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Sample records for colonic cancer cells

  1. Multifaceted Interpretation of Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hatano, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Kenji; Hirata, Akihiro; Hara, Akira; Tomita, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, despite recent advances in clinical oncology. Accumulating evidence sheds light on the existence of cancer stem cells and their role in conferring therapeutic resistance. Cancer stem cells are a minor fraction of cancer cells, which enable tumor heterogeneity and initiate tumor formation. In addition, these cells are resistant to various cytotoxic factors. Therefore, elimination of cancer stem cells is difficult but...

  2. Colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma; Colon carcinoma ... eat may play a role in getting colon cancer. Colon cancer may be linked to a high-fat, ...

  3. Up-regulation of CIT promotes the growth of colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zehua; Zhu, Xiangying; Xu, Wendi; Zhang,Yu; Chen, Lin; Qiu, Fabo; Zhang, Binyuan; Wu, Liqun; Peng, Zhihai; Tang, Huamei

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the major causes of cancer mortality worldwide. However, the underlying mechanism and therapeutic targets of colon cancer have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrate that citron rho-interacting, serine/threonine kinase 21 (CIT) promotes the growth of human colon cancer cells. CIT is overexpressed in human colon cancer tissues and cell lines. High expression of CIT predicts poor survival for patients with colon cancer. In colon cancer cells, ...

  4. EZH2 depletion blocks the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

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    Bettina Fussbroich

    Full Text Available The Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2 protein has been reported to stimulate cell growth in some cancers and is therefore considered to represent an interesting new target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we investigated a possible role of EZH2 for the growth control of colon cancer cells. RNA interference (RNAi-mediated intracellular EZH2 depletion led to cell cycle arrest of colon carcinoma cells at the G1/S transition. This was associated with a reduction of cell numbers upon transient transfection of synthetic EZH2-targeting siRNAs and with inhibition of their colony formation capacity upon stable expression of vector-borne siRNAs. We furthermore tested whether EZH2 may repress the growth-inhibitory p27 gene, as reported for pancreatic cancer. However, expression analyses of colon cancer cell lines and colon cancer biopsies did not reveal a consistent correlation between EZH2 and p27 levels. Moreover, EZH2 depletion did not re-induce p27 expression in colon cancer cells, indicating that p27 repression by EZH2 may be cell- or tissue-specific. Whole genome transcriptome analyses identified cellular genes affected by EZH2 depletion in colon cancer cell lines. They included several cancer-associated genes linked to cellular proliferation or invasion, such as Dag1, MageD1, SDC1, Timp2, and Tob1. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that EZH2 depletion blocks the growth of colon cancer cells. These findings might provide benefits for the treatment of colon cancer.

  5. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: Towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Krul, C.A.M.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B. van

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived

  6. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Krul, C.A.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived

  7. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  8. Betulinic Acid Kills Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potze, Lisette; Di Franco, Simone; Kessler, Jan H.; Stassi, Giorgio; Medema, Jan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered to be the origin of cancer and it is suggested that they are resistant to chemotherapy. Current therapies fail to eradicate CSCs and therefore selecting a resistant cell subset that is able to facilitate tumor recurrences. Betulinic acid (BetA) is a broad

  9. Colon Cancer Stem Cells: Promise of Targeted Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todaro, Matilde; Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    First developed for hematologic disorders, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) was expanded to solid tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The traditional model of colon carcinogenesis includes several steps that occur via mutational activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor

  10. Valproic acid enhances bosutinib cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mologni, Luca; Cleris, Loredana; Magistroni, Vera; Piazza, Rocco; Boschelli, Frank; Formelli, Franca; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2009-04-15

    Unbalanced histone deacetylase (HDAC) hyperactivity is a common feature of tumor cells. Inhibition of HDAC activity is often associated with cancer cell growth impairment and death. Valproic acid (VPA) is a HDAC inhibitor used for the treatment of epilepsy. It has recently been recognized as a promising anticancer drug. We investigated the effects of VPA on growth and survival of colon cancer cells. VPA caused growth inhibition and programmed cell death that correlated with histone hyperacetylation. VPA modulated the expression of various factors involved in cell cycle control and apoptosis and induced caspase activation. Interestingly, VPA induced downregulation of c-Src and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of the c-Src inhibitor bosutinib, both in vitro and in vivo. The combination of sublethal doses of VPA and bosutinib led to massive apoptosis of colon cancer cells, irrespective of their genetic background. These results suggest that VPA may be employed as a positive modulator of bosutinib antitumor activity in colorectal cancer.

  11. Procaine Induces Epigenetic Changes in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Sabit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world, and it is the major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The present study aimed at treating colon cancer cell line (HCT116 with different chemotherapeutic drug/drug combinations (procaine, vorinostat “SAHA,” sodium phenylbutyrate, erlotinib, and carboplatin. Two different final concentrations were applied: 3 μM and 5 μM. Trypan blue test was performed to assess the viability of the cell before and after being treated with the drugs. The data obtained showed that there was a significant decrease in the viability of cells after applying the chemotherapeutic drugs/drug combinations. Also, DNA fragmentation assay was carried out to study the effect of these drugs on the activation of apoptosis-mediated DNA degradation process. The results indicated that all the drugs/drug combinations had a severe effect on inducing DNA fragmentation. Global DNA methylation quantification was performed to identify the role of these drugs individually or in combination in hypo- or hypermethylating the CpG dinucleotide all over the genome of the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Data obtained indicated that different combinations had different effects in reducing or increasing the level of methylation, which might indicate the effectiveness of combining drugs in treating colon cancer cells.

  12. Colon cancer stem cells dictate tumor growth and resist cell death by production of interleukin-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todaro, Matilde; Alea, Mileidys Perez; Di Stefano, Anna B.; Cammareri, Patrizia; Vermeulen, Louis; Iovino, Flora; Tripodo, Claudio; Russo, Antonio; Gulotta, Gaspare; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    A novel paradigm in tumor biology suggests that cancer growth is driven by stem-like cells within a tumor. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of such cells from colon carcinomas using the stem cell marker CD133 that accounts around 2% of the cells in human colon cancer. The

  13. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Capecitabine treatment of. HCT-15 cells caused condensation of DNA and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent ... Conclusion: Capecitabine treatment causes inhibition of colon cancer growth via the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Thus ... extraction of distant metastases from various organs such as liver ...

  14. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway. Mingli Li1*, Na Zhang2 and Mingxuan Li3. 1Biology and Medicine, 2Pharmaceutics, Shandong University, Shandong 250100, 3Department of Nursing, Affiliated Hospital of. Jining Medical University, Jining, Shandong ...

  15. SRPK2 promotes the growth and migration of the colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Hai-Feng; Shen, Wei; Xu, Dong-Yan; Ruan, Ting-Yan; Tao, Guo-Qing; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2016-07-15

    Colon cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related death in the world. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying this malignancy will facilitate the diagnosis and treatment. Serine-arginine protein kinase 2 (SRPK2) has been reported to be upregulated in several cancer types. However, its expression and functions in colon cancer remains unknown. In this study, it was found that the expression of SRPK2 was up-regulated in the clinical colon cancer samples. Overexpression of SRPK2 promoted the growth and migration of colon cancer cells, while knocking down the expression of SRPK2 inhibited the growth, migration and tumorigenecity of colon cancer cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that SRPK2 activated ERK signaling in colon cancer cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the tumor promoting roles of SRPK2 in colon cancer cells and SRPK2 might be a promising therapeutic target for colon cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, B. van

    2004-01-01

    Background. Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  17. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, van M.J.; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, van B.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  18. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Erk, Marjan J; Teuling, Eva; Staal, Yvonne C. M.; Huybers, Sylvie; Van Bladeren, Peter J; Aarts, Jac MMJG; Van Ommen, Ben

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  19. Induction of cancer stem cell properties in colon cancer cells by defined factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobu Oshima

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered to be responsible for the dismal prognosis of cancer patients. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition and maintenance of CSC properties in cancer cells because of their rarity in clinical samples. We herein induced CSC properties in cancer cells using defined factors. We retrovirally introduced a set of defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2 and KLF4 into human colon cancer cells, followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium, not human embryonic stem cell medium. We then evaluated the CSC properties in the cells. The colon cancer cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of the marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. We designated the cells with CSC properties induced by the factors, a subset of the transduced cells, as induced CSCs (iCSCs. Moreover, we established a novel technology to isolate and collect the iCSCs based on the differences in the degree of the dye-effluxing activity enhancement. The xenografts derived from our iCSCs were not teratomas. Notably, in contrast to the tumors from the parental cancer cells, the iCSC-based tumors mimicked actual human colon cancer tissues in terms of their immunohistological findings, which showed colonic lineage differentiation. In addition, we confirmed that the phenotypes of our iCSCs were reproducible in serial transplantation experiments. By introducing defined factors, we generated iCSCs with lineage specificity directly from cancer cells, not via an induced pluripotent stem cell state. The novel method enables us to obtain abundant materials of CSCs that not only have enhanced tumorigenicity, but also the ability to differentiate to recapitulate a specific type of cancer tissues. Our method can be of great value to fully understand CSCs and develop new therapies targeting CSCs.

  20. Identification of colonic fibroblast secretomes reveals secretory factors regulating colon cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Xu, Xiao-En; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Yan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Qian; Qiao, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-10-14

    Stromal microenvironment influences tumor cell proliferation and migration. Fibroblasts represent the most abundant stromal constituents. Here, we established two pairs of normal fibroblast (NF) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) cultures from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues and the normal counterparts. The NFs and CAFs were stained positive for typical fibroblast markers and inhibited colon cancer (CC) cell proliferation in in vitro cocultures and in xenograft mouse models. The fibroblast conditioned media were analyzed using LC-MS and 227 proteins were identified at a false discovery rate of 1.3%, including 131 putative secretory and 20 plasma membrane proteins. These proteins were enriched for functional categories of extracellular matrix, adhesion, cell motion, inflammatory response, redox homeostasis and peptidase inhibitor. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, transgelin, follistatin-related protein 1 (FSTL1) and decorin was abundant in the fibroblast secretome as confirmed by Western blot. Silencing of FSTL1 and transgelin in colonic fibroblast cell line CCD-18Co induced an accelerated proliferation of CC cells in cocultures. Exogenous FSTL1 attenuates CC cell proliferation in a negative fashion. FSTL1 was upregulated in CC patient plasma and cancerous tissues but had no implication in prognosis. Our results provided novel insights into the molecular signatures and modulatory role of CC associated fibroblasts. In this study, a label-free LC-MS was performed to analyze the secretomes of two paired primary fibroblasts, which were isolated from fresh surgical specimen of colorectal adenocarcinoma and adjacent normal colonic tissues and exhibited negative modulatory activity for colon cancer cell growth in in vitro cocultures and in vivo xenograph mouse models. Follistatin-related protein 1 was further revealed to be one of the stroma-derived factors of potential suppression role for colon cancer cell proliferation. Our results provide novel

  1. Colon cancer cell treatment with rose bengal generates a protective immune response via immunogenic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianzhong; Kunda, Nicholas; Qiao, Guilin; Calata, Jed F; Pardiwala, Krunal; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Maker, Ajay V

    2017-02-02

    Immunotherapeutic approaches to manage patients with advanced gastrointestinal malignancies are desired; however, mechanisms to incite tumor-specific immune responses remain to be elucidated. Rose bengal (RB) is toxic at low concentrations to malignant cells and may induce damage-associated molecular patterns; therefore, we investigated its potential as an immunomodulator in colon cancer. Murine and human colon cancer lines were treated with RB (10% in saline/PV-10) for cell cycle, cell death, and apoptosis assays. Damage-associated molecular patterns were assessed with western blot, ELISA, and flow cytometry. In an immunocompetent murine model of colon cancer, we demonstrate that tumors regress upon RB treatment, and that RB induces cell death in colon cancer cells through G2/M growth arrest and predominantly necrosis. RB-treated colon cancer cells expressed distinct hallmarks of immunogenic cell death (ICD), including enhanced expression of calreticulin and heat-shock protein 90 on the cell surface, a decrease in intracellular ATP, and the release of HMGB1. To confirm the ICD phenotype, we vaccinated immunocompetent animals with syngeneic colon cancer cells treated with RB. RB-treated tumors served as a vaccine against subsequent challenge with the same CT26 colon cancer tumor cells, and vaccination with in vitro RB-treated cells resulted in slower tumor growth following inoculation with colon cancer cells, but not with syngeneic non-CT26 cancer cells, suggesting a specific antitumor immune response. In conclusion, RB serves as an inducer of ICD that contributes to enhanced specific antitumor immunity in colorectal cancer.

  2. The Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on DNA Synthesis and Genotoxicity in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Rogers; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Walker, Alice M.; Barbara Graham; Jacqueline J. Stevens

    2010-01-01

    Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that arsenic trioxide is cytotoxic in human colon cancer (HT-29), lung (A549) and breast (MCF-7) carcinoma cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide on DNA synthesis and the possible genotoxic effects on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were cultured according to standard protocol, followed by exposure to various do...

  3. A stochastic model for cancer stem cell origin in metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoux, Christine; Fohrer, Helene; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Guzik, Lynda; Stolz, Donna Beer; Lewis, Dale W; Gollin, Susanne M; Gamblin, T Clark; Geller, David A; Lagasse, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Human cancers have been found to include transformed stem cells that may drive cancer progression to metastasis. Here, we report that metastatic colon cancer contains clonally derived tumor cells with all of the critical properties expected of stem cells, including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into mature colon cells. Additionally, when injected into mice, these cells initiated tumors that closely resemble human cancer. Karyotype analyses of parental and clonally derived tumor cells expressed many consistent (clonal) along with unique chromosomal aberrations, suggesting the presence of chromosomal instability in the cancer stem cells. Thus, this new model for cancer origin and metastatic progression includes features of both the hierarchical model for cancerous stem cells and the stochastic model, driven by the observation of chromosomal instability.

  4. Urotensin-II receptor is over-expressed in colon cancer cell lines and in colon carcinoma in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Alessandro; Zappavigna, Silvia; Romano, Marco; Grieco, Paolo; Luce, Amalia; Marra, Monica; Gravina, Antonietta Gerarda; Stiuso, Paola; D'Armiento, Francesco Paolo; Vitale, Giovanni; Tuccillo, Concetta; Novellino, Ettore; Loguercio, Carmela; Caraglia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Urotensin (U)-II receptor (UTR) has been previously reported to be over-expressed in a number of tumours. Whether UTR-related pathway plays a role in colon carcinogenesis is unknown. We evaluated UTR protein and mRNA expression in human epithelial colon cancer cell lines and in normal colon tissue, adenomatous polyps and colon cancer. U-II protein expression was assessed in cancer cell lines. Moreover, we evaluated the effects of U-II(4-11) (an UTR agonist), antagonists and knockdown of UTR protein expression through a specific shRNA, on proliferation, invasion and motility of human colon cancer cells. Cancer cell lines expressed U-II protein and UTR protein and mRNA. By immunohistochemistry, UTR was expressed in 5-30% of epithelial cells in 45 normal controls, in 30-48% in 21 adenomatous polyps and in 65-90% in 48 colon adenocarcinomas. UTR mRNA expression was increased by threefold in adenomatous polyps and eightfold in colon cancer, compared with normal colon. U-II(4-11) induced a 20-40% increase in cell growth while the blockade of the receptor with specific antagonists caused growth inhibition of 20-40%. Moreover, the knock down of UTR with a shRNA or the inhibition of UTR with the antagonist urantide induced an approximately 50% inhibition of both motility and invasion. UTR appears to be involved in the regulation of colon cancer cell invasion and motility. These data suggest that UTR-related pathway may play a role in colon carcinogenesis and that UTR may function as a target for therapeutic intervention in colon cancer. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  5. Radiosensitization effects of sorafenib on colon cancer cells

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    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Mi-Sook; Jung, Won-Gyun; Jeong, Youn Kyoung [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Radiotherapy is a standard therapy in the adjuvant treatment of resected colon and rectum cancers, and its combination with chemotherapy has been shown to reduce local failure and distant metastasis still further, thereby improving the outcome of treatment. One potential chemotherapeutic agent for this, sorafenib (Nexavar, BAY43-9006), is an oral multikinase inhibitor that blocks tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis, and induces tumor cell apoptosis by inhibiting serine/threonine kinases (c-RAF and mutant and wild-type BRAF) as well as the receptor tyrosine kinases vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and 3 (VEGFR2 and VEGFR3), platelet- derived growth factor receptor , FLT3, and c-KIT. Sorafenib is currently used in clinics to treat patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and thyroid cancer. These findings provide a molecular evidence base for the use of chemoradiation to treat colon cancer, and in vivo modeling should be used to further assess its suitability for clinical applications.

  6. Mast Cell Targeted Chimeric Toxin Can Be Developed as an Adjunctive Therapy in Colon Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The association of colitis with colorectal cancer has become increasingly clear with mast cells being identified as important inflammatory cells in the process. In view of the relationship between mast cells and cancer, we studied the effect and mechanisms of mast cells in the development of colon cancer. Functional and mechanistic insights were gained from ex vivo and in vivo studies of cell interactions between mast cells and CT26 cells. Further evidence was reversely obtained in studies of mast cell targeted Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin. Experiments revealed mast cells could induce colon tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Cancer progression was found to be related to the density of mast cells in colonic submucosa. The activation of MAPK, Rho-GTPase, and STAT pathways in colon cancer cells was triggered by mast cells during cell-to-cell interaction. Lastly, using an Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin we constructed, we confirmed the promoting effect of mast cells in development of colon cancer. Mast cells are a promoting factor of colon cancer and thus also a potential therapeutic target. The Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin targeting mast cells could effectively prevent colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, these data may demonstrate a novel immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of tumors.

  7. Natural grape extracts regulate colon cancer cells malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Paola; Fabiani, Carlotta; Brizzolari, Andrea; Paroni, Rita; Casas, Josefina; Fabriàs, Gemma; Rossi, Dario; Ghidoni, Riccardo; Caretti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Natural dietary components are evolutionary-selected molecules able to control inflammation and cancerous transformation and progression. Because many studies assessed the beneficial properties of key molecules extracted from grapes, we aimed at investigating the properties of Liofenol™, a natural red wine lyophilized extract, devoid of alcohol and composed by a miscellaneous of components (polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins). We proved that the colon cancer cell line HCT116 responded to Liofenol™ treatment by reducing their proliferation, in association with an increase of p53 and p21 cell cycle gate keepers. Liofenol™ increased dihydroceramides, sphingolipid mediators involved in cell cycle arrest and reduced proliferation rate. We observed a strong induction of antioxidant response, with the activation of the transcriptional factor Nrf2, involved in redox homeostasis and differentiation, without altering tumor sensitivity to chemotherapy. Liofenol™ induced an important morphology change in HCT116 cells, migration inhibition, undifferentiated stem/stem-like cells markers downregulation, and E-cadherin downregulation, interested in epithelia to mesenchymal malignant transition. We conclude that lyophilized grape extract, at dose comparable to putative dietary doses, can activate molecular pathways, involving Nrf2 signaling and the modulation of structural and signaling sphingolipid mediators that cooperate in promoting differentiation and reducing proliferation of digestive tract cancer cells.

  8. Liver X receptor ligand cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells and not in normal colon epithelial cells depends on LXRβ subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtaut, Flavie; Derangère, Valentin; Chevriaux, Angélique; Ladoire, Sylvain; Cotte, Alexia K; Arnould, Laurent; Boidot, Romain; Rialland, Mickaël; Ghiringhelli, François; Rébé, Cédric

    2015-09-29

    Increasing evidence indicates that Liver X Receptors (LXRs) have some anticancer properties. We recently demonstrated that LXR ligands induce colon cancer cell pyroptosis through an LXRβ-dependent pathway. In the present study, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines presented differential cytoplasmic localizations of LXRβ. This localization correlated with caspase-1 activation and cell death induction under treatment with LXR ligand. The association of LXRβ with the truncated form of RXRα (t-RXRα) was responsible for the sequestration of LXRβ in the cytoplasm in colon cancer cells. Moreover t-RXRα was not expressed in normal colon epithelial cells. These cells presented a predominantly nuclear localization of LXRβ and were resistant to LXR ligand cytotoxicity. Our results showed that predominant cytoplasmic localization of LXRβ, which occurs in colon cancer cells but not in normal colon epithelial cells, allowed LXR ligand-induced pyroptosis. This study strengthens the hypothesis that LXRβ could be a promising target in cancer therapy.

  9. Isolation and characterization of spheroid cells from the HT29 colon cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinlan; Ouyang, Nengyong; Teng, Hong; Yao, Herui

    2011-10-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (Cr-CSCs) are involved in the growth of colon cancer, but their specific role in tumor biology, including metastasis, is still unclear. Currently, methods for sorting Cr-CSCs are based on the expression of surface markers (e.g., CD133(+), CD44(+), and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1(+))); however, the specificity of these markers for Cr-CSCs is uncertain. This study aimed to develop more effective ways of isolating and purifying Cr-CSCs. Suspension culture was used for isolation of Cr-CSCs. And spheroid cells were performed by side population technology, and the putative molecular marker analysis of colorectal cancer stem cell. Migration assay and chemoresistance experiment were conducted between the adherent cells and spheroid cells. HT29 colon cancer cells grew well in suspension culture. The percentage of CD44(+) cancer cell of spheroid cells was 68 times higher than that of adherent cells (89.5% vs. 1.3%), but there was no obvious difference in the percentage of CD133(+) cells (6.25% vs. 5.6%). Moreover, it is worth noting that the percent of CD133 (+)/CD44(+) cells remarkably rose (from 0.6% to 5.4%). The expression of ALDH1 was markedly increased (7.5% vs. 20.5%) for the spheroid cells than the adherent cells. The side population within the spheroid population dramatically increased from 0.2% to 6.3%. The resistance of spheroid cells to 5-FU was higher than that of adherent cells, as was their ability to migrate in the presence of SDF-1α. Suspension culture is an effective approach for enriching Cr-CSCs and can provide an inexhaustible supply of genetically stable colon cancer stem cells for targeted Cr-CSC studies. Spheroid cell models also enable the study of colon cancer chemoresistance and metastasis and may help to elucidate the role of cancer stem cells in colon cancer.

  10. Characterization of side population cells isolated from the colon cancer cell line SW480.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Binghong; Ma, Li; Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Caiquan; Cheng, Yong

    2014-09-01

    Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer. Many types of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells, including colon cancer cell lines. This study aimed to identify cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the SP of the colon cancer cell line SW480. SP cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), followed by serum-free medium (SFM) culture. The self-renewal, differentiated progeny, clone formation, proliferation, invasion ability, cell cycle, chemosensitivity and tumorigenic properties in SP and non-SP (NSP) cells were investigated through in vitro culture and in vivo serial transplantation. The expression profiles of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein transporters and stem cell-related genes were examined by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The human colon cancer cell lines SW480, Lovo and HCT116 contain 1.1 ± 0.10, 0.93 ± 0.11 and 1.33 ± 0.05% SP cells, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that SP cells could differentiate into SP and NSP cells. SP cells had a higher proliferation potency and CFE than NSP cells. Compared to NSP cells, SP cells were also more resistant to CDDP and 5-FU, and were more invasive and displayed increased tumorigenic ability. Moreover, SP cells showed higher mRNA and protein expression of ABCG2, MDR1, OCT-4, NANOG, SOX-2, CD44 and CD133. SP cells isolated from human colon cancer cell lines harbor CSC properties that may be related to the invasive potential and therapeutic resistance of colon cancer.

  11. ER-Stress-Induced Differentiation Sensitizes Colon Cancer Stem Cells to Chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielenga, Mattheus C. B.; Colak, Selcuk; Heijmans, Jarom; van Lidth de Jeude, Jooske F.; Rodermond, Hans M.; Paton, James C.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Vermeulen, Louis; Medema, Jan Paul; van den Brink, Gijs R.

    2015-01-01

    Colon cancer stem cells (colon-CSCs) are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy than differentiated cancer cells. This subset of therapy refractory cells is therefore believed to play an important role in post-therapeutic tumor relapse. In order to improve the rate of sustained response to

  12. Inhibition of autophagy induced by TSA sensitizes colon cancer cell to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gang; Wang, Yan; Pang, Xueli; Zhang, Bo

    2014-02-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main treatments for clinical cancer therapy. However, its application was limited due to lack of radiosensitivity in some cancers. Trichostatin A (TSA) is a classic histone deacetylases inhibitor (HDACi) that specifically inhibits the biochemical functions of HDAC and is demonstrated to be an active anticancer drug. However, whether it could sensitize colon cancer to radiation is not clear. Our results showed that TSA enhanced the radiosensitivity of colon cancer cells as determined by CCK-8 and clonogenic survival assay. Moreover, apoptotic cell death induced by radiation was enhanced by TSA treatment. Additionally, TSA also induced autophagic response in colon cancer cells, while autophagy inhibition led to cell apoptosis and enhanced the radiosensitivity of colon cancer cells. Our data suggested that inhibition of cytoprotective autophagy sensitizes cancer cell to radiation, which might be further investigated for clinical cancer radiotherapy.

  13. Study on Invasion of Artesunate on Inhibiting Human Colon Cancer Cell SW620

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the invasive effect of Chinese extraction artesunate on human colon cancer cell SW620 and explore its possible mechanisms. Methods: Colon cancer cell SW620 was managed by different concentrations of artesunate, and soft agar colony-cultivating trial was applied to detect anchorage independent proliferation of cancer cells, Boyden chamber model method to detect the invasive capability of cancer cells and Western blot method to detect the change of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 proteins. Results: Artesunate can effectively inhibit malignant proliferation and invasive capability of colon cancer cell SW620, and was dose-dependent (P < 0.01. Artesunate can effectively inhibit the expression of cancer cell ICAM-1 gene proteins, and was time- and concentration-dependant (P <0.01. Conclusion: Artesunate can significantly inhibit the invasion of colon cancer cell SW620, which can be related to down-regulation of ICAM-1 protein level.

  14. DNA array analysis of the effects of aspirin on colon cancer cells: involvement of Rac1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardwick, James C. H.; van Santen, Marije; van den Brink, Gijs R.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2004-01-01

    Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs show efficacy in the prevention of colon cancer. The mechanism by which they do this is unclear. We used a commercially available DNA microarray to study changes in gene expression in 1176 cancer related genes in the HT29 colon cancer cell line

  15. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    15 colon carcinoma cells and investigate the underlying mechanism. Methods: Phase-contrast microscopy was used for the examination of morphological changes while flow cytometry was employed for the analysis of cell cycle distribution, ...

  16. Novel roles of DC-SIGNR in colon cancer cell adhesion, migration, invasion, and liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Heya; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Xinsheng; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhaohui; Yuan, Menglang; Zhang, Yu; Ren, Shuangyi; Zuo, Yunfei

    2017-01-21

    Tumor metastasis is an essential cause of the poor prognosis of colon cancer. DC-SIGNR is a C-type lectin that is frequently found on human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. LSECtin, which is a homologue of DC-SIGNR, has been demonstrated to participate in colon cancer liver metastasis. Due to the similarities in the expression pattern and structure of the two proteins, we speculated that DC-SIGNR could also be involved in this process. Colon cancer cells were treated with the DC-SIGNR protein or control IgG, after which cell migration, invasion, and morphology were assayed. Xenograft mouse models were used to determine the role of DC-SIGNR in colon cancer liver metastasis in vivo. In addition, a human gene expression array was used to detect differential gene expression in colon cancer cells stimulated with the DC-SIGNR protein. The serum level of DC-SIGNR was examined in colon cancer patients by ELISA, and the significance of DC-SIGNR was determined. In our research, we investigated whether DC-SIGNR promotes colon cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Knocking down mouse DC-SIGNR decreased the liver metastatic potency of colon cancer cells and increased survival time. Expressing human DC-SIGNR enhanced colon cancer liver metastasis. Furthermore, DC-SIGNR conferred metastatic capability on cancer cells by upregulating various metallothionein isoforms. To validate the above results, we also found that the serum DC-SIGNR level was statistically higher in colon cancer patients with liver metastasis compared with those without metastasis. These results imply that DC-SIGNR may promote colon carcinoma hepatic metastasis and could serve as a promising therapeutic target for anticancer treatment.

  17. Study of targeted-treatment on colon cancer cell via spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Da; Hsu, Hao Yun; Khaleel, Mai Ibrahim; Chan, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Yia-Chung; Wu, Chien-Hsun; Wu, Han-Chung

    2017-04-01

    We present the enhancement of targeted treatment on colon cancer cell via microscopic imaging ellipsometry (MIE). All spectroscopic MIE signals on 5μm×5μm area in visible range are captured within the modified Optrel MULTISKOP system. Colon cancer cells are cultured in Bottom-up Millicell EZ SLIDE 4-well structure under the environment (37°C, 10% CO2). Original single colon cancer cell, single colon cancer cell under untargeted-treatment, and single colon cancer cell under targeted-treatment are studied by specular-reflective mode and off-specular scattering mode in this experiment. Some polarization-related and phase-related MIE images are analyzed to reveal the improvement of targeted-treatment by observing changes in specular and off-specular reflectance and absorption.

  18. General Information about Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history affects the risk of developing colon cancer. Anything ... and organs. This is called metastatic cancer. This animation shows how cancer cells travel from the place ...

  19. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-03-31

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis.

  20. Trolox induces inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Guang Yang; Xiang-An Tian; Xiao-Yan Li; Jian-Guo Huang; Nai-Qing Liu; Qin-Li Sun

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of trolox on human colon cancer cell lines was investigated. The results revealed that trolox treatment caused inhibition of cell growth in T84 and HCT-15 colon cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was significant at 50 µM of trolox after 48 hours in both cell lines. Trolox treatment promoted expression of p38 and inhibited expression of survivin and Akt. It also induced cleavage of PARP and caspase-3 and ultimately induced apoptosis in...

  1. Grape compounds suppress colon cancer stem cells in vitro and in a rodent model of colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddivari, Lavanya; Charepalli, Venkata; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Elias, Ryan J; Lambert, Joshua D; Vanamala, Jairam K P

    2016-08-09

    We have previously shown that the grape bioactive compound resveratrol (RSV) potentiates grape seed extract (GSE)-induced colon cancer cell apoptosis at physiologically relevant concentrations. However, RSV-GSE combination efficacy against colon cancer stem cells (CSCs), which play a key role in chemotherapy and radiation resistance, is not known. We tested the anti-cancer efficacy of the RSV-GSE against colon CSCs using isolated human colon CSCs in vitro and an azoxymethane-induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis in vivo. RSV-GSE suppressed tumor incidence similar to sulindac, without any gastrointestinal toxicity. Additionally, RSV-GSE treatment reduced the number of crypts containing cells with nuclear β-catenin (an indicator of colon CSCs) via induction of apoptosis. In vitro, RSV-GSE suppressed - proliferation, sphere formation, nuclear translocation of β-catenin (a critical regulator of CSC proliferation) similar to sulindac in isolated human colon CSCs. RSV-GSE, but not sulindac, suppressed downstream protein levels of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, c-Myc and cyclin D1. RSV-GSE also induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in colon CSCs characterized by elevated p53, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved PARP. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated knockdown of p53, a tumor suppressor gene, in colon CSCs did not alter efficacy of RSV-GSE. The suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and elevated mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in colon CSCs support potential clinical testing/application of grape bioactives for colon cancer prevention and/or therapy.

  2. Deficiency in the 15 kDa Selenoprotein Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Tobe

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals, and is thought to provide protection against some forms of cancer. These protective effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, through selenium-containing proteins (selenoproteins. Recent studies in a mouse colon cancer cell line have shown that the 15 kDa selenoprotein (Sep15 may also play a role in promoting colon cancer. The current study investigated whether the effects of reversing the cancer phenotype observed when Sep15 was removed in mouse colon cancer cells, were recapitulated in HCT116 and HT29 human colorectal carcinoma cells. Targeted down-regulation of Sep15 using RNAi technology in these human colon cancer cell lines resulted in similarly decreased growth under anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent conditions. However, the magnitude of reduction in cell growth was much less than in the mouse colon cancer cell line investigated previously. Furthermore, changes in cell cycle distribution were observed, indicating a delayed release of Sep15 deficient cells from the G0/G1 phase after synchronization. The potential mechanism by which human colon cancer cells lacking Sep15 revert their cancer phenotype will need to be explored further.

  3. Vasohibin-1 suppresses colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Han, Bing; Zhang, Qunyuan; Dou, Jie; Wang, Fang; Lin, Wenli; Sun, Yuping; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-01-01

    Vasohibin-1 (VASH1) is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. However, the clinical relevance of VASH1 in colon cancer and its regulations on cancer angiogenesis and cancer cell biological characteristics are still unknown. Here we showed that stromal VASH1 levels were negatively correlated with tumor size, advanced clinical stage and distant metastases in colon cancer patients. Overexpression of VASH1 in colon cancer cells induced apoptosis and senescence, inhibiting cancer cell growth and colony formation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. In addition, knockdown of VASH1 in cancer cells promoted cell growth, adhesion and migration in vitro, and enhanced tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. PMID:25797264

  4. IL-4-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todaro, Matilde; Perez Alea, Mileidys; Scopelliti, Alessandro; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are defined as cells able to both extensively self-renew and differentiate into progenitors. Cancer stem cells are thus likely to be responsible for maintaining or spreading a cancer, and may be the most relevant targets for cancer therapy. The CD133 glycoprotein was recently

  5. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  6. Decorin in Human Colon Cancer: Localization In Vivo and Effect on Cancer Cell Behavior In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Marie C; Sainio, Annele O; Pennanen, Mirka M; Lund, Riikka J; Vuorikoski, Sanna; Sundström, Jari T T; Järveläinen, Hannu T

    2015-09-01

    Decorin is generally recognized as a tumor suppressing molecule. Nevertheless, although decorin has been shown to be differentially expressed in malignant tissues, it has often remained unclear whether, in addition to non-malignant stromal cells, cancer cells also express it. Here, we first used two publicly available databases to analyze the current information about decorin expression and immunoreactivity in normal and malignant human colorectal tissue samples. The analyses demonstrated that decorin expression and immunoreactivity may vary in cancer cells of human colorectal tissues. Therefore, we next examined decorin expression in normal, premalignant and malignant human colorectal tissues in more detail using both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for decorin. Our results invariably demonstrate that malignant cells within human colorectal cancer tissues are devoid of both decorin mRNA and immunoreactivity. Identical results were obtained for cells of neuroendocrine tumors of human colon. Using RT-qPCR, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines are also decorin negative, in accordance with the above in vivo results. Finally, we demonstrate that decorin transduction of human colon cancer cell lines causes a significant reduction in their colony forming capability. Thus, strategies to develop decorin-based adjuvant therapies for human colorectal malignancies are highly rational. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. CacyBP/SIP promotes the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihong Zhai

    Full Text Available CacyBP/SIP is a component of the ubiquitin pathway and is overexpressed in several transformed tumor tissues, including colon cancer, which is one of the most common cancers worldwide. It is unknown whether CacyBP/SIP promotes the proliferation of colon cancer cells. This study examined the expression level, subcellular localization, and binding activity of CacyBP/SIP in human colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of the hormone gastrin. We found that CacyBP/SIP was expressed in a high percentage of colon cancer cells, but not in normal colonic surface epithelium. CacyBP/SIP promoted the cell proliferation of colon cancer cells under both basal and gastrin stimulated conditions as shown by knockdown studies. Gastrin stimulation triggered the translocation of CacyBP/SIP to the nucleus, and enhanced interaction between CacyBP/SIP and SKP1, a key component of ubiquitination pathway which further mediated the proteasome-dependent degradation of p27kip1 protein. The gastrin induced reduction in p27kip1 was prevented when cells were treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. These results suggest that CacyBP/SIP may be promoting growth of colon cancer cells by enhancing ubiquitin-mediated degradation of p27kip1.

  8. LRF inhibits p53 expression in colon cancer cells via modulating DAP5 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Wang, Peng; Feng, Fan; Li, Ming-Yang

    2017-10-01

    The p53 protein plays a critical role in suppression of tumour growth; its regulation is not fully understood. Leukaemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF) promotes tumour cell growth. This study tests a hypothesis that LRF inhibits p53 expression in colon cancer cells. In this study, human colon cancer cell lines, LIM1215 and HCT116 cells, were used. The expression of LRF and p53 in the cells was analysed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. We observed that the expression of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) was detected in both LIM1215 and HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Activation of PAR2 increased the expression of LRF and inhibited the p53 expression in the cancer cells. We also detected a complex of LRF and DAP5, one of the p53 gene transcription factors. The interaction of LRF and DAP5 resulted in the repression of p53 expression in the colon cancer cells. In conclusion, PAR2 activation increases the expression of LRF in colon cancer cells, which interacts with DAP5 to repress the p53 expression. Leukaemia/lymphoma-related factor may be a novel target in the treatment of colon cancer. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Vasohibin-1 suppresses colon cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Shuai; Han, Bing; Zhang, Qunyuan; Dou, Jie; Wang, Fang; Lin, Wenli; Sun, Yuping; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-01-01

    Vasohibin-1 (VASH1) is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor.However, the clinical relevance of VASH1 in colon cancer and its regulations on cancer angiogenesis and cancer cell biological characteristics are still unknown...

  10. EGFR regulation of colon cancer stem-like cells during aging and in response to the colonic carcinogen dimethylhydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Jyoti; Du, Jianhua; Yu, Yingjie; Kanwar, Shailender S; Levi, Edi; Majumdar, Adhip P N

    2012-04-01

    One of the most consistent pathological conditions in the gastrointestinal tract with advancing age is malignancy, particularly gastrointestinal cancers, the incidence of which increases sharply with aging. Although the reasons for the age-related rise in colorectal cancer are not fully understood, we hypothesize that aging increases susceptibility of the colon to carcinogen(s)/toxicant(s), leading to an increase in cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) that express cancer stem cell markers, in the colonic mucosa. The current study demonstrates that aging is associated with increased expression of several colon CSLC markers [CD44, CD166, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH-1)] and a higher proportion of cells expressing these markers. Aging is also accompanied by increased expression of miR-21 in colon. These increases are further increased in response to the colonic carcinogen dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Aging is also associated with increased tyrosine-phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Inhibition of EGFR using the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab abrogated the age-related increase in CD166 and ALDH-1 as well as miRNA (miR)-21. Our results provide new evidence that aging and DMH are associated with increases in CSLC biomarkers and miR21, each of which have been linked to colorectal cancer. EGFR inhibition attenuates these changes, indicating a role for EGFR in age- and mutagen-associated changes in CSLCs.

  11. MiR-495-3p facilitates colon cancer cell proliferation via Wnt/β ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression protein was tested using Western blotting. β-catenin binding ability was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. MiRNA target gene was defined by luciferase assay. Results: Compared with normal colon cells and tissue, miR-495-3p is elevated in colon cancer cells and tissues, which regulate ...

  12. MiR-495-3p facilitates colon cancer cell proliferation via Wnt/β ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    development of colon cancer stem cells by inhibiting Wnt inhibitory factor (WIF1). Methods: ... cancer and is a potential target for prevention and treatment of cancer. ... therapy. At present, molecular targets have been investigated in the treatment of many types of cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are proposed to be prospective ...

  13. Human colonic fibroblasts regulate stemness and chemotherapy resistance of colon cancer stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colak, S.; Medema, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that cancers are heterogeneous and contain a hierarchical organization consisting of cancer stem cells and their differentiated cell progeny. These cancer stem cells are at the core of the tumor as they represent the clonogenic cells within a tumor. Moreover, these cells

  14. Differential expression of nanog1 and nanogp8 in colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Sato, Ai; Ohata, Hirokazu; Sakai, Hiroaki [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi, E-mail: hnakagam@ncc.go.jp [Division of Cancer Development System, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Okamoto, Koji, E-mail: kojokamo@ncc.go.jo [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in a majority of colon cancer cell lines examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both nanog1 and nanogp8 are expressed in colon cancer cells with varying ratios. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog mediates cell proliferation of colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog predominantly localizes in cytoplasm of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Nanog, a homeodomain transcription factor, is an essential regulator for promotion of self-renewal of embryonic stem cells and inhibition of their differentiation. It has been demonstrated that nanog1 as well as nanogp8, a retrogene of nanog1, is preferentially expressed in advanced stages of several types of cancer, suggesting their involvement during cancer progression. Here, we investigated the expression of Nanog in well-characterized colon cancer cell lines. Expression of Nanog was detectable in 5 (HCT116, HT29, RKO, SW48, SW620) out of seven cell lines examined. RNA expression analyses of nanog1 and nanogp8 indicated that, while nanog1 was a major form in SW620 as well as in teratoma cells Tera-2, nanogp8 was preferentially expressed in HT29 and HCT116. In accordance with this, shRNA-mediated knockdown of nanog1 caused the reduction of Nanog in SW620 but not in HT29. Inhibition of Nanog in SW620 cells negatively affected cell proliferation and tumor formation in mouse xenograft. Biochemical subcellular fractionation and immunostaining analyses revealed predominant localization of Nanog in cytoplasm in SW620 and HT29, while it was mainly localized in nucleus in Tera-2. Our data indicate that nanog1 and nanogp8 are differentially expressed in colon cancer cells, and suggest that their expression contributes to proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  15. Down-regulation of GPR137 expression inhibits proliferation of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Shen, Zhen; Liang, Xianjun; Liu, Tongjun; Wang, Tiejun; Jiang, Yang

    2014-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPRs) are highly related to oncogenesis and cancer metastasis. G protein-coupled receptor 137 (GPR137) was initially reported as a novel orphan GPR about 10 years ago. Some orphan GPRs have been implicated in human cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of GPR137 in human colon cancer. Expression levels of GRP137 were analyzed in different colon cancer cell lines by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA was specifically designed to knock down GPR137 expression in colon cancer cells. Cell viability was measured by methylthiazoletetrazolium and colony formation assays. In addition, cell cycle characteristic was investigated by flow cytometry. GRP137 expression was observed in all seven colon cancer cell lines at different levels. The mRNA and protein levels of GPR137 were down-regulated in both HCT116 and RKO cells after lentivirus infection. Lentivirus-mediated silencing of GPR137 reduced the proliferation rate and colonies numbers. Knockdown of GPR137 in both cell lines led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. These results indicated that GPR137 plays an important role in colon cancer cell proliferation. A better understanding of GPR137's effects on signal transduction pathways in colon cancer cells may provide insights into the novel gene therapy of colon cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on a-Lactalbumin and Sulindac treated colon cancer cells: ELF-EMF and colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gorgulu, Kivanc; Gokce, Burak; Aydemir, Isil; Ozbilgin, M. Kemal; Vatansever, H.Seda

    2014-01-01

    Aim: In this research, we aimed to investigate the effects extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on proliferation and apoptosis during treatment of primary and metastatic colon cancer cell lines. Material and Methods: Colon cell lines; COLO-320, COLO-741 and as control mouse fibroblast (STO) cells were cultured in 24 wells of tissue culture plate. Both COLO-320 and COLO-741 cells were treated with a-lactalbumin, sulindac and a-lactalbumin + sulindac. The cells from all grou...

  17. Secreted Human Adipose Leptin Decreases Mitochondrial Respiration in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, prespiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24073224

  18. Rhein induces apoptosis of HCT-116 human colon cancer cells via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rhein, a major compound in rhubarb, has been found to have anti-tumor properties in many human cancer cells. However, the details about rhein suppressing the growth of human colon cancer cells remained elusive. In this paper, we explored the potential of rhein as a chemotherapeutic agent on HCT- 116 cells and ...

  19. Resveratrol Treatment Inhibits Proliferation of and Induces Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Miao; Zhong, Lu-Xing; Zhan, Zheng-Yu; Huang, Zhi-Hao; Xiong, Jian-Ping

    2016-04-04

    Resveratrol, a natural isolate from plant sources, has a long and important history in traditional Chinese medicine. In the present study we investigated the effect of resveratrol on human colon cancer cell lines. We used the Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) for determination of colon cancer cell viability. Apoptosis induction was analyzed using the DeadEnd™ Colorimetric TUNEL System (Promega, Madison, WI, USA). The siRNA Transfection Reagent kit (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Inc.) was used for the administration of COX-2 silencer RNA (siRNA) into the colon cancer cells. Primer Express® software for Real-Time PCR ver. 3.0 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) was used to prepare the primers for RT-PCR. The results revealed that exposure of colon cancer cells to resveratrol inhibited cell viability. Resveratrol exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on cell viability at 30 μM concentration after 48 h of exposure. We observed that 30-μM doses of resveratrol for 72 h led to 18, 29, and 34% reduction in the viability of HCA-17, SW480, and HT29 cells, respectively. It also significantly induced apoptosis in both of the tested carcinoma cell lines. The population of apoptotic cells in HCA-17 and SW480 cell lines after 48 h of resveratrol treatment was 59.8±4 and 67.2±4%, respectively, compared to 2.3±1% in the control cells. The colon cancer cells exposed to resveratrol showed significantly lower cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin receptor expression. Treatment of colon cancer cells with the inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, indomethacin, and administration of silencer RNA for cyclooxygenase-2 also produced similar results. These findings suggest that resveratrol treatment can be a promising strategy for the treatment of colon cancer.

  20. γδ T cells as a potential tool in colon cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramutton, Thiranut; Buccheri, Simona; Dieli, Francesco; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio; Meraviglia, Serena

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells are capable of recognizing tumor cells and exert potent cellular cytotoxicity against a large range of tumors, including colon cancer. However, tumors utilize numerous strategies to escape recognition or killing by patrolling γδ T cells, such a downregulation of NKG2D ligands, MICA/B and ULBPs. Therefore, the combined upregulation of T-cell receptorand NKG2D ligands on tumor cells and induction of NKG2D expression on γδ T cells may greatly enhance tumor killing and unlock the functions of γδ T cells. Here, we briefly review current data on the mechanisms of γδ T-cell recognition and killing of colon cancer cells and propose that γδ T cells may represent a promising target for the design of novel and highly innovative immunotherapy in patients with colon cancer.

  1. Sweets for a bitter end: lung cancer cell-surface protein glycosylation mediates metastatic colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Nguyen, Don X

    2015-02-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most predominant forms of cell-surface protein modifications, yet its deregulation in cancer and contribution to tumor microenvironment interactions remain poorly understood. In this issue of Cancer Discovery, Reticker-Flynn and Bhatia characterize an enzymatic switch in lung cancer cells that triggers aberrant surface protein glycosylation patterns, adhesion to lectins on the surface of inflammatory cells, and subsequent metastatic colonization of the liver. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth and cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data indicate that methylselenol is a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo but its role in colon cancer prevention remains to be characterized. This study tested the hypothesis that methylselenol inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells and tumors. We found that submicr...

  3. Evaluation and SAR analysis of the cytotoxicity of tanshinones in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Liu, An; Zhang, Fei-Long; Yeung, John H K; Li, Xu-Qin; Cho, Chi-Hin

    2014-03-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the anti-cancer actions of tanshinone I and tanshinone IIA, and six derivatives of tanshinone IIA on normal and cancerous colon cells. Structure activity relationship (SAR) analysis was conducted to delineate the significance of the structural modifications of tanshinones for improved anti-cancer action. Tanshinone derivatives were designed and synthesized according to the literature. The cytotoxicity of different compounds on colon cancer cells was determined by the MTT assay. Apoptotic activity of the tanshinones was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). Tanshinone I and tanshinone IIA both exhibited significant cytotoxicity on colon cancer cells. They are more effective in p53(+/+) colon cancer cell line. It was also noted that the anti-cancer activity of tanshinone I was more potent and selective. Two of the derivatives of tanshinone IIA (N1 and N2) also exhibited cytotoxicity on colon cancer cells. The anti-colon cancer activity of tanshinone I was more potent and selective than tanshinone IIA, and is p53 dependent. The derivatives obtained by structural modifications of tanshinone IIA exhibited lower cytotoxicity on both normal and colon cancer cells. From steric and electronic characteristics point of view, it was concluded that structural modifications of ring A and furan or dihydrofuran ring D on the basic structure of tanshinones influences the activity. An increase of the delocalization of the A and B rings could enhance the cytotoxicity of such compounds, while a non-planar and small sized D ring region would provide improved anti-cancer activity. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pomegranate juice, total pomegranate ellagitannins, and punicalagin suppress inflammatory cell signaling in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Lynn S; Seeram, Navindra P; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Takada, Yasunari; Sand, Daniel; Heber, David

    2006-02-08

    Phytochemicals from fruits such as the pomegranate (Punica granatum L) may inhibit cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the modulation of cellular transcription factors and signaling proteins. In previous studies, pomegranate juice (PJ) and its ellagitannins inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells. The present study examined the effects of PJ on inflammatory cell signaling proteins in the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. At a concentration of 50 mg/L PJ significantly suppressed TNFalpha-induced COX-2 protein expression by 79% (SE = 0.042), total pomegranate tannin extract (TPT) 55% (SE = 0.049), and punicalagin 48% (SE = 0.022). Additionally, PJ reduced phosphorylation of the p65 subunit and binding to the NFkappaB response element 6.4-fold. TPT suppressed NFkappaB binding 10-fold, punicalagin 3.6-fold, whereas ellagic acid (EA) (another pomegranate polyphenol) was ineffective. PJ also abolished TNFalpha-induced AKT activation, needed for NFkappaB activity. Therefore, the polyphenolic phytochemicals in the pomegranate can play an important role in the modulation of inflammatory cell signaling in colon cancer cells.

  5. Influence of race on microsatellite instability and CD8+ T cell infiltration in colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Carethers

    Full Text Available African American patients with colorectal cancer show higher mortality than their Caucasian counterparts. Biology might play a partial role, and prior studies suggest a higher prevalence for microsatellite instability (MSI among cancers from African Americans, albeit patients with MSI cancers have improved survival over patients with non-MSI cancers, counter to the outcome observed for African American patients. CD8+ T cell infiltration of colon cancer is postively correlated with MSI tumors, and is also related to improved outcome. Here, we utilized a 503-person, population-based colon cancer cohort comprising 45% African Americans to determine, under blinded conditions from all epidemiological data, the prevalence of MSI and associated CD8+ T cell infiltration within the cancers. Among Caucasian cancers, 14% were MSI, whereas African American cancers demonstrated 7% MSI (P = 0.009. Clinically, MSI cancers between races were similar; among microsatellite stable cancers, African American patients were younger, female, and with proximal cancers. CD8+ T cells were higher in MSI cancers (88.0 vs 30.4/hpf, P<0.0001, but was not different between races. Utilizing this population-based cohort, African American cancers show half the MSI prevalence of Caucasians without change in CD8+ T cell infiltration which may contribute towards their higher mortality from colon cancer.

  6. Combination therapy targeting Raf-1 and MEK causes apoptosis of HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Romesh R; Yamakawa, Akio

    2012-11-01

    Members of the Ras protooncogene family are mutated in approximately 75% of colon cancers. The Raf kinases (Raf-1, b-Raf and a-Raf) directly interact with Ras and serve as mediators of mitogenic signals. Expression of the constitutively active alleles of Raf or Ras gene families results in oncogenesis in a number of model systems. Previous studies emphasized the importance of Raf-1 and b-Raf in preventing apoptosis in addition to their roles in cell growth. In the present study, we examined whether inhibition of the Raf-1 or b-Raf kinase decreases cell growth and increases apoptosis in colon cancer cells. c-Raf and b-Raf were depleted in colon cancer cell lines, such as HCT116, HT29 and Colo205, containing Ras or b-Raf mutations by RNA interference (RNAi). The results showed that colon cancer cells with activating Ras mutations undergo apoptosis following Raf-1 inhibition, as determined by cell cycle analysis and the release of cytochrome c. Moreover, in b-Raf mutant colon cancers, the inhibition of b-Raf as compared to Raf-1 is crucial for cancer cell death. There is increasing evidence for both MEK-independent Raf signaling and Raf-independent MEK signaling. Thus, we investigated whether targeting multiple points of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway with a MEK inhibitor and Raf RNAi increases cancer cell death. The results showed that combination therapy, inhibiting Raf and MEK kinases simultaneously, increased apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that combination therapy targeting the MAPK pathway at two distinct points, Raf kinase and MEK, has greater efficacy in increasing cancer cell death and is likely to improve therapeutic outcomes for patients.

  7. In Vitro Collapsing Colon Cancer Cells by Selectivity of Disulfiram-Loaded Charge Switchable Nanoparticles Against Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Serie, Marwa M; El-Rashidy, Fatma H

    2017-01-01

    Different strategies against colon cancer are accompanied by treatment failure, because of drug toxicity toward normal cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs) resistance. However, previous patent evaluated liposome that encapsulated inhibitor of CSCs' aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)1; disulfiram, for targeting breast CSCs. Liposome has disadvantages due to its hydrophobicity. Designing hydrophilic nanoparticles has selectivity to release disulfiram in CC cells rather than in normal colonocytes based on variation in microenvironment between normal and cancer cells. Disulfiram was nanoformulated by its loading into cationic chitosan and coating with anionic albumin. Their selectivity and targeting were investigated using murine and human colon cancer cells compared to normal mice colon cells. Zeta potential of the coated nanoparticles confirmed that albumin-layering confers negative charge (-10.3mv) for disulfiram-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (52.9mv). In slightly acidic medium of tumor, the ionic bond between albumin and chitosan hydrolyzed then the positive charge was reversed (47.6mv). Thus coated nanoparticles showed higher sustain release for disulfiram in tumor microenvironment than neutral pH and their uptake was higher in cancer cells than normal cells. This interpreted the highest selectivity of coated nanoparticles for enhancing apoptosis and eliminating CSCs in cancer cells. These patented coated nanoparticles were the most effective and selective for eradicating colon CSCs without insulting normal stem cells in comparison with disulfiram which was toxic to both normal and CSCs. This novel study that used charge switchable (hydrophilic) nanoparticles for targeting colon CSCs may represent a basis for future in vivo studies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. microRNA-143 down-regulates Hexokinase 2 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea Haarup; Jacobsen, Anders; Frankel, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    and validated HK2 as a miR-143 target. Furthermore, our results indicate that miR-143 mediated down-regulation of HK2 affects glucose metabolism in colon cancer cells. We hypothesize that loss of miR-143-mediated repression of HK2 can promote glucose metabolism in cancer cells, contributing to the shift towards...

  9. Resistin causes G1 arrest in colon cancer cells through upregulation of SOCS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Snahlata; Chouhan, Surbhi; Mohammad, Naoshad; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Resistin, a proinflammatory cytokine, is elevated in a number of pathological disorders, including cancer. The serum resistin level in colon cancer patients is elevated and correlates with tumor grade. However, the implications of increased resistin on colon cancer cells remain unclear. In the present study, we find that resistin binds to TLR4 on colon cancer cell membrane and initiates TLR4-MyD88-dependent activation of ERK. In addition, the upregulation of SOCS3 by ERK downregulates the JAK2/TAT3 pathway and causes the arrest of cells in G1 phase. Interestingly, we observe that resistin-exposed cells survive 5-fluorouracil treatment because of a decrease in drug uptake due to the arrest of cells in G1 phase. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Prolonged Sulforaphane Treatment Activates Extracellular-Regulated Kinase 1/2 Signaling in Nontumorigenic Colon Cells but not Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  11. A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Chidamide induces apoptosis of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lin [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Chen, Baoan, E-mail: wenyu811@126.com [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Qin, Shukui [Chinese PLA Cancer Center, The 81st PLA Hospital, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu (China); Li, Suyi; He, Xiangming [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Qiu, Shaomin; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Hong [Department of Internal Medicine, Nanjing Municipal Cancer Hospital, Nanjing 210003, Jiangsu (China)

    2010-02-05

    Many studies have demonstrated that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce various tumor cells to undergo apoptosis, and such inhibitors have been used in different clinical trials against different human cancers. In this study, we designed and synthesized a novel HDAC inhibitor, Chidamide. We showed that Chidamide was able to increase the acetylation levels of histone H3 and to inhibit the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Ras signaling pathways, which resulted in arresting colon cancer cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle and promoting apoptosis. As a result, the proliferation of colon cancer cells was suppressed in vitro. Our data support the potential application of Chidamide as an anticancer agent in treating colon cancer. Future studies are needed to demonstrate its in vivo efficacy.

  12. Down-regulation of LRP1B in colon cancer promoted the growth and migration of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Sun, Peng; Gao, Chun; Chen, Ji; Li, Jun; Chen, Zhonghao; Xu, Ming; Shao, Jun; Zhang, Yunpeng; Xie, Jiang

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant activation of beta-catenin/TCF signaling is one of the hallmarks of colon cancer. It is of great interest to study the mechanism for the regulation of beta-catenin/TCF signaling. In this study, it was found that LRP1B was down-regulated in colon cancer tissues and inhibited the growth, migration and metastasis of colon cancer cells. The molecular mechanism study revealed that LRP1B interacted with DVL2, inhibited the interaction between DVL2 and Axin, and negatively regulated beta-catenin/TCF signaling. Taken together, our study demonstrated the suppressive roles of LRP1B in the progression of colon cancer, implicating that restoring the function of LRP1B would be a promising strategy for the treatment of colon cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. PPARδ deficiency disrupts hypoxia-mediated tumorigenic potential of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eunshil; Koo, Jung Eun; Yeon, Sang Hyeon; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Hwang, Daniel H; Lee, Joo Young

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ is highly expressed in colon epithelial cells and closely linked to colon carcinogenesis. However, the role of PPARδ in colon cancer cells in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment is not fully understood. We found that expression of the tumor-promoting cytokines, IL-8 and VEGF, induced by hypoxia (colon cancer cells. Consequently, PPARδ-knockout colon cancer cells exposed to hypoxia and deferoxamine failed to stimulate endothelial cell vascularization and macrophage migration/proliferation, whereas wild-type cells were able to induce angiogenesis and macrophage activation in response to hypoxic stress. Hypoxic stress induced transcriptional activation of PPARδ, but not its protein expression, in HCT116 cells. Exogenous expression of p300 potentiated deferoxamine-induced PPARδ transactivation, while siRNA knockdown of p300 abolished hypoxia- and deferoxamine-induced PPARδ transactivation. PPARδ associated with p300 upon hypoxic stress as demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation studies. PI3K inhibitors or siRNA knockdown of Akt suppressed the PPARδ transactivation induced by hypoxia and deferoxamine in HCT116 cells, leading to decreased expression of IL-8 and VEGF. Collectively, these results reveal that PPARδ is required for hypoxic stress-mediated cytokine expression in colon cancer cells, resulting in promotion of angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and macrophage proliferation in the tumor microenvironment. p300 and the PI3K/Akt pathway play a role in the regulation of PPARδ transactivation induced by hypoxic stress. Our results demonstrate the positive crosstalk between PPARδ in tumor cells and the hypoxic tumor microenvironment and provide potential therapeutic targets for colon cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach S. Templeton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014 and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006 and IL-1β (P = .001 in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche.

  15. Effect of hydroxyapatite particle size, morphology and crystallinity on proliferation of colon cancer HCT116 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Sangeeta; Das, Mitun, E-mail: mitun@cgcri.res.in; Balla, Vamsi Krishna

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to chemically and physically characterize the synthesized Hydroxyapatite (HAp) micro and nanoparticles and to explore the inhibitory effect of nano-HAps on the in vitro growth of human colon cancerous cells HCT116. HAp powder was synthesized using three different routes to achieve micro and nanosized powders, with different morphologies and crystallinity. The synthesized powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the average crystallite size of HAp powder varies from 11 nm to 177 nm and respective crystallinity of powder found to be in the range of 0.12 and 0.92. The effect of these physico-chemical properties of HAp powders on human colon cancer HCT116 cells inhibition was determined in vitro. It was found that decreasing the HAp powder crystallite size between 11 nm and 22 nm significantly increases the HCT116 cell inhibition. Our results demonstrate that apart from HAp powder size their crystallinity and morphology also play an important role in cellular inhibition of human colon cancer cells. - Highlights: • Chemically synthesized hydroxyapatite micro and nano-particles with different morphologies and crystallinity. • In vitro cell–material interaction showed that hydroxyapatite nano-particles inhibit colon cancer cells. • Human colon cancer cell inhibition also depends on crystallinity and morphology of HAp powder.

  16. β-Catenin promotes colitis and colon cancer through imprinting of proinflammatory properties in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthivasan, Shilpa; Aghajani, Katayoun; Dose, Marei; Molinero, Luciana; Khan, Mohammad W; Venkateswaran, Vysak; Weber, Christopher; Emmanuel, Akinola Olumide; Sun, Tianjao; Bentrem, David J; Mulcahy, Mary; Keshavarzian, Ali; Ramos, Elena M; Blatner, Nichole; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Gounari, Fotini

    2014-02-26

    The density and type of lymphocytes that infiltrate colon tumors are predictive of the clinical outcome of colon cancer. High densities of T helper 17 (T(H)17) cells and inflammation predict poor outcome, whereas infiltration by T regulatory cells (Tregs) that naturally suppress inflammation is associated with longer patient survival. However, the role of Tregs in cancer remains controversial. We recently reported that Tregs in colon cancer patients can become proinflammatory and tumor-promoting. These properties were directly linked with their expression of RORγt (retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-γt), the signature transcription factor of T(H)17 cells. We report that Wnt/β-catenin signaling in T cells promotes expression of RORγt. Expression of β-catenin was elevated in T cells, including Tregs, of patients with colon cancer. Genetically engineered activation of β-catenin in mouse T cells resulted in enhanced chromatin accessibility in the proximity of T cell factor-1 (Tcf-1) binding sites genome-wide, induced expression of T(H)17 signature genes including RORγt, and promoted T(H)17-mediated inflammation. Strikingly, the mice had inflammation of small intestine and colon and developed lesions indistinguishable from colitis-induced cancer. Activation of β-catenin only in Tregs was sufficient to produce inflammation and initiate cancer. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in effector T cells and/or Tregs is causatively linked with the imprinting of proinflammatory properties and the promotion of colon cancer.

  17. STAT3 signaling pathway is necessary for cell survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +} stem cell-like human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Li, E-mail: lin.796@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Fuchs, James; Li, Chenglong [Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olson, Veronica [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Bekaii-Saab, Tanios [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lin, Jiayuh, E-mail: lin.674@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 inhibits P-STAT3 and STAT3 target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of STAT3 resulted in decreased cell viability and reduced numbers of tumorspheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 is required for survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a novel treatment approach for colon cancer. -- Abstract: Persistent activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in colon cancer. Increasing evidence suggests the existence of a small population of colon cancer stem or cancer-initiating cells may be responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Whether STAT3 plays a role in colon cancer-initiating cells and the effect of STAT3 inhibition is still unknown. Flow cytometry was used to isolate colon cancer stem-like cells from three independent human colon cancer cell lines characterized by both aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and CD133-positive subpopulation (ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +}). The effects of STAT3 inhibition in colon cancer stem-like cells were examined. The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells and was reduced by a STAT3-selective small molecular inhibitor, FLLL32. FLLL32 also inhibited the expression of potential STAT3 downstream target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells including survivin, Bcl-XL, as well as Notch-1, -3, and -4, which may be involved in stem cell function. Furthermore, FLLL32 inhibited cell viability and tumorsphere formation as well as induced cleaved caspase-3 in colon cancer stem-like cells. FLLL32 is more potent than curcumin as evidenced with lower

  18. Targeting Wnt Signaling in Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis; Richel, Dick; Medema, Jan Paul

    2011-01-01

    The identification of cancer stem cell (CSC) populations in virtually all tumor types has widespread clinical consequences. CSCs are suggested to be the only cells within malignancies endowed with tumorigenic capacity and are, therefore, directly implicated in therapy resistance and minimal residual

  19. A cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus shows enhanced suppression of stem-cell like colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, So Young; Bang, Seo Young; Jeong, Su-Nam; Kang, Dae Hwan; Heo, Jeong

    2016-03-29

    Stem cell-like colon cancer cells (SCCs) pose a major challenge in colon cancer treatment because of their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oncolytic virus-based therapy has shown promising results in uncured cancer patients; however, its effects on SCCs are not well studied yet. Here, we engineered a cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus (CVV) as a potent biotherapeutic and investigated its therapeutic efficacy in terms of killing SCCs. CVV is an evolved Wyeth strain vaccinia virus (EVV) lacking the viral thymidine kinase. SCC models were established using human or mouse colon cancer spheres, which continuously expressed stemness markers. The cancer-favoring characteristics and different cytotoxic pathways for killing cancer cells successfully overrode general drug resistance, thereby killing colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of SCCs. Subcutaneously injected HT29 spheres showed lower growth in CVV-treated models than in 5-Fu-treated models. Intraperitoneally injected CT26 spheres induced tumor masses in the abdominal region. CVV-treated groups showed higher survival rates and smaller tumor mass formation, compared to 5-Fu-treated groups. Interestingly, the combined treatment of CVV with 5-Fu showed improved survival rates and complete suppression of tumor mass. The CVV developed in this study, thus, effectively suppresses SCCs, which can be synergistically enhanced by simultaneous treatment with the anticancer drug 5-Fu. Our novel CVV is highly advantageous as a next-generation therapeutic for treating colon cancer.

  20. Dual Effects of Resveratrol on Cell Death and Proliferation of Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Hipólito-Luengo, Álvaro; Alcaide, Antonio; Ramos-González, Mariella; Cercas, Elena; Vallejo, Susana; Romero, Alejandra; Talero, Elena; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Motilva, Virginia; Peiró, Concepción

    2017-10-01

    Colorectal cancer remains a main cause of deaths worldwide, and novel agents are being searched to treat this disease. Polyphenols have emerged as promising therapeutic tools in cancer. Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydoxy-trans-stilbene) induces cell death in different tumor cell lines, and it also stimulates the proliferation of specific breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Here, we studied the impact of resveratrol over a 100-fold concentration range on cell death and proliferation of HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. After 96 h of treatment, a biphasic pattern was observed. At lower concentrations (1 and 10 μmol/l), resveratrol increased the cell number, as did the polyphenol quercetin. At 50 or 100 μmol/l, resveratrol reduced the cell number and increased the percentage of apoptotic or necrotic cells, thus indicating cytotoxicity. On HCT116 colon cancer cells, however, no proliferative properties of resveratrol were observed. Resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity on HT-29 cells was associated with NADPH oxidase activation and increased levels of histone γH2AX, a marker of DNA damage, paralleled by enhanced sirtuin 6 levels, likely as a repair mechanism. Overall, resveratrol may be an effective tool in anti-tumor chemotherapy. However, since under some conditions it may favor tumor cell growth, appropriate local concentrations must be achieved to minimize unwanted effects of resveratrol.

  1. The effects of arsenic trioxide on DNA synthesis and genotoxicity in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jacqueline J; Graham, Barbara; Walker, Alice M; Tchounwou, Paul B; Rogers, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that arsenic trioxide is cytotoxic in human colon cancer (HT-29), lung (A549) and breast (MCF-7) carcinoma cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide on DNA synthesis and the possible genotoxic effects on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were cultured according to standard protocol, followed by exposure to various doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 microg/mL) of arsenic trioxide for 24 h. The proliferative response (DNA synthesis) to arsenic trioxide was assessed by [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. The genotoxic effects of arsenic-induced DNA damage in a human colon cancer cell line was evaluated by the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis. Results indicated that arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis in HT-29 cells in a biphasic manner; showing a slight but not significant increase in cell proliferation at lower levels of exposure (2, 4 and 6 microg/mL) followed by a significant inhibition of cell proliferation at higher doses (i.e., 8 and 10 microg/mL). The study also confirmed that arsenic trioxide exposure caused genotoxicity as revealed by the significant increase in DNA damage, comet tail-lengths, and tail moment when compared to non-exposed cells. Results of the [(3)H]thymidine incorporation assay and comet assay revealed that exposure to arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis and exhibited genotoxic effects in human colon cancer cells.

  2. The Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on DNA Synthesis and Genotoxicity in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rogers

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that arsenic trioxide is cytotoxic in human colon cancer (HT-29, lung (A549 and breast (MCF-7 carcinoma cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide on DNA synthesis and the possible genotoxic effects on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were cultured according to standard protocol, followed by exposure to various doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 μg/mL of arsenic trioxide for 24 h. The proliferative response (DNA synthesis to arsenic trioxide was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation. The genotoxic effects of arsenic-induced DNA damage in a human colon cancer cell line was evaluated by the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis. Results indicated that arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis in HT-29 cells in a biphasic manner; showing a slight but not significant increase in cell proliferation at lower levels of exposure (2, 4 and 6 µg/mL followed by a significant inhibition of cell proliferation at higher doses (i.e., 8 and 10 µg/mL. The study also confirmed that arsenic trioxide exposure caused genotoxicity as revealed by the significant increase in DNA damage, comet tail-lengths, and tail moment when compared to non-exposed cells. Results of the [3H]thymidine incorporation assay and comet assay revealed that exposure to arsenic trioxide affected DNA synthesis and exhibited genotoxic effects in human colon cancer cells.

  3. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Erk Marjan J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an anti-oxidant and it can act as an anti-inflammatory agent. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms and effect of curcumin in colon cancer cells using gene expression profiling. Methods Gene expression changes in response to curcumin exposure were studied in two human colon cancer cell lines, using cDNA microarrays with four thousand human genes. HT29 cells were exposed to two different concentrations of curcumin and gene expression changes were followed in time (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. Gene expression changes after short-term exposure (3 or 6 hours to curcumin were also studied in a second cell type, Caco-2 cells. Results Gene expression changes (>1.5-fold were found at all time points. HT29 cells were more sensitive to curcumin than Caco-2 cells. Early response genes were involved in cell cycle, signal transduction, DNA repair, gene transcription, cell adhesion and xenobiotic metabolism. In HT29 cells curcumin modulated a number of cell cycle genes of which several have a role in transition through the G2/M phase. This corresponded to a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase as was observed by flow cytometry. Functional groups with a similar expression profile included genes involved in phase-II metabolism that were induced by curcumin after 12 and 24 hours. Expression of some cytochrome P450 genes was downregulated by curcumin in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. In addition, curcumin affected expression of metallothionein genes, tubulin genes, p53 and other genes involved in colon carcinogenesis. Conclusions This study has extended knowledge on pathways or processes already reported to be affected by curcumin (cell cycle arrest, phase

  4. In vitro effects of extracts of extra virgin olive oil on human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaloni, Barbara; Mavilia, Carmelo; Fabbri, Sergio; Romani, Annalisa; Ieri, Francesca; Tanini, Annalisa; Tonelli, Francesco; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, and some types of cancer. Recent interest has been focused on the biological activity of phenolic compounds present in extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs). Both in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that EVOO components have positive effects on metabolic parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet function, and antimicrobial activity. We have investigated the possible interactions between 2 extracts of extra virgin olive oil and estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in an in vitro model of colon cancer. The qualification and quantification of the components of the 2 samples tested showed that phenolic compounds-hydroxytyrosol, secoiridoids, and lignans-are the major represented compounds. EVOO extracts were tested on a colon cancer cell line engineered to overexpress ERβ (HCT8-β8). By using custom made Oligo microarray, gene expression profiles of colon cancer cells challenged with EVOO-T extracts when compared with those of cells exposed to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2). This study demonstrated that the EVOO extracts tested showed an antiproliferative effect on colon cancer cells through the interaction with estrogen-dependent signals involved in tumor cell growth. Specifically, the ability of EVOO extracts to inhibit cell proliferation was superimposable to the activation of the ERβ receptor, similar to what was observed after 17β-E2 challenge.

  5. Crucial role of interleukin-4 in the survival of colon cancer stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Alea, Mileidys Perez; Lombardo, Ylenia; Todaro, Matilde; Medema, J. P.; Stassi, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Colon tumors may be maintained by a rare fraction of cancer stem-like cells (CSC) that express the cell surface marker CD133. Self-renewing CSCs exhibit relatively greater resistance to clinical cytotoxic therapies and recent work suggests that this resistance may be mediated in part by an autocrine

  6. Miltirone induced mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Hu, Tao; Shen, Jing; Zhang, Lin; Li, Long-Fei; Chan, Ruby Lok-Yi; Li, Ming-Xing; Wu, William Ka-Kei; Cho, Chi-Hin

    2016-04-15

    To study the characteristics of miltirone-induced anti-colon cancer effects. Cell viability was detected using MTT assay. LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) leakage was detected using CytoTox96® non-radioactive cytotoxicity kit. Apoptosis was detected by FCM (flow cytometry). Caspase activation was determined by chemiluminescence or western blotting. AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor) expression in the cell fraction was determined by western blotting. ROS (reactive oxygen species), MMP (mitochondrial membrane potential) and mitochondrial mass were determined by confocal microscope. Intracellular calcium was detected by both FCM and confocal microscope. To determine the roles of ROS and Ca(2+) in the pro-apoptotic activity of miltirone, colon cancer cells were pretreated with kinds of antioxidants, dicoumarol, calpeptin or BAPTA-AM in some cases. Miltirone exhibited potent cytotoxicity on colon cancer cells with a better selectivity than that of dihydrotanshinone. The pro-apoptotic activity of miltirone was p53- and ROS-dependent. In detail, miltirone induced direct mitochondrial damage, including significant decrease of mitochondrial ROS, MMP, mass and increase of intracellular ROS and Ca(2+). NQO1 (quinone oxidoreductase1) was supposed to be a defender for the cytotoxicity induced by miltirone in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, miltirone induced time- and concentration-dependent translocation of AIF and activation of caspases. In this study, ROS- and p53-dependent apoptosis induced by miltirone on colon cancer cells was firstly revealed. Strong positive feedback between mitochondrial dysfunction and accumulation of intracellular Ca(2+) was suggested to be the characteristic of the anti-colon cancer activity of miltirone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Yoon, Seo-Hyun; Han, Long-Shan; Zheng, Long-Tai; Jung, Kyung-Hee; Uhm, Yoon-Kyung; Lee, Je-Hyun; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Joo, Woo-Sang; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Joo-Ho; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2005-09-07

    The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-related, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cycle-related, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes. We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL, 24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE11A), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells. These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells, and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  8. Noscapine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zi-Rong; Liu, Meng; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Lei, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Xiang [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China); Dong, Wei-Guo, E-mail: dongwg1966@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine inhibited cell viability of colon cancer in a time- and dose- dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G{sub 2}/M phase arrest and chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine promoted apoptosis via mitochondrial pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumorigenicity was inhibited by noscapine. -- Abstract: Noscapine, a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for decades. Noscapine has recently been shown to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of several therapies by inducing apoptosis in various malignant cells without any detectable toxicity in cells or tissues. However, the mechanism by which noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells remains unclear. The signaling pathways by which noscapine induces apoptosis were investigated in colon cancer cell lines treated with various noscapine concentrations for 72 h, and a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed. Noscapine effectively inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells in vitro (IC{sub 50} = 75 {mu}M). This cytotoxicity was reflected by cell cycle arrest at G{sub 2}/M and subsequent apoptosis, as indicated by increased chromatin condensation and fragmentation, the upregulation of Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c), the downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, in a xenograft tumor model in mice, noscapine injection clearly inhibited tumor growth via the induction of apoptosis, which was demonstrated using a TUNEL assay. These results suggest that noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways. Noscapine may be a safe and effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon cancer.

  9. Early stage colon cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2013-01-01

    .... After resection of malignant pedunculated colon polyps or early stage colon cancers, long-term repeated surveillance programs can also lead to detection and removal of asymptomatic high risk advanced...

  10. Colon cancer - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100157.htm Colon cancer - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The colon, or large intestine, is a muscular tube that ...

  11. CUB domain containing protein 1 (CDCP1) modulates adhesion and motility in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard-Webb, David J; Lee, Thong Chuan; Cook, Graham P; Blair, G Eric

    2014-10-09

    Deregulated expression of the transmembrane glycoprotein CDCP1 (CUB domain-containing protein-1) has been detected in several cancers including colon, lung, gastric, breast, and pancreatic carcinomas. CDCP1 has been proposed to either positively or negatively regulate tumour metastasis. In this study we assessed the role of CDCP1 in properties of cells that are directly relevant to metastasis, namely adhesion and motility. In addition, association between CDCP1 and the tetraspanin protein CD9 was investigated. CDCP1 and CD9 protein expression was measured in a series of colon cancer cell lines by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Adhesion of Colo320 and SW480 cells was determined using a Matrigel adhesion assay. The chemotactic motility of SW480 cells in which CDCP1 expression had been reduced by RNA interference was analysed using the xCELLigence system Real-Time Cell Analyzer Dual Plates combined with 8 μm pore filters. Detergent-resistant membrane fractions were generated following density gradient centrifugation and the CDCP1 and CD9 protein composition of these fractions was determined by Western blotting. The potential association of the CDCP1 and CD9 proteins was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. Engineered CDCP1 expression in Colo320 cells resulted in a reduction in cell adhesion to Matrigel. Treatment of SW480 cells with CDCP1 siRNA reduced serum-induced chemotaxis. CDCP1 and CD9 cell-surface protein and mRNA levels showed a positive correlation in colon cancer cell lines and the proteins formed a low-level, but detectable complex as judged by co-sedimentation of detergent lysates of HT-29 cells in sucrose gradients as well as by co-immunoprecipitation in SW480 cell lysates. A number of recent studies have assigned a potentially important role for the cell-surface protein CDCP1 in invasion and metastasis of a several types of human cancer cells. In this study, CDCP1 was shown to modulate cell-substratum adhesion and motility in colon cancer cell

  12. Depletion of mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 causes increased apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue-Yamauchi, Akane, E-mail: ainoyama@research.twmu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan); Oda, Hideaki [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 is required for mitochondrial fission in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 participates in inhibition of colon cancer cell apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 can inhibit apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release. -- Abstract: Mitochondria play a critical role in regulation of apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, by releasing apoptogenic factors including cytochrome c. Growing evidence suggests that dynamic changes in mitochondrial morphology are involved in cellular apoptotic response. However, whether DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission is required for induction of apoptosis remains speculative. Here, we show that siRNA-mediated DRP1 knockdown promoted accumulation of elongated mitochondria in HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells. Surprisingly, DRP1 down-regulation led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of these cells. A higher rate of cytochrome c release and reductions in mitochondrial membrane potential were also revealed in DRP1-depleted cells. Taken together, our present findings suggest that mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 inhibits colon cancer cell apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release and mitochondrial membrane integrity.

  13. Caveolin-1-Mediated Expression and Secretion of Kallikrein 6 in Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Henkhaus

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Kallikreins are secreted proteases that may play a functional role and/or serve as a serum biomarker for the presence or progression of certain types of cancers. Kallikrein 6 (KLK6 has been shown to be upregulated in several types of cancers, including colon. The aims of this study were to elucidate pathways that influence KLK6 gene expression and KLK6 protein secretion in the HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Our data indicate a central role for caveolin-1 (CAV-1, the main structural protein of caveolae, in both KLK6 gene expression and protein secretion. Sucrose gradient subcellular fractionation reveals that CAV-1 and KLK6 colocalize to lipid raft domains in the plasma membrane of HCT116 cells. Furthermore, we show that CAV-1, although it does not directly interact with the KLK6 molecule, enhances KLK6 secretion from the cells. Deactivation of CAV-1, through SRC-mediated phosphorylation, decreased KLK6 secretion. We also demonstrate that, in colon cancer cells, CAV-1 increased the amount of phosphorylated AKT in cells by inhibiting the activity of the AKT-negative regulators PP1 and PP2A. This study demonstrates that proteins such as CAV-1 and AKT, which are known to be altered in colon cancer, affect KLK6 expression and KLK6 secretion.

  14. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shen, Jie, E-mail: tongrensj163@163.com [Department of Administrative, Tongren Hospital, No. 786 Yuyuan Road, Changning District, Shanghai (China)

    2015-08-07

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions. - Highlights: • AR-42 is anti-proliferative against primary/established colon cancer cells. • AR-42 induces significant apoptotic death in primary/established colon cancer cells. • Ceramide production mediates AR-42-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells. • AR-42 oral administration potently inhibits SW-620 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  15. CCR1-mediated accumulation of myeloid cells in the liver microenvironment promoting mouse colon cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hideyo; Fujishita, Teruaki; Kurimoto, Kazuki; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Kitano, Satsuki; Inamoto, Susumu; Itatani, Yoshiro; Saitou, Mitinori; Maekawa, Taira; Taketo, M Mark

    2014-12-01

    To understand colon cancer metastasis, we earlier analyzed a mouse model that developed liver metastasis of cancer cells disseminated from the spleen. We suggested that CCR1(+) bone marrow (BM)-derived cells are recruited to the microenvironment of disseminated colon cancer cells, and produce metalloproteinases MMP9 and MMP2, helping metastatic colonization. In the present study, we have examined these myeloid cells expressing CCR1 and/or MMPs in detail. To this end, we have established bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based transgenic mouse lines in which membrane-targeted Venus fluorescent protein (mVenus) was expressed under the control of Ccr1 gene promoter. Then, myeloid cells obtained from the BM and liver metastatic foci were analyzed by the combination of flow cytometry and cytology/immunohistochemistry, in situ RNA hybridization, or quantitative RT-PCR. We have found four distinct types of myeloid cells recruited to the metastatic foci; neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes and fibrocytes. These cell types exhibited distinct expression patterns for CCR1, MMP2 and MMP9. Namely, neutrophils found in the early phase of cancer cell dissemination expressed CCR1 exclusively and MMP9 preferentially, whereas fibrocytes accumulated in later phase expressed MMP2 exclusively. Either genetic inactivation of Ccr1 or antibody-mediated neutrophil depletion reduced subsequent recruitment of fibrocytes. The recruitment of CCR1(+) neutrophils in early phase of colon cancer dissemination appears to cause that of fibrocytes in late phase. These results implicate the key role of CCR1 in colon cancer metastasis in this mouse model, and explain why both MMP9 and MMP2 are essential as genetically demonstrated previously. The results also suggest relevant mechanisms in humans.

  16. Dragon (RGMb) induces oxaliplatin resistance in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ying; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Chen, Guo-Bin; Wang, Ying; Zhi, Qiang; Liu, Yuan-Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Li-Fen; Yang, Bing; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Xing, Hui-Qin; Ren, Jian-Lin; Xia, Yin; Guleng, Bayasi

    2016-07-26

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and a major cause of cancer mortality. Chemotherapy resistance remains a major challenge for treating advanced CRC. Therefore, the identification of targets that induce drug resistance is a priority for the development of novel agents to overcome resistance. Dragon (also known as RGMb) is a member of the repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) family. We previously showed that Dragon expression increases with CRC progression in human patients. In the present study, we found that Dragon inhibited apoptosis and increased viability of CMT93 and HCT116 cells in the presence of oxaliplatin. Dragon induced resistance of xenograft tumor to oxaliplatinin treatment in mice. Mechanistically, Dragon inhibited oxaliplatin-induced JNK and p38 MAPK activation, and caspase-3 and PARP cleavages. Our results indicate that Dragon may be a novel target that induces drug resistance in CRC.

  17. HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Haidari, Amr A.; Syk, Ingvar; Thorlacius, Henrik, E-mail: henrik.thorlacius@med.lu.se

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Simvastatin blocked CCL17-induced and CCR4-dependent RhoA activation in HT29 cells. • CCL17/CCR4-mediated migration of colon cancer cells was antagonised by simvastatin. • Cell migration recovered by adding Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. • Targeting HMG-CoA reductase might be useful to inhibit colon cancer metastasis. - Abstract: Background: Simvastatin is widely used to lower cholesterol levels in patients with cardiovascular diseases, although accumulating evidence suggests that statins, such as simvastatin, also exert numerous anti-tumoral effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration. Methods: Migration assays were performed to evaluate CCL17-induced colon cancer cell (HT-29) chemotaxis. In vitro tumor growth and apoptosis were assessed using a proliferation assay and annexin V assay, respectively. Active RhoA protein levels in CCL17-stimulated colon cancer cells were quantified using a G-LISA assay. Results: We found that simvastatin dose-dependently decreased CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Simvastatin had no effect on colon cancer cell proliferation or apoptosis. Inhibition of beta chemokine receptor 4, CCR4, reduced CCL17-evoked activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Moreover, administration of mevalonate reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Interestingly, co-incubation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) antagonized the inhibitory impact of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration triggered by CCL17. Moreover, we observed that simvastatin decreased CCL17-induced activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Administration of mevalonate and GGPP reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-provoked RhoA activation in colon cancer cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings show for the first time that HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via

  18. GC-MS based metabolomics of colon cancer cells using different extraction solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Clara; Simó, Carolina; Palazoglu, Mine; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2017-09-15

    The increasing incidence of colorectal cancer enforces the development of novel methodologies and protocols to deepen in the molecular mechanisms that govern disease pathophysiological events. The aim of this work is to deepen in the optimum metabolite extraction protocol from adherent mammalian cells of colon cancer for high throughput metabolomics using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). GC-MS results showed that metabolic information obtained from colon cancer cells was highly dependent on metabolite extraction selection, which at the same time is extremely influenced by the analytical platform. A further purpose of this investigation is to uncover an unexplored portion of HT-29 colon cancer cells metabolome, complementary to other already explored by CE-MS and LC-MS methods. At this respect, a total of 150 metabolites were identified in HT-29 colon cancer cells by GC-MS. The extraction protocol with acetonitrile-isopropanol-water was the most appropriate for fatty acids and related pathways analysis. Most of the metabolites involved in pathways of amino acids, glutathione, amino sugars and other polar metabolites were better extracted with acidified water, although water extraction showed the best overall reproducibility. Although pathways involving nitrogenous bases could be investigated using organic or aqueous extracts, a higher number of metabolites involved in these pathways were identified in the aqueous extracts. In addition, metabolite extraction protocol was observed to be crucial for the determination of potentially interesting clusters of metabolites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina [Laboratorio de Fisiología y Biología Molecular, Departamento de Fisiología, Biología Molecular y Celular, IFIBYNE-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Redal, María Ana [Instituto de Ciencias Básicas y Medicina Experimental, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alghamdi, Mansour A. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Khoder, Mamdouh I. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence in Environmental Studies, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Shamy, Magdy [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Muñoz, Manuel J., E-mail: mmunoz@fbmc.fcen.uba.ar [Laboratorio de Fisiología y Biología Molecular, Departamento de Fisiología, Biología Molecular y Celular, IFIBYNE-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2015-07-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5′ untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. - Highlights: • Airborne particulate matter (PM10) affects alternative splicing in colon cells. • PM10 upregulates one of the two mRNA variants of the growth factor BMP-4. • This variant has a longer 5′ unstranslated region and introduces an upstream AUG. • By regulating BMP-4 mRNA splicing PM10 inhibits total expression of BMP-4 protein. • BMP-4 downregulation was previously reported to be associated to colon cancer.

  20. Aspirin inhibited the metastasis of colon cancer cells by inhibiting the expression of toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jun; Zhou, Hai-Yang; Liu, Peng; You, Qing; Kuang, Fei; Shen, Yi-Nan; Hu, Zhi-Qian

    2018-01-01

    The metastasis of colorectal cancer frequently tends to liver, which is one of the three leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Growing evidence showed that aspirin could effectively inhibit liver metastasis of colorectal cancer. However, the potential mechanism has not been fully understood. Mouse splenic vein metastasis assay was used to examine the metastatic ability of colon cancer cells in vivo. And wound healing and transwell assay were applied to detect the metastasis potential of C26 and HCT116 colon cancer cell lines in vitro. RT-PCR and western blotting were used to explore Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression in colon cancer cell lines. The functions of TLR4 in the migration of the colon cancer cell line were analyzed by infecting cells with lentivirus containing TLR4 siRNA. We demonstrated that lipopolysaccharides (LPS) could enhance the metastasis potential of C26 and HCT116 colon cancer cell lines. However, aspirin effectively decreased the metastasis capacity of colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that the enhancement of LPS on the migration of colon cancer cells by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype demonstrated a TLR4-dependent manner. Aspirin treatment lead to the downregulation of TLR4 on C26 cells which resulted in the decrease of C26 cells migration and EMT phenotype that induced by LPS. Additionally, the inhibitory effect from aspirin on the expression of TLR4 on C26 cells leads to the downregulation of NF-κB. The results of our study indicate that LPS origin from intestinal flora may promote the metastasis of colon cancer to liver and aspirin may inhibit the metastasis of colon cancer by inhibiting the expression of TLR4.

  1. Reduction of Orc6 expression sensitizes human colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine J Gavin

    Full Text Available Previous studies from our group have shown that the expression levels of Orc6 were highly elevated in colorectal cancer patient specimens and the induction of Orc6 was associated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment. The goal of this study was to investigate the molecular and cellular impact of Orc6 in colon cancer. In this study, we use HCT116 (wt-p53 and HCT116 (null-p53 colon cancer cell lines as a model system to investigate the impact of Orc6 on cell proliferation, chemosensitivity and pathways involved with Orc6. We demonstrated that the down regulation of Orc6 sensitizes colon cancer cells to both 5-FU and cisplatin (cis-pt treatment. Decreased Orc6 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells by RNA interference triggered cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. Prolonged inhibition of Orc6 expression resulted in multinucleated cells in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cell line. Western immunoblot analysis showed that down regulation of Orc6 induced p21 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells. The induction of p21 was mediated by increased level of phosphorylated p53 at ser-15. By contrast, there is no elevated expression of p21 in HCT-116 (null-p53 cells. Orc6 down regulation also increased the expression of DNA damaging repair protein GADD45beta and reduced the expression level of JNK1. Orc6 may be a potential novel target for future anti cancer therapeutic development in colon cancer.

  2. TNF-α promotes colon cancer cell migration and invasion by upregulating TROP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2018-03-01

    High levels of tumor-associated calcium signal transduction protein (TROP)-2 have been demonstrated to be strongly associated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in colon cancer. In the present study, the effect of TNF-α on the regulation of TROP-2 expression and its effect in colon cancer cell migration and invasion were investigated in vitro . TROP-2 protein levels were evaluated in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells cultured with various concentrations of TNF-α using western blot analysis. Changes in the migratory and invasive potential of the cells were evaluated using a wound healing and transwell assay, respectively. Then, TROP-2 expression was downregulated in cells by use of siRNA, and TROP-2 knockdown was confirmed at the mRNA and protein level by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. The migration and invasion potential of cells transfected with TROP-2 siRNA was also evaluated. Levels of several mitogen-activated protein kinase proteins, namely p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), were detected in cells treated with TNF-α using western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that TROP-2 protein levels increased in cells treated with lower concentrations of TNF-α, but decreased in cells treated with higher concentrations of TNF-α, compared with untreated control. Maximum TROP-2 levels were observed in cells treated with 20 µg/l TNF-α. Migration and invasion were enhanced in cells treated with 20 µg/l TNF-α. When TROP-2 was silenced in colon cancer cells by siRNA, migration and invasion were significantly decreased compared with control cells. TNF-α stimulation activated the ERK1/2 pathway, but did not significantly affect p38 and JNK phosphorylation levels. Treatment with a specific ERK1/2 inhibitor suppressed the TNF-α-induced upregulation of TROP-2 and the TNF-α-induced colon cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, the

  3. The cardiac glycoside oleandrin induces apoptosis in human colon cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Li; Zhang, Yuming; Zhao, Wanlu; Zhou, Xia; Wang, Chunxia; Deng, Fan

    2017-07-01

    Evidence indicates that the cardiac glycoside oleandrin exhibits cytotoxic activity against several different types of cancer. However, the specific mechanisms underlying oleandrin-induced anti-tumor effects remain largely unknown. The present study examined the anti-cancer effect and underlying mechanism of oleandrin on human colon cancer cells. The cytotoxicity and IC50 of five small molecule compounds (oleandrin, neriifolin, strophanthidin, gitoxigenin, and convallatoxin) in human colon cancer cell line SW480 cells and normal human colon cell line NCM460 cells were determined by cell counting and MTT assays, respectively. Apoptosis was determined by staining cells with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide, followed by flow cytometry. Intracellular Ca2+ was determined using Fluo-3 AM,glutathione (GSH) levels were measured using a GSH detection kit,and the activity of caspase-3, -9 was measured using a peptide substrate. BAX, pro-caspase-3, -9, cytochrome C and BCL-2 expression were determined by Western blotting. Oleandrin significantly decreased cell viabilities in SW480, HCT116 and RKO cells. The IC50 for SW480 cells was 0.02 µM, whereas for NCM460 cells 0.56 µM. More interestingly, the results of flow cytometry showed that oleandrin potently induced apoptosis in SW480 and RKO cells. Oleandrin downregulated protein expression of pro-caspase-3, -9, but enhanced caspase-3, -9 activities. These effects were accompanied by upregulation of protein expression of cytochrome C and BAX, and downregulation of BCL-2 protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, oleandrin increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, but decreased GSH concentration in the cells. The present results suggest that oleandrin induces apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanism of anti-cancer property of oleandrin.

  4. Evaluation of non-thermal plasma-induced anticancer effects on human colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Sun; Kim, Jeongho; Hong, Young-Jun; Bae, Woom-Yee; Choi, Eun Ha; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2017-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma has been introduced in various applications such as sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and other biomedical applications. The most attractive application of non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is in cancer treatment, where the plasma is used to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to facilitate cell apoptosis. We investigate the effects of different durations of exposure to dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on colon cancer cells using measurement of cell viability and ROS levels, western blot, immunocytochemistry, and Raman spectroscopy. Our results suggest that different kinds of plasma-treated cells can be differentiated from control cells using the Raman data. PMID:28663896

  5. Levistolide A Induces Apoptosis via ROS-Mediated ER Stress Pathway in Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingjuan; Zhang, Yanhua; Wang, Lan; Lee, Shaochin

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Levistolide A (LA), a natural compound isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort, is used for treating cancer. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of LA in HCT116 and its isogenic p53-/- colon cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms. MTT assay was used to evaluate the effect of LA on the viability of cancer cells. Apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by the cells were determined by flow cytometry. Protein expression was detected by western blotting. The results showed that LA inhibited viability and caused apoptosis of both wild-type and p53-/- HCT116 cells. LA was able to trigger production of ROS and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Inhibition of ROS using N-acetylcysteine abrogated LA-induced ER stress and apoptosis, as well as the reduction in cancer cell viability. Our results indicate that LA causes apoptosis of colon cancer cells via ROS-mediated ER stress pathway. It will be interesting to develop the natural compound for chemotherapy of cancers such as CRC. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Gemifloxacin, a Fluoroquinolone Antimicrobial Drug, Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yu Kan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemifloxacin (GMF is an orally administered broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent used to treat acute bacterial exacerbation of pneumonia and bronchitis. Although fluoroquinolone antibiotics have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects, studies on the effect of GMF on treating colon cancer have been relatively rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the antimetastasis activities of GMF in colon cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Results have shown that GMF inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer SW620 and LoVo cells and causes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT. In addition, GMF suppresses the activation of NF-κB and cell migration and invasion induced by TNF-α and inhibits the TAK1/TAB2 interaction, resulting in decreased IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation in SW620 cells. Furthermore, Snail, a critical transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated after GMF treatment. Overexpression of Snail by cDNA transfection significantly decreases the inhibitory effect of GMF on EMT and cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, GMF may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of metastasis in colon cancer.

  7. Low Number of Detectable Circulating Tumor Cells in Non-metastatic Colon Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Söletormos, György; Jess, Per

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of patients with non-metastatic colon cancer and to evaluate whether there is a diurnal variation in the CTC counts. Furthermore, the study aimed to examine the correlation between CTCs and TNM stage...

  8. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity. Submicromolar methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase, and an induction of apoptosis in cancerous colon HCT11...

  9. Coaction of Spheroid-Derived Stem-Like Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells Promotes Development of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Shi; Zheng, Zong-Heng; Huang, Yong; Chen, Tu-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Although some studies described the characteristics of colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) and the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in neovascularization, it is still controversial whether an interaction exists or not between CSCs and EPCs. In the present study, HCT116 and HT29 sphere models, which are known to be the cells enriching CSCs, were established to investigate the roles of this interaction in development and metastasis of colon cancer. Compared with their parental counterparts, spheroid cells demonstrated higher capacity of invasion, higher tumorigenic and metastatic potential. Then the in vitro and in vivo relationship between CSCs and EPCs were studied by using capillary tube formation assay and xenograft models. Our results showed that spheroid cells could promote the proliferation, migration and tube formation of EPCs through secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Meanwhile, the EPCs could increase tumorigenic capacity of spheroid cells through angiogenesis. Furthermore, higher microvessel density was detected in the area enriching cancer stem cells in human colon cancer tissue. Our findings indicate that spheroid cells possess the characteristics of cancer stem cells, and the coaction of CSCs and EPCs may play an important role in the development of colon cancer. PMID:22745705

  10. Attenuation of cell mechanosensitivity in colon cancer cells during in vitro metastasis.

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    Xin Tang

    Full Text Available Human colon carcinoma (HCT-8 cells show a stable transition from low to high metastatic state when cultured on appropriately soft substrates (21 kPa. Initially epithelial (E in nature, the HCT-8 cells become rounded (R after seven days of culture on soft substrate. R cells show a number of metastatic hallmarks [1]. Here, we use gradient stiffness substrates, a bio-MEMS force sensor, and Coulter counter assays to study mechanosensitivity and adhesion of E and R cells. We find that HCT-8 cells lose mechanosensitivity as they undergo E-to-R transition. HCT-8 R cells' stiffness, spread area, proliferation and migration become insensitive to substrate stiffness in contrast to their epithelial counterpart. They are softer, proliferative and migratory on all substrates. R cells show negligible cell-cell homotypic adhesion, as well as non-specific cell-substrate adhesion. Consequently they show the same spread area on all substrates in contrast to E cells. Taken together, these results indicate that R cells acquire autonomy and anchorage independence, and are thus potentially more invasive than E cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of quantitative data relating changes in cancer cell adhesion and stiffness during the expression of an in vitro metastasis-like phenotype.

  11. Arctigenin induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells through ROS/p38MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing-chun; Liang, Yun; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Guang-rui

    2016-01-01

    In the current study the antiproliferative effect of arctigenin, plant lignin, was evaluated on human colon cancer cell line HT-29. Furthermore, attempts were made to explore the signaling mechanism which may be responsible for its effect. Cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTT and LDH assays. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to determine cell arrest in the cell cycle phase and apoptosis. Furthermore, to confirm the apoptotic activity of arctigenin, caspase-9 and -3 activities analysis was performed. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) were investigated to determine their role in inducing apoptosis in arctigenin-treated HT-29 colon cancer cell line. MTT and LDH results demonstrated significant cell growth inhibitory effect of arctigenin on HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, increase in cell number arrested at G2/M phase was observed in flow cytometric analysis upon arctigenin treatment. In addition, arctigenin increased the apoptotic ratio in a dose-dependent manner. The involvement of intrinsic apoptotic pathway was indicated by the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Moreover, increased ROS production, activation of p38 MAPK and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) also revealed the role of intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway in cell growth inhibition after arctigenin exposure. Arctigenin induces apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells by regulating ROS and p38 MAPK pathways.

  12. Compound K induces apoptosis via CAMK-IV/AMPK pathways in HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yeon; Park, Min Woo; Yuan, Hai Dan; Lee, Hyo Jung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Sung Hyun

    2009-11-25

    Although compound K (CK), an intestinal metabolite of ginseng protopanaxadiol saponins, has been known to induce apoptosis in various cancer cells, association of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) with apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells remains unclear. We hypothesized that CK may exert an anticancer activity through modulating the AMPK pathway in HT-29 cells. CK-induced apoptosis was associated with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic factors (cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor) from mitochondria, and cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3, caspase-8, Bid, and PARP proteins. This apoptotic effect of CK on colon cancer cells was found to be initiated by AMPK activation, and AMPK was activated through phosphorylation by Ca2+/calmodulin-activated protein kinase-IV (CAMK-IV). Treatment of HT-29 cells with compound C (AMPK inhibitor) or siRNA for AMPK completely abolished the CK-induced apoptosis. STO-609, CAMKs inhibitor, also attenuated CK-induced AMPK activation and apoptosis. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that CK-mediated cell death of HT-29 colon cancer cells is regulated by CAMK-IV/AMPK pathways, and these findings provide a molecular basis for the anticancer effect of CK.

  13. Improved retroviral suicide gene transfer in colon cancer cell lines after cell synchronization with methotrexate

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    Nordlinger Bernard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy by retroviral vectors is mainly limited by the level of transduction. Retroviral gene transfer requires target cell division. Cell synchronization, obtained by drugs inducing a reversible inhibition of DNA synthesis, could therefore be proposed to precondition target cells to retroviral gene transfer. We tested whether drug-mediated cell synchronization could enhance the transfer efficiency of a retroviral-mediated gene encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk in two colon cancer cell lines, DHDK12 and HT29. Methods Synchronization was induced by methotrexate (MTX, aracytin (ara-C or aphidicolin. Gene transfer efficiency was assessed by the level of HSV-TK expression. Transduced cells were driven by ganciclovir (GCV towards apoptosis that was assessed using annexin V labeling by quantitative flow cytometry. Results DHDK12 and HT29 cells were synchronized in S phase with MTX but not ara-C or aphidicolin. In synchronized DHDK12 and HT29 cells, the HSV-TK transduction rates were 2 and 1.5-fold higher than those obtained in control cells, respectively. Furthermore, the rate of apoptosis was increased two-fold in MTX-treated DHDK12 cells after treatment with GCV. Conclusions Our findings indicate that MTX-mediated synchronization of target cells allowed a significant improvement of retroviral HSV-tk gene transfer, resulting in an increased cell apoptosis in response to GCV. Pharmacological control of cell cycle may thus be a useful strategy to optimize the efficiency of retroviral-mediated cancer gene therapy.

  14. Inhibition of JNK Sensitizes Hypoxic Colon Cancer Cells to DNA Damaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevskaya, Irina A.; Selvakumaran, Muthu; Hierro, Lucia Cabal; Goldstein, Sara R.; Winkler, Jeffrey D.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We showed previously that in HT29 colon cancer cells, modulation of hypoxia-induced stress signaling affects oxaliplatin cytotoxicity. To further study the significance of hypoxia-induced signaling through JNK, we set out to investigate how modulation of kinase activities influences cellular responses of hypoxic colon cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs. Experimental design In a panel of cell lines we investigated effects of pharmacological and molecular inhibition of JNK on sensitivity to oxaliplatin, SN-38 and 5-FU. Combination studies for the drugs and JNK inhibitor CC-401 were carried out in vitro and in vivo. Results Hypoxia-induced JNK activation was associated with resistance to oxaliplatin. CC-401 in combination with chemotherapy demonstrates synergism in colon cancer cell lines, though synergy is not always hypoxia-specific. A more detailed analysis focused on HT29 and SW620 (responsive), and HCT116 (non-responsive) lines. In HT29 and SW620 cells CC-401 treatment results in greater DNA damage in the sensitive cells. In vivo, potentiation of bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and the combination by JNK inhibition was confirmed in HT29-derived mouse xenografts, where tumor growth delay was greater in the presence of CC-401. Finally, stable introduction of a dominant negative JNK1, but not JNK2, construct into HT29 cells rendered them more sensitive to oxaliplatin under hypoxia, suggesting differing input of JNK isoforms in cellular responses to chemotherapy. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that signaling through JNK is a determinant of response to therapy in colon cancer models, and support the testing of JNK inhibition to sensitize colon tumors in the clinic. PMID:26023085

  15. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon cancer - prevention; Colon cancer - screening ... We do not know what causes colon cancer, but we do know some of the things that may increase the risk of getting it, such as: Age. Your risk increases ...

  16. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells.

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    Hisataka Ogawa

    Full Text Available Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors.

  17. MicroRNA profiling in human colon cancer cells during 5-fluorouracil-induced autophagy.

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    Ni Hou

    Full Text Available Autophagy modulation is now recognized as a potential therapeutic approach for cancer (including colorectal cancer, yet the molecular mechanisms regulating autophagy in response to cellular stress are still not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been found to play important roles in controlling many cellular functions, including growth, metabolism and stress response. The physiological importance of the miRNA-autophagy interconnection is only beginning to be elucidated. MiRNA microarray technology facilitates analysis of global miRNA expression in certain situations. In this study, we explored the expression profile of miRNAs during the response of human colon cancer cells (HT29s to 5-FU treatment and nutrient starvation using miRNA microarray analysis. The alteration of miRNA expression showed the same pattern under both conditions was further testified by qRT-PCR in three human colon cancer cell lines. In addition, bioinformatic prediction of target genes, pathway analysis and gene network analysis were performed to better understand the roles of these miRNAs in the regulation of autophagy. We identified and selected four downregulated miRNAs including hsa-miR-302a-3p and 27 upregulated miRNAs under these two conditions as having the potential to target genes involved in the regulation of autophagy in human colon cancer cells. They have the potential to modulate autophagy in 5-FU-based chemotherapy in colorectal cancer.

  18. Learning about Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Top of page Is there a test for hereditary colon cancer? Gene testing can identify individuals who carry the more ... looking for mutations in four of the five genes identified that are associated with ... Colon Cancer Currently, NHGRI is not conducting clinical research studies ...

  19. Aspirin Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell and Tumor Growth and Downregulates Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite. PMID:23110215

  20. Aspirin inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite.

  1. Aspirin inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates specificity protein (Sp transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Pathi

    Full Text Available Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB. Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite.

  2. PUTATIVE ROLE OF ADIPOSE TISSUE IN GROWTH AND METABOLISM OF COLON CANCER CELLS

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    Betty eSchwartz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Newly emerging data highlight obesity as an important risk factor for developing certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. Although evidence supports a link between the two, the mechanisms responsible for this relationship have not yet been fully elucidated. Hypertrophied and dysfunctional adipose tissue of the obese state is characterized by low-grade inflammation. Adipokines and cytokines secreted from adipocytes, together with the abundant availability of lipids from adipocytes in the tumor microenvironment, promote adhesion, migration, and invasion of tumor cells and support tumor progression and uncontrolled growth. One of the predisposed targets of the deleterious effects exerted by secretions from adipose tissue in obesity are the activities associated with the cellular mitochondria. Mitochondrial oxidative metabolism plays a key role in meeting cells' energetic demands by oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos. Here we discuss: (a the dynamic relationship between glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, and OxPhos; (b the evidence for impaired OxPhos (i.e. mitochondrial dysfunction in colon cancer; (c the mechanisms by which mitochondrial dysfunction can predispose to cancer. We propose that impaired OxPhos increases susceptibility to colon cancer since OxPhos is sensitive to a large number of factors that are intrinsic to the host (e.g. inflammation.Given that adipocytes are a major source of adipokines and energy for the cancer cell, understanding the mechanisms of metabolic symbiosis between cancer cells and adipocytes should reveal new therapeutic possibilities.

  3. Dyospiros kaki phenolics inhibit colitis and colon cancer cell proliferation, but not gelatinase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Rosa; Lima, Ana; Rocha, João; Ferreira, Ricardo Boavida; Mota, Joana; Rebelo, Patrícia; Fernandes, Adelaide; Pinto, Rui; Alves, Paula; Bronze, Rosário; Sepodes, Bruno; Figueira, Maria-Eduardo

    2017-08-01

    Polyphenols from persimmon (Diospyros kaki) have demonstrated radical-scavenging and antiinflammatory activities; however, little is known about the effects of persimmon phenolics on inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC). Therefore, we aimed in this work to characterize the antiinflammatory and antiproliferative effects of a persimmon phenolic extract (80% acetone in water), using an in vivo model of experimental colitis and a model of cancer cell invasion. Our results show, for the first time, a beneficial effect of a persimmon phenolic extract in the attenuation of experimental colitis and a potential antiproliferative effect on cultured colon cancer cells. Administration of persimmon phenolic extract to mice with TNBS-induced colitis led to a reduction in several functional and histological markers of colon inflammation, namely: attenuation of colon length decrease, reduction of the extent of visible injury (ulcer formation), decrease in diarrhea severity, reduced mortality rate, reduction of mucosal hemorrhage and reduction of general histological features of colon inflammation. In vitro studies also showed that persimmon phenolic extract successfully impaired cell proliferation and invasion in HT-29 cells. Further investigation showed a decreased expression of COX-2 and iNOS in the colonic tissue of colitis mice, two important mediators of intestinal inflammation, but there was no inhibition of the gelatinase MMP-9 and MMP-2 activities. Given the role of inflammatory processes in the progression of CRC and the important link between inflammation and cancer, our results highlight the potential of persimmon polyphenols as a pharmacological tool in the treatment of patients with IBD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prognostic value of stem cell quantification in stage II colon cancer.

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    Maria Angeles Vaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a subset of tumor cells with capacity to self-renew and generate the diverse cells that make up the tumor. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of CSCs in a highly homogeneous population of stage II colon cancer. METHODS: One hundred stage II colon cancer patients treated by the same surgical team between 1977 and 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. None of the patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Inmunohistochemistry expression of CD133, NANOG and CK20 was scored, using four levels: 50% positivity. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log rank test were used to compare survival. RESULTS: The average patient age was 68 years (patients were between 45-92 years of age and median follow up was 5.8 years. There was recurrent disease in 17 (17%; CD133 expression (defined by >10% positivity was shown in 60% of the tumors, in 95% for NANOG and 78% for CK20. No correlation was found among expression levels of CD133, NANOG or CK20 and relapse-free survival (RFS or overall survival (OS. However, a statistical significant correlation was found between established pathological prognostic factors and RFS and OS. CONCLUSIONS: Stem Cell quantification defined by CD133 and NANOG expression has no correlation with RFS or OS in this cohort of Stage II colon cancer.

  5. Galectin-8 expression decreases in cancer compared with normal and dysplastic human colon tissue and acts significantly on human colon cancer cell migration as a suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, N; Bronckart, Y; Camby, I; Legendre, H; Lahm, H; Kaltner, H; Hadari, Y; Van Ham, P; Yeaton, P; Pector, J-C; Zick, Y; Salmon, I; Danguy, A; Kiss, R; Gabius, H-J

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Galectins are β-galactoside binding proteins. This ability may have a bearing on cell adhesion and migration/proliferation in human colon cancer cells. In addition to galectins-1 and -3 studied to date, other members of this family not investigated in detail may contribute to modulation of tumour cell features. This evident gap has prompted us to extend galectin analysis beyond the two prototypes. The present study deals with the quantitative determination of immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 in normal, benign, and malignant human colon tissue samples and in four human colon cancer models (HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1) maintained both in vitro as permanent cell lines and in vivo as nude mice xenografts. The role of galectin-8 (and its neutralising antibody) in cell migration was investigated in HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1 cell lines. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 and its overall ability to bind to sugar ligands (revealed glycohistochemically by means of biotinylated histochemically inert carrier bovine serum albumin with α- and β-d-galactose, α-d-glucose, and lactose derivatives as ligands) were quantitatively determined using computer assisted microscopy. The presence of galectin-8 mRNA in the four human colon cancer cell lines was examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In vitro, cellular localisation of exogenously added galectin-8 in the culture media of these colon cancer cells was visualised by fluorescence microscopy. In vitro galectin-8 mediated effects (and the influence of its neutralising antibody) on migration levels of living HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1 cells were quantitatively determined by computer assisted phase contrast microscopy. Results: A marked decrease in immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 occurred with malignancy development in human colon tissue. Malignant colon tissue exhibited a significantly lower galectin-8 level than normal or

  6. Krt19(+)/Lgr5(-) Cells Are Radioresistant Cancer-Initiating Stem Cells in the Colon and Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaha, Samuel; Hayakawa, Yoku; Muley, Ashlesha; Stokes, Sarah; Graham, Trevor A; Ericksen, Russell E; Westphalen, Christoph B; von Burstin, Johannes; Mastracci, Teresa L; Worthley, Daniel L; Guha, Chandhan; Quante, Michael; Rustgi, Anil K; Wang, Timothy C

    2015-06-04

    Epithelium of the colon and intestine are renewed every 3 days. In the intestine there are at least two principal stem cell pools. The first contains rapid cycling crypt-based columnar (CBC) Lgr5(+) cells, and the second is composed of slower cycling Bmi1-expressing cells at the +4 position above the crypt base. In the colon, however, the identification of Lgr5(-) stem cell pools has proven more challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the intermediate filament keratin-19 (Krt19) marks long-lived, radiation-resistant cells above the crypt base that generate Lgr5(+) CBCs in the colon and intestine. In colorectal cancer models, Krt19(+) cancer-initiating cells are also radioresistant, while Lgr5(+) stem cells are radiosensitive. Moreover, Lgr5(+) stem cells are dispensable in both the normal and neoplastic colonic epithelium, as ablation of Lgr5(+) stem cells results in their regeneration from Krt19-expressing cells. Thus, Krt19(+) stem cells are a discrete target relevant for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. When Neighbors Talk: Colon Cancer Cell Invasion and Tumor Microenvironment Myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridelance, Jolien; Drebert, Zuzanna; De Wever, Olivier; Bracke, Marc; Beck, Ilse M

    2017-01-01

    Historically, the word cancer is derived from the Latin cancer, as the red swollen arteries near a tumor reminded the physician Galenus and his fellow Romans of a red crab. Currently, cancer remains the disease to beat as it remains a leading cause of death worldwide (WHO). Tumors do not simply consist of cancer cells, as they can recruit normal cells, which will form the tumor-associated stroma. These stromal cells together with the extracellular matrix, constitute the tumor microenvironment. Reciprocal communication between tumor-associated stromal cells and cancer cells is important for the induction of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion. A detailed knowledge of this communication can spark the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at tackling yet unaddressed regulators of invasion and thus metastasis. Therefore, this review will focus not only on epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion, but also on communication between tumor cells, in particular colon cancer cells, and their stroma, with a primordial focus on cancer-associated fibroblasts, and lastly this review will discuss how this communication can affect the cancer cell's ability to invade its surroundings and form metastases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Effect of essential oil of Rosa Damascena on human colon cancer cell line SW742.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie-Tavirani, Mostafa; Fayazfar, Setareh; Heydari-Keshel, Saeid; Rezaee, Mohamad Bagher; Zamanian-Azodi, Mona; Rezaei-Tavirani, Majid; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report the effect of the essential oil of Rosa Damascena on human colon cancer cell line (SW742) and human fibroblast cells. Colon cancer is the second most common fatal malignancy. Owing to the existence of many side effects and problems related to common treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, alternative treatments are being investigated. Some herbal medicines have shown promising results against different types of cancers. Herbal medicines used have included the use naturally occurring essential oils. The essential oil of Rosa Damascena was obtained by distillation and its effect on SW742 cell-line and fibroblast cells were investigated with cell culture. The cells were cultured and different volumes of essential oil were induced to the cells. After48hincubation, cell survival was measured and using statistical analysis, the findings were evaluated and reported. This study showed that soluble part of Rosa Damascena oil increases cell proliferation in high volumes and the non-soluble component decreases cell proliferation. The effects of essential oils, such as Rosa Damascena, on cell proliferation require more thorough investigation.

  9. Effect of essential oil of Rosa Damascena on human colon cancer cell line SW742

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie-Tavirani, Mostafa; Heydari-Keshel, Saeid; Rezaee, Mohamad Bagher; Zamanian-Azodi, Mona; Rezaei-Tavirani, Majid; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Aim In this study, we report the effect of the essential oil of Rosa Damascena on human colon cancer cell line (SW742) and human fibroblast cells. Background Colon cancer is the second most common fatal malignancy. Owing to the existence of many side effects and problems related to common treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, alternative treatments are being investigated. Some herbal medicines have shown promising results against different types of cancers. Herbal medicines used have included the use naturally occurring essential oils. Patients and methods The essential oil of Rosa Damascena was obtained by distillation and its effect on SW742 cell-line and fibroblast cells were investigated with cell culture. The cells were cultured and different volumes of essential oil were induced to the cells. After48hincubation, cell survival was measured and using statistical analysis, the findings were evaluated and reported. Results This study showed that soluble part of Rosa Damascena oil increases cell proliferation in high volumes and the non-soluble component decreases cell proliferation. Conclusion The effects of essential oils, such as Rosa Damascena, on cell proliferation require more thorough investigation. PMID:24834241

  10. Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, A; Francis, P; Nilbert, M

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the industrial countries. Due to advances regarding the treatments, primarily development of improved surgical methods and the ability to make the earlier diagnosis, the mortality has remained constant during the past decades even though...... the incidence in fact has increased. To improve chemotherapy and enable personalised treatment, the need of biomarkers is of great significance. In this study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of the colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38, the active metabolite of topoisomerase-1 inhibitor...

  11. Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, A; Francis, P; Nilbert, M

    2010-01-01

    the incidence in fact has increased. To improve chemotherapy and enable personalised treatment, the need of biomarkers is of great significance. In this study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of the colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38, the active metabolite of topoisomerase-1 inhibitor......Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the industrial countries. Due to advances regarding the treatments, primarily development of improved surgical methods and the ability to make the earlier diagnosis, the mortality has remained constant during the past decades even though...

  12. MiR-9, -31, and -182 deregulation promote proliferation and tumor cell survival in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekaite, Lina; Rantala, Juha K; Bruun, Jarle; Guriby, Marianne; Agesen, Trude H; Danielsen, Stine A; Lind, Guro E; Nesbakken, Arild; Kallioniemi, Olli; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2012-09-01

    Several microRNAs (miRNAs) are known to be deregulated in colon cancer, but the mechanisms behind their potential involvement on proliferation and tumor cell survival are unclear. The present study aimed to identify miRNAs with functional implications for development of colon cancer. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were examined following perturbations of miRNA levels by employing a comprehensive miRNA library screen. miRNAs nominated for relevance to colon cancer were validated on expression and functional levels. By integrating the effect of miRNA up-regulation with the endogenous miRNA expression levels within the HT29, HCT116, and SW480 colon cancer cell lines, we identified miRNAs controlling cell proliferation (n = 53) and apoptosis (n = 93). From these functionally nominated miRNAs, we narrowed the list to 10 oncogene- and 20 tumor suppressor-like miRNAs that were also differentially expressed between colon cancer (n = 80) and normal colonic mucosa (n = 20). The differential expressions of miR-9, miR-31, and miR-182 were successfully validated in a series of colon carcinomas (n = 30) and polyps (n = 10) versus normal colonic mucosa (n = 10), whereas the functional effect was confirmed in an in-depth validation using different cell viability and apoptotic markers. Several transcription factors and genes regulating cell proliferation were identified as putative target genes by integrative miRNA/mRNA expression analysis obtained from the same colon cancer patient samples. This study suggests that deregulated expression of miR-9, miR-31, and miR-182 during carcinogenesis plays a significant role in the development of colon cancer by promoting proliferation and tumor cell survival.

  13. MiR-9, -31, and -182 Deregulation Promote Proliferation and Tumor Cell Survival in Colon Cancer12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekaite, Lina; Rantala, Juha K; Bruun, Jarle; Guriby, Marianne; Ågesen, Trude H; Danielsen, Stine A; Lind, Guro E; Nesbakken, Arild; Kallioniemi, Olli; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2012-01-01

    Several microRNAs (miRNAs) are known to be deregulated in colon cancer, but the mechanisms behind their potential involvement on proliferation and tumor cell survival are unclear. The present study aimed to identify miRNAs with functional implications for development of colon cancer. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were examined following perturbations of miRNA levels by employing a comprehensive miRNA library screen. miRNAs nominated for relevance to colon cancer were validated on expression and functional levels. By integrating the effect of miRNA up-regulation with the endogenous miRNA expression levels within the HT29, HCT116, and SW480 colon cancer cell lines, we identified miRNAs controlling cell proliferation (n = 53) and apoptosis (n = 93). From these functionally nominated miRNAs, we narrowed the list to 10 oncogene- and 20 tumor suppressor-like miRNAs that were also differentially expressed between colon cancer (n = 80) and normal colonic mucosa (n = 20). The differential expressions of miR-9, miR-31, and miR-182 were successfully validated in a series of colon carcinomas (n = 30) and polyps (n = 10) versus normal colonic mucosa (n = 10), whereas the functional effect was confirmed in an in-depth validation using different cell viability and apoptotic markers. Several transcription factors and genes regulating cell proliferation were identified as putative target genes by integrative miRNA/mRNA expression analysis obtained from the same colon cancer patient samples. This study suggests that deregulated expression of miR-9, miR-31, and miR-182 during carcinogenesis plays a significant role in the development of colon cancer by promoting proliferation and tumor cell survival. PMID:23019418

  14. MiR-9, -31, and -182 Deregulation Promote Proliferation and Tumor Cell Survival in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Cekaite

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Several microRNAs (miRNAs are known to be deregulated in colon cancer, but the mechanisms behind their potential involvement on proliferation and tumor cell survival are unclear. The present study aimed to identify miRNAs with functional implications for development of colon cancer. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were examined following perturbations of miRNA levels by employing a comprehensive miRNA library screen. miRNAs nominated for relevance to colon cancer were validated on expression and functional levels. By integrating the effect of miRNA up-regulation with the endogenous miRNA expression levels within the HT29, HCT116, and SW480 colon cancer cell lines, we identified miRNAs controlling cell proliferation (n = 53 and apoptosis (n = 93. From these functionally nominated miRNAs, we narrowed the list to 10 oncogene- and 20 tumor suppressor-like miRNAs that were also differentially expressed between colon cancer (n = 80 and normal colonic mucosa (n = 20. The differential expressions of miR-9, miR-31, and miR-182 were successfully validated in a series of colon carcinomas (n = 30 and polyps (n = 10 versus normal colonic mucosa (n = 10, whereas the functional effect was confirmed in an in-depth validation using different cell viability and apoptotic markers. Several transcription factors and genes regulating cell proliferation were identified as putative target genes by integrative miRNA/mRNA expression analysis obtained from the same colon cancer patient samples. This study suggests that deregulated expression of miR-9, miR-31, and miR-182 during carcinogenesis plays a significant role in the development of colon cancer by promoting proliferation and tumor cell survival.

  15. Prostaglandin E2 stimulates Fas ligand expression via the EP1 receptor in colon cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Callaghan, G

    2012-02-03

    Fas ligand (FasL\\/CD95L) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor superfamily that triggers apoptosis following crosslinking of the Fas receptor. Despite studies strongly implicating tumour-expressed FasL as a major inhibitor of the anti-tumour immune response, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate FasL expression in tumours. In this study, we show that the cyclooxygenase (COX) signalling pathway, and in particular prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), plays a role in the upregulation of FasL expression in colon cancer. Suppression of either COX-2 or COX-1 by RNA interference in HCA-7 and HT29 colon tumour cells reduced FasL expression at both the mRNA and protein level. Conversely, stimulation with PGE(2) increased FasL expression and these cells showed increased cytotoxicity against Fas-sensitive Jurkat T cells. Prostaglandin E(2)-induced FasL expression was mediated by signalling via the EP1 receptor. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis using serial sections of human colon adenocarcinomas revealed a strong positive correlation between COX-2 and FasL (r=0.722; P<0.0001) expression, and between EP1 receptor and FasL (r=0.740; P<0.0001) expression, in the tumour cells. Thus, these findings indicate that PGE(2) positively regulates FasL expression in colon tumour cells, adding another pro-neoplastic activity to PGE(2).

  16. MicroRNA-145 targets YES and STAT1 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea H; Jacobsen, Anders B; Frankel, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important gene regulators and are recognized as key players in tumorigenesis. miR-145 is reported to be down-regulated in several cancers, but knowledge of its targets in colon cancer remains limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate...... the role of miR-145 in colon cancer, we have employed a microarray based approach to identify miR-145 targets. Based on seed site enrichment analyses and unbiased word analyses, we found a significant enrichment of miRNA binding sites in the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of transcripts down-regulated upon......, VANGL1 as well as the transcription factor STAT1. Both YES and STAT1 were verified as direct miR-145 targets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The study identifies and validates new cancer-relevant direct targets of miR-145 in colon cancer cells and hereby adds important mechanistic understanding of the tumor...

  17. Effect of light irradiation by light emitting diode on colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Noriko; Yoshikawa, Kozo; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kurita, Nobuhiro; Sato, Hirohiko; Iwata, Takashi; Higashijima, Jun; Chikakiyo, Motoya; Nishi, Masaaki; Kashihara, Hideya; Takasu, Chie; Eto, Shohei; Takahashi, Akira; Akutagawa, Masatake; Emoto, Takahiro

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of irradiation from light emitting diodes (LED) for wound healing, anti-inflammation and anticancer therapies. However, little is known about the effects of visible light in colon cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological response (including gene expression changes) of human colon cancer cells to different wavelengths of LED irradiation. Human colon cancer cells (HT29 or HCT116) were seeded onto laboratory dishes that were then put on LED irradiation equipment with a 465 nm-, 525 nm-, or 635 nm-LED. Irradiation at 15 or 30 mW was performed 10 min/day, each day for 5 days. The cell counting kit8 was then used to measure cell viability. Apoptosis and expression of several mRNAs (caspase, MAPK and autophagy pathway) in HT29 cultures irradiated with 465 nm LED were evaluated via AnnexinV/PI and RT-PCR, respectively. Viability of HT29 and HCT116 cells was lower in 465 nm-LED irradiated cultures than in control cultures, but viability of HT29 cells did not differ between control cultures and 525 nm-LED or 635 nm-LED irradiated cultures. Moreover, the expression of FAS, caspase-3, capase-8, and JUK were significantly higher in 465 nm-LED irradiated cultures than in control cultures, and expression of ERK1/2 and LC3 was lower in blue-irradiated cells. LED irradiation at 465 nm inhibited the proliferation of HT29 cells and of HCT116 cells. Notably, LED irradiation at 465 nm promoted apoptosis inHT29 cultures via the extrinsic apoptosis pathway and the MAPK pathway. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Methanolic Extracts of Bitter Melon Inhibit Colon Cancer Stem Cells by Affecting Energy Homeostasis and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deep Kwatra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bitter melon fruit is recommended in ancient Indian and Chinese medicine for prevention/treatment of diabetes. However its effects on cancer progression are not well understood. Here, we have determined the efficacy of methanolic extracts of bitter melon on colon cancer stem and progenitor cells. Both, whole fruit (BMW and skin (BMSk extracts showed significant inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation, with BMW showing greater efficacy. In addition, the cells were arrested at the S phase of cell cycle. Moreover, BMW induced the cleavage of LC3B but not caspase 3/7, suggesting that the cells were undergoing autophagy and not apoptosis. Further confirmation of autophagy was obtained when western blots showed reduced Bcl-2 and increased Beclin-1, Atg 7 and 12 upon BMW treatment. BMW reduced cellular ATP levels coupled with activation of AMP activated protein kinase; on the other hand, exogenous additions of ATP lead to revival of cell proliferation. Finally, BMW treatment results in a dose-dependent reduction in the number and size of colonospheres. The extracts also decreased the expression of DCLK1 and Lgr5, markers of quiescent, and activated stem cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the extracts of bitter melon can be an effective preventive/therapeutic agent for colon cancer.

  19. Cross-Talk between Alternatively Spliced UGT1A Isoforms and Colon Cancer Cell Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet-Delage, Yannick; Rouleau, Michèle; Rouleau, Mélanie; Roberge, Joannie; Miard, Stéphanie; Picard, Frédéric; Têtu, Bernard; Guillemette, Chantal

    2017-03-01

    Alternative splicing at the human glucuronosyltransferase 1 gene locus (UGT1) produces alternate isoforms UGT1A_i2s that control glucuronidation activity through protein-protein interactions. Here, we hypothesized that UGT1A_i2s function as a complex protein network connecting other metabolic pathways with an influence on cancer cell metabolism. This is based on a pathway enrichment analysis of proteomic data that identified several high-confidence candidate interaction proteins of UGT1A_i2 proteins in human tissues-namely, the rate-limiting enzyme of glycolysis pyruvate kinase (PKM), which plays a critical role in cancer cell metabolism and tumor growth. The partnership of UGT1A_i2 and PKM2 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation in the HT115 colon cancer cells and was supported by a partial colocalization of these two proteins. In support of a functional role for this partnership, depletion of UGT1A_i2 proteins in HT115 cells enforced the Warburg effect, with a higher glycolytic rate at the expense of mitochondrial respiration, and led to lactate accumulation. Untargeted metabolomics further revealed a significantly altered cellular content of 58 metabolites, including many intermediates derived from the glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways. These metabolic changes were associated with a greater migration potential. The potential relevance of our observations is supported by the down-regulation of UGT1A_i2 mRNA in colon tumors compared with normal tissues. Alternate UGT1A variants may thus be part of the expanding compendium of metabolic pathways involved in cancer biology directly contributing to the oncogenic phenotype of colon cancer cells. Findings uncover new aspects of UGT functions diverging from their transferase activity. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Overexpression of UbcH10 alternates the cell cycle profile and accelerate the tumor proliferation in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatoh Shinji

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background UbcH10 participates in proper metaphase to anaphase transition, and abrogation of UbcH10 results in the premature separation of sister chromatids. To assess the potential role of UbcH10 in colon cancer progression, we analyzed the clinicopathological relevance of UbcH10 in colon cancer. Methods We firstly screened the expression profile of UbcH10 in various types of cancer tissues as well as cell lines. Thereafter, using the colon cancer cells line, we manipulated the expression of UbcH10 and evaluated the cell cycle profile and cellular proliferations. Furthermore, the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 was immunohistologically evaluated in patients with colon cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using the student's t-test and Chi-square test. Results Using the colon cancer cells, depletion of UbcH10 resulted in suppression of cellular growth whereas overexpression of UbcH10 promoted the cellular growth and oncogenic cellular growth. Mitotic population was markedly alternated by the manipulation of UbcH10 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that UbcH10 was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon epithelia. Furthermore, the clinicopathological evaluation revealed that UbcH10 was associated with high-grade histological tumors. Conclusion The results show the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in the progression of colon cancer. Thus UbcH10 may act as a novel biomarker in patients with colon cancer.

  1. Up-regulation of CHAF1A, a poor prognostic factor, facilitates cell proliferation of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zehua; Cui, Feifei; Yu, Fudong; Peng, Xiao; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Dawei [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated First People’s Hospital, 85 Wujin Road, Shanghai 200080 (China); Lu, Su [Department of Pathology, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated First People’s Hospital, 85 Wujin Road, Shanghai 200080 (China); Tang, Huamei, E-mail: tanghuamei@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated First People’s Hospital, 85 Wujin Road, Shanghai 200080 (China); Peng, Zhihai, E-mail: zhihai.peng@hotmail.com [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated First People’s Hospital, 85 Wujin Road, Shanghai 200080 (China)

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • We identified that CHAF1A was up-regulated in colon tumor mucosa in TMA. • The expression pattern of CHAF1A was validated with qPCR and western-blot. • CHAF1A overexpression is an independent indicator for poor colon cancer survival. • CHAF1A facilitates cell proliferation of colon cancer both in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Deregulation of chromatin assembly factor 1, p150 subunit A (CHAF1A) has recently been reported to be involved in the development of some cancer types. In this study, we identified that the frequency of positive CHAF1A staining in primary tumor mucosa (45.8%, 93 of 203 samples) was significantly elevated compared to that in paired normal mucosa (18.7%, 38 of 203 samples). The increased expression was strongly associated with cancer stage, tumor invasion, and histological grade. The five-year survival rate of patients with CHAF1A-positive tumors was remarkably lower than that of patients with CHAF1A-negative tumors. Colon cancer cells with CHAF1A knockdown exhibited decreased cell growth index, reduction in colony formation ability, elevated cell apoptosis rate as well as impaired colon tumorigenicity in nude mice. Hence, CHAF1A upregulation functions as a poor prognostic indicator of colon cancer, potentially contributing to its progression by mediating cancer cell proliferation.

  2. Keratin23 (KRT23) knockdown decreases proliferation and affects the DNA damage response of colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Hahn, Stephan; Mansilla, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    correlated with absent expression, while increased KRT23 expression in tumor samples correlated with promoter hypomethylation, as confirmed by bisulfite sequencing. Demethylation induced KRT23 expression in vitro. Expression profiling of shRNA mediated stable KRT23 knockdown in colon cancer cell lines showed...... response, mainly molecules of the double strand break repair homologous recombination pathway. KRT23 knockdown decreased the transcript and protein expression of key molecules as e.g. MRE11A, E2F1, RAD51 and BRCA1. Knockdown of KRT23 rendered colon cancer cells more sensitive to irradiation and reduced......Keratin 23 (KRT23) is strongly expressed in colon adenocarcinomas but absent in normal colon mucosa. Array based methylation profiling of 40 colon samples showed that the promoter of KRT23 was methylated in normal colon mucosa, while hypomethylated in most adenocarcinomas. Promoter methylation...

  3. Using Oral and Colon Cancer Cells for Studying the Anticancer Properties of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpornsuwan, Teerakul; Sriwai, Wimolpak; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are of importance in defense mechanism of many organisms and are potential candidate for treatment of infections in animals and humans. AMPs exhibit a wide range of immunomodulatory activities related to innate immunity, wound healing, and inflammation. AMPs also serve as drug delivery vectors, antitumor agents, and mitogenic agents. Here, we describe the investigation of anticancer and cytotoxic activities of antimicrobial peptides by colorimetric MTT assay using smooth muscle, dental pulp stem cell, human colon cancer cell line (SW620), and human oral squamous carcinoma cell line (HSC4).

  4. A mechanically-induced colon cancer cell population shows increased metastatic potential

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Xin

    2014-05-29

    Background: Metastasis accounts for the majority of deaths from cancer. Although tumor microenvironment has been shown to have a significant impact on the initiation and/or promotion of metastasis, the mechanism remains elusive. We previously reported that HCT-8 colon cancer cells underwent a phenotypic transition from an adhesive epithelial type (E-cell) to a rounded dissociated type (R-cell) via soft substrate culture, which resembled the initiation of metastasis. The objective of current study was to investigate the molecular and metabolic mechanisms of the E-R transition.Methods: Global gene expressions of HCT-8 E and R cells were measured by RNA Sequencing (RNA-seq); and the results were further confirmed by real-time PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), anoikis resistance, enzyme activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 3 family, member A1 (ALDH3A1), and in vitro invasion assay were tested on both E and R cells. The deformability of HCT-8 E and R cells was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). To study the in vivo invasiveness of two cell types, athymic nude mice were intra-splenically injected with HCT-8 E or R cells and sacrificed after 9 weeks. Incidences of tumor development and metastasis were histologically evaluated and analyzed with Fisher\\'s exact test.Results: Besides HCT-8, E-R transition on soft substrates was also seen in three other cancer cell lines (HCT116, SW480 colon and DU145 prostate cancer). The expression of some genes, such as ALDH3A1, TNS4, CLDN2, and AKR1B10, which are known to play important roles in cancer cell migration, invasion, proliferation and apoptosis, were increased in HCT-8 R cells. R cells also showed higher ALDH3A1 enzyme activity, higher ROS, higher anoikis resistance, and higher softness than E cells. More importantly, in vitro assay and in vivo animal models revealed that HCT-8 R cells were more invasive than E cells.Conclusions: Our comprehensive comparison of HCT-8 E and R cells revealed differences of molecular

  5. A mechanically-induced colon cancer cell population shows increased metastatic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xin; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Li, Qian; Ali, Shahjahan; Lezmi, Stephane; Chen, Hong; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Laegreid, William W; Saif, Taher A; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S

    2014-05-29

    Metastasis accounts for the majority of deaths from cancer. Although tumor microenvironment has been shown to have a significant impact on the initiation and/or promotion of metastasis, the mechanism remains elusive. We previously reported that HCT-8 colon cancer cells underwent a phenotypic transition from an adhesive epithelial type (E-cell) to a rounded dissociated type (R-cell) via soft substrate culture, which resembled the initiation of metastasis. The objective of current study was to investigate the molecular and metabolic mechanisms of the E-R transition. Global gene expressions of HCT-8 E and R cells were measured by RNA Sequencing (RNA-seq); and the results were further confirmed by real-time PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), anoikis resistance, enzyme activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 3 family, member A1 (ALDH3A1), and in vitro invasion assay were tested on both E and R cells. The deformability of HCT-8 E and R cells was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). To study the in vivo invasiveness of two cell types, athymic nude mice were intra-splenically injected with HCT-8 E or R cells and sacrificed after 9 weeks. Incidences of tumor development and metastasis were histologically evaluated and analyzed with Fisher's exact test. Besides HCT-8, E-R transition on soft substrates was also seen in three other cancer cell lines (HCT116, SW480 colon and DU145 prostate cancer). The expression of some genes, such as ALDH3A1, TNS4, CLDN2, and AKR1B10, which are known to play important roles in cancer cell migration, invasion, proliferation and apoptosis, were increased in HCT-8 R cells. R cells also showed higher ALDH3A1 enzyme activity, higher ROS, higher anoikis resistance, and higher softness than E cells. More importantly, in vitro assay and in vivo animal models revealed that HCT-8 R cells were more invasive than E cells. Our comprehensive comparison of HCT-8 E and R cells revealed differences of molecular, phenotypical, and mechanical signatures

  6. Specific Colon Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Bacteriophage E Gene Expression under Transcriptional Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Rama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Patients in advanced stages often develop metastases that require chemotherapy and usually show a poor response, have a low survival rate and develop considerable toxicity with adverse symptoms. Gene therapy may act as an adjuvant therapy in attempts to destroy the tumor without affecting normal host tissue. The bacteriophage E gene has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in several cancers, but without any tumor-specific activity. The use of tumor-specific promoters may help to direct the expression of therapeutic genes so they act against specific cancer cells. We used the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter (CEA to direct E gene expression (pCEA-E towards colon cancer cells. pCEA-E induced a high cell growth inhibition of human HTC-116 colon adenocarcinoma and mouse MC-38 colon cancer cells in comparison to normal human CCD18co colon cells, which have practically undetectable levels of CEA. In addition, in vivo analyses of mice bearing tumors induced using MC-38 cells showed a significant decrease in tumor volume after pCEA-E treatment and a low level of Ki-67 in relation to untreated tumors. These results suggest that the CEA promoter is an excellent candidate for directing E gene expression specifically toward colon cancer cells.

  7. Diet-Induced Obesity Is Associated with an Impaired NK Cell Function and an Increased Colon Cancer Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Bähr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with an increased colon cancer incidence, but underlying mechanisms remained unclear. Previous studies showed altered Natural killer (NK cell functions in obese individuals. Therefore, we studied the impact of an impaired NK cell functionality on the increased colon cancer risk in obesity. In vitro investigations demonstrated a decreased IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxicity of human NK cells against colon tumor cells after NK cell preincubation with the adipokine leptin. In addition, leptin incubation decreased the expression of activating NK cell receptors. In animal studies, colon cancer growth was induced by injection of azoxymethane (AOM in normal weight and diet-induced obese rats. Body weight and visceral fat mass were increased in obese animals compared to normal weight rats. AOM-treated obese rats showed an increased quantity, size, and weight of colon tumors compared to the normal weight tumor group. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a decreased number of NK cells in spleen and liver in obesity. Additionally, the expression levels of activating NK cell receptors were lower in spleen and liver of obese rats. The results show for the first time that the decreased number and impaired NK cell function may be one cause for the higher colon cancer risk in obesity.

  8. Increased carnitine-dependent fatty acid uptake into mitochondria of human colon cancer cells induces apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Uwe; Nickel, Alexander; Daniel, Hannelore

    2005-06-01

    Carnitine-dependent fatty acid import into mitochondria and beta-oxidation seem to be impaired in tumor cells. In the present study we show that a supply of palmitoylcarnitine together with L-carnitine potently induces apoptosis in HT-29 human colon cancer cells as a consequence of accelerated fatty acid oxidation. Caspase-3-like activities, measured by the cleavage rate of a fluorogenic tetrapeptide substrate and nuclear fragmentation determined after DNA labeling in fixed cells by fluorescence microscopy, served as indicators of apoptosis. Neither L-carnitine nor palmitoylcarnitine alone were able to increase caspase-3-like activities and DNA fragmentation, but when provided together, apoptosis occurred. That exogenous carnitine was indeed able to enhance fatty acid uptake into mitochondria was demonstrated by an increased influx of a fluorescent palmitic acid analog. Enhanced fatty acid availability in mitochondria led to an increased generation of O*2-, as detected by a O*2- -sensitive fluorogenic dye, indicating oxidation of delivered substrates. Benzoquinone, an O*2- scavenger, blocked O*2- generation and prevented apoptosis as initiated by the combination of palmitoylcarnitine and carnitine. The lack of effect of the ceramide synthesis inhibitor fumonisin on palmitoylcarnitine/carnitine-induced apoptosis further supports the notion that apoptotic cell death is specifically due to fatty acid oxidation. In contrast to HT-29 cells, nontransformed human colonocytes did not respond to exogenous palmitoylcarnitine/carnitine and no apoptosis was observed. In conclusion, our studies provide evidence that a limited mitochondrial fatty acid import in human colon cancer cells prevents high rates of mitochondrial O*2- production and protects colon cancer cells from apoptosis that can be overcome by an exogenous carnitine supply.

  9. Transcriptomic responses of cancerous and noncancerous human colon cells to sulforaphane and selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Simona; Hecht, Katrin; Sobotzki, Nadine; Erzinger, Melanie M; Bovet, Cédric; Shay, Jerry W; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sturla, Shana J; Marra, Giancarlo; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2014-03-17

    Diets enriched with bioactive food components trigger molecular changes in cells that may contribute to either health-promoting or adverse effects. Recent technological advances in high-throughput data generation allow for observing systems-wide molecular responses to cellular perturbations with nontoxic and dietary-relevant doses while considering the intrinsic differences between cancerous and noncancerous cells. In this chemical profile, we compared molecular responses of the colon cancer cell line HT29 and a noncancerous colon epithelial cell line (HCEC) to two widely encountered food components, sulforaphane and selenium. We conducted this comparison by generating new transcriptome data by microarray gene-expression profiling, analyzing them statistically on the single gene, network, and functional pathway levels, and integrating them with protein expression data. Sulforaphane and selenium, at doses that did not inhibit the growth of the tested cells, induced or repressed the transcription of a limited number of genes in a manner distinctly dependent on the chemical and the cell type. The genes that most strongly responded in cancer cells were observed after treatment with sulforaphane and were members of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. These genes were in high agreement in terms of fold change with their corresponding proteins (correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.98, p = 0.01). Conversely, selenium had little influence on the cancer cells. In contrast, in noncancerous cells, selenium induced numerous genes involved in apoptotic, angiogenic, or tumor proliferation pathways, whereas the influence of sulforaphane was very limited. These findings contribute to defining the significance of cell type in interpreting human cellular transcriptome-level responses to exposures to natural components of the diet.

  10. Decorin in Human Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Marie C.; Sainio, Annele O.; Pennanen, Mirka M.; Lund, Riikka J.; Vuorikoski, Sanna; Sundström, Jari T. T.

    2015-01-01

    Decorin is generally recognized as a tumor suppressing molecule. Nevertheless, although decorin has been shown to be differentially expressed in malignant tissues, it has often remained unclear whether, in addition to non-malignant stromal cells, cancer cells also express it. Here, we first used two publicly available databases to analyze the current information about decorin expression and immunoreactivity in normal and malignant human colorectal tissue samples. The analyses demonstrated that decorin expression and immunoreactivity may vary in cancer cells of human colorectal tissues. Therefore, we next examined decorin expression in normal, premalignant and malignant human colorectal tissues in more detail using both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for decorin. Our results invariably demonstrate that malignant cells within human colorectal cancer tissues are devoid of both decorin mRNA and immunoreactivity. Identical results were obtained for cells of neuroendocrine tumors of human colon. Using RT-qPCR, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines are also decorin negative, in accordance with the above in vivo results. Finally, we demonstrate that decorin transduction of human colon cancer cell lines causes a significant reduction in their colony forming capability. Thus, strategies to develop decorin-based adjuvant therapies for human colorectal malignancies are highly rational. PMID:26001829

  11. Establishment and Analysis of Cancer Stem-Like and Non-Cancer Stem-Like Clone Cells from the Human Colon Cancer Cell Line SW480.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akari Takaya

    Full Text Available Human cancer stem-like cells (CSCs/cancer-initiating cells (CICs can be isolated as side population (SP cells, aldehyde dehydrogenase high (ALDHhigh cells or cell surface marker-positive cells including CD44+ cells and CD133+ cells. CSCs/CICs and non-CSCs/CICs are unstable in in vitro culture, and CSCs/CICs can differentiate into non-CSCs/CICs and some non-CSCs/CICs can dedifferentiate into CSCs/CICs. Therefore, experiments using a large amount of CSCs/CICs are technically very difficult. In this study, we isolated single cell clones from SP cells and main population (MP cells derived from the human colon cancer cell line SW480. SP analysis revealed that SP clone cells had relatively high percentages of SP cells, whereas MP clone cells showed very few SP cells, and the phenotypes were sustainable for more than 2 months of in vitro culture. Xenograft transplantation revealed that SP clone cells have higher tumor-initiating ability than that of MP clone cells and SP clone cell showed higher chemo-resistance compared with MP clone cells. These results indicate that SP clone cells derived from SW480 cells are enriched with CSCs/CICs, whereas MP clone cells are pure non-CSCs/CICs. SP clone cells and MP clone cells are a very stable in vitro CSC/CIC-enriched and non-CSC/CIC model for further analysis.

  12. Niacin alleviates TRAIL-mediated colon cancer cell death via autophagy flux activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin M D; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-26

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinamide is a water-soluble vitamin that is present in black beans and rice among other foods. Niacin is well known as an inhibitor of metastasis in human breast carcinoma cells but the effect of niacin treatment on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis is unknown. Here, we show that niacin plays an important role in the regulation of autophagic flux and protects tumor cells against TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Our results indicated that niacin activated autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells and the autophagic flux activation protected tumor cells from TRAIL-induced dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential and tumor cell death. We also demonstrated that ATG5 siRNA and autophagy inhibitor blocked the niacin-mediated inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our study is the first report demonstrating that niacin inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells. And our results also suggest that autophagy inhibitors including genetic and pharmacological tools may be a successful therapeutics during anticancer therapy using TRAIL.

  13. CoCl2, a mimic of hypoxia, induces formation of polyploid giant cells with stem characteristics in colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Lopez-Sánchez

    Full Text Available The induction of polyploidy is considered the reproductive end of cells, but there is evidence that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs contribute to cell repopulation during tumor relapse. However, the role of these cells in the development, progression and response to therapy in colon cancer remains undefined. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the generation of PGCCs in colon cancer cells and identify mechanisms of formation. Treatment of HCT-116 and Caco-2 colon cancer cells with the hypoxia mimic CoCl2 induced the formation of cells with larger cell and nuclear size (PGCCs, while the cells with normal morphology were selectively eliminated. Cytometric analysis showed that CoCl2 treatment induced G2 cell cycle arrest and the generation of a polyploid cell subpopulation with increased cellular DNA content. Polyploidy of hypoxia-induced PGCCs was confirmed by FISH analysis. Furthermore, CoCl2 treatment effectively induced the stabilization of HIF-1α, the differential expression of a truncated form of p53 (p47 and decreased levels of cyclin D1, indicating molecular mechanisms associated with cell cycle arrest at G2. Generation of PGCCs also contributed to expansion of a cell subpopulation with cancer stem cells (CSCs characteristics, as indicated by colonosphere formation assays, and enhanced chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin. In conclusion, the pharmacological induction of hypoxia in colon cancer cells causes the formation of PGCCs, the expansion of a cell subpopulation with CSC characteristics and chemoresistance. The molecular mechanisms involved, including the stabilization of HIF-1 α, the involvement of p53/p47 isoform and cell cycle arrest at G2, suggest novel targets to prevent tumor relapse and treatment failure in colon cancer.

  14. Differentiation Affects the Release of Exosomes from Colon Cancer Cells and Their Ability to Modulate the Behavior of Recipient Cells.

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    Lucchetti, Donatella; Calapà, Federica; Palmieri, Valentina; Fanali, Caterina; Carbone, Federica; Papa, Alfredo; De Maria, Ruggero; De Spirito, Marco; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Exosomes are involved in intercellular communication. We previously reported that sodium butyrate-induced differentiation of HT29 colon cancer cells is associated with a reduced CD133 expression. Herein, we analyzed the role of exosomes in the differentiation of HT29 cells. Exosomes were prepared using ultracentrifugation. Gene expression levels were evaluated by real-time PCR. The cell proliferation rate was assessed by MTT assay and with the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing system, whereas cell motility was assessed using the scratch test and confocal microscopy. Sodium butyrate-induced differentiation of HT29 and Caco-2 cells increased the levels of released exosomes and their expression of CD133. Cell differentiation and the decrease of cellular CD133 expression levels were prevented by blocking multivesicular body maturation. Exosomes released by HT29 differentiating cells carried increased levels of miRNAs, induced an increased proliferation and motility of both colon cancer cells and normal fibroblasts, increased the colony-forming efficiency of cancer cells, and reduced the sodium butyrate-induced differentiation of HT29 cells. Such effects were associated with an increased phosphorylation level of both Src and extracellular signal regulated kinase proteins and with an increased expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related genes. Release of exosomes is affected by differentiation of colon cancer cells; exosomes might be used by differentiating cells to get rid of components that are no longer necessary but might continue to exert their effects on recipient cells. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Lidocaine on HT-29 and SW480 Colon Cancer CellsIn Vitro.

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    Bundscherer, Anika C; Malsy, Manuela; Bitzinger, Diane I; Wiese, Christoph H R; Gruber, Michael A; Graf, Bernhard M

    2017-04-01

    Evidence is growing that the risk of cancer dissemination may be enhanced during the perioperative period. Whether particular anesthetic techniques influence oncological outcome is still under discussion. For pain management, lidocaine can be administered perioperatively by intravenous, intraperitoneal or epidural infusion. Here we investigated the effect of lidocaine on colon carcinoma cell lines (HT-29 and SW480) in vitro. ELISA BrdU (Roche) for cell proliferation and FITC Annexin V detection kit (BD Pharming) for apoptosis analysis were applied. Cell-cycle profiles were investigated by flow cytometry. Cell-cycle arrest was induced in both cell lines by 1000 μM lidocaine, while no inhibition of cell proliferation was detected. Apoptosis decreased in SW480 but not in HT-29 cells. Lidocaine induces cell-cycle arrest in both colon carcinoma cell lines in vitro. The effective drug concentration can be obtained by local infiltration. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Isoreserpine promotes {beta}-catenin degradation via Siah-1 up-regulation in HCT116 colon cancer cells

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    Gwak, Jungsug; Song, Taeyun [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook [Laboratory of Radiation Cancer Science, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Il-Whan [Department of Microbiology, Center for Viral Disease Research, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yongsu [Department of Genetic Engineering, and Graduate School of Biotechnology, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae-Gook [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sangtaek, E-mail: ohsa@inje.ac.kr [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-25

    Aberrant accumulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells is a frequent early event during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that decrease the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, we performed cell-based chemical screening using genetically engineered HEK293 reporter cells to detect compounds that inhibit TOPFlash reporter activity, which was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium. We found that isoreserpine promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin by up-regulation of Siah-1 in HEK293 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Moreover, isoreserpine repressed the expression of {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, resulting in the suppression of HCT116 cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that isoreserpine can potentially be used as a chemotherapeutic agent against colon cancer.

  17. Modulation of intracellular calcium levels by calcium lactate affects colon cancer cell motility through calcium-dependent calpain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer.

  18. 5-Geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin inhibits colon cancer (SW480) cells growth by inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Jaiprakash R; Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K; Kim, Jinhee; Murthy, Kotamballi N Chidambara; Chetti, Mahadev B; Nam, Sang-Yong; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2013-03-01

    For the first time, three coumarins were isolated from the hexane extract of limes (Citrus aurantifolia) and purified by flash chromatography. The structures were identified by NMR (1D, 2D) and mass spectral analyses as 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin, limettin, and isopimpinellin. These compounds inhibited human colon cancer (SW-480) cell proliferation, with 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin showing the highest inhibition activity (67 %) at 25 µM. Suppression of SW480 cell proliferation by 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin was associated with induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by annexin V staining and DNA fragmentation. In addition, 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin arrested cells at the G0/G1 phase, and induction of apoptosis was demonstrated through the activation of tumour suppressor gene p53, caspase8/3, regulation of Bcl2, and inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These findings suggest that 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin has potential as a cancer preventive agent. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Persistent STAT3 Activation in Colon Cancer Is Associated with Enhanced Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian M. Corvinus

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma (CRC is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries. It has so far been molecularly defined mainly by alterations of the Wnt pathway. We show here for the first time that aberrant activities of the signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT3 actively contribute to this malignancy and, thus, are a potential therapeutic target for CRC. Constitutive STAT3 activity was found to be abundant in dedifferentiated cancer cells and infiltrating lymphocytes of CRC samples, but not in non-neoplastic colon epithelium. Cell lines derived from malignant colorectal tumors lost persistent STAT3 activity in culture. However, implantation of colon carcinoma cells into nude mice resulted in restoration of STAT3 activity, suggesting a role of an extracellular stimulus within the tumor microenvironment as a trigger for STAT activation. STAT3 activity in CRC cells triggered through interleukin-6 or through a constitutively active STAT3 mutant promoted cancer cell multiplication, whereas STAT3 inhibition through a dominant-negative variant impaired IL-6-driven proliferation. Blockade of STAT3 activation in CRCderived xenograft tumors slowed down their development, arguing for a contribution of STAT3 to colorectal tumor growth.

  20. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  1. ME-143 Is Superior to Genistein in Suppression of WNT Signaling in Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintova, Sofya; Planutis, Kestutis; Planutiene, Marina; Holcombe, Randall F

    2017-04-01

    This study tested the effect of the soy isoflavones genistein and ME-143, and two chemotherapeutic agents, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and oxaliplatin, on WNT signaling. Colon cancer cell lines RKO (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer type) and DLD1 (most common colorectal cancer type driven by a mutation in WNT pathway) were utilized. WNT throughput was measured using a β-catenin-responsive SuperTopFlash luciferase assay. A stabilized β-catenin construct was employed to test β-catenin involvement in the mechanism of drug activity. ME-143 was a more than 10-fold potent inhibitor of DLD1 proliferation than genistein at 3.125 μM. Genistein alone did not inhibit WNT signaling in either cell line. In RKO cells, oxaliplatin and its combination with 5FU significantly inhibited WNT throughput. Neither 5FU, oxaliplatin nor their combination inhibited WNT signaling in DLD1 cells. In both the RKO and DLD1 cell lines, ME-143 significantly reduced WNT throughput by 65-75%. The introduction of stabilized β-catenin attenuated the ME-143-dependent inhibition of the WNT/β-catenin pathway. ME-143 alone and in combination with 5FU and oxaliplatin effectively inhibits the WNT/β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer cells of diverse genetic background. β-Catenin is directly involved in the mechanism of inhibition, and clinical studies are warranted. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. Resveratrol induces mitochondrial respiration and apoptosis in SW620 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquer-Rosselló, Mª Del Mar; Hernández-López, Reyniel; Roca, Pilar; Oliver, Jordi; Valle, Adamo

    2017-02-01

    The polyphenol resveratrol (RSV) is found in the skin of red grapes and has been reported to exhibit anticancer properties. The antitumor effects of RSV in the gastrointestinal tract have gained considerable interest due to the high exposure of this tissue to this dietary compound. One of the hallmarks of cancer cells is their particular metabolism mainly relying on glycolysis for ATP production rather than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Although RSV has been described to act as a calorie-restriction mimetic, modulating energy metabolism in normal tissues, little efforts have been done to study the effects of this polyphenol in the metabolism of cancer cells. Taking this into account, the aim of this study was to explore metabolic effects of this polyphenol in colon cancer. Oxygen consumption, ATP levels, Western blotting and other molecular biology techniques were carried out to characterize the metabolic signature of RSV in SW620 colon cancer cells. Paradoxically, the cytotoxic effects of RSV were associated with an increase in oxygen consumption supported by mitochondrial biogenesis and increased fatty acid oxidation. This partial reversion of the Warburg effect was followed by hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane and ROS production, leading to an increased apoptosis. Our results propose that the anticancer mechanisms of RSV could reside in targeting cancer cell metabolism, promoting mitochondrial electron transport chain overload and, ultimately, increasing ROS production. These results shed new light into the anticancer mechanism of RSV supporting the ability of this compound in potentiating the effects of chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. PROX1 Promotes Metabolic Adaptation and Fuels Outgrowth of Wnthigh Metastatic Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Ragusa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt pathway is abnormally activated in the majority of colorectal cancers, and significant knowledge has been gained in understanding its role in tumor initiation. However, the mechanisms of metastatic outgrowth in colorectal cancer remain a major challenge. We report that autophagy-dependent metabolic adaptation and survival of metastatic colorectal cancer cells is regulated by the target of oncogenic Wnt signaling, homeobox transcription factor PROX1, expressed by a subpopulation of colon cancer progenitor/stem cells. We identify direct PROX1 target genes and show that repression of a pro-apoptotic member of the BCL2 family, BCL2L15, is important for survival of PROX1+ cells under metabolic stress. PROX1 inactivation after the establishment of metastases prevented further growth of lesions. Furthermore, autophagy inhibition efficiently targeted metastatic PROX1+ cells, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach. These data identify PROX1 as a key regulator of the transcriptional network contributing to metastases outgrowth in colorectal cancer.

  4. DHA-induced stress response in human colon cancer cells - Focus on oxidative stress and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Kristine; Monsen, Vivi Talstad; Hakvåg Pettersen, Caroline Hild; Overland, Hilde Bremseth; Pettersen, Grete; Samdal, Helle; Tesfahun, Almaz Nigatu; Lundemo, Anne Gøril; Bjørkøy, Geir; Schønberg, Svanhild A

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important constituents of the diet and health benefits of omega-3/n-3 PUFAs, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) have been well documented in relation to several diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that n-3 PUFAs may have anticancer activity and improve the effect of conventional cancer therapy. The mechanisms behind these effects are still unclear and need to be elucidated. We have examined the DHA-induced stress response in two human colon cancer cell lines, SW620 and Caco-2. SW620 cells are growth-inhibited at early time points by DHA, while the growth of Caco-2 cells almost remains unaffected by the same treatment. Gene expression analysis of SW620 cells treated with DHA revealed changes at early time points; transcripts involved in oxidative stress and autophagy were among the first to be differentially expressed. We find that oxidative stress is induced in both cell lines, although at different time points and to different extent. DHA induced nuclear translocation of the oxidative stress sensor NFE2L2 in both cell lines, indicating an induction of an anti-oxidative response. However, vitamin E did not counteract ROS-production or the translocation of NFE2L2 to the nucleus. Neither vitamin E nor the antioxidants butylated hydoxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydoxytoluene (BHT) did affect the growth inhibition in SW620 cells after DHA-treatment. Also, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of NFE2L2 did not sensitize SW620 and Caco-2 cells to DHA. These results indicate that oxidative stress response is not the cause of DHA-induced cytotoxicity in SW620 cells. Using biochemical and imaging based functional assays, we found a low basal level of autophagy and no increase in autophagic flux after adding DHA to the SW620 cells. However, Caco-2 cells displayed a higher level of autophagy, both in the absence and presence of DHA. Inhibition of autophagy by siRNA mediated knock down

  5. Multiple MTS Assay as the Alternative Method to Determine Survival Fraction of the Irradiated HT-29 Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab-Bafrani, Zahra; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Abbasian, Mahdi; Fesharaki, Mehrafarin

    2016-01-01

    A multiple colorimetric assay has been introduced to evaluate the proliferation and determination of survival fraction (SF) of irradiated cells. The estimation of SF based on the cell-growth curve information is the major advantage of this assay. In this study, the utility of multiple-MTS assay for the SF estimation of irradiated HT-29 colon cancer cells, which were plated before irradiation, was evaluated. The SF of HT-29 colon cancer cells under irradiation with 9 MV photon was estimated using multiple-MTS assay and colony assay. Finally, the correlation between two assays was evaluated. Results showed that there are no significant differences between the SF obtained by two assays at different radiation doses (P > 0.05), and the survival curves have quite similar trends. In conclusion, multiple MTS-assay can be a reliable method to determine the SF of irradiated colon cancer cells that plated before irradiation.

  6. Effects and Mechanism of Imatinib in Inhibiting Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samei, Lv; Yaling, Pang; Lihua, Yang; Yan, Zhang; Shuyan, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effects and mechanism of imatinib in inhibiting colon cancer cell proliferation. Material/Methods The SW480 cells were divided into 4 imatinib-treated groups: 0 μM, 1.25 μM, 2.5 μM, and 5μM. We analyzed the apoptosis and cell cycle of the 4 groups. The gene and protein expressions of p21, p27, HGF, and GAPDH were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Results Compared with the 0-μM imatinib-treated group, the apoptosis of 1.25-μM, 2.5-μM, and 5.0-μM treated groups was significantly induced (P<0.05, all). The G1 phase was significantly up-regulated in the 1.25-μM, 2.5-μM, and 5.0-μM treated groups compared with the 0-μM imatinib-treated group (P<0.05, respectively), but the S and G2 phase of 3 imatinib-treated groups were significantly down-regulated (P<0.05, all). The gene and protein expressions of p27 and HGF were significantly different among the 4 groups (P<0.05, all). Conclusions Imatinib inhibits proliferation of colon cancer cells by reducing HGF and increasing p27 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:27799652

  7. Circulating cell-free DNA mutation patterns in early and late stage colon and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietsch, Eveline E; Graham, Garrett T; McCutcheon, Justine N; Javaid, Aamir; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Marshall, John L; Wellstein, Anton

    2017-12-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease harboring diverse subclonal populations that can be discriminated by their DNA mutations. Environmental pressure selects subclones that ultimately drive disease progression and tumor relapse. Circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) can be used to approximate the mutational makeup of cancer lesions and can serve as a marker for monitoring disease progression at the molecular level without the need for invasively acquired samples from primary or metastatic lesions. This potential for molecular analysis makes ccfDNA attractive for the study of clonal evolution and for uncovering emerging therapeutic resistance or sensitivity. We assessed ccfDNA from colon and pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients using next generation sequencing of 56 cancer-associated genes at the time of primary resectable disease and metastatic progression and compared this to the mutational patterns of the primary tumor. 28%-47% of non-synonymous mutations in the primary tumors were also detected in the ccfDNA while 71%-78% mutations found in ccfDNA were not detected in the primary tumors. ccfDNA collected at the time of progression harbored 3-5 new mutations not detected in ccfDNA at the earlier collection time points. We conclude that incorporation of ccfDNA analysis provides crucial insights into the changing molecular makeup of progressive colon and pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of multiple biomarkers for the localization and characterization of colon cancer stem cells by indirect immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Freyhan, Ora; Fabrikant, Yakov; Melzer, Ehud

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we used LGR5, γ-synuclein, p53, KRAS and epiregulin antibodies to localize stem cells by indirect immunocytochemistry in paraffin sections of normal and cancerous colon tissues. In the normal colon tissue, no staining of cells with LGR5, γ-synuclein, p53 and KRAS antibodies was observed, apart from a few scattered cells in between the colon villi that were faintly stained with antibodies to LGR5. Staining of highly differentiated cancer tissue with LGR5 antibodies revealed single cells or clusters of up to 4 cells in the interior space of the carcinoma cell layers. Staining of poorly differentiated cancer tissues (stage I-IV) revealed 9-81 clustered stem cells. The number of clustered stem cells increased significantly with the tumor stage, when comparing stage II to stage IV (pcrypt-villus axis. The antibodies weakly stained the highly differentiated tumor cells and moderately stained the moderately differentiated tumor cells. Of note, the antibodies intensively stained the clustered stem cells of the poorly differentiated tumor cells. These antibodies also clearly stained the clustered stem cells of poorly differentiated tumors but were not specific as they clearly stained cells in the crypt-villus axis of the normal colon wall. Our results show that LGR5 antibodies can serve as a reliable marker for colon cancer stem cells. Once the colon stem cells are identified, the targeting of specific drugs to kill these cells should be attempted in the future in order to cure this disease. Moreover, the fact that we did not find any stained cells with antibodies to LGR5 in normal tissues apart from a few scattered cells, suggests that the normal colon stem cells differ from the tumor stem cells at least as regards the expression of this protein. In addition, antibodies to γ-synuclein, p53 and KRAS only stained the tumor stem cells and not the normal tissue. Thus, they can serve as multiple biomarkers for the localization of colon cancer stem cells by

  9. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Kurimoto, Akiko [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Oncology Research Laboratories, Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd, 1-2-58, Hiromachi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, 140-8710 (Japan); Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Akiyama, Tetsu, E-mail: akiyama@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan)

    2015-03-27

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  10. [Preoperatiove Airway Bacterial Colonization: the Missing Link between Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Following Lobectomy and Postoperative Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ke; Lai, Yutian; Huang, Jian; Wang, Yifan; Wang, Xiaowei; Che, Guowei

    2017-04-20

    Surgical procedure is the main method of treating lung cancer. Meanwhile, postoperative pneumonia (POP) is the major cause of perioperative mortality in lung cancer surgery. The preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization is an independent risk factor causing postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC). This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the relationship between preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization and POP in lung cancer and to identify the high-risk factors of preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization. A total of 125 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent thoracic surgery in six hospitals of Chengdu between May 2015 and January 2016. Preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization was detected in all patients via fiber bronchoscopy. Patients' PPC, high-risk factors, clinical characteristics, and the serum surfactant protein D (SP-D) level were also analyzed. The incidence of preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization among NSCLC patients was 15.2% (19/125). Up to 22 strains were identified in the colonization positive group, with Gram-negative bacteria being dominant (86.36%, 19/22). High-risk factors of pathogenic airway bacterial colonization were age (≥75 yr) and smoking index (≥400 cigarettes/year). PPC incidence was significantly higher in the colonization-positive group (42.11%, 8/19) than that in the colonization-negative group (16.04%, 17/106)(P=0.021). POP incidence was significantly higher in the colonization-positive group (26.32%, 5/19) than that in the colonization-negative group (6.60%, 7/106)(P=0.019). The serum SP-D level of patients in the colonization-positive group was remarkably higher than that in the colonization-negative group [(31.25±6.09) vs (28.17±5.23)](P=0.023). The incidence of preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization among NSCLC patients with POP was 41.67% (5/12). This value was 3.4 times higher than that among the patients without

  11. Preoperatiove Airway Bacterial Colonization: the Missing Link between Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Following Lobectomy and Postoperative Pneumonia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke GAO

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Surgical procedure is the main method of treating lung cancer. Meanwhile, postoperative pneumonia (POP is the major cause of perioperative mortality in lung cancer surgery. The preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization is an independent risk factor causing postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC. This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the relationship between preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization and POP in lung cancer and to identify the high-risk factors of preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization. Methods A total of 125 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC underwent thoracic surgery in six hospitals of Chengdu between May 2015 and January 2016. Preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization was detected in all patients via fiber bronchoscopy. Patients’ PPC, high-risk factors, clinical characteristics, and the serum surfactant protein D (SP-D level were also analyzed. Results The incidence of preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization among NSCLC patients was 15.2% (19/125. Up to 22 strains were identified in the colonization positive group, with Gram-negative bacteria being dominant (86.36%, 19/22. High-risk factors of pathogenic airway bacterial colonization were age (≥75 yr and smoking index (≥400 cigarettes/year. PPC incidence was significantly higher in the colonization-positive group (42.11%, 8/19 than that in the colonization-negative group (16.04%, 17/106(P=0.021. POP incidence was significantly higher in the colonization-positive group (26.32%, 5/19 than that in the colonization-negative group (6.60%, 7/106(P=0.019. The serum SP-D level of patients in the colonization-positive group was remarkably higher than that in the colonization-negative group [(31.25±6.09 vs (28.17±5.23](P=0.023. The incidence of preoperative pathogenic airway bacterial colonization among NSCLC patients with POP was 41.67% (5/12. This value was 3

  12. L-Ascorbic acid can abrogate SVCT-2-dependent cetuximab resistance mediated by mutant KRAS in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soo-A; Lee, Dae-Hee; Moon, Jai-Hee; Hong, Seung-Woo; Shin, Jae-Sik; Hwang, Ih Yeon; Shin, Yu Jin; Kim, Jeong Hee; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Kim, Seung-Mi; Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Seul; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jung Shin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, TaeWon; Lee, Wang Jae

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer patients with mutant KRAS are resistant to cetuximab, an antibody directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor, which is an effective clinical therapy for patients with wild-type KRAS. Numerous combinatorial therapies have been tested to overcome the resistance to cetuximab. However, no combinations have been found that can be used as effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, we demonstrate that L-ascorbic acid partners with cetuximab to induce killing effects, which are influenced by sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT-2) in human colon cancer cells with a mutant KRAS. L-Ascorbic acid treatment of human colon cancer cells that express a mutant KRAS differentially and synergistically induced cell death with cetuximab in a SVCT-2-dependent manner. The ectopic expression of SVCT-2 induced sensitivity to L-ascorbic acid treatment in human colon cancer cells that do not express SVCT-2, whereas the knockdown of endogenous SVCT-2 induced resistance to L-ascorbic acid treatment in SVCT-2-positive cells. Moreover, tumor regression via the administration of L-ascorbic acid and cetuximab in mice bearing tumor cell xenografts corresponded to SVCT-2 protein levels. Interestingly, cell death induced by the combination of L-ascorbic acid and cetuximab resulted in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. These cell death mechanisms were related to a disruption of the ERK pathway and were represented by the impaired activation of RAFs and the activation of the ASK-1-p38 pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that resistance to cetuximab in human colon cancer patients with a mutant KRAS can be bypassed by L-ascorbic acid in an SVCT-2-dependent manner. Furthermore, SVCT-2 in mutant KRAS colon cancer may act as a potent marker for potentiating L-ascorbic acid co-treatment with cetuximab. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro evaluation of anticancer properties of exopolysaccharides from Lactobacillus acidophilus in colon cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, Venkataraman; Ramachandran, Sharavan; Balahmar, Reham Mohammed; Pandian, Sureshbabu Ram Kumar; Sivasubramaniam, Shiva D; Nellaiah, Hariharan; Sundar, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    The present work aims at studying the effect of exopolysaccharides (EPS) from Lactobacillus acidophilus on the colon cancer cell lines in vitro. Initial analysis showed that EPS has antioxidative properties. EPS was also found to induce cytotoxicity in two colon cancer cell lines, viz. HCT15 and CaCo2 under normoxia and hypoxia. The membrane integrity was also found to be affected in EPS-treated cells. Once the toxic concentration was determined (5 mg/ml), the effect of EPS on the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of various genes was studied by quantitative real-time (RT)-PCR under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The results suggest that EPS downregulated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and upregulated the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3), hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α), and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). An increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was also observed. These results show that EPS may inhibit the expressions of genes involved in tumor angiogenesis and survival. Increase in the expression of HO-1 also shows that EPS have antioxidative properties.

  14. Apigenin Restrains Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation via Targeted Blocking of Pyruvate Kinase M2-Dependent Glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shuhua; Shi, Jiangying; Yang, Peng; Jia, Bin; Wu, Haili; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Zhuoyu

    2017-09-20

    Apigenin (AP), as an anticancer agent, has been widely explored. However, the molecular targets of apigenin on tumor metabolism are unclear. Herein, we found that AP could block cellular glycolysis through restraining the tumor-specific pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) activity and expression and further significantly induce anti-colon cancer effects. The IC50 values of AP against HCT116, HT29, and DLD1 cells were 27.9 ± 2.45, 48.2 ± 3.01 and 89.5 ± 4.89 μM, respectively. Fluorescence spectra and solid-phase AP extraction assays proved that AP could directly bind to PKM2 and markedly inhibit PKM2 activity in vitro and in HCT116 cells. Interestingly, in the presence of d-fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FBP), the inhibitory effect of AP on PKM2 was not reversed, which suggests that AP is a new allosteric inhibitor of PKM2. RT-PCR and Western blot assays showed that AP could ensure a low PKM2/PKM1 ratio in HCT116 cells via blocking the β-catenin/c-Myc/PTBP1 signal pathway. Hence, PKM2 represents a novel potential target of AP against colon cancer.

  15. Anticarcinogenic activity of polyphenolic extracts from grape stems against breast, colon, renal and thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahpazidou, Despina; Geromichalos, George D; Stagos, Dimitrios; Apostolou, Anna; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Tzanakakis, George N; Hayes, A Wallace; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2014-10-15

    A major part of the wineries' wastes is composed of grape stems which are discarded mainly in open fields and cause environmental problems due mainly to their high polyphenolic content. The grape stem extracts' use as a source of high added value polyphenols presents great interest because this combines a profitable venture with environmental protection close to wine-producing zones. In the present study, at first, the Total Polyphenolic Content (TPC) and the polyphenolic composition of grape stem extracts from four different Greek Vitis vinifera varieties were determined by HPLC methods. Afterwards, the grape stem extracts were examined for their ability to inhibit growth of colon (HT29), breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-23), renal (786-0 and Caki-1) and thyroid (K1) cancer cells. The cancer cells were exposed to the extracts for 72 h and the effects on cell growth were evaluated using the SRB assay. The results indicated that all extracts inhibited cell proliferation, with IC₅₀ values of 121-230 μg/ml (MCF-7), 121-184 μg/ml (MDA-MD-23), 175-309 μg/ml (HT29), 159-314 μg/ml (K1), 180-225 μg/ml (786-0) and 134->400 μg/ml (Caki-1). This is the first study presenting the inhibitory activity of grape stem extracts against growth of colon, breast, renal and thyroid cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of APC and AXIN2 expression by intestinal tumor suppressor CDX2 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Krüger; Coskun, Mehmet; Bzorek, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Wnt signaling is often constitutively active in colorectal cancer cells. The expression of the intestinal specific transcription factor CDX2 is found to be transiently decreased in invasive cells at the tumor/stroma interface. A recent ChIP-Seq study has indicated that several Wnt signaling...... suggest that a low CDX2 level has influence on the Wnt signaling in invasive colon cancer cells possibly promoting cellular migration....

  17. Prevention and treatment of colon cancer by peroral administration of HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthia, Manoj; Storm, Petter; Nadeem, Aftab; Hsiung, Sabrina; Svanborg, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Most colon cancers start with dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling and remain a major therapeutic challenge. Examining whether HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) may be used for colon cancer treatment is logical, based on the properties of the complex and its biological context. To investigate if HAMLET can be used for colon cancer treatment and prevention. Apc(Min)(/+) mice, which carry mutations relevant to hereditary and sporadic human colorectal tumours, were used as a model for human disease. HAMLET was given perorally in therapeutic and prophylactic regimens. Tumour burden and animal survival of HAMLET-treated and sham-fed mice were compared. Tissue analysis focused on Wnt/β-catenin signalling, proliferation markers and gene expression, using microarrays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Confocal microscopy, reporter assay, immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, ion flux assays and holographic imaging were used to determine effects on colon cancer cells. Peroral HAMLET administration reduced tumour progression and mortality in Apc(Min)(/+) mice. HAMLET accumulated specifically in tumour tissue, reduced β-catenin and related tumour markers. Gene expression analysis detected inhibition of Wnt signalling and a shift to a more differentiated phenotype. In colon cancer cells with APC mutations, HAMLET altered β-catenin integrity and localisation through an ion channel-dependent pathway, defining a new mechanism for controlling β-catenin signalling. Remarkably, supplying HAMLET to the drinking water from the time of weaning also significantly prevented tumour development. These data identify HAMLET as a new, peroral agent for colon cancer prevention and treatment, especially needed in people carrying APC mutations, where colon cancer remains a leading cause of death.

  18. NADPH oxidase 1 supports proliferation of colon cancer cells by modulating reactive oxygen species-dependent signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Agnes; Markel, Susan; Gaur, Shikha; Liu, Han; Lu, Jiamo; Jiang, Guojian; Wu, Xiwei; Antony, Smitha; Wu, Yongzhong; Melillo, Giovanni; Meitzler, Jennifer L; Haines, Diana C; Butcher, Donna; Roy, Krishnendu; Doroshow, James H

    2017-05-12

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in cell signaling and proliferation. NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1), a membrane-bound flavin dehydrogenase that generates O2̇̄, is highly expressed in colon cancer. To investigate the role that NOX1 plays in colon cancer growth, we used shRNA to decrease NOX1 expression stably in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. The 80-90% decrease in NOX1 expression achieved by RNAi produced a significant decline in ROS production and a G1/S block that translated into a 2-3-fold increase in tumor cell doubling time without increased apoptosis. The block at the G1/S checkpoint was associated with a significant decrease in cyclin D1 expression and profound inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Decreased steady-state MAPK phosphorylation occurred concomitant with a significant increase in protein phosphatase activity for two colon cancer cell lines in which NOX1 expression was knocked down by RNAi. Diminished NOX1 expression also contributed to decreased growth, blood vessel density, and VEGF and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression in HT-29 xenografts initiated from NOX1 knockdown cells. Microarray analysis, supplemented by real-time PCR and Western blotting, revealed that the expression of critical regulators of cell proliferation and angiogenesis, including c-MYC, c-MYB, and VEGF, were down-regulated in association with a decline in hypoxic HIF-1α protein expression downstream of silenced NOX1 in both colon cancer cell lines and xenografts. These studies suggest a role for NOX1 in maintaining the proliferative phenotype of some colon cancers and the potential of NOX1 as a therapeutic target in this disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using brown algae Cystoseira baccata: Its activity in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ballesteros, N; Prado-López, S; Rodríguez-González, J B; Lastra, M; Rodríguez-Argüelles, M C

    2017-05-01

    This study is the first dealt with the use of brown macroalgae Cystoseira baccata (CB) extracts in obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au@CB) through an eco-friendly, fast, one-pot synthetic route. The formation of spherical, stable, polycrystalline nanoparticles with mean diameter of 8.4±2.2nm was demonstrated by UV-vis spectroscopy, TEM, HRTEM, STEM and zeta potential measurements. The extract appears to act as a protective agent where the particles are embedded, keeping them separated, avoiding aggregation and coalescence. The EELS and EDS analyses confirmed the elemental composition of the extract and nanoparticles. Moreover, the functional group of biomolecules present in CB and Au@CB were characterized by FTIR. The effects of CB extract and Au@CB were tested in vitro on the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2, as well as on normal primary neonatal dermal fibroblast cell line PCS-201-010. Results show a stronger cytotoxic effect against HT-29 than that on Caco-2; interestingly, a lack of toxicity on PCS-201-010 was obtained. Finally, the apoptotic activity was determined; Au@CB is able to induce apoptosis activation by the extrinsic and mitochondrial pathway in our CRC in vitro model. These encouraging results suggest that Au@CB has a significant potential for the treatment of colon rectal cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of neutral ceramidase in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barros, Mónica; Coant, Nicolas; Kawamori, Toshihiko; Wada, Masayuki; Snider, Ashley J; Truman, Jean-Philip; Wu, Bill X; Furuya, Hideki; Clarke, Christopher J; Bialkowska, Agnieszka B; Ghaleb, Amr; Yang, Vincent W; Obeid, Lina M; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2016-12-01

    Alterations in sphingolipid metabolism, especially ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate, have been linked to colon cancer, suggesting that enzymes of sphingolipid metabolism may emerge as novel regulators and targets in colon cancer. Neutral ceramidase (nCDase), a key enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism that hydrolyzes ceramide into sphingosine, is highly expressed in the intestine; however, its role in colon cancer has not been defined. Here we show that molecular and pharmacological inhibition of nCDase in colon cancer cells increases ceramide, and this is accompanied by decreased cell survival and increased apoptosis and autophagy, with minimal effects on noncancerous cells. Inhibition of nCDase resulted in loss of β-catenin and inhibition of ERK, components of pathways relevant for colon cancer development. Furthermore, inhibition of nCDase in a xenograft model delayed tumor growth and increased ceramide while decreasing proliferation. It is noteworthy that mice lacking nCDase treated with azoxymethane were protected from tumor formation. Taken together, these studies show that nCDase is pivotal for regulating initiation and development of colon cancer, and these data suggest that this enzyme is a suitable and novel target for colon cancer therapy.-García-Barros, M., Coant, N., Kawamori, T., Wada, M., Snider, A. J., Truman, J.-P., Wu, B. X., Furuya, H., Clarke, C. J., Bialkowska, A. B., Ghaleb, A., Yang, V. W., Obeid, L. M., Hannun, Y. A. Role of neutral ceramidase in colon cancer. © FASEB.

  1. Reduced migration of MLH1 deficient colon cancer cells depends on SPTAN1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Defects in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein MLH1 are frequently observed in sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers (CRC). Affected tumors generate much less metastatic potential than the MLH1 proficient forms. Although MLH1 has been shown to be not only involved in postreplicative MMR but also in several MMR independent processes like cytoskeletal organization, the connection between MLH1 and metastasis remains unclear. We recently identified non-erythroid spectrin αII (SPTAN1), a scaffolding protein involved in cell adhesion and motility, to interact with MLH1. In the current study, the interaction of MLH1 and SPTAN1 and its potential consequences for CRC metastasis was evaluated. Methods Nine cancer cell lines as well as fresh and paraffin embedded colon cancer tissue from 12 patients were used in gene expression studies of SPTAN1 and MLH1. Co-expression of SPTAN1 and MLH1 was analyzed by siRNA knock down of MLH1 in HeLa, HEK293, MLH1 positive HCT116, SW480 and LoVo cells. Effects on cellular motility were determined in MLH1 deficient HCT116 and MLH1 deficient HEK293T compared to their MLH1 proficient sister cells, respectively. Results MLH1 deficiency is clearly associated with SPTAN1 reduction. Moreover, siRNA knock down of MLH1 decreased the mRNA level of SPTAN1 in HeLa, HEK293 as well as in MLH1 positive HCT116 cells, which indicates a co-expression of SPTAN1 by MLH1. In addition, cellular motility of MLH1 deficient HCT116 and MLH1 deficient HEK293T cells was impaired compared to the MLH1 proficient sister clones. Consequently, overexpression of SPTAN1 increased migration of MLH1 deficient cells while knock down of SPTAN1 decreased cellular mobility of MLH1 proficient cells, indicating SPTAN1-dependent migration ability. Conclusions These data suggest that SPTAN1 levels decreased in concordance with MLH1 reduction and impaired cellular mobility in MLH1 deficient colon cancer cells. Therefore, aggressiveness of MLH1-positive CRC might be

  2. MicroRNA-200b is downregulated in colon cancer budding cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindebjerg, Jan; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2017-01-01

    Background The microRNA-200 (miR-200) family acts as a major suppressor of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Impaired miR-200 expression may lead to EMT initiation and eventually cancer dissemination. The presence of tumor budding cells (TBC) is associated with metastasis and poor prognosis, and molecular similarities to EMT indicate that these cells may reflect ongoing EMT. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of miR-200b in budding cells of colon cancer and the relationship with the EMT-markers E-cadherin, β-catenin and laminin-5γ2. Material & methods MiR-200b was investigated by in situ hybridization in 58 cases of stage II (n = 36) and III colon (n = 22) cancers with tumor budding. Expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin and laminin-5γ2 was examined by immunohistochemistry. A multiplex fluorescence assay combining miR-200b with cytokeratin and laminin-5γ2 was employed on a subset of 16 samples. Results MiR-200b was downregulated in the TBC at the invasive front of 41 out of 58 (71%) cases. The decline was present in both mismatch satellite stable and instable adenocarcinomas. The majority of cases also showed loss of membranous E-cadherin and increased nuclear β-catenin in the TBC, while laminin-5γ2 expression was upregulated at the invasive front and in the tumor buds of approximately half the adenocarcinomas. However, the miR-200b decline was not statistically associated with the expression of any of the EMT-markers. The miR-200b decline was also documented by multiplex fluorescence. Fourteen out of fifteen cases showed a decrease in miR-200b expression in the majority of the TBC, but no obvious relationship between miR-200b and laminin-5γ2 expression was observed. Conclusion: The findings support the assumption of a miR-200b related downregulation in colon cancer budding cells. Whether miR-200b expression may be of clinical significance awaits further studies. PMID:28552992

  3. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  4. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  5. KRAS mutation is a predictor of oxaliplatin sensitivity in colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lin Lin

    Full Text Available Molecular biomarkers to determine the effectiveness of targeted therapies in cancer treatment have been widely adopted in colorectal cancer (CRC, but those to predict chemotherapy sensitivity remain poorly defined. We tested our hypothesis that KRAS mutation may be a predictor of oxaliplatin sensitivity in CRC. KRAS was knocked-down in KRAS-mutant CRC cells (DLD-1(G13D and SW480(G12V by small interfering RNAs (siRNA and overexpressed in KRAS-wild-type CRC cells (COLO320DM by KRAS-mutant vectors to generate paired CRC cells. These paired CRC cells were tested by oxaliplatin, irinotecan and 5FU to determine the change in drug sensitivity by MTT assay and flow cytometry. Reasons for sensitivity alteration were further determined by western blot and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT -PCR. In KRAS-wild-type CRC cells (COLO320DM, KRAS overexpression by mutant vectors caused excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1 downregulation in protein and mRNA levels, and enhanced oxaliplatin sensitivity. In contrast, in KRAS-mutant CRC cells (DLD-1(G13D and SW480(G12V, KRAS knocked-down by KRAS-siRNA led to ERCC1 upregulation and increased oxaliplatin resistance. The sensitivity of irinotecan and 5FU had not changed in the paired CRC cells. To validate ERCC1 as a predictor of sensitivity for oxaliplatin, ERCC1 was knocked-down by siRNA in KRAS-wild-type CRC cells, which restored oxaliplatin sensitivity. In contrast, ERCC1 was overexpressed by ERCC1-expressing vectors in KRAS-mutant CRC cells, and caused oxaliplatin resistance. Overall, our findings suggest that KRAS mutation is a predictor of oxaliplatin sensitivity in colon cancer cells by the mechanism of ERCC1 downregulation.

  6. Molecular mechanism of chemoresistance by miR-215 in osteosarcoma and colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Formentini Andrea

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Translational control mediated by non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs plays a key role in the mechanism of cellular resistance to anti-cancer drug treatment. Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR and thymidylate synthase (TYMS, TS are two of the most important targets for antifolate- and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapies in the past 50 years. In this study, we investigated the roles of miR-215 in the chemoresistance to DHFR inhibitor methotrexate (MTX and TS inhibitor Tomudex (TDX. Results The protein levels of both DHFR and TS were suppressed by miR-215 without the alteration of the target mRNA transcript levels. Interestingly, despite the down-regulation of DHFR and TS proteins, ectopic expression of miR-215 resulted in a decreased sensitivity to MTX and TDX. Paradoxically, gene-specific small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs against DHFR or TS had the opposite effect, increasing sensitivity to MTX and TDX. Further studies revealed that over-expression of miR-215 inhibited cell proliferation and triggered cell cycle arrest at G2 phase, and that this effect was accompanied by a p53-dependent up-regulation of p21. The inhibitory effect on cell proliferation was more pronounced in cell lines containing wild-type p53, but was not seen in cells transfected with siRNAs against DHFR or TS. Moreover, denticleless protein homolog (DTL, a cell cycle-regulated nuclear and centrosome protein, was confirmed to be one of the critical targets of miR-215, and knock-down of DTL by siRNA resulted in enhanced G2-arrest, p53 and p21 induction, and reduced cell proliferation. Additionally, cells subjected to siRNA against DTL exhibited increased chemoresistance to MTX and TDX. Endogenous miR-215 was elevated about 3-fold in CD133+HI/CD44+HI colon cancer stem cells that exhibit slow proliferating rate and chemoresistance compared to control bulk CD133+/CD44+ colon cancer cells. Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that miR-215, through the suppression

  7. DTNQ-Pro, a Mimetic Dipeptide, Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells to 5-Fluorouracil Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Gomez-Monterrey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of growing human colon cancer cells to chemotherapy agents has been correlated to endogenous overexpression of stress proteins including the family of heat shock proteins (HSPs. Previously, we have demonstrated that a quinone-based mimetic dipeptide, named DTNQ-Pro, induced differentiation of growing Caco-2 cells through inhibition of HSP70 and HSP90. In addition, our product induced a HSP27 and vimentin intracellular redistribution. In the present study, we have evaluated whether a decrease of stress proteins induced by DTNQ-Pro in Caco-2 cells could sensitize these cells to treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU cytotoxicity. The pretreatment of Caco-2 with 500 nM of DTNQ-Pro increases lipid peroxidation and decreases expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and FOXO3a. At the same experimental conditions, an increase of the 5-FU-induced growth inhibition of Caco-2 cells was recorded. These effects could be due to enhanced DTNQ-Pro-induced membrane lipid peroxidation that, in turn, causes the sensitization of cancer cells to the cytotoxicity mediated by 5-FU.

  8. Influences of combination of chemotherapy and autophagy inhibitor on the calreticulin expression in colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-qing PENG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the influence of chemotherapy combined with autophagy inhibitor on apoptosis and calreticulin (CRT expression on colonic cancer cells. Methods  The colon cancer cells HCT116 were taken as the target in the present study. The inhibition rates (IC50 of chemotherapeutics oxaliplatin, 5-Fu and SN-38 were assessed by MTT assay. The changes in CRT expression on the membrane of HCT116 and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry before and after treatment with chemotherapeutics. CRT location in HCT116 was detected by fluorescent immunoassay before and after treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The influence on HCT116 autophagy was determined by Western blotting after treatment with these chemotherapeutic agents. The changes in CRT expression on HCT116 membrane and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry before and after treatment with the chemotherapeutics combined with autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ. Results  The ratio of apoptosis and membrane expression of CRT were elevated 12 hours after treatment with Oxaliplatin, 5-Fu and SN38, but without statistical significance. Fluorescent immunoassay showed a transposition of CRT from cytoplasm to the membrane after oxaliplatin treatment. Western blotting revealed that oxaliplatin, 5Fu and SN38 induced autophagy of HCT116 cells, and the autophagy was inhibited by the addition of CQ. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the percentages of annexin V+ cells and membrane expression of CRT were higher after treatment with the chemotherapy agents combined with CQ. The upregulation of CRT expression on membrane was obviously higher after treatment with oxaliplatin combined with CQ than that before the treatment with these agents (P=0.027. Conclusion  Oxaliplatin combined with CQ may increase the apoptosis rate of HCT116 cells and upregulate CRT expression in the membrane. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.04.03

  9. SN38 conjugated hyaluronic acid gold nanoparticles as a novel system against metastatic colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Hosniyeh; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Varnamkhasti, Behrang Shiri; Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2017-06-30

    Combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy has been proposed for better treatment of metastatic colon cancer. In this study SN38, a highly potent cytotoxic agent, was conjugated to negatively charged hyaluronic acid (HA), which was deposited on the surface of the positively charged gold nanoparticles via electrostatic interaction. The drug conjugation and its interaction with gold nanoparticles were verified by 1 H NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies, respectively. The prepared SN38-HA gold NPs are negatively charged spherical nanoparticles with an average size of 75±10nm. In vitro release study revealed that drug release in acidic conditions (pH 5.2) was faster than that in physiological pH. Red light emitting diode (LED, 630nm, 30mW) was used as a light source for photothermal experiments. The drug release in acidic conditions was increased up to 30% using red LED illumination (6min) in comparison with experiment carried out indark. The cytotoxicity study on MUC1 positive HT29, SW480 colon cancer cells and MUC1 negative CHO cells, showed higher toxicity of the nanoparticles on HT29 and SW480 cell lines compared to CHO cells. Confocal microscopy images along with flow cytometry analysis confirm the cytotoxicity results. The incubation time for reaching IC50 decreases from 48h to 24h by LED illumination after nanoparticle treatment. Migratory potential of the HT29 and SW480 cell lines was reduced by co-application of SN38-HA gold NPs and LED radiation. Also anti-proliferative study indicates that LED radiation has increased the cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles and this effect is remained up to 8days. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Down-regulation of liver-intestine cadherin enhances noscapine-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xia; Liu, Meng; Zhu, Qingxi; Tan, Jie; Liu, Weijie; Wang, Yanfen; Chen, Wei; Zou, Yanli; Cai, Yishan; Han, Zheng; Huang, Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the signaling pathway of noscapine which induces apoptosis by blocking liver-intestine cadherin (CDH17) gene in colon cancer SW480 cells. Human colon cancer SW480 cells were transfected with CDH17 interference vector and treatment with 10 µmol/L noscapine. The proliferation and apoptosis of SW480 cells were detected by MTT assay and AnnexinV-FITC/PI flow cytometry kit (BD), respectively. Cell invasion were assessed by transwell assays. Apoptosis related proteins (Cyt-c, Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) levels were evaluated by western blot. Compared to the noscapine group, the proliferation was decreased significantly and the apoptosis was increased significantly in SW480 cells of the siCDH17+noscapine group. Cyt-c and Bax protein levels in siCDH17+noscapine group was higher than that of the noscapine group, but Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein levels in siCDH17+noscapine group were lower than that of the noscapine group. Moreover, up-expression of CDH17 inhibited the efficacy of noscapine-induced apoptosis in SW480 cells. We inferred that down-expression of extrinsic CDH17 gene can conspicuously promote apoptosis-inducing effects of noscapine on human colon cancer SW480 cells, which is a novel strategy to improve chemotherapeutic effects on colon cancer.

  11. Difluorinated-curcumin (CDF restores PTEN expression in colon cancer cells by down-regulating miR-21.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchita Roy

    Full Text Available Despite recent advancement in medicine, nearly 50% of patients with colorectal cancer show recurrence of the disease. Although the reasons for the high relapse are not fully understood, the presence of chemo- and radiotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells, where many oncomirs like microRNA-21 (miR-21 are upregulated, could be one of the underlying causes. miR-21 regulates the processes of invasion and metastasis by downregulating multiple tumor/metastatic suppressor genes including PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog. Tumor suppressor protein PTEN controls self-renewal of stem cells. Indeed, our current data demonstrate a marked downregulation of PTEN in SCID mice xenografts of miR-21 over-expressing colon cancer HCT116 cells. Colonospheres that are highly enriched in cancer stem/stem like cells reveal increased miR-21 expression and decreased PTEN. Difluorinated curcumin (CDF, a novel analog of the dietary ingredient curcumin, which has been shown to inhibit the growth of 5-Flurouracil + Oxaliplatin resistant colon cancer cells, downregulated miR-21 in chemo-resistant colon cancer HCT116 and HT-29 cells and restored PTEN levels with subsequent reduction in Akt phosphorylation. Similar results were also observed in metastatic colon cancer SW620 cells. Since PTEN-Akt confers drug resistance to different malignancies including colorectal cancer, our observation of normalization of miR-21-PTEN-Akt pathway by CDF suggests that the compound could be a potential therapeutic agent for chemotherapy-resistant colorectal cancer.

  12. Calreticulin is a fine tuning molecule in epibrassinolide-induced apoptosis through activating endoplasmic reticulum stress in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obakan-Yerlikaya, Pinar; Arisan, Elif Damla; Coker-Gurkan, Ajda; Adacan, Kaan; Ozbey, Utku; Somuncu, Berna; Baran, Didem; Palavan-Unsal, Narcin

    2017-06-01

    Epibrassinolide (EBR), a member of brassinostreoids plant hormones with cell proliferation promoting role in plants, is a natural polyhydroxysteroid with structural similarity to steroid hormones of vertebrates. EBR has antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effect in various cancer cells. Although EBR has been shown to affect survival and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathways in a p53-independent manner, the exact molecular targets of EBR are still under investigation. Our recent SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture) data showed that the most significantly altered protein after EBR treatment was calreticulin (CALR). CALR, a chaperone localized in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen, plays role in protein folding and buffering Ca2+ ions. The alteration of CALR may cause ER stress and unfolded protein response correspondingly the induction of apoptosis. Unfolded proteins are conducted to 26S proteasomal degradation following ubiquitination. Our study revealed that EBR treatment caused ER stress and UPR by altering CALR expression causing caspase-dependent apoptosis in HCT 116, HT29, DLD-1, and SW480 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, 48 h EBR treatment did not caused UPR in Fetal Human Colon cells (FHC) and Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast cells (MEF). In addition our findings showed that HCT 116 colon cancer cells lacking Bax and Puma expression still undergo UPR and related apoptosis. CALR silencing and rapamycin co-treatment prevented EBR-induced UPR and apoptosis, whereas 26S proteasome inhibition further increased the effect of EBR in colon cancer cells. All these findings showed that EBR is an ER stress and apoptotic inducer in colon cancer cells without affecting non-malignant cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Chemopreventive activity of ellagitannins and their derivatives from black raspberry seeds on HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunnho; Jung, Hana; Lee, Heejae; Yi, Hae Chang; Kwak, Ho-kyung; Hwang, Keum Taek

    2015-05-01

    Black raspberry (BRB) seeds are a major waste product after fruit processing. The seeds are abundant in ellagitannins (ET), a class of hydrolysable tannins, which are hydrolyzed to ellagic acid (EA) and further metabolized to urolithin A (UA) and urolithin B (UB), known to be bioavailable in the colon and the prostate. In this study, the anti-cancer activities of these compounds were evaluated on HT-29 colon cancer cells. ET, EA, UA and UB inhibited the proliferation of the cancer cells. EA caused a slight, but significant cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and urolithins caused cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and upregulated p21 expression. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V-FITC/PI assay when treated with the compounds. Disruption in mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspases 8 and 9 suggest that both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways may be involved. Activation of caspase 3 and cleavage of PARP further confirmed the induction of the apoptosis. ET, EA, UA and UB showed anti-cancer activity by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis on HT-29 human colon cancer cells. This study suggests that the BRB seeds could be a potential source of anti-cancer ET.

  14. Silencing the livin gene enhances the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs on colon cancer cells.

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    Oh, Bo Young; Kim, Kwang Ho; Chung, Soon Sup; Lee, Ryung-Ah

    2016-12-01

    Livin is associated with drug response in several cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of silencing the livin gene expression on anticancer drug response in colorectal cancer. siRNA was transfected at different concentrations (0, 10, and 30nM) into HCT116 cells, then cells were treated with either 5-fluorouracil (FU)/leucovorin (LV) or oxaliplatin (L-OHP)/5-FU/LV. Cellular viability and apoptosis were evaluated following silencing of livin gene expression combined with treatment with anticancer drugs. Livin gene expression was effectively suppressed by 30nM siRNA compared with control and 10nM siRNA. The 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that proliferation was effectively inhibited in cells treated with a combination of both siRNA and an anticancer drug, compared to cells treated with siRNA-Livin or anticancer drug alone. In particular, the combination of 30nM siRNA and L-OHP/5-FU/LV resulted in a 93.8% and 91.4% decrease, compared to untreated control or L-OHP/5-FU/LV alone, respectively. Cellular proliferation was most effectively suppressed by a combination of 30nM of siRNA and L-OHP/5-FU/LV compared to other combinations. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of livin gene expression could significantly suppress colon cancer growth and enhance the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs such as 5-FU and L-OHP. The results of this study suggest that silencing livin gene expression in combination with treatment with anticancer drugs might be a novel cancer therapy for colorectal cancer.

  15. Laminarin Induces Apoptosis of Human Colon Cancer LOVO Cells through a Mitochondrial Pathway

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    He Zhang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many scientific studies have shown that laminarin has anti-tumor effects, but the anti-tumor mechanism was unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of laminarin on the induction of apoptosis in human colon cancer LOVO cells and the molecular mechanism involved. LOVO cells were treated with different concentrations of laminarin at different times. Morphology observations were performed to determine the effects of laminarin on apoptosis of LOVO cells. Flow cytometry (FCM was used to detect the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and pH. Laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM was used to analyze intracellular calcium ion concentration, mitochondrion permeability transition pore (MPTP and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. Western blotd were performed to analyze the expressions of Cyt-C, Caspase-9 and -3. The results showed the apoptosis morphology, which showed cell protuberance, concentrated cytoplasm and apoptotic bodies, was obvious after 72 h treatment. Laminarin treatment for 24 h increased the intracellular level of ROS and Ca2+; decreased pH value; activated intracellular MPTP and decreased MMP in dose-dependent manners. It also induced the release of Cyt-C and the activation of Caspase-9 and -3. In conclusion, laminarin induces LOVO cell apoptosis through a mitochondrial pathway, suggesting that it could be a potent agent for cancer prevention and treatment.

  16. Induction of apoptosis by cannabinoids in prostate and colon cancer cells is phosphatase dependent.

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    Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Joseph, Sonia; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Safe, Stephen H

    2011-11-01

    We hypothesized that the anticancer activity of cannabinoids was linked to induction of phosphatases. The effects of cannabidiol (CBD) and the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212 (WIN) on LNCaP (prostate) and SW480 (colon) cancer cell proliferation were determined by cell counting; apoptosis was determined by cleavage of poly(ADP)ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3 (Western blots); and phosphatase mRNAs were determined by real-time PCR. The role of phosphatases and cannabinoid receptors in mediating CBD- and WIN-induced apoptosis was determined by inhibition and receptor knockdown. CBD and WIN inhibited LNCaP and SW480 cell growth and induced mRNA expression of several phosphatases, and the phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate significantly inhibited cannabinoid-induced PARP cleavage in both cell lines, whereas only CBD-induced apoptosis was CB1 and CB2 receptor-dependent. Cannabinoid receptor agonists induce phosphatases and phosphatase-dependent apoptosis in cancer cell lines; however, the role of the CB receptor in mediating this response is ligand-dependent.

  17. Antiproliferative effect of a food coloring on colon cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norizadeh Tazehkand, M

    2017-01-01

    4-MEI (4-Methylimidazole) is used as a chemical intermediate, crude material or component in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, photographic and photothermographic chemicals, dyes and pigments and agricultural chemicals. 4-MEI is unintentionally found in our food. Caramel colour (which is the most used beverage colouring and food), dark beers and common brands of cola drinks may comprise more than 100 μg of this compound per 12-ounce serving. 4-MEI is widely used by people and colon cancer is common in our countries. So, it was decided to do in vitro analysis of anti-cancer effect of 4-MEI by MTT test using htc-116 cell line.In this study, mouse Htc-116 cell line was treated with 4-MEI concentrations of 300, 450, 600 and 750 µg/mL for 24 hours and 48 hours periods, after that antiproliferative effect of the 4-MEI was studied by MTT assay. In this study 4-MEI at highest concentration of 24h and at all concentration for 48 h treatment time significantly inhibited cell proliferation when it was compared to control. Also, exposing to the 4-MEI for 48 hours led to a decrease in cells proliferation by concentration dependent manner. This result showed that 4-MEI had anticancer effect in htc-116 cells. However, it has to be evaluated with different new studies (Tab. 1, Fig. 4, Ref. 19).

  18. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition associates with maintenance of stemness in spheroid-derived stem-like colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Yan; Wei, Bo; Fang, Jia-Feng; Zhang, Shi; Zhang, Fu-Cheng; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Lan, Tian-Yun; Lu, Hui-Qiong; Wei, Hong-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Despite earlier studies demonstrating characteristics of colon cancer stem cells (CCSCs) and the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor development, it remains controversial as to the relationship between CCSCs and EMT. In this study, in order to present an insight into this relationship in colon cancer, we developed HCT116 and HT29 sphere models, which are known to be the cells enriching cancer stem cells. Compared to their parental counterparts, spheroid cells displayed lower homotypic/heterotypic adhesion but higher in vitro migratory/invasive capacity, as well as higher tumorigenic and metastatic potential in vivo. The spheroid cells also demonstrated down-regulated E-cadherin and up-regulated α-SMA and Vimentin expression, which is the typical phenotype of EMT. In order to explore whether this phenomenon is associated to activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, we detected several key signaling molecules. Compared with their parental cells, HCT116 and HT29 spheroid cells demonstrated down-regulated expression of GSK3β, but up-regulated expression of Slug and Snail. And also, the up-regulation of nucleus β-catenin in spheroid cells indicated that the free β-catenin transferred from cytoplasm to cell nucleus. Our findings indicate that spheroid cells have the characteristics of colon cancer stem cells, and EMT may account for their stemness and malignancy. And persistent activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway may play an important role in the EMT of CCSCs.

  19. Microbiota source impact in vitro metabolite colonic production and anti-proliferative effect of spent coffee grounds on human colon cancer cells (HT-29).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Arriaga, Angélica María; Dave Oomah, B; Campos-Vega, Rocio

    2017-07-01

    Human gut flora-mediated non-digestible fraction of spent coffee grounds (hgf-NDSCG) was evaluated for its chemopreventive effect and molecular mechanisms involved on human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cell survival using two different microbiota source [lean (L) and overweight (OW)]. The source of human gut flora (hgf) (L or OW) affected the pH of hgf-NDSCG only minimally, but linearly reduced those of hgf-inulin. The variability between lean and overweight microbiota was characterized by the metabolism and/or bioaccessibility of different phenolic metabolites, their intermediate and end products as well as by variable time courses. Apoptosis of colon cancer HT-29 cells depended on the microbiota source with the lean microbiota expressing a low lethal concentration 50 (LC50/L-hgf-NDSCG=13.5%). We demonstrate that NDSCG and its colonic metabolite from lean microbiota induced HT-29 cell apoptosis by reducing catalase and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α as biomarkers of in vivo oxidative stress as the primary mechanism underlying its overall chemoprotection against colon cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thymosin beta4 targeting impairs tumorigenic activity of colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Mollinari, Cristiana; di Martino, Simona; Biffoni, Mauro; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Pagliuca, Alfredo; de Stefano, Maria Chiara; Circo, Rita; Merlo, Daniela; De Maria, Ruggero; Garaci, Enrico

    2010-11-01

    Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) is an actin-binding peptide overexpressed in several tumors, including colon carcinomas. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Tβ4 in promoting the tumorigenic properties of colorectal cancer stem cells (CR-CSCs), which are responsible for tumor initiation and growth. We first found that CR-CSCs from different patients have higher Tβ4 levels than normal epithelial cells. Then, we used a lentiviral strategy to down-regulate Tβ4 expression in CR-CSCs and analyzed the effects of such modulation on proliferation, survival, and tumorigenic activity of CR-CSCs. Empty vector-transduced CR-CSCs were used as a control. Targeting of the Tβ4 produced CR-CSCs with a lower capacity to grow and migrate in culture and, interestingly, reduced tumor size and aggressiveness of CR-CSC-based xenografts in mice. Moreover, such loss in tumorigenic activity was accompanied by a significant increase of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and a concomitant reduction of the integrin-linked kinase (ILK) expression, which resulted in a decreased activation of protein kinase B (Akt). Accordingly, exogenous expression of an active form of Akt rescued all the protumoral features lost after Tβ4 targeting in CR-CSCs. In conclusion, Tβ4 may have important implications for therapeutic intervention for treatment of human colon carcinoma.

  1. Cytotoxicity of curcumin silica nanoparticle complexes conjugated with hyaluronic acid on colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surya Prakash; Sharma, Mrinalini; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-03-01

    We report results of our investigations on the cytotoxic efficacy of Organically modified silica nanoparticle (SiNp)-curcumin complex conjugated with hyaluronic acid (HA) (HA-SiNp-cur) and HA free SiNp-cur complex in human colon carcinoma (colo-205) cells. Curcumin was loaded in SiNp and resulting complexes were conjugated with HA, which has a strong affinity for cancer cells expressing CD44. After conjugation with HA, the average size of the SiNp-cur nanoparticles increased from 45 nm to 70 nm, and zeta potential changed to -33 mV from -26 mV. Compared to free curcumin and SiNp-cur, curcumin in HA-SiNp was more stable. The uptake and cytotoxicity of curcumin delivered through HA-SiNp-cur was significantly higher in monolayer and spheroids as compared to free curcumin and HA free SiNp-cur. Concomitantly, HA-SiNp-cur complex treatment resulted in higher inhibition of growth and migration of cells in spheroids. Further, incubation of colo-205 cancer cells with an excess of HA impaired the uptake of HA-SiNp-cur confirming the involvement of receptor mediated endocytosis in the uptake of HA conjugated nanocomplex. Time dependent increase in the fluorescence of curcumin observed in the release media when HA-SiNp-cur was incubated with hyaluronidase suggests involvement of enzyme in release of curcumin from nanoparticle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypoxia Induces Autophagy through Translational Up-Regulation of Lysosomal Proteins in Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chih Lai

    Full Text Available Hypoxia occurs in a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis. Tumor cells have to adapt to hypoxia by altering their gene expression and protein synthesis. Here, we showed that hypoxia inhibits translation through activation of PERK and inactivation of mTOR in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Prolonged hypoxia (1% O2, 16 h dramatically inhibits general translation in HCT116 cells, yet selected mRNAs remain efficiently translated under such a condition. Using microarray analysis of polysome- associated mRNAs, we identified a large number of hypoxia-regulated genes at the translational level. Efficiently translated mRNAs during hypoxia were validated by polysome profiling and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of the up-regulated genes are involved in lysosome, glycan and lipid metabolism, antigen presentation, cell adhesion, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. The majority of down-regulated genes are involved in apoptosis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and oxidative phosphorylation. Further investigation showed that hypoxia induces lysosomal autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction through translational regulation in HCT116 cells. The abundance of several translation factors and the mTOR kinase activity are involved in hypoxia-induced mitochondrial autophagy in HCT116 cells. Our studies highlight the importance of translational regulation for tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia.

  3. A novel double-enhanced suicide gene therapy in a colon cancer cell line mediated by gef and apoptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulaiz, Houria; Aránega, Antonia; Cáceres, Blanca; Blanca, Cáceres; Alvarez, Pablo; Pablo, Alvarez; Serrano-Rodríguez, Fernando; Fernando, Rodríguez-Serrano; Carrillo, Esmeralda; Esmeralda, Carrillo; Melguizo, Consolación; Consolación, Melguizo; Prados, Jose; Jose, Prados

    2014-02-01

    Double-suicide gene therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of advanced cancer. It has become an important research line in the development of gene therapy to overcome the drawbacks of single-gene therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of double-suicide gene therapy with the two suicide genes, gef and apoptin, in colon carcinoma. gef and apoptin genes were cloned into a doxycycline-regulated retrovirus-mediated gene expression system. Expression of both genes in the DLD-1 cell line was confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cell viability was determined with the sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay, and the cell cycle was studied by propidium iodide (PI) staining. Annexin V-FITC and PI assays were used to evaluate apoptosis, and the results were confirmed by electron microscopy. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by JC-1 assay. Our results showed that the combined expression of gef and apoptin genes was strikingly more effective than the expression of either gene alone. Co-expression of gef and apoptin synergistically enhanced the decrease in cell viability, increasing necrosis and inducing apoptosis in colon cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway, which can be deficient in advanced or metastatic colon cancer. Double-suicide gene therapy based on gef and apoptin genes may be a candidate for the development of new colon cancer strategies, and further studies are warranted to establish the usefulness of double-suicide gene therapy in vivo.

  4. Endogenous expression of proteases in colon cancer cells facilitate influenza A viruses mediated oncolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturlan, Sanda; Stremitzer, Stefan; Bauman, Suzann; Sachet, Monika; Wolschek, Markus; Ruthsatz, Tanja; Egorov, Andrej; Bergmann, Michael

    2010-09-15

    Previously we have developed a prototype for conditionally replicating oncolytic influenza A virus which is based on deletions in the non-structural (NS1) protein. Multi-cycle replication of influenza A virus in malignant tissue is critically dependent on a protease which cleaves the viral entry protein. Here we demonstrate that the malignant colon cancer cell lines Caco-2, HT-29 and SW-620 can endogenously provide a virus-activating protease, which allows lytic multi-cycle replication of NS1 deletion viruses in those cancer cells in vitro. The oncolytic potency of an influenza NS1 deletion virus (NS1-80) was further tested in SCID mice bearing HT-29 derived tumors. The intra-tumoral injection of live, but not of heat inactivated NS1-80 virus significantly inhibited progression of established tumors. We conclude that a selected set of human cancer expressing virus activating- proteases will be a preferred target for oncolytic tumor therapy using influenza A virus mutants.

  5. Sulforaphane inhibits hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression and migration of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Sung, Bokyung; Kang, Yong Jung; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Im, Eunok; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-12-01

    The effects of sulforaphane (a natural product commonly found in broccoli) was investigated on hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression in HCT116 human colon cancer cells and AGS human gastric cancer cells. We found that hypoxia-induced HIF-1α protein expression in HCT116 and AGS cells, while treatment with sulforaphane markedly and concentration-dependently inhibited HIF-1α expression in both cell lines. Treatment with sulforaphane inhibited hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in HCT116 cells. Treatment with sulforaphane modulated the effect of hypoxia on HIF-1α stability. However, degradation of HIF-1α by sulforaphane was not mediated through the 26S proteasome pathway. We also found that the inhibition of HIF-1α by sulforaphane was not mediated through AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation under hypoxic conditions. Finally, hypoxia-induced HCT116 cell migration was inhibited by sulforaphane. These data suggest that sulforaphane may inhibit human colon cancer progression and cancer cell angiogenesis by inhibiting HIF-1α and VEGF expression. Taken together, these results indicate that sulforaphane is a new and potent chemopreventive drug candidate for treating patients with human colon cancer.

  6. Lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors can reverse inflammation induced changes in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manerba, Marcella; Di Ianni, Lorenza; Govoni, Marzia; Roberti, Marinella; Recanatini, Maurizio; Di Stefano, Giuseppina

    2017-01-01

    The inflammatory microenvironment is an essential component of neoplastic lesions and can significantly impact on tumor progression. Besides facilitating invasive growth, inflammatory cytokines were also found to reprogram cancer cell metabolism and to induce aerobic glycolysis. Previous studies did not consider the possible contribution played in these changes by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The A isoform of LDH (LDH-A) is the master regulator of aerobic glycolysis; it actively reduces pyruvate and causes enhanced lactate levels in tumor tissues. In cancer cells, lactate was recently found to directly increase migration ability; moreover, when released in the microenvironment, it can facilitate matrix remodeling. In this paper, we illustrate that treatment of human colon adenocarcinoma cells with TNF-α and IL-17, two pro-inflammatory cytokines, modifies LDH activity, causing a shift toward the A isoform which results in increased lactate production. At the same time, the two cytokines appeared to induce features of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the treated cells, such as reduction of E-cadherin levels and increased secretion of metalloproteinases. Noteworthy, oxamate and galloflavin, two inhibitors of LDH activity which reduce lactate production in cells, were found to relieve the inflammation-induced effects. These results suggest LDH-A and/or lactate as common elements at the cross-road between cancer cell metabolism, tumor progression and inflammation. At present, LDH inhibitors suitable for clinical use are actively searched as possible anti-proliferative agents; our data lead to hypothesize for these compounds a wider potential in anticancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adrenaline promotes cell proliferation and increases chemoresistance in colon cancer HT29 cells through induction of miR-155

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    Pu, Jun [Department of General Surgery, Tangdu Hospital of the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Bai, Danna [Department of Cardiology, 323 Hospital of PLA, Xi' an 710054 (China); Yang, Xia [Department of Teaching and Medical Administration, Tangdu Hospital of the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Lu, Xiaozhao [Department of Nephrology, The 323 Hospital of PLA, Xi' an 710054 (China); Xu, Lijuan, E-mail: 13609296272@163.com [Department of Nephrology, The 323 Hospital of PLA, Xi' an 710054 (China); Lu, Jianguo, E-mail: lujianguo029@yahoo.com.cn [Department of General Surgery, Tangdu Hospital of the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adrenaline increases colon cancer cell proliferation and its resistance to cisplatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adrenaline activates NF{kappa}B in a dose dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF{kappa}B-miR-155 pathway contributes to cell proliferation and resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Recently, catecholamines have been described as being involved in the regulation of cancer genesis and progression. Here, we reported that adrenaline increased the cell proliferation and decreased the cisplatin induced apoptosis in HT29 cells. Further study found that adrenaline increased miR-155 expression in an NF{kappa}B dependent manner. HT29 cells overexpressing miR-155 had a higher cell growth rate and more resistance to cisplatin induced apoptosis. In contrast, HT29 cells overexpressing miR-155 inhibitor displayed decreased cell proliferation and sensitivity to cisplatin induced cell death. In summary, our study here revealed that adrenaline-NF{kappa}B-miR-155 pathway at least partially contributes to the psychological stress induced proliferation and chemoresistance in HT29 cells, shedding light on increasing the therapeutic strategies of cancer chemotherapy.

  8. Modulation of intracellular calcium levels by calcium lactate affects colon cancer cell motility through calcium-dependent calpain.

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    Pasupathi Sundaramoorthy

    Full Text Available Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+ supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa, its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+ levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer.

  9. Association of Ozone with 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin in Regulation of Human Colon Cancer Cell Viability: In Vitro Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Ozone in Colon Cancer Cells Exposed to Lipopolysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Simonetti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ozone therapy is an effective medical treatment for different diseases like mucositis, psoriasis, acute pain, neurovascular diseases, and cancer. The aim of this study is based on the association of different ozone concentration with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in human colon cancer cell (HT29 cell line in order to investigate possible anticancer synergistic effects. Methods. HT29 cells were incubated with ozone at different concentration ranging from 10 up to 50 μg/ml at different incubation time alone or in combination with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. Cell viability was performed by using a modified MTT method. Anti-inflammatory studies were conducted incubating HT29 with or without 20, 30, or 50 μg/ml of ozone before exposure to lipopolysaccharides. Results. Ozone alone has a time and concentration dependent cytotoxicity against HT29 cells (IC50 at 24 h: 30 μg/ml. Association of ozone with drugs increases cytotoxicity by 15–20%. Preincubation of ozone at 50 μg/ml decreases IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1β production by 50, 56, and 70%, respectively, compared to untreated cells. Conclusion. These results indicated that ozone could be useful in colon cancer management in combination with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin with significant inhibition of cytokines having a central role in colon cancer cell survival and chemoresistance.

  10. The Promoting Effect of the Extracellular Matrix Peptide TNIIIA2 Derived from Tenascin-C in Colon Cancer Cell Infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hideo; Sasada, Manabu; Kamiya, Sadahiro; Ito, Yuka; Watanabe, Hikaru; Okada, Yuko; Ishibashi, Kazuma; Iyoda, Takuya; Yanaka, Akinori; Fukai, Fumio

    2017-01-17

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) molecule tenascin C (TNC) is known to be highly expressed under various pathological conditions such as inflammation and cancer. It has been reported that the expression of TNC is correlated with the malignant potential of cancer. In our laboratory, it was found that the peptide derived from the alternative splicing domain A2 in TNC, termed TNIIIA2, has been shown to influence a variety of cellular processes, such as survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. In this study, we investigated the effect of TNC/TNIIIA2 on the invasion and metastasis of colon cancer cells, Colon26-M3.1, or PMF-Ko14, using an in vitro and in vivo experimental system. The degree of cell invasion was increased by the addition of TNC and TNIIIA2 in a dose-dependent manner. The invasion by TNC and TNIIIA2 were suppressed by an MMP inhibitor or TNIIIA2-blocking antibody. In an in vivo experiment, pulmonary metastasis was promoted conspicuously by the addition of TNIIIA2. In this study, we found that colon cancer cell invasion and metastasis was accelerated by TNC/TNIIIA2 via MMP induction. This result suggests the possibility of a new strategy targeting TNC/TNIIIA2 for colon cancer.

  11. Multiplex flow cytometry barcoding and antibody arrays identify surface antigen profiles of primary and metastatic colon cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sukhdeo

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a deadly disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Current treatment challenges include management of disease burden as well as improvements in detection and targeting of tumor cells. To identify disease state-specific surface antigen signatures, we combined fluorescent cell barcoding with high-throughput flow cytometric profiling of primary and metastatic colon cancer lines (SW480, SW620, and HCT116. Our multiplexed technique offers improvements over conventional methods by permitting the simultaneous and rapid screening of cancer cells with reduced effort and cost. The method uses a protein-level analysis with commercially available antibodies on live cells with intact epitopes to detect potential tumor-specific targets that can be further investigated for their clinical utility. Multiplexed antibody arrays can easily be applied to other tumor types or pathologies for discovery-based approaches to target identification.

  12. Cytotoxic Activity of Selected Iranian Traditional Medicinal Plants on Colon, Colorectal and Breast Cancer Cell Lines

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    Leila Mohammad Taghizadeh Kashani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many natural products from plants have been recognized to exert anticancer activity. In this study, ethanolic extracts of selected medicinal herbs from Iranian flora including Alyssum homolocarpum Fisch. (from seeds, Urtica dioica L. (from aerial parts, Cichorium intybus L. (from roots and Solanum nigrum L. (from fruits, were evaluated for their cytotoxic effect on different cell lines.Methods: Cytotoxic effect of these extracts was studied on three different cancer cell lines; colon carcinoma (HT-29, colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2 and breast ductal carcinoma (T47D. In addition, Swiss mouse embryo fibroblasts (NIH 3T3 were used as normal nonmalignant cells. MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide was utilized for calculating the cytotoxicity of extracts on cell lines.Results: Results showed the potent cytotoxic activity of U. dioica ethanolic extract against T47D cell line with IC50 value of 46.14±4.55 µg/ml. Other extracts showed poor activity with IC50>100 µg/ml.Conclusions: Cytotoxic activity recorded in the present study revealed high potential antiproliferative activity of U. dioica ethanolic extract against T47D cell line. The real IC50 values of this extract may be considerably lower than the IC50 measured in our study if its pharmacological active compounds become pure. The results emphasize the importance of studies on U. dioica ethanolic extract to characterize potential components as cytotoxic natural medicines.

  13. Cell Line Derived 5-FU and Irinotecan Drug-Sensitivity Profiles Evaluated in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Trial Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Ida Kappel; Gerster, Sarah; Delorenzi, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    patients enrolled in the PETACC-3 prospective randomized clinical trial. A 5-FU profile developed similarly was assessed by comparing the PETACC-3 cohort with a cohort of 359 stage II colon cancer patients who underwent surgery but received no adjuvant therapy. RESULTS: There was no statistically...... patients who benefitted from the addition of irinotecan to 5-FU, we used gene expression profiles based on cell lines and clinical tumor material. These profiles were applied to expression data obtained from pretreatment formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue from 636 stage III colon cancer...... to identify colon cancer patients who may benefit from 5-FU, however, any biomarker predicting benefit for adjuvant 5-FU must be rigorously evaluated in independent cohorts. Given differences between the two study cohorts, the present results should be further validated....

  14. Characterization of Cancer Stem Cells in Colon Adenocarcinoma Metastasis to the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Hugo N; Wickremesekera, Susrutha K; Marsh, Reginald W; Brasch, Helen D; Mehrotra, Shreeja; Tan, Swee T; Itinteang, Tinte

    2017-01-01

    Fifty percent of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients develop liver metastasis. This study identified and characterized cancer stem cells (CSCs) within colon adenocarcinoma metastasis to the liver (CAML). 3,3-Diaminobenzidine immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed on nine CAML samples for embryonic stem cell (ESC) markers OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, c-Myc, and KLF4. Immunofluorescence (IF) IHC staining was performed to investigate coexpression of two markers. NanoString mRNA expression analysis and colorimetric in situ hybridization (CISH) were performed on four snap-frozen CAML tissue samples for transcript expression of these ESC markers. Cells stained positively and negatively for each marker by IHC and CISH staining were counted and analyzed. 3,3-Diaminobenzidine IHC staining, and NanoString and CISH mRNA analyses demonstrated the expression of OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, c-Myc, and KLF4 within in all nine CAML samples, except for SOX2 which was below detectable levels on NanoString mRNA analysis. IF IHC staining showed the presence of a SOX2 + /NANOG + /KLF4 + /c-Myc + /OCT - CSC subpopulation within the tumor nests, and a SOX2 + /NANOG + /KLF4 + /c-Myc + /OCT4 - CSC subpopulation and a SOX2 + /NANOG + /KLF4 + /c-Myc + /OCT4 + CSC subpopulation within the peritumoral stroma. The novel finding of three CSC subpopulations within CAML provides insights into the biology of CRC.

  15. Sulforaphene and sulforaphane in commonly consumed cruciferous plants contributed to antiproliferation in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Piman Pocasap; Natthida Weerapreeyakul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze two isothiocyanates (sulforaphene and sulforaphane) and their antiproliferative effect of 11 indigenous cruciferous vegetables. Methods: Phytoconstituents identification was conducted by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometer techniques. The antiproliferation was evaluated in colon cancer cell line HCT116 by MTT assay. Results: Isothiocyanate identification by high performance liquid chromatography showed that broccoli, cabb...

  16. Effects of differentiation on purinergic and neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling in human HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammad A; Peters, Amelia A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-09-13

    Calcium signaling is a key regulator of processes important in differentiation. In colon cancer cells differentiation is associated with altered expression of specific isoforms of calcium pumps of the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane, suggesting that differentiation of colon cancer cells is associated with a major remodeling of calcium homeostasis. Purinergic and neurotensin receptor activation are known regulators of cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in colon cancer cells. This study aimed to assess changes in cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in response to ATP and neurotensin with differentiation induced by sodium butyrate or culturing post-confluence. Parameters assessed included peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) level after activation; time to reach peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) and the EC50 of dose response curves. Our results demonstrate that differentiation of HT-29 colon cancer cells is associated with a remodeling of both ATP and neurotensin mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling appeared more sensitive to differentiation than ATP-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. miR-4458 suppresses glycolysis and lactate production by directly targeting hexokinase2 in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yaguang; Cheng, Chuanyao; Lu, Hong; Wang, Yaqiu

    2016-01-01

    miR-4458, a new tumor-suppressor, was reported to down-regulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma. The expression status, roles and inhibitory mechanisms of miR-4458 in other tumors still need to be clarified. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of miR-4458 and to elucidate the potential mechanism in colon cancer cells. Using bioinformatic databases, we predicted that hexokinase2 (HK2), a rate-limiting enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, was a target of miR-4458, so the effects of miR-4458 on glycolysis and lactate production was assessed in colon cancer cells. We found that miR-4458 was down-regulated and HK2 was up-regulated in colon cancer cells. Overexpression of miR-4458 inhibited proliferation, glycolysis, and lactate production under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Luciferase activity assays showed that HK2 was a direct target of miR-4458. Moreover, knockdown of HK2 by specific RNAi also suppressed proliferation, glycolysis, and lactate production under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In conclusion, our findings suggested that miR-4458 inhibited the progression of colon cancer cells by inhibition of glycolysis and lactate production via directly targeting HK2 mRNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The inflammatory mediator leukotriene D{sub 4} induces subcellular β-catenin translocation and migration of colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salim, Tavga [Division of Cell and Experimental Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Center, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Sand-Dejmek, Janna [Division of Cell and Experimental Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Center, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Section of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Bayer HealthCare, Pharmaceuticals Medical Affairs, Solna (Sweden); Sjölander, Anita, E-mail: anita.sjolander@med.lu.se [Division of Cell and Experimental Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Center, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden)

    2014-02-15

    The abnormal activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway frequently occurs in colorectal cancer. The nuclear translocation of β-catenin activates the transcription of target genes that promote cell proliferation, survival, and invasion. The pro-inflammatory mediator leukotriene D{sub 4} (LTD{sub 4}) exerts its effects through the CysLT{sub 1} receptor. We previously reported an upregulation of CysLT{sub 1}R in patients with colon cancer, suggesting the importance of leukotrienes in colon cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of LTD{sub 4} on Wnt/β-catenin signaling and its effects on proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells. LTD{sub 4} stimulation led to an increase in β-catenin expression, β-catenin nuclear translocation and the subsequent transcription of MYC and CCND1. Furthermore, LTD{sub 4} significantly reduced the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin at the plasma membrane and increased the migration and proliferation of HCT116 colon cancer cells. The effects of LTD{sub 4} can be blocked by the inhibition of CysLT{sub 1}R. Furthermore, LTD{sub 4} induced the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK)-3β activity, indicating a crosstalk between the G-protein-coupled receptor CysLT{sub 1} and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In conclusion, LTD{sub 4}, which can be secreted from macrophages and leukocytes in the tumor microenvironment, induces β-catenin translocation and the activation of β-catenin target genes, resulting in the increased proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells. - Highlights: • Leukotriene D{sub 4} (LTD{sub 4}) lowers membrane β-catenin but increases nuclear β-catenin levels in colon cancer cells. • In agreement, LTD{sub 4} triggers inactivation of GSK-3β, activation of TCF/LEF and increased expression of Cyclin D1 and c-Myc. • LTD{sub 4} also caused a significant reduction in the expression of E-cadherin and an increased migration of colon cancer cells.

  19. MDR-1-overexpression in HT 29 colon cancer cells grown in SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Udo; Nehmann, Nina; Adam, Elizabeth; Mukthar, Dhia; Slotki, Itzchak N; Horny, Hans-Peter; Flens, Marcel J; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Steinemann, Doris

    2012-10-01

    The multidrug-resistance 1 (MDR-1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a transmembrane transporter system, which actively pumps cytotoxic drugs out of the cell. MDR-1 acquired in vitro differs from MDR-1 acquired in vivo, but has important consequences on the cellular phenotype and metastatic behavior. Here we report that the human colonic cancer cell line HT29 (MDR-1 negative) is more malignant than its MDR-1 overexpressing variant (HT29 MDR-1 positive). HT29 MDR-1 negative cells produce undifferentiated signet ring carcinomas when implanted subcutaneously into SCID mice, while HT29 MDR-1 positive cells form tumors with tubular structures, but without signet ring cells. Immunohistochemical proliferation marker analysis revealed that the MDR-1 positive cells proliferate much more slowly than the MDR-1 negative cells. MDR-1 overexpression results in a less differentiated phenotype at the cellular level (absence of mucin producing cells) but in a more differentiated phenotype at the tissue level (tubule formation). In addition, lectin binding patterns including that of Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), an indicator of metastatic potential, differed between the two cell lines. HT29 MDR-1 positive cells had less HPA binding sites than HT29 MDR-1 negative counterparts and metastasized less frequently in SCID mice. As slow proliferation, low degree of differentiation and multidrug-resistance is a hallmark of cancer stem cells and all were present in MDR-1 positive tumors, it is attractive to speculate that they represent a stem cell rich tumor. As shown by global gene expression analyses, genes involved, e.g. in cell adhesion, glycosylation and signal transduction, were deregulated in MDR-1 positive tumors compared to MDR-negative tumors. Overexpression of E-cadherin and carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules 1 (CEACAM1) may provide clues to the mechanisms responsible for the reduced metastatic potential of MDR-1 overexpressing tumors. Since drug treatment shifted

  20. Effects of anaesthesia on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of LoVo colon cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y J; Li, S Y; Cheng, Q; Chen, W K; Wang, S L; Ren, Y; Miao, C H

    2016-02-01

    Tumour cell proliferation, invasion and apoptosis are crucial steps in tumour metastasis. We evaluated the effect of serum from patients undergoing colon cancer surgery receiving thoracic epidural and propofol anaesthesia on colon cancer cell biology. Patients were randomly assigned to receive propofol anaesthesia with a concomitant thoracic epidural (PEA, n = 20) or sevoflurane anaesthesia with opioid analgesia (SGA, n = 20). Venous blood was obtained before induction of anaesthesia and 24 hours postoperatively. The LoVo colon cancer cells were cultured with patient serum from both groups and the effects on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis were measured. Twenty-four hours after surgery, the absorbance value of LoVo cells at 10% serum concentration from PEA was decreased when compared with SGA (0.302 (0.026) vs 0.391 (0.066), p = 0.005). The inhibitory rate of LoVo cells at 10% serum concentration from PEA was higher than that from SGA (p = 0.004) 24 h after surgery. The number of invasive LoVo cells at 10% serum concentration from PEA was reduced when compared with SGA (44 (4) vs 62 (4), p < 0.001). Exposure of LoVo cells to postoperative serum from patients receiving PEA led to a higher luminescence ratio (apoptosis) than those receiving SGA (0.36 (0.04) vs 0.27 (0.05), p < 0.001). Serum from patients receiving PEA for colon cancer surgery inhibited proliferation and invasion of LoVo cells and induced apoptosis in vitro more than that from patients receiving SGA. Anaesthetic technique might influence the serum milieu in a way that affects cancer cell biology and, thereby, tumour metastastasis. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang Jin [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  2. miR-4458 suppresses glycolysis and lactate production by directly targeting hexokinase2 in colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Yaguang; Cheng, Chuanyao; Lu, Hong, E-mail: honglu6512@163.com; Wang, Yaqiu

    2016-01-01

    miR-4458, a new tumor-suppressor, was reported to down-regulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma. The expression status, roles and inhibitory mechanisms of miR-4458 in other tumors still need to be clarified. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of miR-4458 and to elucidate the potential mechanism in colon cancer cells. Using bioinformatic databases, we predicted that hexokinase2 (HK2), a rate-limiting enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, was a target of miR-4458, so the effects of miR-4458 on glycolysis and lactate production was assessed in colon cancer cells. We found that miR-4458 was down-regulated and HK2 was up-regulated in colon cancer cells. Overexpression of miR-4458 inhibited proliferation, glycolysis, and lactate production under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Luciferase activity assays showed that HK2 was a direct target of miR-4458. Moreover, knockdown of HK2 by specific RNAi also suppressed proliferation, glycolysis, and lactate production under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In conclusion, our findings suggested that miR-4458 inhibited the progression of colon cancer cells by inhibition of glycolysis and lactate production via directly targeting HK2 mRNA. - Highlights: • miR-4458 is down-regulated in colon cancer cells. • miR-4458 suppresses proliferation, glycolysis, and lactate production. • HK2 is a target of miR-4458. • HK2 knockdown inhibits proliferation, glycolysis, and lactate production.

  3. miR-320 enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy in vitro by targeting FOXM1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Lu-Ying; Deng, Jun; Xiang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Ling; Yu, Feng; Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhe; Feng, Miao; Xiong, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpxiong@medmail.com.cn

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • miR-320 plays a significant role in chemoresistance. • This role might be attribute to targeting FOXM1. • The Wnt/β-catenin pathway also involves in this chemotherapy sensitivity. - Abstract: miR-320 expression level is found to be down-regulated in human colon cancer. To date, however, its underlying mechanisms in the chemo-resistance remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of miR-320 led to inhibit HCT-116 cell proliferation, invasion and hypersensitivity to 5-Fu and Oxaliplatin. Also, knockdown of miR-320 reversed these effects in HT-29 cells. Furthermore, we identified an oncogene, FOXM1, as a direct target of miR-320. In addition, miR-320 could inactive the activity of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Finally, we found that miR-320 and FOXM1 protein had a negative correlation in colon cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues. These findings implied that miR-320–FOXM1 axis may overcome chemo-resistance of colon cancer cells and provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of colon cancer.

  4. Anticancer effect of dentatin and dentatin-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin complex on human colon cancer (HT-29) cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Abboodi, Ashwaq Shakir; Rasedee, Abdullah; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Alkaby, Wafaa Abd Alwahed; Ghaji, Mostafa Saddam; Waziri, Peter M; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Dentatin (DEN) (5-methoxy-2, 2-dimethyl-10-(1, 1-dimethyl-2propenyl) dipyran-2-one), a natural compound present in the roots of Clausena excavata Burm f, possesses pro-apoptotic and antiproliferative effects in various cancer cells. Because of its hydrophobicity, it is believed that its complexation with hydroxy-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) will make it a potent inhibitor of cancer cell growth. In the current work, the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induced by DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex were demonstrated in human colon HT-29 cancer cells. Materials and methods After the human colon HT-29 cancer cells were treated with DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex, their effects on the expression of apoptotic-regulated gene markers in mitochondria-mediated apoptotic and death receptor pathways were detected by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These markers included caspases-9, 3, and 8, cytochrome c, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, p53, p21, cyclin A as well as the Bcl-2 family of proteins. Results At 3, 6, 12, and 24 µg/mL exposure, DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex significantly affected apoptosis in HT-29 cells through the down-regulation of Bcl-2 and cyclin A in turn, and up-regulation of Bax, p53, p21, cytochrome c at both protein and mRNA levels. DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex also decreased cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and induced caspases-3, -8, and -9. Conclusion Results of this study indicate that the apoptotic pathway caused by DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex are mediated by the regulation of caspases and Bcl-2 families in human colon HT-29 cancer cells. The results also suggest that DEN-HPβCD complex may have chemotherapeutic benefits for colon cancer patients. PMID:29200826

  5. Inhibition of colon cancer cell growth by nanoemulsion carrying gold nanoparticles and lycopene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rwei-Fen S; Wei, Yi-Jun; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Lycopene (LP), an important functional compound in tomatoes, and gold nanoparticles (AN), have received considerable attention as potential candidates for cancer therapy. However, the extreme instability and poor bioavailability of LP limits its in vivo application. This study intends to develop a nanoemulsion system incorporating both LP and AN, and to study the possible synergistic effects on the inhibition of the HT-29 colon cancer cell line. LP-nanogold nanoemulsion containing Tween 80 as an emulsifier was prepared, followed by characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and zeta potential analysis. The particle size as determined by TEM and DLS was 21.3±3.7 nm and 25.0±4.2 nm for nanoemulsion and 4.7±1.1 nm and 3.3±0.6 nm for AN, while the zeta potential of nanoemulsion and AN was -32.2±1.8 mV and -48.5±2.7 mV, respectively. Compared with the control treatment, both the combo (AN 10 ppm plus LP 12 μM) and nanoemulsion (AN 0.16 ppm plus LP 0.4 μM) treatments resulted in a five- and 15-fold rise in early apoptotic cells of HT-29, respectively. Also, the nanoemulsion significantly reduced the expressions of procaspases 8, 3, and 9, as well as PARP-1 and Bcl-2, while Bax expression was enhanced. A fivefold decline in the migration capability of HT-29 cells was observed for this nanoemulsion when compared to control, with the invasion-associated markers being significantly reversed through the upregulation of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and downregulation of Akt, nuclear factor kappa B, pro-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and active MMP-9 expressions. The TEM images revealed that numerous nanoemulsion-filled vacuoles invaded cytosol and converged into the mitochondria, resulting in an abnormally elongated morphology with reduced cristae and matrix contents, demonstrating a possible passive targeting effect. The nanoemulsion containing vacuoles were engulfed and

  6. High expression of the DNA methyltransferase gene characterizes human neoplastic cells and progression stages of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Deiry, W.S.; Nelkin, B.D.; Celano, P.; Ray-Whay Chiu Yen; Falco, J.P.; Hamilton, S.R.; Baylin, S.B. (Johns Hopkins Medical Inst., Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1991-04-15

    DNA methylation abnormalities occur consistently in human neoplasia including widespread hypomethylation and more recently recognized local increases in DNA methylation that hold potential for gene inactivation events. To study this imbalance further, the authors have localized to chromosome 19 a portion of the human DNA methyltransferase gene that codes for the enzyme catalyzing DNA methylation. Expression of this gene is low in normal human cells, significantly increased (30- to 50-fold by PCR analysis) in virally transformed cells, and strikingly elevated in human cancer cells (several hundredfold). In comparison to colon mucosa from patients without neoplasia, median levels of DNA methyltransferase transcripts are 15-fold increased in histologically normal mucosa from patients with cancers or the benign polyps that can precede cancers, 60-fold increased in the premalignant polyps, and >200-fold increased in the cancers. Thus, increases in DNA methyltransferase gene expression precede development of colonic neoplasia and continue during progression of colonic neoplasms. These increases may play a role in the genetic instability of cancer and mark early events in cell transformation.

  7. HPV16-E7 Expression Causes Fluorodeoxyuridine-mediated Radiosensitization in SW620 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Axelson

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available We have reported that HT29 colon cancer cells, which are radiosensitized by fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd, exhibit a greater increase in cyclin E—dependent kinase activity and progress further into S phase in the presence of FdUrd than do SW620 colon cancer cells, which are only minimally sensitized by this drug (Cancer Res 56: 3203, 1996. Although these findings suggested that the ability to progress into S phase in the presence of FdUrd permits cells to be radiosensitized, we wished to test this hypothesis by attempting to drive SW620 human colon cells into S phase by transducing them with the HPV16-E7 gene. Two-parameter flow cytometry showed that E7-transduced cells progressed through S phase after radiation and FdUrd treatment more rapidly than SW620 parental cells. We found that E7-transduced SW620 cells were significantly radiosensitized by FdUrd (100 nmol/L, 14 hours with an enhancement ratio for 2 clones of 1.47±0.03 and 1.51±0.14, compared with 1.24±0.04 in SW620 parental cells. These data strongly support the hypothesis that dysregulation of S-phase progression is an important factor in FdUrd-mediated radiosensitization.

  8. RSPO2 enriches LGR5+ spheroid colon cancer stem cells and promotes its metastasis by epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi; Han, Xiaoyan; Wei, Bo; Fang, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer stem cells (CCSCs) account for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer and promote its progression and metastasis. RSPO2, the agonist of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and serves as the growth factor of intestinal stem cells (ISCs), is considered playing an important role in CCSCs. However, the specific function of RSPO2 in CCSCs remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that RSPO2 was highly expressed in CCSCs-enriched HCT116 spheroid cells. Elevates the concentration of RSPO2 in medium in favor of enriching the LGR5+ cells and increasing the LGR5 expression in HCT116 spheroid cells, meanwhile silencing of RSPO2 by small interfering RNA inhibits LGR5 expression in HCT116 spheroid cells. In addition, RSPO2 promotes spheres formation but has little effect on the proliferation of HCT116 spheroid cells in vitro. Moreover, RSPO2 also promotes the invasion of HCT116 spheroid cells through enhancing Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These findings suggests that RSPO2 is a potential growth factor for CCSCs, helps enriching the CCSCs by serum-free DMEM/F12 medium (SFM) culture and plays a vital role in the metastasis of colon cancer. PMID:27158331

  9. RSPO2 enriches LGR5(+) spheroid colon cancer stem cells and promotes its metastasis by epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi; Han, Xiaoyan; Wei, Bo; Fang, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer stem cells (CCSCs) account for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer and promote its progression and metastasis. RSPO2, the agonist of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and serves as the growth factor of intestinal stem cells (ISCs), is considered playing an important role in CCSCs. However, the specific function of RSPO2 in CCSCs remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that RSPO2 was highly expressed in CCSCs-enriched HCT116 spheroid cells. Elevates the concentration of RSPO2 in medium in favor of enriching the LGR5(+) cells and increasing the LGR5 expression in HCT116 spheroid cells, meanwhile silencing of RSPO2 by small interfering RNA inhibits LGR5 expression in HCT116 spheroid cells. In addition, RSPO2 promotes spheres formation but has little effect on the proliferation of HCT116 spheroid cells in vitro. Moreover, RSPO2 also promotes the invasion of HCT116 spheroid cells through enhancing Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These findings suggests that RSPO2 is a potential growth factor for CCSCs, helps enriching the CCSCs by serum-free DMEM/F12 medium (SFM) culture and plays a vital role in the metastasis of colon cancer.

  10. Characterizations of irofulven cytotoxicity in combination with cisplatin and oxaliplatin in human colon, breast, and ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serova, Maria; Calvo, Fabien; Lokiec, François; Koeppel, Florence; Poindessous, Virginie; Larsen, Annette K; Laar, Emily S Van; Waters, Stephen J; Cvitkovic, Esteban; Raymond, Eric

    2006-04-01

    This study assessed the cytotoxic effects of irofulven in combination with oxaliplatin and cisplatin in a panel of human cancer cell lines. Growth inhibition studies were performed using the human HT29 colon cancer cell line, irofulven-resistant derivative HT29/IF2, breast cancer cell line MCF7, and ovarian cancer line CAOV3. Irofulven-oxaliplatin combinations were compared with irofulven-cisplatin combinations in the same cell lines using similar experimental settings. Cells were exposed for 1 h to irofulven and then for 24 h to oxaliplatin or cisplatin and vice versa. Single agent irofulven displayed cytotoxic effects against human colon HT29 cells, human breast cancer cell lines including MCF7, SKBR3, and ZR-75-1, and human ovarian cancer cell lines CAOV3, OVCAR3, and IGROV1, with OVCAR3 being the most sensitive cancer cell line (IC50: 2.4 microM). In all tested cell lines the oxaliplatin-irofulven combination led to clear evidence of synergistic activity. In HT29 and HT29/IF2, the sequence oxaliplatin followed by irofulven appears to be the most effective whereas in MCF7 cells, irofulven given prior to or simultaneously with oxaliplatin is more effective than the other schedule. The combination displays additive activity toward CAOV3 ovarian cells when irofulven was administered prior to or simultaneously with oxaliplatin and partially synergistic when oxaliplatin was followed by irofulven. In most of the cell lines, the sequence oxaliplatin followed by irofulven appears to be the most effective as compared to other schedules. A combination of irofulven with cisplatin has the same efficacy as with oxaliplatin for the same cell lines. Cell cycle studies show that irofulven increases the proportion of cells in the S phase. Cisplatin-irofulven and oxaliplatin-irofulven combinations block cells in G1/S and potently induce apoptosis. Irofulven displays synergistic antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects when combined with oxaliplatin over a broad range of

  11. Exenatide suppresses 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer in diabetic mice: Effect on tumor angiogenesis and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Mona K; Mohamed, Magda I

    2016-08-01

    Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide, which results from interactions of different factors. It is frequently a pathological consequence of persistent inflammation. Diabetes affects several cancers and is positively correlated with the incidence of colon cancer. This study aimed to study the effect of exenatide in ameliorating inflammation, angiogenesis and cell proliferation in 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) induced colorectal carcinoma in diabetic mice. Mice were randomly allocated into six groups, 8 mice each. Group 1: vehicle control group. Group 2: diabetic control group. Group 3: DMH control group: diabetic mice treated with DMH (20mg/kg/week,s.c.) for 15 week. Group 4: DMH-cisplatin group: mice received cisplatin (4mg/kg/week, i.p.). Groups 5 & 6: DMH-exenatide (10 and 20μg/kg) group: mice received exenatide (10 or 20μg/kg/day,s.c.), respectively. The present results highlighted an increase in angiogenic markers and cell proliferation in the DMH-diabetic group in comparison with the control group with greater expression of endothelial marker (CD34) and Ki-67 in colon tissue. Monotherapy with cisplatin or exenatide (10 and 20μg/kg) downregulated these markers to different extents. The current results provided evidence that exenatide represents a promising chemopreventive effect against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in diabetic mice, at least in part, attributed to its anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Raman micro-spectroscopic analysis of cultured HCT116 colon cancer cells in the presence of roscovitine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, S.; Ozel, A. E.; Balci, K.; Akyuz, T.; Coker, A.; Arisan, E. D.; Palavan-Unsal, N.; Ozalpan, A.

    2011-05-01

    Raman micro-spectroscopic analysis of cultured HCT116 colon cancer cells in the presence of roscovitine, [seliciclib, 2-(1-ethyl-2-hydroxy-ethylamino)-6-benzylamino-9-isopropylpurine], a promising drug candidate in cancer therapy, has been performed for the first time. The aim of this study was to investigate modulations in colon cancer cells induced by roscovitine. Raman spectra of the cultured HCT116 colon cancer cells treated with roscovitine at different concentrations (0, 5, 10, 25 and 50 μM) were recorded in the range 400-1850 cm -1. It was shown that the second derivative profile of the experimental spectrum gives valuable information about the wavenumbers and band widths of the vibrational modes of cell components, and it eliminates the appearance of false peaks arising from incorrect baseline corrections. In samples containing roscovitine, significant spectral changes were observed in the intensities of characteristic protein and DNA bands, which indicate roscovitine-induced apoptosis. Roscovitine-induced apoptosis was also assessed by flow cytometry analysis, and analysis of propidium iodide staining. We observed some modifications in amide I and III bands, which arise from alterations in the secondary structure of cell proteins caused by the presence of roscovitine.

  13. Study characterizes long non-coding RNA’s response to DNA damage in colon cancer cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers led by Ashish Lal, Ph.D., Investigator in the Genetics Branch, have shown that when the DNA in human colon cancer cells is damaged, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) regulates the expression of genes that halt growth, which allows the cells to repair the damage and promote survival. Their findings suggest an important pro-survival function of a lncRNA in cancer cells.  Read more...

  14. Measles Virus Enters Breast and Colon Cancer Cell Lines through a PVRL4-Mediated Macropinocytosis Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Sisson, Gary; Black, Karen M; Richardson, Christopher D

    2017-05-15

    Measles virus (MeV) is a member of the family Paramixoviridae that causes a highly contagious respiratory disease but has emerged as a promising oncolytic platform. Previous studies of MeV entry focused on the identification of cellular receptors. However, the endocytic and trafficking pathways utilized during MeV entry remain poorly described. The contribution of each endocytic pathway has been examined in cells that express the MeV receptors SLAM (signaling lymphocyte-activating molecule) and PVRL4 (poliovirus receptor-like 4) (nectin-4). Recombinant MeVs expressing either firefly luciferase or green fluorescent protein together with a variety of inhibitors were used. The results showed that MeV uptake was dynamin independent in the Vero.hPVRL4, Vero.hSLAM, and PVRL4-positive MCF7 breast cancer cell lines. However, MeV infection was blocked by 5-( N -ethyl- N -propyl)amiloride (EIPA), the hallmark inhibitor of macropinocytosis, as well as inhibitors of actin polymerization. By using phalloidin staining, MeV entry was shown to induce actin rearrangements and the formation of membrane ruffles accompanied by transient elevated fluid uptake. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) demonstrated that MeV enters both Vero.hPVRL4 and Vero.hSLAM cells in a PAK1-independent manner using a macropinocytosis-like pathway. In contrast, MeV entry into MCF7 human breast cancer cells relied upon Rac1 and its effector PAK1 through a PVRL4-mediated macropinocytosis pathway. MeV entry into DLD-1 colon and HTB-20 breast cancer cells also appeared to use the same pathway. Overall, these findings provide new insight into the life cycle of MeV, which could lead to therapies that block virus entry or methods that improve the uptake of MeV by cancer cells during oncolytic therapy. IMPORTANCE In the past decades, measles virus (MeV) has emerged as a promising oncolytic platform. Previous studies concerning MeV entry focused mainly on the identification of

  15. LGR5 receptor promotes cell-cell adhesion in stem cells and colon cancer cells via the IQGAP1-Rac1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmon, Kendra S; Gong, Xing; Yi, Jing; Wu, Ling; Thomas, Anthony; Moore, Catherine M; Masuho, Ikuo; Timson, David J; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Liu, Qingyun J

    2017-09-08

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5) is a bona fide marker of adult stem cells in several epithelial tissues, most notably in the intestinal crypts, and is highly up-regulated in many colorectal, hepatocellular, and ovarian cancers. LGR5 activation by R-spondin (RSPO) ligands potentiates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vitro; however, deletion of LGR5 in stem cells has little or no effect on Wnt/β-catenin signaling or cell proliferation in vivo Remarkably, modulation of LGR5 expression has a major impact on the actin cytoskeletal structure and cell adhesion in the absence of RSPO stimulation, but the molecular mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that LGR5 interacts with IQ motif-containing GTPase-activating protein 1 (IQGAP1), an effector of Rac1/CDC42 GTPases, in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and cell-cell adhesion. Specifically, LGR5 decreased levels of IQGAP1 phosphorylation at Ser-1441/1443, leading to increased binding of Rac1 to IQGAP1 and thus higher levels of cortical F-actin and enhanced cell-cell adhesion. LGR5 ablation in colon cancer cells and crypt stem cells resulted in loss of cortical F-actin, reduced cell-cell adhesion, and disrupted localization of adhesion-associated proteins. No evidence of LGR5 coupling to any of the four major subtypes of heterotrimeric G proteins was found. These findings suggest that LGR5 primarily functions via the IQGAP1-Rac1 pathway to strengthen cell-cell adhesion in normal adult crypt stem cells and colon cancer cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Undecylprodigiosin conjugated monodisperse gold nanoparticles efficiently cause apoptosis in colon cancer cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Mojic, Marija; Kang, Yijin; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Mijatovic, Sanja; Vasiljevic, Branka; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Senerovic, Lidija

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pigment undecylprodigiosin (UP) was produced using Streptomyces sp. JS520 and conjugated to monodisperse gold nanoparticles (UP-Au). Both UP and UP-Au showed cytocidal activity towards melanoma (A375), lung carcinoma (A549), breast cancer (MCF-7) and colon cancer (HCT-116) cells, inducing apoptosis with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 to 4 mu g ml(-1). Unconjugated UP had a tendency to lose its activity over time and to change biophysical characteristics over pH. The loss of the pigment potency was overcome by conjugation with gold nanoparticles. UP-Au exhibited high stability over pH 3.8 to 7.4 and its activity remained unaffected in time. Nano-packing changed the mechanism of UP toxicity by converting the intracellular signals from a mitochondrial dependent to a mitochondrial independent apoptotic process. The availability of nonpyrogenic UP in high amounts, together with specific anticancer activity and improved stability in the complex with gold nanoparticles, presents a novel platform for further development of UP-Au complexes as an anticancer drug suitable for clinical applications.

  17. STI571 reduces TRAIL-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells: c-Abl activation by the death receptor leads to stress kinase-dependent cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Duen-Yi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an effort to achieve better cancer therapies, we elucidated the combination cancer therapy of STI571 (an inhibitor of Bcr-Abl and clinically used for chronic myelogenous leukemia and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, a developing antitumor agent in leukemia, colon, and prostate cancer cells. Methods Colon cancer (HCT116, SW480, prostate cancer (PC3, LNCaP and leukemia (K562 cells were treated with STI571 and TRAIL. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay and sub-G1 appearance. Protein expression and kinase phosphorylation were determined by Western blotting. c-Abl and p73 activities were inhibited by target-specific small interfering (siRNA. In vitro kinase assay of c-Abl was conducted using CRK as a substrate. Results We found that STI571 exerts opposite effects on the antitumor activity of TRAIL. It enhanced cytotoxicity in TRAIL-treated K562 leukemia cells and reduced TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCT116 and SW480 colon cancer cells, while having no effect on PC3 and LNCaP cells. In colon and prostate cancer cells, TRAIL caused c-Abl cleavage to the active form via a caspase pathway. Interestingly, JNK and p38 MAPK inhibitors effectively blocked TRAIL-induced toxicity in the colon, but not in prostate cancer cells. Next, we found that STI571 could attenuate TRAIL-induced c-Abl, JNK and p38 activation in HCT116 cells. In addition, siRNA targeting knockdown of c-Abl and p73 also reduced TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity, rendering HCT116 cells less responsive to stress kinase activation, and masking the cytoprotective effect of STI571. Conclusions All together we demonstrate a novel mediator role of p73 in activating the stress kinases p38 and JNK in the classical apoptotic pathway of TRAIL. TRAIL via caspase-dependent action can sequentially activate c-Abl, p73, and stress kinases, which contribute to apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Through the inhibition of c-Abl-mediated apoptotic p73 signaling, STI571 reduces

  18. Identification of CEA-interacting proteins in colon cancer cells and their changes in expression after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byong Chul [Colorectal Cancer Branch, Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Seung Gu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level has been recognized as a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer, and associated with response of rectal cancer to radiotherapy. This study aimed to identify CEA-interacting proteins in colon cancer cells and observe post-irradiation changes in their expression. CEA expression in colon cancer cells was examined by Western blot analysis. Using an anti-CEA antibody or IgG as a negative control, immunoprecipitation was performed in colon cancer cell lysates. CEA and IgG immunoprecipitates were used for liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Proteins identified in the CEA immunoprecipitates but not in the IgG immunoprecipitates were selected as CEA-interacting proteins. After radiation treatment, changes in expression of CEA-interacting proteins were monitored by Western blot analysis. CEA expression was higher in SNU-81 cells compared with LoVo cells. The membrane localization of CEA limited the immunoprecipitation results and thus the number of CEA-interacting proteins identified. Only the Ras-related protein Rab-6B and lysozyme C were identified as CEA-interacting proteins in LoVo and SNU-81 cells, respectively. Lysozyme C was detected only in SNU-81, and CEA expression was differently regulated in two cell lines; it was down-regulated in LoVo but up-regulated in SNU-81 in radiation dosage-dependent manner. CEA-mediated radiation response appears to vary, depending on the characteristics of individual cancer cells. The lysozyme C and Rab subfamily proteins may play a role in the link between CEA and tumor response to radiation, although further studies are needed to clarify functional roles of the identified proteins.

  19. A Preclinical Model of Chronic Alcohol Consumption Reveals Increased Metastatic Seeding of Colon Cancer Cells in the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hwi-Jin; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyo-Seon; Cho, Jung-Hyo; Jo, Il-Joo; Park, Sung-Joo; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-04-01

    Liver metastasis is the main cause of death from colorectal cancer. Alcohol consumption impacts liver function and is suggested to be an independent risk factor for liver metastasis of colorectal cancer, but no experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis has been demonstrated to date. In this study, we investigated the effect of alcohol intake on liver metastasis. We examined colon cancer cell spread from the spleen in mice provided with water (control group), alcohol for 4 weeks before tumor injection (prealcohol), alcohol for 3 weeks after tumor injection (postalcohol), or alcohol throughout the 7-week study (alcohol). Alcohol intake significantly increased hepatic metastatic burden in the prealcohol (2.4-fold, P liver (2.5-fold, P liver metastasis of colorectal cancer cells through alterations to the liver microenvironment and inactivation of immune surveillance. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1698-704. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Retinoid-Chalcones as Inhibitors of Colon Cancer Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based on the observed anticancer activity of chalcones and retinoids, a novel class of retinoid-chalcone hybrids were designed and synthesized. As part of our ongoing studies to discover natural product based anticancer compounds, the retinoid-chalcone hybrids were tested against the colon cancer ce...

  1. MiR-495-3p facilitates colon cancer cell proliferation via Wnt/β ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISSN: 1596-5996 (print); 1596-9827 (electronic). © Pharmacotherapy Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of ... impacting colon cancer tumorigenesis has to be classified to help in monitoring the progress of therapy. ... USA) and maintained in DMEM containing 10% fetal calf serum (Hyclone) in an incubator at 5 %. CO2.

  2. Higher Molecular Weight Polyethylene Glycol Increases Cell Proliferation While Improving Barrier Function in an In Vitro Colon Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi Bharadwaj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG has been previously shown to protect against enteric pathogens and prevent colon cancer invasion. To determine if PEG could indeed protect against previously observed pro-invasive effects of commensal E. coli and EPEC, Caco-2 cells grown in an in vitro model of colon cancer were infected with strains of human commensal E. coli or EPEC and treated with 10% PEG 3350, PEG 8000, and PEG 20,000, respectively. At 24 hours after infection, MMP-1 and MMP-13 activities, cell cluster thickness, depth of invasion, and proliferation were determined using standard molecular biology techniques and advanced imaging. We found that higher molecular weight PEG, especially PEG 8000 and 20,000, regardless of bacterial infection, increased proliferation and depth of invasion although a decrease in cellular density and MMP-1 activity was also noted. Maximum proliferation and depth of invasion of Caco-2 cells was observed in scaffolds treated with a combination of commensal E. coli strain, HS4 and PEG 8000. In conclusion, we found that PEG 8000 increased cell proliferation and led to the preservation of cell density in cells treated with commensal bacteria. This is important, because the preservation of a proliferative response in colon cancer results in a more chemo-responsive tumor.

  3. Grape seed extracts modify the outcome of oxaliplatin in colon cancer cells by interfering with cellular mechanisms of drug cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Letizia; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Quatrale, Anna Elisa; Bergamini, Carlo; Denora, Nunzio; Crupi, Pasquale; Antonacci, Donato; Mangia, Anita; Simone, Giovanni; Silvestris, Nicola; Azzariti, Amalia

    2017-08-01

    Grape seed extracts are commonly utilized as dietary supplements for their antioxidant properties, even from cancer patients. However, whether these natural extracts interfere with chemotherapeutics utilized in colon cancer treatment is still poorly investigated. The cytotoxicity of extracts from Italia and Palieri cultivars either alone or in combination with oxaliplatin was evaluated in colon cancer cells. Grape seed extracts displayed anti-proliferative activity depending on the concentration utilized through apoptosis induction. In combination, they affected the activation of Erk1/2 and counteracted the intrinsic and the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis, the DNA damage and the generation of ROS induced by oxaliplatin. Noteworthy grape seed extracts strongly enhanced the uptake of oxaliplatin into all cells, by affecting the cell transport system of platinum. The addition of these natural extracts to oxaliplatin strongly reduced the cellular response to oxaliplatin and allowed a huge accumulation of platinum into cells. Here, we shed light on the chemical biology underlying the combination of grape seed extracts and oxaliplatin, demonstrating that they might be detrimental to oxaliplatin effectiveness in colon cancer therapy.

  4. Extravirgin olive oil up-regulates CB₁ tumor suppressor gene in human colon cancer cells and in rat colon via epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Andrea; Falconi, Anastasia; Di Germanio, Clara; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Costa, Antonio; Caramuta, Stefano; Del Carlo, Michele; Compagnone, Dario; Dainese, Enrico; Cifani, Carlo; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Extravirgin olive oil (EVOO) represents the typical lipid source of the Mediterranean diet, an eating habit pattern that has been associated with a significant reduction of cancer risk. Diet is the more studied environmental factor in epigenetics, and many evidences suggest dysregulation of epigenetic pathways in cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of EVOO and its phenolic compounds on endocannabinoid system (ECS) gene expression via epigenetic regulation in both human colon cancer cells (Caco-2) and rats exposed to short- and long-term dietary EVOO. We observed a selective and transient up-regulation of CNR1 gene - encoding for type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB₁) - that was evoked by exposure of Caco-2 cells to EVOO (100 ppm), its phenolic extracts (OPE, 50 μM) or authentic hydroxytyrosol (HT, 50 μM) for 24 h. None of the other major elements of the ECS (i.e., CB₂; GPR55 and TRPV1 receptors; and NAPE-PLD, DAGL, FAAH and MAGL enzymes) was affected at any time point. The stimulatory effect of OPE and HT on CB₁ expression was inversely correlated to DNA methylation at CNR1 promoter and was associated with reduced proliferation of Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, CNR1 gene was less expressed in Caco-2 cells when compared to normal colon mucosa cells, and again this effect was associated with higher level of DNA methylation at CNR1. Moreover, in agreement with the in vitro studies, we also observed a remarkable (~4-fold) and selective increase in CB₁ expression in the colon of rats receiving dietary EVOO supplementation for 10 days. Consistently, CpG methylation of rat Cnr1 promoter, miR23a and miR-301a, previously shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and predicted to target CB₁ mRNA, was reduced after EVOO administration down to ~50% of controls. Taken together, our findings demonstrating CB₁ gene expression modulation by EVOO or its phenolic compounds via epigenetic mechanism, both in vitro and in vivo, may

  5. Characterization of Cancer Stem Cells in Colon Adenocarcinoma Metastasis to the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo N. Humphries

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFifty percent of colorectal cancer (CRC patients develop liver metastasis. This study identified and characterized cancer stem cells (CSCs within colon adenocarcinoma metastasis to the liver (CAML.Methods3,3-Diaminobenzidine immunohistochemical (IHC staining was performed on nine CAML samples for embryonic stem cell (ESC markers OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, c-Myc, and KLF4. Immunofluorescence (IF IHC staining was performed to investigate coexpression of two markers. NanoString mRNA expression analysis and colorimetric in situ hybridization (CISH were performed on four snap-frozen CAML tissue samples for transcript expression of these ESC markers. Cells stained positively and negatively for each marker by IHC and CISH staining were counted and analyzed.Results3,3-Diaminobenzidine IHC staining, and NanoString and CISH mRNA analyses demonstrated the expression of OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, c-Myc, and KLF4 within in all nine CAML samples, except for SOX2 which was below detectable levels on NanoString mRNA analysis. IF IHC staining showed the presence of a SOX2+/NANOG+/KLF4+/c-Myc+/OCT− CSC subpopulation within the tumor nests, and a SOX2+/NANOG+/KLF4+/c-Myc+/OCT4− CSC subpopulation and a SOX2+/NANOG+/KLF4+/c-Myc+/OCT4+ CSC subpopulation within the peritumoral stroma.ConclusionThe novel finding of three CSC subpopulations within CAML provides insights into the biology of CRC.

  6. Activity and expression of human telomerase in normal and malignant cells in gastric and colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jerzy; Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Nowicka-Kujawska, Karina; Pernak, Monika; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowak, Tomasz; Wysocki, Jacek

    2003-01-01

    The reactivation of telomerase is believed to play an important role in immortalization and carcinogenesis. To investigate the expression of three components of the telomerase complex (hTR, hTERT and TP1), along with telomerase activity in malignant and normal cells. Cells were isolated from gastric and colon cancer, and from normal mucosa from the stomach and colon of participating patients. Expression of hTERT, hTR and TP1 has been studied by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The telomerase repeat amplification protocol and PCR enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for analysis of telomerase activity. All telomerase components were consistently expressed in colon and gastric cancer cells. Neoplastic RNA produced consistently very strong amplification signals either for hTR, hTERT or TP1. The expression of hTR was observed in RNA isolated from all normal mucosa samples and from peripheral blood lymphocytes. The expression of TP1 and hTERT has been found in the majority of normal cells; however, the amplification signals produced were usually much weaker than in malignant cells. The limiting dilution experiments indicated that the cancer cells have at least 100-fold higher telomerase activity and at least 25-fold higher TP1 and hTERT expression in comparison to normal cells. It can be concluded that all the cancer cells tested have higher telomerase expression and activity than normal cells. Therefore, telomerase can be a good cancer marker, provided that quantitative analysis is carried out. Copyright 2003 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  7. DNA Tetrahedron Delivery Enhances Doxorubicin-Induced Apoptosis of HT-29 Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guiyu; Zhang, Zhiyong; Yang, Junen

    2017-08-01

    As a nano-sized drug carrier with the advantage of modifiability and proper biocompatibility, DNA tetrahedron (DNA tetra) delivery is hopeful to enhance the inhibitory efficiency of nontargeted anticancer drugs. In this investigation, doxorubicin (Dox) was assembled to a folic acid-modified DNA tetra via click chemistry to prepare a targeted antitumor agent. Cellular uptake efficiency was measured via fluorescent imaging. Cytotoxicity, inhibition efficiency, and corresponding mechanism on colon cancer cell line HT-29 were evaluated by MTT assay, cell proliferation curve, western blot, and flow cytometry. No cytotoxicity was induced by DNA tetra, but the cellular uptake ratio increased obviously resulting from the DNA tetra-facilitated penetration through cellular membrane. Accordingly, folic acid-DNA tetra-Dox markedly increased the antitumor efficiency with increased apoptosis levels. In details, 100 μM was the effective concentration and a 6-h incubation period was needed for apoptosis induction. In conclusion, nano-sized DNA tetrahedron was a safe and effective delivery system for Dox and correspondingly enhanced the anticancer efficiency.

  8. Interactions of cisplatin and the copper transporter CTR1 in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerfeldt, Mia C; Tran, Carmen M-N; Shen, Clara; Hambley, Trevor W; New, Elizabeth J

    2017-07-01

    There is much interest in understanding the mechanisms by which platinum-based anticancer agents enter cells, and the copper transporter CTR1 has been the focus of many recent studies. While there is a clinical correlation between CTR1 levels and platinum efficacy, cellular studies have provided conflicting evidence relating to the relationship between cisplatin and CTR1. We report here our studies of the relationship between cisplatin and copper homeostasis in human colon cancer cells. While the accumulation of copper and platinum do not appear to compete with each other, we did observe that cisplatin perturbs CTR1 distribution within 10 min, a far shorter incubation time than commonly employed in cellular studies of cisplatin. Furthermore, on these short time-scales, cisplatin caused an increase in the cytoplasmic labile copper pool. While the predominant focus of studies to date has been on CTR1, these studies highlight the importance of investigating the interaction of cisplatin with other copper proteins.

  9. Green tea phenolics inhibit butyrate-induced differentiation of colon cancer cells by interacting with monocarboxylate transporter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Tena, S.; Vizán, P.; Dudeja, P.K.; Centelles, J.J.; Cascante, M.

    2016-01-01

    Diet has a significant impact on colorectal cancer and both dietary fiber and plant-derived compounds have been independently shown to be inversely related to colon cancer risk. Butyrate (NaB), one of the principal products of dietary fiber fermentation, induces differentiation of colon cancer cell lines by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs). On the other hand, (−)-epicatechin (EC) and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), two abundant phenolic compounds of green tea, have been shown to exhibit antitumoral properties. In this study we used colon cancer cell lines to study the cellular and molecular events that take place during co-treatment with NaB, EC and EGCG. We found that (i) polyphenols EC and EGCG fail to induce differentiation of colon adenocarcinoma cell lines; (ii) polyphenols EC and EGCG reduce NaB-induced differentiation; (iii) the effect of the polyphenols is specific for NaB, since differentiation induced by other agents, such as trichostatin A (TSA), was unaltered upon EC and EGCG treatment, and (iv) is independent of the HDAC inhibitory activity of NaB. Also, (v) polyphenols partially reduce cellular NaB; and (vi) on a molecular level, reduction of cellular NaB uptake by polyphenols is achieved by impairing the capacity of NaB to relocalize its own transporter (monocarboxylate transporter 1, MCT1) in the plasma membrane. Our findings suggest that beneficial effects of NaB on colorectal cancer may be reduced by green tea phenolic supplementation. This valuable information should be of assistance in choosing a rational design for more effective diet-driven therapeutic interventions in the prevention or treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:23994611

  10. Aged black garlic extract inhibits HT29 colon cancer cell growth via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Menghua; Yang, Guiqing; Liu, Hanchen; Liu, Xiaoxu; Lin, Sixiang; Sun, Dongning; Wang, Yishan

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that aged black garlic extract (ABGE) may prove beneficial in preventing or inhibiting oncogenesis; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of ABGE on the proliferation and apoptosis of HT29 colon cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that ABGE inhibited HT29 cell growth via the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. We further investigated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) signal transduction pathway and the molecular mechanisms underlying the ABGE-induced inhibition of HT29 cell proliferation. We observed that ABGE may regulate the function of the PI3K/Akt pathway through upregulating PTEN and downregulating Akt and p-Akt expression, as well as suppressing its downstream target, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway is crucial for the development of colon cancer. ABGE inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in HT29 cells through the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway, suggesting that ABGE may be effective in the prevention and treatment of colon cancer in humans.

  11. Epigenetic mechanisms involved in differential MDR1 mRNA expression between gastric and colon cancer cell lines and rationales for clinical chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyung-Jong

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp, the MDR1 gene product, are one of causes of treatment failure in cancer patients. In this study, the epigenetic mechanisms involved in differential MDR1 mRNA expression were compared between 10 gastric and 9 colon cancer cell lines. Methods The MDR1 mRNA levels were determined using PCR and real-time PCR assays after reverse transcription. Cytotoxicity was performed using the MTT assay. Methylation status was explored by quantification PCR-based methylation and bisulfite DNA sequencing analyses. Results The MDR1 mRNA levels obtained by 35 cycles of RT-PCR in gastric cancer cells were just comparable to those obtained by 22 cycles of RT-PCR in colon cancer cells. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that MDR1 mRNA was not detected in the 10 gastric cancer cell lines but variable MDR1 mRNA levels in 7 of 9 colon cancer cell lines except the SNU-C5 and HT-29 cells. MTT assay showed that Pgp inhibitors such as cyclosporine A, verapamil and PSC833 sensitized Colo320HSR (colon, highest MDR1 expression but not SNU-668 (gastric, highest and SNU-C5 (gastric, no expression to paclitaxel. Quantification PCR-based methylation analysis revealed that 90% of gastric cancer cells, and 33% of colon cancer cells were methylated, which were completely matched with the results obtained by bisulfite DNA sequencing analysis. 5-aza-2'-deoxcytidine (5AC, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor increased the MDR1 mRNA levels in 60% of gastric cells, and in 11% of colon cancer cells. Trichostatin A (TSA, histone deacetylase inhibitor increased the MDR1 mRNA levels in 70% of gastric cancer cells and 55% of colon cancer cells. The combined treatment of 5AC with TSA increased the MDR1 mRNA levels additively in 20% of gastric cancer cells, but synergistically in 40% of gastric and 11% of colon cancer cells. Conclusion These results indicate that the MDR1 mRNA levels in gastric cancer cells are significantly

  12. Antiproliferative effect of immunoliposomes containing 5-fluorodeoxyuridine-dipalmitate on colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, GA; Gorter, A; Scherphof, GL; Kamps, JAAM

    We have investigated the antiproliferative action towards CC531 colon adenocarcinoma cells of target cell-specific immunoliposomes containing the amphiphilic dipalmitoyl derivative of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR-dP). FUdR-dP incorporated in immunoliposomes caused a 13-fold stronger inhibition of

  13. Exploring the Colonic Metabolism of Grape and Strawberry Anthocyanins and Their in Vitro Apoptotic Effects in HT-29 Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Las Hazas, María-Carmen; Mosele, Juana I; Macià, Alba; Ludwig, Iziar A; Motilva, María-José

    2017-08-09

    Beneficial properties attributed to the intake of fruit and red wine have been associated with the presence of significant amounts of anthocyanins. However, their low absorption and consequent accumulation in the gut have generated the suspicion that colonic metabolites of anthocyanins are probably involved in these protective effects. Grape pomace and strawberry extracts, rich in malvidin- and pelargonidin-glucoside, respectively, were fermented in vitro using human feces as microbial inoculum. After 8 h of anaerobic incubation, the anthocyanins were almost completely degraded, whereas their microbial metabolite concentrations were highest at 24 h. Syringic acid and tyrosol were the main metabolites of grape and strawberry extracts, respectively. On the basis of the metabolites detected, metabolic pathways of malvidin- and pelargonidin-glucosides were proposed. Anthocyanin-rich grape and strawberry extracts and their generated metabolites such as hydroxyphenylacetic acid showed apoptotic effects in HT-29 colon cancer cells and may suggest their possible contribution as anticarcinogenic agents.

  14. Gamma-Mangostin, a Micronutrient of Mangosteen Fruit, Induces Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Fang Chang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently colorectal cancer rates have increased rapidly in Taiwan. The treatment of colorectal cancer includes surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana is a famous Asian tropical fruit. γ-Mangostin is a xanthone derivative isolated from the fruit hull. In previous studies, we found evidence of anti-inflammatory and anti-brain tumor activities in γ-mangostin. In this study, we performed further studies to assess the apoptotic effects of γ-mangostin on colorectal adenocarcinoma cells HT29. γ-Mangostin showed concentration and time-dependent cytotoxic effects on HT29 cells. Microscopic observation under Giemsa staining showed that γ-mangostin induced cellular swelling and the appearance of apoptotic bodies, characteristic of apoptosis in HT29 cells. In addition, flow cytometry analysis showed an increase of hypodiploid cells in γ-mangostin-treated HT29 cells, while enhancement of intracellular peroxide production was detected in the same γ-mangostin-treated cells by DCHDA assay and DiOC6(3 staining. In view of the above results, γ-mangostin has demonstrated anticancer activity and induces apoptosis in HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The evidence suggests that γ-mangostin could serve as a micronutrient for colon cancer prevention and is a potential lead compound for the development of anti-colon cancer agents.

  15. Arsenic trioxide causes redistribution of cell cycle, caspase activation, and GADD expression in human colonic, breast, and pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinquan; Ding, Xianzhong; Adrian, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide is valuable for treatment of promyelocytic leukemia, but less attention has been paid to its therapeutic potential for other cancers. In this study, the effects of arsenic trioxide were tested in human pancreatic (AsPC-1), colonic (HT-29), and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. In all three cancer cell lines, arsenic trioxide inhibited proliferation in a concentration and time-dependent manner, as measured by 3H-methyl thymidine incorporation and cell counting. Coincident with inhibition of growth, arsenic trioxide induced marked morphologic changes, including reduced cytoplasmic volume, membrane blebbing, and nuclear condensation consistent with apoptosis. Propidium iodide DNA staining at 24 hours revealed cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and an increase in the S phase, while at 72 hr there was G2/M phase arrest with a marked increase in the sub-G0/G1, apoptotic cell population. The DNA fragmentation induced by arsenic trioxide was confirmed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay in all cell lines. Western blot analysis revealed activation of caspase -3, -7, and -9 by arsenic trioxide. Caspase-3 activity was confirmed by demonstrating cleavage of its downstream target, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Expression of the antiapoptosis protein, Bcl-2, was time-dependently decreased. In contrast, arsenic trioxide markedly enhanced the expression of the p21 protein, GADD45 and GADD153, in a time-dependent manner. These findings suggest that arsenic trioxide has potential as a therapeutic agent for these cancers.

  16. Novel Piperazine-based Compounds Inhibit Microtubule Dynamics and Sensitize Colon Cancer Cells to Tumor Necrosis Factor-induced Apoptosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Avijeet; Anderson, Amy; Giardina, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a series of mitotically acting piperazine-based compounds that potently increase the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to apoptotic ligands. Here we describe a structure-activity relationship study on this compound class and identify a highly active derivative ((4-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)(2-ethoxyphenyl)methanone), referred to as AK301, the activity of which is governed by the positioning of functional groups on the phenyl and benzoyl rings. AK301 induced mitotic arrest in HT29 human colon cancer cells with an ED50 of ≈115 nm. Although AK301 inhibited growth of normal lung fibroblast cells, mitotic arrest was more pronounced in the colon cancer cells (50% versus 10%). Cells arrested by AK301 showed the formation of multiple microtubule organizing centers with Aurora kinase A and γ-tubulin. Employing in vitro and in vivo assays, tubulin polymerization was found to be slowed (but not abolished) by AK301. In silico molecular docking suggests that AK301 binds to the colchicine-binding domain on β-tubulin, but in a novel orientation. Cells arrested by AK301 expressed elevated levels of TNFR1 on their surface and more readily activated caspases-8, -9, and -3 in the presence of TNF. Relative to other microtubule destabilizers, AK301 was the most active TNF-sensitizing agent and also stimulated Fas- and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In summary, we report a new class of mitosis-targeting agents that effectively sensitizes cancer cells to apoptotic ligands. These compounds should help illuminate the role of microtubules in regulating apoptotic ligand sensitivity and may ultimately be useful for developing agents that augment the anti-cancer activities of the immune response. PMID:24338023

  17. Inhibiting DNA methylation activates cancer testis antigens and expression of the antigen processing and presentation machinery in colon and ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenkäs, Cornelia; Chiappinelli, Katherine B; Guzzetta, Angela A; Sharma, Anup; Jeschke, Jana; Vatapalli, Rajita; Baylin, Stephen B; Ahuja, Nita

    2017-01-01

    Innovative therapies for solid tumors are urgently needed. Recently, therapies that harness the host immune system to fight cancer cells have successfully treated a subset of patients with solid tumors. These responses have been strong and durable but observed in subsets of patients. Work from our group and others has shown that epigenetic therapy, specifically inhibiting the silencing DNA methylation mark, activates immune signaling in tumor cells and can sensitize to immune therapy in murine models. Here we show that colon and ovarian cancer cell lines exhibit lower expression of transcripts involved in antigen processing and presentation to immune cells compared to normal tissues. In addition, treatment with clinically relevant low doses of DNMT inhibitors (that remove DNA methylation) increases expression of both antigen processing and presentation and Cancer Testis Antigens in these cell lines. We confirm that treatment with DNMT inhibitors upregulates expression of the antigen processing and presentation molecules B2M, CALR, CD58, PSMB8, PSMB9 at the RNA and protein level in a wider range of colon and ovarian cancer cell lines and treatment time points than had been described previously. In addition, we show that DNMTi treatment upregulates many Cancer Testis Antigens common to both colon and ovarian cancer. This increase of both antigens and antigen presentation by epigenetic therapy may be one mechanism to sensitize patients to immune therapies.

  18. Nonsense mediated decay resistant mutations are a source of expressed mutant proteins in colon cancer cell lines with microsatellite instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Frameshift mutations in microsatellite instability high (MSI-High colorectal cancers are a potential source of targetable neo-antigens. Many nonsense transcripts are subject to rapid degradation due to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD, but nonsense transcripts with a cMS in the last exon or near the last exon-exon junction have intrinsic resistance to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD. NMD-resistant transcripts are therefore a likely source of expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High tumours. METHODS: Using antibodies to the conserved N-termini of predicted mutant proteins, we analysed MSI-High colorectal cancer cell lines for examples of naturally expressed mutant proteins arising from frameshift mutations in coding microsatellites (cMS by immunoprecipitation and Western Blot experiments. Detected mutant protein bands from NMD-resistant transcripts were further validated by gene-specific short-interfering RNA (siRNA knockdown. A genome-wide search was performed to identify cMS-containing genes likely to generate NMD-resistant transcripts that could encode for antigenic expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancers. These genes were screened for cMS mutations in the MSI-High colon cancer cell lines. RESULTS: Mutant protein bands of expected molecular weight were detected in mutated MSI-High cell lines for NMD-resistant transcripts (CREBBP, EP300, TTK, but not NMD-sensitive transcripts (BAX, CASP5, MSH3. Expression of the mutant CREBBP and EP300 proteins was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. Five cMS-bearing genes identified from the genome-wide search and without existing mutation data (SFRS12IP1, MED8, ASXL1, FBXL3 and RGS12 were found to be mutated in at least 5 of 11 (45% of the MSI-High cell lines tested. CONCLUSION: NMD-resistant transcripts can give rise to expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancer cells. If commonly expressed in primary MSI-High colon cancers, MSI-derived mutant proteins could be useful as cancer specific

  19. Wnt/β-catenin signaling in T-cells drives epigenetic imprinting of pro-inflammatory properties and promotes colitis and colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthivasan, Shilpa; Aghajani, Katayoun; Dose, Marei; Molinero, Luciana; Khan, Mohammad W.; Venkatesvaran, Vysak; Weber, Christopher; Emmanuel, Akinola Olumide; Sun, Tianjao; Ramos, Elena M.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Mulcahy, Mary; Blatner, Nichole; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Gounari, Fotini

    2014-01-01

    The density and type of lymphocytes that infiltrate colon tumors are predictive of the clinical outcome of colon cancer. High densities of TH17 cells and inflammation predict poor outcome, while infiltration by Tregs that naturally suppress inflammation is associated with longer patient survival. However, the role of Tregs in cancer remains controversial. We recently reported that Tregs in colon cancer patients can become pro-inflammatory and tumor promoting. These properties were directly linked with their expression of RORγt, the signature transcription factor of TH17 cells. Here, we report that Wnt/β-catenin signaling in T-cells promotes expression of RORγt. Expression of β-catenin was elevated in T-cells and Tregs of patients with colitis and colon cancer. Genetically engineered activation of β-catenin in mouse T-cells resulted in enhanced chromatin accessibility in the proximity of Tcf-1 binding sites genome-wide, induced expression of TH17 signature genes including RORγt, and promoted TH17-mediated inflammation. Strikingly, the mice had inflammation of intestine and colon and developed lesions indistinguishable from colitis-induced cancer. Activation of β-catenin only in Tregs was sufficient to produce inflammation and initiate cancer. Based on these findings we conclude that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in T-cells and/or Tregs is causatively linked with the imprinting of pro-inflammatory properties and the promotion of colon cancer. PMID:24574339

  20. Evaluation of chemical composition, antioxidant, antibacterial, cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of Aloysia citrodora extract on colon cancer cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Mirzaie; Seyed Ataollah Sadat Shandiz; Hassan Noorbazargan; Elahe Ali Asgary

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aloysia citrodora belongs to the Verbenaceae family of plants, a well-known herbal medicine in Iran. The aim of the present study was to investigate the chemical composition, antioxidant, antibacterial, cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of A. citrodora extract against human colon cancer (HT29) cells by using real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow-cytometry methods. Methods: This experimental study was carried out in Islamic Azad University, East Tehran Branch, from March to...

  1. Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Colon Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  2. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  3. Sanguinarine induces apoptosis of HT-29 human colon cancer cells via the regulation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-9-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Sik; Jung, Won-Kyo; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Taek Rim; Kim, Hyung Keun

    2012-01-01

    Sanguinarine is an alkaloid obtained from the bloodroot plant Sanguinaria canadensis and has beneficial effects on oxidative stress and inflammatory disorders. Previous reports have demonstrated that sanguinarine also exhibit anticancer properties. In the current study, we investigated the effects of sanguinarine on HT-29 human colon cancer cells. It was observed that sanguinarine treatment induces a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis of human colon cancer cells. We also investigated the effects of sanguinarine on the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins, and the results revealed that there was an increase in Bax and a decrease in B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) protein levels. Moreover, sanguinarine treatment significantly increases the activation of caspases 3 and 9 that are the key executioners in apoptosis. Our results suggest that sanguinarine induces apoptosis of HT-29 human colon cancer cells and may have a potential therapeutic use in the treatment of human colon cancer.

  4. Antioxidant activity and growth inhibition of human colon cancer cells by crude and purified fucoidan preparations extracted from Sargassum cristaefolium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides, also termed “fucoidans”, which are known to possess antioxidant, anticoagulant, anticancer, antiviral, and immunomodulating properties, are normally isolated from brown algae via various extraction techniques. In the present study, two methods (SC1 and SC2 for isolation of fucoidan from Sargassum cristaefolium were compared, with regard to the extraction yields, antioxidant activity, and inhibition of growth of human colon cancer cells exhibited by the respective extracts. SC1 and SC2 differ in the number of extraction steps and concentration of ethanol used, as well as the obtained sulfated polysaccharide extracts, namely, crude fucoidan preparation (CFP and purified fucoidan preparation (PFP, respectively. Thin layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared analysis, and measurements of fucose and sulfate contents revealed that the extracts were fucoidan. There was a higher extraction yield for CFP, which contained less fucose and sulfate but more uronic acid, and had weaker antioxidant activity and inhibition of growth in human colon cancer cells. In contrast, there was a lower extraction yield for PFP, which contained more fucose and sulfate but less uronic acid, and had stronger antioxidant activity and inhibition of growth in human colon cancer cells. Thus, since the difference in bioactive activities between CFP and PFP was not remarkable, the high extraction yield of SC1 might be favored as a method in industrial usage for extracting fucoidan.

  5. The effect of gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839) in combination with oxaliplatin is schedule-dependent in colon cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Ming; Azzariti, Amalia; Colucci, Giuseppe; Paradiso, Angelo

    2003-12-01

    Clinical trials of gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839) in combination with cytotoxic agents have been carried out or are ongoing in several varieties of tumor. To provide a rationale for future clinical trials, the effects of combining gefitinib with oxaliplatin in different sequences of administration and different dose ratios in two colon cancer cell lines were evaluated. The colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and LoVo were used. The methods consisted of median effect and combination index analysis, Western blot, mass spectrometry, and a cell death ELISA. In vitro analysis demonstrated that the combination effects of the two agents were sequence-dependent. Changing the sequence of administration from gefitinib first to gefitinib last changed the combination effect from antagonism to synergy. The dose ratio between the two agents affected the combination effects. When equiactive doses of the two agents were used with the sequence gefitinib following oxaliplatin, the greatest level of synergism was obtained (CI=0.6+/-0.2, P=0.032). Further evaluation revealed that gefitinib significantly inhibited removal of Pt-DNA adducts ( P<0.05), providing a potential explanation for the sequence-dependent synergy observed with gefitinib following oxaliplatin. However, this effect was not dose-dependent. Additional studies demonstrated that gefitinib enhanced the effects of oxaliplatin by maintaining oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis, and equiactive dose of gefitinib following oxaliplatin induced prominent enhancement of apoptosis. Oxaliplatin followed by an equiactive relative dose of gefitinib is an appropriate combination for evaluation in colon cancer.

  6. Fetal microchimerism in breast and colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, M; Biggar, R J; Stamper, Casey L

    2011-01-01

    microchimerism predicts risk for developing breast cancer is unknown. FMc was evaluated in buffy coat cells from presumed healthy women who later developed breast cancer or colon cancer, a cancer in which prior pregnancy appears protective but has different associations with endocrine risk factors. METHODS......1574 Background: Cells acquired by a woman from her baby that durably persist in her blood and tissues is known as fetal microchimerism (FMc). In women with breast cancer, frequency and quantity of FMc in blood and breast tissue is reduced compared to healthy women. Whether the absence of fetal....... DNA from repository buffy coat specimens was tested for male FMc with quantitative PCR targeting the DYS14gene on the Y chromosome. For this analysis, 89 women who developed breast cancer and 67 women who developed colon cancer were evaluable for FMc. Results were compared to 272 women who remained...

  7. Different functions of AKT1 and AKT2 in molecular pathways, cell migration and metabolism in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggblad Sahlberg, Sara; Mortensen, Anja C; Haglöf, Jakob; Engskog, Mikael K R; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt; Glimelius, Bengt; Stenerlöw, Bo; Nestor, Marika

    2017-01-01

    AKT is a central protein in many cellular pathways such as cell survival, proliferation, glucose uptake, metabolism, angiogenesis, as well as radiation and drug response. The three isoforms of AKT (AKT1, AKT2 and AKT3) are proposed to have different physiological functions, properties and expression patterns in a cell type-dependent manner. As of yet, not much is known about the influence of the different AKT isoforms in the genome and their effects in the metabolism of colorectal cancer cells. In the present study, DLD-1 isogenic AKT1, AKT2 and AKT1/2 knockout colon cancer cell lines were used as a model system in conjunction with the parental cell line in order to further elucidate the differences between the AKT isoforms and how they are involved in various cellular pathways. This was done using genome wide expression analyses, metabolic profiling and cell migration assays. In conclusion, downregulation of genes in the cell adhesion, extracellular matrix and Notch-pathways and upregulation of apoptosis and metastasis inhibitory genes in the p53-pathway, confirm that the knockout of both AKT1 and AKT2 will attenuate metastasis and tumor cell growth. This was verified with a reduction in migration rate in the AKT1 KO and AKT2 KO and most explicitly in the AKT1/2 KO. Furthermore, the knockout of AKT1, AKT2 or both, resulted in a reduction in lactate and alanine, suggesting that the metabolism of carbohydrates and glutathione was impaired. This was further verified in gene expression analyses, showing downregulation of genes involved in glucose metabolism. Additionally, both AKT1 KO and AKT2 KO demonstrated an impaired fatty acid metabolism. However, genes were upregulated in the Wnt and cell proliferation pathways, which could oppose this effect. AKT inhibition should therefore be combined with other effectors to attain the best effect.

  8. Inositol Hexaphosphate Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis of Colon Cancer Cells by Suppressing the AKT/mTOR Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kapral

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: AKT, a serine/threonine protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR plays a critical role in the proliferation and resistance to apoptosis that are essential to the development and progression of colon cancer. Therefore, AKT/mTOR signaling pathway has been recognized as an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Inositol hexaphosphate (InsP6, a natural occurring phytochemical, has been shown to have both preventive and therapeutic effects against various cancers, however, its exact molecular mechanisms of action are not fully understood. The aim of the in vitro study was to investigate the anticancer activity of InsP6 on colon cancer with the focus on inhibiting the AKT1 kinase and p70S6K1 as mTOR effector, in relation to proliferation and apoptosis of cells. The colon cancer Caco-2 cells were cultured using standard techniques and exposed to InsP6 at different concentrations (1 mM, 2.5 mM and 5 mM. Cellular proliferative activity was monitored by 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation into cellular DNA. Flow cytometric analysis was performed for cell cycle progression and apoptosis studies. Real-time RT-qPCR was used to validate mRNA levels of CDNK1A, CDNK1B, CASP3, CASP9, AKT1 and S6K1 genes. The concentration of p21 protein as well as the activities of caspase 3, AKT1 and p70S6K1 were determined by the ELISA method. The results revealed that IP6 inhibited proliferation and stimulated apoptosis of colon cancer cells. This effect was mediated by an increase in the expression of genes encoding p21, p27, caspase 3, caspase 9 as well a decrease in transcription of AKT1 and S6K1. InsP6 suppressed phosphorylation of AKT1 and p70S6K1, downstream effector of mTOR. Based on these studies it may be concluded that InsP6 can reduce proliferation and induce apoptosis through inhibition of the AKT/mTOR pathway and mTOR effector followed by modulation of the expression and activity of several key components of these pathways in

  9. 6-Gingerol Inhibits Growth of Colon Cancer Cell LoVo via Induction of G2/M Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Bin Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 6-Gingerol, a natural component of ginger, has been widely reported to possess antiinflammatory and antitumorigenic activities. Despite its potential efficacy against cancer, the anti-tumor mechanisms of 6-gingerol are complicated and remain sketchy. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anti-tumor effects of 6-gingerol on colon cancer cells. Our results revealed that 6-gingerol treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of human colon cancer cell, LoVo, in a dose-dependent manner. Further flow cytometric analysis showed that 6-gingerol induced significant G2/M phase arrest and had slight influence on sub-G1 phase in LoVo cells. Therefore, levels of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs, and their regulatory proteins involved in S-G2/M transition were investigated. Our findings revealed that levels of cyclin A, cyclin B1, and CDK1 were diminished; in contrast, levels of the negative cell cycle regulators p27Kip1 and p21Cip1 were increased in response to 6-gingerol treatment. In addition, 6-gingerol treatment elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and phosphorylation level of p53. These findings indicate that exposure of 6-gingerol may induce intracellular ROS and upregulate p53, p27Kip1, and p21Cip1 levels leading to consequent decrease of CDK1, cyclin A, and cyclin B1 as result of cell cycle arrest in LoVo cells. It would be suggested that 6-gingerol should be beneficial to treatment of colon cancer.

  10. Regulation of UGT1A1 and HNF1 transcription factor gene expression by DNA methylation in colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Mario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1 is a pivotal enzyme involved in metabolism of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan commonly used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer. We previously demonstrated aberrant methylation of specific CpG dinucleotides in UGT1A1-negative cells, and revealed that methylation state of the UGT1A1 5'-flanking sequence is negatively correlated with gene transcription. Interestingly, one of these CpG dinucleotides (CpG -4 is found close to a HNF1 response element (HRE, known to be involved in activation of UGT1A1 gene expression, and within an upstream stimulating factor (USF binding site. Results Gel retardation assays revealed that methylation of CpG-4 directly affect the interaction of USF1/2 with its cognate sequence without altering the binding for HNF1-alpha. Luciferase assays sustained a role for USF1/2 and HNF1-alpha in UGT1A1 regulation in colon cancer cells. Based on the differential expression profiles of HNF1A gene in colon cell lines, we also assessed whether methylation affects its expression. In agreement with the presence of CpG islands in the HNF1A promoter, treatments of UGT1A1-negative HCT116 colon cancer cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor restore HNF1A gene expression, as observed for UGT1A1. Conclusions This study reveals that basal UGT1A1 expression in colon cells is positively regulated by HNF1-alpha and USF, and negatively regulated by DNA methylation. Besides, DNA methylation of HNF1A could also play an important role in regulating additional cellular drug metabolism and transporter pathways. This process may contribute to determine local inactivation of drugs such as the anticancer agent SN-38 by glucuronidation and define tumoral response.

  11. Anticancer effects of Chinese red yeast rice versus monacolin K alone on colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mee Young; Seeram, Navindra P; Zhang, Yanjun; Heber, David

    2008-07-01

    Chinese red yeast rice (RYR) is a food herb made by fermenting Monascus purpureus Went yeast with white rice. RYR contains a mixture of monacolins, one of which--monacolin K (MK)--is identical to lovastatin (LV). Epidemiological studies show that individuals taking statins have a reduced risk of colon cancer. In the present study, LV decreased cellular proliferation (Pred yeast rice (PF-RYR) and monacolin-rich fraction of Chinese red yeast rice (MF-RYR). The effect of MF-RYR was similar to that of LV, while the effect of PF-RYR was similar to the effect of the whole RYR extract on the proliferation, apoptosis and mRNA level of HMGCR and sterol response element binding protein-2. These results suggest that the matrix effects of RYR beyond MK alone may be active in inhibiting colon cancer growth. RYR with or without MK may be a botanical approach to colon cancer chemoprevention worthy of further investigation.

  12. Coix lacryma-jobi var. ma-yuen Stapf sprout extract has anti-metastatic activity in colon cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Eun Suk; Kim, Young Ock; Park, Chun Geon; Park, Kyung Hun; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Park, Jeong-Woong; Kim, Se-Hee

    2017-11-06

    Coix lacryma-jobi var. ma-yuen (Rom.Caill.) Stapf has been used in China as an herbal medicine. Many studies of this plant have reported anti-proliferative and apoptotic activities on human cancer cell lines. Therefore, this study of the anti-metastatic effect of Coix lacryma-jobi var. ma-yuen Stapf sprout extract (CLSE) in colorectal cancer cells may provide a scientific basis for exploring anti-cancer effects of edible crops. To evaluate the effect of CLSE on cell proliferation and signaling, we performed a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay in HCT116 cells and used western blot analysis. Furthermore, scratch-wound healing, transwell migration, matrigel invasion, and adhesion assays were conducted to elucidate the anti-metastatic effects of CLSE under hypoxic conditions in colon cancer cells. First, CLSE decreased deferoxamine (DFO)-induced migration of colon cancer cells by 87%, and blocked colon cancer cell migration by 80% compared with hypoxia control cells. Second, CLSE treatment resulted in a 54% reduction in hypoxia-induced invasiveness of colon cancer cells, and 50% inhibition of adhesive potency through inactivation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and protein kinase b (AKT) pathways. Third, conditioned medium collected from CLSE-treated HCT116 cells suppressed tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by 91%. CLSE inhibited migration, invasion, and adhesion of colon cancer cells and tube formation by HUVECs via repression of the ERK1/2 and AKT pathways under hypoxic conditions. Therefore, CLSE may be used to treat patients with colon cancer.

  13. MEK and TAK1 Regulate Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells with KRAS-Dependent Activation of Proinflammatory Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNew, Kelsey L; Whipple, William J; Mehta, Anita K; Grant, Trevor J; Ray, Leah; Kenny, Connor; Singh, Anurag

    2016-12-01

    MEK inhibitors have limited efficacy in treating RAS-RAF-MEK pathway-dependent cancers due to feedback pathway compensation and dose-limiting toxicities. Combining MEK inhibitors with other targeted agents may enhance efficacy. Here, codependencies of MEK, TAK1, and KRAS in colon cancer were investigated. Combined inhibition of MEK and TAK1 potentiates apoptosis in KRAS-dependent cells. Pharmacologic studies and cell-cycle analyses on a large panel of colon cancer cell lines demonstrate that MEK/TAK1 inhibition induces cell death, as assessed by sub-G1 accumulation, in a distinct subset of cell lines. Furthermore, TAK1 inhibition causes G2-M cell-cycle blockade and polyploidy in many of the cell lines. MEK plus TAK1 inhibition causes reduced G2-M/polyploid cell numbers and additive cytotoxic effects in KRAS/TAK1-dependent cell lines as well as a subset of BRAF-mutant cells. Mechanistically, sensitivity to MEK/TAK1 inhibition can be conferred by KRAS and BMP receptor activation, which promote expression of NF-κB-dependent proinflammatory cytokines, driving tumor cell survival and proliferation. MEK/TAK1 inhibition causes reduced mTOR, Wnt, and NF-κB signaling in TAK1/MEK-dependent cell lines concomitant with apoptosis. A Wnt/NF-κB transcriptional signature was derived that stratifies primary tumors into three major subtypes: Wnt-high/NF-κB-low, Wnt-low/NF-κB-high and Wnt-high/NF-κB-high, designated W, N, and WN, respectively. These subtypes have distinct characteristics, including enrichment for BRAF mutations with serrated carcinoma histology in the N subtype. Both N and WN subtypes bear molecular hallmarks of MEK and TAK1 dependency seen in cell lines. Therefore, N and WN subtype signatures could be utilized to identify tumors that are most sensitive to anti-MEK/TAK1 therapeutics. This study describes a potential therapeutic strategy for a subset of colon cancers that are dependent on oncogenic KRAS signaling pathways, which are currently difficult to block

  14. Arsenic trioxide inhibits lung metastasis of mouse colon cancer via reducing the infiltration of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Hu, Xiang; Xu, Yingxin; Liu, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on the infiltration of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the local lung metastasis of mouse colon cancer in vivo and the regulation of Tregs in cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) in vitro. A high Tregs infiltration mouse colon cancer lung metastasis model was established by intravenous injection of CT26 murine colon carcinoma cells. Tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into three groups: control group, low-dose As2O3 group, and high-dose As2O3 group. For in vitro studies, CIKs were treated with vehicle control or 0.1, 1, or 5 μM As2O3. The level of Tregs was detected via flow cytometry, Foxp3 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the level of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), and the cytotoxic activity of As2O3-treated CIKs was assessed through a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. Obvious lung metastasis was observed 3 days after CT26 murine colon carcinoma cell injection. The numbers of Tregs in the lungs and spleens of tumor-bearing mice were significantly higher than those of the normal group (p mouse weight as well as reduced the number of metastatic lung nodules and the lung/body weight ratio (p cancer by reducing the local infiltration of Tregs and increase the cytotoxic activity of CIKs by suppressing Tregs.

  15. Combination Effect of Regulatory T-Cell Depletion and Ionizing Radiation in Mouse Models of Lung and Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Cheol-Hun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jae-Ho [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong-Yeok; Lee, Hong-Rae; Jo, Wol-Soon; Yang, Kwangmo [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, You-Soo, E-mail: biotek01@hanmail.net [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of low-dose cyclophosphamide (LD-CTX) and anti-CD25 antibody to prevent activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We used LD-CTX and anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody as a means to inhibit Tregs and improve the therapeutic effect of radiation in a mouse model of lung and colon cancer. Mice were irradiated on the tumor mass of the right leg and treated with LD-CTX and anti-CD25 antibody once per week for 3 weeks. Results: Combined treatment of LD-CTX or anti-CD25 antibody with radiation significantly decreased Tregs in the spleen and tumor compared with control and irradiation only in both lung and colon cancer. Combinatorial treatments resulted in a significant increase in the effector T cells, longer survival rate, and suppressed irradiated and distal nonirradiated tumor growth. Specifically, the combinatorial treatment of LD-CTX with radiation resulted in outstanding regression of local and distant tumors in colon cancer, and almost all mice in this group survived until the end of the study. Conclusions: Our results suggest that Treg depletion strategies may enhance radiation-mediated antitumor immunity and further improve outcomes after radiation therapy.

  16. Deoxycholic acid mediates non-canonical EGFR-MAPK activation through the induction of calcium signaling in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centuori, Sara M; Gomes, Cecil J; Trujillo, Jesse; Borg, Jamie; Brownlee, Joshua; Putnam, Charles W; Martinez, Jesse D

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and a western diet have been linked to high levels of bile acids and the development of colon cancer. Specifically, increased levels of the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), an established tumor promoter, has been shown to correlate with increased development of colorectal adenomas and progression to carcinoma. Herein we investigate the mechanism by which DCA leads to EGFR-MAPK activation, a candidate mechanism by which DCA may promote colorectal tumorigenesis. DCA treated colon cancer cells exhibited strong and prolonged activation of ERK1/2 when compared to EGF treatment alone. We also showed that DCA treatment prevents EGFR degradation as opposed to the canonical EGFR recycling observed with EGF treatment. Moreover, the combination of DCA and EGF treatment displayed synergistic activity, suggesting DCA activates MAPK signaling in a non-canonical manner. Further evaluation showed that DCA treatment increased intracellular calcium levels and CAMKII phosphorylation, and that blocking calcium with BAPTA-AM abrogated MAPK activation induced by DCA, but not by EGF. Finally we showed that DCA-induced CAMKII leads to MAPK activation through the recruitment of c-Src. Taken together, we demonstrated that DCA regulates MAPK activation through calcium signaling, an alternative mechanism not previously recognized in human colon cancer cells. Importantly, this mechanism allows for EGFR to escape degradation and thus achieve a constitutively active state, which may explain its tumor promoting effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pleurotus ostreatus inhibits proliferation of human breast and colon cancer cells through p53-dependent as well as p53-independent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    JEDINAK, ANDREJ; SLIVA, DANIEL

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the global consumption of mushrooms, only two epidemiological studies demonstrated an inverse correlation between mushroom intake and the risk of cancer. Therefore, in the present study we evaluated whether extracts from edible mushrooms Agaricus bisporus (portabella), Flammulina velutipes (enoki), Lentinula edodes (shiitake) and Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster) affect the growth of breast and colon cancer cells. Here, we identified as the most potent, P. ostreatus (oyster mushroom) which suppressed proliferation of breast cancer (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) and colon cancer (HT-29, HCT-116) cells, without affecting proliferation of epithelial mammary MCF-10A and normal colon FHC cells. Flow cytometry revealed that the inhibition of cell proliferation by P. ostreatus was associated with the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in MCF-7 and HT-29 cells. Moreover, P. ostreatus induced the expression of the tumor suppressor p53 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(CIP1/WAF1), whereas inhibited the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma Rb protein in MCF-7 cells. In addition, P. ostreatus also up-regulated expression of p21 and inhibited Rb phosphorylation in HT-29 cells, suggesting that that P. ostreatus suppresses the proliferation of breast and colon cancer cells via p53-dependent as well as p53-independent pathway. In conclusion, our results indicated that the edible oyster mushroom has potential therapeutic/preventive effects on breast and colon cancer. PMID:19020765

  18. Prolonged exposure of colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil nanoparticles improves its anticancer activity

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    Essam Tawfik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to improve the anticancer effect of 5-FU on human colon cancer cell lines by incorporating in poly(d,l lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs. The 5-FU-PLGA NPs were prepared by nanoprecipitation technique. Prepared NPs were moderately dispersed with an average diameter of 133 ± 25.19 nm. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM images revealed spherical structures with subtle surface irregularity. Free 5-FU dose–response curves were constructed (12.5–2000 μM using MTT assay on HCT 116 and HT-29 cell lines for 1, 3, and 5 days. The calculated IC50 on HCT 116 were 185 μM after 1 day, 11.3 μM after 3 days, and 1.48 μM after 5 days. On HT-29, IC50 was only reached after 5 days of 5-FU treatment (11.25 μM. The HCT 116 viability following treatment with 100 μM 5-FU in free or NPs forms for 3 days was 38.8% and 18.6%, respectively. Similarly, when 250 μM was applied, HCT 116 viability was 17.03% and 14.6% after treatment with free and NPs forms of 5-FU, respectively. Moreover, HT-29 cell viability after 250 μM 5-FU treatment in free or NPs forms was 55.45% and 34.01%, respectively. We also noticed that HCT 116 cells were more sensitive to 5-FU-PLGA NPs as compared to HT-29 cells. Overall, our data indicate that 5-FU activity is time dependent and the prolonged effects created by PLGA NPs may contribute, at least in part, to the noticed enhancement of the anticancer activity of 5-FU drug.

  19. Polyphenol stabilized colloidal gold nanoparticles from Abutilon indicum leaf extract induce apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells.

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    Mata, Rani; Nakkala, Jayachandra Reddy; Sadras, Sudha Rani

    2016-07-01

    Green synthesized gold nanoparticles have received substantial attention owing to their biomedical applications, particularly in cancer therapy. Although anticancer activities of green synthesized gold nanoparticles have been reported earlier, the underlying mechanism behind their anticancer activity is still to be understood. The present study, describes the green synthesis of Abutilon indicum gold nanoparticles (AIGNPs) from Abutilon indicum leaf extract (AILE) and their cytotoxic mechanism in colon cancer cells. Dimensions of spherical shaped AIGNPs were found to be in the range of 1-20nm as determined by TEM. GC-MS and FTIR analysis indicated the presence of polyphenolic groups in AILE, which might have been involved in the stabilization of AIGNPs. In vitro free radical scavenging analysis revealed the radical quenching activity of AIGNPs. Further, the AIGNPs exhibited cytotoxicity in HT-29 colon cancer cells with IC50 values of 210 and 180μg/mL after 24 and 48h. This was mediated through nuclear morphological changes and cell membrane damage as evidenced by acridine orange/ethidium bromide, propidium iodide and AnnexinV-Cy3 staining methods. Mechanism of the observed cytotoxicity of AIGNPs was explained on the basis of increased levels of reactive oxygen species and simultaneous reduction in cellular antioxidants, which might have caused mitochondrial membrane potential loss, DNA damage and G1/S phase cell cycle arrest. Expression of cleaved Caspase-9, Caspase-8, Caspase-3, Lamin A/C and PARP, provided the clues for the induction of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways in AIGNPs treated HT-29 cells. The study provides a preliminary guidance towards the development of colon cancer therapy using green synthesized gold nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. SILENCING THE NUCLEOCYTOPLASMIC O-GLCNAC TRANSFERASE REDUCES PROLIFERATION, ADHESION AND MIGRATION OF CANCER AND FETAL HUMAN COLON CELL LINES

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    AGATA eSTEENACKERS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The post-translational modification of proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc is regulated by a unique couple of enzymes. O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT transfers the GlcNAc residue from UDP-GlcNAc, the final product of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP, whereas O-GlcNAcase (OGA removes it. This study and others show that OGT and O-GlcNAcylation levels are increased in cancer cell lines. In that context we studied the effect of OGT silencing in the colon cancer cell lines HT29 and HCT116 and the primary colon cell line CCD841CoN. Herein we report that OGT silencing diminished proliferation, in vitro cell survival and adhesion of primary and cancer cell lines. SiOGT dramatically de-creased HT29 and CCD841CoN migration, CCD841CoN harboring high capabilities of mi-gration in Boyden chamber system when compared to HT29 and HCT116. The expression levels of actin and tubulin were unaffected by OGT knockdown but siOGT seemed to disor-ganize microfilament, microtubule and vinculin networks in CCD841CoN. While cancer cell lines harbor higher levels of OGT and O-GlcNAcylation to fulfill their proliferative and migra-tory properties, in agreement with their higher consumption of HBP main substrates glucose and glutamine, our data demonstrate that OGT expression is not only necessary for the biolog-ical properties of cancer cell lines but also for normal cells.

  1. The lysyl oxidase inhibitor, beta-aminopropionitrile, diminishes the metastatic colonization potential of circulating breast cancer cells.

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    Alla Bondareva

    Full Text Available Lysyl oxidase (LOX, an extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme, appears to have a role in promoting breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness. In addition, increased LOX expression has been correlated with decreases in both metastases-free, and overall survival in breast cancer patients. With this background, we studied the ability of beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN, an irreversible inhibitor of LOX, to regulate the metastatic colonization potential of the human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231. BAPN was administered daily to mice starting either 1 day prior, on the same day as, or 7 days after intracardiac injection of luciferase expressing MDA-MB-231-Luc2 cells. Development of metastases was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and tumor-induced osteolysis was assessed by micro-computed tomography (microCT. We found that BAPN administration was able to reduce the frequency of metastases. Thus, when BAPN treatment was initiated the day before, or on the same day as the intra-cardiac injection of tumor cells, the number of metastases was decreased by 44%, and 27%, and whole-body photon emission rates (reflective of total tumor burden were diminished by 78%, and 45%, respectively. In contrast, BAPN had no effect on the growth of established metastases. Our findings suggest that LOX activity is required during extravasation and/or initial tissue colonization by circulating MDA-MB-231 cells, lending support to the idea that LOX inhibition might be useful in metastasis prevention.

  2. Activation by zinc of the human gastrin gene promoter in colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kathryn M; Laval, Marie; Estacio, Ortis; Hudson, Damien F; Kalitsis, Paul; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; Patel, Oneel

    2015-10-01

    Over-expression of growth factors can contribute to the development and progression of cancer, and gastrins in particular have been implicated in accelerating the development of gastrointestinal cancers. Previously our group showed that hypoxia, cobalt chloride (a hypoxia mimetic) and zinc chloride could activate the expression of the gastrin gene in vitro. To characterise activation of the gastrin promoter by zinc ions further in vivo, TALEN technology was used to engineer a luciferase reporter construct into the endogenous human gastrin gene promoter in SW480 colon cancer cells. Gastrin promoter activity in the resultant Gast(luc) SW480 colon cancer cells was then measured by bioluminescence in cell culture and in tumour xenografts in SCID mice. Activation of intracellular signalling pathways was assessed by Western blotting. Activation of the gastrin promoter by zinc ions was concentration dependent in vitro and in vivo. Zinc ions significantly stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (MAPK pathway) but not of Akt (PI3K pathway). We conclude that the endogenous gastrin promoter is responsive to zinc ions, likely via activation of the MAPK pathway.

  3. Spontaneous regression of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Kyoichi; Fujita, Shin; Ohshiro, Taihei; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Sekine, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    A case of spontaneous regression of transverse colon cancer is reported. A 64-year-old man was diagnosed as having cancer of the transverse colon at a local hospital. Initial and second colonoscopy examinations revealed a typical cancer of the transverse colon, which was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent right hemicolectomy 6 weeks after the initial colonoscopy. The resected specimen showed only a scar at the tumor site, and no cancerous tissue was proven histologically. The patient is alive with no evidence of recurrence 1 year after surgery. Although an antitumor immune response is the most likely explanation, the exact nature of the phenomenon was unclear. We describe this rare case and review the literature pertaining to spontaneous regression of colorectal cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Targeting miR-21 enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer HT-29 cells to chemoradiotherapy in vitro

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    Deng, Jun; Lei, Wan; Fu, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Ling; Li, Jun-He; Xiong, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpxiong@medmail.com.cn

    2014-01-17

    Highlight: •MiR-21 plays a significant role in 5-FU resistance. •This role might be attributed to targeting of hMSH2 as well as TP and DPD via miR-21 targeted hMSH2. •Indirectly targeted TP and DPD to influence 5-FU chemotherapy sensitivity. -- Abstract: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a classic chemotherapeutic drug that has been widely used for colorectal cancer treatment, but colorectal cancer cells are often resistant to primary or acquired 5-FU therapy. Several studies have shown that miR-21 is significantly elevated in colorectal cancer. This suggests that this miRNA might play a role in this resistance. In this study, we investigated this possibility and the possible mechanism underlying this role. We showed that forced expression of miR-21 significantly inhibited apoptosis, enhanced cell proliferation, invasion, and colony formation ability, promoted G1/S cell cycle transition and increased the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU and X radiation in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of miR-21 reversed these effects on HT-29 cells and increased the sensitivity of HT-29/5-FU to 5-FU chemotherapy. Finally, we showed that miR-21 targeted the human mutS homolog2 (hMSH2), and indirectly regulated the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD). These results demonstrate that miR-21 may play an important role in the 5-FU resistance of colon cancer cells.

  5. Oxidative Stress Promotes Doxorubicin-Induced Pgp and BCRP Expression in Colon Cancer Cells Under Hypoxic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón-Daza, Martha L; Cuellar-Saenz, Yenith; Nualart, Francisco; Ondo-Mendez, Alejandro; Del Riesgo, Lilia; Castillo-Rivera, Fabio; Garzón, Ruth

    2017-07-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters that are overexpressed in different drug-resistant cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated whether doxorubicin promotes Pgp and/or BCRP expression to induce drug resistance in colon cancer cells under hypoxic conditions. We analyzed HIF-1α activity via ELISA, Pgp, and BCRP expression by qRT-PCR and the relationship between doxorubicin uptake and ABC transporter expression via confocal microscopy in HT-29WT and HT-29 doxorubicin-resistant colon cancer cells (HT-29DxR). These cells were treated with doxorubicin and/or CoCl2 (chemical hypoxia), and reactive oxygen species inductors. We found that the combination of chemically induced hypoxia and doxorubicin promoted Pgp mRNA expression within 24 h in HT-29WT and HT-29DxR cells. Both doxorubicin and CoCl2 alone or in combination induced Pgp and BCRP expression, as demonstrated via confocal microscopy in each of the above two cell lines. Thus, we surmised that Pgp and BCRP expression may result from synergistic effects exerted by the combination of doxorubicin-induced ROS production and HIF-1α activity under hypoxic conditions. However, HIF-1α activity disruption via the administration of E3330, an APE-1 inhibitor, downregulated Pgp expression and increased doxorubicin delivery to HT-29 cells, where it served as a substrate for Pgp, indicating the existence of an indirect relationship between Pgp expression and doxorubicin accumulation. Thus, we concluded that Pgp and BCRP expression can be regulated via cross-talk between doxorubicin and hypoxia, promoting drug resistance in HT-29 WT, and HT-29DxR cells and that this process may be ROS dependent. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1868-1878, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Protein nitration and nitrosylation by NO-donating aspirin in colon cancer cells: Relevance to its mechanism of action

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    Williams, Jennie L.; Ji, Ping; Ouyang, Nengtai [Division of Cancer Prevention, Stony Brook University, HSC, T17-080, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8173 (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention NCI, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Rigas, Basil, E-mail: basil.rigas@stonybrook.edu [Division of Cancer Prevention, Stony Brook University, HSC, T17-080, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8173 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Nitric oxide-donating aspirin (NO-ASA) is a promising agent for cancer prevention. Although studied extensively, its molecular targets and mechanism of action are still unclear. S-nitrosylation of signaling proteins is emerging as an important regulatory mechanism by NO. Here, we examined whether S-nitrosylation of the NF-{kappa}B, p53, and Wnt signaling proteins by NO-ASA might explain, in part, its mechanism of action in colon cancer. NO-ASA releases significant amounts of NO detected intracellularly in HCT116 and HT-29 colon cells. Using a modified biotin switch assay we demonstrated that NO-ASA S-nitrosylates the signaling proteins p53, {beta}-catenin, and NF-{kappa}B, in colon cancer cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. NO-ASA suppresses NF-{kappa}B binding to its cognate DNA oligonucleotide, which occurs without changes in the nuclear levels of the NF-{kappa}B subunits p65 and p50 and is reversed by dithiothreitol that reduces -S-NO to -SH. In addition to S-nitrosylation, we documented both in vitro and in vivo widespread nitration of tyrosine residues of cellular proteins in response to NO-ASA. Our results suggest that the increased intracellular NO levels following treatment with NO-ASA modulate cell signaling by chemically modifying key protein members of signaling cascades. We speculate that S-nitrosylation and tyrosine nitration are responsible, at least in part, for the inhibitory growth effect of NO-ASA on cancer cell growth and that this may represent a general mechanism of action of NO-releasing agents.

  7. Protein nitration and nitrosylation by NO-donating aspirin in colon cancer cells: Relevance to its mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennie L; Ji, Ping; Ouyang, Nengtai; Kopelovich, Levy; Rigas, Basil

    2011-06-10

    Nitric oxide-donating aspirin (NO-ASA) is a promising agent for cancer prevention. Although studied extensively, its molecular targets and mechanism of action are still unclear. S-nitrosylation of signaling proteins is emerging as an important regulatory mechanism by NO. Here, we examined whether S-nitrosylation of the NF-κB, p53, and Wnt signaling proteins by NO-ASA might explain, in part, its mechanism of action in colon cancer. NO-ASA releases significant amounts of NO detected intracellularly in HCT116 and HT-29 colon cells. Using a modified biotin switch assay we demonstrated that NO-ASA S-nitrosylates the signaling proteins p53, β-catenin, and NF-κB, in colon cancer cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. NO-ASA suppresses NF-κB binding to its cognate DNA oligonucleotide, which occurs without changes in the nuclear levels of the NF-κB subunits p65 and p50 and is reversed by dithiothreitol that reduces -S-NO to -SH. In addition to S-nitrosylation, we documented both in vitro and in vivo widespread nitration of tyrosine residues of cellular proteins in response to NO-ASA. Our results suggest that the increased intracellular NO levels following treatment with NO-ASA modulate cell signaling by chemically modifying key protein members of signaling cascades. We speculate that S-nitrosylation and tyrosine nitration are responsible, at least in part, for the inhibitory growth effect of NO-ASA on cancer cell growth and that this may represent a general mechanism of action of NO-releasing agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Portulaca oleracea extract can inhibit nodule formation of colon cancer stem cells by regulating gene expression of the Notch signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Heiying; Chen, Li; Wang, Shuiming; Chao, Deng

    2017-07-01

    To investigate whether Portulaca oleracea extract affects tumor formation in colon cancer stem cells and its chemotherapy sensitivity. In addition, to analyze associated genetic changes within the Notch signal transduction pathway. Serum-free cultures of colon cancer cells (HT-29) and HT-29 cancer stem cells were treated with the chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil to assess sensitivity. Injections of the stem cells were also given to BALB/c mice to confirm tumor growth and note its characteristics. In addition, the effect of different concentrations of P. oleracea extract was tested on the growth of HT-29 colon cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells, as determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. The effects of P. oleracea extract on the expression of β-catenin, Notch1, and Notch2 in the HT-29 cells were studied using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The tumor volume of the HT29 cells was two times larger than that of HT29 cancer stem cells. Treatment with P. oleracea extract inhibited the proliferation of both HT-29 cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells at doses from 0.07 to 2.25 µg/mL. Apoptosis of HT-29 cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells was assessed by flow cytometry; it was enhanced by the addition of P. oleracea extract. Finally, treatment with P. oleracea extract significantly downregulated the expression of the Notch1 and β-catenin genes in both cell types. The results of this study show that P. oleracea extract inhibits the growth of colon cancer stem cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, it inhibits the expression of the Notch1 and β-catenin genes. Taken together, this suggests that it may elicit its effects through regulatory and target genes that mediate the Notch signal transduction pathway.

  9. Fluorescent porphyrin with an increased uptake in peripheral blood cell subpopulations from colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Carolina; Neagu, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic fluorescence of synthetic or natural porphyrins is regarded as an attractive characteristic exploited for assisting early cancer diagnosis and/or tumor localization. Single tumor cells circulating in the blood stream can be considered a major step in depicting dissemination of primary tumors, an event of clinical relevance for prognosis, staging or therapy monitoring of cancer. The third leading cause of cancer death in men is colorectal cancer and the hematogenous spreading of primary tumor cells is one of the main events in metastasis of this type of cancer. Hidden in the myriad of circulating blood cells, tumor cells need both a sensitive and affordable detection technique. 5- (3-methoxy)-4-methoxycarbonylphenyl)-10, 15, 20-tris-(4- methoxycarbonylphenyl) - 21, 23-H porphyne is a synthetic porphyrin with a noticeable preference of accumulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from cancer patients as assessed by flow cytometry analysis. In addition, we found distinct accumulation of porphyrin depending on cancer type (cutaneous melanoma versus colorectal cancer). These data lead to the possibility of identifying circulating cells based on preferential accumulation of this new porphyrin in circulating tumor cells because, even accumulated in low percentage of cells the registered intensity of fluorescence was high. Selecting the genetic markers for circulating tumor cells is an option, but high costs and high level of know-how can be somewhat a hurdle for a rapid evaluation. Thus our approach with a new porphyrin can be developed in an accurate and innovative fast tracking method for circulating cancer cells, at least in colorectal cancer patients.

  10. Lebein, a snake venom disintegrin, suppresses human colon cancer cells proliferation and tumor-induced angiogenesis through cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction and inhibition of VEGF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakraoui, Ons; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Aloui, Zohra; Othman, Houcemeddine; Grépin, Renaud; Haoues, Meriam; Essafi, Makram; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Gasmi, Ammar; Karoui, Habib; Pagès, Gilles; Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija

    2017-01-01

    Lebein, is an heterodimeric disintegrin isolated from Macrovipera lebetina snake venom that was previously characterized as an inhibitor of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In this study, we investigated the effect of Lebein on the p53-dependent growth of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. We found that Lebein significantly inhibited LS174 (p53wt), HCT116 (p53wt), and HT29 (p53mut) colon cancer cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest through the modulation of expression levels of the tumor suppression factor p53, cell cycle regulating proteins cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, retinoblastoma (Rb), CDK1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27. Interestingly, Lebein-induced apoptosis of colon cancer cells was dependent on their p53 status. Thus, in LS174 cells, cell death was associated with PARP cleavage and the activation of caspases 3 and 8 while in HCT116 cells, Lebein induced caspase-independent apoptosis through increased expression of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). In LS174 cells, Lebein triggers the activation of the MAPK ERK1/2 pathway through induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It also decreased cell adhesion and migration to fibronectin through down regulation of α5β1 integrin. Moreover, Lebein significantly reduced the expression of two angiogenesis stimulators, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Neuropilin 1 (NRP1). It inhibited the VEGF-induced neovascularization process in the quail embryonic CAM system and blocked the development of human colon adenocarcinoma in nude mice. Overall, our work indicates that Lebein may be useful to design a new therapy against colon cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Analysis of cell adhesion during early stages of colon cancer based on an extended multi-valued logic approach.

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    Guebel, Daniel V; Schmitz, Ulf; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2012-04-01

    Cell adhesion in the normal colon is typically associated with differentiated cells, whereas in cancerous colon it is associated with advanced tumors. For advanced tumors growing evidence supports the existence of stem-like cells that have originated from transdifferentiation. Because stem cells can also be transformed in their own niche, at the base of the Lieberkühn's crypts, we conjectured that cell adhesion can also be critical in early tumorigenesis. To assess this hypothesis we built an annotated, multi-valued logic model addressing cell adhesion of normal and tumorigenic stem cells in the human colon. The model accounts for (i) events involving intercellular adhesion structures, (ii) interactions involving cytoskeleton-related structures, (iii) compartmental distribution of α/β/γ/δ-catenins, and (iv) variations in critical cell adhesion regulators (e.g., ILK, FAK, IQGAP, SNAIL, Caveolin). We developed a method that can deal with graded multiple inhibitions, something which is not possible with conventional logical approaches. The model comprises 315 species (including 26 genes), interconnected by 269 reactions. Simulations of the model covered six scenarios, which considered two types of colonic cells (stem vs. differentiated cells), under three conditions (normal, stressed and tumor). Each condition results from the combination of 92 inputs. We compared our multi-valued logic approach with the conventional Boolean approach for one specific example and validated the predictions against published data. Our analysis suggests that stem cells in their niche synthesize high levels of cytoplasmatic E-cadherin and CdhEP(Ser684,686,692), even under normal-mitogenic stimulus or tumorigenic conditions. Under these conditions, E-cadherin would be incorporated into the plasmatic membrane, but only as a non-adhesive CdhE_β-catenin_IQGAP complex. Under stress conditions, however, this complex could be displaced, yielding adhesive Cdh

  12. Galectin-3-independent Down-regulation of GABABR1 due to Treatment with Korean Herbal Extract HAD-B Reduces Proliferation of Human Colon Cancer Cells

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    Kim Kyung-Hee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Many efforts have shown multi-oncologic roles of galectin-3 for cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. However, the mechanisms by which galectin-3 is involved in cell proliferation are not yet fully understood, especially in human colon cancer cells. Methods: To cluster genes showing positively or negatively correlated expression with galectin-3, we employed human colon cancer cell lines, SNU-61, SNU-81, SNU-769B, SNU-C4 and SNU-C5 in high-throughput gene expression profiling. Gene and protein expression levels were determined by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. The proliferation rate of human colon cancer cells was measured by using a 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Results: Expression of γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor 1 (GABABR1 showed a positive correlation with galectin-3 at both the transcriptional and the translational levels. Downregulation of galectin-3 decreased not only GABABR1 expression but also the proliferation rate of human colon cancer cells. However, Korean herbal extract, HangAmDan-B (HAD-B, decreased expression of GABABR1 without any expressional change of galectin-3, and offset γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-enhanced human colon cancer cell proliferation. Conclusions: Our present study confirmed that GABABR1 expression was regulated by galectin-3. HAD-B induced galectin-3-independent down-regulation of GABABR1, which resulted in a decreased proliferation of human colon cancer cells. The therapeutic effect of HAD-B for the treatment of human colon cancer needs to be further validated.

  13. BAY61-3606 affects the viability of colon cancer cells in a genotype-directed manner.

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    Ken S Lau

    Full Text Available K-RAS mutation poses a particularly difficult problem for cancer therapy. Activating mutations in K-RAS are common in cancers of the lung, pancreas, and colon and are associated with poor response to therapy. As such, targeted therapies that abrogate K-RAS-induced oncogenicity would be of tremendous value.We searched for small molecule kinase inhibitors that preferentially affect the growth of colorectal cancer cells expressing mutant K-RAS. The mechanism of action of one inhibitor was explored using chemical and genetic approaches.We identified BAY61-3606 as an inhibitor of proliferation in colorectal cancer cells expressing mutant forms of K-RAS, but not in isogenic cells expressing wild-type K-RAS. In addition to its anti-proliferative effects in mutant cells, BAY61-3606 exhibited a distinct biological property in wild-type cells in that it conferred sensitivity to inhibition of RAF. In this context, BAY61-3606 acted by inhibiting MAP4K2 (GCK, which normally activates NFκβ signaling in wild-type cells in response to inhibition of RAF. As a result of MAP4K2 inhibition, wild-type cells became sensitive to AZ-628, a RAF inhibitor, when also treated with BAY61-3606.These studies indicate that BAY61-3606 exerts distinct biological activities in different genetic contexts.

  14. [10]-Gingerol induces mitochondrial apoptosis through activation of MAPK pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Min Ju; Chung, Ha Sook

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of [10]-gingerol activity against HCT116 human colon cancer cells. [10]-Gingerol inhibited the proliferation of HCT116 cells by 50% at a concentration of 30 μM, and this inhibition was dose-dependent accompanied by the morphological changes indicative of apoptosis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis showed that [10]-gingerol increased DNA in the sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle, and the extent of apoptosis was confirmed by Annexin V and PI double staining. Analysis of the mechanism of these events indicated that [10]-gingerol-treated cells exhibited an increased ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, resulting in the activation of caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in a dose-dependent manner, which are hallmarks of apoptosis. Moreover, [10]-gingerol-induced apoptosis was accompanied by phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) family, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 MAPK (p38), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). This is the first report to demonstrate the cytotoxic effect of [10]-gingerol on human colon cancer cells, as well as the first to describe its possible chemotherapeutic potentials.

  15. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of NCX 4040 cytotoxic activity in human colon cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zupi Gabriella

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide-releasing nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs are reported to be safer than NSAIDs because of their lower gastric toxicity. We compared the effect of a novel NO-releasing derivate, NCX 4040, with that of aspirin and its denitrated analog, NCX 4042, in in vitro and in vivo human colon cancer models and investigated the mechanisms of action underlying its antitumor activity. Methods In vitro cytotoxicity was evaluated on a panel of colon cancer lines (LoVo, LoVo Dx, WiDr and LRWZ by sulforhodamine B assay. Cell cycle perturbations and apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Protein expression was detected by Western blot. In the in vivo experiments, tumor-bearing mice were treated with NCX 4040, five times a week, for six consecutive weeks. Results In the in vitro studies, aspirin and NCX 4042 did not induce an effect on any of the cell lines, whereas NCX 4040 produced a marked cytostatic dose-related effect, indicating a pivotal role of the -NO2 group. Furthermore, in LoVo and LRWZ cell lines, we observed caspase-9 and -3-mediated apoptosis, whereas no apoptotic effect was observed after drug exposure in WiDr or LoVo Dx cell lines. In in vivo studies, both NCX 4040 and its parental compound were administered per os. NCX 4040 induced a 40% reduction in tumor weight. Conversely, aspirin did not influence tumor growth at all. Conclusions NCX 4040, but not its parental compound, aspirin, showed an in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative activity, indicating its potential usefulness to treat colon cancer.

  16. Evaluation of chemical composition, antioxidant, antibacterial, cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of Aloysia citrodora extract on colon cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mirzaie

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aloysia citrodora belongs to the Verbenaceae family of plants, a well-known herbal medicine in Iran. The aim of the present study was to investigate the chemical composition, antioxidant, antibacterial, cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of A. citrodora extract against human colon cancer (HT29 cells by using real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow-cytometry methods. Methods: This experimental study was carried out in Islamic Azad University, East Tehran Branch, from March to September of 2014. At first, the A. citrodora chemical constituents were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS technique. In addition, antioxidant assay, antibacterial and anti-cancer effect was performed using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, disk diffusion and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT methods, respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 value was calculated. We extracted total RNA molecules by using RNX solution, after which cDNA was synthesized. Finally, the pro-apoptotic (Bax and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2 gene expression was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and apoptotic effects were analyzed using Flow-cytometry method. Results: GC-MS analysis of Aloysia citrodora extract was shown 37 major components and the most frequent component was belonged to Spathulenol (17.57% and Caryophyllene oxide (15.15% The antioxidant activity of the extract was IC50= 0.6±0.03 mg/ml. The maximum and minimum antibacterial effects of extract were belonged to gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, respectively. Cytotoxic results revealed that the A.citrodora extract have IC50= 20.1±0.78 mg/ml against colon cancer (HT29 cell line and real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed the expression level of Bax and Bcl2 was increased and decreased respectively in colon cancer cell line (3.470±0.72 (P< 0.05, 0.43±0.35 (P< 0.05. In addition, the flow-cytometry results indicated the 38

  17. Prophylactic effects of triptolide on colon cancer development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate effects of triptolide on colon cancer cell growth and its capacity to prevent tumor development in an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) mouse model of colon cancer. Methods: HCT116 cell viability and migration potential were assessed. Control and AOM/DSS-treated mice (with and ...

  18. Novel ent-Kaurane Diterpenoid from Rubus corchorifolius L. f. Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth via Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuexiang; Wu, Xian; Ouyang, Wen; Gu, Min; Gao, Zili; Song, Mingyue; Chen, Yunjiao; Lin, Yanyin; Cao, Yong; Xiao, Hang

    2017-03-01

    The tender leaves of Rubus corchorifolius L. f. have been consumed as tea for drinking in China since ancient times. In this study, a novel ent-kaurane diterpenoid was isolated and identified from R. corchorifolius L. f. leaves as ent-kaur-2-one-16β,17-dihydroxy-acetone-ketal (DEK). DEK suppressed the growth of HCT116 human colon cancer cells with an IC50 value of 40 ± 0.21 μM, while it did not cause significant growth inhibition on CCD-18Co human colonic myofibroblasts at up to100 μM. Moreover, DEK induced extensive apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in the colon cancer cells. Accordingly, DEK caused profound effects on multiple signaling proteins associated with cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation. DEK significantly upregulated the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins such as cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved PARP, p53, Bax, and tumor suppressor p21Cip1/Waf1, downregulated the levels of cell cycle regulating proteins such as cyclinD1, CDK2, and CDK4 and carcinogenic proteins such as EGFR and COX-2, and suppressed the activation of Akt. Overall, our results provide a basis for using DEK as a potential chemopreventive agent against colon carcinogenesis.

  19. New-generation taxoid SB-T-1214 inhibits stem cell-related gene expression in 3D cancer spheroids induced by purified colon tumor-initiating cells

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    Rowehl Rebecca A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing evidence suggests that the majority of tumors are organized hierarchically, comprising a population of tumor-initiating, or cancer stem cells (CSCs responsible for tumor development, maintenance and resistance to drugs. Previously we have shown that the CD133high/CD44high fraction of colon cancer cells is different from their bulk counterparts at the functional, morphological and genomic levels. In contrast to the majority of colon cancer cells expressing moderate levels of CD133, CD44 and CD166, cells with a high combined expression of CD133 and CD44 possessed several characteristic stem cell features, including profound self-renewal capacity in vivo and in vitro, and the ability to give rise to different cell phenotypes. The present study was undertaken for two aims: a to determine stem cell-related genomic characteristics of floating 3D multicellular spheroids induced by CD133high/CD44high colon cancer cells; and b to evaluate CSC-specific alterations induced by new-generation taxoid SB-T-1214. Results Selected CSC phenotype was isolated from three independent invasive colon cancer cell lines, HCT116, HT29 and DLD-1. A stem cell-specific PCR array assay (SABiosciences revealed that colonospheres induced by purified CD133high/CD44high expressing cells display profound up-regulation of stem cell-related genes in comparison with their bulk counterparts. The FACS analysis has shown that the 3D colonospheres contained some minority cell populations with high levels of expression of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and c-Myc, which are essential for stem cell pluripotency and self-renewal. Single administration of the SB-T-1214 at concentration 100 nM-1 μM for 48 hr not only induced growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death in these three types of colon cancer spheroids in 3D culture, but also mediated massive inhibition of the stem cell-related genes and significant down-regulation of the pluripotency gene expression. PCR array and

  20. Cytotoxic, antimigratory, pro-and antioxidative activities of extracts from medicinal mushrooms on colon cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šeklić Dragana S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol extracts of five commercially available mushroom species (Phellinus linteus (Berk. et Curt Teng, Cordyceps sinensis (Berk. Sacc., Lentinus edodes (Berk. Pegler, Coprinus comatus (O. F. Müll. Pers. and Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis P. Karst, traditionally used as anticancer agents, were evaluated in vitro for their total phenol and flavonoid contents, cytotoxic and antimigratory activities and antioxidant/prooxidant effects on colon cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and SW-480. Spectrophotometric methods were used for the determination of total phenol content, flavonoid concentrations and DPPH activity of the extracts. Cytotoxic activity was measured by the MTT assay. The antimigratory activity of extracts was determined using the Transwell assay and immunofluorescence staining of β-catenin. The prooxidant/antioxidant status was followed by measuring the superoxide anion radical (O2•-, nitrite and reduced glutathione (GSH concentrations. Our results show that the highest phenolic and flavonoid content was found in P. linteus, and its DPPH-scavenging capacity was significantly higher than in other samples. The P. linteus extract significantly decreased cell viability of both tested cancer cell lines. All other extracts selectively inhibited SW-480 cell viability, but did not show significant cytotoxic activity. The mushroom extracts caused changes in the prooxidant/antioxidant status of cells, inducing oxidative stress. All extracts tested on HCT-116 cells demonstrated significant antimigratory effects, which correlated with increased production of O2•- and a reduced level of β-catenin protein expression, while only P. linteus showed the same effect on SW-480 cells. The results of the present research indicate that the mushroom extracts causes oxidative stress which has a pronounced impact on the migratory status of colon cancer cell lines. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41010

  1. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0527 TITLE: Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Aik...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0527 5c...combination with irinotecan or cetuximab. Results: Colon cancer cell lines demonstrated varying sensitivity to MLN8237 with IC50 values ranging from 0.08 to

  2. Preventing Second Cancers in Colon Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this phase III trial, people who have had curative surgery for colon cancer will be randomly assigned to take sulindac and a placebo, eflornithine and a placebo, both sulindac and eflornithine, or two placebo pills for 36 months.

  3. A metabolite of nobiletin, 4'-demethylnobiletin and atorvastatin synergistically inhibits human colon cancer cell growth by inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Qiu, Peiju; Li, Fang; Wang, Minqi; Zheng, Jinkai; Wang, Qi; Xu, Fei; Xiao, Hang

    2018-01-24

    Combining different chemopreventive agents is a promising strategy to reduce cancer incidence and mortality due to potential synergistic interactions between these agents. Previously, we demonstrated that oral administration of nobiletin (NBT, a citrus flavonoid) at 0.05% (w/w, in diet) together with atorvastatin (ATST, a lipid-lowering drug) at 0.02% (w/w, in diet) produced much stronger inhibition against colon carcinogenesis in rats in comparison with that produced by NBT (at 0.1% w/w in diet) or ATST (at 0.04% w/w in diet) alone at higher doses. To further elucidate the mechanism of this promising synergy between NBT and ATST, herein, we measured the levels of NBT, its major metabolites and ATST in the colonic tissue of rats fed NBT (0.05% w/w, in diet) + ATST (0.02% w/w, in diet), and determined the mode of interaction between the major NBT metabolite and ATST in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth. HPLC-MS analysis showed that 4'-demethylnobiletin (4DN) is the most abundant metabolite of NBT with a level about 5-fold as high as that of NBT in the colonic tissue, which indicated the potential significance of 4DN in mediating the biological effects of NBT in the colon. We found that co-treatments of 4DN/ATST at 2 : 1 concentration ratio produced much stronger growth inhibitory effects on human colon cancer HT-29 cells than 4DN or ATST alone, and isobologram analysis confirmed that this enhanced inhibitory effect by the 4DN/ATST combination was highly synergistic. The co-treatment of 4DN/ATST led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and induced extensive apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Furthermore, the 4DN/ATST co-treatment profoundly modulated key signaling proteins related to the regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Our results demonstrated a strong synergy produced by the 4DN/ATST co-treatment in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth, which provided a novel mechanism by which NBT/ATST in combination synergistically inhibit colon carcinogenesis.

  4. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

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    Paquet Éric R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Methods Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Results Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT

  5. The melatonin action on stromal stem cells within pericryptal area in colon cancer model under constant light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannen, Vinicius, E-mail: kannen71@yahoo.com.br [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil); Marini, Tassiana [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil); Zanette, Dalila L. [National Institute of Science and Technology in Stem Cell and Cell Therapy, Center for Cell Therapy and Regional Blood Center, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo (Brazil); Frajacomo, Fernando T.; Silva, Gyl E.B. [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil); Silva, Wilson A. [Department of Genetics, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo (Brazil); National Institute of Science and Technology in Stem Cell and Cell Therapy, Center for Cell Therapy and Regional Blood Center, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garcia, Sergio B. [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We investigated melatonin against the malignant effects of constant light. {yields} Melatonin supplementation increased its serum levels and its receptor expression. {yields} Melatonin decreased cancer stem cells and dysplastic injuries in colon tissue. {yields} Melatonin controlled proliferative process and apoptosis induction. -- Abstract: Constant light (LL) is associated with high incidence of colon cancer. MLT supplementation was related to the significant control of preneoplastic patterns. We sought to analyze preneoplastic patterns in colon tissue from animals exposed to LL environment (14 days; 300 lx), MLT-supplementation (10 mg/kg/day) and DMH-treatment (1,2 dimethylhydrazine; 125 mg/kg). Rodents were sacrificed and MLT serum levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Our results indicated that LL induced ACF development (p < 0.001) with a great potential to increase the number of CD133(+) and CD68(+) cells (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). LL also increased the proliferative process (PCNA-Li; p < 0.001) as well as decreased caspase-3 protein (p < 0.001), related to higher COX-2 protein expression (p < 0.001) within pericryptal colonic stroma (PCCS). However, MLT-supplementation controlled the development of dysplastic ACF (p < 0.001) diminishing preneoplastic patterns into PCCS as CD133 and CD68 (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). These events were relative to decreased PCNA-Li index and higher expression of caspase-3 protein. Thus, MLT showed a great potential to control the preneoplastic patterns induced by LL.

  6. Visualization and targeting of LGR5(+) human colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Mariko; Ohta, Yuki; Nishikori, Shingo; Matano, Mami; Takano, Ai; Fujii, Masayuki; Date, Shoichi; Sugimoto, Shinya; Kanai, Takanori; Sato, Toshiro

    2017-05-11

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory highlights a self-renewing subpopulation of cancer cells that fuels tumour growth. The existence of human CSCs is mainly supported by xenotransplantation of prospectively isolated cells, but their clonal dynamics and plasticity remain unclear. Here, we show that human LGR5(+) colorectal cancer cells serve as CSCs in growing cancer tissues. Lineage-tracing experiments with a tamoxifen-inducible Cre knock-in allele of LGR5 reveal the self-renewal and differentiation capacity of LGR5(+) tumour cells. Selective ablation of LGR5(+) CSCs in LGR5-iCaspase9 knock-in organoids leads to tumour regression, followed by tumour regrowth driven by re-emerging LGR5(+) CSCs. KRT20 knock-in reporter marks differentiated cancer cells that constantly diminish in tumour tissues, while reverting to LGR5(+) CSCs and contributing to tumour regrowth after LGR5(+) CSC ablation. We also show that combined chemotherapy potentiates targeting of LGR5(+) CSCs. These data provide insights into the plasticity of CSCs and their potential as a therapeutic target in human colorectal cancer.

  7. [6]-Gingerol induces caspase-dependent apoptosis and prevents PMA-induced proliferation in colon cancer cells by inhibiting MAPK/AP-1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, E K; Bava, Smitha V; Narayanan, Sai Shyam; Nath, Lekshmi R; Thulasidasan, Arun Kumar T; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan; Anto, Ruby John

    2014-01-01

    We report mechanism-based evidence for the anticancer and chemopreventive efficacy of [6]-gingerol, the major active principle of the medicinal plant, Ginger (Zingiber officinale), in colon cancer cells. The compound was evaluated in two human colon cancer cell lines for its cytotoxic effect and the most sensitive cell line, SW-480, was selected for the mechanistic evaluation of its anticancer and chemopreventive efficacy. The non-toxic nature of [6]-gingerol was confirmed by viability assays on rapidly dividing normal mouse colon cells. [6]-gingerol inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by externalization of phosphatidyl serine in SW-480, while the normal colon cells were unaffected. Sensitivity to [6]-gingerol in SW-480 cells was associated with activation of caspases 8, 9, 3 &7 and cleavage of PARP, which attests induction of apoptotic cell death. Mechanistically, [6]-gingerol down-regulated Phorbol Myristate Acetate (PMA) induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK MAP kinases and activation of AP-1 transcription factor, but had only little effects on phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and activation of NF-kappa B. Additionally, it complemented the inhibitors of either ERK1/2 or JNK MAP kinase in bringing down the PMA-induced cell proliferation in SW-480 cells. We report the inhibition of ERK1/2/JNK/AP-1 pathway as a possible mechanism behind the anticancer as well as chemopreventive efficacy of [6]-gingerol against colon cancer.

  8. [6]-Gingerol induces caspase-dependent apoptosis and prevents PMA-induced proliferation in colon cancer cells by inhibiting MAPK/AP-1 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E K Radhakrishnan

    Full Text Available We report mechanism-based evidence for the anticancer and chemopreventive efficacy of [6]-gingerol, the major active principle of the medicinal plant, Ginger (Zingiber officinale, in colon cancer cells. The compound was evaluated in two human colon cancer cell lines for its cytotoxic effect and the most sensitive cell line, SW-480, was selected for the mechanistic evaluation of its anticancer and chemopreventive efficacy. The non-toxic nature of [6]-gingerol was confirmed by viability assays on rapidly dividing normal mouse colon cells. [6]-gingerol inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by externalization of phosphatidyl serine in SW-480, while the normal colon cells were unaffected. Sensitivity to [6]-gingerol in SW-480 cells was associated with activation of caspases 8, 9, 3 &7 and cleavage of PARP, which attests induction of apoptotic cell death. Mechanistically, [6]-gingerol down-regulated Phorbol Myristate Acetate (PMA induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK MAP kinases and activation of AP-1 transcription factor, but had only little effects on phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and activation of NF-kappa B. Additionally, it complemented the inhibitors of either ERK1/2 or JNK MAP kinase in bringing down the PMA-induced cell proliferation in SW-480 cells. We report the inhibition of ERK1/2/JNK/AP-1 pathway as a possible mechanism behind the anticancer as well as chemopreventive efficacy of [6]-gingerol against colon cancer.

  9. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 22 inhibits colon cancer cell invasion by suppressing the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/matrix metalloproteinase 9 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Ning; Liu, Yanyan; Bian, Xiaocui; Feng, Hailiang; Liu, Yuqin

    2015-08-01

    Colon cancer is associated with increased cell migration and invasion. In the present study, the role of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 22 (USP22) in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-mediated colon cancer cell invasion was investigated. The messenger RNA levels of STAT3 target genes were measured by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, following USP22 knockdown by RNA interference in SW480 colon cancer cells. The matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) proteolytic activity and invasion potential of SW480 cells were measured by zymography and Transwell assay, respectively, following combined USP22 and STAT3 short interfering (si)RNA treatment or STAT3 siRNA treatment alone. Similarly, a cell counting kit-8 assay was used to detect the proliferation potential of SW480 cells. The protein expression levels of USP22, STAT3 and MMP9 were detected by immunohistochemistry in colon cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs) and the correlation between USP22, STAT3 and MMP9 was analyzed. USP22/STAT3 co-depletion partly rescued the MMP9 proteolytic activity and invasion of SW480 cells, compared with that of STAT3 depletion alone. However, the proliferation of USP22/STAT3si-SW480 cells was decreased compared with that of STAT3si-SW480 cells. USP22 expression was positively correlated with STAT3 and MMP9 expression in colon cancer TMAs. In conclusion, USP22 attenuated the invasion capacity of colon cancer cells by inhibiting the STAT3/MMP9 signaling pathway.

  10. Early apoptosis and cell death induced by ATX-S10Na (II)-mediated photodynamic therapy are Bax- and p53-dependent in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsunaga, Makoto; Tsubota, Akihito; Nariai, Kohichi; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Sumi, Makoto; Yoshikawa, Tetsuya; Fujise, Kiyotaka

    2007-02-07

    To investigate the roles of Bax and p53 proteins in photosensitivity of human colon cancer cells by using lysosome-localizing photosensitizer, ATX-S10Na (II). HCT116 human colon cancer cells and Bax-null or p53-null isogenic derivatives were irradiated with a diode laser. Early apoptosis and cell death in response to photodynamic therapy were determined by MTT assays, annexin V assays, transmission electron microscopy assays, caspase assays and western blotting. Induction of early apoptosis and cell death was Bax- and p53-dependent. Bax and p53 were required for caspase-dependent apoptosis. The levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L), were decreased in Bax- and p53-independent manner. Our results indicate that early apoptosis and cell death of human colon cancer cells induced by photodynamic therapy with lysosome-localizing photosensitizer ATX-S10Na (II) are mediated by p53-Bax network and low levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L) proteins. Our results might help in formulating new therapeutic approaches in photodynamic therapy.

  11. Black Raspberries Enhance Natural Killer Cell Infiltration into the Colon and Suppress the Progression of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Pan; Kang, Siwen; Wang, Youwei; Liu, Ka; Oshima, Kiyoko; Huang, Yi-Wen; Zhang, Jianying; Yearsley, Martha; Yu, Jianhua; Wang, Li-Shu

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity against cancer development. Many studies have been conducted to evaluate immune-modulating effects using dietary compounds. Our laboratory has been investigating the chemopreventive potential of black raspberries (BRBs) and previously demonstrated their beneficial modulation of genetic and epigenetic biomarkers in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The current study investigated their potential on modulating NK cells. To avoid the excessive inflammation caused by the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) treatment that leads to colitis, we treated the mice with overnight DSS so that it would slightly irritate the colon but still promote colon carcinogenesis with 100% incidence in both the Apc(Min/+) mice and azoxymethane (AOM)-treated mice. A significant decrease of tissue-infiltrating NK cells along the progression of microadenoma-to-adenoma and adenoma-to-adenocarcinoma was observed in the Apc(Min/+) /DSS and AOM/DSS mice, respectively. Depletion of NK cells significantly promoted the development of CRC, suggesting a critical role of NK cells in combating CRC progression. BRBs significantly suppressed the CRC progression and increased the number of tissue-infiltrating NK cells in both mouse models. Moreover, we further determined BRBs' effects on NK cells in the human biopsy specimens collected from our previously completed clinical trial, in which CRC patients consumed BRBs for an average of 4 weeks during a presurgical window. We observed an increased number and an enhanced cytotoxicity of NK cells by BRB intervention. The current study provides evidence that BRBs have the potential to enhance the tumor immunesurveillance of NK cells that can be beneficial in the setting of CRC prevention and treatment.

  12. Black Raspberries Enhance Natural Killer Cell Infiltration into the Colon and Suppress the Progression of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Pan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are an essential component of innate immunity against cancer development. Many studies have been conducted to evaluate immune-modulating effects using dietary compounds. Our laboratory has been investigating the chemopreventive potential of black raspberries (BRBs and previously demonstrated their beneficial modulation of genetic and epigenetic biomarkers in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC. The current study investigated their potential on modulating NK cells. To avoid the excessive inflammation caused by the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS treatment that leads to colitis, we treated the mice with overnight DSS so that it would slightly irritate the colon but still promote colon carcinogenesis with 100% incidence in both the ApcMin/+ mice and azoxymethane (AOM-treated mice. A significant decrease of tissue-infiltrating NK cells along the progression of microadenoma-to-adenoma and adenoma-to-adenocarcinoma was observed in the ApcMin/+/DSS and AOM/DSS mice, respectively. Depletion of NK cells significantly promoted the development of CRC, suggesting a critical role of NK cells in combating CRC progression. BRBs significantly suppressed the CRC progression and increased the number of tissue-infiltrating NK cells in both mouse models. Moreover, we further determined BRBs’ effects on NK cells in the human biopsy specimens collected from our previously completed clinical trial, in which CRC patients consumed BRBs for an average of 4 weeks during a presurgical window. We observed an increased number and an enhanced cytotoxicity of NK cells by BRB intervention. The current study provides evidence that BRBs have the potential to enhance the tumor immunesurveillance of NK cells that can be beneficial in the setting of CRC prevention and treatment.

  13. Methyl Sartortuoate Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Inducing Apoptosis and G2/M-Phase Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Qiusheng; Li, Shoufeng; Lai, Wei; Xu, Heyang; Zhang, Yang; Zeng, Yujie; Lan, Wenjian; Chu, Zhonghua

    2015-08-17

    The potential anti-neoplastic activity of terpenoids is of continued interest. In this study, we investigate whether methyl sartortuoate, a terpenoid isolated from soft coral, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a human colon cancer cell line. Culture studies found that methyl sartortuoate inhibited colon cancer cell (LoVo and RKO) growth and caused apoptotic death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, by activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, p53 and Bax, and inactivation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) apoptosis regulating proteins. Methyl sartortuoate treatment led to reduced expression of cdc2 and up-regulated p21 and p53, suggesting that Methyl sartortuoate induced G2-M arrest through modulation of p53/p21/cdc2 pathways. Methyl sartortuoate also up-regulated phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 expression levels. This resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2-M phase and apoptosis in LoVo and RKO cells. Treatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 prevented methyl sartortuoate-induced apoptosis in LoVo cells. Moreover, methyl sartortuoate also prevented neoplasm growth in NOD-SCID nude mice inoculated with LoVo cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that methyl sartortuoate is capable of leading to activation of caspase-8, -9, -3, increasing p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio apoptosis through MAPK-dependent apoptosis and results in G2-M phase arrest in LoVo and RKO cells. Thus, methyl sartortuoate may be a promising anticancer candidate.

  14. T cell therapy targeting a public neoantigen in microsatellite instable colon cancer reduces in vivo tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inderberg, Else M; Wälchli, Sébastien; Myhre, Marit R; Trachsel, Sissel; Almåsbak, Hilde; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Gaudernack, Gustav

    2017-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) transfer is an attractive strategy to increase the number of cancer-specific T cells in adoptive cell therapy. However, recent clinical and pre-clinical findings indicate that careful consideration of the target antigen is required to limit the risk of off-target toxicity. Directing T cells against mutated proteins such as frequently occurring frameshift mutations may thus be a safer alternative to tumor-associated self-antigens. Furthermore, such frameshift mutations result in novel polypeptides allowing selection of TCRs from the non-tolerant T-cell repertoire circumventing the problem of low affinity TCRs due to central tolerance. The transforming growth factor β Receptor II frameshift mutation (TGFβRIImut) is found in Lynch syndrome cancer patients and in approximately 15% of sporadic colorectal and gastric cancers displaying microsatellite instability (MSI). The -1A mutation within a stretch of 10 adenine bases (nucleotides 709-718) of the TGFβRII gene gives rise to immunogenic peptides previously used for vaccination of MSI+ colorectal cancer patients in a Phase I clinical trial. From a clinically responding patient, we isolated a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone showing a restriction for HLA-A2 in complex with TGFβRIImut peptide. Its TCR was identified and shown to redirect T cells against colon carcinoma cell lines harboring the frameshift mutation. Finally, T cells transduced with the HLA-A2-restricted TGFβRIImut-specific TCR were demonstrated to significantly reduce the growth of colorectal cancer and enhance survival in a NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model.

  15. Cilostazol and enzymatically modified isoquercitrin attenuate experimental colitis and colon cancer in mice by inhibiting cell proliferation and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangawa, Yumi; Yoshida, Toshinori; Maruyama, Kiyoshi; Okamoto, Minako; Kihara, Tohru; Nakamura, Michi; Ochiai, Masako; Hippo, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Shim-Mo; Shibutani, Makoto

    2017-02-01

    We previously reported the anti-inflammatory effects of cilostazol, a selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 3, and two antioxidants, enzymatically modified isoquercitrin and α-lipoic acid in a dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis mouse model. We further examined the chemopreventive effects of these substances in a murine azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulphate -induced colorectal carcinoma model and compared the effects with those of the well-known anticancer natural plant pigment, anthocyanin. In addition, the effects on cell proliferation activity were evaluated in colon cancer cell lines and mucosal epithelial cells in a model of acute dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis. Cilostazol and enzymatically modified isoquercitrin improved the outcome of azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulphate-induced colorectal cancer along with anthocyanin though inhibiting inflammation and cell proliferation, but the effect of α-lipoic acid was minimal. Inhibition of cell proliferation by cilostazol was confirmed in vitro. In the acute dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis model, cilostazol and enzymatically modified isoquercitrin prevented the decrease in epithelial proliferative cells. These results indicate that cilostazol and enzymatically modified isoquercitrin first exhibited an anti-dextran sodium sulphate effect at the initial stage of colitis and then showed antitumour effects throughout subsequent inflammation-related cancer developmental stages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-Canonical Hedgehog Signaling Is a Positive Regulator of the WNT Pathway and Is Required for the Survival of Colon Cancer Stem Cells

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    Joseph L. Regan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Colon cancer is a heterogeneous tumor driven by a subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs. To study CSCs in colon cancer, we used limiting dilution spheroid and serial xenotransplantation assays to functionally define the frequency of CSCs in a panel of patient-derived cancer organoids. These studies demonstrated cancer organoids to be enriched for CSCs, which varied in frequency between tumors. Whole-transcriptome analysis identified WNT and Hedgehog signaling components to be enhanced in CSC-enriched tumors and in aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-positive CSCs. Canonical GLI-dependent Hedgehog signaling is a negative regulator of WNT signaling in normal intestine and intestinal tumors. Here, we show that Hedgehog signaling in colon CSCs is autocrine SHH-dependent, non-canonical PTCH1 dependent, and GLI independent. In addition, using small-molecule inhibitors and RNAi against SHH-palmitoylating Hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT, we demonstrate that non-canonical Hedgehog signaling is a positive regulator of WNT signaling and required for colon CSC survival. : Colon cancer is a heterogeneous tumor driven by a subpopulation(s of therapy-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs. Regan et al. use 3D culture models to demonstrate that CSC survival is regulated by non-canonical, SHH-dependent, PTCH1-dependent Hedgehog signaling, which acts as a positive regulator of WNT signaling to block CSC differentiation. Keywords: WNT pathway, non-canonical Hedgehog signaling, cancer stem cell, colon cancer, cancer organoid, PTCH1, HHAT, SHH

  17. Leptin counteracts sodium butyrate-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer HT-29 cells via NF-kappaB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet-Benzineb, Patricia; Aparicio, Thomas; Guilmeau, Sandra; Pouzet, Cécile; Descatoire, Véronique; Buyse, Marion; Bado, André

    2004-04-16

    This study shows that leptin induced a rapid phosphorylation of p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase, an enhancement of both NF-kappaB DNA binding and transcriptional activities, and a concentration-dependent increase of HT-29 cell proliferation. These effects are consistent with the presence of leptin receptors on cell membranes. The leptin induction of cell growth was associated with an increase of cell population in S and G2/M phase compared with control cells found in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, cyclin D1 immunoreactivity was enhanced in leptin-treated HT-29 cells and this increase was essentially associated with cell population in G0/G1 phase. On the other hand, we observed that sodium butyrate inhibited cell proliferation by blocking HT-29 cells in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Interestingly, at physiological concentration, leptin prevented sodium butyrate-induced morphological nucleus changes, DNA laddering and suppressed butyrate-induced cell cycle arrest. This anti-apoptotic effect of leptin was associated with HT-29 cell proliferation and activation NF-kappaB pathways. However, the phosphorylation of p42/44 MAP kinase in response to leptin was reduced in butyrate-treated cells. These data demonstrated that leptin is a potent mitogenic factor for intestinal epithelial cells through the MAP kinase and NF-kappaB pathways. They also showed, for the first time, that leptin promotes colon cancer HT-29 cell survival upon butyrate challenge by counteracting the apoptotic programs initiated by this short chain fatty acid probably through the NF-kappaB pathways. Although further studies are required to unravel the precise mechanism, these data may have significance in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and ulcerative colitis diseases.

  18. CALCIUM AND THE PREVENTION OF COLON CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WELBERG, JWM; KLEIBEUKER, JH; VANDERMEER, R; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE

    1991-01-01

    Diet is a major determinant of colon cancer risk. Calcium may protect against colon cancer, presumably by binding cytotoxic bile acids and fatty acids. Numerous studies support this proposition. In subjects at risk for colon cancer oral calcium supplementation has been shown to reduce rectal

  19. Cancer stem cell gene profile as predictor of relapse in high risk stage II and stage III, radically resected colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, Riccardo; Scartozzi, Mario; Loretelli, Cristian; Piva, Francesco; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Lezoche, Giovanni; Del Prete, Michela; Bittoni, Alessandro; Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Cecchini, Luca; Guerrieri, Mario; Bearzi, Italo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data indicate that prognostic stratification of radically resected colorectal cancer based on disease stage only may not be always be adequate. Preclinical findings suggest that cancer stem cells may influence the biological behaviour of colorectal cancer independently from stage: objective of the study was to assess whether a panel of stemness markers were correlated with clinical outcome in resected stage II and III colon cancer patients. A panel of 66 markers of stemness were analysed and thus patients were divided into two groups (A and B) with most patients clustering in a manner consistent with different time to relapse by using a statistical algorithm. A total of 62 patients were analysed. Thirty-six (58%) relapsed during the follow-up period (range 1.63-86.5 months). Twelve (19%) and 50 (81%) patients were allocated into group A and B, respectively. A significantly different median relapse-free survival was observed between the 2 groups (22.18 vs 42.85 months, p=0.0296). Among of all genes tested, those with the higher "weight" in determining different prognosis were CD44, ALCAM, DTX2, HSPA9, CCNA2, PDX1, MYST1, COL1A1 and ABCG2. This analysis supports the idea that, other than stage, biological variables, such as expression levels of colon cancer stem cell genes, may be relevant in determining an increased risk of relapse in resected colorectal cancer patients.

  20. Cancer stem cell gene profile as predictor of relapse in high risk stage II and stage III, radically resected colon cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Giampieri

    Full Text Available Clinical data indicate that prognostic stratification of radically resected colorectal cancer based on disease stage only may not be always be adequate. Preclinical findings suggest that cancer stem cells may influence the biological behaviour of colorectal cancer independently from stage: objective of the study was to assess whether a panel of stemness markers were correlated with clinical outcome in resected stage II and III colon cancer patients. A panel of 66 markers of stemness were analysed and thus patients were divided into two groups (A and B with most patients clustering in a manner consistent with different time to relapse by using a statistical algorithm. A total of 62 patients were analysed. Thirty-six (58% relapsed during the follow-up period (range 1.63-86.5 months. Twelve (19% and 50 (81% patients were allocated into group A and B, respectively. A significantly different median relapse-free survival was observed between the 2 groups (22.18 vs 42.85 months, p=0.0296. Among of all genes tested, those with the higher "weight" in determining different prognosis were CD44, ALCAM, DTX2, HSPA9, CCNA2, PDX1, MYST1, COL1A1 and ABCG2. This analysis supports the idea that, other than stage, biological variables, such as expression levels of colon cancer stem cell genes, may be relevant in determining an increased risk of relapse in resected colorectal cancer patients.

  1. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Comparison of 2D and 3D Colon Cancer Cell Culture Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiaoshan; Lukowski, Jessica K; Weaver, Eric M; Skube, Susan B; Hummon, Amanda B

    2016-12-02

    Cell cultures are widely used model systems. Some immortalized cell lines can be grown in either two-dimensional (2D) adherent monolayers or in three-dimensional (3D) multicellular aggregates, or spheroids. Here, the quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome of colon carcinoma HT29 cells cultures in 2D monolayers and 3D spheroids were compared with a stable isotope labeling of amino acids (SILAC) labeling strategy. Two biological replicates from each sample were examined, and notable differences in both the proteome and the phosphoproteome were determined by nanoliquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to assess how growth configuration affects molecular expression. A total of 5867 protein groups, including 2523 phosphoprotein groups and 8733 phosphopeptides were identified in the samples. The Gene Ontology analysis revealed enriched GO terms in the 3D samples for RNA binding, nucleic acid binding, enzyme binding, cytoskeletal protein binding, and histone binding for their molecular functions (MF) and in the process of cell cycle, cytoskeleton organization, and DNA metabolic process for the biological process (BP). The KEGG pathway analysis indicated that 3D cultures are enriched for oxidative phosphorylation pathways, metabolic pathways, peroxisome pathways, and biosynthesis of amino acids. In contrast, analysis of the phosphoproteomes indicated that 3D cultures have decreased phosphorylation correlating with slower growth rates and lower cell-to-extracellular matrix interactions. In sum, these results provide quantitative assessments of the effects on the proteome and phosphoproteome of culturing cells in 2D versus 3D cell culture configurations.

  2. Anticancer effect of dentatin and dentatin-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin complex on human colon cancer (HT-29 cell line

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    AL-Abboodi AS

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ashwaq Shakir AL-Abboodi,1,2 Abdullah Rasedee,3 Ahmad Bustamam Abdul,1,4 Yun Hin Taufiq-Yap,5 Wafaa Abd Alwahed Alkaby,6 Mostafa Saddam Ghaji,7 Peter M Waziri,1,8 Mothanna Sadiq Al-Qubaisi1 1MAKNA-UPM, Cancer Research Laboratory, Institute of Bioscience, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia; 2Basic Science Branch, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Al-Qadisiyah, Al Diwaniyah, Iraq; 3Department of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosis, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia; 4Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia; 5Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia; 6Department of Biomedical, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of AL-Qadisiyah, Al Diwaniyah, Iraq; 7Department of Anatomy and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Basrah, Basrah, Iraq; 8Department of Biochemistry, Kaduna State University, Main Campus,  Kaduna, Nigeria Introduction: Dentatin (DEN (5-methoxy-2, 2-dimethyl-10-(1, 1-dimethyl-2propenyl dipyran-2-one, a natural compound present in the roots of Clausena excavata Burm f, possesses pro-apoptotic and antiproliferative effects in various cancer cells. Because of its hydrophobicity, it is believed that its complexation with hydroxy-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD will make it a potent inhibitor of cancer cell growth. In the current work, the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induced by DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex were demonstrated in human colon HT-29 cancer cells.Materials and methods: After the human colon HT-29 cancer cells were treated with DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex, their effects on the expression of apoptotic-regulated gene markers in mitochondria-mediated apoptotic and death receptor pathways were detected by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These markers included caspases-9, 3, and 8, cytochrome c, poly (ADP

  3. Biosynthesis and characterization of copper oxide nanoparticles and its anticancer activity on human colon cancer cell lines (HCT-116).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanavel, V; Palanichamy, V; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana

    2017-06-01

    The eco-friendly synthesis of nanoparticles through green route from plant extracts have renowned a wide range of application in the field of modern science, due to increased drug efficacy and less toxicity in the nanosized mediated drug delivery model. In the present study, our research groups have biosynthesized the stable and cost effective copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) from the leaves of (Ormocarpum cochinchinense) O. cochinchinense. The synthesis of crystalline CuO NPs from the leaf extract of O. cochinchinense were confirmed by various analytical techniques like UV-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Vis), Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) pattern. Further the synthesized CuO NPs were screened for anticancer activity on human colon cancer cell lines (HCT-116) by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-tiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The obtained result inferred that the synthesized CuO NPs demonstrated high anticancer cytotoxicity on human colon cancer cell lines (HCT-116) with IC50 value of 40μgmL(-1) were discussed briefly in this manuscript. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-term persistence of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil in the colon cancer cell line SW620

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tentes, I.K., E-mail: itentes@med.duth.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 6th km Alexandroupolis-Komotini (Dragana), 68100 Alexandroupolis (Greece); Schmidt, W.M. [Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Waehringer Strasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Krupitza, G. [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Steger, G.G.; Mikulits, W. [Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kortsaris, A. [Department of Biochemistry, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 6th km Alexandroupolis-Komotini (Dragana), 68100 Alexandroupolis (Greece); Mader, R.M. [Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-11-15

    Treatment resistance to antineoplastic drugs represents a major clinical problem. Here, we investigated the long-term stability of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil (FU) in an in vitro colon cancer model, using four sub-clones characterised by increasing FU-resistance derived from the cell line SW620. The resistance phenotype was preserved after FU withdrawal for 15 weeks ({approx} 100 cell divisions) independent of the established level of drug resistance and of epigenetic silencing. Remarkably, resistant clones tolerated serum deprivation, adopted a CD133{sup +} CD44{sup -} phenotype, and further exhibited loss of membrane-bound E-cadherin together with predominant nuclear {beta}-catenin localisation. Thus, we provide evidence for a long-term memory of acquired drug resistance, driven by multiple cellular strategies (epithelial-mesenchymal transition and selective propagation of CD133{sup +} cells). These resistance phenomena, in turn, accentuate the malignant phenotype.

  5. The epigenetic landscape of Alu repeats delineates the structural and functional genomic architecture of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordà, Mireia; Díez-Villanueva, Anna; Mallona, Izaskun; Martín, Berta; Lois, Sergi; Barrera, Víctor; Esteller, Manel; Vavouri, Tanya; Peinado, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit multiple epigenetic changes with prominent local DNA hypermethylation and widespread hypomethylation affecting large chromosomal domains. Epigenome studies often disregard the study of repeat elements owing to technical complexity and their undefined role in genome regulation. We have developed NSUMA (Next-generation Sequencing of UnMethylated Alu), a cost-effective approach allowing the unambiguous interrogation of DNA methylation in more than 130,000 individual Alu elements, the most abundant retrotransposon in the human genome. DNA methylation profiles of Alu repeats have been analyzed in colon cancers and normal tissues using NSUMA and whole-genome bisulfite sequencing. Normal cells show a low proportion of unmethylated Alu (1%-4%) that may increase up to 10-fold in cancer cells. In normal cells, unmethylated Alu elements tend to locate in the vicinity of functionally rich regions and display epigenetic features consistent with a direct impact on genome regulation. In cancer cells, Alu repeats are more resistant to hypomethylation than other retroelements. Genome segmentation based on high/low rates of Alu hypomethylation allows the identification of genomic compartments with differential genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptomic features. Alu hypomethylated regions show low transcriptional activity, late DNA replication, and its extent is associated with higher chromosomal instability. Our analysis demonstrates that Alu retroelements contribute to define the epigenetic landscape of normal and cancer cells and provides a unique resource on the epigenetic dynamics of a principal, but largely unexplored, component of the primate genome. © 2017 Jordà et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Role of microsatellite instability in colon cancer

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    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coloncancer is among leading causes of cancer morbidity and mortality both inRussiaand worldwide. Development of molecular biology lead to decoding of carcinogenesis and tumor progression mechanisms. These processes require accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in a tumor cell.Coloncancer carcinogenesis is characterized by mutations cumulation in genes controlling growth and differentiation of epithelial cells, which leads to their genetic instability. Microsatellite instability is a type of genetic instability characterized by deterioration of mismatch DNA repair. This leads to faster accumulation of mutations in DNA. Loss of mismatch repair mechanism can easily be diagnosed by length of DNA microsatellites. These alterations are termed microsatellite instability. They can be found both in hereditary and sporadic colon cancers. This review covers the questions of microsatellite instability, its prognostic and predictive value in colon cancer.

  7. Sphingosine Kinase 2 and Ceramide Transport as Key Targets of the Natural Flavonoid Luteolin to Induce Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loubna Abdel Hadi

    Full Text Available The plant flavonoid luteolin exhibits different biological effects, including anticancer properties. Little is known on the molecular mechanisms underlying its actions in colorectal cancer (CRC. Here we investigated the effects of luteolin on colon cancer cells, focusing on the balance between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, two sphingoid mediators with opposite roles on cell fate. Using cultured cells, we found that physiological concentrations of luteolin induce the elevation of ceramide, followed by apoptotic death of colon cancer cells, but not of differentiated enterocytes. Pulse studies revealed that luteolin inhibits ceramide anabolism to complex sphingolipids. Further experiments led us to demonstrate that luteolin induces an alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER-Golgi flow of ceramide, pivotal to its metabolic processing to complex sphingolipids. We report that luteolin exerts its action by inhibiting both Akt activation, and sphingosine kinase (SphK 2, with the consequent reduction of S1P, an Akt stimulator. S1P administration protected colon cancer cells from luteolin-induced apoptosis, most likely by an intracellular, receptor-independent mechanism. Overall this study reveals for the first time that the dietary flavonoid luteolin exerts toxic effects on colon cancer cells by inhibiting both S1P biosynthesis and ceramide traffic, suggesting its dietary introduction/supplementation as a potential strategy to improve existing treatments in CRC.

  8. Prognostic implications of occult nodal tumour cells in stage I and II colon cancer: The correlation between micrometastasis and disease recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloothaak, D. A. M.; van der Linden, R. L. A.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Bemelman, W. A.; Lips, D. J.; van der Linden, J. C.; Doornewaard, H.; Tanis, P. J.; Bosscha, K.; van der Zaag, E. S.; Buskens, C. J.

    2017-01-01

    Occult nodal tumour cells should be categorised as micrometastasis (MMs) and isolated tumour cells (ITCs). A recent meta-analysis demonstrated that MMs, but not ITCs, are prognostic for disease recurrence in patients with stage I/II colon cancer. The objective of this retrospective multicenter study

  9. Tumor associated macrophages protect colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis through IL-1beta-dependent stabilization of Snail in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kaler

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that colon tumor cells stimulate macrophages to release IL-1beta, which in turn inactivates GSK3beta and enhances Wnt signaling in colon cancer cells, generating a self-amplifying loop that promotes the growth of tumor cells.Here we describe that macrophages protect HCT116 and Hke-3 colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Inactivation of IL-1beta by neutralizing IL-1beta antibody, or silencing of IL-1beta in macrophages inhibited their ability to counter TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, IL-1beta was sufficient to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis. TRAIL-induced collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta psi and activation of caspases were prevented by macrophages or by recombinant IL-1beta. Pharmacological inhibition of IL-1beta release from macrophages by vitamin D(3, a potent chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer, restored the ability of TRAIL to induce apoptosis of tumor cells cultured with macrophages. Macrophages and IL-1beta failed to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells expressing dnIkappaB, dnAKT or dnTCF4, confirming that they oppose TRAIL-induced cell death through induction of Wnt signaling in tumor cells. We showed that macrophages and IL-1beta stabilized Snail in tumor cells in an NF-kappaB/Wnt dependent manner and that Snail deficient tumor cells were not protected from TRAIL-induced apoptosis by macrophages or by IL-1beta, demonstrating a crucial role of Snail in the resistance of tumor cells to TRAIL.We have identified a positive feedback loop between tumor cells and macrophages that propagates the growth and promotes the survival of colon cancer cells: tumor cells stimulate macrophages to secrete IL-1beta, which in turn, promotes Wnt signaling and stabilizes Snail in tumor cells, conferring resistance to TRAIL. Vitamin D(3 halts this amplifying loop by interfering with the release of IL-1beta from macrophages. Accordingly, vitamin D(3 sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL

  10. Loss of P53 Function in Colon Cancer Cells Results in Increased Phosphocholine and Total Choline

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    Noriko Mori

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequently observed genetic lesions in human cancers. Human cancers that contain a p53 mutation are more aggressive, more apt to metastasize, and more often fatal. p53 controls numerous downstream targets that can influence various outcomes such as apoptosis, growth arrest, and DNA repair. Based on previous observations using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, we have identified choline phospholipid metabolite intensities typical of increased malignancy. Here we have used 1H MRS to characterize the choline phospholipid metabolite levels of p53+/+ and p53−/– cells, and demonstrated that loss of p53 function results in increased phosphocholine and total choline. These data suggest that the increased malignancy of cancer cells resulting from loss of p53 may be mediated, in part, through the choline phospholipid pathway.

  11. The ganglioside GM3 is associated with cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Wook Chung

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum, CDDP is a well-known chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of several cancers. However, the precise mechanism underlying apoptosis of cancer cells induced by CDDP remains unclear. In this study, we show mechanistically that CDDP induces GM3-mediated apoptosis of HCT116 cells by inhibiting cell proliferation, and increasing DNA fragmentation and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis signals. CDDP induced apoptosis within cells through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, regulated the ROS-mediated expression of Bax, Bcl-2, and p53, and induced the degradation of the poly (ADP-ribosyl polymerase (PARP. We also checked expression levels of different gangliosides in HCT116 cells in the presence or absence of CDDP. Interestingly, among the gangliosides, CDDP augmented the expression of only GM3 synthase and its product GM3. Reduction of the GM3 synthase level through ectopic expression of GM3 small interfering RNA (siRNA rescued HCT116 cells from CDDP-induced apoptosis. This was evidenced by inhibition of apoptotic signals by reducing ROS production through the regulation of 12-lipoxigenase activity. Furthermore, the apoptotic sensitivity to CDDP was remarkably increased in GM3 synthase-transfected HCT116 cells compared to that in controls. In addition, GM3 synthase-transfected cells treated with CDDP exhibited an increased accumulation of intracellular ROS. These results suggest the CDDP-induced oxidative apoptosis of HCT116 cells is mediated by GM3.

  12. Sinomenine Sensitizes Multidrug-Resistant Colon Cancer Cells (Caco-2) to Doxorubicin by Downregulation of MDR-1 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Chang, Jiu-Yang; Zhang, Zhi-feng; Chu, Rui; Li, Yu-Ling; Dai, Ke-Hang; Mo, Guang-quan; Chang, Qing-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Chemoresistance in multidrug-resistant (MDR) cells over expressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the MDR1 gene, is a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. Previous studies have indicated that sinomenine can enhance the absorption of various P-gp substrates. In the present study, we investigated the effect of sinomenine on the chemoresistance in colon cancer cells and explored the underlying mechanism. We developed multidrug-resistant Caco-2 (MDR-Caco-2) cells by exposure of Caco-2 cells to increasing concentrations of doxorubicin. We identified overexpression of COX-2 and MDR-1 genes as well as activation of the NF-κB signal pathway in MDR-Caco-2 cells. Importantly, we found that sinomenine enhances the sensitivity of MDR-Caco-2 cells towards doxorubicin by downregulating MDR-1 and COX-2 expression through inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. These findings provide a new potential strategy for the reversal of P-gp-mediated anticancer drug resistance. PMID:24901713

  13. Colon cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or polyps. This usually means close relatives (parent, sibling, or child) who developed these conditions younger than age 60. A personal history of colorectal cancer or polyps. A personal history of chronic inflammatory ...

  14. Stages of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... under a microscope ). Having inherited changes in certain genes that increase the risk of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). Having a personal history of chronic ulcerative colitis ...

  15. Effect of indomethacin on Bfl-1, WISP-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in colon cancer cell line HCT116 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Gui Ying; Li, Xin Hua

    2006-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as indomethacin can inhibit the growth of tumors through both the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) dependant and COX-2 independent pathways, but the exact mechanism has not yet been shown. In our previous study, COX-2 independent proteins (Bfl-1, WISP-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigens [PCNA]) in indomethacin-treated colorectal cancer cells with the use of proteomics technology had been identified. To study and confirm the effect of indomethacin on the expression of Bfl-1, WISP-1 and PCNA in human colon cancer line HCT116 cells and the COX-2 independent tumor inhibiting pathway. Human colon cancer cell line HCT116 cells were divided into a treatment with indomethacin (IC 50) group, and a treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a control group for 48 h. The expression of Bfl-1, WISP-1 and PCNA, mRNA and protein were determined by a real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot, respectively. Indomethacin down-regulated the expression of Bfl-1, WISP-1 and PCNA mRNA in vitro (9.53 +/- 0.15 vs 27.87 +/- 0.12, 7.37 +/- 0.58 vs 20.17 +/- 0.58, 5.17 +/- 0.06 vs 0.87 +/- 0.06). Indomethacin also down-regulated the expression of Bfl-1, WISP-1 and PCNA protein (40.01 +/- 1.61 vs 43.76 +/- 1.63, 22.50 +/- 1.17 vs 30.30 +/- 1.55, 17.69 +/- 1.18 vs 20.80 +/- 1.08). Inducing apoptosis and inhibiting proliferation contribute to the anticancer activity of indomethacin via COX-2 independent pathway of Bfl-1, WISP-1 and PCNA. This further confirms the results of our previous study.

  16. Novel mechanism for obesity-induced colon cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Birmingham, Janette M; Busik, Julia V.; Hansen-Smith, Fay M.; Fenton, Jenifer I

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue secretes factors linked to colon cancer risk including leptin. A hallmark of cancer is sustained angiogenesis. While leptin promotes angiogenesis in adipose tissue, it is unknown whether leptin can induce epithelial cells to produce factors that may drive angiogenesis, vascular development and therefore cancer progression. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of leptin-stimulated colon epithelial cells differing in adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) genotype (gate...

  17. Oxaliplatin and Infliximab Combination Synergizes in Inducing Colon Cancer Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenya; Xu, Jian; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Rui

    2017-02-12

    BACKGROUND Colon cancer is one of the most common malignant cancers and causes millions of deaths each year. There are still no effective treatments for colon cancer patients who are at advanced stage. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) might be a good therapy target due to its widely-accepted roles in regulating multiple important biological processes, especially in promoting inflammation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We evaluated the expression of TNF-α in 108 human colon cancer tissue samples and 2 colon cancer cell lines (CT26 and HCT116), and analyzed its prognostic values. Further, we explored the roles and mechanism of anti-TNF-α treatment in combination with chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS We found that TNF-α was highly expressed in colon cancer cell lines. The survival analysis and Cox regression analysis indicated that high TNF-α was an independent adverse prognosticator of colon cancer. In addition, anti-TNF-α treatment enhanced the effects of chemotherapy in the xenograft mouse model through inducing ADCC and CDC effects. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that TNF-α is an independent adverse prognosticator of colon cancer, and anti-TNF-α might benefit colon cancer patients.

  18. Delphinidin, an anthocyanidin in pigmented fruits and vegetables, induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human colon cancer HCT116 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jung-Mi; Afaq, Farrukh; Khan, Naghma; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2009-03-01

    Because of unsatisfactory treatment options for colon cancer, there is a need to develop novel preventive approaches for this malignancy. One such strategy is through chemoprevention by the use of non-toxic dietary substances and botanical products. Delphinidin, an anthocyanidin in pigmented fruits and vegetables, possesses strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties of delphinidin in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. We found that treatment of cells with delphinidin (30-240 microM; 48 h) resulted in (i) decrease in cell viability (ii) induction of apoptosis, (iii) cleavage of PARP, (iv) activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9, (v) increase in Bax with a concomitant decrease in Bcl-2 protein, and (vi) G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. NF-kappaB provides a mechanistic link between inflammation and cancer, and is a major factor controlling the ability of both pre-neoplastic and malignant cells to resist apoptosis-based tumor surveillance mechanisms. We therefore, determined the effect of delphinidin on NF-kappaB signaling pathway. The immunoblot, ELISA and EMSA analysis demonstrated that the treatment of HCT116 cells with delphinidin resulted in the inhibition of (i) IKKalpha, (ii) phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha, (iii) phosphorylation of NF-kappaB/p65 at Ser(536), (iv) nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB/p65, (v) NF-kappaB/p65 DNA binding activity, and (vi) transcriptional activation of NF-kappaB. Our results suggest that delphinidin treatment of HCT116 cells suppressed NF-kappaB pathway, resulting in G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. We suggest that delphinidin could have potential in inhibiting colon cancer growth. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Efficacy of 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy using light-emitting diodes in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomoya; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Komatsu, Shuhei; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Ochiai, Toshiya; Kokuba, Yukihito; Inoue, Katsushi; Nakajima, Motowo; Otsuji, Eigo

    2013-03-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) (ALA-PDT) is a highly selective treatment for malignant cells. ALA-PDT has the potential to develop into a novel therapeutic strategy for various types of cancer. Recently, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which are inexpensive, stable and easier to handle compared to lasers, have been used in PDT as a light source. However, in colorectal cancer (CRC), the efficacy of ALA-PDT in combination with LEDs has not been fully assessed. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the antitumor effect of ALA-PDT using various LEDs in colon cancer cells. The HT-29 human colon cancer cell line was used both in vitro and in vivo. HT-29 cells were seeded in 96-well plates. Following 5-ALA administration, cells were irradiated using LEDs at different wavelengths. Three types of LEDs, blue (peak wavelength, 456 nm), white (broad-band) and red (635 nm) were used. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, the cytotoxic effects of ALA-PDT were measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. In order to evaluate the antitumor effect of ALA-PDT in vivo, nude mice were inoculated with HT-29 cells. Xenograft mice were injected intraperitoneally with 5-ALA and irradiated with 3 types of LEDs at a measured fluence rate of 96 mW/cm2 and fluence of 32 J/cm2. Each group comprised 6 mice. ALA-PDT was repeated 3 times at weekly intervals. Tumor weights were measured. Compared to the controls, ALA-PDT using LEDs showed significant antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. The blue and white LEDs demonstrated greater antitumor effects compared to the red LEDs in vitro and in vivo. In particular, tumor inhibition rates in the blue and white LED groups were approximately 88% to those of the control group in the mouse models. In conclusion, ALA-PDT using LEDs is effective and useful in the treatment of CRC cells. This method could be a novel treatment modality for CRC.

  20. Taiwanin E inhibits cell migration in human LoVo colon cancer cells by suppressing MMP-2/9 expression via p38 MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Li, Shin-Yi; Chang, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Hui-Nung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-08-01

    Taiwanin E is a natural compound which is structurally analogous to estrogen II and is abundantly found in Taiwania cryptomerioides. It has been previously reported for its anticancer effects; however, the pharmaceutical effect of Taiwanin E on Human LoVo colon cancer cells is not clear. In this study, we investigated the effects of Taiwanin E on metastasis and the associated mechanism of action on Human LoVo colon cancer cells with respect to the modulations in their cell migration and signaling pathways associated with migration. The results showed that Taiwanin E inhibited cell migration ability correlated with reduced expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. In addition, Taiwanin E induced activation of p38 through phosphorylation. Inhibition of p38α/β significantly abolished the effect of Taiwanin E on cell migration and MMP-2/-9 activity. Our results conclude that Taiwanin E inhibited cell migration chiefly via p38α MAPK pathway and in a lesser extend via p38β MAPK. The results elucidate the potential of the phytoestrogen natural compound Taiwanin E as a cancer therapeutic agent in inhibiting the cell migration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 2021-2031, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Hypoxia activates the K-ras proto-oncogene to stimulate angiogenesis and inhibit apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zeng

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The KRAS proto-oncogene plays a key role in the development of many human tumors and is commonly activated by somatic mutation or signaling through specific growth factor receptors. However, the interaction between the micro-environment and K-ras activity has not been defined. Hypoxia invariably develops as tumors outgrow their supply of oxygen. A series of well-orchestrated cellular adaptations occur that stimulate angiogenesis and enhance survival of the tumor in hypoxic conditions. Our previous studies demonstrated that mutant KRAS alleles can interact with hypoxia to induce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in colon cancer. We sought to determine whether similar hypoxic responses are also present in tumors without a KRAS mutation. Hypoxia consistently increased the levels of activated, GTP-bound K-ras in colon cancer cell lines with a wild-type KRAS gene, and this depended upon the activation of c-Src. Inhibition of c-Src by PP2 treatment or siRNA knockdown blocked the hypoxic activation of K-ras. This activation of K-ras did not depend upon EGFR and resulted in the phosphorylation of Akt and induction of VEGF expression. In addition, activation of K-ras significantly blocked apoptosis in hypoxic conditions. These studies reveal a unique adaptive mechanism in hypoxia that activates K-ras signaling in the absence of a mutant KRAS oncogene.

  2. Chemical synthesis, docking studies and biological effects of functionalized 1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-ones on human colon cancer cells

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    Guo-Min Zhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of 1, 3-diaryl-2-propen-1-ones was synthesised in order to obtain a new type of anticancer drug, designed with hybrid features to inhibit colon cancer activated receptor. Based on computational modelling and docking studies, potential inhibitors were synthesised and their biological activity evaluated. The structures of newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by 1HNMR, 13CNMR and Mass spectrometry. All analogues were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against human colon (caco-2 cancer cell lines. Compounds 1b, 1f-1h, and 2i showed significant cytotoxicity. Chalcones 1b, 1f and 1g were identified as the most potent and selective anticancer agents with IC50 values <1 µg/mL and 1.5 µg/mL, against caco-2 cell line, respectively. In conclusion, this finding confirms the suitability of indolyl chalcone analogues as candidates for further investigation towards the management of colon cancer related diseases.

  3. Selenoesters and selenoanhydrides as novel multidrug resistance reversing agents: A confirmation study in a colon cancer MDR cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdács, Márió; Spengler, Gabriella; Sanmartín, Carmen; Marć, Małgorzata Anna; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Domínguez-Álvarez, Enrique

    2017-02-15

    Taking into account that multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main cause for chemotherapeutic failure in cancer treatment and as a continuation of our efforts to overcome this problem we report the evaluation of one cyclic selenoanhydride (1) and ten selenoesters (2-11) in MDR human colon adenocarcinoma Colo 320 cell line. The most potent derivatives (1, 9-11) inhibited the ABCB1 efflux pump much stronger than the reference compound verapamil. Particularly, the best one (9) was 4-fold more potent than verapamil at a 10-fold lower concentration. Furthermore, the evaluated derivatives exerted a potent and selective cytotoxic activity. In addition, they were strong apoptosis inducers as the four derivatives triggered apoptotic events in a 64-72% of the examined MDR Colo 320 human adenocarcinoma cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Sterols Isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans on Growth Inhibition of Colon and Breast Cancer Cells

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    Mario Augusto Bolaños-Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore the effect of peniocerol and macdougallin on HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and PARP cleavage. Methods. HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells were treated with various concentrations of peniocerol and macdougallin (10–80 μM during 24 or 48 h. Crystal Violet Assay was used to evaluate the inhibition effect. Cell cycle regulation was examined by a propidium iodide method. Cell apoptosis was detected through both Annexin–V FLUOS/PI double-labeled cytometry assays and Western blot was applied to assess PARP cleavage. Results. Peniocerol and macdougallin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, peniocerol and macdougallin induced arrest of cell cycle-dependent manner and increased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase. PARP cleavage in HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells was induced by treatment with peniocerol and macdougallin after 36 hours. Conclusions. Our results showed that the mechanism of cytotoxicity displayed by peniocerol and macdougallin is related to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in both cell lines. This is a significant observation because it helps to understand the way some oxysterols isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans develop their biological activities against cancer cells.

  5. Effect of Sterols Isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans on Growth Inhibition of Colon and Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños-Carrillo, Mario Augusto; Ventura-Gallegos, Jose Luis; Saldivar-Jiménez, Arturo David; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore the effect of peniocerol and macdougallin on HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and PARP cleavage. Methods. HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells were treated with various concentrations of peniocerol and macdougallin (10–80 μM) during 24 or 48 h. Crystal Violet Assay was used to evaluate the inhibition effect. Cell cycle regulation was examined by a propidium iodide method. Cell apoptosis was detected through both Annexin–V FLUOS/PI double-labeled cytometry assays and Western blot was applied to assess PARP cleavage. Results. Peniocerol and macdougallin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, peniocerol and macdougallin induced arrest of cell cycle-dependent manner and increased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase. PARP cleavage in HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells was induced by treatment with peniocerol and macdougallin after 36 hours. Conclusions. Our results showed that the mechanism of cytotoxicity displayed by peniocerol and macdougallin is related to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in both cell lines. This is a significant observation because it helps to understand the way some oxysterols isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans develop their biological activities against cancer cells. PMID:26113867

  6. Molecular mechanisms for inhibition of colon cancer cells by combined epigenetic-modulating epigallocatechin gallate and sodium butyrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldanha, Sabita N., E-mail: sabivan@uab.edu [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104 (United States); Kala, Rishabh [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Tollefsbol, Trygve O., E-mail: trygve@uab.edu [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Center for Healthy Aging, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Nutrition Obesity Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Diabetes Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bioactive compounds are considered safe and have been shown to alter genetic and epigenetic profiles of tumor cells. However, many of these changes have been reported at molecular concentrations higher than physiologically achievable levels. We investigated the role of the combinatorial effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a predominant polyphenol in green tea, and sodium butyrate (NaB), a dietary microbial fermentation product of fiber, in the regulation of survivin, which is an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in colon cancer cells. For the first time, our study showed that the combination treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in RKO, HCT-116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. This was found to be regulated by the decrease in HDAC1, DNMT1, survivin and HDAC activity in all three cell lines. A G2/M arrest was observed for RKO and HCT-116 cells, and G1 arrest for HT-29 colorectal cancer cells for combinatorial treatment. Further experimentation of the molecular mechanisms in RKO colorectal cancer (CRC) cells revealed a p53-dependent induction of p21 and an increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-p65. An increase in double strand breaks as determined by gamma-H2A histone family member X (γ-H2AX) protein levels and induction of histone H3 hyperacetylation was also observed with the combination treatment. Further, we observed a decrease in global CpG methylation. Taken together, these findings suggest that at low and physiologically achievable concentrations, combinatorial EGCG and NaB are effective in promoting apoptosis, inducing cell cycle arrest and DNA-damage in CRC cells. - Highlights: • EGCG and NaB as a combination inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation. • The combination treatment induces DNA damage, G2/M and G1 arrest and apoptosis. • Survivin is effectively down-regulated by the combination treatment. • p21 and p53 expressions are induced by the combination treatment. • Epigenetic proteins DNMT1 and HDAC1 are

  7. Tian Xian Liquid (TXL induces apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cell in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Ellie

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tian Xian Liquid (TXL is a Chinese medicine decoction and has been used as an anticancer dietary supplement. The present study aims to investigate the effects of TXL on the apoptosis of HT-29 cells and tumor growth in vivo. Method HT-29 colon cancer cells were treated with gradient dilution of TXL. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by JC-1 assay. The release of cytochrome c from mitochondrial and apoptosis-related proteins Bax, Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3, 9 were examined by Western blot analysis. HT-29 cells were implanted in nude mice to examine the effects of TXL on tumor growth. Result TXL inhibited HT-29 xenografted model and showed a strong and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of HT-29 cells. Mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced by TXL at the concentration of 0.5% above. For Western blot analysis, an increase in Bax expression and a decrease in Bcl-2 expression were observed in TXL-treated cells. TXL treatment increased the protein level of cleaved casepase-3 and caspase-9, and the release of cytochrome c in cytoplasm was up-regulated as well. Conclusion TXL significantly inhibits cell proliferation in the HT-29 cells and HT-29 xenografted model via the mitochondrial cell death pathway.

  8. Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Effects Triggered by Grape Seed Extract (GSE versus Epigallocatechin and Procyanidins on Colon Cancer Cell Lines

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    Simona Dinicola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Grape seed extract has been proven to exert anticancer effects on different tumors. These effects are mainly ascribed to catechin and procyanidin content. Analytical studies demonstrated that grape seed extract composition is complex and it is likely other components could exert biological activities. Using cell count and flow cytometry assays, we evaluated the cytostatic and apoptotic effects produced by three different grape seed extracts from Italia, Palieri and Red Globe cultivars, on Caco2 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells. These effects were compared to those induced by epigallocatechin and procyanidins, alone or in association, on the same cell lines. All the extracts induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in Caco2 and HCT-8 cells, along the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. On both cell lines, growth inhibition induced by Italia and Palieri grape seed extracts was significantly higher than that it has been recorded with epigallocatechin, procyanidins and their association. In Caco2 cells, the extract from Red Globe cultivar was less effective in inducing growth inhibition than procyanidins alone and in association with epigallocatechin, whereas, in HCT-8 cells, only the association of epigallocatechin and procyanidins triggers a significant proliferation decrease. On both cell lines, apoptosis induced by Italia, Palieri and Red Globe grape seed extracts was considerably higher than has been recorded with epigallocatechin, procyanidins and their association. These data support the hypothesis by which other compounds, present in the grape seed extracts, are likely to enhance the anticancer effects.

  9. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects triggered by Grape Seed Extract (GSE) versus epigallocatechin and procyanidins on colon cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinicola, Simona; Cucina, Alessandra; Pasqualato, Alessia; D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Proietti, Sara; Lisi, Elisabetta; Pasqua, Gabriella; Antonacci, Donato; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Grape seed extract has been proven to exert anticancer effects on different tumors. These effects are mainly ascribed to catechin and procyanidin content. Analytical studies demonstrated that grape seed extract composition is complex and it is likely other components could exert biological activities. Using cell count and flow cytometry assays, we evaluated the cytostatic and apoptotic effects produced by three different grape seed extracts from Italia, Palieri and Red Globe cultivars, on Caco2 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells. These effects were compared to those induced by epigallocatechin and procyanidins, alone or in association, on the same cell lines. All the extracts induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in Caco2 and HCT-8 cells, along the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. On both cell lines, growth inhibition induced by Italia and Palieri grape seed extracts was significantly higher than that it has been recorded with epigallocatechin, procyanidins and their association. In Caco2 cells, the extract from Red Globe cultivar was less effective in inducing growth inhibition than procyanidins alone and in association with epigallocatechin, whereas, in HCT-8 cells, only the association of epigallocatechin and procyanidins triggers a significant proliferation decrease. On both cell lines, apoptosis induced by Italia, Palieri and Red Globe grape seed extracts was considerably higher than has been recorded with epigallocatechin, procyanidins and their association. These data support the hypothesis by which other compounds, present in the grape seed extracts, are likely to enhance the anticancer effects.

  10. Dichloromethane-methanol extract from Borassus aethiopumn mart. (Arecaceae) induces apoptosis of human colon cancer HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakandé, J; Rouet-benzineb, P; Devaud, H; Nikiema, J B; Lompo, M; Nacoulma, O G; Guissou, I P; Bado, A

    2011-05-15

    Borassus aetihiopum MART (Arecaceae) is a plant used in traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of various diseases (bronchitis, laryngitis, antiseptic). In particular, their male inflorcscences were reported to exhibit cicatrizing, antiseptic and fungicidal properties. In the present study, the biological activity of E2F2, an apolar extract from Borassus aethiopum male inflorescence was investigated on colon cancer HT29 cells. Phytochemical screening was carried according to methodology for chemical analysis for vegetable drugs. Cells proliferation was determined by the MTT assay and cells cycle distribution was analysed by using laser flow cytometer (Beckman coulter). The cytoskeleton organisation was examined under a laser scanning confocal microscope (Zess). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of E2F2 extract revealed the presence of sterols, triterpenes and saponosids. E2F2 extract (1 microg and 100 microg mL(-1)) significantly inhibited cell proliferation by blocking cell population in G0/G1 phase. Flow Cytometric analysis of E2F2-treated HT29 cells showed that hypoploïd cell population (sub G1 phase) increased with processing time exposures. Immunofluorescence confocal analysis revealed a disrupt actin microfilaments network in E2F2 treated-cells with a significant reduction in actin stress fibres and appearance of a random, non-oriented distribution of focal adhesion sites. These data indicate that E2F2 extract has anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. Further studies are required to unravel the mechanisms of action of E2F2 extract.

  11. CRH promotes human colon cancer cell proliferation via IL-6/JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway and VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xianjun; Hong, Yali; Dai, Li; Qian, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Chao; Wu, Biao; Li, Shengnan

    2017-11-01

    Corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) has been demonstrated to participate in various diseases. Our previous study showed that its receptor CRHR1 mediated the development of colitis-associated cancer in mouse model. However, the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we explored the oncogenetic role of CRH/CRHR1 signaling in colon cancer cells. Cell proliferation and colony formation assays revealed that CRH contributed to cell proliferation. Moreover, tube formation assay showed that CRH-treated colon cancer cell supernatant significantly promoted tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). And these effects could be reversed by the CRHR1 specific antagonist Antalarmin. Further investigation showed that CRH significantly upregulated the expressions of interlukin-6 (IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through activating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). The CRH-induced IL-6 promoted phosphorylation of janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). STAT3 inhibition by Stattic significantly inhibited the CRH-induced cell proliferation. In addition, silence of VEGF resulted in declined tube formation induced by CRH. Taken together, CRH/CRHR1 signaling promoted human colon cancer cell proliferation via NF-κB/IL-6/JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway and tumor angiogenesis via NF-κB/VEGF signaling pathway. Our results provide evidence to support a critical role for the CRH/CRHR1 signaling in colon cancer progression and suggest its potential utility as a new therapeutic target for colon cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in colon confounded by prior history of colorectal cancer: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanling; Chen, Zhilu; Su, Chuanyong; Tong, Hongyan; Qian, Wenbin

    2016-02-01

    A 66-year-old male underwent left hemicolectomy for rectal adenocarcinoma in 2008. Five years later he was admitted to hospital with abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan revealed notable thickening of the middle of the ascending colon wall, and colonoscopy revealed an ulcerofungating mass of 3×3 cm in the cecum and extending to the ascending colon. Under the consideration of cancer recurrence, laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was performed directly. Surgical specimens revealed sheets of large pleomorphic lymphoid cells with nuclei of different sizes, nucleoli and mitotic phases visible in most cells. These tested positive for CD45, CD20 and CD79a diffusely, but negative for CD3, CD5, Bcl-2, Bcl-6 and ALK. The Ki-67 proliferation index was 40%. Epstein-Barr virus in situ hybridization did not reveal any positive signals in any of the tumor cells. Based on these findings, the recurrent tumor was diagnosed as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient could have avoided surgery and received chemotherapy only; however, the case was confounded by the patient's prior history of colorectal cancer due to the rarity of colon lymphoma following rectal cancer in the same patient. It is therefore essential to investigate carefully and differentiate between potential lesions during routine postoperative colonoscopy following colorectal cancer surgery, as patients may present with rare colon lymphoma, which may be confused with a recurrence of colorectal cancer.

  13. HIF-1α inhibition reverses multidrug resistance in colon cancer cells via downregulation of MDR1/P-glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Chen

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is one of the major reasons chemotherapy-based treatments fail. Hypoxia is generally associated with tumor chemoresistance. However, the correlation between the heterodimeric hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 and the multidrug resistance (MDR1 gene/transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp remains unclear. This study aims to explore the molecular mechanisms of reversing colon cancer MDR by focusing on the target gene HIF-1α.A chemotherapeutic sensitivity assay was used to observe the efficiency of MDR reversal in LoVo multicellular spheroids (MCS. The apoptotic level induced by different drugs was examined by flow cytometry (FCM. Binding of HIF-1α to the MDR1 gene promoter was evaluated by Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. The relationship between HIF-1α/P-gp expression and sensitivity to chemotherapy was analyzed.The sensitivity of LoVo MCS to all four chemotherapy drugs was decreased to varying degrees under hypoxic conditions. After silencing the HIF-1α gene, the sensitivities of LoVo MCS to all four chemotherapy drugs were restored. The apoptotic levels that all the drugs induced were all decreased to various extents in the hypoxic group. After silencing HIF-1α, the apoptosis level induced by all four chemotherapy drugs increased. The expression of HIF-1α and P-gp was significantly enhanced in LoVo MCS after treatment with hypoxia. Inhibiting HIF-1α significantly decreased the expression of MDR1/P-gp mRNA or protein in both the LoVo monolayers and LoVo MCS. The ChIP assay showed that HIF-1α was bound to the MDR1 gene promoter. Advanced colon carcinoma patients with expression of both HIF-1α and P-gp were more resistant to chemotherapy than that with non expression.HIF-1α inhibition reverses multidrug resistance in colon cancer cells via downregulation of MDR1/P-gp. The expression of HIF-1α and MDR1/P-gp can be used as a predictive marker for chemotherapy resistance in colon cancer.

  14. Pro-apoptotic activities of polyphenolics from açai (Euterpe oleracea Martius) in human SW-480 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Manoela Maciel dos Santos; Noratto, Giuliana; Martino, Hercia Stampini Duarte; Arbizu, Shirley; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo Gouveia; Talcott, Stephen; Ramos, Afonso Mota; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cell growth inhibition activity of açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) polyphenolic extract against colon cancer HT-29 and SW-480 cells and the nonmalignant CCD-18Co colon fibroblast cells. Results showed that açai polyphenolic extract (5-20 mg/L) inhibited preferentially the growth of SW-480 cells with no toxicity in CCD-18Co cells, and this was accompanied by reduction of H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The mechanisms involved in SW-480 cell growth-inhibition by açai polyphenolic extract included the downregulation of NF-κB proinflammatory transcription factor and the nuclear factor-kappa B targets intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Furthermore, prooncogenic specificity proteins (Sp) were downregulated as well as Sp-targets Bcl-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and survivin. This was accompanied by activation of mitochondrial proapoptotic pathway involving increase of cytochrome c, cleavage of caspase-3, and decrease of PARP-1. Results strongly suggest that açai polyphenolic extract has antiinflammatory and cytotoxic activities in colon cancer cells and can be effective as natural colon cancer chemopreventive agents.

  15. BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetto de Farias, Caroline [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Heinen, Tiago Elias; Pereira dos Santos, Rafael [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Abujamra, Ana Lucia [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Schwartsmann, Gilberto [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

  16. Identification of alternatively spliced TIMP-1 mRNA in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usher, Pernille Autzen; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Bartels, Annette

    2007-01-01

    TIMP-1 is a promising new candidate as a prognostic marker in colorectal and breast cancer. We now describe the discovery of two alternatively spliced variants of TIMP-1 mRNA. The two variants lacking exon 2 (del-2) and 5 (del-5), respectively, were identified in human cancer cell lines by RT......-PCR. The del-2 variant was, furthermore, detected in extracts from 12 colorectal cancer tissue samples. By western blotting additional bands of lower molecular mass than full-length TIMP-1 were identified in tumor tissue, but not in plasma samples obtained from cancer patients. The two splice variants of TIMP...

  17. Annona muricata leaves induce G₁ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through mitochondria-mediated pathway in human HCT-116 and HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Karimian, Hamed; Rouhollahi, Elham; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2014-10-28

    Annona muricata known as "the cancer killer" has been widely used in the traditional medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anticancer properties of ethyl acetate extract of Annona muricata leaves (EEAM) on HT-29 and HCT-116 colon cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. The effect of EEAM on the cell proliferation of HT-29 and HCT-116 cells was analyzed by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium) assay. High content screening system (HCS) was applied to investigate the cell membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), nuclear condensation and cytochrome c translocation from mitochondria to cytosol. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and activation of caspase-3/7, -8 and -9 were measured while treatment. Flow cytometric analysis was used to determine the cell cycle distribution and phosphatidylserine externalization. The protein expression of Bax and Bcl-2 was determined using immunofluorescence analysis. In addition, the potential of EEAM to suppress the migration and invasion of colon cancer cells was also examined. EEAM exerted significant cytotoxic effects on HCT-116 and HT-29 cells as determined by MTT and LDH assays. After 24 h treatment, EEAM exhibited the IC₅₀ value of 11.43 ± 1.87 µg/ml and 8.98 ± 1.24 µg/ml against HT-29 and HCT-116 cells, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and phosphatidylserine externalization confirming the induction of apoptosis. EEAM treatment caused excessive accumulation of ROS followed by disruption of MMP, cytochrome c leakage and activation of the initiator and executioner caspases in both colon cancer cells. Immunofluorescence analysis depicted the up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 proteins while treated with EEAM. Furthermore, EEAM conspicuously blocked the migration and invasion of HT-29 and HCT-116 cells. These

  18. Characterization of the N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (NI3C)–Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neave, Antje S.; Sarup, Sussi; Seidelin, Michel

    2005-01-01

    of cellular proliferation, NI3C caused an accumulation of HCT-116 cells in the G2/M phase, in contrast to I3C, which led to an accumulation of the colon cells in G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, NI3C delays the G1-S phase transition of synchronized HCT-116 cells. The indole-mediated cell-cycle arrest may be related......Recent results have shown that indole-3-carbinol (I3C) inhibits the cellular growth of human cancer cell lines. In some cruciferous vegetables, another indole, N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (NI3C), is found beside I3C. Knowledge about the biological effects of NI3C is limited. The aim of the present...... study was to show the effect of NI3C on cell growth of two human colon cancer cell lines, DLD-1 and HCT-116. For the first time it is shown that NI3C inhibits cellular growth of DLD-1 and HCT-116 and that NI3C is a more potent inhibitor of cell proliferation than I3C. In addition to the inhibition...

  19. Comparative effects of RRR-alpha- and RRR-gamma-tocopherol on proliferation and apoptosis in human colon cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Devin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mediterranean societies, with diets rich in vitamin E isoforms, have a lower risk for colon cancer than those of northern Europe and the Americas. Vitamin E rich diets may neutralize free radicals generated by fecal bacteria in the gut and prevent DNA damage, but signal transduction activities can occur independent of the antioxidant function. The term vitamin E represents eight structurally related compounds, each differing in their potency and mechanisms of chemoprevention. The RRR-γ-tocopherol isoform is found primarily in the US diet, while RRR-α-tocopherol is highest in the plasma. Methods The effectiveness of RRR-α- and RRR-γ-tocopherol at inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis in colon cancer cell lines with varying molecular characteristics (SW480, HCT-15, HCT-116 and HT-29 and primary colon cells (CCD-112CoN, nontransformed normal phenotype was studied. Colon cells were treated with and without RRR-α- or RRR-γ-tocopherol using varying tocopherol concentrations and time intervals. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured using the trypan blue assay, annexin V staining, DNA laddering and caspase activation. Results Treatment with RRR-γ-tocopherol resulted in significant cell death for all cancer cell lines tested, while RRR-α-tocopherol did not. Further, RRR-γ-tocopherol treatment showed no cytotoxicity to normal colon cells CCD-112CoN at the highest concentration and time point tested. RRR-γ-tocopherol treatment resulted in cleavage of PARP, caspase 3, 7, and 8, but not caspase 9. Differences in the percentage cell death and apoptosis were observed in different cell lines suggesting that molecular differences in these cell lines may influence the ability of RRR-γ-tocopherol to induce cell death. Conclusion This is the first study to demonstrate that multiple colon cancer cell lines containing varying genetic alterations will under go growth reduction and apoptosis in the presence of RRR

  20. EZH2 regulates cofilin activity and colon cancer cell migration by targeting ITGA2 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Ferraro

    Full Text Available Reorganization of cytoskeleton via actin remodeling is a basic step of cell locomotion. Although cell migration of normal and cancer cells can be stimulated by a variety of intra- and extra-cellular factors, all paths ultimate on the regulation of cofilin activity. Cofilin is a small actin-binding protein able to bind both forms of actin, globular and filament, and is regulated by phosphorylation at Serine 3. Following phosphorylation at serine 3 cofilin is inactive, therefore cannot bind actin molecules and cytoskeleton remodeling is impaired. The histone methyltransferase EZH2 is frequently over expressed in many tumour types including colorectal cancer (CRC. EZH2 over activity, which results in epigenetic gene-silencing, has been associated with many tumour properties including invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis but little is known about the underneath molecular mechanisms. Herein, we report that EZH2 is able to control cofilin activity and consequently cell locomotion of CRC cell lines through a non-conventional novel axis that involves integrin signaling. Indeed, we show how genetic and pharmacological inhibition (DZNep and GSK343 of EZH2 function produces hyper phosphorylation of cofilin and reduces cell migration. We previously demonstrated by chromatin immuno-precipitation that Integrin alpha 2 (ITGα2 expression is regulated by EZH2. In the present study we provide evidence that in EZH2-silenced cells the signaling activity of the de-repressed ITGα2 is able to increase cofilin phosphorylation, which in turn reduces cell migration. This study also proposes novel mechanisms that might provide new anti-metastatic strategies for CRC treatment based on the inhibition of the epigenetic factor EZH2 and/or its target gene.

  1. Effects of Simulated Human Gastrointestinal Digestion of Two Purple-Fleshed Potato Cultivars on Anthocyanin Composition and Cytotoxicity in Colonic Cancer and Non-Tumorigenic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubow, Stan; Iskandar, Michèle M; Melgar-Bermudez, Emiliano; Sleno, Lekha; Sabally, Kebba; Azadi, Behnam; How, Emily; Prakash, Satya; Burgos, Gabriela; Felde, Thomas Zum

    2017-08-29

    A dynamic human gastrointestinal (GI) model was used to digest cooked tubers from purple-fleshed Amachi and Leona potato cultivars to study anthocyanin biotransformation in the stomach, small intestine and colonic vessels. Colonic Caco-2 cancer cells and non-tumorigenic colonic CCD-112CoN cells were tested for cytotoxicity and cell viability after 24 h exposure to colonic fecal water (FW) digests (0%, 10%, 25%, 75% and 100% FW in culture media). After 24 h digestion, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identified 36 and 15 anthocyanin species throughout the GI vessels for Amachi and Leona, respectively. The total anthocyanin concentration was over thirty-fold higher in Amachi compared to Leona digests but seven-fold higher anthocyanin concentrations were noted for Leona versus Amachi in descending colon digests. Leona FW showed greater potency to induce cytotoxicity and decrease viability of Caco-2 cells than observed with FW from Amachi. Amachi FW at 100% caused cytotoxicity in non-tumorigenic cells while FW from Leona showed no effect. The present findings indicate major variations in the pattern of anthocyanin breakdown and release during digestion of purple-fleshed cultivars. The differing microbial anthocyanin metabolite profiles in colonic vessels between cultivars could play a significant role in the impact of FW toxicity on tumor and non-tumorigenic cells.

  2. Genistein inhibits proliferation of colon cancer cells by attenuating a negative effect of epidermal growth factor on tumor suppressor FOXO3 activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasland Kaarin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soy consumption is associated with a lower incidence of colon cancer which is believed to be mediated by one of its of components, genistein. Genistein may inhibit cancer progression by inducing apoptosis or inhibiting proliferation, but mechanisms are not well understood. Epidermal growth factor (EGF-induced proliferation of colon cancer cells plays an important role in colon cancer progression and is mediated by loss of tumor suppressor FOXO3 activity. The aim of this study was to assess if genistein exerts anti-proliferative properties by attenuating the negative effect of EGF on FOXO3 activity. Methods The effect of genistein on proliferation stimulated by EGF-mediated loss of FOXO3 was examined in human colonic cancer HT-29 cells. EGF-induced FOXO3 phosphorylation and translocation were assessed in the presence of genistein. EGF-mediated loss of FOXO3 interactions with p53 (co-immunoprecipitation and promoter of p27kip1 (ChIP assay were examined in presence of genistein in cells with mutated p53 (HT-29 and wild type p53 (HCT116. Silencing of p53 determined activity of FOXO3 when it is bound to p53. Results Genistein inhibited EGF-induced proliferation, while favoring dephosphorylation and nuclear retention of FOXO3 (active state in colon cancer cells. Upstream of FOXO3, genistein acts via the PI3K/Akt pathway to inhibit EGF-stimulated FOXO3 phosphorylation (i.e. favors active state. Downstream, EGF-induced disassociation of FOXO3 from mutated tumor suppressor p53, but not wild type p53, is inhibited by genistein favoring FOXO3-p53(mut interactions with the promoter of the cell cycle inhibitor p27kip1 in colon cancer cells. Thus, the FOXO3-p53(mut complex leads to elevated p27kip1 expression and promotes cell cycle arrest. Conclusion These novel anti-proliferative mechanisms of genistein suggest a possible role of combining genistein with other chemoreceptive agents for the treatment of colon cancer.

  3. Glycoalkaloids and metabolites inhibit the growth of human colon (HT29) and liver (HepG2) cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kap-Rang; Kozukue, Nobuyuki; Han, Jae-Sook; Park, Joon-Hong; Chang, Eun-Young; Baek, Eun-Jung; Chang, Jong-Sun; Friedman, Mendel

    2004-05-19

    As part of an effort to improve plant-derived foods such as potatoes, eggplants, and tomatoes, the antiproliferative activities against human colon (HT29) and liver (HepG2) cancer cells of a series of structurally related individual compounds were examined using a microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The objective was to assess the roles of the carbohydrate side chain and aglycon part of Solanum glycosides in influencing inhibitory activities of these compounds. Evaluations were carried out with four concentrations each (0.1, 1, 10, and 100 microg/mL) of the the potato trisaccharide glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine; the disaccharides beta(1)-chaconine, beta(2)-chaconine, and beta(2)-solanine; the monosaccharide gamma-chaconine and their common aglycon solanidine; the tetrasaccharide potato glycoalkaloid dehydrocommersonine; the potato aglycon demissidine; the tetrasaccharide tomato glycoalkaloid alpha-tomatine, the trisaccharide beta(1)-tomatine, the disaccharide gamma-tomatine, the monosaccharide delta-tomatine, and their common aglycon tomatidine; the eggplant glycoalkaloids solamargine and solasonine and their common aglycon solasodine; and the nonsteroidal alkaloid jervine. All compounds were active in the assay, with the glycoalkaloids being the most active and the hydrolysis products less so. The effectiveness against the liver cells was greater than against the colon cells. Potencies of alpha-tomatine and alpha-chaconine at a concentration of 1 microg/mL against the liver carcinoma cells were higher than those observed with the anticancer drugs doxorubicin and camptothecin. Because alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, and alpha-tomatine also inhibited normal human liver HeLa (Chang) cells, safety considerations should guide the use of these compounds as preventative or therapeutic treatments against carcinomas.

  4. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  5. Hypofractionated Irradiation Has Immune Stimulatory Potential and Induces a Timely Restricted Infiltration of Immune Cells in Colon Cancer Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Benjamin; Rückert, Michael; Weber, Julia; Mayr, Xaver; Derer, Anja; Lotter, Michael; Bert, Christoph; Rödel, Franz; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.

    2017-01-01

    In addition to locally controlling the tumor, hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) particularly aims to activate immune cells in the RT-modified microenvironment. Therefore, we examined whether hypofractionated RT can activate dendritic cells (DCs), induce immune cell infiltration in tumors, and how the chronology of immune cell migration into tumors occurs to gain knowledge for future definition of radiation breaks and inclusion of immunotherapy. Colorectal cancer treatments offer only limited survival benefit, and immunobiological principles for additional therapies need to be explored with preclinical models. The impact of hypofractionated RT on CT26 colon cancer tumor cell death, migration of DCs toward supernatants (SN) of tumor cells, and activation of DCs by SN were analyzed. The subcutaneous tumor of a BALB/c-CT26 mouse model was locally irradiated with 2 × 5 Gy, the tumor volume was monitored, and the infiltration of immune cells in the tumor was determined by flow cytometry daily. Hypofractionated RT induced a mixture of apoptotic and necrotic CT26 cells, which is known to be in particular immunogenic. DCs that migrated toward SN of CT26 cells particularly upregulated the activation markers CD80 and CD86 when in contact with SN of irradiated tumor cells. After hypofractionated RT, the tumor outgrowth was significantly retarded and in the irradiated tumors an increased infiltration of macrophages (CD11bhigh/F4-80+) and DCs (MHC-II+), but only between day 5 and 10 after the first irradiation, takes place. While CD4+ T cells migrated into non-irradiated and irradiated tumors, CD8+ T cells were only found in tumors that had been irradiated and they were highly increased at day 8 after the first irradiation. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells show regular turnover in irradiated and non-irradiated tumors. Tumor cell-specific anti-IgM antibodies were enhanced in the serum of animals with irradiated tumors. We conclude that

  6. DHA induces ER stress and growth arrest in human colon cancer cells: associations with cholesterol and calcium homeostasis *s⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Caroline Hild; Størvold, Gro Leite; Bremseth, Hilde; Follestad, Turid; Sand, Kristin; Mack, Merete; Olsen, Karina Standahl; Lundemo, Anne Gøril; Iversen, Jens Gustav; Krokan, Hans Einar; Schønberg, Svanhild Arentz

    2008-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are normal constituents of the diet, but have properties different from other fatty acids (e.g., through generation of signaling molecules). N-3 PUFAs reduce cancer cell growth, but no unified mechanism has been identified. We show that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3) causes extensive changes in gene expression patterns at mRNA level in the colon cancer cell line SW620. Early changes include unfolded protein response (UPR) and increased levels of phosphorylated eIF2α as verified at protein level. The latter is considered a hallmark of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and is abundantly present already after 3 h. It may coordinate many of the downstream changes observed, including signaling pathways for cell cycle arrest/apoptosis, calcium homeostasis, cholesterol metabolism, ubiquitination, and proteasomal degradation. Also, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), but not oleic acid (OA), induced key mediators of ER stress and UPR at protein level. Accumulation of esterified cholesterol was not compensated for by increased total levels of cholesterol, and mRNAs for cholesterol biosynthesis as well as de novo synthesis of cholesterol were reduced. These results suggest that cytotoxic effects of DHA are associated with signaling pathways involving lipid metabolism and ER stress. PMID:18566476

  7. Functional identification of a novel transcript variant of INPP4B in human colon and breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Amanda; Guo, Su Tang; Sherwin, Simonne; Farrelly, Margaret; Yan, Xu Guang; Zhang, Xu Dong; Jiang, Chen Chen

    2017-03-25

    The 4-phosphatase Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase II (INPP4B) is a regulator of the PI3K signalling pathway and functions to suppress or promote activation of downstream kinases depending on cell type and context. Here we report the identification of a novel small transcript variant of INPP4B (INPP4B-S) that has a role in promoting proliferation of colon and breast cancer cells. INPP4B-S differed from full length INPP4B (INPP4B-FL) by the insertion of a small exon between exons 15 and 16 and the deletion of exons 20-24. Nevertheless, INPP4B-S retained all the functional domains of INPP4B-FL and was similarly located to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of INPP4B-S increased, whereas selective knockdown of INPP4B-S reduced the rate of proliferation in HCT116 and MCF-7 cells. These results warrant further investigation of the role INPP4B-S in activation of downstream kinases and in regulation of cancer pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Maintenance of the stemness in CD44+ HCT-15 and HCT-116 human colon cancer cells requires miR-203 suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sy-Yeuan Ju

    2014-01-01

    Taken together, CD44 is a critical molecule for modulating stemness in CSCs. More importantly, we show for the first time that the downregulation of miR-203 by HA/CD44 signaling is the main reason for stemness-maintenance in colon cancer cells.

  9. T-cell evaluation in patients with colon cancer : Dinitrochlorobenzene skin testing versus plasma levels of sIL-2r and sCD8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, WA; de Ley, L; Oeseburg, HB; Martens, A; Mulder, NH; Hermans, J; Plukker, JT

    1998-01-01

    Background: Developing reliable methods to test the T-cell system may be important in the treatment of colon cancer patients with 5-fluorouracil/levamisole. In a pilot study we explored whether DNCB (dinitrochlorobenzene) skin testing correlated with plasma levels of soluble inter leukin-2 receptor

  10. Hericium erinaceus (Lion's Mane) mushroom extracts inhibit metastasis of cancer cells to the lung in CT-26 colon cancer-tansplanted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Phil; Nam, Seok Hyun; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-05-22

    This study investigated the antimetastatic activity of four Hericium erinaceus edible mushroom extracts using CT-26 murine colon carcinoma cells as an indicator of inhibition of cell migration to the lung. Hot water (HWE) and microwaved 50% ethanol (MWE) extracts of H. erinaceus strongly elicited cancer cell death through apoptosis and inhibited metastasis of cancer cells to the lungs by 66% and 69%, respectively. HWE and MWE reduced the expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in cells and their activities in culture media. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), another extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading proteinase, also showed decreased protein expression. In CT-26 cells, HWE and MWE down-regulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylations. The reduced phosphorylations seem to cause reduction of activity of the MMPs, thereby blocking migration and invasion of cells. Dietary administration of HWE and MWE reduced the formation of tumor nodules in the lung by about 50% and 55%, respectively, and prevented increases in lung weight caused by cancer cell metastasis. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of HWE and MWE as beneficial antimetastatic agents, targeting their upstream signaling molecules for mediating the expression of the ECM-degrading proteinases. Acidic and alkaline extracts were not bioactive. Bioactivity seems to be related to composition. H. erinaceus edible mushrooms have the potential to serve as a health-promoting functional food.

  11. miR-6734 Up-Regulates p21 Gene Expression and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo Rim Kang

    Full Text Available Recently, microRNAs have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression in terms of both gene silencing and gene activation. Here, we investigated the effects of miR-6734, which has a sequence homology with a specific region of p21WAF1/CIP1 (p21 promoter, on cancer cell growth and the mechanisms involved in this effect. miR-6734 up-regulated p21 expression at both mRNA and protein levels and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis using biotin-labeled miR-6734 confirmed the association of miR-6734 with p21 promoter. Moreover, miR-6734 inhibited cancer cell growth and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HCT-116 cells, which was abolished by knockdown of p21. The phosphorylation of Rb and the cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP were suppressed by miR-6734 transfection in HCT-116 cells and these effects were also reversed by p21 knockdown. In addition, miR-6734 transfection caused prolonged induction of p21 gene and modification of histones in p21 promoter, which are typical aspects of a phenomenon referred to as RNA activation (RNAa. Collectively, our results demonstrated that miR-6734 inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells by up-regulating p21 gene expression and subsequent induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting its role as an important endogenous regulator of cancer cell proliferation and survival.

  12. Human NK cells selective targeting of colon cancer-initiating cells: A role for natural cytotoxicity receptors and MHC class i molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Tallerico, Rossana

    2013-01-23

    Tumor cell populations have been recently proposed to be composed of two compartments: tumor-initiating cells characterized by a slow and asymmetrical growth, and the "differentiated" cancer cells with a fast and symmetrical growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells (CICs) play a crucial role in tumor recurrence. The resistance of CICs to drugs and irradiation often allows them to survive traditional therapy. NK cells are potent cytotoxic lymphocytes that can recognize tumor cells. In this study, we have analyzed the NK cell recognition of tumor target cells derived from the two cancer cell compartments of colon adenocarcinoma lesions. Our data demonstrate that freshly purified allogeneic NK cells can recognize and kill colorectal carcinoma- derived CICs whereas the non-CIC counterpart of the tumors (differentiated tumor cells), either autologous or allogeneic, is less susceptible to NK cells. This difference in the NK cell susceptibility correlates with higher expression on CICs of ligands for NKp30 and NKp44 in the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) group of activating NK receptors. In contrast, CICs express lower levels of MHC class I, known to inhibit NK recognition, on their surface than do the "differentiated" tumor cells. These data have been validated by confocal microscopy where NCR ligands and MHC class I molecule membrane distribution have been analyzed. Moreover, NK cell receptor blockade in cytotoxicity assays demonstrates that NCRs play a major role in the recognition of CIC targets. This study strengthens the idea that biology-based therapy harnessing NK cells could be an attractive opportunity in solid tumors. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High nitric oxide production, secondary to inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, is essential for regulation of the tumour-initiating properties of colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Cenciarelli, Carlo; Tesori, Valentina; Cappellari, Marianna; Martini, Maurizio; Di Francesco, Angela Maria; Giorda, Ezio; Carsetti, Rita; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Chronic inflammation is a leading cause of neoplastic transformation in many human cancers and especially in colon cancer (CC), in part due to tumour promotion by nitric oxide (NO) generated at inflammatory sites. It has also been suggested that high NO synthesis, secondary to inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression, is a distinctive feature of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small subset of tumour cells with self-renewal capacity. In this study we explored the contribution of NO to the development of colon CSC features and evaluated potential strategies to treat CC by modulating NO production. Our data show an integral role for endogenous NO and iNOS activity in the biology of colon CSCs. Indeed, colon CSCs with high endogenous NO production (NO(high)) displayed higher tumourigenic abilities than NO(low) fractions. The blockade of endogenous NO availability, using either a specific iNOS inhibitor or a genetic knock-down of iNOS, resulted in a significant reduction of colon CSC tumourigenic capacities in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, analysis of genes altered by iNOS-directed shRNA showed that the knockdown of iNOS expression was associated with a significant down-regulation of signalling pathways involved in stemness and tumour progression in colon CSCs. These findings confirm that endogenous NO plays an important role in defining the stemness properties of colon CSCs through cross-regulation of several cellular signalling pathways. This discovery could shed light on the mechanisms by which NO induces the growth and invasiveness of CC, providing new insights into the link between inflammation and colon tumourigenesis. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The TF-antigen binding lectin from Sclerotium rolfsii inhibits growth of human colon cancer cells by inducing apoptosis in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamdar, Shashikala R; Savanur, Mohammed Azharuddin; Eligar, Sachin M; Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Nagre, Nagaraja N; Chen, Chen; Barclays, Monica; Ingle, Aravind; Mahajan, Praveen; Borges, Anita; Shastry, Padma; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Swamy, Bale M; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Yu, Lu-Gang

    2012-09-01

    Glycan array analysis of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) revealed its exquisite binding specificity to the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-O-Ser/Thr, T or TF) antigen and its derivatives. This study shows that SRL strongly inhibits the growth of human colon cancer HT29 and DLD-1 cells by binding to cell surface glycans and induction of apoptosis through both the caspase-8 and -9 mediated signaling. SRL showed no or very weak binding to normal human colon tissues but strong binding to cancerous and metastatic tissues. Intratumor injection of SRL at subtoxic concentrations in NOD-SCID mice bearing HT29 xenografts resulted in total tumor regression in 9 days and no subsequent tumor recurrence. As the increased expression of TF-associated glycans is commonly seen in human cancers, SRL has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for cancer.

  15. Ketogenic HMGCS2 Is a c-Myc target gene expressed in differentiated cells of human colonic epithelium and down-regulated in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Nuria; Mascaró, Cristina; Mayordomo, Cristina; Vilardell, Felip; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F

    2006-09-01

    HMGCS2, the gene that regulates ketone body production, is expressed in liver and several extrahepatic tissues, such as the colon. In CaCo-2 colonic epithelial cells, the expression of this gene increases with cell differentiation. Accordingly, immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies shows that HMGCS2 is expressed mainly in differentiated cells of human colonic epithelium. Here, we used a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to study the molecular mechanism responsible for this expression pattern. The assay revealed that HMGCS2 is a direct target of c-Myc, which represses HMGCS2 transcriptional activity. c-Myc transrepression is mediated by blockade of the transactivating activity of Miz-1, which occurs mainly through a Sp1-binding site in the proximal promoter of the gene. Accordingly, the expression of human HMGCS2 is down-regulated in 90% of Myc-dependent colon and rectum tumors. HMGCS2 protein expression is down-regulated preferentially in moderately and poorly differentiated carcinomas. In addition, it is also down-regulated in 80% of small intestine Myc-independent tumors. Based on these findings, we propose that ketogenesis is an undesirable metabolic characteristic of the proliferating cell, which is down-regulated through c-Myc-mediated repression of the key metabolic gene HMGCS2.

  16. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P N; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  17. Potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria of human origin induce antiproliferation of colon cancer cells via synergic actions in adhesion to cancer cells and short-chain fatty acid bioproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirabunyanon, Mongkol; Hongwittayakorn, Penrat

    2013-01-01

    The activities and modes of probiotic action of lactic acid bacteria isolated from infant feces were investigated for alternative application in the prevention and biotherapy of colon cancer. From a total of 81 isolates of Gram-positive rod and cocci bacteria obtained from healthy infants, only 15 isolates had the probiotic criteria which included growth inhibition against eight food-borne pathogens, no blood hemolysis, and tolerance to gastrointestinal tract properties such as pH 2.5 and 0.3 % bile salt. Four probiotic bacteria showed antiproliferation of colon cancer cells with the use of MTT and Trypan blue exclusion assay at the rates of 17-35 %. Through comparison of probiotic 16S rRNA sequences, they were identified as Pediococcus pentosaceus FP3, Lactobacillus salivarius FP25, L. salivarius FP35, and Enterococcus faecium FP51. Finding the mechanism of proliferative inhibition of colon cancer cells in this study indicated synergic induction by probiotic bacteria directly adhered to these cancer cells and triggered the bioproduction of short-chain fatty acids, mainly butyric and propionic acids. This study suggested that the use of these probiotics may be suitable as an alternative bioprophylactic and biotherapeutic strategy for colon cancer.

  18. Induction of apoptosis in colon cancer cells treated with isorhamnetin glycosides from Opuntia ficus-indica pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes-Ricardo, Marilena; Moreno-García, Beatriz E; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Aráiz-Hernández, Diana; Alvarez, Mario M; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O

    2014-12-01

    (OFI) contains health-promoting compounds like flavonoids, being the isorhamnetin glycosides the most abundant. We evaluated the effect of OFI extracts with different isorhamnetin glycosides against two different human colon cancer cells (HT-29 and Caco2). The extracts were obtained by alkaline hydrolysis with NaOH at 40 °C during 15, 30 or 60 min. Tri and diglycosides were the most abundant isorhamnetin glycosides, therefore these compounds were isolated to compare their cytotoxic effect with the obtained from the extracts. The OFI extracts and purified isorhamnetin glycosides were more cytotoxic against HT-29 cells than Caco2 cells. OFI-30 exhibited the lowest IC50 value against HT-29 (4.9 ± 0.5 μg/mL) and against Caco2 (8.2 ± 0.3 μg/mL). Isorhamnetin diglycosides IG5 and IG6 were more cytotoxic than pure isorhamnetin aglycone or triglycosides when they were tested in HT-29 cells. Bioluminescent analysis revealed increased activity of caspase 3/7 in OFI extracts-treated cells, particularly for the extract with the highest concentration of isorhamnetin triglycosides. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that OFI extract and isorhamnetin glycosides induced a higher percentage of apoptosis in HT-29 than in Caco2, while isorhamnetin was more apoptotic in Caco2. This research demonstrated that glycosilation affected antiproliferative effect of pure isorhamnetin glycosides or when they are mixed with other phytochemicals in an extract obtained from OFI.

  19. Oxidative stress and inhibition of nitric oxide generation underlie methotrexate-induced senescence in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, Magdalena; Uram, Lukasz; Zielinski, Zbigniew; Rode, Wojciech; Sikora, Ewa

    2017-07-21

    The response of human colon cancer C85 cells to methotrexate takes the form of reversible growth arrest of the type of stress-induced senescence. In the present study it is shown that during C85 cell progression into methotrexate-induced senescence, dihydrofolate reductase, the primary intracellular target for the drug, is stabilized at the protein level and its enzymatic activity, assayed in crude cellular extracts, decreases by 2-fold. Dihydrofolate reductase inhibition results in an increase in dihydrobiopterin level and an ultimate decrease in the tetrahydrobiopterin: dihydrobiopterin ratio in senescent cells. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression declines. Despite concomitant upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, no nitric oxide generation in senescent cells is detected. Progressing oxidative stress accompanies establishment of the state of senescence. DNA damage, in the form of double strand-breaks, occurs at the highest level at the senescence initiation phase and decreases as cells progress into the senescence maintenance phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Strawberry-Tree Honey Induces Growth Inhibition of Human Colon Cancer Cells and Increases ROS Generation: A Comparison with Manuka Honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Sadia; Forbes-Hernandez, Tamara Y; Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Bompadre, Stefano; Quiles, José L; Sanna, Gavino; Spano, Nadia; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio

    2017-03-11

    Honey is a natural product known to modulate several biological activities including cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the phytochemical content and the antioxidant activity of Strawberry tree ( Arbutus unedo ) honey (STH) and its cytotoxic properties against human colon adenocarcinoma (HCT-116) and metastatic (LoVo) cell lines in comparison with Manuka ( Leptospermum scoparium ) honey (MH). Several unifloral STH and MH were analyzed for their phenolic, flavonoid, amino acid and protein contents, as well as their radical scavenging activities. STH from the Berchidda area showed the highest amount of phenolic, flavonoid, amino acid and protein content, and antioxidant capacity compared to MH. Both STH and MH induced cytotoxicity and cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HCT-116 and LoVo cells, with less toxicity on non-cancer cells. Compared to MH, STH showed more effect at lower concentrations on HCT-116 and LoVo cells. In addition, both honeys increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In HCT-116 cells, STH and MH induced similar ROS production but in LoVo cells STH induced a higher percentage of ROS compared to MH. Our results indicate that STH and MH can induce cell growth inhibition and ROS generation in colon adenocarcinoma and metastatic cells, which could be due to the presence of phytochemicals with antioxidant properties. These preliminary results are interesting and suggest a potential chemopreventive action which could be useful for further studies in order to develop chemopreventive agents for colon cancer.

  1. Evaluation of melphalan, oxaliplatin, and paclitaxel in colon, liver, and gastric cancer cell lines in a short-term exposure model of chemosaturation therapy by percutaneous hepatic perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzgare, Rajneesh P; Sheets, Timothy P; Johnston, Daniel S

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether liver, gastric, or colonic cancer may be suitable targets for chemosaturation therapy with percutaneous hepatic perfusion (CS-PHP) and to assess the feasibility of utilizing other cytotoxic agents besides melphalan in the CS-PHP system. Forty human cell lines were screened against three cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. Specifically, the dose-dependent effect of melphalan, oxaliplatin, and paclitaxel on proliferation and apoptosis in each cell line was evaluated. These agents were also evaluated for their ability to induce apoptosis in normal primary human hepatocytes. A high-dose short-term drug exposure protocol was employed to simulate conditions encountered during CS-PHP. The average concentration of melphalan required for inducing significant apoptosis was 61 μM, or about 3-fold less than the theoretical concentration of 192 μM, achieved in the hepatic artery during CS-PHP dosing with melphalan. Additionally, we found that gastric cancer cell lines were 2-5 fold more sensitive to apoptosis than liver cancer cell lines to all three compounds, suggesting that in addition to colonic and gastric cancer metastases to the liver, primary gastric cancer may also be amenable to management by CS-PHP using an appropriate therapeutic agent. Significantly, at concentrations that are predicted using the CS-PHP system, these agents caused apoptosis of colonic, gastric, and liver cancer cells but were not toxic to primary human hepatocytes. The compounds tested are potential candidates for use in the CS-PHP system to treat patients with gastric and colonic metastases, and primary cancer of the liver.

  2. MYEOV (myeloma overexpressed gene) drives colon cancer cell migration and is regulated by PGE2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lawlor, Garrett

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have previously reported that Myeov (MYEloma OVerexpressed gene) expression is enhanced in colorectal cancer (CRC) and that it promotes CRC cell proliferation and invasion. The role of Myeov in CRC migration is unclear. ProstaglandinE2 (PGE 2) is a known factor in promoting CRC carcinogenesis. The role of PGE 2 in modulating Myeov expression has also not been defined. AIM: To assess the role of Myeov expression in CRC cell migration and to evaluate the role of PGE 2 in Myeov bioactivity. METHODS: siRNA mediated Myeov knockdown was achieved in T84 CRC cells. Knockdown was assessed using quantitative real time PCR. The effect of knockdown on CRC cell migration was assessed using a scratch wound healing assay. Separately, T84 cells were treated with PGE 2 (0.00025 micro M, 0.1 micro M and 1 micro M) from 30 min to 3 hours and the effect on Myeov gene expression was assessed using real time PCR. RESULTS: Myeov knockdown resulted in a significant reduction in CRC cell migration, observable as early as 12 hours (P < 0.05) with a 39% reduction compared to control at 36 hours (p < 0.01). Myeov expression was enhanced after treatment with PGE 2, with the greatest effect seen at 60 mins for all 3 PGE 2 doses. This response was dose dependent with a 290%, 550% & 1,000% increase in Myeov expression for 0.00025 micro M, 0.1 micro M and 1 micro M PGE 2 respectively. CONCLUSION: In addition to promoting CRC proliferation and invasion, our findings indicate that Myeov stimulates CRC cell migration, and its expression may be PGE 2 dependant.

  3. Myeov (myeloma overexpressed gene) drives colon cancer cell migration and is regulated by PGE2

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lawlor, Garrett

    2010-06-22

    Abstract Introduction We have previously reported that Myeov (MYEloma OVerexpressed gene) expression is enhanced in colorectal cancer (CRC) and that it promotes CRC cell proliferation and invasion. The role of Myeov in CRC migration is unclear. ProstaglandinE2 (PGE 2) is a known factor in promoting CRC carcinogenesis. The role of PGE 2 in modulating Myeov expression has also not been defined. Aim To assess the role of Myeov expression in CRC cell migration and to evaluate the role of PGE 2 in Myeov bioactivity. Methods siRNA mediated Myeov knockdown was achieved in T84 CRC cells. Knockdown was assessed using quantitative real time PCR. The effect of knockdown on CRC cell migration was assessed using a scratch wound healing assay. Separately, T84 cells were treated with PGE 2 (0.00025 μ M, 0.1 μ M and 1 μ M) from 30 min to 3 hours and the effect on Myeov gene expression was assessed using real time PCR. Results Myeov knockdown resulted in a significant reduction in CRC cell migration, observable as early as 12 hours (P < 0.05) with a 39% reduction compared to control at 36 hours (p < 0.01). Myeov expression was enhanced after treatment with PGE 2, with the greatest effect seen at 60 mins for all 3 PGE 2 doses. This response was dose dependent with a 290%, 550% & 1,000% increase in Myeov expression for 0.00025 μ M, 0.1 μ M and 1 μ M PGE 2 respectively. Conclusion In addition to promoting CRC proliferation and invasion, our findings indicate that Myeov stimulates CRC cell migration, and its expression may be PGE 2 dependant.

  4. Resveratrol suppresses IGF-1 induced human colon cancer cell proliferation and elevates apoptosis via suppression of IGF-1R/Wnt and activation of p53 signaling pathways

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    Radhakrishnan Sridhar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a global phenomenon and is associated with various types of cancer, including colon cancer. There is a growing interest for safe and effective bioactive compounds that suppress the risk for obesity-promoted colon cancer. Resveratrol (trans-3, 4', 5,-trihydroxystilbene, a stilbenoid found in the skin of red grapes and peanuts suppresses many types of cancers by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis through a variety of mechanisms, however, resveratrol effects on obesity-promoted colon cancer are not clearly established. Methods We investigated the anti-proliferative effects of resveratrol on HT-29 and SW480 human colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1; elevated during obesity and elucidated the mechanisms of action using IGF-1R siRNA in HT-29 cells which represents advanced colon carcinogenesis. Results Resveratrol (100-150 μM exhibited anti-proliferative properties in HT-29 cells even after IGF-1 exposure by arresting G0/G1-S phase cell cycle progression through p27 stimulation and cyclin D1 suppression. Treatment with resveratrol suppressed IGF-1R protein levels and concurrently attenuated the downstream Akt/Wnt signaling pathways that play a critical role in cell proliferation. Targeted suppression of IGF-1R using IGF-1R siRNA also affected these signaling pathways in a similar manner. Resveratrol treatment induced apoptosis by activating tumor suppressor p53 protein, whereas IGF-1R siRNA treatment did not affect apoptosis. Our data suggests that resveratrol not only suppresses cell proliferation by inhibiting IGF-1R and its downstream signaling pathways similar to that of IGF-1R siRNA but also enhances apoptosis via activation of the p53 pathway. Conclusions For the first time, we report that resveratrol suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation and elevates apoptosis even in the presence of IGF-1 via suppression of IGF-1R/Akt/Wnt signaling pathways and

  5. Betulinic acid inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and induces proteasome-dependent and -independent downregulation of specificity proteins (Sp transcription factors

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    Pathi Satya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Betulinic acid (BA inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines and tumors and the effects of BA have been attributed to its mitochondriotoxicity and inhibition of multiple pro-oncogenic factors. Previous studies show that BA induces proteasome-dependent degradation of specificity protein (Sp transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in prostate cancer cells and this study focused on the mechanism of action of BA in colon cancer cells. Methods The effects of BA on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis and tumor growth in vivo were determined using standardized assays. The effects of BA on Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analyzed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a and ZBTB10 mRNA expression. Results BA inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in RKO and SW480 colon cancer cells and inhibited tumor growth in athymic nude mice bearing RKO cells as xenograft. BA also decreased expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors which are overexpressed in colon cancer cells and decreased levels of several Sp-regulated genes including survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor, p65 sub-unit of NFκB, epidermal growth factor receptor, cyclin D1, and pituitary tumor transforming gene-1. The mechanism of action of BA was dependent on cell context, since BA induced proteasome-dependent and proteasome-independent downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in SW480 and RKO cells, respectively. In RKO cells, the mechanism of BA-induced repression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 was due to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, ROS-mediated repression of microRNA-27a, and induction of the Sp repressor gene ZBTB10. Conclusions These results suggest that the anticancer activity of BA in colon cancer cells is due, in part, to downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors; however, the mechanism of this response is cell context-dependent.

  6. Treating Colon Cancer Cells with FK228 Reveals a Link between Histone Lysine Acetylation and Extensive Changes in the Cellular Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tian-yun; Jia, Yan-long; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Qiu-li; Li, Yi-Chun; Zhang, Jun-he; Zhao, Chun-peng; Wang, Xiao-yin; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic value of FK228 as a cancer treatment option is well known, and various types of cancer have been shown to respond to this drug. However, the complete mechanism of FK228 and the affect it has on histone lysine acetylation and the colon cancer cell proteome are largely unknown. In the present study, we used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and affinity enrichment followed by high-resolution liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer (LC-MS)/MS analysis ...

  7. Antiproliferative activity and induction of apoptosis in human colon cancer cells treated in vitro with constituents of a product derived from Pistacia lentiscus L. var. chia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, K V; Prince, J; Han, Z; Dimas, K; Cladaras, M; Wyche, J H; Sitaras, N M; Pantazis, P

    2007-04-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that a 50% ethanol extract of the plant-derived product, Chios mastic gum (CMG), contains compounds which inhibit proliferation and induce death of HCT116 human colon cancer cells in vitro. CMG-treatment induces cell arrest at G(1), detachment of the cells from the substrate, activation of pro-caspases-8, -9 and -3, and causes several morphological changes typical of apoptosis in cell organelles. These events, furthermore, are time- and dose-dependent, but p53- and p21-independent. Apoptosis induction by CMG is not inhibited in HCT116 cell clones expressing high levels of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, or dominant-negative FADD, thereby indicating that CMG induces cell death via a yet-to-be identified pathway, unrelated to the death receptor- and mitochondrion-dependent pathways. The findings presented here suggest that CMG (a) induces an anoikis form of cell death in HCT116 colon cancer cells that includes events associated with caspase-dependent pathways; and (b) might be developed into a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon and other cancers.

  8. Right colon cancer: Left behind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervaz, P; Usel, M; Rapiti, E; Chappuis, P; Neyroud-Kaspar, I; Bouchardy, C

    2016-09-01

    Prognosis of colon cancer (CC) has steadily improved during the past three decades. This trend, however, may vary according to proximal (right) or distal (left) tumor location. We studied if improvement in survival was greater for left than for right CC. We included all CC recorded at the Geneva population-based registry between 1980 and 2006. We compared patients, tumor and treatment characteristics between left and right CC by logistic regression and compared CC specific survival by Cox models taking into account putative confounders. We also compared changes in survival between CC location in early and late years of observation. Among the 3396 CC patients, 1334 (39%) had right-sided and 2062 (61%) left-sided tumors. In the early 1980s, 5-year specific survival was identical for right and left CCs (49% vs. 48%). During the study period, a dramatic improvement in survival was observed for patients with left-sided cancers (Hazard ratio [HR]: 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.29-0.62, p colon cancer patients, those with right-sided lesions have by far the worse prognosis. Change of strategic management in this subgroup is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Resveratrol suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via targeting the pentose phosphate and the talin-FAK signaling pathways-A proteomic approach

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    Reddivari Lavanya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have previously reported that resveratrol (RSV suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation and elevates apoptosis in vitro and/or in vivo, however molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Particularly, little information is available on RSV's effects on metabolic pathways and the cell-extra cellular matrix (ECM communication that are critical for cancer cell growth. To identify important targets of RSV, we analyzed whole protein fractions from HT-29 advanced human colon cancer cell line treated with solvent control, IGF-1 (10 nM and RSV (150 μM using LC/MS/MS-Mud PIT (Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology. Results Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, a vital metabolic pathway for cell cycle progression, was elevated and suppressed by IGF-1 and RSV, respectively in the HT-29 cell line. Enzymatic assays confirmed RSV suppression of glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (rate limiting and transketolase, key enzymes of the PPP. RSV (150 μM suppressed, whereas IGF-1 (10 nM elevated focal adhesion complex (FAC proteins, talin and pFAK, critical for the cell-ECM communication. Western blotting analyses confirmed the suppression or elevation of these proteins in HT-29 cancer cells treated with RSV or IGF-1, respectively. Conclusions Proteomic analysis enabled us to establish PPP and the talin-pFAK as targets of RSV which suppress cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in the colon cancer cell line HT-29. RSV (150 μM suppressed these pathways in the presence and absence of IGF-1, suggesting its role as a chemo-preventive agent even in obese condition.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide-releasing naproxen suppresses colon cancer cell growth and inhibits NF-κB signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodela R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ravinder Kodela,1 Niharika Nath,2 Mitali Chattopadhyay,1 Diandra E Nesbitt,1 Carlos A Velázquez-Martínez,3 Khosrow Kashfi11Department of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City University of New York Medical School, 2Department of Life Sciences, New York Institute of Technology, New York, NY, USA; 3Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of death due to cancer and the third most common cancer in men and women in the USA. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB is known to be activated in CRC and is strongly implicated in its development and progression. Therefore, activated NF-κB constitutes a bona fide target for drug development in this type of malignancy. Many epidemiological and interventional studies have established nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs as a viable chemopreventive strategy against CRC. Our previous studies have shown that several novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing NSAIDs are promising anticancer agents and are safer derivatives of NSAIDs. In this study, we examined the growth inhibitory effect of a novel H2S-releasing naproxen (HS-NAP, which has a repertoire as a cardiovascular-safe NSAID, for its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle phase transitions, and apoptosis using HT-29 human colon cancer cells. We also investigated its effect as a chemopreventive agent in a xenograft mouse model. HS-NAP suppressed the growth of HT-29 cells by induction of G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis and downregulated NF-κB. Tumor xenografts in mice were significantly reduced in volume. The decrease in tumor mass was associated with a reduction of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and decreases in NF-κB levels in vivo. Therefore, HS-NAP demonstrates strong anticancer potential in CRC. Keywords: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cell cycle, apoptosis, xenograft, NF

  11. Methanolic extract of Boswellia serrata exhibits anti-cancer activities by targeting microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbarnejad, Tayebeh; Saidijam, Massoud; Moradkhani, Shirin; Najafi, Rezvan

    2017-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cancer. A proper method to reduce mortality of CRC is chemoprevention to prevent initiation and promotion of intestinal tumorgenesis. One of the promising and developing chemopreventive agents is natural compounds found in plants. Frankincense, the resin extract from the Boswellia specious, has been used in traditional and modern medicine for treating various diseases with very minimal side effects. In the current study, we investigated the anti-cancer activity of methanolic extract of Boswellia serrata (B. serrata) on HT-29 human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were treated with different concentrations of B. serrata and cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. mRNA expression of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) were examined by quantitative real-time PCR. Apoptosis was evaluated by the proportion of sub-G1 cells. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level and caspase 3 activity were determined by ELISA assay. Tube formation potential and HT-29 cells migration were assessed using three-dimensional vessel formation assay and scratch test. B. serrata extract considerably decreased the expression of mPGES-1, VEGF, CXCR4, MMP-2, MMP-9 and HIF-1. The caspase 3 activity and percent of cells in sub-G1 phase were increased by B. serrata extract. Cell viability, PGE2 generation, in vitro tube formation and cell migration were decreased significantly in B. serrata-treated HT-29 compared to the control group. Our findings suggest that B. serrata extract inhibits proliferation, angiogenesis and migration and induces apoptosis in HT-29 cells by inhibiting of mPGES-1 and decreasing the PGE2 level and its downstream targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cell Growth Inhibition Effect of DsiRNA Vectorised by Pectin-Coated Chitosan-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites as Potential Therapy for Colon Cancer

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    Haliza Katas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic-targeted drug delivery system is widely explored to combat colon-related diseases such as colon cancer. Dicer-substrate small interfering RNA (DsiRNA has been explored for cancer therapy due to its potency in targeting specific gene of interest. However, its application is limited by rapid degradation and poor cellular uptake. To address this, chitosan-graphene oxide (CS-GO nanocomposite was used to deliver DsiRNA effectively into cells. Additionally, pectin was used as compatibilization agent to allow specific delivery to the colon and protect the nanocomposites from the harsh environment in the stomach and small intestine. CS-GO-DsiRNA nanocomposites were prepared by electrostatic interaction between CS and GO prior to coating with pectin. The mean particle size of CS-GO-DsiRNA-pectin nanocomposites was 554.5±124.6 nm with PDI and zeta potential of 0.47±0.19 and −10.7±3.0 mV, respectively. TEM analysis revealed smooth and spherical shape of CS-GO-DsiRNA nanocomposites and the shape became irregular after pectin coating. FTIR analysis further confirmed the successful formation of CS-GO-DsiRNA-pectin nanocomposites. Furthermore, the nanocomposites were able to entrap high amount of DsiRNA (% entrapment efficiency of 92.6±3.9% with strong binding efficiency. CS-GO-DsiRNA-pectin nanocomposites also selectively inhibited cell growth of colon cancer cell line (Caco-2 cells and were able to decrease VEGF level significantly. In a nutshell, pectin-coated DsiRNA-loaded CS-GO nanocomposites were successfully developed and they have a great potential to deliver DsiRNA to the colon effectively.

  13. A new clerodane furano diterpene glycoside from Tinospora cordifolia triggers autophagy and apoptosis in HCT-116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, P R; Qayum, Arem; Singh, Shashank K; Dutt, Prabhu; Paul, Satya; Gupta, Vivek; Verma, M K; Satti, N K; Vishwakarma, R

    2018-01-30

    treatment of colon cancer. The overall study on the bioassay guided isolation of T.cordifolia identified and isolated a new clerodane furano diterpenoid that exhibited anticancer activity via induction of mitochondria mediated apoptosis and autophagy in HCT116 cells. We have reported a promising future candidate for treating colon cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sp1 is a transcription repressor to stanniocalcin-1 expression in TSA-treated human colon cancer cells, HT29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Alice Y S; Yeung, B H Y; Ching, L Y; Wong, Chris K C

    2011-08-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that, stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) was a target of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and was involved in trichostatin A (TSA) induced apoptosis in the human colon cancer cells, HT29. In this study, we reported that the transcriptional factor, specificity protein 1 (Sp1) in association with retinoblastoma (Rb) repressed STC1 gene transcription in TSA-treated HT29 cells. Our data demonstrated that, a co-treatment of the cells with TSA and Sp1 inhibitor, mithramycin A (MTM) led to a marked synergistic induction of STC1 transcript levels, STC1 promoter (1 kb)-driven luciferase activity and an increase of apoptotic cell population. The knockdown of Sp1 gene expression in TSA treated cells, revealed the repressor role of Sp1 in STC1 transcription. Using a protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA), an increase of Sp1 hyperphosphorylation and so a reduction of its transcriptional activity, led to a significant induction of STC1 gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that Sp1 binding on STC1 proximal promoter in TSA treated cells. The binding of Sp1 to STC1 promoter was abolished by the co-treatment of MTM or OKA in TSA-treated cells. Re-ChIP assay illustrated that Sp1-mediated inhibition of STC1 transcription was associated with the recruitment of another repressor molecule, Rb. Collectively our findings identify STC1 is a downstream target of Sp1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Induction of cell differentiation activates transcription of the Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum calcium-ATPase 3 gene (ATP2A3) in gastric and colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Peredo, Lucía; Rodríguez, Gabriela; Zarain-Herzberg, Angel

    2017-02-01

    The Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ -ATPases (SERCAs), pump Ca2+ into the endoplasmic reticulum lumen modulating cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations to regulate various cellular processes including cell growth. Previous studies have reported a downregulation of SERCA3 protein expression in gastric and colon cancer cell lines and showed that in vitro cell differentiation increases its expression. However, little is known about the transcriptional mechanisms and transcription factors that regulate SERCA3 expression in epithelial cancer cells. In this work, we demonstrate that SERCA3 mRNA is upregulated up to 45-fold in two epithelial cancer cell lines, KATO-III and Caco-2, induced to differentiate with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and by cell confluence, respectively. To evaluate the transcriptional elements responding to the differentiation stimuli, we cloned the human ATP2A3 promoter, generated deletion constructs and transfected them into KATO-III cells. Basal and differentiation responsive DNA elements were located by functional analysis within the first -135 bp of the promoter region. Using site-directed mutagenesis and DNA-protein binding assays we found that Sp1, Sp3, and Klf-4 transcription factors bind to ATP2A3 proximal promoter elements and regulate basal gene expression. We showed that these factors participated in the increase of ATP2A3 expression during cancer cell differentiation. This study provides evidence for the first time that Sp1, Sp3, and Klf-4 transcriptionally modulate the expression of SERCA3 during induction of epithelial cancer cell differentiation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effect of resistant starch on potential biomarkers for colonic cancer risk patients with colonic adenomas : A controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubben, M. J A L; van den Braak, C.C.M.; Essenberg, M.; Olthof, M.; Tangerman, A.; Katan, M. B.; Nagengast, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    Resistant starch decreases the concentration of secondary bile acids in the feces and the proliferation rate of colonic mucosal cells in healthy volunteers. This may reduce the risk of colon cancer. We investigated 23 patients with recently removed colonic adenoma(s) in a controlled parallel trial.

  17. BRAFV600E Efficient Transformation and Induction of Microsatellite Instability Versus KRASG12V Induction of Senescence Markers in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftychia Oikonomou

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In colorectal cancer, BRAF and KRAS oncogenes are mutated in about 15% and 35% respectively at approximately the same stage of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Since these two mutations rarely coexist, further analysis to dissect their function of transformation in colon cancer is required. Caco-2 human colon adenocarcinoma cells were stably transfected with BRAFV600E (Caco-BR cells or KRASG12V (Caco-K cells oncogenes. BRAFV600E is more efficient in transforming Caco-2 cells and altering their morphology. The dominant nature of BRAFV600E is evident by its ability to render Caco-2 cells tumorigenic in vivo all be it through selective extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK 2 phosphorylation and high levels of cyclin D1. As a consequence, the cell cycle distribution of parental cells is altered and microsatellite instability is introduced. Attenuated ERK activation observed correlated with KSR downregulation by BRAFV600E without further implications to signaling. Highly activated ERK in case of KRASG12V (Caco-K cells leads to mild transformation causing Caco-K cells to express premature senescence-related markers and acquire growth factor-dependent viability. Interestingly, BRAFWTgets equally activated by upstream KRAS mutations present in colon adenocarcinoma cells such as DLD-1 and SW620. Taken together, these results suggest that the two oncogenes have different transforming capability in colon cancer, although they both use the mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathway to carry out their effect. In general, BRAFV600E presents greater potential in mediating tumorigenic effect as compared to KRASG12V both in vivo and in vitro. These findings may have implications in personalised diagnosis and targeted therapeutics.

  18. What roles do colon stem cells and gap junctions play in the left and right location of origin of colorectal cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, James E; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2017-03-01

    This "Commentary" examines an important clinical observation that right-sided colorectal cancers appear less treatable than the left-sided cancers. The concepts of (a) the "initiation/promotion/progression" process, (b) the stem cell hypothesis, (c) the role gap junctional intercellular communication, (d) cancer cells lacking GJIC either because of the non-expression of connexin genes or of non-functional gap junction proteins, and (e) the role of the microbiome in promoting initiated colon stem cells to divide symmetrically or asymmetrically are examined to find an explanation. It has been speculated that "embryonic-like" lesions in the ascending colon are initiated stem cells, promoted via symmetrical cell division, while the polyp-type lesions in the descending colon are initiated stem cells stimulated to divide asymmetrically. To test this hypothesis, experiments could be designed to examine if right-sided lesions might express Oct4A and ABCG2 genes but not any connexin genes, whereas the left-sided lesions might express a connexin gene, but not Oct4A or the ABCG2 genes. Treatment of the right sided lesions might include transcriptional regulators, whereas the left-sided lesions would need to restore the posttranslational status of the connexin proteins.

  19. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  20. Opposing effects of low versus high concentrations of water soluble vitamins/dietary ingredients Vitamin C and niacin on colon cancer stem cells (CSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Utsav; Shenoy P, Sudheer; Bose, Bipasha

    2017-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the global causes of cancer deaths. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour niche responsible for metastasis and relapses, and hence need to be targeted for cancer therapeutics. Although dietary fibre and lifestyle changes have been recommended as measures for colorectal cancer prevention, no such recommendations are available for using water soluble vitamins as prophylaxis measure for colorectal cancers. High dose of Vitamin C has been proven to selectively kill colon cancer cells having BRAF and KRAS mutations by inducing oxidative stress. In this study, we show for the first time the opposing effects of the low and high dose of Vitamin C and vitamin B3 on colon CSCs isolated from HT-29 and HCT-15 colorectal carcinoma cell lines. At small doses, both of these vitamins exerted a cell proliferative effect only on CSCs, while there was no change in the proliferation status of non-stem cancer cells and wild-type (WT) populations. On the other hand, the death effects induced by high doses of Vitamin C and B3 were of the order of 50-60% and ∼30% on CSCs from HT-29 and HCT15, respectively. Interestingly, the control fibroblast cell line (NIH3T3) was highly refractory all the tested concentrations of Vitamin C and B3, except for the highest dose - 10,000 μg of Vitamin C that induced only 15% of cell death. Hence, these results indicate the future scope of use of therapeutic doses of Vitamin C and B3 especially in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  1. Oleic Acid Uptake Reveals the Rescued Enterocyte Phenotype of Colon Cancer Caco-2 by HT29-MTX Cells in Co-Culture Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Emmanuelle; Nassra, Merian; Atgié, Claude; Plaisancié, Pascale; Géloën, Alain

    2017-07-20

    Gastrointestinal epithelium is the unique route for nutrients and for many pharmaceuticals to enter the body. The present study aimed to analyze precisely whether co-culture of two colon cancer cell lines, mucus-producing cells HT29-MTX and enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells, ameliorate differentiation into an in vitro intestinal barrier model and the signaling pathways involved. Differentiated Caco-2 cells gene datasets were compared first to intestinal or cancer phenotypes and second to signaling pathway gene datasets. Experimental validations were performed in real-time experiments, immunochemistry, and gene expression analyses on Caco-2 versus co-cultures of Caco-2 and HT29-MTX (10%) cells. Partial maintenance of cancer-cell phenotype in differentiated Caco-2 cells was confirmed and fatty acids merged as potential regulators of cancer signaling pathways. HT29-MTX cells induced morphological changes in Caco-2 cells, slightly increased their proliferation rate and profoundly modified gene transcription of phenotype markers, fatty acid receptors, intracellular transporters, and lipid droplet components as well as functional responses to oleic acid. In vitro, enterocyte phenotype was rescued partially by co-culture of cancer cells with goblet cells and completed through oleic acid interaction with signaling pathways dysregulated in cancer cells.

  2. MicroRNA-184 inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis of human colon cancer SW480 and HCT116 cells by downregulating C-MYC and BCL-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Bing; Zhao, Xiao-Hui; Li, Gang; Zheng, Jun-Hua; Qiu, Wei

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of microRNA-184 (miR-184) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human colon cancer cells through the regulation of C-MYC and BCL-2. Human colon cancer tissues were selected as case group, and adjacent normal tissues were as control group. Human colon cancer SW480 and HCT116 cells were allocated into blank, miR-184 mimic negative control (mimic-NC), miR-184 inhibitor NC (inhibitor-NC), miR-184 mimic, and miR-184 inhibitor groups. Flow cytometry, Annexin V/PI and MTT assay were used to examine the cell cycle, apoptosis and viability. The expressions of C-MYC, BCL-2 and miR-184 were detected via immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). C-MYC and BCL-2 were direct targets to miR-184. The growth of colon cancer cells in the miR-184 mimic group was inhibited and exhibited an increase in apoptosis. Cell growth in the miR-184 mimic group was increased in addition to the inhibition of apoptosis. Compared with miR-184 mimic group, the expressions of C-MYC and BCL-2 in miR-184 inhibitor group were increased. The expressions of C-MYC and BCL-2 in colon cancer tissues exhibited high levels of expression, while miR-184 displayed relatively low levels in comparison to the adjacent normal tissues. An association was detected regarding the expressions of miR-184, C-MYC and BCL-2 with the differentiation, invasion depth and lymph node metastasis. MiR-184 expression was negatively related to C-MYC and BCL-2 expressions. Our study suggested that miR-184 could inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of colon cancer cells by down-regulating expressions of C-MYC and BCL-2. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Cellular response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU in 5-FU-resistant colon cancer cell lines during treatment and recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravik Katherine L

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of cells with the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU causes DNA damage, which in turn affects cell proliferation and survival. Two stable wild-type TP53 5-FU-resistant cell lines, ContinB and ContinD, generated from the HCT116 colon cancer cell line, demonstrate moderate and strong resistance to 5-FU, respectively, markedly-reduced levels of 5-FU-induced apoptosis, and alterations in expression levels of a number of key cell cycle- and apoptosis-regulatory genes as a result of resistance development. The aim of the present study was to determine potential differential responses to 8 and 24-hour 5-FU treatment in these resistant cell lines. We assessed levels of 5-FU uptake into DNA, cell cycle effects and apoptosis induction throughout treatment and recovery periods for each cell line, and alterations in expression levels of DNA damage response-, cell cycle- and apoptosis-regulatory genes in response to short-term drug exposure. Results 5-FU treatment for 24 hours resulted in S phase arrests, p53 accumulation, up-regulation of p53-target genes on DNA damage response (ATF3, GADD34, GADD45A, PCNA, cell cycle-regulatory (CDKN1A, and apoptosis-regulatory pathways (FAS, and apoptosis induction in the parental and resistant cell lines. Levels of 5-FU incorporation into DNA were similar for the cell lines. The pattern of cell cycle progression during recovery demonstrated consistently that the 5-FU-resistant cell lines had the smallest S phase fractions and the largest G2(/M fractions. The strongly 5-FU-resistant ContinD cell line had the smallest S phase arrests, the lowest CDKN1A levels, and the lowest levels of 5-FU-induced apoptosis throughout the treatment and recovery periods, and the fastest recovery of exponential growth (10 days compared to the other two cell lines. The moderately 5-FU-resistant ContinB cell line had comparatively lower apoptotic levels than the parental cells during treatment and recovery

  4. A safety and feasibility study of an allogeneic colon cancer cell vaccine administered with a granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor-producing bystander cell line in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Edil, Barish H; Soares, Kevin C; El-Shami, Khaled; Uram, Jennifer N; Judkins, Carol; Zhang, Zhe; Onners, Beth; Laheru, Daniel; Pardoll, Drew; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Schulick, Richard D

    2014-11-01

    Despite recent advances in earlier detection and improvements in chemotherapy, the 5-year survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma remains poor. Immunotherapy is a potentially effective therapeutic approach to the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. Preclinical studies have supported the antitumor activity of immunization with a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) producing murine colon tumor cell vaccine. A novel colorectal cancer vaccine composed of irradiated, allogeneic human colon cancer cells and GM-CSF-producing bystander cells was developed and tested in combination with a single intravenous low dose of cyclophosphamide in a phase 1 study of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A total of nine patients were enrolled onto and treated in this study. Six patients had a history of colorectal adenocarcinoma hepatic metastases and underwent curative metastasectomy, while three other patients had unresectable stage IV disease. This study demonstrates the safety and feasibility of this vaccine administered in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. At last follow-up, the six patients who underwent curative metastasectomy survived longer than 36 months, and four of these six patients were without disease recurrence. Immunologic correlate results suggest that the GM-CSF-producing colon cancer vaccine enhances the production of anti-MUC1 antibodies. This vaccine is feasible and safe. Future investigation of the efficacy and antitumor immunity of this vaccine is warranted.

  5. Colon and rectal cancer survival by tumor location and microsatellite instability: the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Lindor, Noralane M; Jenkins, Mark A; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A

    2013-08-01

    Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. We assessed the differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997 and 2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18 to 74. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Distal colon (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71) and rectal cancers (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically with patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, patients with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause-of-death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some patient groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Proximal colon cancer survival differs from survival for distal colon and rectal cancer in a manner apparently dependent on microsatellite instability status. These

  6. Neurotensin Phosphorylates GSK-3α/β through the Activation of PKC in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingding Wang

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurotensin (NT, a gastrointestinal hormone, binds its receptor [neurotensin receptor (NTR] to regulate the growth of normal and neoplastic intestinal cells; molecular mechanisms remain largely undefined. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 regulates diverse cellular processes, including cell growth and apoptosis. Here, we show that NT induces the phosphorylation of GSK-3α/β in the human colon cancer cell line HT29, HCT116, or SW480, which possesses high-affinity NTR. The effect of NT was blocked by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC, but not by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK1 or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, suggesting a predominant role for PKC in GSK-3β phosphorylation by NT. Pretreatment with Gö6976 (which inhibits PKCα and PKCβ1 or downregulation of endogenous PKCα or PKCβ1 blocked NT-mediated GSK-3β (but not GSK-3α phosphorylation. Moreover, a selective PKCβ inhibitor, LY379196, reduced NT-mediated GSK-3β (but not GSK-3α phosphorylation, suggesting a role for PKCbβ in the NT-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3β and an undefined kinase in the NT-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3α. Treatment with NT or the GSK-3 inhibitor SB216763 increased the expression of cyclin D1, a downstream effector protein of GSK-3 and a critical protein for the proliferation of various cells. Our results indicate that NT uses PKC-dependent pathways to modulate GSK-3, which may play a role in the NT regulation of intestinal cell growth.

  7. Dietary factors in colon cancer: international relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown-Eyssen, G E; Bright-See, E

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between dietary factors and mortality from colon cancer was explored by an analysis of the correlation between age-adjusted colon cancer death rates for men in 38 countries and estimates of the availability of a number of dietary components. Cereals were the only source of fiber found to be negatively associated with colon cancer mortality after adjustment for the availability of total or animal fats, or total or red meats, foods that were themselves positively associated with mortality. The estimate of dietary fiber from cereals was more closely associated with mortality than that of crude fiber. The previously postulated protective effects of vitamins C and A and of cruciferous vegetables were not supported by the international data; we found no evidence of a negative association between colon cancer mortality and availability of these dietary factors. The positive association previously reported between colon cancer and beer consumption disappeared following adjustment for animal fat.

  8. Epsin is required for Dishevelled stability and Wnt signaling activation in colon cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Baojun; Tessneer, Kandice L.; McManus, John; Liu, Xiaolei; Hahn, Scott; Pasula, Satish; Wu, Hao; Song, Hoogeun; Chen, Yiyuan; Cai, Xiaofeng; Dong, Yunzhou; Brophy, Megan L.; Rahman, Ruby; Ma, Jian-Xing; Xia, Lijun; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled canonical Wnt signaling supports colon epithelial tumor expansion and malignant transformation. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms involved is crucial for elucidating the pathogenesis of and will provide new therapeutic targets for colon cancer. Epsins are ubiquitin-binding adaptor proteins upregulated in several human cancers; however, epsins’ involvement in colon cancer is unknown. Here we show that loss of intestinal epithelial epsins protects against colon cancer by significantly reducing the stability of the crucial Wnt signaling effector, dishevelled (Dvl2), and impairing Wnt signaling. Consistently, epsins and Dvl2 are correspondingly upregulated in colon cancer. Mechanistically, epsin binds Dvl2 via its epsin N-terminal homology domain and ubiquitin-interacting motifs and prohibits Dvl2 polyubiquitination and degradation. Our findings reveal an unconventional role for epsins in stabilizing Dvl2 and potentiating Wnt signaling in colon cancer cells to ensure robust colon cancer progression. Epsins’ pro-carcinogenic role suggests they are potential therapeutic targets to combat colon cancer. PMID:25871009

  9. Disruption of thioredoxin metabolism enhances the toxicity of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1 inhibition in KRAS-mutated colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Hrabe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1 is critical for survival of many KRAS mutated colorectal cancer cells, and TAK1 inhibition with 5Z-7-oxozeaenol has been associated with oxidative stress leading to tumor cell killing. When SW 620 and HCT 116 human colon cancer cells were treated with 5 µM 5Z-7-oxozeaenol, cell viability, growth, and clonogenic survival were significantly decreased. Consistent with TAK1 inhibition being causally related to thiol-mediated oxidative stress, 10 mM N-acetylcysteine (NAC partially reversed the growth inhibitory effects of 5Z-7-oxozeaenol. In addition, 5Z-7-oxozeaenol also increased steady-state levels of H2DCFDA oxidation as well as increased levels of total glutathione (GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG. Interestingly, depletion of GSH using buthionine sulfoximine did not significantly potentiate 5Z-7-oxozeaenol toxicity in either cell line. In contrast, pre-treatment of cells with auranofin (Au to inhibit thioredoxin reductase activity significantly increased levels of oxidized thioredoxin as well as sensitized cells to 5Z-7-oxozeaenol-induced growth inhibition and clonogenic cell killing. These results were confirmed in SW 620 murine xenografts, where treatment with 5Z-7-oxozeaenol or with Au plus 5Z-7-oxozeaenol significantly inhibited growth, with Au plus 5Z-7-oxozeaenol trending toward greater growth inhibition compared to 5Z-7-oxozeaenol alone. These results support the hypothesis that thiol-mediated oxidative stress is causally related to TAK1-induced