WorldWideScience

Sample records for colocated polyhedral finite

  1. n-th Roots in finite polyhedral and centro-polyhedral groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Probability in finite groups; roots of elements; polyhedral groups; centro- polyhedral groups. 2010 Mathematics ... An element g of a finite group G is said to have an n-th root if there exists an element h ∈ G such that g = hn (n is a ..... For the proof of the fourth part, we must consider two cases: (i) m is odd and 4|d,. (ii) m, d are ...

  2. n-th Roots in finite polyhedral and centro-polyhedral groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The probability that a randomly chosen element in a non-abelian finite group has a square root, has been investigated by certain authors in recent years. In this paper, this probability will be generalized for the -th roots when ≥ 2 and it will be computed for every finite polyhedral group and all of the finite ...

  3. A piecewise linear finite element discretization of the diffusion equation for arbitrary polyhedral grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L [Texas A M Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, College Station, TX (United States); Yang, B; Zika, M R [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    We develop a piecewise linear (PWL) Galerkin finite element spatial discretization for the multi-dimensional radiation diffusion equation. It uses piecewise linear weight and basis functions in the finite element approximation, and it can be applied on arbitrary polygonal (2-dimensional) or polyhedral (3-dimensional) grids. We show that this new PWL method gives solutions comparable to those from Palmer's finite-volume method. However, since the PWL method produces a symmetric positive definite coefficient matrix, it should be substantially more computationally efficient than Palmer's method, which produces an asymmetric matrix. We conclude that the Galerkin PWL method is an attractive option for solving diffusion equations on unstructured grids. (authors)

  4. A piecewise linear finite element discretization of the diffusion equation for arbitrary polyhedral grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Teresa S. [Texas A and M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)], E-mail: baileyte@tamu.edu; Adams, Marvin L. [Texas A and M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)], E-mail: mladams@tamu.edu; Yang, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Zika, Michael R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)], E-mail: zika@llnl.gov

    2008-04-01

    We develop a piecewise linear (PWL) Galerkin finite element spatial discretization for the multi-dimensional radiation diffusion equation. It uses recently introduced piecewise linear weight and basis functions in the finite element approximation and it can be applied on arbitrary polygonal (2D) or polyhedral (3D) grids. We first demonstrate some analytical properties of the PWL method and perform a simple mode analysis to compare the PWL method with Palmer's vertex-centered finite-volume method and with a bilinear continuous finite element method. We then show that this new PWL method gives solutions comparable to those from Palmer's. However, since the PWL method produces a symmetric positive-definite coefficient matrix, it should be substantially more computationally efficient than Palmer's method, which produces an asymmetric matrix. We conclude that the Galerkin PWL method is an attractive option for solving diffusion equations on unstructured grids.

  5. A piecewise linear finite element discretization of the diffusion equation for arbitrary polyhedral grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Teresa S.; Adams, Marvin L.; Yang, Brian; Zika, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    We develop a piecewise linear (PWL) Galerkin finite element spatial discretization for the multi-dimensional radiation diffusion equation. It uses recently introduced piecewise linear weight and basis functions in the finite element approximation and it can be applied on arbitrary polygonal (2D) or polyhedral (3D) grids. We first demonstrate some analytical properties of the PWL method and perform a simple mode analysis to compare the PWL method with Palmer's vertex-centered finite-volume method and with a bilinear continuous finite element method. We then show that this new PWL method gives solutions comparable to those from Palmer's. However, since the PWL method produces a symmetric positive-definite coefficient matrix, it should be substantially more computationally efficient than Palmer's method, which produces an asymmetric matrix. We conclude that the Galerkin PWL method is an attractive option for solving diffusion equations on unstructured grids

  6. A piecewise linear finite element discretization of the diffusion equation for arbitrary polyhedral grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, T.S.; Adams, M.L. [Texas A M Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, College Station, TX (United States); Yang, B.; Zika, M.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    We develop a piecewise linear (PWL) Galerkin finite element spatial discretization for the multi-dimensional radiation diffusion equation. It uses piecewise linear weight and basis functions in the finite element approximation, and it can be applied on arbitrary polygonal (2-dimensional) or polyhedral (3-dimensional) grids. We show that this new PWL method gives solutions comparable to those from Palmer's finite-volume method. However, since the PWL method produces a symmetric positive definite coefficient matrix, it should be substantially more computationally efficient than Palmer's method, which produces an asymmetric matrix. We conclude that the Galerkin PWL method is an attractive option for solving diffusion equations on unstructured grids. (authors)

  7. Polyhedral patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Caigui; Tang, Chengcheng; Vaxman, Amir; Wonka, Peter; Pottmann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    We study the design and optimization of polyhedral patterns, which are patterns of planar polygonal faces on freeform surfaces. Working with polyhedral patterns is desirable in architectural geometry and industrial design. However, the classical

  8. Polyhedral patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Caigui

    2015-10-27

    We study the design and optimization of polyhedral patterns, which are patterns of planar polygonal faces on freeform surfaces. Working with polyhedral patterns is desirable in architectural geometry and industrial design. However, the classical tiling patterns on the plane must take on various shapes in order to faithfully and feasibly approximate curved surfaces. We define and analyze the deformations these tiles must undertake to account for curvature, and discover the symmetries that remain invariant under such deformations. We propose a novel method to regularize polyhedral patterns while maintaining these symmetries into a plethora of aesthetic and feasible patterns.

  9. Smooth polyhedral surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gü nther, Felix; Jiang, Caigui; Pottmann, Helmut

    2017-01-01

    Polyhedral surfaces are fundamental objects in architectural geometry and industrial design. Whereas closeness of a given mesh to a smooth reference surface and its suitability for numerical simulations were already studied extensively, the aim of our work is to find and to discuss suitable assessments of smoothness of polyhedral surfaces that only take the geometry of the polyhedral surface itself into account. Motivated by analogies to classical differential geometry, we propose a theory of smoothness of polyhedral surfaces including suitable notions of normal vectors, tangent planes, asymptotic directions, and parabolic curves that are invariant under projective transformations. It is remarkable that seemingly mild conditions significantly limit the shapes of faces of a smooth polyhedral surface. Besides being of theoretical interest, we believe that smoothness of polyhedral surfaces is of interest in the architectural context, where vertices and edges of polyhedral surfaces are highly visible.

  10. Smooth polyhedral surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Günther, Felix

    2017-03-15

    Polyhedral surfaces are fundamental objects in architectural geometry and industrial design. Whereas closeness of a given mesh to a smooth reference surface and its suitability for numerical simulations were already studied extensively, the aim of our work is to find and to discuss suitable assessments of smoothness of polyhedral surfaces that only take the geometry of the polyhedral surface itself into account. Motivated by analogies to classical differential geometry, we propose a theory of smoothness of polyhedral surfaces including suitable notions of normal vectors, tangent planes, asymptotic directions, and parabolic curves that are invariant under projective transformations. It is remarkable that seemingly mild conditions significantly limit the shapes of faces of a smooth polyhedral surface. Besides being of theoretical interest, we believe that smoothness of polyhedral surfaces is of interest in the architectural context, where vertices and edges of polyhedral surfaces are highly visible.

  11. Hamiltonian cycles in polyhedral maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a necessary and sufficient condition for existence of a contractible, non-separating and non-contractible separating Hamiltonian cycle in the edge graph of polyhedral maps on surfaces.We also present algorithms to construct such cycles whenever it exists where one of them is linear time and another is ...

  12. Space-filling polyhedral sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaland, Peter

    2016-06-21

    Solid sorbents, systems, and methods for pumping, storage, and purification of gases are disclosed. They derive from the dynamics of porous and free convection for specific gas/sorbent combinations and use space filling polyhedral microliths with facial aplanarities to produce sorbent arrays with interpenetrating interstitial manifolds of voids.

  13. Polyhedral combinatorics of UPGMA cones

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Ruth; Sullivant, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Distance-based methods such as UPGMA (Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean) continue to play a significant role in phylogenetic research. We use polyhedral combinatorics to analyze the natural subdivision of the positive orthant induced by classifying the input vectors according to tree topologies returned by the algorithm. The partition lattice informs the study of UPGMA trees. We give a closed form for the extreme rays of UPGMA cones on n taxa, and compute the normalized volume...

  14. An exact line integral representation of the physical optics scattered field: the case of a perfectly conducting polyhedral structure illuminated by electric Hertzian dipoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Peter M.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    1995-01-01

    An exact line integral representation of the electric physical optics scattered field is presented. This representation applies to scattering configurations with perfectly electrically conducting polyhedral structures illuminated by a finite number of electric Hertzian dipoles. The positions...

  15. Polyhedral and semidefinite programming methods in combinatorial optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Tunçel, Levent

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, polyhedral methods have played a central role in both the theory and practice of combinatorial optimization. Since the early 1990s, a new technique, semidefinite programming, has been increasingly applied to some combinatorial optimization problems. The semidefinite programming problem is the problem of optimizing a linear function of matrix variables, subject to finitely many linear inequalities and the positive semidefiniteness condition on some of the matrix variables. On certain problems, such as maximum cut, maximum satisfiability, maximum stable set and geometric r

  16. Interactive volume visualization of general polyhedral grids

    KAUST Repository

    Muigg, Philipp; Hadwiger, Markus; Doleisch, Helmut; Grö ller, Eduard M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for visualizing volumetric data specified on complex polyhedral grids, without the need to perform any kind of a priori tetrahedralization. These grids are composed of polyhedra that often are non

  17. hp-version discontinuous Galerkin methods on polygonal and polyhedral meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Cangiani, Andrea; Georgoulis, Emmanuil H; Houston, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Over the last few decades discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods (DGFEMs) have been witnessed tremendous interest as a computational framework for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Their success is due to their extreme versatility in the design of the underlying meshes and local basis functions, while retaining key features of both (classical) finite element and finite volume methods. Somewhat surprisingly, DGFEMs on general tessellations consisting of polygonal (in 2D) or polyhedral (in 3D) element shapes have received little attention within the literature, despite the potential computational advantages. This volume introduces the basic principles of hp-version (i.e., locally varying mesh-size and polynomial order) DGFEMs over meshes consisting of polygonal or polyhedral element shapes, presents their error analysis, and includes an extensive collection of numerical experiments. The extreme flexibility provided by the locally variable elemen t-shapes, element-sizes, and elemen...

  18. Mesophase behaviour of polyhedral particles

    KAUST Repository

    Agarwal, Umang

    2011-02-13

    Translational and orientational excluded-volume fields encoded in particles with anisotropic shapes can lead to purely entropy-driven assembly of morphologies with specific order and symmetry. To elucidate this complex correlation, we carried out detailed Monte Carlo simulations of six convex space-filling polyhedrons, namely, truncated octahedrons, rhombic dodecahedrons, hexagonal prisms, cubes, gyrobifastigiums and triangular prisms. Simulations predict the formation of various new liquid-crystalline and plastic-crystalline phases at intermediate volume fractions. By correlating these findings with particle anisotropy and rotational symmetry, simple guidelines for predicting phase behaviour of polyhedral particles are proposed: high rotational symmetry is in general conducive to mesophase formation, with low anisotropy favouring plastic-solid behaviour and intermediate anisotropy (or high uniaxial anisotropy) favouring liquid-crystalline behaviour. It is also found that dynamical disorder is crucial in defining mesophase behaviour, and that the apparent kinetic barrier for the liquid-mesophase transition is much lower for liquid crystals (orientational order) than for plastic solids (translational order). © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  19. Mesophase behaviour of polyhedral particles

    KAUST Repository

    Agarwal, Umang; Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2011-01-01

    Translational and orientational excluded-volume fields encoded in particles with anisotropic shapes can lead to purely entropy-driven assembly of morphologies with specific order and symmetry. To elucidate this complex correlation, we carried out detailed Monte Carlo simulations of six convex space-filling polyhedrons, namely, truncated octahedrons, rhombic dodecahedrons, hexagonal prisms, cubes, gyrobifastigiums and triangular prisms. Simulations predict the formation of various new liquid-crystalline and plastic-crystalline phases at intermediate volume fractions. By correlating these findings with particle anisotropy and rotational symmetry, simple guidelines for predicting phase behaviour of polyhedral particles are proposed: high rotational symmetry is in general conducive to mesophase formation, with low anisotropy favouring plastic-solid behaviour and intermediate anisotropy (or high uniaxial anisotropy) favouring liquid-crystalline behaviour. It is also found that dynamical disorder is crucial in defining mesophase behaviour, and that the apparent kinetic barrier for the liquid-mesophase transition is much lower for liquid crystals (orientational order) than for plastic solids (translational order). © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  20. Finite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.R. Azzam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the application of using a skirted foundation system to study the behavior of foundations with structural skirts adjacent to a sand slope and subjected to earthquake loading. The effect of the adopted skirts to safeguard foundation and slope from collapse is studied. The skirts effect on controlling horizontal soil movement and decreasing pore water pressure beneath foundations and beside the slopes during earthquake is investigated. This technique is investigated numerically using finite element analysis. A four story reinforced concrete building that rests on a raft foundation is idealized as a two-dimensional model with and without skirts. A two dimensional plain strain program PLAXIS, (dynamic version is adopted. A series of models for the problem under investigation were run under different skirt depths and lactation from the slope crest. The effect of subgrade relative density and skirts thickness is also discussed. Nodal displacement and element strains were analyzed for the foundation with and without skirts and at different studied parameters. The research results showed a great effectiveness in increasing the overall stability of the slope and foundation. The confined soil footing system by such skirts reduced the foundation acceleration therefore it can be tended to damping element and relieved the transmitted disturbance to the adjacent slope. This technique can be considered as a good method to control the slope deformation and decrease the slope acceleration during earthquakes.

  1. octamethyl-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes nanocomposites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, biodegradable poly(p-dioxanone) (PPDO)/octamethyl-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (ome-POSS) nanocomposites were fabricated by the simple solution casting method with various ome-POSS loadings. Scanning electron microscopic observations indicate that ome-POSS is well dispersed in the ...

  2. Decompositions of the polyhedral product functor with applications to moment-angle complexes and related spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, A; Bendersky, M; Cohen, F R; Gitler, S

    2009-07-28

    This article gives a natural decomposition of the suspension of a generalized moment-angle complex or partial product space which arises as the polyhedral product functor described below. The introduction and application of the smash product moment-angle complex provides a precise identification of the stable homotopy type of the values of the polyhedral product functor. One direct consequence is an analysis of the associated cohomology. For the special case of the complements of certain subspace arrangements, the geometrical decomposition implies the homological decomposition in earlier work of others as described below. Because the splitting is geometric, an analogous homological decomposition for a generalized moment-angle complex applies for any homology theory. Implied, therefore, is a decomposition for the Stanley-Reisner ring of a finite simplicial complex, and natural generalizations.

  3. Logical and Geometrical Distance in Polyhedral Aristotelian Diagrams in Knowledge Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenz Demey

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aristotelian diagrams visualize the logical relations among a finite set of objects. These diagrams originated in philosophy, but recently, they have also been used extensively in artificial intelligence, in order to study (connections between various knowledge representation formalisms. In this paper, we develop the idea that Aristotelian diagrams can be fruitfully studied as geometrical entities. In particular, we focus on four polyhedral Aristotelian diagrams for the Boolean algebra B 4 , viz. the rhombic dodecahedron, the tetrakis hexahedron, the tetraicosahedron and the nested tetrahedron. After an in-depth investigation of the geometrical properties and interrelationships of these polyhedral diagrams, we analyze the correlation (or lack thereof between logical (Hamming and geometrical (Euclidean distance in each of these diagrams. The outcome of this analysis is that the Aristotelian rhombic dodecahedron and tetrakis hexahedron exhibit the strongest degree of correlation between logical and geometrical distance; the tetraicosahedron performs worse; and the nested tetrahedron has the lowest degree of correlation. Finally, these results are used to shed new light on the relative strengths and weaknesses of these polyhedral Aristotelian diagrams, by appealing to the congruence principle from cognitive research on diagram design.

  4. Flexible Polyhedral Surfaces with Two Flat Poses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellmuth Stachel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present three types of polyhedral surfaces, which are continuously flexible and have not only an initial pose, where all faces are coplanar, but pass during their self-motion through another pose with coplanar faces (“flat pose”. These surfaces are examples of so-called rigid origami, since we only admit exact flexions, i.e., each face remains rigid during the motion; only the dihedral angles vary. We analyze the geometry behind Miura-ori and address Kokotsakis’ example of a flexible tessellation with the particular case of a cyclic quadrangle. Finally, we recall Bricard’s octahedra of Type 3 and their relation to strophoids.

  5. Polybenzoxazine/Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The organic/inorganic hybrid materials from polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS, inorganic nanoparticles and polybenzoxazine (PBZ have received much interesting recently due to their excellent thermal and mechanical properties, flame retardance, low dielectric constant, well-defined inorganic framework at nanosized scale level, and higher performance relative to those of non-hybrid PBZs. This review describes the synthesis, dielectric constants, and thermal, rheological, and mechanical properties of covalently bonded mono- and multifunctionalized benzoxazine POSS hybrids, other functionalized benzoxazine POSS derivatives, and non-covalently (hydrogen bonded benzoxazine POSS composites.

  6. Interactive volume visualization of general polyhedral grids

    KAUST Repository

    Muigg, Philipp

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for visualizing volumetric data specified on complex polyhedral grids, without the need to perform any kind of a priori tetrahedralization. These grids are composed of polyhedra that often are non-convex and have an arbitrary number of faces, where the faces can be non-planar with an arbitrary number of vertices. The importance of such grids in state-of-the-art simulation packages is increasing rapidly. We propose a very compact, face-based data structure for representing such meshes for visualization, called two-sided face sequence lists (TSFSL), as well as an algorithm for direct GPU-based ray-casting using this representation. The TSFSL data structure is able to represent the entire mesh topology in a 1D TSFSL data array of face records, which facilitates the use of efficient 1D texture accesses for visualization. In order to scale to large data sizes, we employ a mesh decomposition into bricks that can be handled independently, where each brick is then composed of its own TSFSL array. This bricking enables memory savings and performance improvements for large meshes. We illustrate the feasibility of our approach with real-world application results, by visualizing highly complex polyhedral data from commercial state-of-the-art simulation packages. © 2011 IEEE.

  7. A Minimum Path Algorithm Among 3D-Polyhedral Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeltekin, Aysin

    1989-03-01

    In this work we introduce a minimum path theorem for 3D case. We also develop an algorithm based on the theorem we prove. The algorithm will be implemented on the software package we develop using C language. The theorem we introduce states that; "Given the initial point I, final point F and S be the set of finite number of static obstacles then an optimal path P from I to F, such that PA S = 0 is composed of straight line segments which are perpendicular to the edge segments of the objects." We prove the theorem as well as we develop the following algorithm depending on the theorem to find the minimum path among 3D-polyhedral objects. The algorithm generates the point Qi on edge ei such that at Qi one can find the line which is perpendicular to the edge and the IF line. The algorithm iteratively provides a new set of initial points from Qi and exploits all possible paths. Then the algorithm chooses the minimum path among the possible ones. The flowchart of the program as well as the examination of its numerical properties are included.

  8. Zero point energy of polyhedral water clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anick, David J

    2005-06-30

    Polyhedral water clusters (PWCs) are cage-like (H2O)n clusters where every O participates in exactly three H bonds. For a database of 83 PWCs, 8 zero point energy (ZPE) was calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level. ZPE correlates negatively with electronic energy (E0): each increase of 1 kcal/mol in E0 corresponds to a decrease of about 0.11 kcal/mol in ZPE. For each n, a set of four connectivity parameters accounts for 98% or more of the variance in ZPE. Linear regression of ZPE against n and this set gives an RMS error of 0.13 kcal/mol. The contributions to ZPE from stretch modes only (ZPE(S)) and from torsional modes only (ZPE(T)) also correlate strongly with E0 and with each other.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, David B.; Lickiss, Paul D.

    Polyhedral OligoSilSesquioxanes are often abbreviated by the acronym POS or POSS® and are compounds of the general formula Sin O3n/2Rn (often denoted as TnRn). The commonest of these compounds are the cubic T8R8 POS species since many hydrolysis/condensation reactions of simple RSiX3 compounds (X = Cl, OMe or OEt) give the T8R8 cage as a major product, usually along with small amounts of other TnRn cages and polymeric by-products. Few T4R4 POS have been prepared as they seem to require very bulky R-groups to stabilize the strained POS system and to prevent formation of larger, more stable POS cages.

  10. Fernando Cassinello Pérez, polyhedral architect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Centellas Soler

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The work of architect Fernando Cassinello Pérez (Almería, 1928-Madrid, 1975 rests on three pillars: architectural production focused on the design and construction of housing and hotel establishments, academic activity as Professor of Construction at the Escuela de Arquitectura de Madrid, and research concern developed in the IETcc of which he became director, and exercised as an author of books and research papers, as disseminator lecturer, speaker at major conferences or as an active member of international associations linked to construction with concrete. This article will review his prolific activity as polyhedral architect and will find interesting works that designed and built by relying on extensive contemporary and international architectural culture.

  11. Clustered deep shadow maps for integrated polyhedral and volume rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Bornik, Alexander; Knecht, Wolfgang; Hadwiger, Markus; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a hardware-accelerated approach for shadow computation in scenes containing both complex volumetric objects and polyhedral models. Our system is the first hardware accelerated complete implementation of deep shadow maps, which

  12. [Formian 2 and a Formian Function for Processing Polyhedric Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshin, H.; Disney, P. L.; Champion, O. C.

    1996-01-01

    The work began in October 1994 with the following objectives: (1) to produce an improved version of the programming language Formian; and (2) to create a means for computer aided handling of polyhedric configurations including the geodesic forms of all kinds. A new version of Formian, referred to as Formian 2, is being implemented to operate in the Windows 95 environment. It is an ideal tool for configuration management in a convenient and user-friendly manner. The second objective was achieved by creating a standard Formian function that allows convenient handling of all types of polyhedric configurations. In particular, the focus of attention is on polyhedric configurations that are of importance in architectural and structural engineering fields. The natural medium for processing of polyhedric configurations is a programming language that incorporates the concepts of 'formex algebra'. Formian is such a programming language in which the processing of polyhedric configurations can be carried out using the standard elements of the language. A description of this function is included in a chapter for a book entitled 'Beyond the Cube: the Architecture of space Frames and Polyhedra'. A copy of this chapter is appended.

  13. A simple gel electrophoresis method for separating polyhedral gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhee; Lee, Hye Jin

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a simple approach to separate differently shaped and sized polyhedral gold nanoparticles (NPs) within colloidal solutions via gel electrophoresis is described. Gel running parameters for separating efficiently gold NPs including gel composition, added surfactant types and applied voltage were investigated. The plasmonic properties and physical structure of the separated NPs extracted from the gel matrix were then investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry respectively. Data analysis revealed that gel electrophoresis conditions of a 1.5 % agarose gel with 0.1 % sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant under an applied voltage of 100 V resulted in the selective isolation of ~ 50 nm polyhedral shaped gold nanoparticles. Further efforts are underway to apply the method to purify biomolecule-conjugated polyhedral Au NPs that can be readily used for NP-enhanced biosensing platforms.

  14. Constitutive equations for discrete electromagnetic problems over polyhedral grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codecasa, Lorenzo; Trevisan, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a novel approach is proposed for constructing discrete counterparts of constitutive equations over polyhedral grids which ensure both consistency and stability of the algebraic equations discretizing an electromagnetic field problem. The idea is to construct discrete constitutive equations preserving the thermodynamic relations for constitutive equations. In this way, consistency and stability of the discrete equations are ensured. At the base, a purely geometric condition between the primal and the dual grids has to be satisfied for a given primal polyhedral grid, by properly choosing the dual grid. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the proposed discrete constitutive equations lead to accurate approximations of the electromagnetic field

  15. Compatible discrete operator schemes on polyhedral meshes for elliptic and Stokes equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonelle, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents a new class of spatial discretization schemes on polyhedral meshes, called Compatible Discrete Operator (CDO) schemes and their application to elliptic and Stokes equations In CDO schemes, preserving the structural properties of the continuous equations is the leading principle to design the discrete operators. De Rham maps define the degrees of freedom according to the physical nature of fields to discretize. CDO schemes operate a clear separation between topological relations (balance equations) and constitutive relations (closure laws). Topological relations are related to discrete differential operators, and constitutive relations to discrete Hodge operators. A feature of CDO schemes is the explicit use of a second mesh, called dual mesh, to build the discrete Hodge operator. Two families of CDO schemes are considered: vertex-based schemes where the potential is located at (primal) mesh vertices, and cell-based schemes where the potential is located at dual mesh vertices (dual vertices being in one-to-one correspondence with primal cells). The CDO schemes related to these two families are presented and their convergence is analyzed. A first analysis hinges on an algebraic definition of the discrete Hodge operator and allows one to identify three key properties: symmetry, stability, and P0-consistency. A second analysis hinges on a definition of the discrete Hodge operator using reconstruction operators, and the requirements on these reconstruction operators are identified. In addition, CDO schemes provide a unified vision on a broad class of schemes proposed in the literature (finite element, finite element, mimetic schemes... ). Finally, the reliability and the efficiency of CDO schemes are assessed on various test cases and several polyhedral meshes. (author)

  16. How to collect and process large polyhedral viruses of insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. D. Rollinson; F. B. Lewis

    1962-01-01

    Polyhedral viruses have proved highly effective and very practical for control of certain pine sawflies; and a method of collecting and processing the small polyhedra (5 microns or less) characteristic of sawflies has been described. There is experimental evidence that the virus diseases of many Lepidopterous insects can be used similarly for direct control. The...

  17. A Novel Type of Polyhedral Viruses Infecting Hyperthermophilic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Krupovic, Mart; Prangishvili, David

    2017-07-01

    Encapsidation of genetic material into polyhedral particles is one of the most common structural solutions employed by viruses infecting hosts in all three domains of life. Here, we describe a new virus of hyperthermophilic archaea, Sulfolobus polyhedral virus 1 (SPV1), which condenses its circular double-stranded DNA genome in a manner not previously observed for other known viruses. The genome complexed with virion proteins is wound up sinusoidally into a spherical coil which is surrounded by an envelope and further encased by an outer polyhedral capsid apparently composed of the 20-kDa virion protein. Lipids selectively acquired from the pool of host lipids are integral constituents of the virion. None of the major virion proteins of SPV1 show similarity to structural proteins of known viruses. However, minor structural proteins, which are predicted to mediate host recognition, are shared with other hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses infecting members of the order Sulfolobales The SPV1 genome consists of 20,222 bp and contains 45 open reading frames, only one-fifth of which could be functionally annotated. IMPORTANCE Viruses infecting hyperthermophilic archaea display a remarkable morphological diversity, often presenting architectural solutions not employed by known viruses of bacteria and eukaryotes. Here we present the isolation and characterization of Sulfolobus polyhedral virus 1, which condenses its genome into a unique spherical coil. Due to the original genomic and architectural features of SPV1, the virus should be considered a representative of a new viral family, "Portogloboviridae." Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Rheological Behavior of Entangled Polystyrene-Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) Copolymer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Jian; Mather, Patrick T; Haddad, Timothy S; Kim, Gyeong-Man

    2006-01-01

    ...: random copolymers of polystyrene (PS) and styryl-based polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS), R7(Si8O12)(C6H4CH=CH2), with R = isobutyl (iBu). A series of styrene-styryl POSS random copolymers with 0, 6, 15, 30, 50 wt...

  19. Demand Externalities from Co-Location

    OpenAIRE

    Boudhayan Sen; Jiwoong Shin; K. Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    We illustrate an approach to measure demand externalities from co-location by estimating household level changes in grocery spending at a supermarket among households that also buy gas at a co-located gas station, relative to those who do not. Controlling for observable and unobserved selection in the use of gas station, we find significant demand externalities; on average a household that buys gas has 7.7% to 9.3% increase in spending on groceries. Accounting for differences in gross margins...

  20. Uniqueness in inverse elastic scattering with finitely many incident waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elschner, Johannes; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    We consider the third and fourth exterior boundary value problems of linear isotropic elasticity and present uniqueness results for the corresponding inverse scattering problems with polyhedral-type obstacles and a finite number of incident plane elastic waves. Our approach is based on a reflection principle for the Navier equation. (orig.)

  1. Form-finding with polyhedral meshes made simple

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Chengcheng; Sun, Xiang; Gomes, Maria Alexandra; Wallner, Johannes; Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    We solve the form-finding problem for polyhedral meshes in a way which combines form, function and fabrication; taking care of user-specified constraints like boundary interpolation, planarity of faces, statics, panel size and shape, enclosed volume, and last, but not least, cost. Our main application is the interactive modeling of meshes for architectural and industrial design. Our approach can be described as guided exploration of the constraint space whose algebraic structure is simplified by introducing auxiliary variables and ensuring that constraints are at most quadratic. Computationally, we perform a projection onto the constraint space which is biased towards low values of an energy which expresses desirable "soft" properties like fairness. We have created a tool which elegantly handles difficult tasks, such as taking boundary-alignment of polyhedral meshes into account, planarization, fairing under planarity side conditions, handling hybrid meshes, and extending the treatment of static equilibrium to shapes which possess overhanging parts.

  2. Form-finding with polyhedral meshes made simple

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Chengcheng

    2014-07-27

    We solve the form-finding problem for polyhedral meshes in a way which combines form, function and fabrication; taking care of user-specified constraints like boundary interpolation, planarity of faces, statics, panel size and shape, enclosed volume, and last, but not least, cost. Our main application is the interactive modeling of meshes for architectural and industrial design. Our approach can be described as guided exploration of the constraint space whose algebraic structure is simplified by introducing auxiliary variables and ensuring that constraints are at most quadratic. Computationally, we perform a projection onto the constraint space which is biased towards low values of an energy which expresses desirable "soft" properties like fairness. We have created a tool which elegantly handles difficult tasks, such as taking boundary-alignment of polyhedral meshes into account, planarization, fairing under planarity side conditions, handling hybrid meshes, and extending the treatment of static equilibrium to shapes which possess overhanging parts.

  3. Clustered deep shadow maps for integrated polyhedral and volume rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Bornik, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a hardware-accelerated approach for shadow computation in scenes containing both complex volumetric objects and polyhedral models. Our system is the first hardware accelerated complete implementation of deep shadow maps, which unifies the computation of volumetric and geometric shadows. Up to now such unified computation was limited to software-only rendering . Previous hardware accelerated techniques can handle only geometric or only volumetric scenes - both resulting in the loss of important properties of the original concept. Our approach supports interactive rendering of polyhedrally bounded volumetric objects on the GPU based on ray casting. The ray casting can be conveniently used for both the shadow map computation and the rendering. We show how anti-aliased high-quality shadows are feasible in scenes composed of multiple overlapping translucent objects, and how sparse scenes can be handled efficiently using clustered deep shadow maps. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Image of the World on polyhedral maps and globes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pędzich Paweł

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of polyhedrons as image surface in cartographic projections has a tradition of more than 200 years. The first maps relying on polyhedrons appeared in the 19th century. One of the first maps which based on an original polyhedral projection using a regular octahedron was constructed by the Californian architect Bernard Cahill in 1909. Other well known polyhedral projections and maps included Buckminster Fuller’s projection and map into icosahedron from 1954 and S. Waterman’s projection into truncated octahedron from 1996, which resulted in the “butterfly” map. Polyhedrons as image surface have the advantage of allowing a continuous image of continents of the Earth with low projection distortion. Such maps can be used for many purposes, such as presentation of tectonic plates or geographic discoveries.

  5. Mimetic finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Manzini, Gianmarco; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method mimics fundamental properties of mathematical and physical systems including conservation laws, symmetry and positivity of solutions, duality and self-adjointness of differential operators, and exact mathematical identities of the vector and tensor calculus. This article is the first comprehensive review of the 50-year long history of the mimetic methodology and describes in a systematic way the major mimetic ideas and their relevance to academic and real-life problems. The supporting applications include diffusion, electromagnetics, fluid flow, and Lagrangian hydrodynamics problems. The article provides enough details to build various discrete operators on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes and summarizes the major convergence results for the mimetic approximations. Most of these theoretical results, which are presented here as lemmas, propositions and theorems, are either original or an extension of existing results to a more general formulation using polyhedral meshes. Finally, flexibility and extensibility of the mimetic methodology are shown by deriving higher-order approximations, enforcing discrete maximum principles for diffusion problems, and ensuring the numerical stability for saddle-point systems.

  6. Topology, isomorphic smoothness and polyhedrality in Banach spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Richard J.

    2018-01-01

    In recent decades, topology has come to play an increasing role in some geometric aspects of Banach space theory. The class of so-called $w^*$-locally relatively compact sets was introduced recently by Fonf, Pallares, Troyanski and the author, and were found to be a useful topological tool in the theory of isomorphic smoothness and polyhedrality in Banach spaces. We develop the topological theory of these sets and present some Banach space applications.

  7. Sub-polyhedral scheduling using (unit-)two-variable-per-inequality polyhedra

    OpenAIRE

    Upadrasta , Ramakrishna; Cohen , Albert

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Polyhedral compilation has been successful in the design and implementation of complex loop nest optimizers and parallelizing compilers. The algorithmic complexity and scalability limitations remain one important weakness. We address it using sub-polyhedral under-aproximations of the systems of constraints resulting from affine scheduling problems. We propose a sub-polyhedral scheduling technique using (Unit-)Two-Variable-Per-Inequality or (U)TVPI Polyhedra. This techn...

  8. Polyhedral Boranes: A Versatile Building Block for Nanoporous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingerman, Daniel Jon

    The studies described in this dissertation examine several new concepts related to polyhedral boranes and their applications towards the synthesis of novel nanoporous materials. The unique thermal and chemical robustness, rigidity, quasi-spherical geometry, and high boron content of polyhedral boranes are explored to generate materials not possible with typical organic synthons. Aside from the fundamental synthetic work, this work was also aimed at solving larger global issues such as energy storage and new routes to therapeutics. Chapter 2 highlights the discovery of the first highly porous carborane-based metal-organic framework, where the spherical nature of the carborane increases volumetric surface area without reducing pore volume. Chapter 3 examines the first tritopic carborane-based ligand and the stabilizing effect the rigid, sterically bulky carboranyl groups have on highly porous topologies not stable with typical organic ligands. Chapters 4 and 5 describe the use of polyhedral borane-based ligands as a means to influence and generate unexpected topologies. Lastly, chapter 6 explores using a simple carborane-based ligand that harnesses the power of coordination-driven assembly to rapidly generate a high boron-containing supramolecular cuboctahedron.

  9. Exploring the Definitions and Discourse of Co-Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Eve

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of co-location is not new, but there is very little research that focuses specifically on co-located schools and the teaching and learning that takes place therein. This article focuses on the term "co-location" and considers the sometimes vague discourse and definitions surrounding the term. The article recommends that…

  10. Polyhedral meshing in numerical analysis of conjugate heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnowski, Marcin; Krzywanski, Jaroslaw; Grabowska, Karolina; Gnatowska, Renata

    2018-06-01

    Computational methods have been widely applied in conjugate heat transfer analysis. The very first and crucial step in such research is the meshing process which consists in dividing the analysed geometry into numerous small control volumes (cells). In Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications it is desirable to use the hexahedral cells as the resulting mesh is characterized by low numerical diffusion. Unfortunately generating such mesh can be a very time-consuming task and in case of complicated geometry - it may not be possible to generate cells of good quality. Therefore tetrahedral cells have been implemented into commercial pre-processors. Their advantage is the ease of its generation even in case of very complex geometry. On the other hand tetrahedrons cannot be stretched excessively without decreasing the mesh quality factor, so significantly larger number of cells has to be used in comparison to hexahedral mesh in order to achieve a reasonable accuracy. Moreover the numerical diffusion of tetrahedral elements is significantly higher. Therefore the polyhedral cells are proposed within the paper in order to combine the advantages of hexahedrons (low numerical diffusion resulting in accurate solution) and tetrahedrons (rapid semi-automatic generation) as well as to overcome the disadvantages of both the above mentioned mesh types. The major benefit of polyhedral mesh is that each individual cell has many neighbours, so gradients can be well approximated. Polyhedrons are also less sensitive to stretching than tetrahedrons which results in better mesh quality leading to improved numerical stability of the model. In addition, numerical diffusion is reduced due to mass exchange over numerous faces. This leads to a more accurate solution achieved with a lower cell count. Therefore detailed comparison of numerical modelling results concerning conjugate heat transfer using tetrahedral and polyhedral meshes is presented in the paper.

  11. Form-finding with polyhedral meshes made simple

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Chengcheng; Sun, Xiang; Gomes, Alexandra; Wallner, Johannes; Pottmann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    We solve the form-finding problem for polyhedral meshes in a way which combines form, function and fabrication; taking care of user-specified constraints like boundary interpolation, planarity of faces, statics, panel size and shape, enclosed volume, and cost. Our main application is the interactive modeling of meshes for architectural and industrial design. Our approach can be described as guided exploration of the constraint space whose algebraic structure is simplified by introducing auxiliary variables and ensuring that constraints are at most quadratic.

  12. Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS)-Containing Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayandele, Ebunoluwa; Sarkar, Biswajit; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid materials with superior structural and functional properties can be obtained by incorporating nanofillers into polymer matrices. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles have attracted much attention recently due to their nanometer size, the ease of which these particles can be incorporated into polymeric materials and the unique capability to reinforce polymers. We review here the state of POSS-containing polymer nanocomposites. We discuss the influence of the incorporation of POSS into polymer matrices via chemical cross-linking or physical blending on the structure of nanocomposites, as affected by surface functional groups, and the POSS concentration. PMID:28348318

  13. Form-finding with polyhedral meshes made simple

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Chengcheng

    2015-08-09

    We solve the form-finding problem for polyhedral meshes in a way which combines form, function and fabrication; taking care of user-specified constraints like boundary interpolation, planarity of faces, statics, panel size and shape, enclosed volume, and cost. Our main application is the interactive modeling of meshes for architectural and industrial design. Our approach can be described as guided exploration of the constraint space whose algebraic structure is simplified by introducing auxiliary variables and ensuring that constraints are at most quadratic.

  14. Bending-active reciprocal structures based on equilateral polyhedral geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic Larsen, Olga; BRANCART, Stijn; DE TEMMERMAN, Niels

    2017-01-01

    As mutually supported beam structures, reciprocal frames limit the number of components that are joined at each connection to two. However, this system of intermediate connections introduces undesirable bending moments in the beam elements. By utilising elastic deformation to create curved...... of parts of reciprocal bending-active components based on a selection of polyhedral dome types. To simplify the assembly of the structures and avoid the manual bending of the components on site, we introduce the concept of a double-layered, pre-bent component. Finally, this paper presents the development...

  15. SALOME PLATFORM and TetGen for Polyhedral Mesh Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Yong; Park, Chan Eok; Kim, Shin Whan [KEPCO E and C Company, Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    SPACE and CUPID use the unstructured mesh and they also require reliable mesh generation system. The combination of CAD system and mesh generation system is necessary to cope with a large number of cells and the complex fluid system with structural materials inside. In the past, a CAD system Pro/Engineer and mesh generator Pointwise were evaluated for this application. But, the cost of those commercial CAD and mesh generator is sometimes a great burden. Therefore, efforts have been made to set up a mesh generation system with open source programs. The evaluation of the TetGen has been made in focusing the application for the polyhedral mesh generation. In this paper, SALOME will be evaluated for the efforts in conjunction with TetGen. In section 2, review will be made on the CAD and mesh generation capability of SALOME. SALOME and TetGen codes are being integrated to construct robust polyhedral mesh generator. Edge removal on the flat surface and vertex reattachment to the solid are two challenging tasks. It is worthwhile to point out that the Python script capability of the SALOME should be fully utilized for the future investigation.

  16. Approximation of scalar and vector transport problems on polyhedral meshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This thesis analyzes, at the continuous and at the discrete level on polyhedral meshes, the scalar and the vector transport problems in three-dimensional domains. These problems are composed of a diffusive term, an advective term, and a reactive term. In the context of Friedrichs systems, the continuous problems are analyzed in Lebesgue graph spaces. The classical positivity assumption on the Friedrichs tensor is generalized so as to consider the case of practical interest where this tensor takes null or slightly negative values. A new scheme converging at the order 3/2 is devised for the scalar advection-reaction problem using scalar degrees of freedom attached to mesh vertices. Two new schemes considering as well scalar degrees of freedom attached to mesh vertices are devised for the scalar transport problem and are robust with respect to the dominant regime. The first scheme converges at the order 1/2 when advection effects are dominant and at the order 1 when diffusion effects are dominant. The second scheme improves the accuracy by converging at the order 3/2 when advection effects are dominant. Finally, a new scheme converging at the order 1/2 is devised for the vector advection-reaction problem considering only one scalar degree of freedom per mesh edge. The accuracy and the efficiency of all these schemes are assessed on various test cases using three-dimensional polyhedral meshes. (author)

  17. A new equi-dimensional fracture model using polyhedral cells for microseismic data sets

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar

    2017-04-09

    We present a method for modeling flow in porous media in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach utilizes the Mimetic Finite Difference (MFD) method. We employ a novel equi-dimensional approach for meshing fractures. By using polyhedral cells we avoid the common challenge in equi-dimensional fracture modeling of creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how polyhedra can mesh complex fractures without introducing a large number of cells. We use polyhedra and the MFD method a second time for embedding fracture boundaries in the matrix domain using a “cut-cell” paradigm. The embedding approach has the advantage of being simple and localizes irregular cells to the area around the fractures. It also circumvents the need for conventional mesh generation, which can be challenging when applied to complex fracture geometries. We present numerical results confirming the validity of our approach for complex fracture networks and for different flow models. In our first example, we compare our method to the popular dual-porosity technique. Our second example compares our method with directly meshed fractures (single-porosity) for two-phase flow. The third example demonstrates two-phase flow for the case of intersecting ellipsoid fractures in three-dimensions, which are typical in microseismic analysis of fractures. Finally, we demonstrate our method on a two-dimensional fracture network produced from microseismic field data.

  18. A new equi-dimensional fracture model using polyhedral cells for microseismic data sets

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar; Dong, Rencheng; Srinivasan, Sanjay; Wheeler, Mary F.

    2017-01-01

    We present a method for modeling flow in porous media in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach utilizes the Mimetic Finite Difference (MFD) method. We employ a novel equi-dimensional approach for meshing fractures. By using polyhedral cells we avoid the common challenge in equi-dimensional fracture modeling of creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how polyhedra can mesh complex fractures without introducing a large number of cells. We use polyhedra and the MFD method a second time for embedding fracture boundaries in the matrix domain using a “cut-cell” paradigm. The embedding approach has the advantage of being simple and localizes irregular cells to the area around the fractures. It also circumvents the need for conventional mesh generation, which can be challenging when applied to complex fracture geometries. We present numerical results confirming the validity of our approach for complex fracture networks and for different flow models. In our first example, we compare our method to the popular dual-porosity technique. Our second example compares our method with directly meshed fractures (single-porosity) for two-phase flow. The third example demonstrates two-phase flow for the case of intersecting ellipsoid fractures in three-dimensions, which are typical in microseismic analysis of fractures. Finally, we demonstrate our method on a two-dimensional fracture network produced from microseismic field data.

  19. Co-location synergies : specialized versus diverse logistics concentration areas

    OpenAIRE

    Heuvel, van den, F.P.; Langen, de, P.W.; Donselaar, van, K.H.; Fransoo, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of spatial concentration of logistics firms by empirically analyzing synergies through co-location and investigating whether co-location of logistics establishments in specialized logistics concentration areas results in benefits compared to co-location in diverse logistics concentration areas. Methodology: A survey among managers of 128 logistics establishments located in logistics concentration areas was used to test f...

  20. Proximity matters : synergies through co-location of logistics establishments

    OpenAIRE

    Heuvel, van den, F.P.; Langen, de, P.W.; Donselaar, van, K.H.; Fransoo, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Although anecdotic evidence suggests that co-location of logistics activities can bring several benefits to the co-located logistics companies and hence, can be important to incorporate in the location decisions of these companies, this is the first paper to empirically research these benefits. This paper contributes to the understanding of spatial concentration of logistics firms by empirically analyzing synergies through co-location and investigates whether spatial concentration of logistic...

  1. Symmetry and Algorithmic Complexity of Polyominoes and Polyhedral Graphs

    KAUST Repository

    Zenil, Hector

    2018-02-24

    We introduce a definition of algorithmic symmetry able to capture essential aspects of geometric symmetry. We review, study and apply a method for approximating the algorithmic complexity (also known as Kolmogorov-Chaitin complexity) of graphs and networks based on the concept of Algorithmic Probability (AP). AP is a concept (and method) capable of recursively enumeration all properties of computable (causal) nature beyond statistical regularities. We explore the connections of algorithmic complexity---both theoretical and numerical---with geometric properties mainly symmetry and topology from an (algorithmic) information-theoretic perspective. We show that approximations to algorithmic complexity by lossless compression and an Algorithmic Probability-based method can characterize properties of polyominoes, polytopes, regular and quasi-regular polyhedra as well as polyhedral networks, thereby demonstrating its profiling capabilities.

  2. Symmetry and Algorithmic Complexity of Polyominoes and Polyhedral Graphs

    KAUST Repository

    Zenil, Hector; Kiani, Narsis A.; Tegner, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a definition of algorithmic symmetry able to capture essential aspects of geometric symmetry. We review, study and apply a method for approximating the algorithmic complexity (also known as Kolmogorov-Chaitin complexity) of graphs and networks based on the concept of Algorithmic Probability (AP). AP is a concept (and method) capable of recursively enumeration all properties of computable (causal) nature beyond statistical regularities. We explore the connections of algorithmic complexity---both theoretical and numerical---with geometric properties mainly symmetry and topology from an (algorithmic) information-theoretic perspective. We show that approximations to algorithmic complexity by lossless compression and an Algorithmic Probability-based method can characterize properties of polyominoes, polytopes, regular and quasi-regular polyhedra as well as polyhedral networks, thereby demonstrating its profiling capabilities.

  3. The mimetic finite difference method for elliptic problems

    CERN Document Server

    Veiga, Lourenço Beirão; Manzini, Gianmarco

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the theoretical and computational aspects of the mimetic finite difference method for a wide class of multidimensional elliptic problems, which includes diffusion, advection-diffusion, Stokes, elasticity, magnetostatics and plate bending problems. The modern mimetic discretization technology developed in part by the Authors allows one to solve these equations on unstructured polygonal, polyhedral and generalized polyhedral meshes. The book provides a practical guide for those scientists and engineers that are interested in the computational properties of the mimetic finite difference method such as the accuracy, stability, robustness, and efficiency. Many examples are provided to help the reader to understand and implement this method. This monograph also provides the essential background material and describes basic mathematical tools required to develop further the mimetic discretization technology and to extend it to various applications.

  4. Proximity matters : synergies through co-location of logistics establishments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den F.P.; Langen, de P.W.; Donselaar, van K.H.; Fransoo, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Although anecdotic evidence suggests that co-location of logistics activities can bring several benefits to the co-located logistics companies and hence, can be important to incorporate in the location decisions of these companies, this is the first paper to empirically research these benefits. This

  5. Co-location synergies : specialised versus diverse logistics concentration areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, F.P.; van Donselaar, K.H.; de Langen, P.W.; Fransoo, J.C.

    Although anecdotal evidence suggests that co-location can bring about several benefits for co-located logistics companies, implying the need to incorporate such considerations in location decisions, these benefits have hardly been analysed empirically. This paper provides detailed insights for

  6. Co-location synergies : specialized versus diverse logistics concentration areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den F.P.; Langen, de P.W.; Donselaar, van K.H.; Fransoo, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of spatial concentration of logistics firms by empirically analyzing synergies through co-location and investigating whether co-location of logistics establishments in specialized logistics concentration areas results in

  7. The Galerkin Finite Element Method for A Multi-term Time-Fractional Diffusion equation

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Bangti; Lazarov, Raytcho; Liu, Yikan; Zhou, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    We consider the initial/boundary value problem for a diffusion equation involving multiple time-fractional derivatives on a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyze a space semidiscrete scheme based on the standard Galerkin finite element method using continuous piecewise linear functions. Nearly optimal error estimates for both cases of initial data and inhomogeneous term are derived, which cover both smooth and nonsmooth data. Further we develop a fully discrete scheme based on a finite...

  8. Morphology and Phase Transitions in Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene Triblock Copolymer Grafted with Isobutyl Substituted Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drazowski, Daniel B; Lee, Andre; Haddad, Timothy S

    2007-01-01

    Two symmetric triblock polystyrene-butadiene-polystyrene (SBS) copolymers with different styrene content were grafted with varying amounts of isobutyl-substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules...

  9. Morphology and Phase Transitions in Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene Triblock Copolymer Grafted with Isobutyl Substituted Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drazkowski, Daniel B; Lee, Andre; Haddad, Timothy S

    2006-01-01

    Two symmetric triblock polystyrene-butadiene-polystyrene (SBS) copolymers with different styrene content were grafted with varying amounts of isobutyl-substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules...

  10. Small Aperture Telescope Observations of Co-located Geostationary Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R.; Wallace, B.

    As geostationary orbit (GEO) continues to be populated, satellite operators are increasing usage of co-location techniques to maximize usage of fewer GEO longitude slots. Co-location is an orbital formation strategy where two or more geostationary satellites reside within one GEO stationkeeping box. The separation strategy used to prevent collision between the co-located satellites generally uses eccentricity (radial separation) and inclination (latitude separation) vector offsets. This causes the satellites to move in relative motion ellipses about each other as the relative longitude drift between the satellites is near zero. Typical separations between the satellites varies from 1 to 100 kilometers. When co-located satellites are observed by optical ground based space surveillance sensors the participants appear to be separated by a few minutes of arc or less in angular extent. Under certain viewing geometries, these satellites appear to visually conjunct even though the satellites are, in fact, well separated spatially. In situations where one of the co-located satellites is more optically reflective than the other, the reflected sunglint from the more reflective satellite can overwhelm the other. This less frequently encountered issue causes the less reflective satellite to be glint masked in the glare of the other. This paper focuses on space surveillance observations on co-located Canadian satellites using a small optical telescope operated by Defence R&D Canada - Ottawa. The two above mentioned problems (cross tagging and glint masking) are investigated and we quantify the results for Canadian operated geostationary satellites. The performance of two line element sets when making in-frame CCD image correlation between the co-located satellites is also examined. Relative visual magnitudes between the co-located members are also inspected and quantified to determine the susceptibility of automated telescopes to glint masking of co-located satellite members.

  11. Preparation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane based imprinted monolith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Chen, Xiu-Xiu; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2015-12-18

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was successfully applied, for the first time, to prepare imprinted monolithic column with high porosity and good permeability. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized with a mixture of PSS-(1-Propylmethacrylate)-heptaisobutyl substituted (MA 0702), naproxon (template), 4-vinylpyridine, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4). The influence of synthesis parameters on the retention factor and imprinting effect, including the amount of MA 0702, the ratio of template to monomer, and the ratio of monomer to crosslinker, was investigated. The greatest imprinting factor on the imprinted monolithic column prepared with MA 0702 was 22, about 10 times higher than that prepared in absence of POSS. The comparisons between MIP monoliths synthesized with POSS and without POSS were made in terms of permeability, column efficiency, surface morphology and pore size distribution. In addition, thermodynamic and Van Deemter analysis were used to evaluate the POSS-based MIP monolith. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Naming polyhedra by general face-spirals - theory and applications to fullerenes and other polyhedral molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirz, Lukas; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Avery, James Emil

    2018-01-01

    We present a general face-spiral algorithm for cubic polyhedral graphs (including fullerenes and fulleroids), and extend it to the full class of all polyhedral graphs by way of the leapfrog transform. This yields compact canonical representations of polyhedra with a simple and intuitive geometrical...... polyhedral molecules, and an especially compact form for the special class of fullerenes. A unique numbering of vertices is obtained as a byproduct of the spiral algorithm. This is required to denote modifications of the parent cage in IUPAC naming schemes. Similarly, the symmetry group of the molecule can...... be found together with the canonical general spiral at negligible cost. The algorithm is fully compatible with the classical spiral algorithm developed by Manolopoulos for fullerenes, i. e., classical spirals are accepted as input, and spiralable graphs lead to identical output. We prove that the algorithm...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of polyhedral and quasi-sphere non-polyhedral Pt nanoparticles: effects of their various surface morphologies and sizes on electrocatalytic activity for fuel cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Ohtaki, Michitaka; Hien, Tong Duy; Jalem, Randy; Nogami, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    In this article, polyhedral and non-polyhedral Pt nanoparticles were prepared by modified polyol method using AgNO 3 as a good structure-modifying agent. Their TEM and HRTEM images showed the particle size in the range of 8–16 nm for both the above cases. The structures and properties of the surfaces of Pt nanoparticles were investigated through cyclic voltammetry in dilute perchloric acid (HClO 4 ) electrolyte solution. A comparison of the electrocatalytic property in methanol electrooxidation was made. Here, the effects of polyhedral and non-polyhedral morphologies on their catalytic properties were studied. The results revealed that the special catalytic activity of quasi-sphere non-polyhedral Pt nanoparticles is higher than that of polyhedral Pt nanoparticles. In addition, Pt nanoparticles of un-sharp and quasi-sphere morphologies exhibit the tolerance to poisoning species better than that of Pt nanoparticles of sharp and polyhedral morphologies due to the various morphologies of the catalyst surfaces in the chronoamperometric plots. Therefore, these experimental evidences showed the morphology-dependent catalytic property according to the various morphologies and complexity of their catalyst surfaces.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Polyfunctional Polyhedral Silsesquioxane Cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Santy

    Recent studies on octameric polyhedral silsesquioxanes, (RSiO1.5 )8, indicate that the silsesquioxane cage is not just a passive component but appears to be involved in electron delocalization with conjugated organic tethers in the excited state. This dissertation presents the synthesis and characterization of (RSiO1.5)8 molecules with unique photophysical properties that provide support for the existence of conjugation that involves the (RSiO1.5)8 cage. The dissertation first discusses the elaboration of octavinylsilsesquioxane via cross-metathesis to form styrenyl-functionalized octasilsesquioxane molecules. Subsequent Heck coupling reactions of p-bromostyrenyl derivative provides vinylstilbene-functionalized octasilsesquioxane. The amino derivative, NH2VinylStilbeneOS, show highly red-shifted emission spectrum (100 nm from the simple organic analog p-vinylstilbene) and high two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section value (100 GM/moiety), indicating charge-transfer processes involving the silsesquioxane cage as the electron acceptor. The unique photophysical properties of polyfunctional luminescent cubic silsesquioxanes synthesized from ortho-8-, (2,5)-16-, and 24-brominated octaphenylsilsesquioxane (OPS) via Heck coupling show how the steric interactions of the organic tethers at the silsesquioxane cage corner affect conjugation with the silsesquioxane cage. Furthermore, the high TPA cross-section (10 GM/moiety) and photoluminescence quantum yield (20%) of OPS functionalized with 24 acetoxystyrenyl groups suggest that the existence excited states in these molecules with similar energies and decay rates: normal radiative pi- pi* transition and charge transfer involving the silsesquioxane cage. The fluoride ion-catalyzed rearrangement reactions of cage and polymeric silsesquioxanes provide a convenient route to a mixture of deca- and dodecameric silsesquioxane molecules in high yields, giving us the opportunity to investigate the effect of silsesquioxane cage

  15. Modeling IrisCode and its variants as convex polyhedral cones and its security implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Adams Wai-Kin

    2013-03-01

    IrisCode, developed by Daugman, in 1993, is the most influential iris recognition algorithm. A thorough understanding of IrisCode is essential, because over 100 million persons have been enrolled by this algorithm and many biometric personal identification and template protection methods have been developed based on IrisCode. This paper indicates that a template produced by IrisCode or its variants is a convex polyhedral cone in a hyperspace. Its central ray, being a rough representation of the original biometric signal, can be computed by a simple algorithm, which can often be implemented in one Matlab command line. The central ray is an expected ray and also an optimal ray of an objective function on a group of distributions. This algorithm is derived from geometric properties of a convex polyhedral cone but does not rely on any prior knowledge (e.g., iris images). The experimental results show that biometric templates, including iris and palmprint templates, produced by different recognition methods can be matched through the central rays in their convex polyhedral cones and that templates protected by a method extended from IrisCode can be broken into. These experimental results indicate that, without a thorough security analysis, convex polyhedral cone templates cannot be assumed secure. Additionally, the simplicity of the algorithm implies that even junior hackers without knowledge of advanced image processing and biometric databases can still break into protected templates and reveal relationships among templates produced by different recognition methods.

  16. Polybenzimidazole and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane composite membranes for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Allward, Todd; Alfaro, Silvia Martinez

    2014-01-01

    Composite membranes based on poly(2,2′(m-phenylene)-5,5́bibenzimidazole) (PBI) and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (S-POSS) with S-POSS contents of 5 and 10wt.% were prepared by solution casting as base materials for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. With membranes...

  17. Rheological Behavior of Entangled Polystyrene-Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) Copolymer (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Jian; Mather, Patrick T; Haddad, Timothy S; Kim, Gyeong-Man

    2006-01-01

    ...: random copolymers of polystyrene (PS) and styryl-based polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS), R7(Si8O12)(C6H4CH=CH2), with R = isobutyl (iBu). A series of styrene-styryl POSS random copolymers with 0, 6, 15, 30, 50 wt...

  18. Robust Hinf control of uncertain switched systems defined on polyhedral sets with Filippov solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, Mohamadreza; Mojallali, Hamed; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the control problem of a class of uncertain switched systems defined on polyhedral sets known as piecewise linear systems where, instead of the conventional Carathe ́odory solutions, Filippov solutions are studied. In other words, in contrast to the previous studies, solutions...

  19. The colocalization transition of homologous chromosomes at meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemi, Mario; Panning, Barbara; Prisco, Antonella

    2008-06-01

    Meiosis is the specialized cell division required in sexual reproduction. During its early stages, in the mother cell nucleus, homologous chromosomes recognize each other and colocalize in a crucial step that remains one of the most mysterious of meiosis. Starting from recent discoveries on the system molecular components and interactions, we discuss a statistical mechanics model of chromosome early pairing. Binding molecules mediate long-distance interaction of special DNA recognition sequences and, if their concentration exceeds a critical threshold, they induce a spontaneous colocalization transition of chromosomes, otherwise independently diffusing.

  20. Designing for social play in co-located mobile games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, William; Garner, Jayden; Jensen, Mads Møller

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we explore how mobile devices and co-location in mobile contexts contribute social play in game design, addressing the limited understanding of social interactivity in mobile games. Using the Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics (MDA) framework, we code four games illustrating effective use...... of mobile, social, and colocated elements. Subsequently, we analyse and discuss this data to identify generalisability in these games. In our discussion we identify how these findings address game design problems of designing collaborative games. Furthermore, we contribute to theory of designing for social...

  1. Proximity matters : synergies through co-location of logistics establishments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den F.P.; Langen, de P.W.; Donselaar, van K.H.; Fransoo, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of spatial concentration of logistics firms by empirically analyzing synergies through co-location and investigating whether spatial concentration of logistics activities indeed results in classical agglomeration economies as

  2. CRMPs colocalize and interact with cytoskeleton in hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuhao; Zhao, Bo; Ji, Zhisheng; Zhang, Guowei; Zhang, Jifeng; Li, Sumei; Guo, Guoqing; Lin, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    CRMP family proteins (CRMPs) are widely expressed in the developing neurons, mediating a variety of fundamental functions such as growth cone guidance, neuronal polarity and axon elongation. However, whether all the CRMP proteins interact with cytoskeleton remains unknown. In this study, we found that in cultured hippocampal neurons, CRMPs mainly colocalized with tubulin and actin network in neurites. In growth cones, CRMPs colocalized with tubulinmainly in the central (C-) domain and transition zone (T-zone), less in the peripheral (P-) domain and colocalized with actin in all the C-domain, T-zone and P-domain. The correlation efficiency of CRMPs between actin was significantly higher than that between tubulin, especially in growth cones. We successfully constructed GST-CRMPs plasmids, expressed and purified the GST-CRMP proteins. By GST-pulldown assay, all the CRMP family proteins were found to beinteracted with cytoskeleton proteins. Taken together, we revealed that CRMPs were colocalized with cytoskeleton in hippocampal neurons, especially in growth cones. CRMPs can interact with both tubulin and actin, thus mediating neuronal development. PMID:26885211

  3. Strict Anatomical Colocalization of Vitiligo and Elastolytic Granulomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Merino de Paz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is the most common depigmenting disorder, with a worldwide occurrence of 0.1–2% in the general population. Multiple conditions have been described colocalized in vitiligo patches, like psoriasis or lichen planus. However, actinic granuloma has not been described in association with vitiligo lesions so far.

  4. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Polyhedral Borane Anions and Aluminum-Ammonia-Borane Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Safronov, Alexander V.; Lee, Han Beak; Wu, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Phase 1. Hydrolysis of borohydride compounds offer the potential for significant hydrogen storage capacity, but most work to date has focused on one particular anion, BH4-, which requires high pH for stability. Other borohydride compounds, in particular polyhedral borane anions offer comparable hydrogen storage capacity without requiring high pH media and their long term thermal and hydrolytic stability coupled with non-toxic nature make them a very attractive alternative to NaBH4. The University of Missouri project provided the overall program focal point for the investigation of catalytic hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions for hydrogen release. Due to their inherent stability, a transition metal catalyst was necessary for the hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions. Transition metal ions such as cobalt, nickel, palladium and rhodium were investigated for their catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of nido-KB11H14, closo-K2B10H10, and closo-K2B12H12. The rate of hydrolysis follows first-order kinetics with respect to the concentration of the polyhedral borane anion and surface area of the rhodium catalyst. The rate of hydrolysis depends upon a) choice of polyhedral borane anion, c) concentration of polyhedral borane anion, d) surface area of the rhodium catalyst and e) temperature of the reaction. In all cases the yield of hydrogen was 100% which corresponds to ~7 wt% of hydrogen (based on material wt%). Phase 2. The phase 2 of program at the University of Missouri was focused upon developing aluminum ammonia-boranes (Al-AB) as chemical hydrogen storage materials, specifically their synthesis and studies of their dehydrogenation. The ammonia borane molecule (AB) is a demonstrated source of chemically stored hydrogen (19.6 wt%) which meets DOE performance parameters except for its regeneration from spent AB and elemental hydrogen. The presence of an aluminum center bonded to multiple AB residues might combine the efficiency of AB dehydrogenation with an aluminum

  5. Colocation opportunities for large solar infrastructures and agriculture in drylands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi, Sujith; Macknick, Jordan; Lobell, David; Field, Christopher; Ganesan, Karthik; Jain, Rishabh; Elchinger, Michael; Stoltenberg, Blaise

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We explored the potential to colocate solar installations and agriculture. • Water use at solar installations are similar to amounts required for desert plants. • Co-located systems are economically viable in some areas. • Colocation can maximize land and water use efficiency in drylands. - Abstract: Solar energy installations in arid and semi-arid regions are rapidly increasing due to technological advances and policy support. Although solar energy provides several benefits such as reduction of greenhouse gases, reclamation of degraded land, and improved quality of life in developing countries, the deployment of large-scale renewable energy infrastructure may negatively impact land and water resources. Meeting the ever-expanding energy demand with limited land and water resources in the context of increasing demand for alternative uses such as agricultural and domestic consumption is a major challenge. The goal of this study was to explore opportunities to colocate solar infrastructures and agricultural crops to maximize the efficiency of land and water use. We investigated the energy inputs/outputs, water use, greenhouse gas emissions, and economics of solar installations in northwestern India in comparison to aloe vera cultivation, another widely promoted and economically important land use in these systems. The life cycle analyses show that the colocated systems are economically viable in some rural areas and may provide opportunities for rural electrification and stimulate economic growth. The water inputs for cleaning solar panels are similar to amounts required for annual aloe productivity, suggesting the possibility of integrating the two systems to maximize land and water use efficiency. A life cycle analysis of a hypothetical colocation indicated higher returns per m"3 of water used than either system alone. The northwestern region of India has experienced high population growth in the past decade, creating additional demand for land

  6. Large-scale, rapid synthesis and application in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of sub-micrometer polyhedral gold nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Shaojun; Wang Yuling; Wang Erkang

    2007-01-01

    Macromolecule-protected sub-micrometer polyhedral gold nanocrystals have been facilely prepared by heating an aqueous solution containing poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) and HAuCl 4 without adding other reducing agents. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy (UV-vis-NIR), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize the obtained polyhedral gold nanocrystals. It is found that the 10:1 molar ratio of PVP to gold is a key factor for obtaining quasi-monodisperse polyhedral gold nanocrystals. Furthermore, the application of polyhedral gold nanocrystals in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was investigated by using 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) as a probe molecule. The results indicated that the sub-micrometer polyhedral gold nanocrystals modified on the ITO substrate exhibited higher SERS activity compared to the traditional gold nanoparticle modified film. The enhancement factor (EF) on polyhedral gold nanocrystals was about six times larger than that obtained on aggregated gold nanoparticles (∼25 nm)

  7. Mimetic Finite Differences for Flow in Fractures from Microseismic Data

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar; Srinivasan, Sanjay; Wheeler, Mary F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for porous media flow in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach uses the Mimetic Finite Difference method (MFD) and takes advantage of MFD's ability to solve over a general set of polyhedral cells. This flexibility is used to mesh fracture intersections in two and three-dimensional settings without creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how to use general polyhedra for embedding fracture boundaries in the reservoir domain. The target application is representing fracture networks inferred from microseismic analysis.

  8. Mimetic Finite Differences for Flow in Fractures from Microseismic Data

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for porous media flow in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach uses the Mimetic Finite Difference method (MFD) and takes advantage of MFD\\'s ability to solve over a general set of polyhedral cells. This flexibility is used to mesh fracture intersections in two and three-dimensional settings without creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how to use general polyhedra for embedding fracture boundaries in the reservoir domain. The target application is representing fracture networks inferred from microseismic analysis.

  9. Reactive bay functionalized perylene monoimide-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane organic electronic dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangatia Lodrick Makokha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation-induced quenching is particularly detrimental in perylene diimides, which are characterized by a near-unity fluorescence quantum yield in solution but are far less emissive in the solid state. Previously, perylene diimide has been improved by linking it to the inorganic cage of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes. As a further study on perylene diimidepolyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes, we report on a double functionalized molecular structure, which can be used for substitution at the bay area and as a side group in other materials. Typical solution absorption and emission features of the perylene diimide fragment have been observed in this new reactive perylene diimide-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane. Moreover, reduced stacking during aggregation and spherical particles exhibiting solid fluorescence have been obtained. Organic semiconducting material with enhanced solid state photophysical properties, like solid fluorescence is a subject of great interest owing to its possible high-tech applications in optoelectronic devices.

  10. Convex polyhedral abstractions, specialisation and property-based predicate splitting in Horn clause verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kafle, Bishoksan; Gallagher, John Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach to constrained Horn clause (CHC) verification combining three techniques: abstract interpretation over a domain of convex polyhedra, specialisation of the constraints in CHCs using abstract interpretation of query-answer transformed clauses, and refinement by splitting...... in conjunction with specialisation for propagating constraints it can frequently solve challenging verification problems. This is a contribution in itself, but refinement is needed when it fails, and the question of how to refine convex polyhedral analyses has not been studied much. We present a refinement...... technique based on interpolants derived from a counterexample trace; these are used to drive a property-based specialisation that splits predicates, leading in turn to more precise convex polyhedral analyses. The process of specialisation, analysis and splitting can be repeated, in a manner similar...

  11. Construction of porous cationic frameworks by crosslinking polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane units with N-heterocyclic linkers

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guojian; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Jing; Xue, Shuang; Liu, Yangqing; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In fields of materials science and chemistry, ionic-type porous materials attract increasing attention due to significant ion-exchanging capacity for accessing diversified applications. Facing the fact that porous cationic materials with robust and stable frameworks are very rare, novel tactics that can create new type members are highly desired. Here we report the first family of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) based porous cationic frameworks (PCIF-n) with enriched poly(ionic li...

  12. The polyomavirus BK agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unterstab, Gunhild; Gosert, Rainer; Leuenberger, David; Lorentz, Pascal; Rinaldo, Christine H.; Hirsch, Hans H.

    2010-01-01

    Agnoprotein encoded by human polyomavirus BK (BKV) is a late cytoplasmic protein of 66 amino acids (aa) of unknown function. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a fine granular and a vesicular distribution in donut-like structures. Using BKV(Dunlop)-infected or agnoprotein-transfected cells, we investigated agnoprotein co-localization with subcellular structures. We found that agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets (LD) in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells as well as in other cells supporting BKV replication in vitro (UTA, Vero cells). Using agnoprotein-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion constructs, we demonstrate that agnoprotein aa 20-42 are required for targeting LD, whereas aa 1-20 or aa 42-66 were not. Agnoprotein aa 22-40 are predicted to form an amphipathic helix, and mutations A25D and F39E, disrupting its hydrophobic domain, prevented LD targeting. However, changing the phosphorylation site serine-11 to alanine or aspartic acid did not alter LD co-localization. Our findings provide new clues to unravel agnoprotein function.

  13. Status of the Polyhedral Mesh Generator using SALOME PLATFORM and TetGen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Yong; Park, Chan Eok; Kim, Shin Whan

    2014-01-01

    Recently developed porous body approach codes such as SPACE and CUPID require a CAD system to estimate the porosity. Since they use the unstructured mesh and they also require reliable mesh generation system. The combination of CAD system and mesh generation system is necessary to cope with a large number of cells and the complex fluid system with structural materials inside. In the past, a CAD system Pro/Engineer and mesh generator Pointwise were evaluated for this application. But, the cost of those commercial CAD and mesh generator is sometimes a great burden. Therefore, efforts have been made to set up a mesh generation system with open source programs. The evaluation of the TetGen has been made in focusing the application for the polyhedral mesh generation. In this paper, SALOME will be described for the efforts to combine TetGen with it. In section 2, brief introduction will be made on the CAD and mesh generation capability of SALOME and Tetgen. SALOME and TetGen codes are being integrated to construct robust polyhedral mesh generator. Procedures to merge boundary faces and to cut concave cells are developed to remove concave cells to get final convex polyhedral mesh. Treating the internal boundary face, i.e. non-manifold face will be the next task in the future investigation

  14. Computer-Aided Panoramic Images Enriched by Shadow Construction on a Prism and Pyramid Polyhedral Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Dzwierzynska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to develop an efficient and practical method of a direct mapping of a panoramic projection on an unfolded prism and pyramid polyhedral projection surface with the aid of a computer. Due to the fact that straight lines very often appear in any architectural form we formulate algorithms which utilize data about lines and draw panoramas as plots of functions in Mathcad software. The ability to draw panoramic images of lines enables drawing a wireframe image of an architectural object. The application of the multicenter projection, as well as the idea of shadow construction in the panoramic representation, aims at achieving a panoramic image close to human perception. The algorithms are universal as the application of changeable base elements of panoramic projection—horizon height, station point location, number of polyhedral walls—enables drawing panoramic images from various viewing positions. However, for more efficient and easier drawing, the algorithms should be implemented in some graphical package. The representation presented in the paper and the method of its direct mapping on a flat unfolded projection surface can find application in the presentation of architectural spaces in advertising and art when drawings are displayed on polyhedral surfaces and can be observed from multiple viewing positions.

  15. Polygonal Prism Mesh in the Viscous Layers for the Polyhedral Mesh Generator, PolyGen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Yong; Park, Chan Eok; Kim, Shin Whan

    2015-01-01

    Polyhedral mesh has been known to have some benefits over the tetrahedral mesh. Efforts have been made to set up a polyhedral mesh generation system with open source programs SALOME and TetGen. The evaluation has shown that the polyhedral mesh generation system is promising. But it is necessary to extend the capability of the system to handle the viscous layers to be a generalized mesh generator. A brief review to the previous works on the mesh generation for the viscous layers will be made in section 2. Several challenging issues for the polygonal prism mesh generation will be discussed as well. The procedure to generate a polygonal prism mesh will be discussed in detail in section 3. Conclusion will be followed in section 4. A procedure to generate meshes in the viscous layers with PolyGen has been successfully designed. But more efforts have to be exercised to find the best way for the generating meshes for viscous layers. Using the extrusion direction of the STL data will the first of the trials in the near future

  16. Selecting optimum locations for co-located wave and wind energy farms. Part I: The Co-Location Feasibility index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astariz, S.; Iglesias, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • New approach to identifying suitable sites for co-located wave and wind farms. • A new tool, the Co-Location Feasibility (CLF) index, is defined. • Its application is analysed by means of a case study off the Danish coast. • Hindcast and measured wave and wind data from 2005 to 2015 are used. • Third-generation models of winds and waves (WAsP and SWAN) are used. - Abstract: Marine energy is poised to play a fundamental role in meeting renewable energy and carbon emission targets thanks to the abundant, and still largely untapped, wave and tidal resources. However, it is often considered difficult and uneconomical – as is usually the case of nascent technologies. Combining various renewables, such as wave and offshore wind energy, has emerged as a solution to improve their competitiveness and in the process overcome other challenges that hinder their development. The objective of this paper is to develop a new approach to identifying suitable sites for co-located wave and wind farms based on the assessment of the available resources and technical constraints, and to illustrate its application by means of a case study off the Danish coast – an area of interest for combining wave and wind energy. The method is based on an ad hoc tool, the Co-Location Feasibility (CLF) index, and is based on a joint characterisation of the wave and wind resources, which takes into account not only the available power but also the correlation between both resources and the power variability. The analysis is carried out based on hindcast data and observations from 2005 to 2015, and using third-generation models of winds and waves – WAsP and SWAN, respectively. Upon selection and ranking, it is found that a number of sites in the study region are indeed suited to realising the synergies between wave and offshore wind energy. The approach developed in this work can be applied elsewhere.

  17. Improvement of prediction accuracy of large eddy simulation on colocated grids; Colocation koshi wo mochiita LES no keisan seido kaizen ni kansuru ichikosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, M.; Abe, K. [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan)

    1998-07-25

    With the recent advances in computers, large eddy simulation (LES) has become applicable to engineering prediction. However, most cases of the engineering applications need to use the nonorthgonal curvilimear coordinate systems. The staggered grids, usually used in LES in the orthgonal coordinates, don`t keep conservative properties in the nonorthgonal curvilinear coordinates. On the other hand, the colocated grids can be applied in the nonorthgonal curvilinear coordinates without losing its conservative properties, although its prediction accuracy isn`t so high as the staggered grid`s in the orthgonal coordinates especially with the coarse grids. In this research, the discretization method of the colocated grids is modified to improve its prediction accuracy. Plane channel flows are simulated on four grids of different resolution using the modified colocated grids and the original colocated grids. The results show that the modified colocated grids have higher accuracy than the original colocated grids. 17 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Building collaboration? Co-location and territoriality in a railway control center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, T.A.H.; van Marrewijk, A.H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the design of co-located spaces and how organizational actors experience such spaces. The literature on co-location is ambiguous about how reduced physical distance increases collaboration. To address this problem, we draw on an ethnographic study of a co-located railway control

  19. The Galerkin finite element method for a multi-term time-fractional diffusion equation

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Bangti

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Authors. We consider the initial/boundary value problem for a diffusion equation involving multiple time-fractional derivatives on a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyze a space semidiscrete scheme based on the standard Galerkin finite element method using continuous piecewise linear functions. Nearly optimal error estimates for both cases of initial data and inhomogeneous term are derived, which cover both smooth and nonsmooth data. Further we develop a fully discrete scheme based on a finite difference discretization of the time-fractional derivatives, and discuss its stability and error estimate. Extensive numerical experiments for one- and two-dimensional problems confirm the theoretical convergence rates.

  20. Final Report of the Project "From the finite element method to the virtual element method"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gyrya, Vitaliy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-20

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a powerful numerical tool that is being used in a large number of engineering applications. The FEM is constructed on triangular/tetrahedral and quadrilateral/hexahedral meshes. Extending the FEM to general polygonal/polyhedral meshes in straightforward way turns out to be extremely difficult and leads to very complex and computationally expensive schemes. The reason for this failure is that the construction of the basis functions on elements with a very general shape is a non-trivial and complex task. In this project we developed a new family of numerical methods, dubbed the Virtual Element Method (VEM) for the numerical approximation of partial differential equations (PDE) of elliptic type suitable to polygonal and polyhedral unstructured meshes. We successfully formulated, implemented and tested these methods and studied both theoretically and numerically their stability, robustness and accuracy for diffusion problems, convection-reaction-diffusion problems, the Stokes equations and the biharmonic equations.

  1. Adipophilin distribution and colocalization with lipid droplets in skeletal muscle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shaw, Christopher S

    2009-05-01

    Intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) are stored as discrete lipid droplets which are associated with a number of proteins. The lipid droplet-associated protein adipophilin (the human orthologue of adipose differentiation-related protein) is ubiquitously expressed and is one of the predominant lipid droplet-proteins in skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the subcellular distribution of adipophilin in human muscle fibres and to measure the colocalization of adipophilin with IMCL. Muscle biopsies from six lean male cyclists (BMI 23.4 +\\/- 0.4, aged 31 +\\/- 2 years, W (max) 346 +\\/- 8) were stained for myosin heavy chain type 1, IMCL, adipophilin and mitochondria using immunofluorescence and viewed with widefield and confocal fluorescence microscopy. The present study shows that like IMCL, the adipophilin content is ~twofold greater in type I skeletal muscle fibres and is situated in the areas between the mitochondrial network. Colocalization analysis demonstrated that 61 +\\/- 2% of IMCL contain adipophilin. Although the majority of adipophilin is contained within IMCL, 36 +\\/- 4% of adipophilin is not associated with IMCL. In conclusion, this study indicates that the IMCL pool is heterogeneous, as the majority but not all IMCL contain adipophilin.

  2. Assessment of local GNSS baselines at co-location sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Pinzón, Iván; Rothacher, Markus

    2018-01-01

    As one of the major contributors to the realisation of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS), the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are prone to suffer from irregularities and discontinuities in time series. While often associated with hardware/software changes and the influence of the local environment, these discrepancies constitute a major threat for ITRS realisations. Co-located GNSS at fundamental sites, with two or more available instruments, provide the opportunity to mitigate their influence while improving the accuracy of estimated positions by examining data breaks, local biases, deformations, time-dependent variations and the comparison of GNSS baselines with existing local tie measurements. With the use of co-located GNSS data from a subset sites of the International GNSS Service network, this paper discusses a global multi-year analysis with the aim of delivering homogeneous time series of coordinates to analyse system-specific error sources in the local baselines. Results based on the comparison of different GNSS-based solutions with the local survey ties show discrepancies of up to 10 mm despite GNSS coordinate repeatabilities at the sub-mm level. The discrepancies are especially large for the solutions using the ionosphere-free linear combination and estimating tropospheric zenith delays, thus corresponding to the processing strategy used for global solutions. Snow on the antennas causes further problems and seasonal variations of the station coordinates. These demonstrate the need for a permanent high-quality monitoring of the effects present in the short GNSS baselines at fundamental sites.

  3. Polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane monolayer as a nanoporous interlayer for preparation of low-k dielectric films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y-L; Liu, C-S; Cho, C-I; Hwu, M-J

    2007-01-01

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane (POSS) monomer was fixed to a silicon surface by reacting octakis(glycidyldimethylsiloxy)octasilsesquioxane (OG-POSS) with the OH-terminated silicon surface in the presence of tin (II) chloride. The POSS cage layer then served as a nanoporous interlayer to reduce the dielectric constants of polyimide films on silicon surfaces. The chemical structure and surface morphology of OG-POSS modified silicon surfaces were characterized with XPS. With the introduction of a POSS nanopored interlayer, the dielectric constants of polyimide films were reduced

  4. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Yuno; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Giant vesicles (GVs) encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of "crowding effect" which is the entropic interaction in the cell.

  5. Thermo-mechanical characterization of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polystyrene composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Ignazio; Bottino, Francesco A.; Cicala, Gianluca; Cozzo, Giulia; Latteri, Alberta; Recca, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polystyrene (ph,hib-POSS/PS) composite were studied and compared with those of pristine polymer. ph,hib-POSS/PS system was prepared by solubilization and precipitation of Polystyrene (PS) in the presence of POSS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was performed to check the distribution of the filler in the polymer matrix. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was carried out to measure viscoelastic properties of solid samples. Degradations were carried out into a thermobalance and the obtained thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves were discussed and interpreted

  6. Glial activation colocalizes with structural abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshikho, Mohamad J; Zürcher, Nicole R; Loggia, Marco L; Cernasov, Paul; Chonde, Daniel B; Izquierdo Garcia, David; Yasek, Julia E; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Catana, Ciprian; Rosen, Bruce R; Cudkowicz, Merit E; Hooker, Jacob M; Atassi, Nazem

    2016-12-13

    In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to evaluate brain structural abnormalities in relation to glial activation in the same cohort of participants. Ten individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 10 matched healthy controls underwent brain imaging using integrated MR/PET and the radioligand [ 11 C]-PBR28. Diagnosis history and clinical assessments including Upper Motor Neuron Burden Scale (UMNB) were obtained from patients with ALS. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analyses including tract-based spatial statistics and tractography were applied. DTI metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivities (mean, axial, and radial) were measured in regions of interest. Cortical thickness was assessed using surface-based analysis. The locations of structural changes, measured by DTI and the areas of cortical thinning, were compared to regional glial activation measured by relative [ 11 C]-PBR28 uptake. In this cohort of individuals with ALS, reduced FA and cortical thinning colocalized with regions demonstrating higher radioligand binding. [ 11 C]-PBR28 binding in the left motor cortex was correlated with FA (r = -0.68, p < 0.05) and cortical thickness (r = -0.75, p < 0.05). UMNB was correlated with glial activation (r = +0.75, p < 0.05), FA (r = -0.77, p < 0.05), and cortical thickness (r = -0.75, p < 0.05) in the motor cortex. Increased uptake of the glial marker [ 11 C]-PBR28 colocalizes with changes in FA and cortical thinning. This suggests a link between disease mechanisms (gliosis and inflammation) and structural changes (cortical thinning and white and gray matter changes). In this multimodal neuroimaging work, we provide an in vivo model to investigate the pathogenesis of ALS. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. An Isometric Mapping Based Co-Location Decision Tree Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G.; Wei, J.; Zhou, X.; Zhang, R.; Huang, W.; Sha, H.; Chen, J.

    2018-05-01

    Decision tree (DT) induction has been widely used in different pattern classification. However, most traditional DTs have the disadvantage that they consider only non-spatial attributes (ie, spectral information) as a result of classifying pixels, which can result in objects being misclassified. Therefore, some researchers have proposed a co-location decision tree (Cl-DT) method, which combines co-location and decision tree to solve the above the above-mentioned traditional decision tree problems. Cl-DT overcomes the shortcomings of the existing DT algorithms, which create a node for each value of a given attribute, which has a higher accuracy than the existing decision tree approach. However, for non-linearly distributed data instances, the euclidean distance between instances does not reflect the true positional relationship between them. In order to overcome these shortcomings, this paper proposes an isometric mapping method based on Cl-DT (called, (Isomap-based Cl-DT), which is a method that combines heterogeneous and Cl-DT together. Because isometric mapping methods use geodetic distances instead of Euclidean distances between non-linearly distributed instances, the true distance between instances can be reflected. The experimental results and several comparative analyzes show that: (1) The extraction method of exposed carbonate rocks is of high accuracy. (2) The proposed method has many advantages, because the total number of nodes, the number of leaf nodes and the number of nodes are greatly reduced compared to Cl-DT. Therefore, the Isomap -based Cl-DT algorithm can construct a more accurate and faster decision tree.

  8. AN ISOMETRIC MAPPING BASED CO-LOCATION DECISION TREE ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Decision tree (DT induction has been widely used in different pattern classification. However, most traditional DTs have the disadvantage that they consider only non-spatial attributes (ie, spectral information as a result of classifying pixels, which can result in objects being misclassified. Therefore, some researchers have proposed a co-location decision tree (Cl-DT method, which combines co-location and decision tree to solve the above the above-mentioned traditional decision tree problems. Cl-DT overcomes the shortcomings of the existing DT algorithms, which create a node for each value of a given attribute, which has a higher accuracy than the existing decision tree approach. However, for non-linearly distributed data instances, the euclidean distance between instances does not reflect the true positional relationship between them. In order to overcome these shortcomings, this paper proposes an isometric mapping method based on Cl-DT (called, (Isomap-based Cl-DT, which is a method that combines heterogeneous and Cl-DT together. Because isometric mapping methods use geodetic distances instead of Euclidean distances between non-linearly distributed instances, the true distance between instances can be reflected. The experimental results and several comparative analyzes show that: (1 The extraction method of exposed carbonate rocks is of high accuracy. (2 The proposed method has many advantages, because the total number of nodes, the number of leaf nodes and the number of nodes are greatly reduced compared to Cl-DT. Therefore, the Isomap -based Cl-DT algorithm can construct a more accurate and faster decision tree.

  9. Towards reproducible experimental studies for non-convex polyhedral shaped particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Daniel N.; Pizette, Patrick; Govender, Nicolin; Abriak, Nor-Edine

    2017-06-01

    The packing density and flat bottomed hopper discharge of non-convex polyhedral particles are investigated in a systematic experimental study. The motivation for this study is two-fold. Firstly, to establish an approach to deliver quality experimental particle packing data for non-convex polyhedral particles that can be used for characterization and validation purposes of discrete element codes. Secondly, to make the reproducibility of experimental setups as convenient and readily available as possible using affordable and accessible technology. The primary technology for this study is fused deposition modeling used to 3D print polylactic acid (PLA) particles using readily available 3D printer technology. A total of 8000 biodegradable particles were printed, 1000 white particles and 1000 black particles for each of the four particle types considered in this study. Reproducibility is one benefit of using fused deposition modeling to print particles, but an extremely important additional benefit is that specific particle properties can be explicitly controlled. As an example in this study the volume fraction of each particle can be controlled i.e. the effective particle density can be adjusted. In this study the particle volumes reduces drastically as the non-convexity is increased, however all printed white particles in this study have the same mass within 2% of each other.

  10. Towards reproducible experimental studies for non-convex polyhedral shaped particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Daniel N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The packing density and flat bottomed hopper discharge of non-convex polyhedral particles are investigated in a systematic experimental study. The motivation for this study is two-fold. Firstly, to establish an approach to deliver quality experimental particle packing data for non-convex polyhedral particles that can be used for characterization and validation purposes of discrete element codes. Secondly, to make the reproducibility of experimental setups as convenient and readily available as possible using affordable and accessible technology. The primary technology for this study is fused deposition modeling used to 3D print polylactic acid (PLA particles using readily available 3D printer technology. A total of 8000 biodegradable particles were printed, 1000 white particles and 1000 black particles for each of the four particle types considered in this study. Reproducibility is one benefit of using fused deposition modeling to print particles, but an extremely important additional benefit is that specific particle properties can be explicitly controlled. As an example in this study the volume fraction of each particle can be controlled i.e. the effective particle density can be adjusted. In this study the particle volumes reduces drastically as the non-convexity is increased, however all printed white particles in this study have the same mass within 2% of each other.

  11. Fourth class of convex equilateral polyhedron with polyhedral symmetry related to fullerenes and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Stan; Gayed, James Maurice

    2014-02-25

    The three known classes of convex polyhedron with equal edge lengths and polyhedral symmetry--tetrahedral, octahedral, and icosahedral--are the 5 Platonic polyhedra, the 13 Archimedean polyhedra--including the truncated icosahedron or soccer ball--and the 2 rhombic polyhedra reported by Johannes Kepler in 1611. (Some carbon fullerenes, inorganic cages, icosahedral viruses, geodesic structures, and protein complexes resemble these fundamental shapes.) Here we add a fourth class, "Goldberg polyhedra," which are also convex and equilateral. We begin by decorating each of the triangular facets of a tetrahedron, an octahedron, or an icosahedron with the T vertices and connecting edges of a "Goldberg triangle." We obtain the unique set of internal angles in each planar face of each polyhedron by solving a system of n equations and n variables, where the equations set the dihedral angle discrepancy about different types of edge to zero, and the variables are a subset of the internal angles in 6gons. Like the faces in Kepler's rhombic polyhedra, the 6gon faces in Goldberg polyhedra are equilateral and planar but not equiangular. We show that there is just a single tetrahedral Goldberg polyhedron, a single octahedral one, and a systematic, countable infinity of icosahedral ones, one for each Goldberg triangle. Unlike carbon fullerenes and faceted viruses, the icosahedral Goldberg polyhedra are nearly spherical. The reasoning and techniques presented here will enable discovery of still more classes of convex equilateral polyhedra with polyhedral symmetry.

  12. Polyhedral Lyapunov functions structurally ensure global asymptotic stability of dynamical networks iff the Jacobian is non-singular

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanchini, Franco; Giordano, G.

    2017-01-01

    For a vast class of dynamical networks, including chemical reaction networks (CRNs) with monotonic reaction rates, the existence of a polyhedral Lyapunov function (PLF) implies structural (i.e., parameter-free) local stability. Global structural stability is ensured under the additional

  13. Immobilization of isolated FI catalyst on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-functionalized silica for the synthesis of weakly entangled polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yang, Huaqin; Zhang, Jingjing; Mu, Jingshan; Gong, Dirong; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-09-25

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSSs) were adsorbed on methylaluminoxane-activated silica for the immobilization of fluorinated bis(phenoxyimine)Ti complexes (FI catalyst). These POSSs have been characterized as horizontal spacers isolating the active sites and hindering the chain overlap in polymerization. The heterogeneous catalyst exhibits considerable activity in the synthesis of weakly entangled polyethylene.

  14. Colocation as a hybrid ICT sourcing strategy to improve operational agility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Roman; Pahlke, Immanuel; Vykoukal, Jens

    2016-01-01

    a hybrid ICT sourcing strategy called colocation that allows firms to operate their own ICT resources in facilities of special-ized data center providers. Grounded in the theory of dynamic capabilities, we theorize and empirically ex-amine how colocation and top management support enable firms to improve...... their operational agility in the presence of environmental turbulence....

  15. Hedgehog Buckyball: A High-Symmetry Complete Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report UV-MALDI-TOF MS evidence of a fullerene-like silsesquioxane, a high-symmetry polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS or SSO formulated as R60-Si60O90 or T60 (T = RSiO1.5. The T60 preparation can be performed using a normal hydrolytic condensation of [(3-methacryloxypropyl]trimethoxysilane (MPMS as an example. Theoretically, four 3sp3 hybrid orbitals (each containing an unpaired electron of a Si atom are generated before the bond formation. Then it bonds to another four atom electrons using the four generated hybrid orbitals which produced a stable configuration. This fullerene-like silsesquioxane should exhibit much more functionality, activity and selectivity and is easier to assemble than the double bonds in a fullerene.

  16. Multifunctional Mesoporous Ionic Gels and Scaffolds Derived from Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Hong; Lee, Albert S; Lee, Jong-Chan; Hong, Soon Man; Hwang, Seung Sang; Koo, Chong Min

    2017-02-01

    A new methodology for fabrication of inorganic-organic hybrid ionogels and scaffolds is developed through facile cross-linking and solution extraction of a newly developed ionic polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane with inorganic core. Through design of various cationic tertiary amines, as well as cross-linkable functional groups on each arm of the inorganic core, high-performance ionogels are fabricated with excellent electrochemical stability and unique ion conduction behavior, giving superior lithium ion battery performance. Moreover, through solvent extraction of the liquid components, hybrid scaffolds with well-defined, interconnected mesopores are utilized as heterogeneous catalysts for the CO 2 -catalyzed cycloaddition of epoxides. Excellent catalytic performance, as well as highly efficient recyclability are observed when compared to other previous literature materials.

  17. Efficient light-emitting devices based on platinum-complexes-anchored polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane materials

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2010-08-24

    The synthesis, photophysical, and electrochemical characterization of macromolecules, consisting of an emissive platinum complex and carbazole moieties covalently attached to a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) core, is reported. Organic light-emitting devices based on these POSS materials exhibit a peak external quantum efficiency of ca. 8%, which is significantly higher than that of the analogous devices with a physical blend of the platinum complexes and a polymer matrix, and they represent noticeable improvement in the device efficiency of solution-processable phosphorescent excimer devices. Furthermore, the ratio of monomer and excimer/aggregate electroluminescent emission intensity, as well as the device efficiency, increases as the platinum complex moiety presence on the POSS macromolecules decreases. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. Flow cytometry evidence of human granulocytes interaction with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes: effect of nanoparticle charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renò, Filippo; Rizzi, Manuela; Pittarella, Pamela; Carniato, Fabio; Olivero, Francesco; Marchese, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) entering the human body are immediately confronted with the innate part of human immune system. In particular, monocyte and neutrophil granulocytes readily clear particles by phagocytosis, even if in the case of NPs the uptake mechanism may be classified as macropinocytosis. Among engineered nanoparticles, in the last years, siliceous materials have emerged as promising materials for several applications ranging from catalysis to biomedical. The polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) are nanodimensional, easily synthesizable molecular compounds and POSS-based systems are promising carriers for biological molecules. In this work, the ability of human granulocytes to uptake positively and negatively charged POSS was measured using a simple flow cytometry analysis based on cell size modifications. The data obtained showed that after a 30 min exposure only positive NPs were uptaken by human granulocyte using both macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated mechanisms as demonstrated by uptake inhibition mediated by amiloride and chlorpromazine. (paper)

  19. Spontaneous growth of the polyhedral fullerene crystals in the supersaturated Ni-C(60) composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacík, Jiří; Lavrentiev, Vasyl; Michalcová, A.; Abe, H.; Horák, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 509, č. 1 (2011), S380-S383 ISSN 0925-8388. [17th International Symposium on Metastable, Amorphous and Nanostructured Materials (ISMANAM 2010). Zurich, 04.09.2010-09.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP107/11/1856; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400480701; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400320901; GA AV ČR IAA200480702; GA ČR GA106/09/1264; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Nickel * Fullerene s * Phase separation * Polyhedral particles Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 2.289, year: 2011

  20. Development of highly open polyhedral networks from vitreous carbon for orthopaedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güiza-Argüello, V.; Bayona-Becerra, M.; Cruz-Orellana, S.; Córdoba-Tuta, E.

    2017-01-01

    Highly open polyhedral networks were fabricated using an economical and environmentally friendly template route. Recycled cellulose foams were impregnated with a sucrose resin and then pyrolyzed in order to produce reticulated vitreous carbon foams with morphological features that closely resemble trabecular bone. Also, cell sizes ~1mm were achieved, a trait that will allow the mechanical reinforcement of such scaffolds using a biomaterial coating without compromising the pore size that favors osteoblast cell infiltration and growth (200-500µm). Moreover, initial studies showed that carbonization conditions have an effect on the mechanical properties of the synthesized foams and, therefore, such process parameters could be further evaluated towards the enhancement of the mechanical resistance of the scaffolds. The materials developed here are visualized as the porous component of a synthetic bone graft with features that could help overcome the current limitations associated with the medical treatments used for bone defect repair.

  1. Descriptive and Computer Aided Drawing Perspective on an Unfolded Polyhedral Projection Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwierzynska, Jolanta

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the herby study is to develop a method of direct and practical mapping of perspective on an unfolded prism polyhedral projection surface. The considered perspective representation is a rectilinear central projection onto a surface composed of several flat elements. In the paper two descriptive methods of drawing perspective are presented: direct and indirect. The graphical mapping of the effects of the representation is realized directly on the unfolded flat projection surface. That is due to the projective and graphical connection between points displayed on the polyhedral background and their counterparts received on the unfolded flat surface. For a significant improvement of the construction of line, analytical algorithms are formulated. They draw a perspective image of a segment of line passing through two different points determined by their coordinates in a spatial coordinate system of axis x, y, z. Compared to other perspective construction methods that use information about points, for computer vision and the computer aided design, our algorithms utilize data about lines, which are applied very often in architectural forms. Possibility of drawing lines in the considered perspective enables drawing an edge perspective image of an architectural object. The application of the changeable base elements of perspective as a horizon height and a station point location enable drawing perspective image from different viewing positions. The analytical algorithms for drawing perspective images are formulated in Mathcad software, however, they can be implemented in the majority of computer graphical packages, which can make drawing perspective more efficient and easier. The representation presented in the paper and the way of its direct mapping on the flat unfolded projection surface can find application in presentation of architectural space in advertisement and art.

  2. Dual channel rank-based intensity weighting for quantitative co-localization of microscopy images

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Singan, Vasanth R

    2011-10-21

    Abstract Background Accurate quantitative co-localization is a key parameter in the context of understanding the spatial co-ordination of molecules and therefore their function in cells. Existing co-localization algorithms consider either the presence of co-occurring pixels or correlations of intensity in regions of interest. Depending on the image source, and the algorithm selected, the co-localization coefficients determined can be highly variable, and often inaccurate. Furthermore, this choice of whether co-occurrence or correlation is the best approach for quantifying co-localization remains controversial. Results We have developed a novel algorithm to quantify co-localization that improves on and addresses the major shortcomings of existing co-localization measures. This algorithm uses a non-parametric ranking of pixel intensities in each channel, and the difference in ranks of co-localizing pixel positions in the two channels is used to weight the coefficient. This weighting is applied to co-occurring pixels thereby efficiently combining both co-occurrence and correlation. Tests with synthetic data sets show that the algorithm is sensitive to both co-occurrence and correlation at varying levels of intensity. Analysis of biological data sets demonstrate that this new algorithm offers high sensitivity, and that it is capable of detecting subtle changes in co-localization, exemplified by studies on a well characterized cargo protein that moves through the secretory pathway of cells. Conclusions This algorithm provides a novel way to efficiently combine co-occurrence and correlation components in biological images, thereby generating an accurate measure of co-localization. This approach of rank weighting of intensities also eliminates the need for manual thresholding of the image, which is often a cause of error in co-localization quantification. We envisage that this tool will facilitate the quantitative analysis of a wide range of biological data sets

  3. IGFBP3 colocalizes with and regulates hypocretin (orexin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Honda

    Full Text Available The sleep disorder narcolepsy is caused by a vast reduction in neurons producing the hypocretin (orexin neuropeptides. Based on the tight association with HLA, narcolepsy is believed to result from an autoimmune attack, but the cause of hypocretin cell loss is still unknown. We performed gene expression profiling in the hypothalamus to identify novel genes dysregulated in narcolepsy, as these may be the target of autoimmune attack or modulate hypocretin gene expression.We used microarrays to compare the transcriptome in the posterior hypothalamus of (1 narcoleptic versus control postmortem human brains and (2 transgenic mice lacking hypocretin neurons versus wild type mice. Hypocretin was the most downregulated gene in human narcolepsy brains. Among many additional candidates, only one, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3, was downregulated in both human and mouse models and co-expressed in hypocretin neurons. Functional analysis indicated decreased hypocretin messenger RNA and peptide content, and increased sleep in transgenic mice overexpressing human IGFBP3, an effect possibly mediated through decreased hypocretin promotor activity in the presence of excessive IGFBP3. Although we found no IGFBP3 autoantibodies nor a genetic association with IGFBP3 polymorphisms in human narcolepsy, we found that an IGFBP3 polymorphism known to increase serum IGFBP3 levels was associated with lower CSF hypocretin-1 in normal individuals.Comparison of the transcriptome in narcolepsy and narcolepsy model mouse brains revealed a novel dysregulated gene which colocalized in hypocretin cells. Functional analysis indicated that the identified IGFBP3 is a new regulator of hypocretin cell physiology that may be involved not only in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy, but also in the regulation of sleep in normal individuals, most notably during adolescence. Further studies are required to address the hypothesis that excessive IGFBP3 expression may

  4. Colocated MIMO Radar: Beamforming, Waveform design, and Target Parameter Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Jardak, Seifallah

    2014-04-01

    Thanks to its improved capabilities, the Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) radar is attracting the attention of researchers and practitioners alike. Because it transmits orthogonal or partially correlated waveforms, this emerging technology outperformed the phased array radar by providing better parametric identifiability, achieving higher spatial resolution, and designing complex beampatterns. To avoid jamming and enhance the signal to noise ratio, it is often interesting to maximize the transmitted power in a given region of interest and minimize it elsewhere. This problem is known as the transmit beampattern design and is usually tackled as a two-step process: a transmit covariance matrix is firstly designed by minimizing a convex optimization problem, which is then used to generate practical waveforms. In this work, we propose simple novel methods to generate correlated waveforms using finite alphabet constant and non-constant-envelope symbols. To generate finite alphabet waveforms, the proposed method maps easily generated Gaussian random variables onto the phase-shift-keying, pulse-amplitude, and quadrature-amplitude modulation schemes. For such mapping, the probability density function of Gaussian random variables is divided into M regions, where M is the number of alphabets in the corresponding modulation scheme. By exploiting the mapping function, the relationship between the cross-correlation of Gaussian and finite alphabet symbols is derived. The second part of this thesis covers the topic of target parameter estimation. To determine the reflection coefficient, spatial location, and Doppler shift of a target, maximum likelihood estimation yields the best performance. However, it requires a two dimensional search problem. Therefore, its computational complexity is prohibitively high. So, we proposed a reduced complexity and optimum performance algorithm which allows the two dimensional fast Fourier transform to jointly estimate the spatial location

  5. Mining Co-Location Patterns with Clustering Items from Spatial Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G.; Li, Q.; Deng, G.; Yue, T.; Zhou, X.

    2018-05-01

    The explosive growth of spatial data and widespread use of spatial databases emphasize the need for the spatial data mining. Co-location patterns discovery is an important branch in spatial data mining. Spatial co-locations represent the subsets of features which are frequently located together in geographic space. However, the appearance of a spatial feature C is often not determined by a single spatial feature A or B but by the two spatial features A and B, that is to say where A and B appear together, C often appears. We note that this co-location pattern is different from the traditional co-location pattern. Thus, this paper presents a new concept called clustering terms, and this co-location pattern is called co-location patterns with clustering items. And the traditional algorithm cannot mine this co-location pattern, so we introduce the related concept in detail and propose a novel algorithm. This algorithm is extended by join-based approach proposed by Huang. Finally, we evaluate the performance of this algorithm.

  6. Non-Colocated Kinesthetic Display Limits Compliance Discrimination in the Absence of Terminal Force Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeremy D; Shelley, Mackenzie K; Gardner, Duane; Gansallo, Emmanuel A; Gillespie, R Brent

    2016-01-01

    An important goal of haptic display is to make available the action/reaction relationships that define interactions between the body and the physical world. While in physical world interactions reaction cues invariably impinge on the same part of the body involved in action (reaction and action are colocated), a haptic interface is quite capable of rendering feedback to a separate body part than that used for producing exploratory actions (non-colocated action and reaction). This most commonly occurs with the use of vibrotactile display, in which a cutaneous cue has been substituted for a kinesthetic cue (a kind of sensory substitution). In this paper, we investigate whether non-colocated force and displacement cues degrade the perception of compliance. Using a custom non-colocated kinesthetic display in which one hand controls displacement and the other senses force, we ask participants to discriminate between two virtual springs with matched terminal force and adjustable non-linearity. An additional condition includes one hand controlling displacement while the other senses force encoded in a vibrotactile cue. Results show that when the terminal force cue is unavailable, and even when sensory substitution is not involved, non-colocated kinesthetic displays degrade compliance discrimination relative to colocated kinesthetic displays. Compliance discrimination is also degraded with vibrotactile display of force. These findings suggest that non-colocated kinesthetic displays and, likewise, cutaneous sensory substitution displays should be avoided when discrimination of compliance is necessary for task success.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of an octaimidazolium-based polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes ionic liquid by an ion-exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jinglin; Ma, Depeng; Sun, Xingrong; Feng, Shengyu; Zhang, Changqiao

    2013-04-07

    Preparation of POSS-min-DS, an octaimidazolium-based polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) room temperature ionic liquid, by an ion-exchange reaction between POSS and sodium dodecyl sulfate was reported. Octaimidazolium-based POSS was synthesized with more than 98% yield within 3 h. POSS-min-DS and octaimidazolium-based POSS were confirmed by (1)H, (13)C, and (29)Si NMR, FT-IR and elemental analysis.

  8. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of

  9. A Partial Join Approach for Mining Co-Location Patterns: A Summary of Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoo, Jin S; Shekhar, Shashi

    2005-01-01

    .... They propose a novel partial-join approach for mining co-location patterns efficiently. It transactionizes continuous spatial data while keeping track of the spatial information not modeled by transactions...

  10. Colocalization analysis in fluorescence micrographs: verification of a more accurate calculation of pearson's correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Andrew L; Macleod, Alasdair; Noppen, Samuel; Sanderson, Jeremy; Guérin, Christopher J

    2010-12-01

    One of the most routine uses of fluorescence microscopy is colocalization, i.e., the demonstration of a relationship between pairs of biological molecules. Frequently this is presented simplistically by the use of overlays of red and green images, with areas of yellow indicating colocalization of the molecules. Colocalization data are rarely quantified and can be misleading. Our results from both synthetic and biological datasets demonstrate that the generation of Pearson's correlation coefficient between pairs of images can overestimate positive correlation and fail to demonstrate negative correlation. We have demonstrated that the calculation of a thresholded Pearson's correlation coefficient using only intensity values over a determined threshold in both channels produces numerical values that more accurately describe both synthetic datasets and biological examples. Its use will bring clarity and accuracy to colocalization studies using fluorescent microscopy.

  11. Design of novel nano-carriers for multi-enzyme co-localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Feng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to design novel nano-structured carriers and strategies to co-localize multiple enzymes to mimic the functionalities of MECs. In order to achieve this goal, distinct approaches for enzyme co-localization were developed and evaluated. Specifically, we investigated different polymeric nano-carriers, both flexible and rigid, as platforms for co-localization, as well as distinct enzyme attachment techniques using model enzyme systems using glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase to control the spatial arrangement of the multiple enzymes on the nanocarriers. This platform technology can be potentially used to co-localize various enzyme systems and its broad applicability will be tested using the sclareol biosynthesis process to control the formation of products through the formation of MECs with multiple enzymes NgCPS and sSsSS to regulate the pathway of reactive intermediate to enhance the final product conversion rate.

  12. IGF-1 colocalizes with muscle satellite cells following acute exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Amanda; Joanisse, Sophie; Moore, Daniel R; Bellamy, Leeann M; Mitchell, Cameron J; Phillips, Stuart M; Parise, Gianni

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro. The aim of this study was to quantify the change in satellite cell (SC) specific IGF-1 colocalization following exercise. We observed a significant increase (p IGF-1 colocalization from baseline to 72 h after a bout of resistance exercise. This strongly supports a role for IGF-1 in human SC function following exercise.

  13. Analysis of Co-assembly and Co-localization of Ameloblastin and Amelogenin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prichita eMazumder

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Epithelially-derived ameloblasts secrete extracellular matrix proteins including amelogenin, enamelin and ameloblastin. Complex intermolecular interactions among these proteins are believed to be important in controlling enamel formation. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence of co-assembly and co-localization of ameloblastin with amelogenin using both biophysical and immunohistochemical methods. We performed co-localization studies using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy with paraffin-embedded tissue sections from mandibular molars of mice at 1, 5 and 8 days of age. Commercially-available ameloblastin antibody (M300 against mouse ameloblastin residues 107-407 and an antibody against full-length recombinant mouse (rM179 amelogenin were used. Ameloblastin-M300 clearly reacted along the secretory face of ameloblasts from days 1-8. Quantitative co-localization was analyzed (QCA in several configurations by choosing appropriate regions of interest (ROIs. Analysis of ROIs along the secretory face of ameloblasts revealed that at day 1, very high percentages of both the ameloblastin and amelogenin co-localized. At day 8 along the ameloblast cells the percentage of co-localization remained high for the ameloblastin whereas co-localization percentage was reduced for amelogenin. Analysis of the entire thickness on day 8 revealed no significant co-localization of amelogenin and ameloblastin. With the progress of amelogenesis and ameloblastin degradation, there was a segregation of ameloblastin and co-localization with the C-terminal region decreased. CD spectra indicated that structural changes in ameloblastin occurred upon addition of amelogenin. Our data suggest that amelogenin-ameloblastin complexes may be the functional entities at the early stage of enamel mineralization.

  14. Groebner Finite Path Algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Leamer, Micah J.

    2004-01-01

    Let K be a field and Q a finite directed multi-graph. In this paper I classify all path algebras KQ and admissible orders with the property that all of their finitely generated ideals have finite Groebner bases. MS

  15. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  16. Self-assembled amphiphilic polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) grafted poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Barakat, Nasser A.M.; Kim, Byoung-Suhk; Aryal, Santosh; Khil, Myung-Seob; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, spherical nanoparticles (NPs) containing polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) as an inner hydrophobic core and poly(vinyl alcohol) PVA as a hydrophilic outer shell were prepared by dialysis approach. Preparation of amphiphilic POSS-grafted-PVA co-polymer was characterized by 1 H NMR and FT-IR. The results indicated urethane linkage between monoisocyanate group of POSS macromer and the hydroxyl groups of PVA. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) and electrophoretic light scattering (ELS) of the NPs revealed that they have an average hydrodynamic diameter and negative zeta (ζ)-potential of 215 nm and - 161 mV, respectively. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and bio-transmission electron microscope (BIO-TEM) have shown unagglomerated NPs within a diameter range of 60-90 nm. The prepared NPs were investigated to improve the control release of anticancer drug; paclitaxel as a model drug. Due to drug loading, the hydrodynamic diameter and negative zeta (ζ)-potential have changed to 325 nm and - 14 mV, respectively. In addition, in-vitro drug release experiments were conducted; the obtained results explicated continuous release for over 40 days. However, in case of using pure drug only, the drug completely released within 1 h.

  17. Coatings of molecularly imprinted polymers based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane for open tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing-Li; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Li-Shun; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2016-05-15

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was successfully applied, for the first time, to prepare imprinted monolithic coating for capillary electrochromatography. The imprinted monolithic coating was synthesized with a mixture of PSS-(1-Propylmethacrylate)-heptaisobutyl substituted (MA 0702), S-amlodipine (template), methacrylic acid (functional monomer), and 2-methacrylamidopropyl methacrylate (crosslinker), in a porogenic mixture of toluene-isooctane. The influence of synthesis parameters on the imprinting effect and separation performance, including the amount of MA 0702, the ratio of template to monomer, and the ratio of monomer to crosslinker, was investigated. The greatest resolution for enantiomers separation on the imprinted monolithic column prepared with MA 0702 was up to 22.3, about 2 times higher than that prepared in absence of the POSS. Column efficiency on the POSS-based MIP coatings was beyond 30,000 plate m(-1). The comparisons between MIP coating synthesized with the POSS and without the POSS were made in terms of selectivity, column efficiency, and resolution. POSS-based MIP capillaries with naproxen or zopiclone was also prepared and separation of enantiomers can be achieved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of Zirconium-Containing Polyhedral Oligometallasilsesquioxane as an Efficient Thermal Stabilizer for Silicone Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiedong Qiu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals play a negative role during the thermal degradation of silicone rubber (SR. Quenching free radicals is proposed to be an efficient way to improve the thermal-oxidative stability of SR. In this work, a novel zirconium-containing polyhedral oligometallasilsesquioxane (Zr-POSS with free-radical quenching capability was synthesized and characterized. The incorporation of Zr-POSS effectively improved the thermal-oxidative stability of SR. The T5 (temperature at 5% weight loss of SR/Zr-POSS significantly increased by 31.7 °C when compared to the unmodified SR. Notably, after aging 12 h at 280 °C, SR/Zr-POSS was still retaining about 65%, 60%, 75%, and 100% of the tensile strength, tear strength, elongation at break, and hardness before aging, respectively, while the mechanical properties of the unmodified SR were significantly decreased. The possible mechanism of Zr-POSS for improving the thermal-oxidative stability of SR was intensively studied and it was revealed that the POSS structure could act as a limiting point to suppress the random scission reaction of backbone. Furthermore, Zr could quench the free radicals by its empty orbital and transformation of valence states. Therefore, it effectively suppressed the thermal-oxidative degradation and crosslinking reaction of the side chains.

  19. Dielectric properties of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-based nanocomposites at 77k

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Ming-Jen; Gorzkowski, Edward; McAllister, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop dielectric nanocomposites for high energy density applications at liquid nitrogen temperature by utilizing a unique nano-material polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS). A POSS molecule is consisted of a silica cage core with 8 silicon and 12 oxygen atoms and organic functional groups attached to the corners of the cage. In this study, we utilize POSS for the fabrication of nanocomposites both as a silica nanoparticle filler to enhance the breakdown strength and as a surfactant for effective dispersion of high permittivity ceramic nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. The matrix materials selected for the study are polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The ceramic nanoparticles are barium strontium titanate (BST 50/50) and strontium titanate. The dielectric properties of the solution-cast nanocomposites films were correlated to the composition and processing conditions. We determined that the addition of POSS did not provide enhanced dielectric performance in PVDF- and PMMA-based materials at either room temperature or 77K. In addition, we found that the dielectric breakdown strength of PMMA is lower at 77K than at room temperature, contradicting literature data.

  20. Structure-properties relationships of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS filled PS nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Schwab

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS additivated polystyrene (PS based nanocomposites were prepared by melt processing and the structure-properties relationships of the POSS-PS systems were compared to those of the neat PS. In order to investigate the effect of these structural parameters on the final properties of the polymer nanocomposites, five different kinds of POSS samples were used, in particular, POSS with different inorganic cage and with different organic pendent groups. The rheological investigation suggests clearly that the POSS acts as a plasticizer and that the processability of the PS was positively modified. The affinity between the POSS samples and the PS matrix was estimated by the calculated theoretical solubility parameters, considering the Hoy’s method and by morphology analysis. Minor difference between the solubility parameter of POSS and the matrix means better compatibility and no aggregation tendency. Furthermore, the POSS loading leads to a decrease of the rigidity, of the glass transition temperature and of the damping factor of the nanocomposite systems. The loading of different POSS molecules with open cage leads to a more pronounced effect on all the investigated properties that the loading of the POSS molecules with closed cage. Moreover, the melt properties are significantly influenced by the type of inorganic framework, by the type of the pendent organic groups and by the interaction between the POSS organic groups and the host matrix, while, the solid state properties appears to be influenced more by the kind of cage.

  1. Quantifying the thermodynamic interactions of polyhedral boranes in solution to guide nanocomposite fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutz, M.; Eastwood, Eric; Lee, Mark E.; Bowen, Daniel E.; Dadmun, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    The solubility of boron containing nanoparticles in a variety of solvents is quantified using static light scattering in conjunction with refractometry. Four polyhedral boranes were tested in this work, using refractometry to obtain dn/dc, while static light scattering quantifies A 2 . A 2 obtained from these measurements was then used to calculate χ, the solute–solvent interaction parameter, and the Hildebrand solubility parameter, δ, which provides a quantifiable method to identify good solvents. Of the nanoparticles studied, 1,3-di-o-carboranylpropane is thermodynamically stable in toluene, with a χ less than 0.5, a solubility limit of 2.47 mg/mL, and all solutions remaining clear with no visible particle settling. For all of the particles tested, there was good correlation between the physical observations of the solutions, χ, and δ. For instance, lower values of χ correspond to a smaller radius of gyration (R g ). A list of suitable solvents based on δ is also presented.

  2. Quantifying the thermodynamic interactions of polyhedral boranes in solution to guide nanocomposite fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutz, M. [University of Tennessee, Department of Chemistry (United States); Eastwood, Eric [Honeywell Kansas City Plant (United States); Lee, Mark E. [University of Missouri (United States); Bowen, Daniel E. [Honeywell Kansas City Plant (United States); Dadmun, M. D., E-mail: dad@utk.edu [University of Tennessee, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The solubility of boron containing nanoparticles in a variety of solvents is quantified using static light scattering in conjunction with refractometry. Four polyhedral boranes were tested in this work, using refractometry to obtain dn/dc, while static light scattering quantifies A{sub 2}. A{sub 2} obtained from these measurements was then used to calculate {chi}, the solute-solvent interaction parameter, and the Hildebrand solubility parameter, {delta}, which provides a quantifiable method to identify good solvents. Of the nanoparticles studied, 1,3-di-o-carboranylpropane is thermodynamically stable in toluene, with a {chi} less than 0.5, a solubility limit of 2.47 mg/mL, and all solutions remaining clear with no visible particle settling. For all of the particles tested, there was good correlation between the physical observations of the solutions, {chi}, and {delta}. For instance, lower values of {chi} correspond to a smaller radius of gyration (R{sub g}). A list of suitable solvents based on {delta} is also presented.

  3. Photo-polymerization of photocurable resins containing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ho-May; Wu, Shi-Yin; Chang, Feng-Chih; Yen, Ying-Chieh

    2011-01-01

    Photocurable resins, bisphenol A propoxylate glycerolate diacrylate (BPA-PGDA, containing two hydroxyl) and bisphenol A propoxylate diacrylate (BPA-PDA), with fixed photoinitiator (Irgacure 907) concentration and various contents of methacrylisobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (MI-POSS) were prepared and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and differential photocalorimetry. The MI-POSS molecules form crystals or aggregated particles in the cured resin matrix. The BPA-PGDA series photocurable resins show higher viscosity and lower photo-polymerization reactivity than the BPA-PDA series resins. The photo-polymerization rate and conversion of BPA-PGDA series are improved with increasing MI-POSS content. On the contrary, the photo-polymerization behavior of BPA-PDA series photocurable resins remains nearly unchanged by the addition of MI-POSS. Hydrogen-bonding interaction between the hydroxyl of BPA-PGDA and the siloxane of MI-POSS tends to attract and concentrate these acrylate double bonds around MI-POSS particles and thus enhances the photo-polymerization rate and conversion.

  4. Transparent cellulose/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposites with enhanced UV-shielding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ye; Zhang, Jinming; He, Jiasong; Zhang, Jun

    2016-08-20

    The solubility of eight types of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) derivatives in an ionic liquid 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) and the dispersion of POSS in cellulose matrix were examined. Only a special POSS containing both aminophenyl and nitrophenyl groups (POSS-AN, NH2:NO2=2:6) was selected to prepare nanocomposites, because of its good solubility in AmimCl and high stability during the preparation process. POSS-AN nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in a cellulose matrix with a size of 30-40nm, and so the resultant cellulose/POSS-AN nanocomposite films were transparent. The mechanical properties of the films achieved a maximum tensile strength of 190MPa after addition of 2wt% POSS-AN. Interestingly, all of the cellulose/POSS-AN films exhibited high UV-absorbing capability. For the 15wt% cellulose/POSS-AN film, the transmittance of UVA (315-400nm) and UVB (280-315nm) was only 9.1% and nearly 0, respectively. The UV aging and shielding experiments showed that the transparent cellulose/POSS-AN nanocomposite films possessed anti-UV aging and UV shielding properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Construction of porous cationic frameworks by crosslinking polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane units with N-heterocyclic linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guojian; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Jing; Xue, Shuang; Liu, Yangqing; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    In fields of materials science and chemistry, ionic-type porous materials attract increasing attention due to significant ion-exchanging capacity for accessing diversified applications. Facing the fact that porous cationic materials with robust and stable frameworks are very rare, novel tactics that can create new type members are highly desired. Here we report the first family of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) based porous cationic frameworks (PCIF-n) with enriched poly(ionic liquid)-like cationic structures, tunable mesoporosities, high surface areas (up to 1,025 m2 g-1) and large pore volumes (up to 0.90 cm3 g-1). Our strategy is designing the new rigid POSS unit of octakis(chloromethyl)silsesquioxane and reacting it with the rigid N-heterocyclic cross-linkers (typically 4,4‧-bipyridine) for preparing the desired porous cationic frameworks. The PCIF-n materials possess large surface area, hydrophobic and special anion-exchanging property, and thus are used as the supports for loading guest species PMo10V2O405- the resultant hybrid behaves as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for aerobic oxidation of benzene and H2O2-mediated oxidation of cyclohexane.

  6. Polyhedral microcrystals encapsulating bone morphogenetic protein 2 improve healing in the alveolar ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Goichi; Ueda, Takayo; Sugita, Yoshihiko; Kubo, Katsutoshi; Mizoguchi, Megumi; Kotani, Eiji; Oda, Naoki; Kawamata, Shin; Segami, Natsuki; Mori, Hajime

    2015-08-01

    Atelocollagen sponges incorporating polyhedra encapsulating bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) were implanted into lateral bone defects in the mandible. Half of the bone defects on the left side were treated with atelocollagen sponges containing 1.8 × 10(7) BMP-2 polyhedra, and half were treated with sponges containing 3.6 × 10(6) BMP-2 polyhedra. As controls, we treated the right-side bone defects in each animal with an atelocollagen sponge containing 5 µg of recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) or 1.8 × 10(7) empty polyhedral. After a healing period of six months, whole mandibles were removed for micro-computed tomography (CT) and histological analyses. Micro-CT images showed that more bone had formed at all experimental sites than at control sites. However, the density of the new bone was not significantly higher at sites with an atelocollagen sponge containing BMP-2 polyhedra than at sites with an atelocollagen sponge containing rhBMP-2 or empty polyhedra. Histological examination confirmed that the BMP-2 polyhedra almost entirely replaced the atelocollagen sponges and connected the original bone with the regenerated bone. These results show that the BMP-2 delivery system facilitates the regeneration of new bone in the mandibular alveolar bone ridge and has an advance in the technology of bone regeneration for implant site development. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Recurring polyhedral motifs in the amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divya; Deepak; Prasad, Rajendra

    2017-01-01

    The coordination polyhedra around the cations are the building blocks of ionic solids. For amorphous InGaZn oxide (a-IGZO), these coordination polyhedra are identified to investigate properties that depend on short range interactions. Therefore, in this first principles based study, a large number (10) of samples of a-IGZO were prepared by ab initio melt-and-quench molecular dynamics, so that several distinct samples of the amorphous landscape are obtained corresponding to local minima in energy. Based on a method of comparing bond angles between metal and oxygen atoms, the identified polyhedra were matched to the polyhedral motifs present in the related crystalline systems, such as, InGaZnO_4, In_2O_3, Ga_2O_3, and ZnO. Consequently, we find, the a-IGZO primarily consists of the following polyhedra: a tetrahedron from space group 199 and an octahedron from space group 206 of In_2O_3; a tetrahedron from space group 12 and an octahedron from space group 167 of Ga_2O_3; a tetrahedron from space group 186 of ZnO; zinc and gallium trigonal bipyramids from c-IGZO; and one zinc fourfold, one zinc fivefold, and one indium fivefold coordination polyhedra that occur only in the amorphous phase. Thus, we were able to reduce the description of structure from 360 to 10 groups of polyhedra. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Preparation and characterization of polyhedral oligomer silsesquioxane nanocomposites incorporated in epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhi, Marielen; Zini, Lucas Pandolphi; Birriel, Eliena Jonko; Kunst, Sandra Raquel; Zattera, Ademir Jose

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of nanofiller in thermosetting like epoxy resin as has been studied in order to modify its properties. In this research, nanocomposites were obtained by incorporating 5% by weight of three polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) with different number of functionalization: Glicidilisobutil-POSS, Triglicidilisobutil- POSS and Glicicil POSS in an epoxy matrix by sonification process. The nanocomposites were characterized by analysis of X-ray diffraction (DRX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The DRX analysis showed the characteristic peak of POSS and TEM images showed that there is a difference in the dispersion of nanocages for the difference in the number of epoxy groups on the POSS. The incorporation of Glicidilisobutil-POSS showed a significant increase in the glass transition temperature (Tg) value, and also that the most effective from the viewpoint of the dispersion, on the other hand, the Glycidyl-POSS had a greater influence on the thermal stability demonstrating that the dispersion medium is an important characteristic to define the most desirable properties. (author)

  9. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)–poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hybrids as injectable biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstrand, Johanna; López, Alejandro; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    One of the major issues with the currently available injectable biomaterials for hard tissue replacement is the mismatch between their mechanical properties and those of the surrounding bone. Hybrid bone cements that combine the benefits of tough polymeric and bioactive ceramic materials could become a good alternative. In this work, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was copolymerized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to form injectable in situ cross-linkable hybrid cements. The hybrids were characterized in terms of their mechanical, rheological, handling and in vitro bioactive properties. The results indicated that hybridization improves the mechanical and bioactive properties of POSS and PEG. The Young moduli of the hybrids were lower than those of commercial cements and more similar to those of cancellous bone. Furthermore, the strength of the hybrids was similar to that of commercial cements. Calcium deficient hydroxyapatite grew on the surface of the hybrids after 28 days in PBS, indicating bioactivity. The study showed that PEG–POSS-based hybrid materials are a promising alternative to commercial bone cements. (paper)

  10. In-situ photocrosslinkable nanohybrid elastomer based on polybutadiene/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirmohammadi, Seyed Amin, E-mail: mirmohammadi.sa@gmail.com [Department of Polymerization Engineering, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nekoomanesh-Haghighi, Mehdi, E-mail: m.nekoomanesh@ippi.ac.ir [Department of Polymerization Engineering, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadian Gezaz, Somayyeh [Department of Chemical Engineering, Payame Noor University (PNU), P. O. Box: 19395-3697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahri-Laleh, Naeimeh [Department of Polymerization Engineering, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atai, Mohammad [Department of Polymer Science, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Hydroxyl functionalized nano-sized POSS or ethyleneglycol as diol monomers was incorporated to hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPBD) chain in the presence of fumaryl chloride as extender. Blue light photocrosslinking system based on camphorquinone (photoinitiator) and dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (accelerator) was applied to cure these two synthesized fumarate based macromers. Self-crosslinkability of unsaturated macromers and also crosslinking in presence of a reactive diluent were investigated in absence and presence of 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, respectively. Finally, photocured samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, equilibrium swelling study, TGA, DMTA, AFM and cell culture. The results showed that incorporation of POSS nanoparticle into the polymer matrix with a perfect distribution and dispersion can enhance thermal stability, mechanical and biocompatibility properties which can prove a good potential of this in-situ photocrosslinkable nanohybrid in medical applications. - Highlights: • Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane was incorporated to HTPBD by fumaryl chloride as extender. • A reactive diluent was used to improve photocrosslinking process of the unsaturated nanohybrid elastomers. • Nanohybrids showed enhanced properties such as thermal stability, mechanical and biocompatibility. • Improved properties were obtained for photocured samples in presence of reactive diluent.

  11. Bioactivity and properties of a dental adhesive functionalized with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) and bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Marta; Hohlfeld, Lisa; Thanh, Loan Tao; Biehl, Ralf; Lühmann, Nicole; Mohn, Dirk; Wiegand, Annette

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of infiltrating a commercial adhesive with nanosized bioactive glass (BG-Bi) particles or methacryl-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) on material properties and bioactivity. An acetone-based dental adhesive (Solobond Plus adhesive, VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany) was infiltrated with nanosized bioactive glass particles (0.1 or 1wt%), or with monofunctional or multifunctional POSS particles (10 or 20wt%). Unfilled adhesive served as control. Dispersion and hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles were studied by dynamic light scattering. Set specimens were immersed for 28days in artificial saliva at 37°C, and surfaces were mapped for the formation of calcium phospate (Ca/P) precipitates (scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). Viscosity (rheometry) and the structural characteristic of the networks were studied, such as degree of conversion (FTIR spectroscopy), sol fraction and water sorption. POSS particles showed a good dispersion of the particles for both types of particles being smaller than 3nm, while the bioactive glass particles had a strong tendency to agglomerate. All nanoparticles induced the formation of Ca/P precipitates. The viscosity of the adhesive was not or only slightly increased by POSS particle addition but strongly increased by the bioactive glass particles. The degree of conversion, water sorption and sol fraction showed a maintained or improved network structure and properties when filled with BG-Bi and multifunctional POSS, however, less polymerization was found when loading a monofunctional POSS. Multifunctional POSS may be incorporated into dental adhesives to provide a bioactive potential without changing material properties adversely. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structure–property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang WG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Weiguo Wang,1,* Xiang Sun,1,* Li Huang,2,* Yu Gao,1 Jinghao Ban,1 Lijuan Shen,1 Jihua Chen1 1Department of Prosthodontics, 2Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS, have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group] and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups] were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials

  13. Morphological evolution in dewetting polystyrene/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane thin film bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rituparna; Karabiyik, Ufuk; Swift, Michael C; Hottle, John R; Esker, Alan R

    2008-05-06

    Morphological evolution in dewetting thin film bilayers of polystyrene (PS) and a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS), trisilanolphenyl-POSS (TPP), was studied as a function of annealing temperature and annealing time. The results demonstrate unique dewetting morphologies in PS/TPP bilayers at elevated temperatures that are significantly different from those typically observed in dewetting polymer/polymer bilayers. During temperature ramp studies by optical microscopy (OM) in the reflection mode, PS/TPP bilayers form cracks with a weak optical contrast at approximately 130 degrees C. The crack formation is attributed to tensile stresses within the upper TPP layer. The weak optical contrast of the cracks observed in the bilayers for annealing temperatures below approximately 160 degrees C is consistent with the cracking and dewetting of only the upper TPP layer from the underlying PS layer. The optical contrast of the morphological features is significantly enhanced at annealing temperatures of >160 degrees C. This observation suggests dewetting of both the upper TPP and the lower PS layers that results in the exposure of the silicon substrate. Upon annealing the PS/TPP bilayers at 200 degrees C in a temperature jump experiment, the upper TPP layer undergoes instantaneous cracking as observed by OM. These cracks in the upper TPP layer serve as nucleation sites for rapid dewetting and aggregation of the TPP layer, as revealed by OM and atomic force microscopy (AFM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that dewetting of the lower PS layer ensued for annealing times >5 min and progressed up to 90 min. For annealing times >90 min, OM, AFM, and XPS results revealed complete dewetting of both the layers with the formation of TPP encapsulated PS droplets.

  14. Recurring polyhedral motifs in the amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divya; Deepak [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); National Center for Flexible Electronics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Prasad, Rajendra [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India)

    2017-02-15

    The coordination polyhedra around the cations are the building blocks of ionic solids. For amorphous InGaZn oxide (a-IGZO), these coordination polyhedra are identified to investigate properties that depend on short range interactions. Therefore, in this first principles based study, a large number (10) of samples of a-IGZO were prepared by ab initio melt-and-quench molecular dynamics, so that several distinct samples of the amorphous landscape are obtained corresponding to local minima in energy. Based on a method of comparing bond angles between metal and oxygen atoms, the identified polyhedra were matched to the polyhedral motifs present in the related crystalline systems, such as, InGaZnO{sub 4}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ZnO. Consequently, we find, the a-IGZO primarily consists of the following polyhedra: a tetrahedron from space group 199 and an octahedron from space group 206 of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}; a tetrahedron from space group 12 and an octahedron from space group 167 of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}; a tetrahedron from space group 186 of ZnO; zinc and gallium trigonal bipyramids from c-IGZO; and one zinc fourfold, one zinc fivefold, and one indium fivefold coordination polyhedra that occur only in the amorphous phase. Thus, we were able to reduce the description of structure from 360 to 10 groups of polyhedra. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Endohedral complexes of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) cages with transition metal dihydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiqiao; Corn, John; Hagelberg, Frank, E-mail: hagelber@etsu.edu

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: • Comparative studies of POSS cages with endohedral metal dihydrides. • Exothermic inclusion was found for the T{sub 10} cage with MH{sub 2}, M = Ti, Ru, Os, Pt. • Within this group of metal atoms, the only exothermic MH{sub 4}@T{sub m} unit is that with M = Os. • Enhanced hydrogen atom density, as compared to free MH{sub 4}, was found in the cage. • No exothermic solutions were identified for MH{sub 6}@T{sub 10}. - Abstract: Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) cages are investigated in terms of their potential to enclose small metal hydrides, with the objective of defining conditions that maximize the number of encapsulated hydrogen atoms. Systems of the form MH{sub 2n}@T{sub m}, where n = 1–3, m = 8, 10, and M comprises metal atom species of the groups IV, VI, VIII, X, and XII, are studied by methods of ab initio and density functional theory (DFT). The resulting composites are categorized with respect to their structural and energetic features. For MH{sub 2}@T{sub 8}, it is found in all cases considered that including MH{sub 2} into the POSS cage is an endothermic process. For MH{sub 2}@T{sub 10} and M = Ti, Ru, Os, Pt, inclusion of the MH{sub 2} guest into the cage turns out to be exothermic, and also leaves the cage intact. For MH{sub 4}@T{sub m}, this behavior is only observed for one system, OsH{sub 4}@T{sub 10}.

  16. Composite polymer electrolyte containing ionic liquid and functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes for anhydrous PEM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subianto, Surya; Mistry, Mayur K; Choudhury, Namita Roy; Dutta, Naba K; Knott, Robert

    2009-06-01

    A new type of supported liquid membrane was made by combining an ionic liquid (IL) with a Nafion membrane reinforced with multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSSs) using a layer-by-layer strategy for anhydrous proton-exchange membrane (PEM) application. The POSS was functionalized by direct sulfonation, and the sulfonated POSS (S-POSS) was incorporated into Nafion 117 membranes by the infiltration method. The resultant hybrid membrane shows strong ionic interaction between the Nafion matrix and the multifunctional POSS, resulting in increased glass transition temperature and thermal stability at very low loadings of S-POSS (1%). The presence of S-POSS has also improved the proton conductivity especially at low humidities, where it shows a marked increase due to its confinement in the ionic domains and promotes water uptake by capillary condensation. In order to achieve anhydrous conductivity, the IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMI-BTSI) was incorporated into these membranes to provide proton conduction in the absence of water. Although the incorporation of an IL shows a plasticizing effect on the Nafion membrane, the S-POSS composite membrane with an IL shows a higher modulus at high temperatures compared to Nafion 117 and a Nafion-IL membrane, with significantly higher proton conductivity (5 mS/cm at 150 degrees C with 20% IL). This shows the ability of the multifunctional POSS and IL to work symbiotically to achieve the desirable proton conductivity and mechanical properties of such membranes by enhancing the ionic interaction within the material.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of polyhedral oligomeric titanized silsesquioxane: A new biocompatible cage like molecule for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahyaei, Hossein [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohseni, Mohsen, E-mail: mmohseni@aut.ac.ir [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanbari, Hossein [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Messori, Massimo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria ‘Enzo Ferrari’, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Organic–inorganic hybrid materials have shown improved properties to be used as biocompatible coating in biomedical applications. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) containing coatings are among hybrid materials showing promising properties for these applications. In this work an open cage POSS has been reacted with a titanium alkoxide to end cap the POSS molecule with titanium atom to obtain a so called polyhedral oligomeric metalized silsesquioxane (POMS). The synthesized POMS was characterized by FTIR, RAMAN and UV–visible spectroscopy as well as {sup 29}Si NMR and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) techniques. Appearance of peaks at 920 cm{sup −1} in FTIR and 491 cm{sup −1} and 1083 cm{sup −1} in Raman spectra confirmed Si–O–Ti linkage formation. It was also demonstrated that POMS was in a monomeric form. To evaluate the biocompatibility of hybrids films, pristine POSS and synthesized POMS were used in synthesis of a polycarbonate urethane polymer. Results revealed that POMS containing hybrid, not only had notable thermal and mechanical stability compared to POSS containing one, as demonstrated by DSC and DMTA analysis, they also showed controlled surface properties in such a manner that hydrophobicity and biocompatibility were both reachable to give rise to improved cell viability in presence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and MRC-5 cells. - Highlight: • Polyhedral Oligomeric Metalized Silsesquioxane (POMS) based on titanium was synthesized. • POMS can improve mechanical properties of polyurethane. • POMS increases hydrophobicity of polyurethane. • POMS is a unique nanocage to enhance biocompatibility of polyurethane.

  18. A New Star-shaped Carbazole Derivative with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Core: Crystal Structure and Unique Photoluminescence Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zixuan; Yu, Tianzhi; Zhao, Yuling; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Guoyun; Li, Jianfeng; Chai, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    A new inorganic–organic hybrid material based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) capped with carbazolyl substituents, octakis[3-(carbazol-9-yl)propyldimethylsiloxy]-silsesquioxane (POSS-8Cz), was successfully synthesized and characterized. The X-ray crystal structure of POSS-8Cz were described. The photophysical properties of POSS-8Cz were investigated by using UV–vis,photoluminescence spectroscopic analysis. The hybrid material exhibits blue emission in the solution and the solid film.The morphology and thermal stablity properties were measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TG-DTA analysis.

  19. Investigation of prototypal MOFs consisting of polyhedral cages with accessible Lewis-acid sites for quinoline synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wen-Yang; Leng, Kunyue; Cash, Lindsay; Chrzanowski, Matthew; Stackhouse, Chavis A; Sun, Yinyong; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-03-21

    A series of prototypal metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consisting of polyhedral cages with accessible Lewis-acid sites, have been systematically investigated for Friedländer annulation reaction, a straightforward approach to synthesizing quinoline and its derivatives. Amongst them MMCF-2 demonstrates significantly enhanced catalytic activity compared with the benchmark MOFs, HKUST-1 and MOF-505, as a result of a high-density of accessible Cu(II) Lewis acid sites and large window size in the cuboctahedral cage-based nanoreactor of MMCF-2.

  20. Better Together: Co-Location of Dental and Primary Care Provides Opportunities to Improve Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nadereh; Martinez, Ana E; Crall, James J

    2015-09-01

    Community Health Centers (CHCs) are one of the principal safety-net providers of health care for low-income and uninsured populations. Co-locating dental services in primary care settings provides an opportunity to improve access to dental care. Yet this study of California CHCs that provide primary care services shows that only about one-third of them co-located primary and dental care services on-site. An additional one-third were members of multisite organizations in which at least one other site provided dental care. The remaining one-third of CHC sites had no dental care capacity. Policy options to promote co-location include requiring on-site availability of dental services, providing infrastructure funding to build and equip dental facilities, and offering financial incentives to provide dental care and recruit dental providers.

  1. Development and analysis of finite volume methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omnes, P.

    2010-05-01

    This document is a synthesis of a set of works concerning the development and the analysis of finite volume methods used for the numerical approximation of partial differential equations (PDEs) stemming from physics. In the first part, the document deals with co-localized Godunov type schemes for the Maxwell and wave equations, with a study on the loss of precision of this scheme at low Mach number. In the second part, discrete differential operators are built on fairly general, in particular very distorted or nonconforming, bidimensional meshes. These operators are used to approach the solutions of PDEs modelling diffusion, electro and magneto-statics and electromagnetism by the discrete duality finite volume method (DDFV) on staggered meshes. The third part presents the numerical analysis and some a priori as well as a posteriori error estimations for the discretization of the Laplace equation by the DDFV scheme. The last part is devoted to the order of convergence in the L2 norm of the finite volume approximation of the solution of the Laplace equation in one dimension and on meshes with orthogonality properties in two dimensions. Necessary and sufficient conditions, relatively to the mesh geometry and to the regularity of the data, are provided that ensure the second-order convergence of the method. (author)

  2. Polyhedral meshing as an innovative approach to computational domain discretization of a cyclone in a fluidized bed CLC unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sosnowski Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC is a technology that allows the separation of CO2, which is generated by the combustion of fossil fuels. The majority of process designs currently under investigation are systems of coupled fluidized beds. Advances in the development of power generation system using CLC cannot be introduced without using numerical modelling as a research tool. The primary and critical activity in numerical modelling is the computational domain discretization. It influences the numerical diffusion as well as convergence of the model and therefore the overall accuracy of the obtained results. Hence an innovative approach of computational domain discretization using polyhedral (POLY mesh is proposed in the paper. This method reduces both the numerical diffusion of the mesh as well as the time cost of preparing the model for subsequent calculation. The major advantage of POLY mesh is that each individual cell has many neighbours, so gradients can be much better approximated in comparison to commonly-used tetrahedral (TET mesh. POLYs are also less sensitive to stretching than TETs which results in better numerical stability of the model. Therefore detailed comparison of numerical modelling results concerning subsection of CLC system using tetrahedral and polyhedral mesh is covered in the paper.

  3. Co-Location versus Disintegration of Manufacturing and R&D in Emerging Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates what makes it more or less relevant to co-locate manufacturing activities and R&D activities in emerging markets within multinational companies. A framework to this end is developed and illustrated in relation to four cases from multinational companies, which have established...

  4. Sensitive detection of nucleic acids by PNA hybridization directed co-localization of fluorescent beads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Büscher, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    )avidin-coated fluorescent beads, differing in size and color [green beads (1 µm) and red beads (5.9 µm)], thereby allowing distinct detection of each PNA probe by conventional fluorescence microscopy. These two PNA beads showed easily detectable co-localization when simultaneously hybridizing to a target nucleic acid...

  5. A method for improved clustering and classification of microscopy images using quantitative co-localization coefficients

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Singan, Vasanth R

    2012-06-08

    AbstractBackgroundThe localization of proteins to specific subcellular structures in eukaryotic cells provides important information with respect to their function. Fluorescence microscopy approaches to determine localization distribution have proved to be an essential tool in the characterization of unknown proteins, and are now particularly pertinent as a result of the wide availability of fluorescently-tagged constructs and antibodies. However, there are currently very few image analysis options able to effectively discriminate proteins with apparently similar distributions in cells, despite this information being important for protein characterization.FindingsWe have developed a novel method for combining two existing image analysis approaches, which results in highly efficient and accurate discrimination of proteins with seemingly similar distributions. We have combined image texture-based analysis with quantitative co-localization coefficients, a method that has traditionally only been used to study the spatial overlap between two populations of molecules. Here we describe and present a novel application for quantitative co-localization, as applied to the study of Rab family small GTP binding proteins localizing to the endomembrane system of cultured cells.ConclusionsWe show how quantitative co-localization can be used alongside texture feature analysis, resulting in improved clustering of microscopy images. The use of co-localization as an additional clustering parameter is non-biased and highly applicable to high-throughput image data sets.

  6. Look together : Using gaze for assisting co-located collaborative search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Pfeuffer, Ken; Chong, Ming Ki; Alexander, Jason; Bulling, Andreas; Gellersen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Gaze information provides indication of users focus which complements remote collaboration tasks, as distant users can see their partner’s focus. In this paper, we apply gaze for co-located collaboration, where users’ gaze locations are presented on the same display, to help collaboration between

  7. A finite landscape?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, B.S.; Douglas, M.R.

    2006-06-01

    We present evidence that the number of string/M theory vacua consistent with experiments is finite. We do this both by explicit analysis of infinite sequences of vacua and by applying various mathematical finiteness theorems. (author)

  8. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  9. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  10. Overview of Opportunities for Co-Location of Solar Energy Technologies and Vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beatty, Brenda [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hill, Graham [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale solar facilities have the potential to contribute significantly to national electricity production. Many solar installations are large-scale or utility-scale, with a capacity over 1 MW and connected directly to the electric grid. Large-scale solar facilities offer an opportunity to achieve economies of scale in solar deployment, yet there have been concerns about the amount of land required for solar projects and the impact of solar projects on local habitat. During the site preparation phase for utility-scale solar facilities, developers often grade land and remove all vegetation to minimize installation and operational costs, prevent plants from shading panels, and minimize potential fire or wildlife risks. However, the common site preparation practice of removing vegetation can be avoided in certain circumstances, and there have been successful examples where solar facilities have been co-located with agricultural operations or have native vegetation growing beneath the panels. In this study we outline some of the impacts that large-scale solar facilities can have on the local environment, provide examples of installations where impacts have been minimized through co-location with vegetation, characterize the types of co-location, and give an overview of the potential benefits from co-location of solar energy projects and vegetation. The varieties of co-location can be replicated or modified for site-specific use at other solar energy installations around the world. We conclude with opportunities to improve upon our understanding of ways to reduce the environmental impacts of large-scale solar installations.

  11. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  12. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  13. Squeeze: designing for playful experiences among co-located people in homes. (received first prize people's choice award)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2007-01-01

    Squeeze is a multi-person, flexible and interactive furniture that allows for collective and playful exploration of the family history among co-located people in homes. It is designed to explore how we can use digital technology to create settings where co-located family members can collectively ...

  14. The benefits of co-location in primary care practices: the perspectives of general practitioners and patients in 34 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonciani, M; Schäfer, W; Barsanti, S; Heinemann, S; Groenewegen, P P

    2018-02-21

    There is no clear evidence as to whether the co-location of primary care professionals in the same facility positively influences their way of working and the quality of healthcare as perceived by patients. The aim of this study was to identify the relationships between general practitioner (GP) co-location with other GPs and/or other professionals and the GP outcomes and patients' experiences. We wanted to test whether GP co-location is related to a broader range of services provided, the use of clinical governance tools and inter-professional collaboration, and whether the patients of co-located GPs perceive a better quality of care in terms of accessibility, comprehensiveness and continuity of care with their GPs. The source of data was the QUALICOPC study (Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe), which involved surveys of GPs and their patients in 34 countries, mostly in Europe. In order to study the relationships between GP co-location and both GPs' outcomes and patients' experience, multilevel linear regression analysis was carried out. The GP questionnaire was filled in by 7183 GPs and the patient experience questionnaire by 61,931 patients. Being co-located with at least one other professional is the most common situation of the GPs involved in the study. Compared with single-handed GP practices, GP co-location are positively associated with the GP outcomes. Considering the patients' perspective, comprehensiveness of care has the strongest negative relationship of GP co-location of all the dimensions of patient experiences analysed. The paper highlights that GP mono- and multi-disciplinary co-location is related to positive outcomes at a GP level, such as a broader provision of technical procedures, increased collaboration among different providers and wider coordination with secondary care. However, GP co-location, particularly in a multidisciplinary setting, is related to less positive patient experiences, especially in countries with health systems

  15. Towards a robust algorithm to determine topological domains from colocalization data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Moscalets

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important tasks in understanding the complex spatial organization of the genome consists in extracting information about this spatial organization, the function and structure of chromatin topological domains from existing experimental data, in particular, from genome colocalization (Hi-C matrices. Here we present an algorithm allowing to reveal the underlying hierarchical domain structure of a polymer conformation from analyzing the modularity of colocalization matrices. We also test this algorithm on several model polymer structures: equilibrium globules, random fractal globules and regular fractal (Peano conformations. We define what we call a spectrum of cluster borders, and show that these spectra behave strikingly di erently for equilibrium and fractal conformations, allowing us to suggest an additional criterion to identify fractal polymer conformations.

  16. Co-location as a Driver for Cross-Sectoral Collaboration with General Practitioners as Coordinators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheele, Christian Elling; Vrangbæk, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The issue of integrated care and inter-sectoral collaboration is on the health policy agenda in many countries. Yet, there is limited knowledge about the effects of the different policy instruments used to achieve this. This paper studies co-location as a driver for cross-sectoral collaboration...... with general practitioners (GPs) acting as coordinators in a municipal health centre. The purpose of the health centre, which is staffed by health professionals from municipal, regional and private sectors, is to provide primary health services to the citizens of the municipality. Co......-locating these professionals is supposed to benefit e.g., elder citizens and patients with chronic diseases who frequently require services from health professionals across administrative sectors. Methodologically, the analysis is based on qualitative data in the form of semi-structured interviews with the health...

  17. The role of co-located storage for wind power producers in conventional electricity markets

    KAUST Repository

    Bitar, E.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we study the problem of optimizing contract offerings for an independent wind power producer (WPP) participating in conventional day-ahead forward electricity markets for energy. As wind power is an inherently variable source of energy and is difficult to predict, we explore the extent to which co-located energy storage can be used to improve expected profit and mitigate the the financial risk associated with shorting on the offered contracts. Using a simple stochastic model for wind power production and a model for the electricity market, we show that the problem of determining optimal contract offerings for a WPP with co-located energy storage can be solved using convex programming.

  18. On the evaluation of the gravity effects of polyhedral bodies and a consistent treatment of related singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, M. G.

    2013-03-01

    We show that the singularities which can affect the computation of the gravity effects (potential, gravity and tensor gradient fields) can be systematically addressed by invoking distribution theory and suitable formulas of differential calculus. Thus, differently from previous contributions on the subject, the use of a-posteriori corrections of the formulas derived in absence of singularities can be ruled out. The general approach presented in the paper is further specialized to the case of polyhedral bodies and detailed for a rectangular prism having a constant mass density. With reference to this last case, we derive novel expressions for the related gravitational field, as well as for its first and second derivative, at an observation point coincident with a prism vertex and show that they turn out to be more compact than the ones reported in the specialized literature.

  19. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes@octavinyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes nanocomposite preparation via cross-linking reaction in acidic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasekharan, Lakshmipriya; Thomas, Sabu [Mahatma Gandhi University, International and Interuniversity Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (India); Comoy, Corinne [Université de Lorraine, SRSMC, UMR 7565 (France); Sivasankarapillai, Anilkumar [NSS Hindu College (India); Kalarikkal, Nandakumar [Mahatma Gandhi University, International and Interuniversity Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (India); Lamouroux, Emmanuel, E-mail: Emmanuel.Lamouroux@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, SRSMC, UMR 7565 (France)

    2016-11-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes have unique properties allowing their use in a wide range of applications—from microelectronics to biomedical and polymer fields. Nevertheless, a crucial aspect for their use resides in the ease of handling them during the process. Here, we report a facile route to prepare multiwalled carbon nanotubes@octavinyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (MWCNT@POSS) nanocomposite. The method involves the formation of a covalent bond between carboxylated MWCNTs and OV-POSS using acid-catalyzed electrophilic addition reaction. The resulting nanocomposite have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), powder X-Ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results confirmed that the formation of MWCNT@POSS nanocomposite did not deteriorate MWCNT structure or morphology. Here, we used a 1:1 ratio of carboxylated MWCNTs and OV-POSS and the POSS content in the nanocomposite was 39.5 wt%.

  20. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Colocated Homeless-Tailored Primary Care Clinic and Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielian, Sonya; Chen, Jennifer C; Minhaj, Beena P; Manchanda, Rishi; Altman, Lisa; Koosis, Ella; Gelberg, Lillian

    2017-10-01

    Homeless adults have low primary care engagement and high emergency department (ED) utilization. Homeless-tailored, patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) decrease this population's acute care use. We studied the feasibility (focused on patient recruitment) and acceptability (conceptualized as clinicians' attitudes/beliefs) of a pilot initiative to colocate a homeless-tailored PCMH with an ED. After ED triage, low-acuity patients appropriate for outpatient care were screened for homelessness; homeless patients chose between a colocated PCMH or ED visit. To study feasibility, we captured (from May to September 2012) the number of patients screened for homelessness, positive screens, unique patients seen, and primary care visits. We focused on acceptability to ED clinicians (physicians, nurses, social workers); we sent a 32-item survey to ED clinicians (n = 57) who worked during clinic hours. Questions derived from an instrument measuring clinician attitudes toward homeless persons; acceptability of homelessness screening and the clinic itself were also explored. Over the 5 months of interest, 281 patients were screened; 172 (61.2%) screened positive for homelessness; 112 (65.1%) of these positive screens were seen over 215 visits. Acceptability data were obtained from 56% (n = 32) of surveyed clinicians. Attitudes toward homeless patients were similar to prior studies of primary care physicians. Most (54.6%) clinicians agreed with the homelessness screening procedures. Nearly all (90.3%) clinicians supported expansion of the homeless-tailored clinic; a minority (42.0%) agreed that ED colocation worked well. Our data suggest the feasibility of recruiting patients to a homeless-tailored primary care clinic colocated with the ED; however, the clinic's acceptability was mixed. Future quality improvement work should focus on tailoring the clinic to increase its acceptability among ED clinicians, while assessing its impact on health, housing, and costs.

  1. Effect of Pediatric Behavioral Health Screening and Colocated Services on Ambulatory and Inpatient Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Karen A; Penfold, Robert B; Arsenault, Lisa N; Zhang, Fang; Soumerai, Stephen B; Wissow, Lawrence S

    2015-11-01

    The study sought to determine the impact of a pediatric behavioral health screening and colocation model on utilization of behavioral health care. In 2003, Cambridge Health Alliance, a Massachusetts public health system, introduced behavioral health screening and colocation of social workers sequentially within its pediatric practices. An interrupted time-series study was conducted to determine the impact on behavioral health care utilization in the 30 months after model implementation compared with the 18 months prior. Specifically, the change in trends of ambulatory, emergency, and inpatient behavioral health utilization was examined. Utilization data for 11,223 children ages ≥4 years 9 months to <18 years 3 months seen from 2003 to 2008 contributed to the study. In the 30 months after implementation of pediatric behavioral health screening and colocation, there was a 20.4% cumulative increase in specialty behavioral health visit rates (trend of .013% per month, p=.049) and a 67.7% cumulative increase in behavioral health primary care visit rates (trend of .019% per month, p<.001) compared with the expected rates predicted by the 18-month preintervention trend. In addition, behavioral health emergency department visit rates increased 245% compared with the expected rate (trend .01% per month, p=.002). After the implementation of a behavioral health screening and colocation model, more children received behavioral health treatment. Contrary to expectations, behavioral health emergency department visits also increased. Further study is needed to determine whether this is an effect of how care was organized for children newly engaged in behavioral health care or a reflection of secular trends in behavioral health utilization or both.

  2. Registration of whole immunohistochemical slide images: an efficient way to characterize biomarker colocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moles Lopez, Xavier; Barbot, Paul; Van Eycke, Yves-Rémi; Verset, Laurine; Trépant, Anne-Laure; Larbanoix, Lionel; Salmon, Isabelle; Decaestecker, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Extracting accurate information from complex biological processes involved in diseases, such as cancers, requires the simultaneous targeting of multiple proteins and locating their respective expression in tissue samples. This information can be collected by imaging and registering adjacent sections from the same tissue sample and stained by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Registration accuracy should be on the scale of a few cells to enable protein colocalization to be assessed. We propose a simple and efficient method based on the open-source elastix framework to register virtual slides of adjacent sections from the same tissue sample. We characterize registration accuracies for different types of tissue and IHC staining. Our results indicate that this technique is suitable for the evaluation of the colocalization of biomarkers on the scale of a few cells. We also show that using this technique in conjunction with a sequential IHC labeling and erasing technique offers improved registration accuracies. Brightfield IHC enables to address the problem of large series of tissue samples, which are usually required in clinical research. However, this approach, which is simple at the tissue processing level, requires challenging image analysis processes, such as accurate registration, to view and extract the protein colocalization information. The method proposed in this work enables accurate registration (on the scale of a few cells) of virtual slides of adjacent tissue sections on which the expression of different proteins is evidenced by standard IHC. Furthermore, combining our method with a sequential labeling and erasing technique enables cell-scale colocalization. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comFor numbered affiliations see end of article.

  3. Photosynthetic and Heterotrophic Ferredoxin Isoproteins Are Colocalized in Fruit Plastids of Tomato1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Koh; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Wada, Keishiro

    1998-01-01

    Fruit tissues of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) contain both photosynthetic and heterotrophic ferredoxin (FdA and FdE, respectively) isoproteins, irrespective of their photosynthetic competence, but we did not previously determine whether these proteins were colocalized in the same plastids. In isolated fruit chloroplasts and chromoplasts, both FdA and FdE were detected by immunoblotting. Colocalization of FdA and FdE in the same plastids was demonstrated using double-staining immunofluorescence microscopy. We also found that FdA and FdE were colocalized in fruit chloroplasts and chloroamyloplasts irrespective of sink status of the plastid. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that FdA and FdE were randomly distributed within the plastid stroma. To investigate the significance of the heterotrophic Fd in fruit plastids, Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity was measured in isolated fruit and leaf plastids. Fruit chloroplasts and chromoplasts showed much higher G6PDH activity than did leaf chloroplasts, suggesting that high G6PDH activity is linked with FdE to maintain nonphotosynthetic production of reducing power. This result suggested that, despite their morphological resemblance, fruit chloroplasts are functionally different from their leaf counterparts. PMID:9765529

  4. Fractional finite Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Kedar; George, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    We show that a fractional version of the finite Fourier transform may be defined by using prolate spheroidal wave functions of order zero. The transform is linear and additive in its index and asymptotically goes over to Namias's definition of the fractional Fourier transform. As a special case of this definition, it is shown that the finite Fourier transform may be inverted by using information over a finite range of frequencies in Fourier space, the inversion being sensitive to noise. Numerical illustrations for both forward (fractional) and inverse finite transforms are provided.

  5. Finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate the relation between finiteness of a four-dimensional quantum field theory and global supersymmetry. To this end we consider the most general quantum field theory and analyse the finiteness conditions resulting from the requirement of the absence of divergent contributions to the renormalizations of the parameters of the theory. In addition to the gauge bosons, both fermions and scalar bosons turn out to be a necessary ingredient in a non-trivial finite gauge theory. In all cases discussed, the supersymmetric theory restricted by two well-known constraints on the dimensionless couplings proves to be the unique solution of the finiteness conditions. (Author)

  6. Error analysis of semidiscrete finite element methods for inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, B.; Lazarov, R.; Pasciak, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved. We consider the initial-boundary value problem for an inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion equation with a homogeneous Dirichlet boundary condition, a vanishing initial data and a nonsmooth right-hand side in a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyse two semidiscrete schemes based on the standard Galerkin and lumped mass finite element methods. Almost optimal error estimates are obtained for right-hand side data f (x, t) ε L∞ (0, T; Hq(ω)), ≤1≥ 1, for both semidiscrete schemes. For the lumped mass method, the optimal L2(ω)-norm error estimate requires symmetric meshes. Finally, twodimensional numerical experiments are presented to verify our theoretical results.

  7. Error analysis of semidiscrete finite element methods for inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, B.

    2014-05-30

    © 2014 Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved. We consider the initial-boundary value problem for an inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion equation with a homogeneous Dirichlet boundary condition, a vanishing initial data and a nonsmooth right-hand side in a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyse two semidiscrete schemes based on the standard Galerkin and lumped mass finite element methods. Almost optimal error estimates are obtained for right-hand side data f (x, t) ε L∞ (0, T; Hq(ω)), ≤1≥ 1, for both semidiscrete schemes. For the lumped mass method, the optimal L2(ω)-norm error estimate requires symmetric meshes. Finally, twodimensional numerical experiments are presented to verify our theoretical results.

  8. R Implementation of a Polyhedral Approximation to a 3D Set of Points Using the ?-Shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lafarge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the implementation in R of the ?-shape of a finite set of points in the three-dimensional space R3. This geometric structure generalizes the convex hull and allows to recover the shape of non-convex and even non-connected sets in 3D, given a ran- dom sample of points taken into it. Besides the computation of the ?-shape, the R package alphashape3d provides users with tools to facilitate the three-dimensional graphical visu- alization of the estimated set as well as the computation of important characteristics such as the connected components or the volume, among others.

  9. Finite Boltzmann schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the special case of relaxation parameter = 1 lattice Boltzmann schemes for (convection) diffusion and fluid flow are equivalent to finite difference/volume (FD) schemes, and are thus coined finite Boltzmann (FB) schemes. We show that the equivalence is inherent to the homology of the

  10. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  11. Supersymmetric theories and finiteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    We attempt here to present a short survey of the all-order finite Lagrangian field theories known at present in four-and two-dimensional space-times. The question of the possible relevance of these ultraviolet finite models in the formulation of consistent unified frameworks for the fundamental forces is also addressed to. (author)

  12. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  13. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  14. Finite fields and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mullen, Gary L

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a brief and accessible introduction to the theory of finite fields and to some of their many fascinating and practical applications. The first chapter is devoted to the theory of finite fields. After covering their construction and elementary properties, the authors discuss the trace and norm functions, bases for finite fields, and properties of polynomials over finite fields. Each of the remaining chapters details applications. Chapter 2 deals with combinatorial topics such as the construction of sets of orthogonal latin squares, affine and projective planes, block designs, and Hadamard matrices. Chapters 3 and 4 provide a number of constructions and basic properties of error-correcting codes and cryptographic systems using finite fields. Each chapter includes a set of exercises of varying levels of difficulty which help to further explain and motivate the material. Appendix A provides a brief review of the basic number theory and abstract algebra used in the text, as well as exercises rel...

  15. COLOCALIZATION OF MUSCARINIC AND NICOTINIC RECEPTORS IN CHOLINOCEPTIVE NEURONS OF THE SUPRACHIASMATIC REGION IN YOUNG AND AGED RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; STREEFLAND, C; STROSBERG, AD; SCHRODER, H; LUITEN, PGM; Schröder, H.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the SCN region were demonstrated and analyzed, employing monoclonal antibodies to purified muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor proteins. A near-total colocalization of the two acetylcholine receptor subclasses in

  16. Co-location satellite GPS and SLR geodetic techniques at the Felix Aguilar Astronomical Observatory of San Juan, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podestá, R.; Pacheco, A. M.; Alvis Rojas, H.; Quinteros, J.; Podestá, F.; Albornoz, E.; Navarro, A.; Luna, M.

    2018-01-01

    This work shows the strategy followed for the co-location of the Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) ILRS 7406 telescope and the antenna of the permanent Global Positioning System (GPS) station, located at the Félix Aguilar Astronomical Observatory (OAFA) in San Juan, Argentina. The accomplishment of the co-location consisted in the design, construction, measurement, adjustment and compensation of a geodesic net between the stations SLR and GPS, securing support points solidly built in the soil. The co-location allows the coordinates of the station to be obtained by combining the data of both SLR and GPS techniques, achieving a greater degree of accuracy than individually. The International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) considers the co-located stations as the most valuable and important points for the maintenance of terrestrial reference systems and their connection with the celestial ones. The 3 mm precision required by the IERS has been successfully achieved.

  17. Feasibility Study for Bioethanol Co-Location with a Coal Fired Power Plant: 29 November 2001--28 July 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-12-01

    This study looks at the feasibility of co-locating 30, 50, and 70 million gallon per year bioethanol facilities with coal fired power plants in Indiana and Nebraska. Corn stover is the feedstock for ethanol production in both cases.

  18. Feasibility study for co-locating and integrating ethanol production plants from corn starch and lignocellulosic feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ibsen, Kelly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McAloon, Andrew [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. (United States); Yee, Winnie [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of the feasibility of co-locating corn-grain-to-ethanol and lignocellulosic ethanol plants and potential savings from combining utilities, ethanol purification, product processing, and fermentation.

  19. Solid-phase single molecule biosensing using dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dong

    2013-10-01

    The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to the QD560-TBA I substrate. Thus, the presence of the target thrombin can be determined based on fluorescent colocalization measurements of the nanoassemblies, without target amplification or probe separation. The detection limit of this assay reached 0.8 pM. This fluorescent colocalization assay has enabled single molecule recognition in a separation-free detection format, and can serve as a sensitive biosensing platform that greatly suppresses the nonspecific adsorption false-positive signal. This method can be extended to other areas such as multiplexed immunoassay, single cell analysis, and real time biomolecule interaction studies.The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to

  20. GNSS-SLR satellite co-location for the estimate of local ties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Sara; Zerbini, Susanna; Errico, Maddalena; Santi, Efisio

    2013-04-01

    The current realization of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) is based on four different space-geodetic techniques, so that the benefits brought by each observing system to the definition of the frame can compensate for the drawbacks of the others and technique-specific systematic errors might be identified. The strategy used to combine the observations from the different techniques is then of prominent importance for the realization of a precise and stable reference frame. This study concentrates, in particular, on the combination of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations by exploiting satellite co-locations. This innovative approach is based on the fact that laser tracking of GNSS satellites, carrying on board laser reflector arrays, allows for the combination of optical and microwave signals in the determination of the spacecraft orbit. Besides, the use of satellite co-locations differs quite significantly from the traditional combination method in which each single technique solution is carried out autonomously and is interrelated in a second step. One of the benefits of the approach adopted in this study is that it allows for an independent validation of the local tie, i.e. of the vector connecting the SLR and GNSS reference points in a multi-techniques station. Typically, local ties are expressed by a single value, measured with ground-based geodetic techniques and taken as constant. In principle, however, local ties might show time variations likely caused by the different monumentation characteristics of the GNSS antennas with respect to those of a SLR system. This study evaluates the possibility of using the satellite co-location approach to generate local-ties time series by means of observations available for a selected network of ILRS stations. The data analyzed in this study were acquired as part of the NASA's Earth Science Data Systems and are archived and distributed by the Crustal

  1. Searching for Stochastic Gravitational Waves Using Data from the Two Co-Located LIGO Hanford Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Searches for a stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) using terrestrial detectors typically involve cross-correlating data from pairs of detectors. The sensitivity of such cross-correlation analyses depends, among other things, on the separation between the two detectors: the smaller the separation, the better the sensitivity. Hence, a co-located detector pair is more sensitive to a gravitational-wave background than a nonco- located detector pair. However, co-located detectors are also expected to suffer from correlated noise from instrumental and environmental effects that could contaminate the measurement of the background. Hence, methods to identify and mitigate the effects of correlated noise are necessary to achieve the potential increase in sensitivity of co-located detectors. Here we report on the first SGWB analysis using the two LIGO Hanford detectors and address the complications arising from correlated environmental noise. We apply correlated noise identification and mitigation techniques to data taken by the two LIGO Hanford detectors, H1 and H2, during LIGO's fifth science run. At low frequencies, 40-460Hz, we are unable to sufficiently mitigate the correlated noise to a level where we may confidently measure or bound the stochastic gravitational-wave signal. However, at high frequencies, 460 - 1000Hz, these techniques are sufficient to set a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit on the gravitational-wave energy density of Omega(f) < 7.7 × 10(exp -4)(f/900Hz)(sup 3), which improves on the previous upper limit by a factor of approx. 180. In doing so, we demonstrate techniques that will be useful for future searches using advanced detectors, where correlated noise (e.g., from global magnetic fields) may affect even widely separated detectors.

  2. Colocalization coefficients evaluating the distribution of molecular targets in microscopy methods based on pointed patterns

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pastorek, Lukáš; Sobol, Margaryta; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 4 (2016), s. 391-406 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA ČR GA15-08738S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Grant - others:Human Frontier Science Program(FR) RGP0017/2013 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Colocalization * Quantitative analysis * Pointed patterns * Transmission electron microscopy * Manders' coefficients * Immunohistochemistry Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.553, year: 2016

  3. Sustainable use of marine resources through offshore wind and mussel farm co-location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Tullio, Giacomo R.; Mariani, Patrizio; Benassai, Guido

    2018-01-01

    wind farms and open-water mussel cultivation. An index of co-location sustainability (SI) was developed based on the application of MCE technique constructed with physical and biological parameters on the basis of remote-sensing data. The relevant physical factors considered were wind velocity, depth...... range, concerning the site location for energy production, and sea surface temperature anomaly. The biological variables used were Chlorofill-a (as a measurement of the productivity) and Particle Organic Carbon(POC) concentration, in order to assess their influence on the probable benefits and complete...

  4. NFIA co-localizes with PPARγ and transcriptionally controls the brown fat gene program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiraike, Yuta; Waki, Hironori; Yu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    . NFIA and the master transcriptional regulator of adipogenesis, PPARγ, co-localize at the brown-fat-specific enhancers. Moreover, the binding of NFIA precedes and facilitates the binding of PPARγ, leading to increased chromatin accessibility and active transcription. Introduction of NFIA into myoblasts...... results in brown adipocyte differentiation. Conversely, the brown fat of NFIA-knockout mice displays impaired expression of the brown-fat-specific genes and reciprocal elevation of muscle genes. Finally, expression of NFIA and the brown-fat-specific genes is positively correlated in human brown fat...

  5. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  6. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    wavelength, they are called shallow water waves. In the ... Deep and intermediate water waves are dispersive as the velocity of these depends on wavelength. This is not the ..... generation processes, the finite amplitude wave theories are very ...

  7. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    frequency bands at certain times. Gabor theory can be formulated for both functions on the real line and for discrete signals of finite length. The two theories are largely the same because many aspects come from the same underlying theory of locally compact Abelian groups. The two types of Gabor systems...... can also be related by sampling and periodization. This thesis extends on this theory by showing new results for window construction. It also provides a discussion of the problems associated to discrete Gabor bases. The sampling and periodization connection is handy because it allows Gabor systems...... on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite...

  8. Finite size scaling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenberg, V.

    1983-01-01

    Fischer's finite-size scaling describes the cross over from the singular behaviour of thermodynamic quantities at the critical point to the analytic behaviour of the finite system. Recent extensions of the method--transfer matrix technique, and the Hamiltonian formalism--are discussed in this paper. The method is presented, with equations deriving scaling function, critical temperature, and exponent v. As an application of the method, a 3-states Hamiltonian with Z 3 global symmetry is studied. Diagonalization of the Hamiltonian for finite chains allows one to estimate the critical exponents, and also to discover new phase transitions at lower temperatures. The critical points lambda, and indices v estimated for finite-scaling are given

  9. Precise Haptic Device Co-Location for Visuo-Haptic Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Ulrich; Pankratz, Frieder; Sandor, Christian; Klinker, Gudrun; Laga, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    Visuo-haptic augmented reality systems enable users to see and touch digital information that is embedded in the real world. PHANToM haptic devices are often employed to provide haptic feedback. Precise co-location of computer-generated graphics and the haptic stylus is necessary to provide a realistic user experience. Previous work has focused on calibration procedures that compensate the non-linear position error caused by inaccuracies in the joint angle sensors. In this article we present a more complete procedure that additionally compensates for errors in the gimbal sensors and improves position calibration. The proposed procedure further includes software-based temporal alignment of sensor data and a method for the estimation of a reference for position calibration, resulting in increased robustness against haptic device initialization and external tracker noise. We designed our procedure to require minimal user input to maximize usability. We conducted an extensive evaluation with two different PHANToMs, two different optical trackers, and a mechanical tracker. Compared to state-of-the-art calibration procedures, our approach significantly improves the co-location of the haptic stylus. This results in higher fidelity visual and haptic augmentations, which are crucial for fine-motor tasks in areas such as medical training simulators, assembly planning tools, or rapid prototyping applications.

  10. Detecting Kerogen as a Biosignature Using Colocated UV Time-Gated Raman and Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolyar, Svetlana; Eshelman, Evan J; Farmer, Jack D; Hamilton, David; Daly, Michael G; Youngbull, Cody

    2018-04-01

    The Mars 2020 mission will analyze samples in situ and identify any that could have preserved biosignatures in ancient habitable environments for later return to Earth. Highest priority targeted samples include aqueously formed sedimentary lithologies. On Earth, such lithologies can contain fossil biosignatures as aromatic carbon (kerogen). In this study, we analyzed nonextracted kerogen in a diverse suite of natural, complex samples using colocated UV excitation (266 nm) time-gated (UV-TG) Raman and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopies. We interrogated kerogen and its host matrix in samples to (1) explore the capabilities of UV-TG Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies for detecting kerogen in high-priority targets in the search for possible biosignatures on Mars; (2) assess the effectiveness of time gating and UV laser wavelength in reducing fluorescence in Raman spectra; and (3) identify sample-specific issues that could challenge rover-based identifications of kerogen using UV-TG Raman spectroscopy. We found that ungated UV Raman spectroscopy is suited to identify diagnostic kerogen Raman bands without interfering fluorescence and that UV fluorescence spectroscopy is suited to identify kerogen. These results highlight the value of combining colocated Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies, similar to those obtainable by SHERLOC on Mars 2020, to strengthen the confidence of kerogen detection as a potential biosignature in complex natural samples. Key Words: Raman spectroscopy-Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy-Mars Sample Return-Mars 2020 mission-Kerogen-Biosignatures. Astrobiology 18, 431-453.

  11. Intrasite motions and monument instabilities at Medicina ITRF co-location site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, Claudio; Legrand, Juliette; Bruyninx, Carine; Vittuari, Luca; Ray, Jim

    2013-03-01

    We process the total-station surveys performed at the ITRF co-location site Medicina (Northern Italy) over the decade (2001-2010) with the purpose of determining the extent of local intrasite motions and relating them to local geophysical processes, the geological setting and the design of the ground pillars. In addition, continuous observations acquired by two co-located GPS stations (MEDI and MSEL separated by ≈27 m) are analysed and their relative motion is cross-checked with the total-station results. The local ground control network extends over a small area (<100 × 100 m) but the results demonstrate significant anisotropic deformations with rates up to 1.6 mm a-1, primarily horizontal, a value comparable to intraplate tectonic deformations. The results derived from GPS and total-station observations are consistent and point to the presence of horizontal intrasite motions over very short distances possibly associated with varying environmental conditions in a very unfavourable local geological setting and unsuitable monument design, these latter being crucial aspects of the realization and maintenance of global permanent geodetic networks and the global terrestrial reference frame.

  12. Ground Motion Analysis of Co-Located DAS and Seismometer Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Lord, N. E.; Lancelle, C.; Thurber, C. H.; Zeng, X.; Parker, L.; Chalari, A.; Miller, D.; Feigl, K. L.; Team, P.

    2016-12-01

    The PoroTomo research team deployed 8700-meters of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) cable in a shallow trench and 400-meters in a borehole at Brady Hot Springs, Nevada in March 2016 together with an array of 246, three-component geophones. The seismic sensors occupied a natural laboratory 1500 x 500 x 400 meters overlying the Brady geothermal field. The DAS cable was laid out in three parallel zig-zag lines with line segments approximately 100-meters in length and geophones were spaced at approximately 50-m intervals. In several line segments, geophones were co-located within one meter of the DAS cable. Both DAS and the conventional geophones recorded continuously over 15 days. A large Vibroseis truck (T-Rex) provided the seismic source at approximately 250 locations outside and within the array. The Vibroseis protocol called for excitation in one vertical and two orthogonal horizontal directions at each location. For each mode, three, 5-to-80-Hz upsweeps were made over 20 seconds. In addition, a moderate-sized earthquake with a local magnitude of 4.3 was recorded on March 21, 2016. Its epicenter was approximately 150-km away. Several DAS line segments with co-located geophone stations were used to test relationships between the strain rate recorded by DAS and ground velocity recorded by the geophones.

  13. Synchronous gesture manipulation for collaboration and coordination of co-located Business Process Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Scholtz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate approaches (techniques and technologies for the coordination of collaborative tasks using synchronous gesture manipulation. Business Process Modelling (BPM tasks are often performed in teams of modellers who need to collaborate with each other in order to coordinate and integrate their individual contributions into the various process models in a co-located environment. These collaborative BPM tasks were used as a case study in order to develop the artifact (the BPM-Touch approach as a proof of concept. The BPM-Touch approach allows for the coordination and collaboration of BPM tasks in co-located modelling teams using synchronous gesture manipulation approaches. The Design Science Research (DSR methodology was used and several cycles of developing and evaluating the artifact took place. This paper reports on the last cycle and set of evaluations. The proposed approach was implemented in a BPM software package in order to provide empirical validation. Usability evaluations of the software were undertaken with both students and BPM professionals as participants. The empirical results of the evaluations revealed that the participants found the approach to be effective and rated the usability and satisfaction of the collaboration and gesture manipulation aspects of the software positively.

  14. Colocalization of coregulated genes: a steered molecular dynamics study of human chromosome 19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Di Stefano

    Full Text Available The connection between chromatin nuclear organization and gene activity is vividly illustrated by the observation that transcriptional coregulation of certain genes appears to be directly influenced by their spatial proximity. This fact poses the more general question of whether it is at all feasible that the numerous genes that are coregulated on a given chromosome, especially those at large genomic distances, might become proximate inside the nucleus. This problem is studied here using steered molecular dynamics simulations in order to enforce the colocalization of thousands of knowledge-based gene sequences on a model for the gene-rich human chromosome 19. Remarkably, it is found that most (≈ 88% gene pairs can be brought simultaneously into contact. This is made possible by the low degree of intra-chromosome entanglement and the large number of cliques in the gene coregulatory network. A clique is a set of genes coregulated all together as a group. The constrained conformations for the model chromosome 19 are further shown to be organized in spatial macrodomains that are similar to those inferred from recent HiC measurements. The findings indicate that gene coregulation and colocalization are largely compatible and that this relationship can be exploited to draft the overall spatial organization of the chromosome in vivo. The more general validity and implications of these findings could be investigated by applying to other eukaryotic chromosomes the general and transferable computational strategy introduced here.

  15. Mental health measurement among women veterans receiving co-located, collaborative care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienthal, Kaitlin R; Buchholz, Laura J; King, Paul R; Vair, Christina L; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Beehler, Gregory P

    2017-12-01

    Routine use of measurement to identify patient concerns and track treatment progress is critical to high quality patient care. This is particularly relevant to the Primary Care Behavioral Health model, where rapid symptom assessment and effective referral management are critical to sustaining population-based care. However, research suggests that women who receive treatment in co-located collaborative care settings utilizing the PCBH model are less likely to be assessed with standard measures than men in these settings. The current study utilized regional retrospective data obtained from the Veterans Health Administration's electronic medical record system to: (1) explore rates of mental health measurement for women receiving co-located collaborative care services (N = 1008); and (2) to identify predictors of mental health measurement in women veterans in these settings. Overall, only 8% of women had documentation of standard mental health measures. Measurement was predicted by diagnosis, facility size, length of care episode and care setting. Specifically, women diagnosed with depression were less likely than those with anxiety disorders to have standard mental health measurement documented. Several suggestions are offered to increase the quality of mental health care for women through regular use of measurement in integrated care settings.

  16. An Intercomparison of GPS RO Retrievals with Colocated Analysis and In Situ Observations within Tropical Cyclones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry R. Winterbottom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations from four Global Position System (GPS Radio Occultation (RO missions: Global Positioning System/Meteorology, CHAallenging Minisatellite Payload, Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C, and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate and Taiwan's FORMOsa SATellite Mission #3 (COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 are collected within a 600 km radius and ±180 minute temporal window of all observed tropical cyclones (TCs from 1995 to 2006 that were recorded in the global hurricane best-track reanalysis data set (Jarvinen et al. (1984; Davis et al. (1984. A composite analysis of tropical cyclone radial mean temperature and water vapor profiles is carried out using the GPS RO retrievals which are colocated with global analysis profiles and available in situ radiosonde observations. The differences between the respective observations and analysis profiles are quantified and the preliminary results show that the observations collected within TCs correspond favorably with both the analysis and radiosonde profiles which are colocated. It is concluded that GPS RO observations will contribute significantly to the understanding and modeling of TC structures, especially those related to vertical variability of the atmospheric state within TCs.

  17. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Finite-temperature supersymmetry (SUSY) is characterized by unbroken Ward identities for SUSY variations of ensemble averages of Klein-operator inserted imaginary time-ordered products of fields. Path-integral representations of these products are defined and the Feynman rules in superspace are given. The finite-temperature no-renormalization theorem is derived. Spontaneously broken SUSY at zero temperature is shown not to be restored at high temperature. (orig.)

  18. A mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem with elected edge bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipnikov, K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berirao, L [DIPARTMENTO DI MATERMATICA

    2009-01-01

    A new mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem is proposed and analyzed. The unstable P{sub 1}-P{sub 0} discretization is stabilized by adding a small number of bubble functions to selected mesh edges. A simple strategy for selecting such edges is proposed and verified with numerical experiments. The discretizations schemes for Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations must satisfy the celebrated inf-sup (or the LBB) stability condition. The stability condition implies a balance between discrete spaces for velocity and pressure. In finite elements, this balance is frequently achieved by adding bubble functions to the velocity space. The goal of this article is to show that the stabilizing edge bubble functions can be added only to a small set of mesh edges. This results in a smaller algebraic system and potentially in a faster calculations. We employ the mimetic finite difference (MFD) discretization technique that works for general polyhedral meshes and can accomodate non-uniform distribution of stabilizing bubbles.

  19. Ground motion response to an ML 4.3 earthquake using co-located distributed acoustic sensing and seismometer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Herbert F.; Zeng, Xiangfang; Miller, Douglas E.; Fratta, Dante; Feigl, Kurt L.; Thurber, Clifford H.; Mellors, Robert J.

    2018-06-01

    The PoroTomo research team deployed two arrays of seismic sensors in a natural laboratory at Brady Hot Springs, Nevada in March 2016. The 1500 m (length) × 500 m (width) × 400 m (depth) volume of the laboratory overlies a geothermal reservoir. The distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) array consisted of about 8400 m of fiber-optic cable in a shallow trench and 360 m in a well. The conventional seismometer array consisted of 238 shallowly buried three-component geophones. The DAS cable was laid out in three parallel zig-zag lines with line segments approximately 100 m in length and geophones were spaced at approximately 60 m intervals. Both DAS and conventional geophones recorded continuously over 15 d during which a moderate-sized earthquake with a local magnitude of 4.3 was recorded on 2016 March 21. Its epicentre was approximately 150 km south-southeast of the laboratory. Several DAS line segments with co-located geophone stations were used to compare signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in both time and frequency domains and to test relationships between DAS and geophone data. The ratios were typically within a factor of five of each other with DAS SNR often greater for P-wave but smaller for S-wave relative to geophone SNR. The SNRs measured for an earthquake can be better than for active sources because the earthquake signal contains more low-frequency energy and the noise level is also lower at those lower frequencies. Amplitudes of the sum of several DAS strain-rate waveforms matched the finite difference of two geophone waveforms reasonably well, as did the amplitudes of DAS strain waveforms with particle-velocity waveforms recorded by geophones. Similar agreement was found between DAS and geophone observations and synthetic strain seismograms. The combination of good SNR in the seismic frequency band, high-spatial density, large N and highly accurate time control among individual sensors suggests that DAS arrays have potential to assume a role in earthquake

  20. Fouling behaviors of polybenzimidazole (PBI)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membranes for engineering osmosis processes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Sicong; Fu, Xiuzhu; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated the individual effects of reverse salt flux and permeate flux on fouling behaviors of as-spun and annealed polybenzimidazole (PBI)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membranes under forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) processes. Two types of membrane fouling had been studied; namely, inorganic fouling (CaSO4·2H2O gypsum scaling) during FO operations and organic fouling (sodium alginate fouling) during PRO operations. It is found that gypsum scaling on the membrane surface may be inhibited and even eliminated with an increase in reverse MgCl2 flux due to competitive formations of MgSO4° and CaSO4·2H2O. In contrast, the increase of reverse NaCl flux exhibits a slight enhancement on alginate fouling in both FO and PRO processes. Comparing to the reverse salt flux, the permeate flux always plays a dominant role in fouling. Therefore, lesser fouling has been observed on the membrane surface under the pressurized PRO process than FO process because the reduced initial flux mitigates the fouling phenomena more significantly than the enhancement caused by an increase in reverse NaCl flux. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Polyhedral-Like NiMn-Layered Double Hydroxide/Porous Carbon as Electrode for Enhanced Electrochemical Performance Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mei; Liu, Ruili; Liu, Jianhua; Li, Songmei; Ma, Yuxiao

    2017-11-01

    Polyhedral-like NiMn-layered double hydroxide/porous carbon (NiMn-LDH/PC-x) composites are successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method (x = 1, 2 means different mass percent of porous carbon (PC) in composites). The NiMn-LDH/PC-1 composites possess specific capacitance 1634 F g -1 at a current density of 1 A g -1 , and it is much better than that of pure LDH (1095 F g -1 at 1 A g -1 ). Besides, the sample can retain 84.58% of original capacitance after 3000 cycles at 15 A g -1 . An asymmetric supercapacitor with NiMn-LDH/PC-1 as anode and activated carbon as cathode is fabricated, and the supercapacitor can achieve an energy density of 18.60 Wh kg -1 at a power density of 225.03 W kg -1 . The enhanced electrochemical performance attributes to the high faradaic pseudocapacitance of NiMn-LDH, the introduction of PC, and the 3D porous structure of LDH/PC-1 composites. The introduction of PC hinders serious agglomeration of LDH and further accelerates ions transport. The encouraging results indicate that these materials are one of the most potential candidates for energy storage devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Development of Biodegradable Poly(citrate)-Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes Hybrid Elastomers with High Mechanical Properties and Osteogenic Differentiation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhang; Yu, Meng; Chen, Xiaofeng; Ma, Peter X; Lei, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Biodegradable elastomeric biomaterials have attracted much attention in tissue engineering due to their biomimetic viscoelastic behavior and biocompatibility. However, the low mechanical stability at hydrated state, fast biodegradation in vivo, and poor osteogenic activity greatly limited bioelastomers applications in bone tissue regeneration. Herein, we develop a series of poly(octanediol citrate)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POC-POSS) hybrids with highly tunable elastomeric behavior (hydrated state) and biodegradation and osteoblasts biocompatibility through a facile one-pot thermal polymerization strategy. POC-POSS hybrids show significantly improved stiffness and ductility in either dry or hydrated conditions, as well as good antibiodegradation ability (20-50% weight loss in 3 months). POC-POSS hybrids exhibit significantly enhanced osteogenic differentiation through upregulating alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and expression of osteogenic markers (ALPL, BGLAP, and Runx2). The high mechanical stability at hydrated state and enhanced osteogenic activity make POC-POSS hybrid elastomers promising as scaffolds and nanoscale vehicles for bone tissue regeneration and drug delivery. This study may also provide a new strategy (controlling the stiffness under hydrated condition) to design advanced hybrid biomaterials with high mechanical properties under physiological condition for tissue regeneration applications.

  3. Preparation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane based hybrid monoliths by ring-opening polymerization for capillary LC and CEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Zhang, Zhenbin; Dong, Jing; Liu, Zhongshan; Ou, Junjie; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-09-01

    A new organic-inorganic hybrid monolith was prepared by the ring-opening polymerization of octaglycidyldimethylsilyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) with 1,4-butanediamine (BDA) using 1-propanol, 1,4-butanediol, and PEG 10,000 as a porogenic system. Benefiting from the moderate phase separation process, the resulting poly(POSS-co-BDA) hybrid monolith possessed a uniform microstructure and exhibited excellent performance in chromatographic applications. Neutral, acidic, and basic compounds were successfully separated on the hybrid monolith in capillary LC (cLC), and high column efficiencies were achieved in all of the separations. In addition, as the amino groups could generate a strong EOF, the hybrid monolith was also applied in CEC for the separation of neutral and polar compounds, and a satisfactory performance was obtained. These results demonstrate that the poly(POSS-co-BDA) hybrid monolith is a good separation media in chromatographic separations of various types of compounds by both cLC and CEC. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Structural Analysis of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Coated SiC Nanoparticles and Their Applications in Thermoset Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reza-E-Rabby, M.; Jeelani, Sh.; Rangari, V. K.

    2015-01-01

    The SiC nanoparticles (NPs) were sonochemically coated with Octa Isobutyl (OI) polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) to create a compatible interface between particle and thermoset polymer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used to analyze the structure of OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles. These results revealed the formation of a covalent bonding between SiC and OI-POSS. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles has also shown the indication of attachment between these two nanoparticles. The OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles were further reinforced into a thermoset resin system in order to evaluate mechanical and thermal properties of nano composites. The flexural strength, modulus, and glass transition temperature were found to be enhanced while SiC and OI-POSS coated SiC were infused into epoxy system compared to those properties of neat epoxy resin

  5. The slice balance approach (SBA): a characteristic-based, multiple balance SN approach on unstructured polyhedral meshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grove, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    The Slice Balance Approach (SBA) is an approach for solving geometrically-complex, neutral-particle transport problems within a multi-group discrete ordinates (S N ) framework. The salient feature is an angle-dependent spatial decomposition. We approximate general surfaces with arbitrary polygonal faces and mesh the geometry with arbitrarily-shaped polyhedral cells. A cell-local spatial decomposition divides cells into angle-dependent slices for each S N direction. This subdivision follows from a characteristic-based view of the transport problem. Most balance-based characteristic methods use it implicitly; we use it explicitly and exploit its properties. Our mathematical approach is a multiple balance approach using exact spatial moments balance equations on cells and slices along with auxiliary relations on slices. We call this the slice balance approach; it is a characteristic-based multiple balance approach. The SBA is intentionally general and can extend differencing schemes to arbitrary 2-D and 3-D meshes. This work contributes to development of general-geometry deterministic transport capability to complement Monte Carlo capability for large, geometrically-complex transport problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe the SBA. We describe the spatial decomposition and mathematical framework and highlight a few interesting properties. We sketch the derivation of two solution schemes, a step characteristic scheme and a diamond-difference-like scheme, to illustrate the approach and we present interesting results for a 2-D problem. (author)

  6. Sn-doped polyhedral In2O3 particles: Synthesis, characterization, and origins of luminous emission in wide visible range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yunqing; Chen Yiqing

    2012-01-01

    Sn-doped octahedronal and tetrakaidecahedronal In 2 O 3 particles were successfully synthesized by simple thermal evaporation of indium grains using SnO as dopant. Structural characterization results demonstrated that the Sn-doped tetrakaidecahedronal In 2 O 3 particle had additional six {001} crystal surfaces compared with the octahedronal one. The luminous properties of both samples were characterized by photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. A broad visible luminous emission around 570 nm was observed. Studies revealed that the emission consisted of three peaks of 511 nm, 564 nm, and 622 nm, which were attributed to radioactive recombination centers such as single ionized oxygen vacancy, indium interstitial, and antisite oxygen, respectively. We believe that the Sn donor level plays an important role in the visible luminous emission. - Graphical abstract: With more oxygen vacancies and tin doping. ITO particles can exhibit a better CL performance. Sn donor level near the conduction band edge plays an important role in luminous emission in wide visible range. Highlights: ► Polyhedral ITO particles synthesized by thermal evaporation using SnO as dopant. ► Broad visible luminous emission around 570 nm. ► Sn donor level plays an important role in the visible emission. ► ITO particles with more oxygen vacancies have better CL performance in visible range.

  7. Structural Analysis of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Coated SiC Nanoparticles and Their Applications in Thermoset Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Reza-E-Rabby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The SiC nanoparticles (NPs were sonochemically coated with OctaIsobutyl (OI polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS to create a compatible interface between particle and thermoset polymer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques were used to analyze the structure of OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles. These results revealed the formation of a covalent bonding between SiC and OI-POSS. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis of OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles has also shown the indication of attachment between these two nanoparticles. The OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles were further reinforced into a thermoset resin system in order to evaluate mechanical and thermal properties of nanocomposites. The flexural strength, modulus, and glass transition temperature were found to be enhanced while SiC and OI-POSS coated SiC were infused into epoxy system compared to those properties of neat epoxy resin.

  8. Procedimiento de corte en cuerpos sólidos poliédricos // Section procedure in solid polyhedral bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Miguel Iznaga Benítez

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available El conocimiento de la estructura de datos de los modelos geométricos ha posibilitado el desarrollo de algoritmos parasolucionar problemas complejos. Estos algoritmos han facilitado a su vez, la automatización en las oficinas de diseño através de los medios computacionales.Por tal motivo, se presenta el desarrollo de un algoritmo para la obtención de cortes y secciones en cuerpos geométricospoliédricos, se plantean las etapas fundamentales del algoritmo y a través de un ejercicio se ejemplifica el mismo.Este algoritmo puede ser utilizado en la creación de software que ayuden al proceso docente.Palabras claves: enseñanza, gráfica, separación de sólidos, geometría, dibujo, algoritmo, CAD._________________________________________________________________________Abstract:The knowledge of data structure in geometric models has facilitated the development of algorithms to solve complexproblems. These algorithms have facilitated in turn, the automation in the design by computational means. For such reason,is presented the development of an algorithm for the obtaining of sections in polyhedral geometric bodies, the fundamentalstages of the algorithm are stated and illustrated using an example.This algorithm can be use in the software creation that will help to the educational processKey words: section, separation of solids, algorithm, geometric modeling, graphic, CAD. teaching.

  9. Unusual Emission of Polystyrene-Based Alternating Copolymers Incorporating Aminobutyl Maleimide Fluorophore-Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we synthesized an unusual 2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (MIPOSS-NHBu monomer lacking conventional fluorescent groups. We then prepared poly(styrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(S-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] and poly(4-acetoxystyrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] copolymers through facile free radical copolymerizations using azobisisobutyronitrile as the initiator and tetrahydrofuran as the solvent. A poly(4-hydroxystyrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(HS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] copolymer was prepared through acetoxyl hydrazinolysis of poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu. We employed 1H, 13C, and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; differential scanning calorimetry; and photoluminescence spectroscopy to investigate the structures and the thermal and optical properties of the monomers and novel POSS-containing alternating copolymers. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the amino and dihydrofuran-2,5-dione group and clustering of the locked C=O groups from the POSS nanoparticles in the MIPOSS-NHBu units restricted the intramolecular motion of the polymer chain, causing it to exhibit strong light emission. As a result, the MIPOSS-NHBu monomer and the poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu copolymer both have potential applicability in the detection of metal ions with good selectivity.

  10. Shape-controlled synthesis of Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles exhibiting polyhedral morphologies by modified polyol method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Asaka, Toru; Matsubara, Takashi; Nogami, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple synthetic method. First, Pt nanoparticles were synthesized in a controlled manner via the reduction of chloroplantinic acid hexahydrate in ethylene glycol (EG) at 160 deg. C in the presence of silver nitrate and the stabilization of polyvinylpyrrolidon. AgNO 3 used acts as a structure-modifying agent to the morphology of the Pt nanoparticles. These Pt nanoparticles function as the seeds for the successive reduction of sodium tetrachloropalladate (II) hydrate in EG under stirring for 15 min at 160 deg. C in order to synthesize Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles. To characterize the as-prepared Pt-Pd nanoparticles, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM are used. The high-resolution elemental mappings were carried out using the combination of scanning TEM and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The results also demonstrate the homogeneous nucleation and growth of the Pd metal shell on the definite Pt core. The synthesized Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles exhibit a sharp and polyhedral morphology. The epitaxial growth of the controlled Pd shells on the Pt cores via a polyol method was observed. It is suggested that Frank-van der Merwe and Stranski-Krastanov growth modes coexisted in the nucleation and growth of Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles.

  11. Fouling behaviors of polybenzimidazole (PBI)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membranes for engineering osmosis processes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Sicong

    2014-02-01

    This paper investigated the individual effects of reverse salt flux and permeate flux on fouling behaviors of as-spun and annealed polybenzimidazole (PBI)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membranes under forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) processes. Two types of membrane fouling had been studied; namely, inorganic fouling (CaSO4·2H2O gypsum scaling) during FO operations and organic fouling (sodium alginate fouling) during PRO operations. It is found that gypsum scaling on the membrane surface may be inhibited and even eliminated with an increase in reverse MgCl2 flux due to competitive formations of MgSO4° and CaSO4·2H2O. In contrast, the increase of reverse NaCl flux exhibits a slight enhancement on alginate fouling in both FO and PRO processes. Comparing to the reverse salt flux, the permeate flux always plays a dominant role in fouling. Therefore, lesser fouling has been observed on the membrane surface under the pressurized PRO process than FO process because the reduced initial flux mitigates the fouling phenomena more significantly than the enhancement caused by an increase in reverse NaCl flux. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Integrating molecular QTL data into genome-wide genetic association analysis: Probabilistic assessment of enrichment and colocalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoquan Wen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel statistical framework for integrating the result from molecular quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping into genome-wide genetic association analysis of complex traits, with the primary objectives of quantitatively assessing the enrichment of the molecular QTLs in complex trait-associated genetic variants and the colocalizations of the two types of association signals. We introduce a natural Bayesian hierarchical model that treats the latent association status of molecular QTLs as SNP-level annotations for candidate SNPs of complex traits. We detail a computational procedure to seamlessly perform enrichment, fine-mapping and colocalization analyses, which is a distinct feature compared to the existing colocalization analysis procedures in the literature. The proposed approach is computationally efficient and requires only summary-level statistics. We evaluate and demonstrate the proposed computational approach through extensive simulation studies and analyses of blood lipid data and the whole blood eQTL data from the GTEx project. In addition, a useful utility from our proposed method enables the computation of expected colocalization signals using simple characteristics of the association data. Using this utility, we further illustrate the importance of enrichment analysis on the ability to discover colocalized signals and the potential limitations of currently available molecular QTL data. The software pipeline that implements the proposed computation procedures, enloc, is freely available at https://github.com/xqwen/integrative.

  13. Co-located wind-wave farm synergies (Operation and Maintenance): A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astariz, S.; Perez-Collazo, C.; Abanades, J.; Iglesias, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The shielding effect of WECs located around the wind farm is analysed. • The height wave reductions achieved by 15 different layouts are compared. • The increase in the accessibility to the wind turbines is quantified. • Alpha Ventus offshore wind farm is considered as baseline scenario. • High-resolution numerical modelling (SWAN) and real sea conditions are used. - Abstract: Operation and maintenance can jeopardise the financial viability of an offshore wind energy project due to the cost of downtime, repairs and, above all, the inevitable uncertainties. The variability of wave climate can impede or hinder emergency repairs when a failure occurs, and the resulting delays imply additional costs which ultimately reduce the competitiveness of offshore wind energy as an alternative to fossil fuels. Co-located wind turbines and Wave Energy Converters (WECs) are proposed in this paper as a novel solution: the reduction of the significant wave height brought about by the WECs along the periphery of the wind farm results in a milder wave climate within the farm. This reduction, also called shadow effect, enlarges weather windows for Operation and Maintenance (O and M). The objective of this paper is to investigate the increase in the accessibility time to the turbines and to optimise the layout for the co-located wind-wave farm in order to maximise this time. The investigation is carried out through a case study: Alpha Ventus, an operating offshore wind farm. To maximise the reduction of wave height in the turbine area no fewer than 15 layouts are tested using high-resolution numerical modelling, and a sensitivity analysis is conducted. The results show that, thanks to the wave energy extraction by the WECs, weather windows (access time) can increase very significantly – over 80%. This substantial effect, together with other benefits from the combination of wave and offshore wind power in a co-located farm (common electrical infrastructures

  14. Persistent Social Networks: Civil War Veterans Who Fought Together Co-Locate in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dora L; Kahn, Matthew E; Roudiez, Christopher; Wilson, Sven

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate the long reach of early social ties in the location decision of individuals and in their older age mortality risk using data on Union Army veterans of the US Civil War (1861-5). We estimate discrete choice migration models to quantify the trade-offs across locations faced by veterans. Veterans were more likely to move to a neighborhood or county where men from their same war company lived and were more likely to move to such areas than to areas where other veterans were located. Veterans also were less likely to move far from their origin and avoided urban immigrant areas and high mortality risk areas. They also avoided areas that opposed the Civil War. This co-location evidence highlights the existence of persistent social networks. Such social networks had long-term consequences: veterans living close to war-time comrades had a 6% lower probability of dying.

  15. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors are colocalized and coregulated with whisker barrels in rat somatosensory cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, P.; Kaufmann, D.; Hand, P.J.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1990-01-01

    Autoradiography has been used to visualize independently the subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat somatosensory cortex. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors, but not beta 1-adrenergic receptors colocalize with whisker barrels in this tissue. Thus, each whisker sends a specific multisynaptic pathway to the somatosensory cortex that can be histochemically visualized and only one subtype of beta-adrenergic receptor is specifically associated with this cortical representation. Additionally, neonatal lesion of any or all of the whisker follicles results in loss of the corresponding barrel(s) as shown by histochemical markers. This loss is paralleled by a similar loss in the organization of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the somatosensory cortex. Other results indicate that these beta 2-adrenergic receptors are not involved in moment-to-moment signal transmission in this pathway and, additionally, are not involved in a gross way in the development of whisker-barrel array

  16. Concept for a small, colocated fuel cycle facility for oxide breeder fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.; Stradley, J.G.; Lerch, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a United States Department of Energy (USDOE) program to examine innovative liquid-metal reactor (LMR) system designs over the past three years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) collaborated on studies of mixed oxide fuel cycle options. A principal effort was an advanced concept for a small integrated fuel cycle colocated with a 1300-MW(e) reactor station. The study provided a scoping design and a basis on which to proceed with implementation of such a facility if future plans so dictate. The facility integrated reprocessing, waste management, and refabrication functions in a single facility of nominal 35-t/year capacity utilizing the latest technology developed in fabrication programs at WHC and in reprocessing at ORNL. The concept was based on many years of work at both sites and extensive design studies of prior years

  17. A Sustainability Index of potential co-location of offshore wind farms and open water aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennassai, G.; Mariani, Patrizio; Stenberg, Claus

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the definition of a Sustainability Index for the co-location in marine areas of offshore wind farms and aquaculture plans. The development of the index is focused on the application of MCE technique based on physical constraints and biological parameters that are directly linked...... to the primary production. The relevant physical factors considered are wind velocity and depth range (which directly governs the choice of the site for energy production and for offshore technology), the relevant biological parameters are SST, SST anomaly and CHL-a concentration (as a measurement...... the computation of the Sustainability Index (SI) was identified in the Danish portion of the Baltic Sea and in the western part of the Danish North Sea. Results on the spatial distribution of the SI underline different responses as a function of the physical and biological main influencing parameters...

  18. Advantages of co-located spent fuel reprocessing, repository and underground reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahar, James M.; Kunze, Jay F.; Wes Myers, Carl; Loveland, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to extend the discussion of potential advantages of the underground nuclear park (UNP) concept by making specific concept design and cost estimate comparisons for both present Generation III types of reactors and for some of the modular Gen IV or the GNEP modular concept. For the present Gen III types, we propose co-locating reprocessing and (re)fabrication facilities along with disposal facilities in the underground park. The goal is to determine the site costs and facility construction costs of such a complex which incorporates the advantages of a closed fuel cycle, nuclear waste repository, and ultimate decommissioning activities all within the UNP. Modular power generation units are also well-suited for placement underground and have the added advantage of construction using current and future tunnel boring machine technology. (authors)

  19. Concept for a small, colocated fuel cycle facility for oxide breeder fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.; Lerch, R.E.; Stradley, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a United States Department of Energy (USDOE) program to examine innovative liquid-metal reactor (LMR) system designs over the past three years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) collaborated on studies of mixed oxide fuel cycle options. A principal effort was an advanced concept for a small integrated fuel cycle colocated with a 1300-MW(e) reactor station. The study provided a scoping design, capital and operating cost estimates, and a basis on which to proceed with implementation of such a facility if future plans so dictate. The facility integrated reprocessing, waste management, and refabrication functions in a single facility of nominal 35-t/year capacity utilizing the latest technology developed in fabrication programs at WHC and in reprocessing at ORNL. The concept was based on many years of work at both sites and extensive design studies of prior years

  20. Market floors strategy and fixed pricing model for co-location under the traditional leaseback framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osei-Owusu, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Towers make up a substantial proportion of capital investments for telecoms operators and, in emerging markets, most of their operating costs. Mobile operators are opting to share towers, renting them from other tower companies instead of making ongoing and a single financial investments...... on the same towers. The higher the co-location ratio the better for the towers companies (and their financiers), as this drives up revenues from the same base costs. Traditional towers are often designed for a specific number of spaces or tenants’ and finding ways to get these “perishable” spaces filled up...... by infrastructure operators may help drive the needed revenues and investments. The research will also investigate whether the adoption of the fixed pricing strategy is primed on a business sense rather than institutional arrangement or influences. The implication of the pricing regime on expansion of telecom...

  1. Finite-dimensional calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinsilver, Philip; Schott, Rene

    2009-01-01

    We discuss topics related to finite-dimensional calculus in the context of finite-dimensional quantum mechanics. The truncated Heisenberg-Weyl algebra is called a TAA algebra after Tekin, Aydin and Arik who formulated it in terms of orthofermions. It is shown how to use a matrix approach to implement analytic representations of the Heisenberg-Weyl algebra in univariate and multivariate settings. We provide examples for the univariate case. Krawtchouk polynomials are presented in detail, including a review of Krawtchouk polynomials that illustrates some curious properties of the Heisenberg-Weyl algebra, as well as presenting an approach to computing Krawtchouk expansions. From a mathematical perspective, we are providing indications as to how to implement infinite terms Rota's 'finite operator calculus'.

  2. Precise colocalization of interacting structural and pigmentary elements generates extensive color pattern variation in Phelsuma lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Color traits in animals play crucial roles in thermoregulation, photoprotection, camouflage, and visual communication, and are amenable to objective quantification and modeling. However, the extensive variation in non-melanic pigments and structural colors in squamate reptiles has been largely disregarded. Here, we used an integrated approach to investigate the morphological basis and physical mechanisms generating variation in color traits in tropical day geckos of the genus Phelsuma. Results Combining histology, optics, mass spectrometry, and UV and Raman spectroscopy, we found that the extensive variation in color patterns within and among Phelsuma species is generated by complex interactions between, on the one hand, chromatophores containing yellow/red pteridine pigments and, on the other hand, iridophores producing structural color by constructive interference of light with guanine nanocrystals. More specifically, we show that 1) the hue of the vivid dorsolateral skin is modulated both by variation in geometry of structural, highly ordered narrowband reflectors, and by the presence of yellow pigments, and 2) that the reflectivity of the white belly and of dorsolateral pigmentary red marks, is increased by underlying structural disorganized broadband reflectors. Most importantly, these interactions require precise colocalization of yellow and red chromatophores with different types of iridophores, characterized by ordered and disordered nanocrystals, respectively. We validated these results through numerical simulations combining pigmentary components with a multilayer interferential optical model. Finally, we show that melanophores form dark lateral patterns but do not significantly contribute to variation in blue/green or red coloration, and that changes in the pH or redox state of pigments provide yet another source of color variation in squamates. Conclusions Precisely colocalized interacting pigmentary and structural elements generate extensive

  3. Finite temperature field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    1997-01-01

    This book discusses all three formalisms used in the study of finite temperature field theory, namely the imaginary time formalism, the closed time formalism and thermofield dynamics. Applications of the formalisms are worked out in detail. Gauge field theories and symmetry restoration at finite temperature are among the practical examples discussed in depth. The question of gauge dependence of the effective potential and the Nielsen identities are explained. The nonrestoration of some symmetries at high temperature (such as supersymmetry) and theories on nonsimply connected space-times are al

  4. Generalized finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachspress, E.

    2009-01-01

    Triangles and rectangles are the ubiquitous elements in finite element studies. Only these elements admit polynomial basis functions. Rational functions provide a basis for elements having any number of straight and curved sides. Numerical complexities initially associated with rational bases precluded extensive use. Recent analysis has reduced these difficulties and programs have been written to illustrate effectiveness. Although incorporation in major finite element software requires considerable effort, there are advantages in some applications which warrant implementation. An outline of the basic theory and of recent innovations is presented here. (authors)

  5. Polyhedral shape model for terrain correction of gravity and gravity gradient data based on an adaptive mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhikui; Chen, Chao; Tao, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    Since 2007, there are four China Da yang cruises (CDCs), which have been carried out to investigate polymetallic sulfides in the southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) and have acquired both gravity data and bathymetry data on the corresponding survey lines(Tao et al., 2014). Sandwell et al. (2014) published a new global marine gravity model including the free air gravity data and its first order vertical gradient (Vzz). Gravity data and its gradient can be used to extract unknown density structure information(e.g. crust thickness) under surface of the earth, but they contain all the mass effect under the observation point. Therefore, how to get accurate gravity and its gradient effect of the existing density structure (e.g. terrain) has been a key issue. Using the bathymetry data or ETOPO1 (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/global/global.html) model at a full resolution to calculate the terrain effect could spend too much computation time. We expect to develop an effective method that takes less time but can still yield the desired accuracy. In this study, a constant-density polyhedral model is used to calculate the gravity field and its vertical gradient, which is based on the work of Tsoulis (2012). According to gravity field attenuation with distance and variance of bathymetry, we present an adaptive mesh refinement and coarsening strategies to merge both global topography data and multi-beam bathymetry data. The local coarsening or size of mesh depends on user-defined accuracy and terrain variation (Davis et al., 2011). To depict terrain better, triangular surface element and rectangular surface element are used in fine and coarse mesh respectively. This strategy can also be applied to spherical coordinate in large region and global scale. Finally, we applied this method to calculate Bouguer gravity anomaly (BGA), mantle Bouguer anomaly(MBA) and their vertical gradient in SWIR. Further, we compared the result with previous results in the literature. Both synthetic model

  6. Interaction of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine at the air/water interface: Thermodynamic and rheological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypiec, M; Georgiev, G As; Rojewska, M; Prochaska, K

    2017-10-01

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) derivatives containing open silsesquioxane cage bear great potential for biomedical applications and therefore their lateral interactions with phospholipids, major biomembranes and drug vehicles constituent, should be studied in detail. That is why the properties of surface films by two POSS-derivatives, POSS-polyethylene glycol (POSS-PEG) and POSS-perfluoroalkyl (POSS-OFP), pure and in presence of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) were studied using Langmuir surface balance. Side chains of opposite nature (PEG is hydrophilic; OFP is hydrophobic) were selected, so that to evaluate their impact on polymers' surface properties. Two types of measurements were performed: (i) the miscibility of POSS-derivatives with DPPC was evaluated via thermodynamic analysis of the surface pressure (π)-area (A) isotherms and (ii) the dilatational rheology of selected POSS-polymer containing films was studied by the stress relaxation method. Fourier transformation analysis of the relaxation transients allows to access films' dynamic interfacial properties in broad frequency range (10 -5 -1Hz). Film morphology was monitored with Brewster Angle Microscopy. PEG moiety enabled POSS-PEG to stably incorporate in DPPC films, modifying their equilibrium and dynamic properties. In contrast OFP chains excluded from interactions with other molecules and diminished PEG-OFP amphiphilicity. Therefore at high packing densities (π≥25mN/m) PEG-OFP was expelled from the air/water interface in DPPC/PEG-OFP mixtures, and the binary films equilibrium and dynamic surface properties were determined primarily by DPPC. Thus the choice of POSS side chains can play key role in biomedical applications depending on whether strong or weak incorporation of POSS-polymers in lipid environment is aimed for. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Porous polyhedral and fusiform Co3O4 anode materials for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Guoyong; Xu, Shengming; Lu, Shasha; Li, Linyan; Sun, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Co 3 O 4 is commonly used as a potential anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). In this study, novel porous polyhedral and fusiform Co 3 O 4 powders have been synthesized successfully through the hydrothermal method with different solvents followed by thermal treatment. It is shown that both of the polyhedrons (1.0-3.0 μm in side length) and the spindles (2.0-5.0 μm in length, 0.5-2.0 μm in width) are composed of similar irregular nanoparticles (20-200 nm in diameter, 20-40 nm in thickness) bonded to each other. Evaluated by electrochemical measurements, both of them have high initial discharge capacities (1374.4 mAhg −1 and 1326.3 mAhg −1 ) and enhanced cycling stabilities at the low rate (the capacity retention ratios at 0.1 C after 70 cycles are 91.6% and 92.2%, respectively). However, the rate capability of the spindles (93.8%, 90.1% and 98.9% of the second discharge capacities after 70 cycles at 0.5 C, 1 C and 2 C, respectively) is better than the polyhedrons’ (only 76.2%, 42.1% and 59.3% under the same conditions). Remarkable, the unique morphologies and special structures may be extended to synthesize other similar transition metal oxides (NiO, Fe 3 O 4 , et al.) as high performance anodes for LIBs

  8. Fabrication of boronate-decorated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes grafted cotton fiber for the selective enrichment of nucleosides in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Wei, Yinmao

    2016-06-01

    Various cotton fiber based boronate-affinity adsorbents are recently developed for the sample pretreatment of cis-diol-containing biomolecules, but most do not have efficient capacity due to limited binding sites on the surface of cotton fibers. To increase the density of boronate groups on the surface of cotton fiber, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes were used to modify cotton fiber to provide plentiful reactive sites for subsequent functionalization with 4-formylphenylboronic acid. The new adsorbent showed special recognition ability towards cis-diols and high adsorption capacity (175 μg/g for catechol, 250 μg/g for dopamine, 400 μg/g for adenosine). The in-pipette-tip solid-phase extraction was investigated under different conditions, including pH and ionic strength of solution, adsorbent amount, pipette times, washing solvent, and elution solvent. The in-pipette-tip solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was used to analyze four nucleosides in urine samples. Under the optimal extraction conditions, the detection limits were determined to be between 5.1 and 6.1 ng/mL (S/N  =  3), and the linearity ranged from 20 to 500 ng/mL for these analytes. The accuracy of the analytical method was examined by studying the relative recoveries of analytes in real urine samples with recoveries varying from 83 to 104% (RSD = 3.9-10.2%, n = 3). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Gravity Gradient Tensor of Arbitrary 3D Polyhedral Bodies with up to Third-Order Polynomial Horizontal and Vertical Mass Contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Zhong, Yiyuan; Chen, Chaojian; Tang, Jingtian; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Maurer, Hansruedi; Li, Yang

    2018-03-01

    During the last 20 years, geophysicists have developed great interest in using gravity gradient tensor signals to study bodies of anomalous density in the Earth. Deriving exact solutions of the gravity gradient tensor signals has become a dominating task in exploration geophysics or geodetic fields. In this study, we developed a compact and simple framework to derive exact solutions of gravity gradient tensor measurements for polyhedral bodies, in which the density contrast is represented by a general polynomial function. The polynomial mass contrast can continuously vary in both horizontal and vertical directions. In our framework, the original three-dimensional volume integral of gravity gradient tensor signals is transformed into a set of one-dimensional line integrals along edges of the polyhedral body by sequentially invoking the volume and surface gradient (divergence) theorems. In terms of an orthogonal local coordinate system defined on these edges, exact solutions are derived for these line integrals. We successfully derived a set of unified exact solutions of gravity gradient tensors for constant, linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial orders. The exact solutions for constant and linear cases cover all previously published vertex-type exact solutions of the gravity gradient tensor for a polygonal body, though the associated algorithms may differ in numerical stability. In addition, to our best knowledge, it is the first time that exact solutions of gravity gradient tensor signals are derived for a polyhedral body with a polynomial mass contrast of order higher than one (that is quadratic and cubic orders). Three synthetic models (a prismatic body with depth-dependent density contrasts, an irregular polyhedron with linear density contrast and a tetrahedral body with horizontally and vertically varying density contrasts) are used to verify the correctness and the efficiency of our newly developed closed-form solutions. Excellent agreements are obtained

  10. Metal-Organic Frameworks Triggered High-Efficiency Li storage in Fe-Based Polyhedral Nanorods for Lithium-ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Lisha; Song, Huawei; Wang, Chengxin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, metal organic framework (MOF) nanostructures have been frequently reported in the field of energy storage, specifically for Li-ion or Na-ion storage. By inter-separating the active sites of metal cluster and organic ligands, MOF nanostructures are exceptionally promising for realizing fast ion exchange and high-efficiency transportation and addressing the intricate issues that the energy-intensive Li-ion batteries have faced over many years. The related ion-storage mechanism remains to be explored. Is the traditional redox reaction mechanism operative for these nanostructure, as it is for transitional metal oxide? Herein, taking [Fe_3O(BDC)_3(H_2O)_2(NO_3)]n (Fe-MIL-88B) as an example, an Fe-based metal organic polyhedral nanorods of MIL–88 B structure was designed as an anode for Li-ion storage. When tested at 60 mA g"−"1, the nanoporous Fe-MIL–88 B polyhedral nanorods retained a reversible capacity of 744.5 mAh g"−"1 for more than 400 cycles. Ex situ characterizations of the post-cycled electrodes revealed that both the transition metal ions and the organic ligands contributed to the high reversible specific capacity. The polyhedral nanorods electrodes held the metal-organic skeleton together throughout the battery operation, although in a somewhat different manner than the pristine ones. This further substantiated that some MOF nanostructures are more appropriate than others for stable lithiation/delithiation processes. State-of-the-art CR2032 full cells showed that a high capacity of 86.8 mAh g"−"1 that was retained after 100 cycles (herein, the capacity for the full cell was calculated based on both the weight of the anode and the cathode, and the charge-discharge rate was 0.25C), when commercial LiFePO_4 powders were used as the cathode.

  11. A finite quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meszaros, A.

    1984-05-01

    In case the graviton has a very small non-zero mass, the existence of six additional massive gravitons with very big masses leads to a finite quantum gravity. There is an acausal behaviour on the scales that is determined by the masses of additional gravitons. (author)

  12. Finite lattice extrapolation algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, M.; Schuetz, G.

    1987-08-01

    Two algorithms for sequence extrapolation, due to von den Broeck and Schwartz and Bulirsch and Stoer are reviewed and critically compared. Applications to three states and six states quantum chains and to the (2+1)D Ising model show that the algorithm of Bulirsch and Stoer is superior, in particular if only very few finite lattice data are available. (orig.)

  13. Finite unified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapetanakis, D. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Mondragon, M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Zoupanos, G. (National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Physics Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  14. Finite unified models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.; Zoupanos, G.

    1993-01-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  15. Finiteness and GUTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown how to obtain phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. A very interesting feature of the models with three families is that they predict the top quark mass to be around 178 GeV. 16 refs

  16. Robust RBF Finite Automata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šorel, Michal; Šíma, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 62, - (2004), s. 93-110 ISSN 0925-2312 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA MŠk LN00A056 Keywords : radial basis function * neural network * finite automaton * Boolean circuit * computational power Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.641, year: 2004

  17. Inside finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  18. The Impact of Co-Locating American Job Centers on Community College Campuses in North Carolina. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noy, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Relationships between community colleges and the public workforce system might have an important role in promoting students' success in the labor market and in college. In particular, the co-location of American Job Centers (AJC) on community college campuses is a particularly strong form of relationship that might benefit students. Yet little is…

  19. Feasibility Study for Co-Locating and Integrating Ethanol Production Plants from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, R.; Ibsen, K.; McAloon, A.; Yee, W.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of the feasibility of co-locating corn-grain-to-ethanol and lignocellulosic ethanol plants and potential savings from combining utilities, ethanol purification, product processing, and fermentation. Although none of the scenarios identified could produce ethanol at lower cost than a straight grain ethanol plant, several were lower cost than a straight cellulosic ethanol plant.

  20. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum chromodynamics; finite temperature; chiral perturbation theory; QCD sum rules. PACS Nos 11.10. ..... at finite temperature. The self-energy diagrams of figure 2 modify it to ..... method of determination at present. Acknowledgement.

  1. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.W. de.

    1986-01-01

    The consequences of the incorporation of finite temperature effects in fields theories are investigated. Particularly, we consider the sypersymmetric non-linear sigma model, calculating the effective potencial in the large N limit. Initially, we present the 1/N expantion formalism and, for the O(N) model of scalar field, we show the impossibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Next, we study the same model at finite temperature and in the presence of conserved charges (the O(N) symmetry's generator). We conclude that these conserved charges explicitly break the symmetry. We introduce a calculation method for the thermodynamic potential of the theory in the presence of chemical potentials. We present an introduction to Supersymmetry in the aim of describing some important concepts for the treatment at T>0. We show that Suppersymmetry is broken for any T>0, in opposition to what one expects, by the solution of the Hierachy Problem. (author) [pt

  2. Ocean zoning for conservation, fisheries and marine renewable energy: assessing trade-offs and co-location opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Katherine L; Schoeman, David S; Klein, Carissa J

    2015-04-01

    Oceans, particularly coastal areas, are getting busier and within this increasingly human-dominated seascape, marine biodiversity continues to decline. Attempts to maintain and restore marine biodiversity are becoming more spatial, principally through the designation of marine protected areas (MPAs). MPAs compete for space with other uses, and the emergence of new industries, such as marine renewable energy generation, will increase competition for space. Decision makers require guidance on how to zone the ocean to conserve biodiversity, mitigate conflict and accommodate multiple uses. Here we used empirical data and freely available planning software to identified priority areas for multiple ocean zones, which incorporate goals for biodiversity conservation, two types of renewable energy, and three types of fishing. We developed an approached to evaluate trade-offs between industries and we investigated the impacts of co-locating some fishing activities within renewable energy sites. We observed non-linear trade-offs between industries. We also found that different subsectors within those industries experienced very different trade-off curves. Incorporating co-location resulted in significant reductions in cost to the fishing industry, including fisheries that were not co-located. Co-location also altered the optimal location of renewable energy zones with planning solutions. Our findings have broad implications for ocean zoning and marine spatial planning. In particular, they highlight the need to include industry subsectors when assessing trade-offs and they stress the importance of considering co-location opportunities from the outset. Our research reinforces the need for multi-industry ocean-zoning and demonstrates how it can be undertaken within the framework of strategic conservation planning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Qualitative Exploration of Co-location as an Intervention to Strengthen Home Visiting Implementation in Addressing Maternal Child Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellom, Katherine S; Matone, Meredith; Adejare, Aderinola; Barg, Frances K; Rubin, David M; Cronholm, Peter F

    2018-06-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper is to explore the process and impact of co-locating evidence-based maternal and child service models to inform future implementation efforts. Methods As part of a state-wide evaluation of maternal and child home visiting programs, we conducted semi-structured interviews with administrators and home visitors from home visiting agencies across Pennsylvania. We collected 33 interviews from 4 co-located agencies. We used the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to describe the key elements mitigating implementation of multiple home visiting models. Results A primary advantage of co-location described by participants was the ability to increase the agency's base of eligible clients through the implementation of a model with different program eligibility (e.g. income, child age) than the existing agency offering. Model differences related to curriculum (e.g. content or intensity/meeting frequency) enabled programs to more selectively match clients to models. To recruit eligible clients, new models were able to build upon the existing service networks of the initial program. Co-location provided organizational opportunities for shared trainings, enabling administrative efficiencies and collaborative staff learning. Programs implemented strategies to build synergies with complementary model features, for instance using the additional program option to serve waitlisted clients and to transition services after one model is completed. Conclusions for Practice Considerable benefits are experienced when home visiting models co-locate. This research builds on literature encouraging collaboration among community agencies and provides insight on a specific facilitative approach. This implementation strategy informs policy across the social services spectrum and competitive funding contexts.

  4. Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the footprint analysis of a steel-belted radial tyre (185/65R14 under vertical static load using finite element method. Two models have been developed in which in the first model the tread patterns were replaced by simple ribs while the second model was consisted of details of the tread blocks. Linear elastic and hyper elastic (Arruda-Boyce material models were selected to describe the mechanical behavior of the reinforcing and rubbery parts, respectively. The above two finite element models of the tyre were analyzed under inflation pressure and vertical static loads. The second model (with detailed tread patterns was analyzed with and without friction effect between tread and contact surfaces. In every stage of the analysis, the results were compared with the experimental data to confirm the accuracy and applicability of the model. Results showed that neglecting the tread pattern design not only reduces the computational cost and effort but also the differences between computed deformations do not show significant changes. However, more complicated variables such as shape and area of the footprint zone and contact pressure are affected considerably by the finite element model selected for the tread blocks. In addition, inclusion of friction even in static state changes these variables significantly.

  5. Probabilistic finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belytschko, Ted; Wing, Kam Liu

    1987-01-01

    In the Probabilistic Finite Element Method (PFEM), finite element methods have been efficiently combined with second-order perturbation techniques to provide an effective method for informing the designer of the range of response which is likely in a given problem. The designer must provide as input the statistical character of the input variables, such as yield strength, load magnitude, and Young's modulus, by specifying their mean values and their variances. The output then consists of the mean response and the variance in the response. Thus the designer is given a much broader picture of the predicted performance than with simply a single response curve. These methods are applicable to a wide class of problems, provided that the scale of randomness is not too large and the probabilistic density functions possess decaying tails. By incorporating the computational techniques we have developed in the past 3 years for efficiency, the probabilistic finite element methods are capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. Sample results for an elastic-plastic ten-bar structure and an elastic-plastic plane continuum with a circular hole subject to cyclic loadings with the yield stress on the random field are given.

  6. Strategic Co-Location in a Hybrid Process Involving Desalination and Pressure Retarded Osmosis (PRO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Victor S.T.; She, Qianhong; Chong, Tzyy Haur; Tang, Chuyang Y.; Fane, Anthony G.; Krantz, William B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on a Hybrid Process that uses feed salinity dilution and osmotic power recovery from Pressure Retarded Osmosis (PRO) to achieve higher overall water recovery. This reduces the energy consumption and capital costs of conventional seawater desalination and water reuse processes. The Hybrid Process increases the amount of water recovered from the current 66.7% for conventional seawater desalination and water reuse processes to a potential 80% through the use of reclaimed water brine as an impaired water source. A reduction of up to 23% in energy consumption is projected via the Hybrid Process. The attractiveness is amplified by potential capital cost savings ranging from 8.7%–20% compared to conventional designs of seawater desalination plants. A decision matrix in the form of a customizable scorecard is introduced for evaluating a Hybrid Process based on the importance of land space, capital costs, energy consumption and membrane fouling. This study provides a new perspective, looking at processes not as individual systems but as a whole utilizing strategic co-location to unlock the synergies available in the water-energy nexus for more sustainable desalination. PMID:24956940

  7. Tissue- and Cell-Specific Co-localization of Intracellular Gelatinolytic Activity and Matrix Metalloproteinase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solli, Ann Iren; Fadnes, Bodil; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) is a proteolytic enzyme that degrades extracellular matrix proteins. Recent studies indicate that MMP-2 also has a role in intracellular proteolysis during various pathological conditions, such as ischemic injuries in heart and brain and in tumor growth. The present study was performed to map the distribution of intracellular MMP-2 activity in various mouse tissues and cells under physiological conditions. Samples from normal brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, pancreas, kidney, adrenal gland, thyroid gland, gonads, oral mucosa, salivary glands, esophagus, intestines, and skin were subjected to high-resolution in situ gelatin zymography and immunohistochemical staining. In hepatocytes, cardiac myocytes, kidney tubuli cells, epithelial cells in the oral mucosa as well as in excretory ducts of salivary glands, and adrenal cortical cells, we found strong intracellular gelatinolytic activity that was significantly reduced by the metalloprotease inhibitor EDTA but not by the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64. Furthermore, the gelatinolytic activity was co-localized with MMP-2. Western blotting and electron microscopy combined with immunogold labeling revealed the presence of MMP-2 in different intracellular compartments of isolated hepatocytes. Our results indicate that MMP-2 takes part in intracellular proteolysis in specific tissues and cells during physiological conditions. PMID:23482328

  8. Simulations of VLBI observations of a geodetic satellite providing co-location in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James M.; Beyerle, Georg; Glaser, Susanne; Liu, Li; Männel, Benjamin; Nilsson, Tobias; Heinkelmann, Robert; Schuh, Harald

    2018-02-01

    We performed Monte Carlo simulations of very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of Earth-orbiting satellites incorporating co-located space-geodetic instruments in order to study how well the VLBI frame and the spacecraft frame can be tied using such measurements. We simulated observations of spacecraft by VLBI observations, time-of-flight (TOF) measurements using a time-encoded signal in the spacecraft transmission, similar in concept to precise point positioning, and differential VLBI (D-VLBI) observations using angularly nearby quasar calibrators to compare their relative performance. We used the proposed European Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (E-GRASP) mission as an initial test case for our software. We found that the standard VLBI technique is limited, in part, by the present lack of knowledge of the absolute offset of VLBI time to Coordinated Universal Time at the level of microseconds. TOF measurements are better able to overcome this problem and provide frame ties with uncertainties in translation and scale nearly a factor of three smaller than those yielded from VLBI measurements. If the absolute time offset issue can be resolved by external means, the VLBI results can be significantly improved and can come close to providing 1 mm accuracy in the frame tie parameters. D-VLBI observations with optimum performance assumptions provide roughly a factor of two higher uncertainties for the E-GRASP orbit. We additionally simulated how station and spacecraft position offsets affect the frame tie performance.

  9. Strategic Co-Location in a Hybrid Process Involving Desalination and Pressure Retarded Osmosis (PRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Krantz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on a Hybrid Process that uses feed salinity dilution and osmotic power recovery from Pressure Retarded Osmosis (PRO to achieve higher overall water recovery. This reduces the energy consumption and capital costs of conventional seawater desalination and water reuse processes. The Hybrid Process increases the amount of water recovered from the current 66.7% for conventional seawater desalination and water reuse processes to a potential 80% through the use of reclaimed water brine as an impaired water source. A reduction of up to 23% in energy consumption is projected via the Hybrid Process. The attractiveness is amplified by potential capital cost savings ranging from 8.7%–20% compared to conventional designs of seawater desalination plants. A decision matrix in the form of a customizable scorecard is introduced for evaluating a Hybrid Process based on the importance of land space, capital costs, energy consumption and membrane fouling. This study provides a new perspective, looking at processes not as individual systems but as a whole utilizing strategic co-location to unlock the synergies available in the water-energy nexus for more sustainable desalination.

  10. [Colocalization of nucleoli in cell nuclei of HeLa line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Iu P; Neguliaev, Iu A; Tsupkina, N V

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of localization of nucleoli relative to each other and to cell nucleus was studied in M-HeLa cell line. For this puspose, the following morphometric parameters were introduced. For the two-nucleolar cells: 1) the ratio of the nucleus long axis to the length of a segment between the centers of the nucleoli, and 2) the angle between the segment connecting the centers of the nucleoli and a longitudinal axis of cell nucleus. For the three-nucleolar cells: the ratio perimeter of the nucleus to perimeter of a triangle with vertexes in the centre of nucleoli. We have shown that the values of these parameters are individual for each cell but their values remain constant for the cell in spite of the changes in cell shape. These results allow us to conclude that, on the one hand, the nucleoli colocalization is individual for each cell, and, on the other hand, location of nucleoli in relation to nucleus is not changed during interphase. Thereby, the distance between nucleoli increases proportionally with nucleus growth.

  11. A Bayesian Framework for Multiple Trait Colo-calization from Summary Association Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambartolomei, Claudia; Zhenli Liu, Jimmy; Zhang, Wen; Hauberg, Mads; Shi, Huwenbo; Boocock, James; Pickrell, Joe; Jaffe, Andrew E; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Roussos, Panos

    2018-03-19

    Most genetic variants implicated in complex diseases by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are non-coding, making it challenging to understand the causative genes involved in disease. Integrating external information such as quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of molecular traits (e.g., expression, methylation) is a powerful approach to identify the subset of GWAS signals explained by regulatory effects. In particular, expression QTLs (eQTLs) help pinpoint the responsible gene among the GWAS regions that harbor many genes, while methylation QTLs (mQTLs) help identify the epigenetic mechanisms that impact gene expression which in turn affect disease risk. In this work we propose multiple-trait-coloc (moloc), a Bayesian statistical framework that integrates GWAS summary data with multiple molecular QTL data to identify regulatory effects at GWAS risk loci. We applied moloc to schizophrenia (SCZ) and eQTL/mQTL data derived from human brain tissue and identified 52 candidate genes that influence SCZ through methylation. Our method can be applied to any GWAS and relevant functional data to help prioritize disease associated genes. moloc is available for download as an R package (https://github.com/clagiamba/moloc). We also developed a web site to visualize the biological findings (icahn.mssm.edu/moloc). The browser allows searches by gene, methylation probe, and scenario of interest. claudia.giambartolomei@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Determinants of Virulence and In Vitro Development Colocalize on a Genetic Map of Setosphaeria turcica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideros, Santiago X; Chung, Chia-Lin; Wiesner-Hanks, Tyr; Poland, Jesse A; Wu, Dongliang; Fialko, Ariel A; Turgeon, B Gillian; Nelson, Rebecca J

    2018-02-01

    Generating effective and stable strategies for resistance breeding requires an understanding of the genetics of host-pathogen interactions and the implications for pathogen dynamics and evolution. Setosphaeria turcica causes northern leaf blight (NLB), an important disease of maize for which major resistance genes have been deployed. Little is known about the evolutionary dynamics of avirulence (AVR) genes in S. turcica. To test the hypothesis that there is a genetic association between avirulence and in vitro development traits, we (i) created a genetic map of S. turcica, (ii) located candidate AVRHt1 and AVRHt2 regions, and (iii) identified genetic regions associated with several in vitro development traits. A cross was generated between a race 1 and a race 23N strain, and 221 progeny were isolated. Genotyping by sequencing was used to score 2,078 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers. A genetic map spanning 1,981 centimorgans was constructed, consisting of 21 linkage groups. Genetic mapping extended prior evidence for the location and identity of the AVRHt1 gene and identified a region of interest for AVRHt2. The genetic location of AVRHt2 colocalized with loci influencing radial growth and mycelial abundance. Our data suggest a trade-off between virulence on Ht1 and Ht2 and the pathogen's vegetative growth rate. In addition, in-depth analysis of the genotypic data suggests the presence of significant duplication in the genome of S. turcica.

  13. Fto colocalizes with a satiety mediator oxytocin in the brain and upregulates oxytocin gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Pawel K., E-mail: olsze005@umn.edu [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Minnesota Obesity Center, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Fredriksson, Robert; Eriksson, Jenny D. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Mitra, Anaya [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Radomska, Katarzyna J. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Gosnell, Blake A. [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Solvang, Maria N. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Levine, Allen S. [Minnesota Obesity Center, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Schioeth, Helgi B. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} The majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto. {yields} The level of colocalization is similar in the male and female brain. {yields} Fto overexpression in hypothalamic neurons increases oxytocin mRNA levels by 50%. {yields} Oxytocin does not affect Fto expression through negative feedback mechanisms. -- Abstract: Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been associated with obesity in humans. Alterations in Fto expression in transgenic animals affect body weight, energy expenditure and food intake. Fto, a nuclear protein and proposed transcription co-factor, has been speculated to affect energy balance through a functional relationship with specific genes encoding feeding-related peptides. Herein, we employed double immunohistochemistry and showed that the majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto in the brain of male and female mice. We then overexpressed Fto in a murine hypothalamic cell line and, using qPCR, detected a 50% increase in the level of oxytocin mRNA. Expression levels of several other feeding-related genes, including neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related protein (AgRP), were unaffected by the FTO transfection. Addition of 10 and 100 nmol oxytocin to the cell culture medium did not affect Fto expression in hypothalamic cells. We conclude that Fto, a proposed transcription co-factor, influences expression of the gene encoding a satiety mediator, oxytocin.

  14. Fto colocalizes with a satiety mediator oxytocin in the brain and upregulates oxytocin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszewski, Pawel K.; Fredriksson, Robert; Eriksson, Jenny D.; Mitra, Anaya; Radomska, Katarzyna J.; Gosnell, Blake A.; Solvang, Maria N.; Levine, Allen S.; Schioeth, Helgi B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto. → The level of colocalization is similar in the male and female brain. → Fto overexpression in hypothalamic neurons increases oxytocin mRNA levels by 50%. → Oxytocin does not affect Fto expression through negative feedback mechanisms. -- Abstract: Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been associated with obesity in humans. Alterations in Fto expression in transgenic animals affect body weight, energy expenditure and food intake. Fto, a nuclear protein and proposed transcription co-factor, has been speculated to affect energy balance through a functional relationship with specific genes encoding feeding-related peptides. Herein, we employed double immunohistochemistry and showed that the majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto in the brain of male and female mice. We then overexpressed Fto in a murine hypothalamic cell line and, using qPCR, detected a 50% increase in the level of oxytocin mRNA. Expression levels of several other feeding-related genes, including neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related protein (AgRP), were unaffected by the FTO transfection. Addition of 10 and 100 nmol oxytocin to the cell culture medium did not affect Fto expression in hypothalamic cells. We conclude that Fto, a proposed transcription co-factor, influences expression of the gene encoding a satiety mediator, oxytocin.

  15. Tracking mobile users in wireless networks via semi-supervised colocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jeffrey Junfeng; Pan, Sinno Jialin; Yin, Jie; Ni, Lionel M; Yang, Qiang

    2012-03-01

    Recent years have witnessed the growing popularity of sensor and sensor-network technologies, supporting important practical applications. One of the fundamental issues is how to accurately locate a user with few labeled data in a wireless sensor network, where a major difficulty arises from the need to label large quantities of user location data, which in turn requires knowledge about the locations of signal transmitters or access points. To solve this problem, we have developed a novel machine learning-based approach that combines collaborative filtering with graph-based semi-supervised learning to learn both mobile users' locations and the locations of access points. Our framework exploits both labeled and unlabeled data from mobile devices and access points. In our two-phase solution, we first build a manifold-based model from a batch of labeled and unlabeled data in an offline training phase and then use a weighted k-nearest-neighbor method to localize a mobile client in an online localization phase. We extend the two-phase colocalization to an online and incremental model that can deal with labeled and unlabeled data that come sequentially and adapt to environmental changes. Finally, we embed an action model to the framework such that additional kinds of sensor signals can be utilized to further boost the performance of mobile tracking. Compared to other state-of-the-art systems, our framework has been shown to be more accurate while requiring less calibration effort in our experiments performed on three different testbeds.

  16. Colocalization and Disposition of Cellulosomes in Clostridium clariflavum as Revealed by Correlative Superresolution Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior Artzi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellulosomes are multienzyme complexes produced by anaerobic, cellulolytic bacteria for highly efficient breakdown of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium clariflavum is an anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium that produces the largest assembled cellulosome complex in nature to date, comprising three types of scaffoldins: a primary scaffoldin, ScaA; an adaptor scaffoldin, ScaB; and a cell surface anchoring scaffoldin, ScaC. This complex can contain 160 polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. In previous studies, we proposed potential types of cellulosome assemblies in C. clariflavum and demonstrated that these complexes are released into the extracellular medium. In the present study, we explored the disposition of the highly structured, four-tiered cell-anchored cellulosome complex of this bacterium. Four separate, integral cellulosome components were subjected to immunolabeling: ScaA, ScaB, ScaC, and the cellulosome’s most prominent enzyme, GH48. Imaging of the cells by correlating scanning electron microscopy and three-dimensional (3D superresolution fluorescence microscopy revealed that some of the protuberance-like structures on the cell surface represent cellulosomes and that the components are highly colocalized and organized by a defined hierarchy on the cell surface. The display of the cellulosome on the cell surface was found to differ between cells grown on soluble or insoluble substrates. Cell growth on microcrystalline cellulose and wheat straw exhibited dramatic enhancement in the amount of cellulosomes displayed on the bacterial cell surface.

  17. Construction of EMSC-islet co-localizing composites for xenogeneic porcine islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Sik; Chung, Hyunwoo; Byun, Nari; Kang, Seong-Jun; Lee, Sunho; Shin, Jun-Seop; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2018-03-04

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is an ultimate solution for treating patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The pig is an ideal donor of islets for replacing scarce human islets. Besides immunological hurdles, non-immunological hurdles including fragmentation and delayed engraftment of porcine islets need solutions to succeed in porcine islet xenotransplantation. In this study, we suggest a simple but effective modality, a cell/islet co-localizing composite, to overcome these challenges. Endothelial-like mesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs), differentiated from bone-marrow derived mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and MSCs evenly coated the surface of porcine islets (>85%) through optimized culture conditions. Both MSCs and EMSCs significantly reduced the fragmentation of porcine islets and increased the islet masses, designated as islet equivalents (IEQs). In fibrin in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis analysis, constructed EMSC-islet composites showed higher angiogenic potentials than naked islets, MSC-islet composites, or human endothelial cell-islet composites. This novel delivery method of porcine islets may have beneficial effects on the engraftment of transplanted islets by prevention of fragmentation and enhancement of revascularization. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. VISTILES: Coordinating and Combining Co-located Mobile Devices for Visual Data Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Ricardo; Horak, Tom; Dachselt, Raimund

    2017-08-29

    We present VISTILES, a conceptual framework that uses a set of mobile devices to distribute and coordinate visualization views for the exploration of multivariate data. In contrast to desktop-based interfaces for information visualization, mobile devices offer the potential to provide a dynamic and user-defined interface supporting co-located collaborative data exploration with different individual workflows. As part of our framework, we contribute concepts that enable users to interact with coordinated & multiple views (CMV) that are distributed across several mobile devices. The major components of the framework are: (i) dynamic and flexible layouts for CMV focusing on the distribution of views and (ii) an interaction concept for smart adaptations and combinations of visualizations utilizing explicit side-by-side arrangements of devices. As a result, users can benefit from the possibility to combine devices and organize them in meaningful spatial layouts. Furthermore, we present a web-based prototype implementation as a specific instance of our concepts. This implementation provides a practical application case enabling users to explore a multivariate data collection. We also illustrate the design process including feedback from a preliminary user study, which informed the design of both the concepts and the final prototype.

  19. Experience with procuring, deploying and maintaining hardware at remote co-location centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bärring, O; Bonfillou, E; Clement, B; Santos, M Coelho Dos; Dore, V; Gentit, A; Grossir, A; Salter, W; Valsan, L; Xafi, A

    2014-01-01

    In May 2012 CERN signed a contract with the Wigner Data Centre in Budapest for an extension to CERN's central computing facility beyond its current boundaries set by electrical power and cooling available for computing. The centre is operated as a remote co-location site providing rack-space, electrical power and cooling for server, storage and networking equipment acquired by CERN. The contract includes a 'remote-hands' services for physical handling of hardware (rack mounting, cabling, pushing power buttons, ...) and maintenance repairs (swapping disks, memory modules, ...). However, only CERN personnel have network and console access to the equipment for system administration. This report gives an insight to adaptations of hardware architecture, procurement and delivery procedures undertaken enabling remote physical handling of the hardware. We will also describe tools and procedures developed for automating the registration, burn-in testing, acceptance and maintenance of the equipment as well as an independent but important change to the IT assets management (ITAM) developed in parallel as part of the CERN IT Agile Infrastructure project. Finally, we will report on experience from the first large delivery of 400 servers and 80 SAS JBOD expansion units (24 drive bays) to Wigner in March 2013. Changes were made to the abstract file on 13/06/2014 to correct errors, the pdf file was unchanged.

  20. The Focinator v2-0 - Graphical Interface, Four Channels, Colocalization Analysis and Cell Phase Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeck, Sebastian; Malewicz, Nathalie M; Hurst, Sebastian; Al-Refae, Klaudia; Krysztofiak, Adam; Jendrossek, Verena

    2017-07-01

    The quantitative analysis of foci plays an important role in various cell biological methods. In the fields of radiation biology and experimental oncology, the effect of ionizing radiation, chemotherapy or molecularly targeted drugs on DNA damage induction and repair is frequently performed by the analysis of protein clusters or phosphorylated proteins recruited to so called repair foci at DNA damage sites, involving for example γ-H2A.X, 53BP1 or RAD51. We recently developed "The Focinator" as a reliable and fast tool for automated quantitative and qualitative analysis of nuclei and DNA damage foci. The refined software is now even more user-friendly due to a graphical interface and further features. Thus, we included an R-script-based mode for automated image opening, file naming, progress monitoring and an error report. Consequently, the evaluation no longer required the attendance of the operator after initial parameter definition. Moreover, the Focinator v2-0 is now able to perform multi-channel analysis of four channels and evaluation of protein-protein colocalization by comparison of up to three foci channels. This enables for example the quantification of foci in cells of a specific cell cycle phase.

  1. Ultrafast preparation of a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-based ionic liquid hybrid monolith via photoinitiated polymerization, and its application to capillary electrochromatography of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingyu; Lei, Xiaoyun; Deng, Lijun; Li, Minsheng; Yao, Sicong; Wu, Xiaoping

    2018-06-06

    An ionic liquid hybrid monolithic capillary column was prepared within 7 min via photoinitiated free-radical polymerization of an ionic liquid monomer (1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium-bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide); VBIMNTF 2 ) and a methacryl substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-MA) acting as a cross-linker. The effects of composition of prepolymerization solution and initiation time on the porous structure and electroosmotic flow (EOF) of monolithic column were investigated. The hybrid monolith was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and FTIR. Owing to the introduction of a rigid nanosized POSS silica core and ionic liquids with multiple interaction sites, the monolithic column has a well-defined 3D skeleton morphology, good mechanical stability, and a stable anodic electroosmotic flow. The hybrid monolithic stationary phase was applied to the capillary electrochromatographic separation of various alkylbenzenes, phenols, anilines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The column efficiency is highest (98,000 plates/m) in case of alkylbenzenes. Mixed-mode retention mechanisms including hydrophobic interactions, π-π stacking, electrostatic interaction and electrophoretic mobility can be observed. This indicates the potential of this material in terms of efficient separation of analytes of different structural type. Graphical Abstract Preparation of a mixed-mode ionic liquid hybrid monolithic column via photoinitiated polymerization of methacryl substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-MA) and 1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium-bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (VBIMNTF 2 ) ionic liquid for use in capillary electrochromatography.

  2. An Improved Computing Method for 3D Mechanical Connectivity Rates Based on a Polyhedral Simulation Model of Discrete Fracture Network in Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingchao; Han, Shuai; Zhou, Sibao; Zhang, Ye

    2018-06-01

    Based on a 3D model of a discrete fracture network (DFN) in a rock mass, an improved projective method for computing the 3D mechanical connectivity rate was proposed. The Monte Carlo simulation method, 2D Poisson process and 3D geological modeling technique were integrated into a polyhedral DFN modeling approach, and the simulation results were verified by numerical tests and graphical inspection. Next, the traditional projective approach for calculating the rock mass connectivity rate was improved using the 3D DFN models by (1) using the polyhedral model to replace the Baecher disk model; (2) taking the real cross section of the rock mass, rather than a part of the cross section, as the test plane; and (3) dynamically searching the joint connectivity rates using different dip directions and dip angles at different elevations to calculate the maximum, minimum and average values of the joint connectivity at each elevation. In a case study, the improved method and traditional method were used to compute the mechanical connectivity rate of the slope of a dam abutment. The results of the two methods were further used to compute the cohesive force of the rock masses. Finally, a comparison showed that the cohesive force derived from the traditional method had a higher error, whereas the cohesive force derived from the improved method was consistent with the suggested values. According to the comparison, the effectivity and validity of the improved method were verified indirectly.

  3. Optical Finite Element Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, David; Taylor, Bradley K.

    1986-01-01

    A new high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) with many advantageous features is described. It achieves floating point accuracy, handles bipolar data by sign-magnitude representation, performs LU decomposition using only one channel, easily partitions and considers data flow. A new application (finite element (FE) structural analysis) for OLAPs is introduced and the results of a case study presented. Error sources in encoded OLAPs are addressed for the first time. Their modeling and simulation are discussed and quantitative data are presented. Dominant error sources and the effects of composite error sources are analyzed.

  4. Combinatorics of finite sets

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Coherent treatment provides comprehensive view of basic methods and results of the combinatorial study of finite set systems. The Clements-Lindstrom extension of the Kruskal-Katona theorem to multisets is explored, as is the Greene-Kleitman result concerning k-saturated chain partitions of general partially ordered sets. Connections with Dilworth's theorem, the marriage problem, and probability are also discussed. Each chapter ends with a helpful series of exercises and outline solutions appear at the end. ""An excellent text for a topics course in discrete mathematics."" - Bulletin of the Ame

  5. Space Geodetic Technique Co-location in Space: Simulation Results for the GRASP Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmicz-Cieslak, M.; Pavlis, E. C.

    2011-12-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System-GGOS, places very stringent requirements in the accuracy and stability of future realizations of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF): an origin definition at 1 mm or better at epoch and a temporal stability on the order of 0.1 mm/y, with similar numbers for the scale (0.1 ppb) and orientation components. These goals were derived from the requirements of Earth science problems that are currently the international community's highest priority. None of the geodetic positioning techniques can achieve this goal alone. This is due in part to the non-observability of certain attributes from a single technique. Another limitation is imposed from the extent and uniformity of the tracking network and the schedule of observational availability and number of suitable targets. The final limitation derives from the difficulty to "tie" the reference points of each technique at the same site, to an accuracy that will support the GGOS goals. The future GGOS network will address decisively the ground segment and to certain extent the space segment requirements. The JPL-proposed multi-technique mission GRASP (Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space) attempts to resolve the accurate tie between techniques, using their co-location in space, onboard a well-designed spacecraft equipped with GNSS receivers, a SLR retroreflector array, a VLBI beacon and a DORIS system. Using the anticipated system performance for all four techniques at the time the GGOS network is completed (ca 2020), we generated a number of simulated data sets for the development of a TRF. Our simulation studies examine the degree to which GRASP can improve the inter-technique "tie" issue compared to the classical approach, and the likely modus operandi for such a mission. The success of the examined scenarios is judged by the quality of the origin and scale definition of the resulting TRF.

  6. Analysis of co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations near clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Várnai

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at helping synergistic studies in combining data from different satellites for gaining new insights into two critical yet poorly understood aspects of anthropogenic climate change, aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects. In particular, the paper examines the way cloud information from the MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer imager can refine our perceptions based on CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization lidar measurements about the systematic aerosol changes that occur near clouds.

    The statistical analysis of a yearlong dataset of co-located global maritime observations from the Aqua and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellites reveals that MODIS's multispectral imaging ability can greatly help the interpretation of CALIOP observations. The results show that imagers on Aqua and CALIPSO yield very similar pictures, and that the discrepancies – due mainly to wind drift and differences in view angle – do not significantly hinder aerosol measurements near clouds. By detecting clouds outside the CALIOP track, MODIS reveals that clouds are usually closer to clear areas than CALIOP data alone would suggest. The paper finds statistical relationships between the distances to clouds in MODIS and CALIOP data, and proposes a rescaling approach to statistically account for the impact of clouds outside the CALIOP track even when MODIS cannot reliably detect low clouds, for example at night or over sea ice. Finally, the results show that the typical distance to clouds depends on both cloud coverage and cloud type, and accordingly varies with location and season. In maritime areas perceived cloud free, the global median distance to clouds below 3 km altitude is in the 4–5 km range.

  7. Finiteness of corner vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jiten C.; Biswas, Sougata; Panda, Swapnendu

    2018-04-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of steady internal viscous incompressible flows was thought to be infinite. However, the already existing and most recent geometric theories on incompressible viscous flows that express vortical structures in terms of critical points in bounded domains indicate a strong opposition to this notion of infiniteness. In this study, we endeavor to bridge the gap between the two opposing stream of thoughts by diagnosing the assumptions of the existing theorems on such vortices. We provide our own set of proofs for establishing the finiteness of the sequence of corner vortices by making use of the continuum hypothesis and Kolmogorov scale, which guarantee a nonzero scale for the smallest vortex structure possible in incompressible viscous flows. We point out that the notion of infiniteness resulting from discrete self-similarity of the vortex structures is not physically feasible. Making use of some elementary concepts of mathematical analysis and our own construction of diametric disks, we conclude that the sequence of corner vortices is finite.

  8. Clus-DoC: a combined cluster detection and colocalization analysis for single-molecule localization microscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pageon, Sophie V.; Nicovich, Philip R.; Mollazade, Mahdie; Tabarin, Thibault; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Advances in fluorescence microscopy are providing increasing evidence that the spatial organization of proteins in cell membranes may facilitate signal initiation and integration for appropriate cellular responses. Our understanding of how changes in spatial organization are linked to function has been hampered by the inability to directly measure signaling activity or protein association at the level of individual proteins in intact cells. Here we solve this measurement challenge by developing Clus-DoC, an analysis strategy that quantifies both the spatial distribution of a protein and its colocalization status. We apply this approach to the triggering of the T-cell receptor during T-cell activation, as well as to the functionality of focal adhesions in fibroblasts, thereby demonstrating an experimental and analytical workflow that can be used to quantify signaling activity and protein colocalization at the level of individual proteins. PMID:27582387

  9. Impact of co-located general practitioner (GP) clinics and patient choice on duration of wait in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anurag; Inder, Brett

    2011-08-01

    To empirically model the determinants of duration of wait of emergency (triage category 2) patients in an emergency department (ED) focusing on two questions: (i) What is the effect of enhancing the degree of choice for non-urgent (triage category 5) patients on duration of wait for emergency (category 2) patients in EDs; and (ii) What is the effect of co-located GP clinics on duration of wait for emergency patients in EDs? The answers to these questions will help in understanding the effectiveness of demand management strategies, which are identified as one of the solutions to ED crowding. The duration of wait for each patient (difference between arrival time and time first seen by treating doctor) was modelled as a function of input factors (degree of choice, patient characteristics, weekend admission, metro/regional hospital, concentration of emergency (category 2) patients in hospital service area), throughput factors (availability of doctors and nurses) and output factor (hospital bed capacity). The unit of analysis was a patient episode and the model was estimated using a survival regression technique. The degree of choice for non-urgent (category 5) patients has a non-linear effect: more choice for non-urgent patients is associated with longer waits for emergency patients at lower values and shorter waits at higher values of degree of choice. Thus more choice of EDs for non-urgent patients is related to a longer wait for emergency (category 2) patients in EDs. The waiting time for emergency patients in hospital campuses with co-located GP clinics was 19% lower (1.5 min less) on average than for those waiting in campuses without co-located GP clinics. These findings suggest that diverting non-urgent (category 5) patients to an alternative model of care (co-located GP clinics) is a more effective demand management strategy and will reduce ED crowding.

  10. General practitioners: Between integration and co-location. The case of primary care centers in Tuscany, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsanti, Sara; Bonciani, Manila

    2018-01-01

    Healthcare systems have followed several strategies aimed at integrating primary care services and professionals. Medical homes in the USA and Canada, and primary care centres across Europe have collocated general practitioners and other health and social professionals in the same building in order to boost coordination among services and the continuity of care for patients. However, in the literature, the impact of co-location on primary care has led to controversial results. This article analyses the possible benefits of the co-location of services in primary care focusing on the Italian model of primary care centres (Case della Salute) in terms of general practitioners' perception. We used the results of a web survey of general practitioners in Tuscany to compare the experiences and satisfaction of those general practitioners involved and not involved in a primary care centre, performed a MONAVA and ANOVA analysis. Our case study highlights the positive impact of co-location on the integration of professionals, especially with nurses and social workers, and on organizational integration, in terms of frequency of meeting to discuss about quality of care. Conversely, no significant differences were found in terms of either clinical or system integration. Furthermore, the collaboration with specialists is still weak. Considering the general practitioners' perspective in terms of experience and satisfaction towards primary care, co-location strategies is a necessary step in order to facilitate the collaboration among professionals and to prevent unintended consequences in terms of an even possible isolation of primary care as an involuntary 'disintegration of the integration'.

  11. Half a Year of Co-located Gaseous Elemental Mercury Measurements: Investigation of Temporal Changes in Measurement Differences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselík, P.; Dvorská, Alice; Michálek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2017), s. 3128-3137 ISSN 1018-4619 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : gaseous elemental mercury * Tekran 2537B * co-located measurement * capability indices * regression * cluster analysis Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 0.425, year: 2016

  12. Colocalization of Galectin-3 With CD147 Is Associated With Increased Gelatinolytic Activity in Ulcerating Human Corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzat, Andrea; Gonzalez-Andrades, Miguel; Mauris, Jérôme; AbuSamra, Dina B; Chidambaram, Preethi; Kenyon, Kenneth R; Chodosh, James; Dohlman, Claes H; Argüeso, Pablo

    2018-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a carbohydrate-binding protein known to promote expression of matrix metalloproteinases, a hallmark of ulceration, through interaction with the extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer CD147. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of galectin-3 in corneas of patients with ulcerative keratitis and to determine its relationship to CD147 and the presence of gelatinolytic activity. This was an observational case series involving donor tissue from 13 patients with active corneal ulceration and 6 control corneas. Fixed-frozen sections of the corneas were processed to localize galectin-3 and CD147 by immunofluorescence microscopy. Gelatinolytic activity was detected by in situ zymography. Tissue from patients with active corneal ulceration showed a greater galectin-3 immunoreactivity in basal epithelia and stroma compared with controls. Immunofluorescence grading scores revealed increased colocalization of galectin-3 and CD147 in corneal ulcers at the epithelial-stromal junction and within fibroblasts. Quantitative analysis using the Manders' colocalization coefficient demonstrated significant overlap in corneas from patients with ulcerative keratitis (M1 = 0.29; M2 = 0.22) as opposed to control corneas (M1 = 0.01, P < 0.01; M2 = 0.02, P < 0.05). In these experiments, there was a significant positive correlation between the degree of galectin-3 and CD147 colocalization and the presence of gelatinolytic activity. Our results indicate that concomitant stimulation and colocalization of galectin-3 with CD147 are associated with increased gelatinolytic activity in the actively ulcerating human cornea and suggest a mechanism by which galectin-3 may contribute to the degradation of extracellular matrix proteins during ulceration.

  13. The tumor suppressor SHIP1 colocalizes in nucleolar cavities with p53 and components of PML nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehm, Patrick; Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Wundenberg, Torsten; Jücker, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP1 is a negative regulator of signaling processes in haematopoietic cells. By converting PI(3,4,5)P3 to PtdIns(3,4)P2 at the plasma membrane, SHIP1 modifies PI3-kinase mediated signaling. We have recently demonstrated that SHIP1 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein and SHIP1 nuclear puncta partially colocalize with FLASH, a component of nuclear bodies. In this study, we demonstrate that endogenous SHIP1 localizes to intranucleolar regions of both normal and leukemic haematopoietic cells. In addition, we report that ectopically expressed SHIP1 accumulates in nucleolar cavities and colocalizes with the tumor suppressor protein p53 and components of PML nuclear bodies (e.g. SP100, SUMO-1 and CK2). Moreover, SHIP1 also colocalizes in nucleolar cavities with components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. By using confocal microscopy data, we generated 3D-models revealing the enormous extent of the SHIP1 aggresomes in the nucleolus. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 causes an enlargement of nucleolar SHIP1 containing structures. Unexpectedly, this accumulation can be partially prevented by treatment with the inhibitor of nuclear protein export Leptomycin B. In recent years, several proteins aggregating in nucleolar cavities were shown to be key factors of neurodegenerative diseases and cancerogenesis. Our findings support current relevance of nuclear localized SHIP1.

  14. Ubiquitous computing to support co-located clinical teams: using the semiotics of physical objects in system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Magnus; Timpka, Toomas

    2007-06-01

    Co-located teams often use material objects to communicate messages in collaboration. Modern desktop computing systems with abstract graphical user interface (GUIs) fail to support this material dimension of inter-personal communication. The aim of this study is to investigate how tangible user interfaces can be used in computer systems to better support collaborative routines among co-located clinical teams. The semiotics of physical objects used in team collaboration was analyzed from data collected during 1 month of observations at an emergency room. The resulting set of communication patterns was used as a framework when designing an experimental system. Following the principles of augmented reality, physical objects were mapped into a physical user interface with the goal of maintaining the symbolic value of those objects. NOSTOS is an experimental ubiquitous computing environment that takes advantage of interaction devices integrated into the traditional clinical environment, including digital pens, walk-up displays, and a digital desk. The design uses familiar workplace tools to function as user interfaces to the computer in order to exploit established cognitive and collaborative routines. Paper-based tangible user interfaces and digital desks are promising technologies for co-located clinical teams. A key issue that needs to be solved before employing such solutions in practice is associated with limited feedback from the passive paper interfaces.

  15. [Tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dakang; An, Xinye; Ji, Bing; Cheng, Yanli; Gao, Honglian; Tian, Mingming

    2016-06-01

    Objective To examine whether tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) is colocalized with micronuclei and investigate the influence on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis. Methods The eukaryotic expression vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed, identified and then transfected into HEK293T cells. With 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole 2HCI (DAPI) staining, the colocalization between TRIM34 and micronuclei was observed under a fluorescence microscope. Moreover, MitoTracker(R)Deep Red was used to identify the colocalization between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria under a confocal microscope. Finally, the effect of TRIM34 on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis was examined. Results DNA sequencing confirmed that the vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed successfully. A fluorescence microscope revealed that TRIM34 could be colocalized with micronuclei in HEK293T cells transfected with TRIM34-pEGFP-N3. In the same manner, a confocal microscope distinctly showed that TRIM34 was colocalized with micronuclei similarly in appearance. However, there was no distinguished colocalization relationship between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria. Interestingly, the micronuclei chromosome conjugated with TRIM34 was hardly transferred to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis. Conclusion TRIM34 is colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate in mitosis.

  16. Analisis Perbandingan Antara Colocation Server Dengan Amazon Web Services (Cloud Untuk Usabilitas Portal Swa.co.id Di PT. Swa Media Bisnis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipur Sugiyanta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Untuk mendukung usabilitas web portal nya, SWA Media Online menggunakan layanan web hosting Colocation Server dari Wowrack. Layanan Colocation Server dari Wowrack ini memiliki lokasi server fisik atau pusat data di Surabaya, Indonesia. Seiring berjalannya waktu, penggunaan Colocation Server dirasa semakin menghambat perkembangan perusahaan, terbukti dengan melambatnya akses ke web portal swa.co.id. Untuk itu, pada bulan Mei - Juni 2015 SWA Media Online memutuskan berpaling dari Colocation Server ke teknologi cloud terbaru. Pada akhir bulan Juni 2015, SWA Media Online resmi bermigrasi dari colocation ke Amazon Web Services. Dimana server fisik nya berada di Singapura (untuk pelanggan ASEAN. Untuk fitur yang digunakan, hampir sama seperti saat menggunakan colocation yaitu yang sesuai dengan kebutuhan perusahaan. Namun, pada Amazon Web Services memberikan service atau fitur tambahan berupa adanya load balancer, auto scaling, dan bucket atau media penyimpanan. Metodologi yang peneliti terapkan dalam penelitian ini adalah metodologi analisis secara kualitatif. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, didapatkan hasil bahwa fitur tambahan yang diberikan Amazon Web Services mampu meningkatkan usabilitas portal dalam segi kemudahan dalam kecepatan akses portal. Kecepatan akses web portal meningkat lebih baik dibandingkan saat menggunakan Colocation Server.

  17. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  18. A Data Colocation Grid Framework for Big Data Medical Image Processing: Backend Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yuankai; Parvathaneni, Prasanna; Plassard, Andrew J.; Bermudez, Camilo; Yao, Yuang; Lyu, Ilwoo; Gokhale, Aniruddha; Landman, Bennett A.

    2018-01-01

    When processing large medical imaging studies, adopting high performance grid computing resources rapidly becomes important. We recently presented a "medical image processing-as-a-service" grid framework that offers promise in utilizing the Apache Hadoop ecosystem and HBase for data colocation by moving computation close to medical image storage. However, the framework has not yet proven to be easy to use in a heterogeneous hardware environment. Furthermore, the system has not yet validated when considering variety of multi-level analysis in medical imaging. Our target design criteria are (1) improving the framework’s performance in a heterogeneous cluster, (2) performing population based summary statistics on large datasets, and (3) introducing a table design scheme for rapid NoSQL query. In this paper, we present a heuristic backend interface application program interface (API) design for Hadoop & HBase for Medical Image Processing (HadoopBase-MIP). The API includes: Upload, Retrieve, Remove, Load balancer (for heterogeneous cluster) and MapReduce templates. A dataset summary statistic model is discussed and implemented by MapReduce paradigm. We introduce a HBase table scheme for fast data query to better utilize the MapReduce model. Briefly, 5153 T1 images were retrieved from a university secure, shared web database and used to empirically access an in-house grid with 224 heterogeneous CPU cores. Three empirical experiments results are presented and discussed: (1) load balancer wall-time improvement of 1.5-fold compared with a framework with built-in data allocation strategy, (2) a summary statistic model is empirically verified on grid framework and is compared with the cluster when deployed with a standard Sun Grid Engine (SGE), which reduces 8-fold of wall clock time and 14-fold of resource time, and (3) the proposed HBase table scheme improves MapReduce computation with 7 fold reduction of wall time compare with a naïve scheme when datasets are relative

  19. MPL-Net Measurements of Aerosol and Cloud Vertical Distributions at Co-Located AERONET Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Spinhirne, James D.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the first small, eye-safe, and autonomous lidar system was developed, the Micropulse Lidar (MPL). The MPL acquires signal profiles of backscattered laser light from aerosols and clouds. The signals are analyzed to yield multiple layer heights, optical depths of each layer, average extinction-to-backscatter ratios for each layer, and profiles of extinction in each layer. In 2000, several MPL sites were organized into a coordinated network, called MPL-Net, by the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) using funding provided by the NASA Earth Observing System. tn addition to the funding provided by NASA EOS, the NASA CERES Ground Validation Group supplied four MPL systems to the project, and the NASA TOMS group contributed their MPL for work at GSFC. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) also agreed to make their data available to the MPL-Net project for processing. In addition to the initial NASA and ARM operated sites, several other independent research groups have also expressed interest in joining the network using their own instruments. Finally, a limited amount of EOS funding was set aside to participate in various field experiments each year. The NASA Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) project also provides funds to deploy their MPL during ocean research cruises. All together, the MPL-Net project has participated in four major field experiments since 2000. Most MPL-Net sites and field experiment locations are also co-located with sunphotometers in the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network. (AERONET). Therefore, at these locations data is collected on both aerosol and cloud vertical structure as well as column optical depth and sky radiance. Real-time data products are now available from most MPL-Net sites. Our real-time products are generated at times of AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. The AERONET AOD is used as input to our

  20. Finite energy electroweak dyon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimm, Kyoungtae [Seoul National University, Faculty of Liberal Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.H. [Konkuk University, Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Y.M. [Konkuk University, Administration Building 310-4, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    The latest MoEDAL experiment at LHC to detect the electroweak monopole makes the theoretical prediction of the monopole mass an urgent issue. We discuss three different ways to estimate the mass of the electroweak monopole. We first present the dimensional and scaling arguments which indicate the monopole mass to be around 4 to 10 TeV. To justify this we construct finite energy analytic dyon solutions which could be viewed as the regularized Cho-Maison dyon, modifying the coupling strength at short distance. Our result demonstrates that a genuine electroweak monopole whose mass scale is much smaller than the grand unification scale can exist, which can actually be detected at the present LHC. (orig.)

  1. Probabilistic fracture finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Lua, Y. J.

    1991-05-01

    The Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) is a promising method for estimating the fatigue life and inspection cycles for mechanical and structural components. The Probability Finite Element Method (PFEM), which is based on second moment analysis, has proved to be a promising, practical approach to handle problems with uncertainties. As the PFEM provides a powerful computational tool to determine first and second moment of random parameters, the second moment reliability method can be easily combined with PFEM to obtain measures of the reliability of the structural system. The method is also being applied to fatigue crack growth. Uncertainties in the material properties of advanced materials such as polycrystalline alloys, ceramics, and composites are commonly observed from experimental tests. This is mainly attributed to intrinsic microcracks, which are randomly distributed as a result of the applied load and the residual stress.

  2. Finite element modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonks, M.R.; Williamson, R.; Masson, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a numerical technique for finding approximate solutions to boundary value problems. While FEM is commonly used to solve solid mechanics equations, it can be applied to a large range of BVPs from many different fields. FEM has been used for reactor fuels modelling for many years. It is most often used for fuel performance modelling at the pellet and pin scale, however, it has also been used to investigate properties of the fuel material, such as thermal conductivity and fission gas release. Recently, the United Stated Department Nuclear Energy Advanced Modelling and Simulation Program has begun using FEM as the basis of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT Project that is developing a multi-dimensional, multi-physics fuel performance capability that is massively parallel and will use multi-scale material models to provide a truly predictive modelling capability. (authors)

  3. Forward calculation of gravity and its gradient using polyhedral representation of density interfaces: an application of spherical or ellipsoidal topographic gravity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Chao

    2018-02-01

    A density interface modeling method using polyhedral representation is proposed to construct 3-D models of spherical or ellipsoidal interfaces such as the terrain surface of the Earth and applied to forward calculating gravity effect of topography and bathymetry for regional or global applications. The method utilizes triangular facets to fit undulation of the target interface. The model maintains almost equal accuracy and resolution at different locations of the globe. Meanwhile, the exterior gravitational field of the model, including its gravity and gravity gradients, is obtained simultaneously using analytic solutions. Additionally, considering the effect of distant relief, an adaptive computation process is introduced to reduce the computational burden. Then features and errors of the method are analyzed. Subsequently, the method is applied to an area for the ellipsoidal Bouguer shell correction as an example and the result is compared to existing methods, which shows our method provides high accuracy and great computational efficiency. Suggestions for further developments and conclusions are drawn at last.

  4. Axial anomaly at finite temperature and finite density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Zhixin; Su Rukeng; Yu, P.K.N.

    1994-01-01

    The U(1) axial anomaly in a hot fermion medium is investigated by using the real time Green's function method. After calculating the lowest order triangle diagrams, we find that finite temperature as well as finite fermion density does not affect the axial anomaly. The higher order corrections for the axial anomaly are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Facile hydrothermal synthesis of polyhedral Fe3O4 nanocrystals, influencing factors and application in the electrochemical detection of H2O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Kefeng; Ni Yonghong; Zhang Li

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fe 3 O 4 polyhedra had been successfully synthesized by a facile hydrothermal technology. ► The as-obtained product exhibited the room-temperature ferrimagnetic property. ► The final product could be prepared into an electrochemical sensor for the detection of H 2 O 2 . - Abstract: Polyhedral Fe 3 O 4 nanocrystals have been successfully synthesized by a facile hydrothermal technique, employing FeSO 4 ·7H 2 O, N 2 H 4 and NH 3 ·H 2 O as the reactants without the assistance of any surfactant. The phase of the as-obtained Fe 3 O 4 was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and further proved by Rietveld refinement of XRD data. Energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used for the composition and morphology analyses of the final product. Some factors influencing the formation of polyhedral Fe 3 O 4 nanocrystals were systematically investigated, including the reaction temperature and time, and the original volume ratio of NH 3 ·H 2 O/N 2 H 4 ·H 2 O. It was found that the as-prepared Fe 3 O 4 polyhedra exhibited a good electrochemical property in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) with pH 7.0 and could be prepared into an electrochemical sensor for the detection of H 2 O 2 . The linear response range of the sensor was 10.0 × 10 −6 to 140.0 × 10 −6 M and a sensitivity was 11.05 μA/mM. Furthermore, the room-temperature magnetic property of the product was also investigated.

  6. Axial anomaly at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.; Gupte, Neelima; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    The Jackiw-Bardeen-Adler anomaly for QED 4 and QED 2 are calculated at finite temperature. It is found that the anomaly is independent of temperature. Ishikawa's method [1984, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 53 1615] for calculating the quantised Hall effect is extended to finite temperature. (author)

  7. Finite flavour groups of fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimus, Walter; Ludl, Patrick Otto

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of the theory of finite groups, with regard to their application as flavour symmetries in particle physics. In a general part, we discuss useful theorems concerning group structure, conjugacy classes, representations and character tables. In a specialized part, we attempt to give a fairly comprehensive review of finite subgroups of SO(3) and SU(3), in which we apply and illustrate the general theory. Moreover, we also provide a concise description of the symmetric and alternating groups and comment on the relationship between finite subgroups of U(3) and finite subgroups of SU(3). Although in this review we give a detailed description of a wide range of finite groups, the main focus is on the methods which allow the exploration of their different aspects. (topical review)

  8. On finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajpoot, S.; Taylor, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The properties that make massless versions of N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory and a class of N = 2 supersymmetric theories finite are: (I) a universal coupling for the gauge and matter interactions, (II) anomaly-free representations to which the bosonic and fermionic matter belong, and (III) no charge renormalisation, i.e. β(g) = 0. It was conjectured that field theories constructed out of N = 1 matter multiplets are also finite if they too share the above properties. Explicit calculations have verified these theories to be finite up to two loops. The implications of the finiteness conditions for N = 1 finite field theories with SU(M) gauge symmetry are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo; Kronbichler, Martin; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Today's large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Co-localization of glycine and gaba immunoreactivity in interneurons in Macaca monkey cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, J; Hendrickson, A; Robinson, F R

    2006-09-15

    Previous work demonstrates that the cerebellum uses glycine as a fast inhibitory neurotransmitter [Ottersen OP, Davanger S, Storm-Mathisen J (1987) Glycine-like immunoreactivity in the cerebellum of rat and Senegalese baboon, Papio papio: a comparison with the distribution of GABA-like immunoreactivity and with [3H]glycine and [3H]GABA uptake. Exp Brain Res 66(1):211-221; Ottersen OP, Storm-Mathisen J, Somogyi P (1988) Colocalization of glycine-like and GABA-like immunoreactivities in Golgi cell terminals in the rat cerebellum: a postembedding light and electron microscopic study. Brain Res 450(1-2):342-353; Dieudonne S (1995) Glycinergic synaptic currents in Golgi cells of the rat cerebellum. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 92:1441-1445; Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2001) IPSC kinetics at identified GABAergic and mixed GABAergic and glycinergic synapses onto cerebellar Golgi cells. J Neurosci 21(16):6045-6057; Dugue GP, Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2005) Target-dependent use of coreleased inhibitory transmitters at central synapses. J Neurosci 25(28):6490-6498; Zeilhofer HU, Studler B, Arabadzisz D, Schweizer C, Ahmadi S, Layh B, Bosl MR, Fritschy JM (2005) Glycinergic neurons expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice. J Comp Neurol 482(2):123-141]. In the rat cerebellum glycine is not released by itself but is released together with GABA by Lugaro cells onto Golgi cells [Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2001) IPSC kinetics at identified GABAergic and mixed GABAergic and glycinergic synapses onto cerebellar Golgi cells. J Neurosci 21(16):6045-6057] and by Golgi cells onto unipolar brush and granule cells [Dugue GP, Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2005) Target-dependent use of coreleased inhibitory transmitters at central synapses. J Neurosci 25(28):6490-6498]. Here we report, from immunolabeling evidence in Macaca cerebellum, that interneurons in the granular cell layer are glycine+ at a density

  12. Finite discrete field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Manoelito M. de

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the physical meaning and the geometric interpretation of implementation in classical field theories. The origin of infinities and other inconsistencies in field theories is traced to fields defined with support on the light cone; a finite and consistent field theory requires a light-cone generator as the field support. Then, we introduce a classical field theory with support on the light cone generators. It results on a description of discrete (point-like) interactions in terms of localized particle-like fields. We find the propagators of these particle-like fields and discuss their physical meaning, properties and consequences. They are conformally invariant, singularity-free, and describing a manifestly covariant (1 + 1)-dimensional dynamics in a (3 = 1) spacetime. Remarkably this conformal symmetry remains even for the propagation of a massive field in four spacetime dimensions. We apply this formalism to Classical electrodynamics and to the General Relativity Theory. The standard formalism with its distributed fields is retrieved in terms of spacetime average of the discrete field. Singularities are the by-products of the averaging process. This new formalism enlighten the meaning and the problem of field theory, and may allow a softer transition to a quantum theory. (author)

  13. An Active-Radio-Frequency-Identification system capable of identifying co-locations and social-structure: validation with a wild free-ranging animal

    OpenAIRE

    Ellwood, SA; Newman, C; Montgomery, RA; Nicosia, V; Buesching, CD; Markham, A; Mascolo, C; Trigoni, N; Pasztor, B; Dyo, V; Latora, V; Baker, SE; Macdonald, DW

    2017-01-01

    Behavioural events that are important for understanding sociobiology and movement ecology are often rare, transient and localised, but can occur at spatially distant sites e.g. territorial incursions and co-locating individuals. Existing animal tracking technologies, capable of detecting such events, are limited by one or more of: battery life; data resolution; location accuracy; data security; ability to co-locate individuals both spatially and temporally. Technology that at least partly res...

  14. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  15. Data assimilation method for fractured reservoirs using mimetic finite differences and ensemble Kalman filter

    KAUST Repository

    Ping, Jing

    2017-05-19

    Optimal management of subsurface processes requires the characterization of the uncertainty in reservoir description and reservoir performance prediction. For fractured reservoirs, the location and orientation of fractures are crucial for predicting production characteristics. With the help of accurate and comprehensive knowledge of fracture distributions, early water/CO 2 breakthrough can be prevented and sweep efficiency can be improved. However, since the rock property fields are highly non-Gaussian in this case, it is a challenge to estimate fracture distributions by conventional history matching approaches. In this work, a method that combines vector-based level-set parameterization technique and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for estimating fracture distributions is presented. Performing the necessary forward modeling is particularly challenging. In addition to the large number of forward models needed, each model is used for sampling of randomly located fractures. Conventional mesh generation for such systems would be time consuming if possible at all. For these reasons, we rely on a novel polyhedral mesh method using the mimetic finite difference (MFD) method. A discrete fracture model is adopted that maintains the full geometry of the fracture network. By using a cut-cell paradigm, a computational mesh for the matrix can be generated quickly and reliably. In this research, we apply this workflow on 2D two-phase fractured reservoirs. The combination of MFD approach, level-set parameterization, and EnKF provides an effective solution to address the challenges in the history matching problem of highly non-Gaussian fractured reservoirs.

  16. Selecting optimum locations for co-located wave and wind energy farms. Part II: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astariz, S.; Iglesias, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The benefits of wave and wind combined systems relative to independent farms are analysed. • This purpose is carried out through a case study off the Danish coast. • The power production, power smoothing and shadow effect are analysed. • Hindcast and measured wave and wind data from 2005 to 2015 are used. • Third-generation models of winds and waves (WAsP and SWAN) are used. - Abstract: Combined energy systems present an opportunity to enhance the competitiveness of renewables and overcome other challenges of these novel renewables by realising the synergies between them. Among the different possibilities for combined systems, this work focuses on wave and wind co-located farms with the aim of assessing their benefits relative to standalone wind farms. To this end we estimate the energy production, investigate the power smoothing and shadow effect, and quantify the reduction in downtime achieved by the co-located farm through a case study off the Danish coast – a promising area for co-located farms based on the available resource and other considerations including technical constraints. The analysis is carried out based on hindcast data and observations extending from 2005 to 2015, and by means of state-of-the-art numerical models of the wind and wave fields – WAsP and SWAN, respectively. It is found that the energy yield per unit area with the combined wave-wind farm increases by 3.4% relative to a standalone wind farm, the downtime periods decrease by 58% and the power output variability reduces by 12.5%. Moreover, the capital and operational expenditures (CAPEX and OPEX, respectively) would also be significantly reduced thanks to the synergies realised through the combination of wind and wave power.

  17. Colocalization of low-methylesterified pectins and Pb deposits in the apoplast of aspen roots exposed to lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabęda, Irena; Bilski, Henryk; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.; Napieralska, Anna; Suski, Szymon; Woźny, Adam; Krzesłowska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Low-methylesterified homogalacturonans have been suggested to play a role in the binding and immobilization of Pb in CW. Using root apices of hybrid aspen, a plant with a high phytoremediation potential, as a model, we demonstrated that the in situ distribution pattern of low-methylesterified homogalacturonan, pectin epitope (JIM5-P), reflects the pattern of Pb occurrence. The region which indicated high JIM5-P level corresponded with “Pb accumulation zone”. Moreover, JIM5-P was especially abundant in cell junctions, CWs lining the intercellular spaces and the corners of intercellular spaces indicating the highest accumulation of Pb. Furthermore, JIM5-P and Pb commonly co-localized. The observations indicate that low-methylesterified homogalacturonan is the CW polymer that determines the capacity of CW for Pb sequestration. Our results suggest a promising directions for CW modification for enhancing the efficiency of plant roots in Pb accumulation, an important aspect in the phytoremediation of soils contaminated with trace metals. - Highlights: • Co-localization of low-methylesterified pectins and Pb was analysed in situ. • The pattern of Pb accumulation matched low-methylesterified pectins distribution. • Low-methylesterified pectins and Pb commonly co-localized in cell walls. • Low-methylesterified pectins revealed an important compound in Pb sequestration. • We suggest a new direction in enhancing plant efficiency for phytoremediation. - The distribution of lead in developing tissues of aspen root tips exposed to short-term lead treatment mimics the distribution of low-methylesterified pectin epitope

  18. Reducing severity of comorbid psychiatric symptoms in an epilepsy clinic using a colocation model: results of a pilot intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jasper J; Caller, Tracie A; Mecchella, John N; Thakur, Devendra S; Homa, Karen; Finn, Christine T; Kobylarz, Erik J; Bujarski, Krzysztof A; Thadani, Vijay M; Jobst, Barbara C

    2014-10-01

    Patients with epilepsy (PWEs) and patients with nonepileptic seizures (PWNESs) constitute particularly vulnerable patient populations and have high rates of psychiatric comorbidities. This potentially decreases quality of life and increases health-care utilization and expenditures. However, lack of access to care or concern of stigma may preclude referral to outpatient psychiatric clinics. Furthermore, the optimal treatment for NESs includes longitudinal psychiatric management. No published literature has assessed the impact of colocated psychiatric services within outpatient epilepsy clinics. We, therefore, evaluated the colocation of psychiatric services within a level 4 epilepsy center. From July 2013 to June 2014, we piloted an intervention to colocate a psychiatrist in the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Epilepsy Center outpatient clinic one afternoon a week (0.1 FTE) to provide medication management and time-limited structural psychotherapeutic interventions to all patients who scored greater than 15 on the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) and who agreed to referral. Psychiatric symptom severity was assessed at baseline and follow-up visits using validated scales including NDDI-E, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), and cognitive subscale items from Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 (QOLIE-31) scores. Forty-three patients (18 males; 25 females) were referred to the clinic over a one-year interval; 27 (64.3%) were seen in follow-up with a median of 3 follow-up visits (range: 1 to 7). Thirty-seven percent of the patients had NESs exclusive of epilepsy, and 11% of the patients had dual diagnosis of epilepsy and NESs. Psychiatric symptom severity decreased in 84% of the patients, with PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores improving significantly from baseline (4.6±0.4 SD improvement in PHQ-9 and 4.0±0.4 SD improvement in GAD-7, p-valuesintegrated models of collaborative and colocated care are becoming more

  19. The tumor suppressor SHIP1 colocalizes in nucleolar cavities with p53 and components of PML nuclear bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Ehm, Patrick; Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Wundenberg, Torsten; Jücker, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP1 is a negative regulator of signaling processes in haematopoietic cells. By converting PI(3,4,5)P3 to PtdIns(3,4)P2 at the plasma membrane, SHIP1 modifies PI3-kinase mediated signaling. We have recently demonstrated that SHIP1 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein and SHIP1 nuclear puncta partially colocalize with FLASH, a component of nuclear bodies. In this study, we demonstrate that endogenous SHIP1 localizes to intranucleolar regions of both normal and ...

  20. Finite spatial volume approach to finite temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Nathan

    1981-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory at finite temperature T=β -1 is equivalent to the same field theory at zero temperature but with one spatial dimension of finite length β. This equivalence is discussed for scalars, for fermions, and for gauge theories. The relationship is checked for free field theory. The translation of correlation functions between the two formulations is described with special emphasis on the nonlocal order parameters of gauge theories. Possible applications are mentioned. (auth)

  1. Automatic Construction of Finite Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with model generation for equational theories,i.e.,automatically generating (finite)models of a given set of (logical) equations.Our method of finite model generation and a tool for automatic construction of finite algebras is described.Some examples are given to show the applications of our program.We argue that,the combination of model generators and theorem provers enables us to get a better understanding of logical theories.A brief comparison betwween our tool and other similar tools is also presented.

  2. Photon propagators at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, J.H.

    1982-07-01

    We have used the real time formalism to compute the one-loop finite temperature corrections to the photon self energies in spinor and scalar QED. We show that, for a real photon, only the transverse components develop the temperature-dependent masses, while, for an external static electromagnetic field applied to the finite temperature system, only the static electric field is screened by thermal fluctuations. After showing how to compute systematically the imaginary parts of the finite temperature Green functions, we have attempted to give a microscopic interpretation of the imaginary parts of the self energies. (author)

  3. Sound radiation from finite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    A method to account for the effect of finite size in acoustic power radiation problem of planar surfaces using spatial windowing is developed. Cremer and Heckl presents a very useful formula for the power radiating from a structure using the spatially Fourier transformed velocity, which combined...... with spatially windowing of a plane waves can be used to take into account the finite size. In the present paper, this is developed by means of a radiation impedance for finite surfaces, that is used instead of the radiation impedance for infinite surfaces. In this way, the spatial windowing is included...

  4. Observations on finite quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, R.; Itzykson, C.

    1986-01-01

    We study the canonical transformations of the quantum mechanics on a finite phase space. For simplicity we assume that the configuration variable takes an odd prime number 4 K±1 of distinct values. We show that the canonical group is unitarily implemented. It admits a maximal abelian subgroup of order 4 K, commuting with the finite Fourier transform F, a finite analogue of the harmonic oscillator group. This provides a natural construction of F 1/K and of an orthogonal basis of eigenstates of F [fr

  5. Organizational correlates of implementation of colocation of mental health and primary care in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G; Heslin, Kevin C; Chang, Evelyn; Fenwick, Karissa; Yano, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    This study explored the role of organizational factors in the ability of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) clinics to implement colocated mental health care in primary care settings (PC-MH). The study used data from the VHA Clinical Practice Organizational Survey collected in 2007 from 225 clinic administrators across the United States. Clinic degree of implementation of PC-MH was the dependent variable, whereas independent variables included policies and procedures, organizational context, and leaders' perceptions of barriers to change. Pearson bivariate correlations and multivariable linear regression were used to test hypotheses. Results show that depression care training for primary care providers and clinics' flexibility and participation were both positively correlated with implementation of PC-MH. However, after accounting for other factors, regressions show that only training primary care providers in depression care was marginally associated with degree of implementation of PC-MH (p = 0.051). Given the importance of this topic for implementing integrated care as part of health care reform, these null findings underscore the need to improve theory and testing of more proximal measures of colocation in future work.

  6. Enhancing Wave Energy Competitiveness through Co-Located Wind and Wave Energy Farms. A Review on the Shadow Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharay Astariz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave energy is one of the most promising alternatives to fossil fuels due to the enormous available resource; however, its development may be slowed as it is often regarded as uneconomical. The largest cost reductions are expected to be obtained through economies of scale and technological progress. In this sense, the incorporation of wave energy systems into offshore wind energy farms is an opportunity to foster the development of wave energy. The synergies between both renewables can be realised through these co-located energy farms and, thus, some challenges of offshore wind energy can be met. Among them, this paper focuses on the longer non-operational periods of offshore wind turbines—relative to their onshore counterparts—typically caused by delays in maintenance due to the harsh marine conditions. Co-located wave energy converters would act as a barrier extracting energy from the waves and resulting in a shielding effect over the wind farm. On this basis, the aim of this paper is to analyse wave energy economics in a holistic way, as well as the synergies between wave and offshore wind energy, focusing on the shadow effect and the associated increase in the accessibility to the wind turbines.

  7. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book analyzes finite element theory as applied to computational fluid mechanics. It includes a chapter on using the heat conduction equation to expose the essence of finite element theory, including higher-order accuracy and convergence in a common knowledge framework. Another chapter generalizes the algorithm to extend application to the nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. Other chapters are concerned with the analysis of a specific fluids mechanics problem class, including theory and applications. Some of the topics covered include finite element theory for linear mechanics; potential flow; weighted residuals/galerkin finite element theory; inviscid and convection dominated flows; boundary layers; parabolic three-dimensional flows; and viscous and rotational flows

  8. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  9. Finite Size Scaling of Perceptron

    OpenAIRE

    Korutcheva, Elka; Tonchev, N.

    2000-01-01

    We study the first-order transition in the model of a simple perceptron with continuous weights and large, bit finite value of the inputs. Making the analogy with the usual finite-size physical systems, we calculate the shift and the rounding exponents near the transition point. In the case of a general perceptron with larger variety of inputs, the analysis only gives bounds for the exponents.

  10. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  11. Symbolic computation with finite biquandles

    OpenAIRE

    Creel, Conrad; Nelson, Sam

    2007-01-01

    A method of computing a basis for the second Yang-Baxter cohomology of a finite biquandle with coefficients in Q and Z_p from a matrix presentation of the finite biquandle is described. We also describe a method for computing the Yang-Baxter cocycle invariants of an oriented knot or link represented as a signed Gauss code. We provide a URL for our Maple implementations of these algorithms.

  12. Finiteness of quantum field theories and supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1986-01-01

    We study the consequences of finiteness for a general renormalizable quantum field theory by analysing the finiteness conditions resulting from the requirement of absence of divergent contributions to the renormalizations of the parameters of an arbitrary gauge theory. In all cases considered, the well-known two-loop finite supersymmetric theories prove to be the unique solution of the finiteness criterion. (Author)

  13. Toward finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajpoot, S.; Taylor, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The properties that make the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory free from ultraviolet divergences are (i) a universal coupling for gauge and matter interactions, (ii) anomaly-free representations, (iii) no charge renormalization, and (iv) if masses are explicitly introduced into the theory, then these are required to satisfy the mass-squared supertrace sum rule Σsub(s=0.1/2)(-1)sup(2s+1)(2s+1)M 2 sub(s)=O. Finite N=2 theories are found to satisfy the above criteria. The missing member in this class of field theories are finite field theories consisting of N=1 superfields. These theories are discussed in the light of the above finiteness properties. In particular, the representations of all simple classical groups satisfying the anomaly-free and no-charge renormalization conditions for finite N=1 field theories are discussed. A consequence of these restrictions on the allowed representations is that an N=1 finite SU(5)-based model of strong and electroweak interactions can contain at most five conventional families of quarks and leptons, a constraint almost compatible with the one deduced from cosmological arguments. (author)

  14. Surface modification of a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane poly(carbonate-urea) urethane (POSS-PCU) nanocomposite polymer as a stent coating for enhanced capture of endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aaron; Farhatnia, Yasmin; Goh, Debbie; G, Natasha; de Mel, Achala; Lim, Jing; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Chawla, Reema; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Cousins, Brian G; Hamblin, Michael R; Alavijeh, Mohammad S; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2013-12-01

    An unmet need exists for the development of next-generation multifunctional nanocomposite materials for biomedical applications, particularly in the field of cardiovascular regenerative biology. Herein, we describe the preparation and characterization of a novel polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane poly(carbonate-urea) urethane (POSS-PCU) nanocomposite polymer with covalently attached anti-CD34 antibodies to enhance capture of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). This material may be used as a new coating for bare metal stents used after balloon angioplasty to improve re-endothelialization. Biophysical characterization techniques were used to assess POSS-PCU and its subsequent functionalization with anti-CD34 antibodies. Results indicated successful covalent attachment of anti-CD34 antibodies on the surface of POSS-PCU leading to an increased propensity for EPC capture, whilst maintaining in vitro biocompatibility and hemocompatibility. POSS-PCU has already been used in 3 first-in-man studies, as a bypass graft, lacrimal duct and a bioartificial trachea. We therefore postulate that its superior biocompatibility and unique biophysical properties would render it an ideal candidate for coating medical devices, with stents as a prime example. Taken together, anti-CD34 functionalized POSS-PCU could form the basis of a nano-inspired polymer platform for the next generation stent coatings.

  15. Preparation and characterization of polyhedral oligomer silsesquioxane nanocomposites incorporated in epoxy resin; Elaboracao e caracterizacao de nanocompositos de oligomero poliedrico de silsesquioxano incorporados na resina epoxidica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhi, Marielen; Zini, Lucas Pandolphi; Birriel, Eliena Jonko; Kunst, Sandra Raquel; Zattera, Ademir Jose, E-mail: marielen_longhi@hotmail.com [Universidade de Caxias do Sul (LPOL/UCS), RS (Brazil). Laboratorio de Polimeros; Pistor, Vinicius [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The incorporation of nanofiller in thermosetting like epoxy resin as has been studied in order to modify its properties. In this research, nanocomposites were obtained by incorporating 5% by weight of three polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) with different number of functionalization: Glicidilisobutil-POSS, Triglicidilisobutil- POSS and Glicicil POSS in an epoxy matrix by sonification process. The nanocomposites were characterized by analysis of X-ray diffraction (DRX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The DRX analysis showed the characteristic peak of POSS and TEM images showed that there is a difference in the dispersion of nanocages for the difference in the number of epoxy groups on the POSS. The incorporation of Glicidilisobutil-POSS showed a significant increase in the glass transition temperature (Tg) value, and also that the most effective from the viewpoint of the dispersion, on the other hand, the Glycidyl-POSS had a greater influence on the thermal stability demonstrating that the dispersion medium is an important characteristic to define the most desirable properties. (author)

  16. Development of a polymeric ionic liquid coating for direct-immersion solid-phase microextraction using polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane as cross-linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunyan; Liang, Xiaotong; Wang, Jianping; Zou, Ying; Hu, Huiping; Cai, Qingyun; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2014-06-27

    A novel solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was developed by chemical binding of a crosslinked polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) on the surface of an anodized Ti wire, and was applied in direct-immersion mode for the extraction of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) from water samples coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The PIL coatings were synthesized by using 1-vinyl-3-hexylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate as monomer and methylacryloyl-substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) as cross-linker via free radical reaction. The proposed fiber coating exhibited high mechanical stability due to the chemical bonding between the coating and the Ti wire surface. The integration of POSS reagent enhanced the organic solvent resistance of the coating. The parameters affecting the extraction performance of the fiber coating including extraction time, pH of solution, ionic strength and desorption conditions were optimized. The developed PIL-POSS fiber showed good linearity (R<0.998) between 0.1 and 50ngmL(-1) with method detection limits ranging from 0.005 to 0.08ngmL(-1) depending on the analyte, and with relative standard deviation for single-fiber repeatability and fiber-to-fiber reproducibility less than 8.6% and 9.5%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Contribution to the reconstruction of scenes made of cylindrical and polyhedral objects from sequences of images obtained by a moving camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, Marc

    1992-01-01

    Environment perception is an important process which enables a robot to perform actions in an unknown scene. Although many sensors exist to 'give sight', the camera seems to play a leading part. This thesis deals with the reconstruction of scenes made of cylindrical and polyhedral objects from sequences of images provided by a moving camera. Two methods are presented. Both are based on the evolution of apparent contours of objects in a sequence. The first approach has been developed considering that camera motion is known. Despite the good results obtained by this method, the specific conditions it requires makes its use limited. In order to avoid an accurate evaluation of camera motion, we introduce another method allowing, at the same time, to estimate the object parameters and camera positions. In this approach, only is needed a 'poor' knowledge of camera displacements supplied by the control system of the robotic platform, in which the camera is embedded. An optimal integration of a priori information, as well as the dynamic feature of the state model to estimate, lead us to use the Kalman filter. Experiments conducted with synthetic and real images proved the reliability of these methods. Camera calibration set-up is also suggested to achieve the most accurate scene models resulting from reconstruction processes. (author) [fr

  18. Development of the optical sensor for discriminating isomers of fatty acids based on emissive network polymers composed of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narikiyo, Hayato; Kakuta, Takahiro; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Gon, Masayuki; Tanaka, Kazuo; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2017-07-01

    It was shown that water-soluble network polymers composed of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) had hydrophobic spaces inside the network because of strong hydrophobicity of the cubic silica cage. In this study, the water-soluble POSS network polymers connected with triphenylamine derivatives (TPA-POSS) were synthesized, and their functions as a sensor for discriminating the geometric isomers of fatty acids were investigated. Accordingly, in the photoluminescence spectra, different time-courses of intensity and peak wavelengths of the emission bands were detected from the TPA-POSS-containing solution in the presence of cis- or trans-fatty acids during incubation. Furthermore, variable time-dependent changes were obtained by changing coexisting ratios between two geometric isomers. From the mechanistic investigation, it was implied that these changes could be originated from the difference in the degree of interaction between the POSS networks and each fatty acid. Our data could be applicable for constructing a sensing material for generation and proportion of trans-fatty acids in the oil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Phenyl hepta cyclopentyl – polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (ph,hcp-POSS/Polystyrene (PS nanocomposites: the influence of substituents in the phenyl group on the thermal stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Blanco

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Some new Polystyrene (PS nanocomposites were prepared by using two Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSSs, namely RR’7(SiO1.58 (where R = 4-methoxyphenyl or 2,4-difluorophenyl and R’ = cyclopentyl, as fillers, and their degradation was studied to investigate the effect of the electron-donor or electron-withdrawing character of the phenyl group substituents on thermal stability. Nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ polymerization of styrene in the presence of various concentrations of POSS. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectra indicated that the POSS content in the obtained nanocomposites was higher than that in reactant mixtures. Inherent viscosity (ηinh and glass transition temperature (Tg determinations indicated that the average molar mass of polymer in 4-methoxynanocomposites was the same than neat PS, while it was much lower in 2,4-difluoro derivatives. Degradations were carried out in both flowing nitrogen and static air atmospheres, in the scanning mode, at various heating rates, and temperature at 5% mass loss (T5% and the activation energy (Ea of degradation of various nanocomposites were determined. The values obtained for 4-methoxyderivatives were higher than unfilled PS thus indicating higher thermal stability. Conversely, the values found for 2,4-difluoro derivatives were lower, in some cases even than those of neat PS. The results were discussed and interpreted.

  20. Soft tissue deformation using a Hierarchical Finite Element Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraci, Alessandro; Bello, Fernando; Darzi, Ara

    2004-01-01

    Simulating soft tissue deformation in real-time has become increasingly important in order to provide a realistic virtual environment for training surgical skills. Several methods have been proposed with the aim of rendering in real-time the mechanical and physiological behaviour of human organs, one of the most popular being Finite Element Method (FEM). In this paper we present a new approach to the solution of the FEM problem introducing the concept of parent and child mesh within the development of a hierarchical FEM. The online selection of the child mesh is presented with the purpose to adapt the mesh hierarchy in real-time. This permits further refinement of the child mesh increasing the detail of the deformation without slowing down the simulation and giving the possibility of integrating force feedback. The results presented demonstrate the application of our proposed framework using a desktop virtual reality (VR) system that incorporates stereo vision with integrated haptics co-location via a desktop Phantom force feedback device.

  1. LONG-TERM STABILITY OF THE LOCAL GROUND CONTROL NETWORK AT THE CO-LOCATION SITE OF MEDICINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbondanza, C.; Sarti, P.; Legrand, J.

    2009-12-01

    ITRF combinations rely on the availability of accurate tie vectors linking reference points of space geodetic techniques. Co-located instruments are assumed to move consistently and no local relative motion is taken into account. Instabilities may degrade the quality of the co-location itself and perturb the result of ITRF combinations. This work aims to determine the stability of the local ground control network at Medicina (Italy) with independent surveying methods. The observatory hosts a co-location between a VLBI telescope and two GPS antennas, MEDI and MSEL. It is located in the Po Plain where thick layers of clays are the prevalent soil characteristics. Hence, provision of long term stability of geodetic monuments is a challenge and monitoring their stability is an issue. MEDI and the VLBI station regularly contribute to the determination of ITRF, while MSEL is part of the EUREF network. A set of five tie vectors observations linking the VLBI and MEDI reference points was acquired between 2001 and 2007. It is our main tool for performing local deformation analysis. Additionally, the GPS time series of MEDI and MSEL were used to cross check and confirm the local instability detected by terrestrial methods. To achieve a rigorous and reliable investigation of the local stability, multi-epoch terrestrial observations were homogeneously processed according to common parameterizations in a consistent reference frame. Similarly, continuous GPS observations from MEDI and MSEL were analysed according to the new EPN reprocessing strategy in order to monitor the short baseline between MEDI and MSEL; to spotlight any change in its length. Both approaches confirm differential motions at the site which can be related to monument instabilities originated by the particularly unfavourable local geological setting and the inapt design of the monuments foundation. The monuments move non homogeneously at rates reaching up to 1.6 mm/year, this value being comparable to intra

  2. Single-Molecule Analysis of Pre-mRNA Splicing with Colocalization Single-Molecule Spectroscopy (CoSMoS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Joerg E; Serebrov, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Recent development of single-molecule techniques to study pre-mRNA splicing has provided insights into the dynamic nature of the spliceosome. Colocalization single-molecule spectroscopy (CoSMoS) allows following spliceosome assembly in real time at single-molecule resolution in the full complexity of cellular extracts. A detailed protocol of CoSMoS has been published previously (Anderson and Hoskins, Methods Mol Biol 1126:217-241, 2014). Here, we provide an update on the technical advances since the first CoSMoS studies including slide surface treatment, data processing, and representation. We describe various labeling strategies to generate RNA reporters with multiple dyes (or other moieties) at specific locations.

  3. Nanoparticle uptake and their co-localization with cell compartments - a confocal Raman microscopy study at single cell level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrela-Lopis, I; Donath, E; Romero, G; Rojas, E; Moya, S E

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, non-destructive and label-free technique, was employed to study the uptake and localization of nanoparticles (NPs) in the Hepatocarcinoma human cell line HepG2 at the level of single cells. Cells were exposed to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the surface of which was engineered with polyelectrolytes and lipid layers, aluminium oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles. Raman spectra deconvolution was applied to obtain the spatial distributions of NPs together with lipids/proteins in cells. The colocalization of the NPs with different intracellular environments, lipid bodies, protein and DNA, was inferred. Lipid coated CNTs associated preferentially with lipid rich regions, whereas polyelectrolyte coated CNTs were excluded from lipid rich regions. Al 2 O 3 NPs were found in the cytoplasm. CeO 2 NPs were readily taken up and have been observed all over the cell. Raman z-scans proved the intracellular distribution of the respective NPs.

  4. Nanoparticle uptake and their co-localization with cell compartments - a confocal Raman microscopy study at single cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela-Lopis, I.; Romero, G.; Rojas, E.; Moya, S. E.; Donath, E.

    2011-07-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, non-destructive and label-free technique, was employed to study the uptake and localization of nanoparticles (NPs) in the Hepatocarcinoma human cell line HepG2 at the level of single cells. Cells were exposed to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the surface of which was engineered with polyelectrolytes and lipid layers, aluminium oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles. Raman spectra deconvolution was applied to obtain the spatial distributions of NPs together with lipids/proteins in cells. The colocalization of the NPs with different intracellular environments, lipid bodies, protein and DNA, was inferred. Lipid coated CNTs associated preferentially with lipid rich regions, whereas polyelectrolyte coated CNTs were excluded from lipid rich regions. Al2O3 NPs were found in the cytoplasm. CeO2 NPs were readily taken up and have been observed all over the cell. Raman z-scans proved the intracellular distribution of the respective NPs.

  5. Poliovirus infection induces the co-localization of cellular protein SRp20 with TIA-1, a cytoplasmic stress granule protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kerry D; Semler, Bert L

    2013-09-01

    Different types of environmental stress cause mammalian cells to form cytoplasmic foci, termed stress granules, which contain mRNPs that are translationally silenced. These foci are transient and dynamic, and contain components of the cellular translation machinery as well as certain mRNAs and RNA binding proteins. Stress granules are known to be induced by conditions such as hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and oxidative stress, and a number of cellular factors have been identified that are commonly associated with these foci. More recently it was discovered that poliovirus infection also induces the formation of stress granules, although these cytoplasmic foci appear to be somewhat compositionally unique. Work described here examined the punctate pattern of SRp20 (a host cell mRNA splicing protein) localization in the cytoplasm of poliovirus-infected cells, demonstrating the partial co-localization of SRp20 with the stress granule marker protein TIA-1. We determined that SRp20 does not co-localize with TIA-1, however, under conditions of oxidative stress, indicating that the close association of these two proteins during poliovirus infection is not representative of a general response to cellular stress. We confirmed that the expression of a dominant negative version of TIA-1 (TIA-1-PRD) results in the dissociation of stress granules. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of wild type TIA-1 or dominant negative TIA-1-PRD in cells during poliovirus infection does not dramatically affect viral translation. Taken together, these studies provide a new example of the unique cytoplasmic foci that form during poliovirus infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Poliovirus infection induces the co-localization of cellular protein SRp20 with TIA-1, a cytoplasmic stress granule protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kerry D.; Semler, Bert L.

    2013-01-01

    Different types of environmental stress cause mammalian cells to form cytoplasmic foci, termed stress granules, which contain mRNPs that are translationally silenced. These foci are transient and dynamic, and contain components of the cellular translation machinery as well as certain mRNAs and RNA binding proteins. Stress granules are known to be induced by conditions such as hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and oxidative stress, and a number of cellular factors have been identified that are commonly associated with these foci. More recently it was discovered that poliovirus infection also induces the formation of stress granules, although these cytoplasmic foci appear to be somewhat compositionally unique. Work described here examined the punctate pattern of SRp20 (a host cell mRNA splicing protein) localization in the cytoplasm of poliovirus-infected cells, demonstrating the partial co-localization of SRp20 with the stress granule marker protein TIA-1. We determined that SRp20 does not co-localize with TIA-1, however, under conditions of oxidative stress, indicating that the close association of these two proteins during poliovirus infection is not representative of a general response to cellular stress. We confirmed that the expression of a dominant negative version of TIA-1 (TIA-1-PRD) results in the dissociation of stress granules. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of wild type TIA-1 or dominant negative TIA-1-PRD in cells during poliovirus infection does not dramatically affect viral translation. Taken together, these studies provide a new example of the unique cytoplasmic foci that form during poliovirus infection. PMID:23830997

  7. Whither voluntary communities of co-located patients in Vietnam? Empirical evidence from a 2016 medical survey dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Hoang Vuong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Empirical evidence on quality of life of poor patients falls short for policy-making in Vietnam. Financial burdens and isolation give rise to Vietnamese voluntary co-location clusters where patients seek to rely on each other. These communities, although important, have been under-researched. Increasingly, there are questions about their sustainability. Aim & Objectives: This study aims to identify factors that affect sustainability of such co-location clusters, seeking to measure the community prospect through critical determinants as seen by member patients. An in-depth analysis is expected to yield insights that help shape future policies contributing to improvement of healthcare systems.  Material & Method: A dataset containing responses from 336 patients living in four clusters in Hanoi was obtained from a survey during 2015Q4-2016Q1. The processing of data is performed using R 3.2.3, employing baseline category logit models (BCL. Coefficients are estimated to compute empirical probabilities. Results: 1 There is a 50% probability that a patient seeing his/her benefits as unsatisfactory views the community prospect as dim; 2 The more a patient contributes time/effort, the less he/she believes in future growth; 3 There is a 80.8% probability that a patient who makes a significant financial contribution and receives back in-kind benefits predicts no growth. Conclusion: Patients predict community growth when receiving what they need/expect. There exists a kind of “liquidity preference”. Only 14% and 32% make significant financial and labor contributions, respectively. There exists a “risk aversion” attitude, viewing contribution as certain while future benefits to be uncertain.

  8. DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4) colocalizes with cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Hyung; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Jo, Jin-Ok; Ock, Mee Sun; Moon, Soo Hyun; Suh, Dong Soo; Yoon, Man Soo; Park, Eun-Sil; Jeong, Namkung; Eo, Wan-Kyu; Kim, Heung Yeol; Cha, Hee-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Germ cell marker DDX4 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • Ovarian cancer stem cell marker CD133 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. • CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4. • Germ cell marker DDX4 has the potential of ovarian cancer stem cell marker. - Abstract: DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4), characterized by the conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp (DEAD), is an RNA helicase which is implicated in various cellular processes involving the alteration of RNA secondary structure, such as translation initiation, nuclear and mitochondrial splicing, and ribosome and spliceosome assembly. DDX4 is known to be a germ cell-specific protein and is used as a sorting marker of germline stem cells for the production of oocytes. A recent report about DDX4 in ovarian cancer showed that DDX4 is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer and disrupts a DNA damage-induced G2 checkpoint. We investigated the relationship between DDX4 and ovarian cancer stem cells by analyzing the expression patterns of DDX4 and the cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers via tissue microarray. Both DDX4 and CD133 were significantly increased in ovarian cancer compared to benign tumors, and showed similar patterns of expression. In addition, DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. Furthermore, almost all CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4, suggesting a strong possibility that DDX4 plays an important role in cancer stem cells, and/or can be used as an ovarian cancer stem cell marker

  9. On characters of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Broué, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the classical and beautiful character theory of finite groups. It does it by using some rudiments of the language of categories. Originally emerging from two courses offered at Peking University (PKU), primarily for third-year students, it is now better suited for graduate courses, and provides broader coverage than books that focus almost exclusively on groups. The book presents the basic tools, notions and theorems of character theory (including a new treatment of the control of fusion and isometries), and introduces readers to the categorical language at several levels. It includes and proves the major results on characteristic zero representations without any assumptions about the base field. The book includes a dedicated chapter on graded representations and applications of polynomial invariants of finite groups, and its closing chapter addresses the more recent notion of the Drinfeld double of a finite group and the corresponding representation of GL_2(Z).

  10. Finite and profinite quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vourdas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to finite quantum systems, a field at the interface between quantum information and number theory, with applications in quantum computation and condensed matter physics. The first major part of this monograph studies the so-called `qubits' and `qudits', systems with periodic finite lattice as position space. It also discusses the so-called mutually unbiased bases, which have applications in quantum information and quantum cryptography. Quantum logic and its applications to quantum gates is also studied. The second part studies finite quantum systems, where the position takes values in a Galois field. This combines quantum mechanics with Galois theory. The third part extends the discussion to quantum systems with variables in profinite groups, considering the limit where the dimension of the system becomes very large. It uses the concepts of inverse and direct limit and studies quantum mechanics on p-adic numbers. Applications of the formalism include quantum optics and ...

  11. Preservation theorems on finite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, M.

    1994-09-01

    This paper concerns classical Preservation results applied to finite structures. We consider binary relations for which a strong form of preservation theorem (called strong interpolation) exists in the usual case. This includes most classical cases: embeddings, extensions, homomorphisms into and onto, sandwiches, etc. We establish necessary and sufficient syntactic conditions for the preservation theorems for sentences and for theories to hold in the restricted context of finite structures. We deduce that for all relations above, the restricted theorem for theories hold provided the language is finite. For the sentences the restricted version fails in most cases; in fact the ''homomorphism into'' case seems to be the only possible one, but the efforts to show that have failed. We hope our results may help to solve this frustrating problem; in the meantime, they are used to put a lower bound on the level of complexity of potential counterexamples. (author). 8 refs

  12. Head-camera video recordings of trauma core competency procedures can evaluate surgical resident's technical performance as well as colocated evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Pasley, Jason; Garofalo, Evan; Shackelford, Stacy; Chen, Hegang; Longinaker, Nyaradzo; Granite, Guinevere; Pugh, Kristy; Hagegeorge, George; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2017-07-01

    Unbiased evaluation of trauma core competency procedures is necessary to determine if residency and predeployment training courses are useful. We tested whether a previously validated individual procedure score (IPS) for individual procedure vascular exposure and fasciotomy (FAS) performance skills could discriminate training status by comparing IPS of evaluators colocated with surgeons to blind video evaluations. Performance of axillary artery (AA), brachial artery (BA), and femoral artery (FA) vascular exposures and lower extremity FAS on fresh cadavers by 40 PGY-2 to PGY-6 residents was video-recorded from head-mounted cameras. Two colocated trained evaluators assessed IPS before and after training. One surgeon in each pretraining tertile of IPS for each procedure was randomly identified for blind video review. The same 12 surgeons were video-recorded repeating the procedures less than 4 weeks after training. Five evaluators independently reviewed all 96 randomly arranged deidentified videos. Inter-rater reliability/consistency, intraclass correlation coefficients were compared by colocated versus video review of IPS, and errors. Study methodology and bias were judged by Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument and the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies criteria. There were no differences (p ≥ 0.5) in IPS for AA, FA, FAS, whether evaluators were colocated or reviewed video recordings. Evaluator consistency was 0.29 (BA) - 0.77 (FA). Video and colocated evaluators were in total agreement (p = 1.0) for error recognition. Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.73 to 0.92, dependent on procedure. Correlations video versus colocated evaluations were 0.5 to 0.9. Except for BA, blinded video evaluators discriminated (p competency. Prognostic study, level II.

  13. Finite element analysis of a finite-strain plasticity problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crose, J.G.; Fong, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    A finite-strain plasticity analysis was performed of an engraving process in a plastic rotating band during the firing of a gun projectile. The aim was to verify a nonlinear feature of the NIFDI/RB code: plastic large deformation analysis of nearly incompressible materials using a deformation theory of plasticity approach and a total Lagrangian scheme. (orig.)

  14. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PECINGINA OLIMPIA-MIOARA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method is analytical when solutions can not be applied for deeper study analyzes static, dynamic or other types of requirements in different points of the structures .In practice it is necessary to know the behavior of the structure or certain parts components of the machine under the influence of certain factors static and dynamic . The application of finite element in the optimization of components leads to economic growth , to increase reliability and durability organs studied, thus the machine itself.

  15. Variational collocation on finite intervals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amore, Paolo; Cervantes, Mayra; Fernandez, Francisco M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we study a set of functions, defined on an interval of finite width, which are orthogonal and which reduce to the sinc functions when the appropriate limit is taken. We show that these functions can be used within a variational approach to obtain accurate results for a variety of problems. We have applied them to the interpolation of functions on finite domains and to the solution of the Schroedinger equation, and we have compared the performance of the present approach with others

  16. Finite elements of nonlinear continua

    CERN Document Server

    Oden, John Tinsley

    1972-01-01

    Geared toward undergraduate and graduate students, this text extends applications of the finite element method from linear problems in elastic structures to a broad class of practical, nonlinear problems in continuum mechanics. It treats both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view.The text reviews the thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method, and then brings them together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of these models are analyzed, along with the numerical s

  17. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemmenhove, B; Coolen, A C C

    2003-01-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous

  18. Opportunities for co-location of solar PV with agriculture for cost reductions and carbon, water, and energy footprint mitigation in the tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, C. S.; Macknick, J.; Ravi, S.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, co-locating the production of agricultural crops or biofuels with solar photovoltaics (PV) installations has been studied as a possible strategy to mitigate the environmental impacts and the high cost of solar PV in arid and semi-arid regions. Co-located PV and agricultural systems can provide multiple benefits in these areas related to water savings, erosion control, energy access, and rural economic development. However, such studies have been rare for water-rich, land-limited tropical countries, where ideal agricultural growing conditions can be substantially different from those in arid regions. We consider a case study in Indonesia to address this research gap. As the fourth most populous nation with an ever-growing energy demand and high vulnerability to the effects of climate change, Indonesia is being prompted to develop means to electrify approximately one-fifth of its population that still lacks access to the grid without incurring increases in its carbon footprint. We address the following questions to explore the feasibility and the benefits of co-location of solar PV with patchouli cultivation and essential oil production: i) How do the lifetime carbon, water, and energy footprints per unit land area of co-located solar PV/patchouli compare to those of standalone diesel microgrid, solar PV or patchouli cultivation? ii) Does energy production from standalone solar PV, diesel/solar PV microgrid, or co-located solar PV/patchouli systems satisfy energy demands of a typical rural Indonesian village? iii) How does the net economic return of the co-located system compare to each standalone land use? iv) How can surplus energy from the co-located system benefit rural socioeconomics? To answer these questions, life cycle assessment and economic analysis are performed for each of the standalone and the co-located land uses utilizing known values and data collected from a field visit to the island of Java in Indonesia. Then, sensitivity analyses and

  19. Differential equations and finite groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Put, Marius van der; Ulmer, Felix

    2000-01-01

    The classical solution of the Riemann-Hilbert problem attaches to a given representation of the fundamental group a regular singular linear differential equation. We present a method to compute this differential equation in the case of a representation with finite image. The approach uses Galois

  20. Symmetric relations of finite negativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaltenbaeck, M.; Winkler, H.; Woracek, H.; Forster, KH; Jonas, P; Langer, H

    2006-01-01

    We construct and investigate a space which is related to a symmetric linear relation S of finite negativity on an almost Pontryagin space. This space is the indefinite generalization of the completion of dom S with respect to (S.,.) for a strictly positive S on a Hilbert space.

  1. Finite subgroups of SU(3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovier, A.; Lueling, M.; Wyler, D.

    1980-12-01

    We present a new class of finite subgroups of SU(3) of the form Zsub(m) s zsub(n) (semidirect product). We also apply the methods used to investigate semidirect products to the known SU(3) subgroups Δ(3n 2 ) and Δ(6n 2 ) and give analytic formulae for representations (characters) and Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. (orig.)

  2. On symmetric pyramidal finite elements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, L.; Davies, K. B.; Yuan, K.; Křížek, Michal

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 11, 1-2 (2004), s. 213-227 ISSN 1492-8760 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1019201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : mesh generation * finite element method * composite elements Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.108, year: 2004

  3. Finite length Taylor Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Axisymmetric numerical solutions of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for flow between concentric rotating cylinders of finite length are obtained by a spectral collocation method. These representative results pertain to two-cell/one-cell exchange process, and are compared with recent experiments.

  4. Finite-temperature confinement transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetitsky, B.

    1984-01-01

    The formalism of lattice gauge theory at finite temperature is introduced. The framework of universality predictions for critical behavior is outlined, and recent analytic work in this direction is reviewed. New Monte Carlo information for the SU(4) theory are represented, and possible results of the inclusion of fermions in the SU(3) theory are listed

  5. Ward identities at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOlivo, J.C.; Torres, M.; Tututi, E.

    1996-01-01

    The Ward identities for QED at finite temperature are derived using the functional real-time formalism. They are verified by an explicit one-loop calculation. An effective causal vertex is constructed which satisfy the Ward identity with the associated retarded self-energy. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  6. Finite-Temperature Higgs Potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgopolov, M.V.; Gurskaya, A.V.; Rykova, E.N.

    2016-01-01

    In the present article we consider the short description of the “Finite-Temperature Higgs Potentials” program for calculating loop integrals at vanishing external momenta and applications for extended Higgs potentials reconstructions. Here we collect the analytic forms of the relevant loop integrals for our work in reconstruction of the effective Higgs potential parameters in extended models (MSSM, NMSSM and etc.)

  7. A finite volume procedure for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Jagad, P. I.

    2018-04-12

    A unified cell-centered unstructured mesh finite volume procedure is presented for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis. An in-house procedure (A. W. Date, Solution of Transport Equations on Unstructured Meshes with Cell-Centered Colocated Variables. Part I: Discretization, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, vol. 48 (6), 1117-1127, 2005) is extended to include the solid-body stress analysis. The transport terms for a cell-face are evaluated in a structured grid-like manner. The Cartesian gradients at the center of each cell-face are evaluated using the coordinate transformation relations. The accuracy of the procedure is demonstrated by solving several benchmark problems involving different boundary conditions, source terms, and types of loading.

  8. Development of a high-order finite volume method with multiblock partition techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Lemos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a new numerical methodology to solve the Navier-Stokes equations based on a finite volume method applied to structured meshes with co-located grids. High-order schemes used to approximate advective, diffusive and non-linear terms, connected with multiblock partition techniques, are the main contributions of this paper. Combination of these two techniques resulted in a computer code that involves high accuracy due the high-order schemes and great flexibility to generate locally refined meshes based on the multiblock approach. This computer code has been able to obtain results with higher or equal accuracy in comparison with results obtained using classical procedures, with considerably less computational effort.

  9. Introduction to finite temperature and finite density QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2014-01-01

    It has been pointed out that QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics) in the circumstances of medium at finite temperature and density shows numbers of phenomena similar to the characteristics of solid state physics, e.g. phase transitions. In the past ten years, the very high temperature and density matter came to be observed experimentally at the heavy ion collisions. At the same time, the numerical QCD analysis at finite temperature and density attained quantitative level analysis possible owing to the remarkable progress of computers. In this summer school lecture, it has been set out to give not only the recent results, but also the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry, the fundamental theory of finite temperature and further expositions as in the following four sections. The first section is titled as 'Introduction to Finite Temperature and Density QCD' with subsections of 1.1 standard model and QCD, 1.2 phase transition and phase structure of QCD, 1.3 lattice QCD and thermodynamic quantity, 1.4 heavy ion collision experiments, and 1.5 neutron stars. The second one is 'Equilibrium State' with subsections of 2.1 chiral symmetry, 2.2 vacuum state: BCS theory, 2.3 NJL (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio) model, and 2.4 color superconductivity. The third one is 'Static fluctuations' with subsections of 3.1 fluctuations, 3.2 moment and cumulant, 3.3 increase of fluctuations at critical points, 3.4 analysis of fluctuations by lattice QCD and Taylor expansion, and 3.5 experimental exploration of QCD phase structure. The fourth one is 'Dynamical Structure' with 4.1 linear response theory, 4.2 spectral functions, 4.3 Matsubara function, and 4.4 analyses of dynamical structure by lattice QCD. (S. Funahashi)

  10. Skeleton polyhedral rearrangements of 8-alkyl-7,9-dicarba-nido-undecaborate(-1) anion to 11-alkyl-2,7-dicarba-nido-undecaborane(13) and to 9-alkyl-7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate(-1) anion. Molecular structure of 2,7-Me2-11-PhCH2-2,7-C2B9H10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharkin, K.I.; Zhigareva, G.G.; Antonovich, V.A.; Yanovskij, A.I.; Struchkov, Yu.T.

    1986-01-01

    Using the methods of 1 H and 11 B NMR-spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis skeleton polyhedral rearrangements of carboranes are studied. During protonation of anion 8-R-7, 9-R' 2 -7, 9-C 2 B 9 H 9 - the skeleton polyhedral rearrangement in the series of nido-carboranes, resulting in 2,7-R' 2 -11-R-2, 7-C 2 B 9 H 10 (R=Me, PhCH 2 , R'=H, Me) is observed. The rearrangement is reversible. On the detachment of two protons from 2,7-Me 2 -11-PhCH 2 -2,7-C 2 B 9 H 10 and during subsequent protonation the skeleton polyhedral rearrangement with the formation of anion 9-PhCH 2 -7,8-Me 2 -7,8-C 2 B 9 H 9 - takes place

  11. New algorithm to determine true colocalization in combination with image restoration and time-lapse confocal microscopy to MAP kinases in mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ignacio Villalta

    Full Text Available The subcellular localization and physiological functions of biomolecules are closely related and thus it is crucial to precisely determine the distribution of different molecules inside the intracellular structures. This is frequently accomplished by fluorescence microscopy with well-characterized markers and posterior evaluation of the signal colocalization. Rigorous study of colocalization requires statistical analysis of the data, albeit yet no single technique has been established as a standard method. Indeed, the few methods currently available are only accurate in images with particular characteristics. Here, we introduce a new algorithm to automatically obtain the true colocalization between images that is suitable for a wide variety of biological situations. To proceed, the algorithm contemplates the individual contribution of each pixel's fluorescence intensity in a pair of images to the overall Pearsońs correlation and Manders' overlap coefficients. The accuracy and reliability of the algorithm was validated on both simulated and real images that reflected the characteristics of a range of biological samples. We used this algorithm in combination with image restoration by deconvolution and time-lapse confocal microscopy to address the localization of MEK1 in the mitochondria of different cell lines. Appraising the previously described behavior of Akt1 corroborated the reliability of the combined use of these techniques. Together, the present work provides a novel statistical approach to accurately and reliably determine the colocalization in a variety of biological images.

  12. Co-located monogenetic eruptions similar to 200 kyr apart driven by tapping vertically separated mantle source regions, Chagwido, Jeju Island, Republic of Korea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenna, M.; Nemeth, K.; Cronin, S.J.; Sohn, Y.K.; Smith, I.E.M.; Wijbrans, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    New eruptions in monogenetic volcanic fields conceptually occur independently of previous ones. In some instances, however, younger volcanic structures and vents may overlap with older edifices. The genetic links between such co-located eruptions remain unclear. We mapped and analysed the

  13. Coating of Carbon Fiber with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS to Enhance Mechanical Properties and Durability of Carbon/Vinyl Ester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Khan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Our continuing quest to improve the performance of polymer composites under moist and saltwater environments has gained momentum in recent years with the reinforcement of inorganic nanoparticles into the polymer. The key to mitigate degradation of composites under such environments is to maintain the integrity of the fiber/matrix (F/M interface. In this study, the F/M interface of carbon/vinyl ester composites has been modified by coating the carbon fiber with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS. POSS is a nanostructured inorganic-organic hybrid particle with a cubic structure having silicon atoms at the core and linked to oxygen atoms. The advantage of using POSS is that the silicon atoms can be linked to a substituent that can be almost any chemical group known in organic chemistry. Cubic silica cores are ‘hard particles’ and are about 0.53 nm in diameter. The peripheral organic unit is a sphere of about 1–3 nm in diameter. Further, cubic structure of POSS remains intact during the polymerization process and therefore with appropriate functional groups, if installed on the fiber surface, would provide a stable and strong F/M interface. Two POSS systems with two different functional groups; namely, octaisobutyl and trisilanolphenyl have been investigated. A set of chemical and mechanical procedures has been developed to coat carbon fibers with POSS, and to fabricate layered composites with vinyl ester resin. Interlaminar shear and low velocity impact tests have indicated around 17–38% improvement in mechanical properties with respect to control samples made without the POSS coating. Saltwater and hygrothermal tests at various environmental conditions have revealed that coating with POSS reduces water absorption by 20–30% and retains the composite properties.

  14. Electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) copolymer/octahydroxy-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanofibrous mats as ionic liquid host: enhanced salt dissociation and its function in electrochromic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Rui; Pramoda, Kumari Pallathadka; Liu, Wanshuang; Zhou, Dan; Ding, Guoqiang; He, Chaobin; Leong, Yew Wei; Lu, Xuehong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The well dispersed POSS-OH promotes the dissociation of both LiClO 4 and BMIM + BF 4 − . • POSS-OH significantly increases the ionic conductivity and lithium transference number. • POSS-OH containing electrolyte improves the optical contrast of electrochromic device. - Abstract: Electrospun polymer nanofibrous mats loaded with ionic liquids (ILs) and lithium salts are promising non-volatile electrolytes owing to their high ionic conductivities. However, the large cations of ILs are difficult to diffuse into solid electrodes, whereas the lithium ions in ILs tend to form anionic complexes with the IL anions, reducing the number of free lithium ions. To address these issues, octa(3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyldimethylsiloxy) polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-OH), which has large specific surface area and functionality number, is incorporated into electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-co-HFP) nanofibrous mats, and the mats are used to host LiClO 4 /1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM + BF 4 − ). It is found that POSS-OH can significantly increase both ionic conductivity and lithium transference number of the electrolytes owing to the Lewis acid-base interactions of POSS-OH with ClO 4 − and BF 4 − . The electrochromic device using the hybrid mat (with 5 wt% POSS-OH) loaded with LiClO 4 /BMIM + BF 4 − as the electrolyte shows significantly improved transmittance contrast and switching time, as a result of increased number of free lithium ions

  15. Dopamine in the Auditory Brainstem and Midbrain: Co-localization with Amino Acid Neurotransmitters and Gene Expression following Cochlear Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avril Genene eHolt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA modulates the effects of amino acid neurotransmitters, including GABA and glutamate, in motor, visual, olfactory and reward systems (Hnasko et al., 2010; Stuber et al., 2010; Hnasko and Edwards, 2012. The results suggest that DA may play a similar modulatory role in the auditory pathways. Previous studies have shown that deafness results in decreased GABA release, changes in excitatory neurotransmitter levels, and increased spontaneous neuronal activity within brainstem regions related to auditory function. Modulation of the expression and localization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate limiting enzyme in the production of DA in the IC following cochlear trauma has been previously reported (Tong et al., 2005. In the current study the possibility of co-localization of TH with amino acid neurotransmitters (AANs was examined. Changes in the gene expression of TH were compared with changes in the gene expression of markers for AANs in the cochlear nucleus (CN and IC to determine whether those deafness related changes occur concurrently. The results indicate that bilateral cochlear ablation significantly reduced TH gene expression in the CN after two months while in the IC the reduction in TH was observed at both three days and two months following ablation. Furthermore, in the CN, glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2 and the GABA transporter (GABAtp were also significantly reduced only after two months. However, in the IC, DA receptor 1 (DRDA1, vesicular glutamate transporters 2 and 3 (vGluT2, vGluT3, GABAtp and GAD67 were reduced in expression both at the three day and two month time points. A close relationship between the distribution of TH and several of the AANs was determined in both the CN and the IC. In addition, GlyT2 and vGluT3 each co-localized with TH within IC somata and dendrites. Therefore, the results of the current study suggest that DA is spatially well positioned to influence the effects of AANs on auditory neurons.

  16. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL STRESSES IN ... the transverse residual stress in the x-direction (σx) had a maximum value of 375MPa ... the finite element method are in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Co-localization patterns of neurotensin receptor 1 and tyrosine hydroxylase in brain regions involved in motivation and social behavior in male European starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merullo, Devin P; Spool, Jeremy A; Zhao, Changjiu; Riters, Lauren V

    2018-04-01

    Animals communicate in distinct social contexts to convey information specific to those contexts, such as sexual or agonistic motivation. In seasonally-breeding male songbirds, seasonal changes in day length and increases in testosterone stimulate sexually-motivated song directed at females for courtship and reproduction. Dopamine and testosterone may act in the same brain regions to stimulate sexually-motivated singing. The neuropeptide neurotensin, acting at the neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1), can strongly influence dopamine transmission. The goal of this study was to gain insight into the degree to which seasonal changes in physiology modify interactions between neurotensin and dopamine to adjust context-appropriate communication. Male European starlings were examined in physiological conditions that stimulate season-typical forms of communication: late summer/early fall non-breeding condition (low testosterone; birds sing infrequently), late fall non-breeding condition (low testosterone; birds produce non-sexually motivated song), and spring breeding condition (high testosterone; males produce sexually-motivated song). Double fluorescent immunolabeling was performed to detect co-localization patterns between tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis) and NTR1 in brain regions implicated in motivation and song production (the ventral tegmental area, medial preoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, and lateral septum). Co-localization between TH and NTR1 was present in the ventral tegmental area for all physiological conditions, and the number of co-localized cells did not differ across conditions. Immunolabeling for TH and NTR1 was also present in the other examined regions, although no co-localization was seen. These results support the hypothesis that interactions between NTR1 and dopamine in the ventral tegmental area may modulate vocalizations, but suggest that testosterone- or photoperiod-induced changes in NTR1/TH co-localization

  18. Automation of finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Korelc, Jože

    2016-01-01

    New finite elements are needed as well in research as in industry environments for the development of virtual prediction techniques. The design and implementation of novel finite elements for specific purposes is a tedious and time consuming task, especially for nonlinear formulations. The automation of this process can help to speed up this process considerably since the generation of the final computer code can be accelerated by order of several magnitudes. This book provides the reader with the required knowledge needed to employ modern automatic tools like AceGen within solid mechanics in a successful way. It covers the range from the theoretical background, algorithmic treatments to many different applications. The book is written for advanced students in the engineering field and for researchers in educational and industrial environments.

  19. Finite elements methods in mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eslami, M Reza

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all basic areas of mechanical engineering, such as fluid mechanics, heat conduction, beams, and elasticity with detailed derivations for the mass, stiffness, and force matrices. It is especially designed to give physical feeling to the reader for finite element approximation by the introduction of finite elements to the elevation of elastic membrane. A detailed treatment of computer methods with numerical examples are provided. In the fluid mechanics chapter, the conventional and vorticity transport formulations for viscous incompressible fluid flow with discussion on the method of solution are presented. The variational and Galerkin formulations of the heat conduction, beams, and elasticity problems are also discussed in detail. Three computer codes are provided to solve the elastic membrane problem. One of them solves the Poisson’s equation. The second computer program handles the two dimensional elasticity problems, and the third one presents the three dimensional transient heat conducti...

  20. Representation theory of finite monoids

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This first text on the subject provides a comprehensive introduction to the representation theory of finite monoids. Carefully worked examples and exercises provide the bells and whistles for graduate accessibility, bringing a broad range of advanced readers to the forefront of research in the area. Highlights of the text include applications to probability theory, symbolic dynamics, and automata theory. Comfort with module theory, a familiarity with ordinary group representation theory, and the basics of Wedderburn theory, are prerequisites for advanced graduate level study. Researchers in algebra, algebraic combinatorics, automata theory, and probability theory, will find this text enriching with its thorough presentation of applications of the theory to these fields. Prior knowledge of semigroup theory is not expected for the diverse readership that may benefit from this exposition. The approach taken in this book is highly module-theoretic and follows the modern flavor of the theory of finite dimensional ...

  1. Structural modeling techniques by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeong Jin; Kim, Geung Hwan; Ju, Gwan Jeong

    1991-01-01

    This book includes introduction table of contents chapter 1 finite element idealization introduction summary of the finite element method equilibrium and compatibility in the finite element solution degrees of freedom symmetry and anti symmetry modeling guidelines local analysis example references chapter 2 static analysis structural geometry finite element models analysis procedure modeling guidelines references chapter 3 dynamic analysis models for dynamic analysis dynamic analysis procedures modeling guidelines and modeling guidelines.

  2. $\\delta$-Expansion at Finite Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Rudnei O.

    1996-01-01

    We apply the $\\delta$-expansion perturbation scheme to the $\\lambda \\phi^{4}$ self-interacting scalar field theory in 3+1 D at finite temperature. In the $\\delta$-expansion the interaction term is written as $\\lambda (\\phi^{2})^{ 1 + \\delta}$ and $\\delta$ is considered as the perturbation parameter. We compute within this perturbative approach the renormalized mass at finite temperature at a finite order in $\\delta$. The results are compared with the usual loop-expansion at finite temperature.

  3. Finite temperature instability for compactification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accetta, F.S.; Kolb, E.W.

    1986-03-01

    We consider finite temperature effects upon theories with extra dimensions compactified via vacuum stress energy (Casimir) effects. For sufficiently high temperature, a static configuration for the internal space is impossible. At somewhat lower temperatures, there is an instability due to thermal fluctuations of radius of the compact dimensions. For both cases, the Universe can evolve to a de Sitter-like expansion of all dimensions. Stability to late times constrains the initial entropy of the universe. 28 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  4. Finite mathematics models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Carla C

    2015-01-01

    Features step-by-step examples based on actual data and connects fundamental mathematical modeling skills and decision making concepts to everyday applicability Featuring key linear programming, matrix, and probability concepts, Finite Mathematics: Models and Applications emphasizes cross-disciplinary applications that relate mathematics to everyday life. The book provides a unique combination of practical mathematical applications to illustrate the wide use of mathematics in fields ranging from business, economics, finance, management, operations research, and the life and social sciences.

  5. Quantum Chromodynamic at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, N.S.

    1987-01-01

    A formal expression to the Gibbs free energy of topological defects of quantum chromodynamics (QCD)by using the semiclassical approach in the context of field theory at finite temperature and in the high temperature limit is determined. This expression is used to calculate the free energy of magnetic monopoles. Applying the obtained results to a method in which the free energy of topological defects of a theory may indicate its different phases, its searched for informations about phases of QCD. (author) [pt

  6. Perturbative QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.

    1989-03-01

    We discuss an application of finite temperature QCD to lepton-pair production in a quark-gluon plasma. The perturbative calculation is performed within the realtime formalism. After cancellation of infrared and mass singularities, the corrections at O (α s ) are found to be very small in the region where the mass of the Drell-Yan pair is much larger than the temperature of the plasma. Interesting effects, however, appear at the annihilation threshold of the thermalized quarks

  7. Spinor pregeometry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Seiji.

    1985-10-01

    We derive the effective action for gravity at finite temperature in spinor pregeometry. The temperature-dependent effective potential for the vierbein which is parametrized as e sub(kμ) = b.diag(1, xi, xi, xi) has the minimum at b = 0 for fixed xi, and behaves as -xi 3 for fixed b. These results indicate that the system of fundamental matters in spinor pregeometry cannot be in equilibrium. (author)

  8. CLC-Nt1, a putative chloride channel protein of tobacco, co-localizes with mitochondrial membrane markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurin, C; Güclü, J; Cheniclet, C; Carde, J P; Barbier-Brygoo, H; Maurel, C

    2000-06-01

    The voltage-dependent chloride channel (CLC) family of membrane proteins has cognates in animals, yeast, bacteria and plants, and chloride-channel activity has been assigned to most of the animal homologues. Lack of evidence of CLC functions in plants prompted us to characterize the cellular localization of the tobacco CLC-Nt1 protein. Specific polyclonal antibodies were raised against an N-terminal polypeptide of CLC-Nt1. These antibodies were used to probe membrane proteins prepared by various cell-fractionation methods. These included aqueous two-phase partitioning (for plasma membranes), free-flow electrophoresis (for vacuolar and plasma membranes), intact vacuole isolation, Percoll-gradient centrifugation (for plastids and mitochondria) and stepped, linear, sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation (for mitochondria). Each purified membrane fraction was characterized with specific marker enzyme activities or antibodies. Our studies ruled out the possibility that the major cell localization of CLC-Nt1 was the vacuolar or plasma membranes, the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi apparatus or the plastids. In contrast, we showed that the tobacco CLC-Nt1 specifically co-localized with the markers of the mitochondrial inner membrane, cytochrome c oxidase and NAD9 protein. CLC-Nt1 may correspond to the inner membrane anion channel ('IMAC') described previously in animal and plant mitochondria.

  9. Optimal combination of signals from colocated gravitational wave interferometers for use in searches for a stochastic background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzarini, Albert; Reilly, Kaice; Whitcomb, Stan; Bose, Sukanta; Fritschel, Peter; McHugh, Martin; Whelan, John T.; Regimbau, Tania; Romano, Joseph D.; Whiting, Bernard F.

    2004-01-01

    This article derives an optimal (i.e., unbiased, minimum variance) estimator for the pseudodetector strain for a pair of colocated gravitational wave interferometers (such as the pair of LIGO interferometers at its Hanford Observatory), allowing for possible instrumental correlations between the two detectors. The technique is robust and does not involve any assumptions or approximations regarding the relative strength of gravitational wave signals in the Hanford pair with respect to other sources of correlated instrumental or environmental noise. An expression is given for the effective power spectral density of the combined noise in the pseudodetector. This can then be introduced into the standard optimal Wiener filter used to cross-correlate detector data streams in order to obtain an optimal estimate of the stochastic gravitational wave background. In addition, a dual to the optimal estimate of strain is derived. This dual is constructed to contain no gravitational wave signature and can thus be used as an 'off-source' measurement to test algorithms used in the 'on-source' observation

  10. Preliminary safety analysis of a PBMR supplying process heat to a co-located ethylene production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, Raluca O.; Cisneros, Anselmo T.; Koutchesfahani, Tawni; Hong, Rada; Peterson, Per F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the safety analysis and licensing approach for co-locating a pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) to provide process heat to an ethylene production unit. The PBMR is an advanced nuclear reactor design that provides 400 MW of thermal energy. Ethylene production is an energy intensive process that utilizes large gas furnaces to provide the heat for the process. Coupling a PBMR with an ethylene production plant would open a new market for nuclear power, and would provide the chemical industry with a cleaner power source, helping to achieve the Clean Air Act standards, and eliminating the 0.5 ton of CO 2 emissions per ton of produced ethylene. Our analysis uses the Chevron Phillips chemical plant in Sweeney, TX as a prototypical site. The plant has four ethylene production trains, with a total power consumption of 2.4 GW, for an ethylene output of 3.7 million tons per year, 4% of the global ethylene production capacity. This paper proposes replacement of the gas furnaces by low-emission PBMR modules, and presents the safety concerns and risk mitigation and management options for this coupled system. Two coupling design options are proposed, and the necessary changes to the design basis events and severe accidents for the PBMR licensing application are discussed. A joint effort between the chemical and the nuclear entities to optimize the coupling design, establish preventive maintenance procedures, and develop emergency response plans for both of the units is recommended.

  11. Bacterial translation elongation factor EF-Tu interacts and colocalizes with actin-like MreB protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defeu Soufo, Hervé Joël; Reimold, Christian; Linne, Uwe; Knust, Tobias; Gescher, Johannes; Graumann, Peter L

    2010-02-16

    We show that translation initiation factor EF-Tu plays a second important role in cell shape maintenance in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis. EF-Tu localizes in a helical pattern underneath the cell membrane and colocalizes with MreB, an actin-like cytoskeletal element setting up rod cell shape. The localization of MreB and of EF-Tu is interdependent, but in contrast to the dynamic MreB filaments, EF-Tu structures are more static and may serve as tracks for MreB filaments. In agreement with this idea, EF-Tu and MreB interact in vivo and in vitro. Lowering of the EF-Tu levels had a minor effect on translation but a strong effect on cell shape and on the localization of MreB, and blocking of the function of EF-Tu in translation did not interfere with the localization of MreB, showing that, directly or indirectly, EF-Tu affects the cytoskeletal MreB structure and thus serves two important functions in a bacterium.

  12. Estimation of 557.7 nm Emission Altitude using Co-located Lidars and Photometers over Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, E.; Raizada, S.; Lautenbach, J.; Brum, C. G. M.

    2017-12-01

    Airglow at 557.7 nm (green line emission) is generated through the Barth mechanism in the E-region altitude and is sometimes associated with red line (630.0 nm) originating at F-region altitudes. Photons at 557.7 nm are produced through the quenching of excited atomic oxygen atoms, O(1S), while 630.0 nm results through the de-excitation of O(1D) atoms. Even though, the contribution of the green line from F-region is negligible and the significant component comes from the mesosphere, this uncertainty gives rise to a question related to its precise altitude. Previous studies have shown that perturbations generated by atmospheric gravity Waves (GWs) alter the airglow intensity and can be used for studying dynamics of the region where it originates. The uncertainty in the emission altitude of green line can be resolved by using co-located lidars, which provide altitude resolved metal densities. At Arecibo, the resonance lidars tuned to Na and K resonance wavelengths at 589 nm and 770 nm can be used in conjunction with simultaneous measurements from green line photometer to resolve this issue. Both photometer and lidars have narrow field of view as compared to airglow imagers, and hence provide an added advantage that these instruments sample same GW spectrum. Hence, correlation between density perturbations inferred from lidars and airglow intensity perturbations can shed light on the exact altitude of green line emission.

  13. Preliminary safety analysis of a PBMR supplying process heat to a co-located ethylene production plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarlat, Raluca O., E-mail: rscarlat@nuc.berkeley.edu [University of California Berkeley, Nuclear Engineering, 4118 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cisneros, Anselmo T. [University of California Berkeley, Nuclear Engineering, 4118 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Koutchesfahani, Tawni [University of California, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 201 Gilman Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hong, Rada; Peterson, Per F. [University of California Berkeley, Nuclear Engineering, 4118 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    This paper considers the safety analysis and licensing approach for co-locating a pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) to provide process heat to an ethylene production unit. The PBMR is an advanced nuclear reactor design that provides 400 MW of thermal energy. Ethylene production is an energy intensive process that utilizes large gas furnaces to provide the heat for the process. Coupling a PBMR with an ethylene production plant would open a new market for nuclear power, and would provide the chemical industry with a cleaner power source, helping to achieve the Clean Air Act standards, and eliminating the 0.5 ton of CO{sub 2} emissions per ton of produced ethylene. Our analysis uses the Chevron Phillips chemical plant in Sweeney, TX as a prototypical site. The plant has four ethylene production trains, with a total power consumption of 2.4 GW, for an ethylene output of 3.7 million tons per year, 4% of the global ethylene production capacity. This paper proposes replacement of the gas furnaces by low-emission PBMR modules, and presents the safety concerns and risk mitigation and management options for this coupled system. Two coupling design options are proposed, and the necessary changes to the design basis events and severe accidents for the PBMR licensing application are discussed. A joint effort between the chemical and the nuclear entities to optimize the coupling design, establish preventive maintenance procedures, and develop emergency response plans for both of the units is recommended.

  14. When students from different professions are co-located: the importance of interprofessional rapport for learning to work together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Anne; Fisher, Karin; Smith, Tony

    2015-01-01

    With increasing interest and research into interprofessional learning, there is scope to more deeply understand what happens when students from different professions live and study in the same location. This study aimed to explore the issue of co-location and its effects on how students learn to work with other professions. The setting for this study was a rural health education facility in Australia with close links to local health care and community services. Philosophical hermeneutics informed the research method. Interviews were undertaken with 29 participants, including students, academic educators and clinical supervisors in diagnostic radiography, medicine, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, pharmacy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology. Photo-elicitation was used to facilitate participant engagement with the topic. The findings foreground the value of interprofessional rapport building opportunities for students learning to work together. Enabled by the proximity of different professions in shared educational, clinical and social spaces, interprofessional rapport building was contingent on contextual conditions (balance of professions, shared spaces and adequate time) and individual's interpersonal capabilities (being interested, being inclusive, developing interpersonal bonds, giving and receiving respect, bringing a sense of own profession and being patient-centred). In the absence of these conditions and capabilities, negative professional stereotypes may be inadvertently re-enforced. From these findings suggestions are made for nurturing interprofessional rapport building opportunities to enable students of different professions to learn to work together.

  15. Action of multiple intra-QTL genes concerted around a co-localized transcription factor underpins a large effect QTL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Shalabh; Kumar Biswal, Akshaya; Min, Aye; Henry, Amelia; Oane, Rowena H.; Raorane, Manish L.; Longkumer, Toshisangba; Pabuayon, Isaiah M.; Mutte, Sumanth K.; Vardarajan, Adithi R.; Miro, Berta; Govindan, Ganesan; Albano-Enriquez, Blesilda; Pueffeld, Mandy; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Slamet-Loedin, Inez; Sundarvelpandian, Kalaipandian; Tsai, Yuan-Ching; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Hsing, Yue-Ie C.; Kumar, Arvind; Kohli, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Sub-QTLs and multiple intra-QTL genes are hypothesized to underpin large-effect QTLs. Known QTLs over gene families, biosynthetic pathways or certain traits represent functional gene-clusters of genes of the same gene ontology (GO). Gene-clusters containing genes of different GO have not been elaborated, except in silico as coexpressed genes within QTLs. Here we demonstrate the requirement of multiple intra-QTL genes for the full impact of QTL qDTY12.1 on rice yield under drought. Multiple evidences are presented for the need of the transcription factor ‘no apical meristem’ (OsNAM12.1) and its co-localized target genes of separate GO categories for qDTY12.1 function, raising a regulon-like model of genetic architecture. The molecular underpinnings of qDTY12.1 support its effectiveness in further improving a drought tolerant genotype and for its validity in multiple genotypes/ecosystems/environments. Resolving the combinatorial value of OsNAM12.1 with individual intra-QTL genes notwithstanding, identification and analyses of qDTY12.1has fast-tracked rice improvement towards food security. PMID:26507552

  16. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    If a finite metric space is of strictly negative type then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by an infinite extent (“load vector''). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all trees, and all finite subspaces of Euclidean and Hyperbolic spaces. We prove that if the distance...

  17. Characterization of finite spaces having dispersion points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Bsoul, A. T

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we shall characterize the finite spaces having dispersion points. Also, we prove that the dispersion point of a finite space with a dispersion points fixed under all non constant continuous functions which answers the question raised by J. C obb and W. Voxman in 1980 affirmatively for finite space. Some open problems are given. (author). 16 refs

  18. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  19. MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule

  20. Strain selection, biomass to biofuel conversion, and resource colocation have strong impacts on the economic performance of algae cultivation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik R. Venteris

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Decisions involving strain selection, biomass to biofuel technology, and the location of cultivation facilities can strongly influence the economic viability of an algae-based biofuel enterprise. We summarize our past results in a new analysis to explore the relative economic impact of these design choices. Our growth model is used to predict average biomass production for two saline strains (Nannocloropsis salina, Arthrospira sp., one fresh to brackish strain (Chlorella sp., DOE strain 1412, and one freshwater strain (order Sphaeropleales. Biomass to biofuel conversion is compared between lipid extraction (LE and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL technologies. National-scale models of water, CO2 (as flue gas, land acquisition, site leveling, construction of connecting roads, and transport of HTL oil to existing refineries are used in conjunction with estimates of fuel value (from HTL to prioritize and select from 88,692 unit farms (UF, 405 ha in pond area, a number sufficient to produce 136E+9 L yr-1 of renewable diesel (36 billion gallons yr-1. Strain selection and choice of conversion technology have large economic impacts, with differences between combinations of strains and biomass to biofuel technologies being up to $10 million dollars yr-1 UF-1. Results based on the most productive strain, HTL-based fuel conversion, and resource costs show that the economic potential between geographic locations within the selection can differ by up to $4 million yr-1 UF-1, with 1.8 BGY of production possible from the most cost-effective sites. The local spatial variability in site rank is extreme, with very high and low sites within 10s of km of each other. Colocation with flue gas sources has a strong influence on rank, but the most costly resource component varies from site to site. The highest rank UFs are located predominantly in Florida and Texas, but most states south of 37°N latitude contain promising locations.

  1. Integrating non-colocated well and geophysical data to capture subsurface heterogeneity at an aquifer recharge and recovery site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Ian P.; Hermans, Thomas; Knight, Rosemary; Caers, Jef; Cameron, David A.; Regnery, Julia; McCray, John E.

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical data have proven to be very useful for lithological characterization. However, quantitatively integrating the information gained from acquiring geophysical data generally requires colocated lithological and geophysical data for constructing a rock-physics relationship. In this contribution, the issue of integrating noncolocated geophysical and lithological data is addressed, and the results are applied to simulate groundwater flow in a heterogeneous aquifer in the Prairie Waters Project North Campus aquifer recharge site, Colorado. Two methods of constructing a rock-physics transform between electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data and lithology measurements are assessed. In the first approach, a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) is used to fit a bimodal lognormal distribution to horizontal crosssections of the ERT resistivity histogram. In the second approach, a spatial bootstrap is applied to approximate the rock-physics relationship. The rock-physics transforms provide soft data for multiple point statistics (MPS) simulations. Subsurface models are used to run groundwater flow and tracer test simulations. Each model's uncalibrated, predicted breakthrough time is evaluated based on its agreement with measured subsurface travel time values from infiltration basins to selected groundwater recovery wells. We find that incorporating geophysical information into uncalibrated flow models reduces the difference with observed values, as compared to flow models without geophysical information incorporated. The integration of geophysical data also narrows the variance of predicted tracer breakthrough times substantially. Accuracy is highest and variance is lowest in breakthrough predictions generated by the MLE-based rock-physics transform. Calibrating the ensemble of geophysically constrained models would help produce a suite of realistic flow models for predictive purposes at the site. We find that the success of breakthrough predictions is highly

  2. Microspectroscopy (μFTIR) reveals co-localization of lipid oxidation and amyloid plaques in human Alzheimer disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseny-Cases, Núria; Klementieva, Oxana; Cotte, Marine; Ferrer, Isidre; Cladera, Josep

    2014-12-16

    Amyloid peptides are the main component of one of the characteristic pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD): senile plaques. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, amyloid peptides may play a central role in the sequence of events that leads to neurodegeneration. However, there are other factors, such as oxidative stress, that may be crucial for the development of the disease. In the present paper, we show that it is possible, by using Fourier tranform infrared (FTIR) microscopy, to co-localize amyloid deposits and lipid peroxidation in tissue slides from patients affected by Alzheimer's disease. Plaques and lipids can be analyzed in the same sample, making use of the characteristic infrared bands for peptide aggregation and lipid oxidation. The results show that, in samples from patients diagnosed with AD, the plaques and their immediate surroundings are always characterized by the presence of oxidized lipids. As for samples from non-AD individuals, those without amyloid plaques show a lower level of lipid oxidation than AD individuals. However, it is known that plaques can be detected in the brains of some non-AD individuals. Our results show that, in such cases, the lipid in the plaques and their surroundings display oxidation levels that are similar to those of tissues with no plaques. These results point to lipid oxidation as a possible key factor in the path that goes from showing the typical neurophatological hallmarks to suffering from dementia. In this process, the oxidative power of the amyloid peptide, possibly in the form of nonfibrillar aggregates, could play a central role.

  3. Calibration and assessment of electrochemical air quality sensors by co-location with regulatory-grade instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, David H.; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Franklin, Jonathan P.; Wallace, Lisa M. M.; Kocar, Benjamin D.; Heald, Colette L.; Kroll, Jesse H.

    2018-01-01

    The use of low-cost air quality sensors for air pollution research has outpaced our understanding of their capabilities and limitations under real-world conditions, and there is thus a critical need for understanding and optimizing the performance of such sensors in the field. Here we describe the deployment, calibration, and evaluation of electrochemical sensors on the island of Hawai`i, which is an ideal test bed for characterizing such sensors due to its large and variable sulfur dioxide (SO2) levels and lack of other co-pollutants. Nine custom-built SO2 sensors were co-located with two Hawaii Department of Health Air Quality stations over the course of 5 months, enabling comparison of sensor output with regulatory-grade instruments under a range of realistic environmental conditions. Calibration using a nonparametric algorithm (k nearest neighbors) was found to have excellent performance (RMSE 0.997) across a wide dynamic range in SO2 ( 2 ppm). However, since nonparametric algorithms generally cannot extrapolate to conditions beyond those outside the training set, we introduce a new hybrid linear-nonparametric algorithm, enabling accurate measurements even when pollutant levels are higher than encountered during calibration. We find no significant change in instrument sensitivity toward SO2 after 18 weeks and demonstrate that calibration accuracy remains high when a sensor is calibrated at one location and then moved to another. The performance of electrochemical SO2 sensors is also strong at lower SO2 mixing ratios (pollutant species in other areas (e.g., polluted urban regions), the calibration and validation approaches described here should be widely applicable to a range of pollutants, sensors, and environments.

  4. Time-Lapse Monitoring of DNA Damage Colocalized With Particle Tracks in Single Living Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFadden, Conor H. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hallacy, Timothy M. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Flint, David B. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Granville, Dal A. [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Asaithamby, Aroumougame [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Akselrod, Mark S. [Crystal Growth Division, Landauer, Inc, Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Sawakuchi, Gabriel O., E-mail: gsawakuchi@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Understanding the DNA damage and repair induced by hadron therapy (HT) beams is crucial for developing novel strategies to maximize the use of HT beams to treat cancer patients. However, spatiotemporal studies of DNA damage and repair for beam energies relevant to HT have been challenging. We report a technique that enables spatiotemporal measurement of radiation-induced damage in live cells and colocalization of this damage with charged particle tracks over a broad range of clinically relevant beam energies. The technique uses novel fluorescence nuclear track detectors with fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy in the beam line to visualize particle track traversals within the subcellular compartments of live cells within seconds after injury. Methods and Materials: We designed and built a portable fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope for use in the beam path, coated fluorescence nuclear track detectors with fluorescent-tagged live cells (HT1080 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein tagged to XRCC1, a single-strand break repair protein), placed the entire assembly into a proton therapy beam line, and irradiated the cells with a fluence of ∼1 × 10{sup 6} protons/cm{sup 2}. Results: We successfully obtained confocal images of proton tracks and foci of DNA single-strand breaks immediately after irradiation. Conclusions: This technique represents an innovative method for analyzing biological responses in any HT beam line at energies and dose rates relevant to therapy. It allows precise determination of the number of tracks traversing a subcellular compartment and monitoring the cellular damage therein, and has the potential to measure the linear energy transfer of each track from therapeutic beams.

  5. Functionals of finite Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Schiffer, Menahem

    1954-01-01

    This advanced monograph on finite Riemann surfaces, based on the authors' 1949-50 lectures at Princeton University, remains a fundamental book for graduate students. The Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society hailed the self-contained treatment as the source of ""a plethora of ideas, each interesting in its own right,"" noting that ""the patient reader will be richly rewarded."" Suitable for graduate-level courses, the text begins with three chapters that offer a development of the classical theory along historical lines, examining geometrical and physical considerations, existence theo

  6. Remarks on finite W algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarin, F.; Sorba, P.; Ragoucy, E.

    1996-01-01

    The property of some finite W algebras to be the commutant of a particular subalgebra of a simple Lie algebra G is used to construct realizations of G. When G ≅ so (4,2), unitary representations of the conformal and Poincare algebras are recognized in this approach, which can be compared to the usual induced representation technique. When G approx=(2, R), the anyonic parameter can be seen as the eigenvalue of a W generator in such W representations of G. The generalization of such properties to the affine case is also discussed in the conclusion, where an alternative of the Wakimoto construction for sl(2) k is briefly presented. (authors)

  7. Simulating QCD at finite density

    CERN Document Server

    de Forcrand, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In this review, I recall the nature and the inevitability of the "sign problem" which plagues attempts to simulate lattice QCD at finite baryon density. I present the main approaches used to circumvent the sign problem at small chemical potential. I sketch how one can predict analytically the severity of the sign problem, as well as the numerically accessible range of baryon densities. I review progress towards the determination of the pseudo-critical temperature T_c(mu), and towards the identification of a possible QCD critical point. Some promising advances with non-standard approaches are reviewed.

  8. Finite temperature approach to confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gave, E.; Jengo, R.; Omero, C.

    1980-06-01

    The finite temperature treatment of gauge theories, formulated in terms of a gauge invariant variable as in a Polyakov method, is used as a device for obtaining an effective theory where the confinement test takes the form of a correlation function. The formalism is discussed for the abelian CPsup(n-1) model in various dimensionalities and for the pure Yang-Mills theory in the limit of zero temperature. In the latter case a class of vortex like configurations of the effective theory which induce confinement correspond in particular to the instanton solutions. (author)

  9. Linear and Nonlinear Finite Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Metzler. Con/ ugte rapdent solution of a finite element elastic problem with high Poson rato without scaling and once with the global stiffness matrix K...nonzero c, that makes u(0) = 1. According to the linear, small deflection theory of the membrane the central displacement given to the membrane is not... theory is possible based on the approximations (l-y 2 )t = +y’ 2 +y𔃾 , (1-y𔃼)’ 1-y’ 2 - y" (6) that change eq. (5) to V𔃺) = , [yŖ(1 + y") - Qy𔃼

  10. Covariant gauges at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Landshoff, Peter V

    1992-01-01

    A prescription is presented for real-time finite-temperature perturbation theory in covariant gauges, in which only the two physical degrees of freedom of the gauge-field propagator acquire thermal parts. The propagators for the unphysical degrees of freedom of the gauge field, and for the Faddeev-Popov ghost field, are independent of temperature. This prescription is applied to the calculation of the one-loop gluon self-energy and the two-loop interaction pressure, and is found to be simpler to use than the conventional one.

  11. Facile synthesis of a boronate affinity sorbent from mesoporous nanomagnetic polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes composite and its application for enrichment of catecholamines in human urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Haibo, E-mail: hbhe2006@shu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhou, Ziqing; Dong, Chen; Wang, Xin [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Yu, Qiong-wei [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Lei, Yunyi; Luo, Liqiang [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Feng, Yuqi [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2016-11-09

    A boronate-decorated nanomagnetic organic-inorganic hybrid material was facilely synthesized by utilizing the nanomagnetic polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) composite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@POSS) as the base platform. A simple copolymerization occurred between 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (AAPBA) and the residual end vinyl groups supplied by the substrate. Here the special emphasis was placed on the octavinyl POSS, which not only acted as the building blocks for a hybrid architecture but also facilitated the process of grafting boronate groups onto the surface of POSS based nanomagnetic composite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@POSS). The successful immobilization of affinity ligand-AAPBA on the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@POSS was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), elemental analysis, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), field emission scanning electron microscope. A magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) for cis-diols enrichment was developed using the as-prepared Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@POSS-AAPBA material as an affinity sorbent and three catecholamines (CAs), namely noradrenaline, epinephrine and isoprenaline, as model analytes. Under the optimal extraction conditions, sensitive and simultaneous analysis of three CAs from the urine sample was achieved by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV). The limits of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) and the limits of quantitation (LOQ, S/N = 10) for the target analytes were 0.81–1.32 ng mL{sup −1} and 2.70–4.40 ng mL{sup −1}, respectively. Also good recoveries (85.5–101.7%) and repeatability (RSD≤10.1%) were obtained by this method. This work not only showed a facility for the utilization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@POSS as a substrate for constructing a boronate functionalized nanomagnetic sorbent, but also demonstrated the capability of the derived material for recognition of trace amount of cis-diols biomolecules presented in complicated biological matrices

  12. Microfibril-associated Protein 4 Binds to Surfactant Protein A (SP-A) and Colocalizes with SP-A in the Extracellular Matrix of the Lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlosser, Anders; Thomsen, Theresa H.; Shipley, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    for phagocytes. Here we describe the molecular interaction between the extracellular matrix protein microfibril-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) and SP-A. MFAP4 is a collagen-binding molecule containing a C-terminal fibrinogen-like domain and a N-terminal located integrin-binding motif. We produced recombinant MFAP4......-A composed of the neck region and carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-A indicating that the interaction between MFAP4 and SP-A is mediated via the collagen domain of SP-A. Monoclonal antibodies directed against MFAP4 and SP-A were used for immunohistochemical analysis, which demonstrates that the two...... molecules colocalize both on the elastic fibres in the interalveolar septum and in elastic lamina of pulmonary arteries of chronically inflamed lung tissue. We conclude, that MFAP4 interacts with SP-A via the collagen region in vitro, and that MFAP4 and SP-A colocates in different lung compartments...

  13. Biset functors for finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bouc, Serge

    2010-01-01

    This volume exposes the theory of biset functors for finite groups, which yields a unified framework for operations of induction, restriction, inflation, deflation and transport by isomorphism. The first part recalls the basics on biset categories and biset functors. The second part is concerned with the Burnside functor and the functor of complex characters, together with semisimplicity issues and an overview of Green biset functors. The last part is devoted to biset functors defined over p-groups for a fixed prime number p. This includes the structure of the functor of rational representations and rational p-biset functors. The last two chapters expose three applications of biset functors to long-standing open problems, in particular the structure of the Dade group of an arbitrary finite p-group.This book is intended both to students and researchers, as it gives a didactic exposition of the basics and a rewriting of advanced results in the area, with some new ideas and proofs.

  14. Phase transitions in finite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), DSM-CEA / IN2P3-CNRS, 14 - Caen (France); Gulminelli, F. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire

    2002-07-01

    In this series of lectures we will first review the general theory of phase transition in the framework of information theory and briefly address some of the well known mean field solutions of three dimensional problems. The theory of phase transitions in finite systems will then be discussed, with a special emphasis to the conceptual problems linked to a thermodynamical description for small, short-lived, open systems as metal clusters and data samples coming from nuclear collisions. The concept of negative heat capacity developed in the early seventies in the context of self-gravitating systems will be reinterpreted in the general framework of convexity anomalies of thermo-statistical potentials. The connection with the distribution of the order parameter will lead us to a definition of first order phase transitions in finite systems based on topology anomalies of the event distribution in the space of observations. Finally a careful study of the thermodynamical limit will provide a bridge with the standard theory of phase transitions and show that in a wide class of physical situations the different statistical ensembles are irreducibly inequivalent. (authors)

  15. Supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzert, K.

    2002-11-01

    The mechanism of supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature is still only partly understood. Though it has been proven that temperature always breaks supersymmetry, the spontaneous nature of this breaking remains unclear, in particular the role of the Goldstone fermion. The aim of this work is to unify two existing approaches to the subject. From a hydrodynamic point of view, it has been argued under very general assumptions that in any supersymmetric quantum field theory at finite temperature there should exist a massless fermionic collective excitation, named phonino because of the analogy to the phonon. In the framework of a self-consistent resummed perturbation theory, it is shown for the example of the Wess-Zumino model that this mode fits very well into the quantum field theoretical framework pursued by earlier works. Interpreted as a bound state of boson and fermion, it contributes to the supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identities in a way showing that supersymmetry is indeed broken spontaneously with the phonino playing the role of the Goldstone fermion. The second part of the work addresses the case of supersymmetric quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that also here the phonino exists and must be interpreted as the Goldstone mode. This knowledge allows a generalization to a wider class of models. (orig.)

  16. Finite groups and quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornyak, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Concepts of quantum theory are considered from the constructive “finite” point of view. The introduction of a continuum or other actual infinities in physics destroys constructiveness without any need for them in describing empirical observations. It is shown that quantum behavior is a natural consequence of symmetries of dynamical systems. The underlying reason is that it is impossible in principle to trace the identity of indistinguishable objects in their evolution—only information about invariant statements and values concerning such objects is available. General mathematical arguments indicate that any quantum dynamics is reducible to a sequence of permutations. Quantum phenomena, such as interference, arise in invariant subspaces of permutation representations of the symmetry group of a dynamical system. Observable quantities can be expressed in terms of permutation invariants. It is shown that nonconstructive number systems, such as complex numbers, are not needed for describing quantum phenomena. It is sufficient to employ cyclotomic numbers—a minimal extension of natural numbers that is appropriate for quantum mechanics. The use of finite groups in physics, which underlies the present approach, has an additional motivation. Numerous experiments and observations in the particle physics suggest the importance of finite groups of relatively small orders in some fundamental processes. The origin of these groups is unclear within the currently accepted theories—in particular, within the Standard Model.

  17. Phase transitions in finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.; Gulminelli, F.

    2002-01-01

    In this series of lectures we will first review the general theory of phase transition in the framework of information theory and briefly address some of the well known mean field solutions of three dimensional problems. The theory of phase transitions in finite systems will then be discussed, with a special emphasis to the conceptual problems linked to a thermodynamical description for small, short-lived, open systems as metal clusters and data samples coming from nuclear collisions. The concept of negative heat capacity developed in the early seventies in the context of self-gravitating systems will be reinterpreted in the general framework of convexity anomalies of thermo-statistical potentials. The connection with the distribution of the order parameter will lead us to a definition of first order phase transitions in finite systems based on topology anomalies of the event distribution in the space of observations. Finally a careful study of the thermodynamical limit will provide a bridge with the standard theory of phase transitions and show that in a wide class of physical situations the different statistical ensembles are irreducibly inequivalent. (authors)

  18. Antigen processing of glycoconjugate vaccines; the polysaccharide portion of the pneumococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine co-localizes with MHC II on the antigen processing cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zengzu; Schreiber, John R

    2009-05-21

    Pneumococcal (Pn) polysaccharides (PS) are T-independent (TI) antigens and do not induce immunological memory or antibodies in infants. Conjugation of PnPS to the carrier protein CRM(197) induces PS-specific antibody in infants, and memory similar to T-dependent (Td) antigens. Conjugates have improved immunogenicity via antigen processing and presentation of carrier protein with MHC II and recruitment of T cell help, but the fate of the PS attached to the carrier is unknown. To determine the location of the PS component of PnPS-CRM(197) in the APC, we separately labeled PS and protein and tracked their location. The PS of types 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) was specifically labeled by Alexa Fluor 594 hydrazide (red). The CRM(197) was separately labeled red in a reaction that did not label PS. Labeled antigens were incubated with APC which were fixed, permeabilized and incubated with anti-MHC II antibody labeled green by Alexa Fluor 488, followed by confocal microscopy. Labeled CRM(197) was presented on APC surface and co-localized with MHC II (yellow). Labeled unconjugated 14 or 19F PS did not go to the APC surface, but PS labeled 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) was internalized and co-localized with MHC II. Monoclonal antibody to type 14 PS bound to intracellular type 14 PS and PS-CRM(197). Brefeldin A and chloroquine blocked both CRM(197) and PS labeled 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) from co-localizing with MHC II. These data suggest that the PS component of the CRM(197) glycoconjugate enters the endosome, travels with CRM(197) peptides to the APC surface and co-localizes with MHC II.

  19. Clinician's perspectives of the relocation of a regional child and adolescent mental health service from co-located to stand alone premises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, K J; Boyd, C P; Sewell, J; Nurse, S

    2008-01-01

    Australia's National Mental Health Strategy's statement of rights and responsibilities states that children and adolescents admitted to a mental health facility or community program have the right to be separated from adult patients and provided with programs suited to their developmental needs. However, in rural Australia, where a lack of healthcare services, financial constraints, greater service delivery areas and fewer mental healthcare specialists represent the norm, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) are sometimes co-located with adult mental health services. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a recent relocation of a regional CAMHS in Victoria from co-located to stand alone premises. Six CAMHS clinicians who had experienced service delivery at a co-located setting and the current stand-alone CAMHS setting were interviewed about their perceptions of the impact of the relocation on service delivery. An exploratory interviewing methodology was utilized due to the lack of previous research in this area. Interview data were transcribed and analysed according to interpretative phenomenological analysis techniques. Findings indicated a perception that the relocation was positive for clients due to the family-friendly environment at the new setting and separation of CAMHS from adult psychiatric services. However, the impact of the relocation on clinicians was marked by a perceived loss of social capital from adult psychiatric service clinicians. These results provide increased understanding of the effects of service relocation and the influence of co-located versus stand-alone settings on mental health service delivery - an area where little prior research exists.

  20. Vitamin D receptor is present on the neuronal plasma membrane and is co-localized with amyloid precursor protein, ADAM10 or Nicastrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Erdinç; Gezen-Ak, Duygu

    2017-01-01

    Our recent study indicated that vitamin D and its receptors are important parts of the amyloid processing pathway in neurons. Yet the role of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in amyloid pathogenesis is complex and all regulations over the production of amyloid beta cannot be explained solely with the transcriptional regulatory properties of VDR. Given that we hypothesized that VDR might exist on the neuronal plasma membrane in close proximity with amyloid precursor protein (APP) and secretase complexes. The present study primarily focused on the localization of VDR in neurons and its interaction with amyloid pathology-related proteins. The localization of VDR on neuronal membranes and its co-localization with target proteins were investigated with cell surface staining followed by immunofluorescence labelling. The FpClass was used for protein-protein interaction prediction. Our results demonstrated the localization of VDR on the neuronal plasma membrane and the co-localization of VDR and APP or ADAM10 or Nicastrin and limited co-localization of VDR and PS1. E-cadherin interaction with APP or the γ-secretase complex may involve NOTCH1, NUMB, or FHL2, according to FpClass. This suggested complex might also include VDR, which greatly contributes to Ca+2 hemostasis with its ligand vitamin D. Consequently, we suggested that VDR might be a member of this complex also with its own non-genomic action and that it can regulate the APP processing pathway in this way in neurons.

  1. Metabolic markers in relation to hypoxia; staining patterns and colocalization of pimonidazole, HIF-1α, CAIX, LDH-5, GLUT-1, MCT1 and MCT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademakers, Saskia E; Lok, Jasper; Kogel, Albert J van der; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes HAM

    2011-01-01

    The cellular response of malignant tumors to hypoxia is diverse. Several important endogenous metabolic markers are upregulated under hypoxic conditions. We examined the staining patterns and co-expression of HIF-1α, CAIX, LDH-5, GLUT-1, MCT1 and MCT4 with the exogenous hypoxic cell marker pimonidazole and the association of marker expression with clinicopathological characteristics. 20 biopsies of advanced head and neck carcinomas were immunohistochemically stained and analyzed. All patients were given the hypoxia marker pimonidazole intravenously 2 h prior to biopsy taking. The tumor area positive for each marker, the colocalization of the different markers and the distribution of the markers in relation to the blood vessels were assessed by semiautomatic quantitative analysis. MCT1 staining was present in hypoxic (pimonidazole stained) as well as non-hypoxic areas in almost equal amounts. MCT1 expression showed a significant overall correlation (r = 0.75, p < 0.001) and strong spatial relationship with CAIX. LDH-5 showed the strongest correlation with pimonidazole (r = 0.66, p = 0.002). MCT4 and GLUT-1 demonstrated a typical diffusion-limited hypoxic pattern and showed a high degree of colocalization. Both MCT4 and CAIX showed a higher expression in the primary tumor in node positive patients (p = 0.09 both). Colocalization and staining patterns of metabolic and hypoxia-related proteins provides valuable additional information over single protein analyses and can improve the understanding of their functions and environmental influences

  2. Hybrid finite difference/finite element immersed boundary method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Griffith, Boyce; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2017-12-01

    The immersed boundary method is an approach to fluid-structure interaction that uses a Lagrangian description of the structural deformations, stresses, and forces along with an Eulerian description of the momentum, viscosity, and incompressibility of the fluid-structure system. The original immersed boundary methods described immersed elastic structures using systems of flexible fibers, and even now, most immersed boundary methods still require Lagrangian meshes that are finer than the Eulerian grid. This work introduces a coupling scheme for the immersed boundary method to link the Lagrangian and Eulerian variables that facilitates independent spatial discretizations for the structure and background grid. This approach uses a finite element discretization of the structure while retaining a finite difference scheme for the Eulerian variables. We apply this method to benchmark problems involving elastic, rigid, and actively contracting structures, including an idealized model of the left ventricle of the heart. Our tests include cases in which, for a fixed Eulerian grid spacing, coarser Lagrangian structural meshes yield discretization errors that are as much as several orders of magnitude smaller than errors obtained using finer structural meshes. The Lagrangian-Eulerian coupling approach developed in this work enables the effective use of these coarse structural meshes with the immersed boundary method. This work also contrasts two different weak forms of the equations, one of which is demonstrated to be more effective for the coarse structural discretizations facilitated by our coupling approach. © 2017 The Authors International  Journal  for  Numerical  Methods  in  Biomedical  Engineering Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Characterization of resonances using finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozsgay, B.; Takacs, G.

    2006-01-01

    We develop methods to extract resonance widths from finite volume spectra of (1+1)-dimensional quantum field theories. Our two methods are based on Luscher's description of finite size corrections, and are dubbed the Breit-Wigner and the improved ''mini-Hamiltonian'' method, respectively. We establish a consistent framework for the finite volume description of sufficiently narrow resonances that takes into account the finite size corrections and mass shifts properly. Using predictions from form factor perturbation theory, we test the two methods against finite size data from truncated conformal space approach, and find excellent agreement which confirms both the theoretical framework and the numerical validity of the methods. Although our investigation is carried out in 1+1 dimensions, the extension to physical 3+1 space-time dimensions appears straightforward, given sufficiently accurate finite volume spectra

  4. Finite size scaling and lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Finite size (Fisher) scaling is investigated for four dimensional SU(2) and SU(3) lattice gauge theories without quarks. It allows to disentangle violations of (asymptotic) scaling and finite volume corrections. Mass spectrum, string tension, deconfinement temperature and lattice β-function are considered. For appropriate volumes, Monte Carlo investigations seem to be able to control the finite volume continuum limit. Contact is made with Luescher's small volume expansion and possibly also with the asymptotic large volume behavior. 41 refs., 19 figs

  5. Finite element application to global reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, F.A.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is described as a Coarse Mesh Method with general basis and trial functions. Various consequences concerning programming and application of Finite Element Methods in reactor physics are drawn. One of the conclusions is that the Finite Element Method is a valuable tool in solving global reactor analysis problems. However, problems which can be described by rectangular boxes still can be solved with special coarse mesh programs more efficiently. (orig.) [de

  6. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  7. Strain selection, biomass to biofuel conversion, and resource colocation have strong impacts on the economic performance of algae cultivation sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard

    2014-09-16

    Decisions involving strain selection, biomass to biofuel technology, and the location of cultivation facilities can strongly influence the economic viability of an algae-based biofuel enterprise. In this contribution we summarize our past results in a new analysis to explore the relative economic impact of these design choices. We present strain-specific growth model results from two saline strains (Nannocloropsis salina, Arthrospira sp.), a fresh to brackish strain (Chlorella sp., DOE strain 1412), and a freshwater strain of the order Sphaeropleales. Biomass to biofuel conversion is compared between lipid extraction (LE) and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) technologies. National-scale models of water, CO2 (as flue gas), land acquisition, site leveling, construction of connecting roads, and transport of HTL oil to existing refineries are used in conjunction with estimates of fuel value (from HTL) to prioritize and select from 88,692 unit farms (UF, 405 ha in pond area), a number sufficient to produce 136E+9 L yr-1 of renewable diesel (36 billion gallons yr-1, BGY). Strain selection and choice of conversion technology have large economic impacts, with differences between combinations of strains and biomass to biofuel technologies being up to $10 million dollars yr-1 UF-1. Results based on the most productive species, HTL-based fuel conversion, and resource costs show that the economic potential between geographic locations within the selection can differ by up to $4 million yr-1 UF-1, with 2.0 BGY of production possible from the most cost-effective sites. The local spatial variability in site rank is extreme, with very high and low rank sites within 10s of km of each other. Colocation with flue gas sources has a strong influence on site rank, but the most costly resource component varies from site to site. The highest rank sites are located predominantly in Florida and Texas, but most states south of 37°N latitude contain promising locations. Keywords: algae

  8. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Verhoelst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs, named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3 satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith–sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only

  9. Calibration and assessment of electrochemical air quality sensors by co-location with regulatory-grade instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Hagan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of low-cost air quality sensors for air pollution research has outpaced our understanding of their capabilities and limitations under real-world conditions, and there is thus a critical need for understanding and optimizing the performance of such sensors in the field. Here we describe the deployment, calibration, and evaluation of electrochemical sensors on the island of Hawai`i, which is an ideal test bed for characterizing such sensors due to its large and variable sulfur dioxide (SO2 levels and lack of other co-pollutants. Nine custom-built SO2 sensors were co-located with two Hawaii Department of Health Air Quality stations over the course of 5 months, enabling comparison of sensor output with regulatory-grade instruments under a range of realistic environmental conditions. Calibration using a nonparametric algorithm (k nearest neighbors was found to have excellent performance (RMSE < 7 ppb, MAE < 4 ppb, r2 > 0.997 across a wide dynamic range in SO2 (< 1 ppb, > 2 ppm. However, since nonparametric algorithms generally cannot extrapolate to conditions beyond those outside the training set, we introduce a new hybrid linear–nonparametric algorithm, enabling accurate measurements even when pollutant levels are higher than encountered during calibration. We find no significant change in instrument sensitivity toward SO2 after 18 weeks and demonstrate that calibration accuracy remains high when a sensor is calibrated at one location and then moved to another. The performance of electrochemical SO2 sensors is also strong at lower SO2 mixing ratios (< 25 ppb, for which they exhibit an error of less than 2.5 ppb. While some specific results of this study (calibration accuracy, performance of the various algorithms, etc. may differ for measurements of other pollutant species in other areas (e.g., polluted urban regions, the calibration and validation approaches described here should be widely applicable

  10. Strain Selection, Biomass to Biofuel Conversion, and Resource Colocation have Strong Impacts on the Economic Performance of Algae Cultivation Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venteris, Erik R., E-mail: erik.venteris@pnl.gov; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-16

    Decisions involving strain selection, biomass to biofuel technology, and the location of cultivation facilities can strongly influence the economic viability of an algae-based biofuel enterprise. We summarize our past results in a new analysis to explore the relative economic impact of these design choices. Our growth model is used to predict average biomass production for two saline strains (Nannochloropsis salina and Arthrospira sp.), one fresh to brackish strain (Chlorella sp., DOE strain 1412), and one freshwater strain (order Sphaeropleales). Biomass to biofuel conversion is compared between lipid extraction and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) technologies. National-scale models of water, CO{sub 2} (as flue gas), land acquisition, site leveling, construction of connecting roads, and transport of HTL oil to existing refineries are used in conjunction with estimates of fuel value (from HTL) to prioritize and select from 88,692 unit farms (UF, 405 ha in pond area), a number sufficient to produce 136E + 9 L year{sup −1} of renewable diesel [36 billion gallons year{sup −1} (BGY)]. Strain selection and choice of conversion technology have large economic impacts, with differences between combinations of strains and biomass to biofuel technologies being up to $10 million year{sup −1} UF{sup −1}. Results based on the most productive strain, HTL-based fuel conversion, and resource costs show that the economic potential between geographic locations within the selection can differ by up to 4 million year{sup −1} UF{sup −1}, with 1.8 BGY of production possible from the most cost-effective sites. The local spatial variability in site rank is extreme, with very high and low sites within 10 kms of each other. Colocation with flue gas sources has a strong influence on rank, but the most costly resource component varies from site to site. The highest rank UFs are located predominantly in Florida and Texas, but most states south of 37°N latitude contain promising

  11. A first course in finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Fish, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Developed from the authors, combined total of 50 years undergraduate and graduate teaching experience, this book presents the finite element method formulated as a general-purpose numerical procedure for solving engineering problems governed by partial differential equations.  Focusing on the formulation and application of the finite element method through the integration of finite element theory, code development, and software application, the book is both introductory and self-contained, as well as being a hands-on experience for any student. This authoritative text on Finite Elements:Adopts

  12. Features of finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.; Denner, A.

    1987-01-01

    We analyse general features of finite quantum field theories. A quantum field theory is considered to be finite, if the corresponding renormalization constants evaluated in the dimensional regularization scheme are free from divergences in all orders of perturbation theory. We conclude that every finite renormalizable quantum field theory with fields of spin one or less must contain both scalar fields and fermion fields and nonabelian gauge fields. Some secific nonsupersymmetric models are found to be finite at the one- and two-loop level. (orig.)

  13. Burnside structures of finite subgroups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysenok, I G

    2007-01-01

    We establish conditions guaranteeing that a group B possesses the following property: there is a number l such that if elements w, x -1 wx,...,x -l+1 wx l-1 of B generate a finite subgroup G then x lies in the normalizer of G. These conditions are of a quite special form. They hold for groups with relations of the form x n =1 which appear as approximating groups for the free Burnside groups B(m,n) of sufficiently large even exponent n. We extract an algebraic assertion which plays an important role in all known approaches to substantial results on the groups B(m,n) of large even exponent, in particular, to proving their infiniteness. The main theorem asserts that when n is divisible by 16, B has the above property with l=6

  14. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  15. Phase transition in finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.; Duflot, V.; Duflot, V.; Gulminelli, F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present a review of selected aspects of Phase transitions in finite systems applied in particular to the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei. We show that the problem of the non existence of boundary conditions can be solved by introducing a statistical ensemble with an averaged constrained volume. In such an ensemble the microcanonical heat capacity becomes negative in the transition region. We show that the caloric curve explicitly depends on the considered transformation of the volume with the excitation energy and so does not bear direct informations on the characteristics of the phase transition. Conversely, partial energy fluctuations are demonstrated to be a direct measure of the equation of state. Since the heat capacity has a negative branch in the phase transition region, the presence of abnormally large kinetic energy fluctuations is a signal of the liquid gas phase transition. (author)

  16. Finite-time braiding exponents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budišić, Marko; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-01

    Topological entropy of a dynamical system is an upper bound for the sum of positive Lyapunov exponents; in practice, it is strongly indicative of the presence of mixing in a subset of the domain. Topological entropy can be computed by partition methods, by estimating the maximal growth rate of material lines or other material elements, or by counting the unstable periodic orbits of the flow. All these methods require detailed knowledge of the velocity field that is not always available, for example, when ocean flows are measured using a small number of floating sensors. We propose an alternative calculation, applicable to two-dimensional flows, that uses only a sparse set of flow trajectories as its input. To represent the sparse set of trajectories, we use braids, algebraic objects that record how trajectories exchange positions with respect to a projection axis. Material curves advected by the flow are represented as simplified loop coordinates. The exponential rate at which a braid stretches loops over a finite time interval is the Finite-Time Braiding Exponent (FTBE). We study FTBEs through numerical simulations of the Aref Blinking Vortex flow, as a representative of a general class of flows having a single invariant component with positive topological entropy. The FTBEs approach the value of the topological entropy from below as the length and number of trajectories is increased; we conjecture that this result holds for a general class of ergodic, mixing systems. Furthermore, FTBEs are computed robustly with respect to the numerical time step, details of braid representation, and choice of initial conditions. We find that, in the class of systems we describe, trajectories can be re-used to form different braids, which greatly reduces the amount of data needed to assess the complexity of the flow.

  17. Finite rotation shells basic equations and finite elements for Reissner kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, K

    2010-01-01

    This book covers theoretical and computational aspects of non-linear shells. Several advanced topics of shell equations and finite elements - not included in standard textbooks on finite elements - are addressed, and the book includes an extensive bibliography.

  18. Hamiltonian cycles in polyhedral maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipendu Maity

    2017-08-24

    Aug 24, 2017 ... and [3] for graph theory related terminology. ... edges of M which are dual to edges of C and form a set E by putting these dual edges ...... In this process, consider components of G . Now, proper tree is a tree that touches all ...

  19. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  20. The effect of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane dispersant and low surface energy additives on spectrally selective paint coatings with self-cleaning properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerman, Ivan; Kozelj, Matjaz; Orel, Boris [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-02-15

    Thickness-Insensitive Spectrally Selective (TISS) paint coatings were made of fluoropolymer resin binder (Lumiflon (LF), Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., Japan) and their water- and oil-repellent properties were obtained (contact angle: {theta}{sub water}{proportional_to}150 , {theta}{sub n-hexadecane}{proportional_to}55 ) by the addition of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) characterized by amino (AP), isooctyl (IO) and perfluoro (PF) groups (i.e. AP{sub 2}IO{sub 4}PF{sub 2}) attached on the silsesquioxane cube (-SiO{sub 3/2}){sub 8}. Paint dispersions were made by modifying of black spinel pigment with trisilanol isobutyl (IB{sub 7}T{sub 7}(OH){sub 3}) POSS dispersant and with a single-capped silane isobutyltrimethoxysilane (IBTMS). Infrared and {sup 29}Si NMR spectra measurements were used for the identification of the structural characteristic of the corresponding POSS compounds. Surface free energy values of the pure cross-linked (no pigment added) LF binder which was determined from the measured contact angles for water, diiodomethane and formamide revealed the {gamma}{sup tot} value of the LF unpigmented resin with added AP{sub 2}IO{sub 4}PF{sub 2} T{sub 8} POSS was about 16.4 mN/m, which led to the {theta}{sub water}{proportional_to}110 , indicating enhancement of the hydrophobicity of the pure LF resin binder ({theta}{sub water}{proportional_to}89 ). SEM micrographs, which were used for the assessment of the TISS paint coating surface morphology confirmed the beneficial dispersive effect of IB{sub 7} T{sub 7}(OH){sub 3} dispersant as compared to the IBTMS silane. The presence of large Aluminium flake pigment and finely ground black pigment led to the formation of TISS paint coating surface, which exhibited bi-hierarchical roughness, resulting in water sliding angles of less than 10 , indicating the possible self-cleaning effect ({theta}{sub water}>150 and {theta}{sub n-hexadecane}{proportional_to}55 ). The use of POSS dispersant and POSS low surface energy

  1. Interpretability degrees of finitely axiomatized sequential theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    In this paper we show that the degrees of interpretability of finitely axiomatized extensions-in-the-same-language of a finitely axiomatized sequential theory-like Elementary Arithmetic EA, IΣ1, or the Gödel-Bernays theory of sets and classes GB-have suprema. This partially answers a question posed

  2. Interpretability Degrees of Finitely Axiomatized Sequential Theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we show that the degrees of interpretability of finitely axiomatized extensions-in-the-same-language of a finitely axiomatized sequential theory —like Elementary Arithmetic EA, IΣ1, or the Gödel-Bernays theory of sets and classes GB— have suprema. This partially answers a question

  3. Finite Topological Spaces as a Pedagogical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstutler, Randall D.; Higginbottom, Ryan S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of finite topological spaces as examples in a point-set topology class especially suited to help students transition into abstract mathematics. We describe how carefully chosen examples involving finite spaces may be used to reinforce concepts, highlight pathologies, and develop students' non-Euclidean intuition. We end with a…

  4. Lectures on zeta functions over finite fields

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Daqing

    2007-01-01

    These are the notes from the summer school in G\\"ottingen sponsored by NATO Advanced Study Institute on Higher-Dimensional Geometry over Finite Fields that took place in 2007. The aim was to give a short introduction on zeta functions over finite fields, focusing on moment zeta functions and zeta functions of affine toric hypersurfaces.

  5. Non-linear finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    The note is written for courses in "Non-linear finite element method". The note has been used by the author teaching non-linear finite element modeling at Civil Engineering at Aalborg University, Computational Mechanics at Aalborg University Esbjerg, Structural Engineering at the University...

  6. Finite p′-nilpotent groups. II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Srinivasan

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we continue the study of finite p′-nilpotent groups that was started in the first part of this paper. Here we give a complete characterization of all finite groups that are not p′-nilpotent but all of whose proper subgroups are p′-nilpotent.

  7. Nonlinear finite element modeling of corrugated board

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C. Gilchrist; J. C. Suhling; T. J. Urbanik

    1999-01-01

    In this research, an investigation on the mechanical behavior of corrugated board has been performed using finite element analysis. Numerical finite element models for corrugated board geometries have been created and executed. Both geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities were included in the models. The analyses were performed using the commercial...

  8. Regularization of finite temperature string theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, Y.; Knecht, M.; Wallet, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The tachyonic divergences occurring in the free energy of various string theories at finite temperature are eliminated through the use of regularization schemes and analytic continuations. For closed strings, we obtain finite expressions which, however, develop an imaginary part above the Hagedorn temperature, whereas open string theories are still plagued with dilatonic divergences. (orig.)

  9. ∗-supplemented subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A subgroup H of a group G is said to be M∗-supplemented in G if ... normal subgroups and determined the structure of finite groups by using some ...... [12] Monakhov V S and Shnyparkov A V, On the p-supersolubility of a finite group with a.

  10. Properties of the distributional finite Fourier transform

    OpenAIRE

    Carmichael, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The analytic functions in tubes which obtain the distributional finite Fourier transform as boundary value are shown to have a strong boundedness property and to be recoverable as a Fourier-Laplace transform, a distributional finite Fourier transform, and as a Cauchy integral of a distribution associated with the boundary value.

  11. Dynamic pricing and learning with finite inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Boer, A.V.; Zwart, Bert

    2013-01-01

    We study a dynamic pricing problem with finite inventory and parametric uncertainty on the demand distribution. Products are sold during selling seasons of finite length, and inventory that is unsold at the end of a selling season, perishes. The goal of the seller is to determine a pricing strategy

  12. Dynamic pricing and learning with finite inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Boer, A.V.; Zwart, Bert

    We study a dynamic pricing problem with finite inventory and parametric uncertainty on the demand distribution. Products are sold during selling seasons of finite length, and inventory that is unsold at the end of a selling season perishes. The goal of the seller is to determine a pricing strategy

  13. Dynamic Pricing and Learning with Finite Inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Zwart (Bert); A.V. den Boer (Arnoud)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study a dynamic pricing problem with finite inventory and parametric uncertainty on the demand distribution. Products are sold during selling seasons of finite length, and inventory that is unsold at the end of a selling season perishes. The goal of the seller is to determine a

  14. Dynamic pricing and learning with finite inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, den A.V.; Zwart, B.

    2015-01-01

    We study a dynamic pricing problem with finite inventory and parametric uncertainty on the demand distribution. Products are sold during selling seasons of finite length, and inventory that is unsold at the end of a selling season perishes. The goal of the seller is to determine a pricing strategy

  15. A Finite Model Property for Intersection Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Statman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that the relational theory of intersection types known as BCD has the finite model property; that is, BCD is complete for its finite models. Our proof uses rewriting techniques which have as an immediate by-product the polynomial time decidability of the preorder <= (although this also follows from the so called beta soundness of BCD.

  16. Why do probabilistic finite element analysis ?

    CERN Document Server

    Thacker, Ben H

    2008-01-01

    The intention of this book is to provide an introduction to performing probabilistic finite element analysis. As a short guideline, the objective is to inform the reader of the use, benefits and issues associated with performing probabilistic finite element analysis without excessive theory or mathematical detail.

  17. Finite-Element Software for Conceptual Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, J.; Sandberg, G.; Damkilde, Lars

    2010-01-01

    and research. Forcepad is an effort to provide a conceptual design and teaching tool in a finite-element software package. Forcepad is a two-dimensional finite-element application based on the same conceptual model as image editing applications such as Adobe Photoshop or Microsoft Paint. Instead of using...

  18. The finite-dimensional Freeman thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Lee

    2008-06-01

    I suggest a modification--and mathematization--of Freeman's thesis on the relations among "perception", "the finite brain", and "the world", based on my recent proposal that the theory of finite topological spaces is both an adequate and a natural mathematical foundation for human psychology.

  19. Factoring polynomials over arbitrary finite fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, T.; Winterhof, A.

    2000-01-01

    We analyse an extension of Shoup's (Inform. Process. Lett. 33 (1990) 261–267) deterministic algorithm for factoring polynomials over finite prime fields to arbitrary finite fields. In particular, we prove the existence of a deterministic algorithm which completely factors all monic polynomials of

  20. Stochastic delocalization of finite populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyrhofer, Lukas; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The localization of populations of replicating bacteria, viruses or autocatalytic chemicals arises in various contexts, such as ecology, evolution, medicine or chemistry. Several deterministic mathematical models have been used to characterize the conditions under which localized states can form, and how they break down due to convective driving forces. It has been repeatedly found that populations remain localized unless the bias exceeds a critical threshold value, and that close to the transition the population is characterized by a diverging length scale. These results, however, have been obtained upon ignoring number fluctuations (‘genetic drift’), which are inevitable given the discreteness of the replicating entities. Here, we study the localization/delocalization of a finite population in the presence of genetic drift. The population is modeled by a linear chain of subpopulations, or demes, which exchange migrants at a constant rate. Individuals in one particular deme, called ‘oasis’, receive a growth rate benefit, and the total population is regulated to have constant size N. In this ecological setting, we find that any finite population delocalizes on sufficiently long time scales. Depending on parameters, however, populations may remain localized for a very long time. The typical waiting time to delocalization increases exponentially with both population size and distance to the critical wind speed of the deterministic approximation. We augment these simulation results by a mathematical analysis that treats the reproduction and migration of individuals as branching random walks subject to global constraints. For a particular constraint, different from a fixed population size constraint, this model yields a solvable first moment equation. We find that this solvable model approximates very well the fixed population size model for large populations, but starts to deviate as population sizes are small. Nevertheless, the qualitative behavior of the

  1. An introduction to finite tight frames

    CERN Document Server

    Waldron, Shayne F D

    2018-01-01

    This textbook is an introduction to the theory and applications of finite tight frames, an area that has developed rapidly in the last decade. Stimulating much of this growth are the applications of finite frames to diverse fields such as signal processing, quantum information theory, multivariate orthogonal polynomials, and remote sensing. Key features and topics: * First book entirely devoted to finite frames * Extensive exercises and MATLAB examples for classroom use * Important examples, such as harmonic and Heisenberg frames, are presented in preliminary chapters, encouraging readers to explore and develop an intuitive feeling for tight frames * Later chapters delve into general theory details and recent research results * Many illustrations showing the special aspects of the geometry of finite frames * Provides an overview of the field of finite tight frames * Discusses future research directions in the field Featuring exercises and MATLAB examples in each chapter, the book is well suited as a textbook ...

  2. Top local cohomology and the catenary of the unmixed part of support of a finitely generated module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Tu Cuong; Nguyen Thi Dung; Le Thanh Nhan

    2005-09-01

    Let (R,m) be a Noetherian local ring and M a finitely generated R-module with dim M = d. This paper is concerned with the following property for the top local cohomology H m d (M): Ann R (0: H m d (M) p) = p for all prime ideals p is a subset of Ann R H m d ( M). It is shown that this property is equivalent to the catenary of the unmixed part Supp M/U M (0) of the support of M, where U M (0) is the largest submodule of M of dimension less than d. Some characterizations of this property in terms of systems of parameters and relations between the unmixed parts of Supp M and Supp M-circumflex are given. A connection to the so-called co-localization is discussed. (author)

  3. Finite density aspects of leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohenegger, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Leptogenesis takes place in the early universe at high temperatures and densities and a deviation from equilibrium in the decay of heavy Majorana neutrinos is a fundamental requirement for the generation of the asymmetry. The equations, commonly used for its description, are largely based on classical Boltzmann equations (BEs) while the source of CP-violation is a quantum interference phenomenon. In view of this clash, it is desirable to study such processes in terms of non-equilibrium quantum field theory. On the other hand, it is simpler to solve BEs rather than the corresponding quantum field theoretical ones. Therefore, we derive modified BEs from first principles in the Kadanoff-Baym (KB) formalism. The results, found for a simple toy model, can be applied to popular phenomenological scenarios by analogy. This approach uncovers structural differences of the corrected equations and leads to different results for the form of the finite density contributions to the CP-violating parameter. In the case of degenerate heavy neutrino masses, corresponding to the popular scenario of resonant leptogenesis, it allows to explicitly distinguish between regimes where BEs are applicable or inapplicable.

  4. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  5. Finite approximations in fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschel, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains twenty papers on work which was conducted between 1983 and 1985 in the Priority Research Program ''Finite Approximations in Fluid Mechanics'' of the German Research Society (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft). Scientists from numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, and aerodynamics present their research on boundary-element methods, factorization methods, higher-order panel methods, multigrid methods for elliptical and parabolic problems, two-step schemes for the Euler equations, etc. Applications are made to channel flows, gas dynamical problems, large eddy simulation of turbulence, non-Newtonian flow, turbomachine flow, zonal solutions for viscous flow problems, etc. The contents include: multigrid methods for problems from fluid dynamics, development of a 2D-Transonic Potential Flow Solver; a boundary element spectral method for nonstationary viscous flows in 3 dimensions; navier-stokes computations of two-dimensional laminar flows in a channel with a backward facing step; calculations and experimental investigations of the laminar unsteady flow in a pipe expansion; calculation of the flow-field caused by shock wave and deflagration interaction; a multi-level discretization and solution method for potential flow problems in three dimensions; solutions of the conservation equations with the approximate factorization method; inviscid and viscous flow through rotating meridional contours; zonal solutions for viscous flow problems

  6. What is finiteness? (Abhishek Banerjee) (Indian Institute of Science)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Do finites get enough respect? • Finiteness is easy, no? • Just count whether 1, 2, 3,... • But then we miss out on the true richness of the concept of finitness. • There's more finiteness around. In fact, finiteness is what helps us really understand things. 5 ...

  7. Co-located hAT transposable element and 5S rDNA in an interstitial telomeric sequence suggest the formation of Robertsonian fusion in armored catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glugoski, Larissa; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Vicari, Marcelo R; Nogaroto, Viviane

    2018-04-15

    Co-located 5S rDNA genes and interstitial telomeric sites (ITS) revealed the involvement of multiple 5S rDNA clusters in chromosome rearrangements of Loricariidae. Interstitial (TTAGGG)n vestiges, in addition to telomeric sites, can coincide with locations of chromosomal rearrangements, and they are considered to be hotspots for chromosome breaks. This study aimed the molecular characterization of 5S rDNA in two Rineloricaria latirostris populations and examination of roles of 5S rDNA in breakpoint sites and its in situ localization. Rineloricaria latirostris from Brazil's Das Pedras river (2n = 46 chromosomes) presented five pairs identified using a 5S rDNA probe, in addition to a pair bearing a co-located ITS/5S rDNA. Rineloricaria latirostris from the Piumhi river (2n = 48 chromosomes) revealed two pairs containing 5S rDNA, without ITS. A 702-bp amplified sequence, using 5S rDNA primers, revealed an insertion of the hAT transposable element (TE), referred to as a degenerate 5S rDNA. Double-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) demonstrated co-localization of 5S rDNA/degenerate 5S rDNA, 5S rDNA/hAT and ITS/5S rDNA from the Das Pedras river population. Piumhi river isolates possessed only 5S rDNA sites. We suggest that the degenerate 5S rDNA was generated by unequal crossing over, which was driven by invasion of hAT, establishing a breakpoint region susceptible to chromosome breakage, non-homologous recombination and Robertsonian (Rb) fusion. Furthermore, the presence of clusters of 5S rDNA at fusion points in other armored catfish species suggests its re-use and that these regions represent hotspots for evolutionary rearrangements within Loricariidae genomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Early evolutionary colocalization of the nuclear ribosomal 5S and 45S gene families in seed plants: evidence from the living fossil gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galián, J A; Rosato, M; Rosselló, J A

    2012-06-01

    In seed plants, the colocalization of the 5S loci within the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the nuclear 45S tandem units is restricted to the phylogenetically derived Asteraceae family. However, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) colocalization of both multigene families has also been observed in other unrelated seed plant lineages. Previous work has identified colocalization of 45S and 5S loci in Ginkgo biloba using FISH, but these observations have not been confirmed recently by sequencing a 1.8 kb IGS. In this work, we report the presence of the 45S-5S linkage in G. biloba, suggesting that in seed plants the molecular events leading to the restructuring of the ribosomal loci are much older than estimated previously. We obtained a 6.0 kb IGS fragment showing structural features of functional sequences, and a single copy of the 5S gene was inserted in the same direction of transcription as the ribosomal RNA genes. We also obtained a 1.8 kb IGS that was a truncate variant of the 6.0 kb IGS lacking the 5S gene. Several lines of evidence strongly suggest that the 1.8 kb variants are pseudogenes that are present exclusively on the satellite chromosomes bearing the 45S-5S genes. The presence of ribosomal IGS pseudogenes best reconciles contradictory results concerning the presence or absence of the 45S-5S linkage in Ginkgo. Our finding that both ribosomal gene families have been unified to a single 45S-5S unit in Ginkgo indicates that an accurate reassessment of the organization of rDNA genes in basal seed plants is necessary.

  9. Ankyrin repeat and SOCS box containing protein 4 (Asb-4 colocalizes with insulin receptor substrate 4 (IRS4 in the hypothalamic neurons and mediates IRS4 degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zefeng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus regulates food intake. Ankyrin repeat and SOCS box containing protein 4 (Asb-4 is expressed in neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus, target neurons in the regulation of food intake and metabolism by insulin and leptin. However, the target protein(s of Asb-4 in these neurons remains unknown. Insulin receptor substrate 4 (IRS4 is an adaptor molecule involved in the signal transduction by both insulin and leptin. In the present study we examined the colocalization and interaction of Asb-4 with IRS4 and the involvement of Asb-4 in insulin signaling. Results In situ hybridization showed that the expression pattern of Asb-4 was consistent with that of IRS4 in the rat brain. Double in situ hybridization showed that IRS4 colocalized with Asb-4, and both Asb-4 and IRS4 mRNA were expressed in proopiomelanocortin (POMC and neuropeptide Y (NPY neurons within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. In HEK293 cells co-transfected with Myc-tagged Asb-4 and Flag-tagged IRS4, Asb-4 co-immunoprecipitated with IRS4; In these cells endogenous IRS4 also co-immunoprecipitated with transfected Myc-Asb-4; Furthermore, Asb-4 co-immunoprecipitated with IRS4 in rat hypothalamic extracts. In HEK293 cells over expression of Asb-4 decreased IRS4 protein levels and deletion of the SOCS box abolished this effect. Asb-4 increased the ubiquitination of IRS4; Deletion of SOCS box abolished this effect. Expression of Asb-4 decreased both basal and insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308. Conclusions These data demonstrated that Asb-4 co-localizes and interacts with IRS4 in hypothalamic neurons. The interaction of Asb-4 with IRS4 in cell lines mediates the degradation of IRS4 and decreases insulin signaling.

  10. Fuel from Wastewater - Harnessing a Potential Energy Source in Canada through the Co-location of Algae Biofuel Production to Sources of Effluent, Heat and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klise, G. T.; Roach, J. D.; Passell, H. D.; Moreland, B. D.; O'Leary, S. J.; Pienkos, P. T.; Whalen, J.

    2010-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the “production” footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada’s NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific

  11. Clifford algebra in finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, M.

    1997-12-01

    We consider the most general power counting renormalizable and gauge invariant Lagrangean density L invariant with respect to some non-Abelian, compact, and semisimple gauge group G. The particle content of this quantum field theory consists of gauge vector bosons, real scalar bosons, fermions, and ghost fields. We assume that the ultimate grand unified theory needs no cutoff. This yields so-called finiteness conditions, resulting from the demand for finite physical quantities calculated by the bare Lagrangean. In lower loop order, necessary conditions for finiteness are thus vanishing beta functions for dimensionless couplings. The complexity of the finiteness conditions for a general quantum field theory makes the discussion of non-supersymmetric theories rather cumbersome. Recently, the F = 1 class of finite quantum field theories has been proposed embracing all supersymmetric theories. A special type of F = 1 theories proposed turns out to have Yukawa couplings which are equivalent to generators of a Clifford algebra representation. These algebraic structures are remarkable all the more than in the context of a well-known conjecture which states that finiteness is maybe related to global symmetries (such as supersymmetry) of the Lagrangean density. We can prove that supersymmetric theories can never be of this Clifford-type. It turns out that these Clifford algebra representations found recently are a consequence of certain invariances of the finiteness conditions resulting from a vanishing of the renormalization group β-function for the Yukawa couplings. We are able to exclude almost all such Clifford-like theories. (author)

  12. Testing a Model of Planck-Scale Quantum Geometry With Broadband Correlation of Colocated 40m Interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCuller, Lee Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The Holometer is designed to test for a Planck diffractive-scaling uncertainty in long-baseline position measurements due to an underlying noncommutative geometry normalized to relate Black hole entropy bounds of the Holographic principle to the now-finite number of position states. The experiment overlaps two independent 40 meter optical Michelson interferometers to detect the proposed uncertainty as a common broadband length fluctuation. 150 hours of instrument cross-correlation data are analyzed to test the prediction of a correlated noise magnitude of 7·10 -21 m/√Hz with an effective bandwidth of 750kHz. The interferometers each have a quantum-limited sensitivity of 2.5·10 -18 m/√Hz, but their correlation with a time-bandwidth product of 4·10 11 digs between the noise floors in search for the covarying geometric jitter. The data presents an exclusion of 5 standard deviations for the tested model. This exclusion is defended through analysis of the calibration methods for the instrument as well as further sub shot noise characterization of the optical systems to limit spurious background-correlations from undermining the signal.

  13. Testing a Model of Planck-Scale Quantum Geometry With Broadband Correlation of Colocated 40m Interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCuller, Lee Patrick [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Holometer is designed to test for a Planck diffractive-scaling uncertainty in long-baseline position measurements due to an underlying noncommutative geometry normalized to relate Black hole entropy bounds of the Holographic principle to the now-finite number of position states. The experiment overlaps two independent 40 meter optical Michelson interferometers to detect the proposed uncertainty as a common broadband length fluctuation. 150 hours of instrument cross-correlation data are analyzed to test the prediction of a correlated noise magnitude of $7\\times10^{−21}$ m/$\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$ with an effective bandwidth of 750kHz. The interferometers each have a quantum-limited sensitivity of $2.5\\times 10^{−18}$ m/$\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$, but their correlation with a time-bandwidth product of $4\\times 10^{11}$ digs between the noise floors in search for the covarying geometric jitter. The data presents an exclusion of 5 standard deviations for the tested model. This exclusion is defended through analysis of the calibration methods for the instrument as well as further sub shot noise characterization of the optical systems to limit spurious background-correlations from undermining the signal.

  14. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, Bram van, E-mail: bramiozo@gmail.com [Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, P.O. Box 94079, 1090GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands); Koren, Barry [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Blank, Hugo J. de [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands)

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  15. The theory of finitely generated commutative semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Rédei, L; Stark, M; Gravett, K A H

    1966-01-01

    The Theory of Finitely Generated Commutative Semigroups describes a theory of finitely generated commutative semigroups which is founded essentially on a single """"fundamental theorem"""" and exhibits resemblance in many respects to the algebraic theory of numbers. The theory primarily involves the investigation of the F-congruences (F is the the free semimodule of the rank n, where n is a given natural number). As applications, several important special cases are given. This volume is comprised of five chapters and begins with preliminaries on finitely generated commutative semigroups before

  16. Finite Markov processes and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iosifescu, Marius

    2007-01-01

    A self-contained treatment of finite Markov chains and processes, this text covers both theory and applications. Author Marius Iosifescu, vice president of the Romanian Academy and director of its Center for Mathematical Statistics, begins with a review of relevant aspects of probability theory and linear algebra. Experienced readers may start with the second chapter, a treatment of fundamental concepts of homogeneous finite Markov chain theory that offers examples of applicable models.The text advances to studies of two basic types of homogeneous finite Markov chains: absorbing and ergodic ch

  17. An introduction to finite projective planes

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, Abraham Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Geared toward both beginning and advanced undergraduate and graduate students, this self-contained treatment offers an elementary approach to finite projective planes. Following a review of the basics of projective geometry, the text examines finite planes, field planes, and coordinates in an arbitrary plane. Additional topics include central collineations and the little Desargues' property, the fundamental theorem, and examples of finite non-Desarguesian planes.Virtually no knowledge or sophistication on the part of the student is assumed, and every algebraic system that arises is defined and

  18. Polyelectrolyte Bundles: Finite size at thermodynamic equilibrium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Mehmet

    2005-03-01

    Experimental observation of finite size aggregates formed by polyelectrolytes such as DNA and F-actin, as well as synthetic polymers like poly(p-phenylene), has created a lot of attention in recent years. Here, bundle formation in rigid rod-like polyelectrolytes is studied via computer simulations. For the case of hydrophobically modified polyelectrolytes finite size bundles are observed even in the presence of only monovalent counterions. Furthermore, in the absence of a hydrophobic backbone, we have also observed formation of finite size aggregates via multivalent counterion condensation. The size distribution of such aggregates and the stability is analyzed in this study.

  19. Books and monographs on finite element technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper proviees a listing of all of the English books and some of the foreign books on finite element technology, taking into account also a list of the conference proceedings devoted solely to finite elements. The references are divided into categories. Attention is given to fundamentals, mathematical foundations, structural and solid mechanics applications, fluid mechanics applications, other applied science and engineering applications, computer implementation and software systems, computational and modeling aspects, special topics, boundary element methods, proceedings of symmposia and conferences on finite element technology, bibliographies, handbooks, and historical accounts.

  20. Modelling robot's behaviour using finite automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janošek, Michal; Žáček, Jaroslav

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a model of a robot's behaviour described by finite automata. We split robot's knowledge into several knowledge bases which are used by the inference mechanism of the robot's expert system to make a logic deduction. Each knowledgebase is dedicated to the particular behaviour domain and the finite automaton helps us switching among these knowledge bases with the respect of actual situation. Our goal is to simplify and reduce complexity of one big knowledgebase splitting it into several pieces. The advantage of this model is that we can easily add new behaviour by adding new knowledgebase and add this behaviour into the finite automaton and define necessary states and transitions.

  1. Electrical machine analysis using finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Nicola

    2005-01-01

    OUTLINE OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDSVector AnalysisElectromagnetic FieldsFundamental Equations SummaryReferencesBASIC PRINCIPLES OF FINITE ELEMENT METHODSIntroductionField Problems with Boundary ConditionsClassical Method for the Field Problem SolutionThe Classical Residual Method (Galerkin's Method)The Classical Variational Method (Rayleigh-Ritz's Method)The Finite Element MethodReferencesAPPLICATIONS OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD TO TWO-DIMENSIONAL FIELDSIntroductionLinear Interpolation of the Function fApplication of the Variational MethodSimple Descriptions of Electromagnetic FieldsAppendix: I

  2. Finite element analysis of piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrie, F.; Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This guide is intended to help people wanting to do finite element analysis of piezoelectric materials by answering some of the questions that are peculiar to piezoelectric materials. The document is not intended as a complete beginners guide for finite element analysis in general as this is better dealt with by the individual software producers. The guide is based around the commercial package ANSYS as this is a popular package amongst piezoelectric material users, however much of the information will still be useful to users of other finite element codes. (author)

  3. Implicit and fully implicit exponential finite difference methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Burgers' equation; exponential finite difference method; implicit exponential finite difference method; ... This paper describes two new techniques which give improved exponential finite difference solutions of Burgers' equation. ... Current Issue

  4. Heterochromatin diversity and its co-localization with 5S and 45S rDNA sites in chromosomes of four Maxillaria species (Orchidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano S. Cabral

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated four orchids of the genus Maxillaria (M. discolor, M. acicularis, M. notylioglossa and M. desvauxiana in regard to the position of heterochromatin blocks as revealed using chromomycin A3 (CMA and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI fluorochrome staining and 5S and 45S rDNA sites using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. The species showed differences in chromosome number and a diversified pattern of CMA+ and DAPI+ bands, including heteromorphism for CMA+ bands. The 5S and 45S rDNA sites also varied in number and most of them were co-localized with CMA+ bands. The relationship between 5S rDNA sites and CMA+ bands was more evident in M. notylioglossa, in which the brighter CMA+ bands were associated with large 5S rDNA sites. However, not all 5S and 45S rDNA sites were co-localized with CMA+ bands, probably due to technical constraints. We compare these results to banding data from other species and suggest that not all blocks of tandemly repetitive sequences, such as 5S rDNA sites, can be observed as heterochromatin blocks.

  5. The Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-6 protein co-localizes with EBNA-3 and survival of motor neurons protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauer, Kenia G.; Buck, Marion; Belzer, Deanna K.; Flanagan, James; Chojnowski, Grace M.; Sculley, Tom B.

    2004-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA)-6 protein is essential for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced immortalization of primary human B-lymphocytes in vitro. In this study, fusion proteins of EBNA-6 with green fluorescent protein (GFP) have been used to characterize its nuclear localization and organization within the nucleus. EBNA-6 associates with nuclear structures and in immunofluorescence demonstrate a punctate staining pattern. Herein, we show that the association of EBNA-6 with these nuclear structures was maintained throughout the cell cycle and with the use of GFP-E6 deletion mutants, that the region amino acids 733-808 of EBNA-6 contains a domain that can influence the association of EBNA-6 with these nuclear structures. Co-immunofluorescence and confocal analyses demonstrated that EBNA-6 and EBNA-3 co-localize in the nucleus of cells. Expression of EBNA-6, but not EBNA-3, caused a redistribution of nuclear survival of motor neurons protein (SMN) to the EBNA-6 containing nuclear structures resulting in co-localization of SMN with EBNA-6

  6. Enhancement in statistical and image analysis for in situ µSXRF studies of elemental distribution and co-localization, using Dioscorea balcanica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dučić, Tanja; Borchert, Manuela; Savić, Aleksandar; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Mitrović, Aleksandra; Radotić, Ksenija

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray microfluorescence has been used for in situ investigation of the distribution of micronutrient and macronutrient elements in an unstained cross section of a stem of monocotyledonous liana plant Dioscorea balcanica Košanin. The elemental allocation has been quantified and the grouping/co-localization in straight and twisted stem internodes has been analysed. Synchrotron-based X-ray microfluorescence (µSXRF) is an analytical method suitable for in situ investigation of the distribution of micronutrient and macronutrient elements in several-micrometres-thick unstained biological samples, e.g. single cells and tissues. Elements are mapped and quantified at sub-p.p.m. concentrations. In this study the quantity, distribution and grouping/co-localization of various elements have been identified in straight and twisted internodes of the stems of the monocotyledonous climber D. balcanica Košanin. Three different statistical methods were employed to analyse the macro-nutrient and micronutrient distributions and co-localization. Macronutrient elements (K, P, Ca, Cl) are distributed homogeneously in both straight and twisted internodes. Micronutrient elements are mostly grouped in the vasculature and in the sclerenchyma cell layer. In addition, co-localization of micronutrient elements is much more prominent in twisted than in straight internodes. These image analyses and statistical methods provided very similar outcomes and could be applied to various types of biological samples imaged by µSXRF

  7. Epigenomic Co-localization and Co-evolution Reveal a Key Role for 5hmC as a Communication Hub in the Chromatin Network of ESCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Juan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Epigenetic communication through histone and cytosine modifications is essential for gene regulation and cell identity. Here, we propose a framework that is based on a chromatin communication model to get insight on the function of epigenetic modifications in ESCs. The epigenetic communication network was inferred from genome-wide location data plus extensive manual annotation. Notably, we found that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC is the most-influential hub of this network, connecting DNA demethylation to nucleosome remodeling complexes and to key transcription factors of pluripotency. Moreover, an evolutionary analysis revealed a central role of 5hmC in the co-evolution of chromatin-related proteins. Further analysis of regions where 5hmC co-localizes with specific interactors shows that each interaction points to chromatin remodeling, stemness, differentiation, or metabolism. Our results highlight the importance of cytosine modifications in the epigenetic communication of ESCs. : 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC plays a key role in the epigenomic communication network of embryonic stem cells. Juan et al. build a communication network based in co-localization of epigenomic data and literature. The analysis of the network and its components reveals that proteins reading and editing 5hmC co-evolve and serve as links between diverse molecular processes.

  8. Patients with a new variant of endemic pemphigus foliaceus have autoantibodies against arrector pili muscle, colocalizing with MYZAP, p0071, desmoplakins 1 and 2 and ARVCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Velez, A M; Valencia-Yepes, C A; Upegui-Zapata, Y A; Upegui-Quiceno, E; Mesa-Herrera, N R; Velazquez-Velez, J E; Howard, M S

    2017-12-01

    We identified a new variant of endemic pemphigus foliaceus in El Bagre, Colombia, South America, which we term El Bagre-EPF, and observed reactivity to arrector pili muscle (APM), thus we tested for autoimmunity to APM. We took skin biopsies from 30 patients with El Bagre-EPF and 30 healthy controls (HCs) matched by age, sex and occupation, who were all from the endemic area, and tested these using direct immunofluorescence (DIF), confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting (IB). Of the 30 patients with El Bagre-EPF, 27 had autoantibodies to APM that colocalized with commercial antibodies to myocardium-enriched zonula occludens-1-associated protein (MYZAP), desmoplakin (DP)1 and DP2, plakophilin 4, and Armadillo repeat gene deleted in velo-cardio-facial syndrome (ARVCF) (P EPF have autoantibodies to APM, colocalizing with the antibodies MYZAP, ARVCF, p0071, DP1 and DP2, suggesting that these molecules are El Bagre-EPF antigens. Further, all of these antigens represent components of cell junctions, indicating that the immune response is directed, at least partially, against cell junctions. The immune response in patients affected by El Bagre-EPF is polyclonal, and it includes B and T lymphocytes, mast cells, IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, IgE, fibrinogen, albumin, complement/C1q, C3c and C4. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Localization of Nitric Oxide Synthase-containing Neurons in the Bat Visual Cortex and Co-localization with Calcium-binding Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Ya-Nan; Kim, Hang-Gu; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Microchiroptera (microbats) is a suborder of bats thought to have degenerated vision. However, many recent studies have shown that they have visual ability. In this study, we labeled neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)—the synthesizing enzyme of the gaseous non-synaptic neurotransmitter nitric oxide—and co-localized it with calbindin D28K (CB), calretinin (CR), and parvalbumin (PV) in the visual cortex of the greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, a species of microbats). nNOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurons were found in all layers of the visual cortex. Intensely labeled neurons were most common in layer IV, and weakly labeled neurons were most common in layer VI. Majority of the nNOS-IR neurons were round- or oval-type neurons; no pyramidal-type neurons were found. None of these neurons co-localized with CB, CR, or PV. However, the synthesis of nitric oxide in the bat visual cortex by nNOS does not depend on CB, CR, or PV

  10. Polynomials in finite geometries and combinatorics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokhuis, A.; Walker, K.

    1993-01-01

    It is illustrated how elementary properties of polynomials can be used to attack extremal problems in finite and euclidean geometry, and in combinatorics. Also a new result, related to the problem of neighbourly cylinders is presented.

  11. Finite Volumes for Complex Applications VII

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlberger, Mario; Rohde, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The methods considered in the 7th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Berlin, June 2014) have properties which offer distinct advantages for a number of applications. The second volume of the proceedings covers reviewed contributions reporting successful applications in the fields of fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, structural analysis, nuclear physics, semiconductor theory and other topics. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation. Recent decades have brought significant success in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including maximum principles, dissipativity, monotone decay of free energy, and asymptotic stability. Due to these properties, finite volume methods belong to the wider class of compatible discretization methods, which preserve qualitative propert...

  12. The finite Fourier transform of classical polynomials

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Atul; Jiu, Lin; Moll, Victor H.; Vignat, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The finite Fourier transform of a family of orthogonal polynomials $A_{n}(x)$, is the usual transform of the polynomial extended by $0$ outside their natural domain. Explicit expressions are given for the Legendre, Jacobi, Gegenbauer and Chebyshev families.

  13. Quantiles for Finite Mixtures of Normal Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mezbahur; Rahman, Rumanur; Pearson, Larry M.

    2006-01-01

    Quantiles for finite mixtures of normal distributions are computed. The difference between a linear combination of independent normal random variables and a linear combination of independent normal densities is emphasized. (Contains 3 tables and 1 figure.)

  14. Jauch-Piron logics with finiteness conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalewicz, Vladimír

    1991-04-01

    We show that there are no non-Boolean block-finite orthomodular posets possessing a unital set of Jauch-Piron states. Thus, an orthomodular poset representing a quantum physical system must have infinitely many blocks.

  15. Finite element methods a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Whiteley, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents practical applications of the finite element method to general differential equations. The underlying strategy of deriving the finite element solution is introduced using linear ordinary differential equations, thus allowing the basic concepts of the finite element solution to be introduced without being obscured by the additional mathematical detail required when applying this technique to partial differential equations. The author generalizes the presented approach to partial differential equations which include nonlinearities. The book also includes variations of the finite element method such as different classes of meshes and basic functions. Practical application of the theory is emphasised, with development of all concepts leading ultimately to a description of their computational implementation illustrated using Matlab functions. The target audience primarily comprises applied researchers and practitioners in engineering, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  16. Finite boson mappings of fermion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.W.; Ginocchio, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss a general mapping of fermion pairs to bosons that preserves Hermitian conjugation, with an eye towards producing finite and usable boson Hamiltonians that approximate well the low-energy dynamics of a fermion Hamiltonian

  17. Advanced finite element method in structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Yu-Qiu; Long, Zhi-Fei

    2009-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the research work on the Finite Element Method completed over the past 25 years. Original theoretical achievements and their applications in the fields of structural engineering and computational mechanics are discussed.

  18. A note on powers in finite fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aabrandt, Andreas; Lundsgaard Hansen, Vagn

    2016-08-01

    The study of solutions to polynomial equations over finite fields has a long history in mathematics and is an interesting area of contemporary research. In recent years, the subject has found important applications in the modelling of problems from applied mathematical fields such as signal analysis, system theory, coding theory and cryptology. In this connection, it is of interest to know criteria for the existence of squares and other powers in arbitrary finite fields. Making good use of polynomial division in polynomial rings over finite fields, we have examined a classical criterion of Euler for squares in odd prime fields, giving it a formulation that is apt for generalization to arbitrary finite fields and powers. Our proof uses algebra rather than classical number theory, which makes it convenient when presenting basic methods of applied algebra in the classroom.

  19. Finite N=1 SUSY gauge field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakov, D.I.

    1986-01-01

    The authors give a detailed description of the method to construct finite N=1 SUSY gauge field theories in the framework of N=1 superfields within dimensional regularization. The finiteness of all Green functions is based on supersymmetry and gauge invariance and is achieved by a proper choice of matter content of the theory and Yukawa couplings in the form Y i =f i (ε)g, where g is the gauge coupling, and the function f i (ε) is regular at ε=0 and is calculated in perturbation theory. Necessary and sufficient conditions for finiteness are determined already in the one-loop approximation. The correspondence with an earlier proposed approach to construct finite theories based on aigenvalue solutions of renormalization-group equations is established

  20. ANSYS mechanical APDL for finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    ANSYS Mechanical APDL for Finite Element Analysis provides a hands-on introduction to engineering analysis using one of the most powerful commercial general purposes finite element programs on the market. Students will find a practical and integrated approach that combines finite element theory with best practices for developing, verifying, validating and interpreting the results of finite element models, while engineering professionals will appreciate the deep insight presented on the program's structure and behavior. Additional topics covered include an introduction to commands, input files, batch processing, and other advanced features in ANSYS. The book is written in a lecture/lab style, and each topic is supported by examples, exercises and suggestions for additional readings in the program documentation. Exercises gradually increase in difficulty and complexity, helping readers quickly gain confidence to independently use the program. This provides a solid foundation on which to build, preparing readers...