraphy identifies up to one-third of breast cancer patients with extra-axillary drainage, which is mainly located in the IM chain. Our aim in this meta-analysis is to identify the lymphoscintigraphy technique variables that effect IM node identification.Methods: An internet database was utilized to review articles concerning sentinel nodes and breast cancer from 1993 through the end of 2011; 74 articles met our inclusion criteria. The total number of patients included was 22959. We grouped the citations by injection location and injection material. We then analyzed the rate of identification of IM nodes according to these groupings and their subsets.Results: The overall IM identification rate using the random effect model was 9%. The injection location had the most significant impact on IM identification rate; the deeper injections were associated with the highest rate of identification. Variation in IM identification was associated with the particle size of injection material; the smaller particle size group had a higher rate of identification. Increased dose of the tracer was also associated with increased identification rate.Conclusions: The use of smaller particle size tracers and a deeper injection location achieve the highest IM identification rate. The dose of the tracer also increased the identification rate. These observations can help in the selection of patients for IM sentinel node biopsy, which can affect their prognosis and treatment management.

  20. Red and processed meat consumption and gastric cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhanwei; Yin, Zifang; Zhao, Qingchuan

    2017-05-02

    The associations between red and processed meat consumption and gastric cancer risk have remained inconclusive. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to analyze these associations. We searched PubMed and EMBASE to identify studies published from inception through October 2016. Subtype analyses of gastric cancer (gastric cardia adenocarcinoma and gastric non-cardiac adenocarcinoma) and dose-response analyses were performed. We finally selected 42 eligible studies. The summary relative risks of highest versus lowest consumption were positive for case-control studies with 1.67 (1.36-2.05) for red meat and 1.76 (1.51-2.05) for processed meat, but negative for cohort studies with 1.14 (0.97-1.34) for red meat and 1.23 (0.98-1.55) for processed meat. Subtype analyses of cohort studies suggested null results for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (red meat, P = 0.79; processed meat, P = 0.89) and gastric non-cardiac adenocarcinoma (red meat, P = 0.12; processed meat, P = 0.12). In conclusion, the present analysis suggested null results between red and processed meat consumption and gastric cancer risk in cohort studies, although case-control studies yielded positive associations. Further well-designed prospective studies are needed to validate these findings.

  1. Soy Consumption and the Risk of Prostate Cancer: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine C. Applegate

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men worldwide. Asian populations consume soy foods as part of a regular diet, which may contribute to the lower PCa incidence observed in these countries. This meta-analysis provides a comprehensive updated analysis that builds on previously published meta-analyses, demonstrating that soy foods and their isoflavones (genistein and daidzein are associated with a lower risk of prostate carcinogenesis. Thirty articles were included for analysis of the potential impacts of soy food intake, isoflavone intake, and circulating isoflavone levels, on both primary and advanced PCa. Total soy food (p < 0.001, genistein (p =