WorldWideScience

Sample records for colocated polyhedral finite

  1. -th Roots in finite polyhedral and centro-polyhedral groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Sadeghieh; K Ahmadidelir

    2015-11-01

    The probability that a randomly chosen element in a non-abelian finite group has a square root, has been investigated by certain authors in recent years. In this paper, this probability will be generalized for the -th roots when ≥ 2 and it will be computed for every finite polyhedral group and all of the finite centro-polyhedral groups.

  2. Nanoscale Continuum Modelling of Carbon Nanotubes by Polyhedral Finite Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logah Perumal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the geometry of a cell of carbon nanotube is hexagonal, a new approach is presented in modelling of single-walled carbon nanotubes using polyhedral finite elements. Effect of varying length, diameter, and thickness of carbon nanotubes on Young’s modulus is studied. Both armchair and zigzag configurations are modelled and simulated in Mathematica. Results from current approach found good agreement with the other published data.

  3. Stress analysis of 3D complex geometries using the scaled boundary polyhedral finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Hossein; Saputra, Albert; Song, Chongmin

    2016-10-01

    While dominating the numerical stress analysis of solids, the finite element method requires a mesh to conform to the surface of the geometry. Thus the mesh generation of three dimensional complex structures often require tedious human interventions. In this paper, we present a formulation for arbitrary polyhedral elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method, which reduces the difficulties in automatic mesh generation. We also propose a simple method to generate polyhedral meshes with local refinements. The mesh generation method is based on combining an octree mesh with surfaces defined using signed distance functions. Through several numerical examples, we verify the results, study the convergence behaviour and depict the many advantages and capabilities of the presented method. This contribution is intended to assist us to eventually frame a set of numerical methods and associated tools for the full automation of the engineering analysis where minimal human interaction is needed.

  4. A piecewise linear finite element discretization of the diffusion equation for arbitrary polyhedral grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, T.S.; Adams, M.L. [Texas A M Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, College Station, TX (United States); Yang, B.; Zika, M.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    We develop a piecewise linear (PWL) Galerkin finite element spatial discretization for the multi-dimensional radiation diffusion equation. It uses piecewise linear weight and basis functions in the finite element approximation, and it can be applied on arbitrary polygonal (2-dimensional) or polyhedral (3-dimensional) grids. We show that this new PWL method gives solutions comparable to those from Palmer's finite-volume method. However, since the PWL method produces a symmetric positive definite coefficient matrix, it should be substantially more computationally efficient than Palmer's method, which produces an asymmetric matrix. We conclude that the Galerkin PWL method is an attractive option for solving diffusion equations on unstructured grids. (authors)

  5. A Piecewise Linear Finite Element Discretization of the Diffusion Equation for Arbitrary Polyhedral Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L; Yang, B; Zika, M R

    2005-07-15

    We develop a piecewise linear (PWL) Galerkin finite element spatial discretization for the multi-dimensional radiation diffusion equation. It uses piecewise linear weight and basis functions in the finite element approximation, and it can be applied on arbitrary polygonal (2D) or polyhedral (3D) grids. We show that this new PWL method gives solutions comparable to those from Palmer's finite-volume method. However, since the PWL method produces a symmetric positive definite coefficient matrix, it should be substantially more computationally efficient than Palmer's method, which produces an asymmetric matrix. We conclude that the Galerkin PWL method is an attractive option for solving diffusion equations on unstructured grids.

  6. ComPASS : a tool for distributed parallel finite volume discretizations on general unstructured polyhedral meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalissier E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the ComPASS project is to develop a parallel multiphase Darcy flow simulator adapted to general unstructured polyhedral meshes (in a general sense with possibly non planar faces and to the parallelization of advanced finite volume discretizations with various choices of the degrees of freedom such as cell centres, vertices, or face centres. The main targeted applications are the simulation of CO2 geological storage, nuclear waste repository and reservoir simulations. The CEMRACS 2012 summer school devoted to high performance computing has been an ideal framework to start this collaborative project. This paper describes what has been achieved during the four weeks of the CEMRACS project which has been focusing on the implementation of basic features of the code such as the distributed unstructured polyhedral mesh, the synchronization of the degrees of freedom, and the connection to scientific libraries including the partitioner METIS, the visualization tool PARAVIEW, and the parallel linear solver library PETSc. The parallel efficiency of this first version of the ComPASS code has been validated on a toy parabolic problem using the Vertex Approximate Gradient finite volume spatial discretization with both cell and vertex degrees of freedom, combined with an Euler implicit time integration.

  7. Polyhedral patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Caigui

    2015-10-27

    We study the design and optimization of polyhedral patterns, which are patterns of planar polygonal faces on freeform surfaces. Working with polyhedral patterns is desirable in architectural geometry and industrial design. However, the classical tiling patterns on the plane must take on various shapes in order to faithfully and feasibly approximate curved surfaces. We define and analyze the deformations these tiles must undertake to account for curvature, and discover the symmetries that remain invariant under such deformations. We propose a novel method to regularize polyhedral patterns while maintaining these symmetries into a plethora of aesthetic and feasible patterns.

  8. Estimate of the truncation error of a finite volume discretisation of the Navier-Stokes equations on colocated grids

    CERN Document Server

    Syrakos, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    A methodology is proposed for the calculation of the truncation error of finite volume discretisations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on colocated grids. The truncation error is estimated by restricting the solution obtained on a given grid to a coarser grid and calculating the image of the discrete Navier-Stokes operator of the coarse grid on the restricted velocity and pressure field. The proposed methodology is not a new concept but its application to colocated finite volume discretisations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is made possible by the introduction of a variant of the momentum interpolation technique for mass fluxes where the pressure-part of the mass fluxes is not dependent on the coefficients of the linearised momentum equations. The theory presented is supported by a number of numerical experiments. The methodology is developed for two-dimensional flows, but extension to three-dimensional cases should not pose problems.

  9. Origamizing polyhedral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first practical method for "origamizing" or obtaining the folding pattern that folds a single sheet of material into a given polyhedral surface without any cut. The basic idea is to tuck fold a planar paper to form a three-dimensional shape. The main contribution is to solve the inverse problem; the input is an arbitrary polyhedral surface and the output is the folding pattern. Our approach is to convert this problem into a problem of laying out the polygons of the surface on a planar paper by introducing the concept of tucking molecules. We investigate the equality and inequality conditions required for constructing a valid crease pattern. We propose an algorithm based on two-step mapping and edge splitting to solve these conditions. The two-step mapping precalculates linear equalities and separates them from other conditions. This allows an interactive manipulation of the crease pattern in the system implementation. We present the first system for designing three-dimensional origami, enabling a user can interactively design complex spatial origami models that have not been realizable thus far.

  10. Transformations for polyhedral process networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Sjoerd

    2010-01-01

    We use the polyhedral process network (PPN) model of computation to program and map streaming applications onto embedded Multi-Processor Systems on Chip (MPSoCs) platforms. The PPNs, which can be automatically derived from sequential program applications, do not necessarily meet the

  11. Polyceptron: A Polyhedral Learning Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Manwani, Naresh

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new algorithm for learning polyhedral classifiers which we call as Polyceptron. It is a Perception like algorithm which updates the parameters only when the current classifier misclassifies any training data. We give both batch and online version of Polyceptron algorithm. Finally we give experimental results to show the effectiveness of our approach.

  12. Space-filling polyhedral sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaland, Peter

    2016-06-21

    Solid sorbents, systems, and methods for pumping, storage, and purification of gases are disclosed. They derive from the dynamics of porous and free convection for specific gas/sorbent combinations and use space filling polyhedral microliths with facial aplanarities to produce sorbent arrays with interpenetrating interstitial manifolds of voids.

  13. Transformations for polyhedral process networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Sjoerd

    2010-01-01

    We use the polyhedral process network (PPN) model of computation to program and map streaming applications onto embedded Multi-Processor Systems on Chip (MPSoCs) platforms. The PPNs, which can be automatically derived from sequential program applications, do not necessarily meet the performance/res

  14. On maximum cycle packings in polyhedral graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Recht

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses upper and lower bounds for the cardinality of a maximum vertex-/edge-disjoint cycle packing in a polyhedral graph G. Bounds on the cardinality of such packings are provided, that depend on the size, the order or the number of faces of G, respectively. Polyhedral graphs are constructed, that attain these bounds.

  15. On Linear Spaces of Polyhedral Meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poranne, Roi; Chen, Renjie; Gotsman, Craig

    2015-05-01

    Polyhedral meshes (PM)-meshes having planar faces-have enjoyed a rise in popularity in recent years due to their importance in architectural and industrial design. However, they are also notoriously difficult to generate and manipulate. Previous methods start with a smooth surface and then apply elaborate meshing schemes to create polyhedral meshes approximating the surface. In this paper, we describe a reverse approach: given the topology of a mesh, we explore the space of possible planar meshes having that topology. Our approach is based on a complete characterization of the maximal linear spaces of polyhedral meshes contained in the curved manifold of polyhedral meshes with a given topology. We show that these linear spaces can be described as nullspaces of differential operators, much like harmonic functions are nullspaces of the Laplacian operator. An analysis of this operator provides tools for global and local design of a polyhedral mesh, which fully expose the geometric possibilities and limitations of the given topology.

  16. An exact line integral representation of the physical optics scattered field: the case of a perfectly conducting polyhedral structure illuminated by electric Hertzian dipoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Peter M.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    1995-01-01

    An exact line integral representation of the electric physical optics scattered field is presented. This representation applies to scattering configurations with perfectly electrically conducting polyhedral structures illuminated by a finite number of electric Hertzian dipoles. The positions...

  17. An analytical description for the elastic compression of metallic polyhedral nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanoparticles are usually polyhedrons instead of perfect spheres, which presents a challenge to characterize their elastic response. In the present paper, the elastic compression of truncated octahedral nanoparticles is investigated through finite element calculations and atomic simulations. An analytical expression of load is obtained for octahedral particles, which is linearly proportional to indent depth, instead of the 3/2 power law relation predicted by Hertzian model for elastic sphere. Comparisons with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the obtained relation can predict the elastic response of polyhedral nanoparticles. This study is helpful to measure the elastic properties of polyhedral nanoparticles, and characterize their elastic response.

  18. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  19. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  20. Mesophase behaviour of polyhedral particles

    KAUST Repository

    Agarwal, Umang

    2011-02-13

    Translational and orientational excluded-volume fields encoded in particles with anisotropic shapes can lead to purely entropy-driven assembly of morphologies with specific order and symmetry. To elucidate this complex correlation, we carried out detailed Monte Carlo simulations of six convex space-filling polyhedrons, namely, truncated octahedrons, rhombic dodecahedrons, hexagonal prisms, cubes, gyrobifastigiums and triangular prisms. Simulations predict the formation of various new liquid-crystalline and plastic-crystalline phases at intermediate volume fractions. By correlating these findings with particle anisotropy and rotational symmetry, simple guidelines for predicting phase behaviour of polyhedral particles are proposed: high rotational symmetry is in general conducive to mesophase formation, with low anisotropy favouring plastic-solid behaviour and intermediate anisotropy (or high uniaxial anisotropy) favouring liquid-crystalline behaviour. It is also found that dynamical disorder is crucial in defining mesophase behaviour, and that the apparent kinetic barrier for the liquid-mesophase transition is much lower for liquid crystals (orientational order) than for plastic solids (translational order). © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  1. Polyhedral (in-)stability of protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Christo N.; Penkova, Anita N.

    2002-04-01

    The polyhedral (in-)stability of monoclinic hen-egg white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals, grown by means of PEG-6000, and that of orthorhombic trypsin crystals has been investigated experimentally. On the basis of a quantitative theoretical analysis, it is compared with the polyhedral (in-)stability of tetragonal HEWL and cubic ferritin crystals. The unambiguous conclusion is that the phenomenon is due to the diffusive supply of matter. This conclusion is also supported by the fact that the phenomenon has common features for both proteins and small molecular crystals.

  2. Architecture of Platonic and Archimedean polyhedral links

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new methodology for understanding the construction of polyhedral links has been developed on the basis of the Platonic and Archimedean solids by using our method of the 'three-cross-curve and doubletwist-line covering'. There are five classes of polyhedral links that can be explored: the tetrahedral and truncated tetrahedral links; the hexahedral and truncated hexahedral links; the dodecahedral and truncated dodecahedral links; the truncated octahedral and icosahedral links. Our results show that the tetrahedral and truncated tetrahedral links have T symmetry; the hexahedral and truncated hexahedral links, as well as the truncated octahedral links, O symmetry; the dodecahedral and truncated dodecahedral links, as well as the truncated icosahedral links, I symmetry, respectively. This study provides further insight into the molecular design, as well as theoretical characterization, of the DNA and protein catenanes.

  3. Architecture of Platonic and Archimedean polyhedral links

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new methodology for understanding the construction of polyhedral links has been developed on the basis of the Platonic and Archimedean solids by using our method of the ‘three-cross-curve and dou- ble-twist-line covering’. There are five classes of polyhedral links that can be explored: the tetrahedral and truncated tetrahedral links; the hexahedral and truncated hexahedral links; the dodecahedral and truncated dodecahedral links; the truncated octahedral and icosahedral links. Our results show that the tetrahedral and truncated tetrahedral links have T symmetry; the hexahedral and truncated hexahedral links, as well as the truncated octahedral links, O symmetry; the dodecahedral and truncated dodeca- hedral links, as well as the truncated icosahedral links, I symmetry, respectively. This study provides further insight into the molecular design, as well as theoretical characterization, of the DNA and protein catenanes.

  4. Unstructured Polyhedral Mesh Thermal Radiation Diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T.S.; Zika, M.R.; Madsen, N.K.

    2000-07-27

    Unstructured mesh particle transport and diffusion methods are gaining wider acceptance as mesh generation, scientific visualization and linear solvers improve. This paper describes an algorithm that is currently being used in the KULL code at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to solve the radiative transfer equations. The algorithm employs a point-centered diffusion discretization on arbitrary polyhedral meshes in 3D. We present the results of a few test problems to illustrate the capabilities of the radiation diffusion module.

  5. Polyhedral representation of invariant manifolds applied to orbit transfers in the Earth-Moon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontani, Mauro; Teofilatto, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Recently, manifold dynamics has assumed an increasing relevance for analysis and design of low-energy missions, both in the Earth-Moon system and in alternative multibody environments. This work proposes and describes an intuitive polyhedral interpolative approach for each state component associated with manifold trajectories, both in two and in three dimensions. An adequate grid of data, coming from the numerical propagation of a finite number of manifold trajectories, is employed. Accuracy of this representation is evaluated with reference to the invariant manifolds associated with a two-dimensional Lyapunov orbit and a three-dimensional Halo orbit, and is proven to be satisfactory, with the exclusion of limited regions of the manifolds. As a first, preliminary application, the polyhedral interpolation technique allows identifying the orbits in the proximity of the interior collinear libration point as either asymptotic, transit, or bouncing trajectories. Then, two applications to orbital maneuvering are addressed. First, the globally optimal two-impulse transfer between a specified low Earth orbit and a Lyapunov orbit (through its stable manifold) is determined. Second, the minimum-time low-thrust transfer from the same terminal orbits is found using again the stable manifold. These applications prove the effectiveness of the polyhedral interpolative technique and represent the premise for its application also to different problems involving invariant manifold dynamics.

  6. Polybenzoxazine/Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The organic/inorganic hybrid materials from polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS, inorganic nanoparticles and polybenzoxazine (PBZ have received much interesting recently due to their excellent thermal and mechanical properties, flame retardance, low dielectric constant, well-defined inorganic framework at nanosized scale level, and higher performance relative to those of non-hybrid PBZs. This review describes the synthesis, dielectric constants, and thermal, rheological, and mechanical properties of covalently bonded mono- and multifunctionalized benzoxazine POSS hybrids, other functionalized benzoxazine POSS derivatives, and non-covalently (hydrogen bonded benzoxazine POSS composites.

  7. Exploiting Polyhedral Symmetries in Social Choice

    CERN Document Server

    Schürmann, Achill

    2011-01-01

    A large amount of literature in social choice theory deals with quantifying the probability of certain election outcomes. One way of computing the probability of a specific voting situation under the impartial anonymous culture is via counting integral points in polyhedra. Here, Ehrhart theory can help, but unfortunately the dimension and complexity of the involved polyhedra grows rapidly with the number of candidates. However, if we exploit available polyhedral symmetries, some computations become possible that previously were infeasible. We show this in three well known examples: Condorcet's paradox, Condorcet efficiency of plurality voting and in Plurality voting vs Plurality Runoff.

  8. Flexible Polyhedral Surfaces with Two Flat Poses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellmuth Stachel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present three types of polyhedral surfaces, which are continuously flexible and have not only an initial pose, where all faces are coplanar, but pass during their self-motion through another pose with coplanar faces (“flat pose”. These surfaces are examples of so-called rigid origami, since we only admit exact flexions, i.e., each face remains rigid during the motion; only the dihedral angles vary. We analyze the geometry behind Miura-ori and address Kokotsakis’ example of a flexible tessellation with the particular case of a cyclic quadrangle. Finally, we recall Bricard’s octahedra of Type 3 and their relation to strophoids.

  9. Interactive volume visualization of general polyhedral grids

    KAUST Repository

    Muigg, Philipp

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for visualizing volumetric data specified on complex polyhedral grids, without the need to perform any kind of a priori tetrahedralization. These grids are composed of polyhedra that often are non-convex and have an arbitrary number of faces, where the faces can be non-planar with an arbitrary number of vertices. The importance of such grids in state-of-the-art simulation packages is increasing rapidly. We propose a very compact, face-based data structure for representing such meshes for visualization, called two-sided face sequence lists (TSFSL), as well as an algorithm for direct GPU-based ray-casting using this representation. The TSFSL data structure is able to represent the entire mesh topology in a 1D TSFSL data array of face records, which facilitates the use of efficient 1D texture accesses for visualization. In order to scale to large data sizes, we employ a mesh decomposition into bricks that can be handled independently, where each brick is then composed of its own TSFSL array. This bricking enables memory savings and performance improvements for large meshes. We illustrate the feasibility of our approach with real-world application results, by visualizing highly complex polyhedral data from commercial state-of-the-art simulation packages. © 2011 IEEE.

  10. On polyhedral approximations in an n-dimensional space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, M. V.

    2016-10-01

    The polyhedral approximation of a positively homogeneous (and, in general, nonconvex) function on a unit sphere is investigated. Such a function is presupporting (i.e., its convex hull is the supporting function) for a convex compact subset of R n . The considered polyhedral approximation of this function provides a polyhedral approximation of this convex compact set. The best possible estimate for the error of the considered approximation is obtained in terms of the modulus of uniform continuous subdifferentiability in the class of a priori grids of given step in the Hausdorff metric.

  11. Zero point energy of polyhedral water clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anick, David J

    2005-06-30

    Polyhedral water clusters (PWCs) are cage-like (H2O)n clusters where every O participates in exactly three H bonds. For a database of 83 PWCs, 8 zero point energy (ZPE) was calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level. ZPE correlates negatively with electronic energy (E0): each increase of 1 kcal/mol in E0 corresponds to a decrease of about 0.11 kcal/mol in ZPE. For each n, a set of four connectivity parameters accounts for 98% or more of the variance in ZPE. Linear regression of ZPE against n and this set gives an RMS error of 0.13 kcal/mol. The contributions to ZPE from stretch modes only (ZPE(S)) and from torsional modes only (ZPE(T)) also correlate strongly with E0 and with each other.

  12. A polyhedral approach to computing border bases

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Gábor

    2009-01-01

    Border bases can be considered to be the natural extension of Gr\\"obner bases that have several advantages. Unfortunately, to date the classical border basis algorithm relies on (degree-compatible) term orderings and implicitly on reduced Gr\\"obner bases. We adapt the classical border basis algorithm to allow for calculating border bases for arbitrary degree-compatible order ideals, which is \\emph{independent} from term orderings. Moreover, the algorithm also supports calculating degree-compatible order ideals with \\emph{preference} on contained elements, even though finding a preferred order ideal is NP-hard. Effectively we retain degree-compatibility only to successively extend our computation degree-by-degree. The adaptation is based on our polyhedral characterization: order ideals that support a border basis correspond one-to-one to integral points of the order ideal polytope. This establishes a crucial connection between the ideal and the combinatorial structure of the associated factor spaces.

  13. Fernando Cassinello Pérez, polyhedral architect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Centellas Soler

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The work of architect Fernando Cassinello Pérez (Almería, 1928-Madrid, 1975 rests on three pillars: architectural production focused on the design and construction of housing and hotel establishments, academic activity as Professor of Construction at the Escuela de Arquitectura de Madrid, and research concern developed in the IETcc of which he became director, and exercised as an author of books and research papers, as disseminator lecturer, speaker at major conferences or as an active member of international associations linked to construction with concrete. This article will review his prolific activity as polyhedral architect and will find interesting works that designed and built by relying on extensive contemporary and international architectural culture.

  14. A non-linear constrained optimization technique for the mimetic finite difference method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Svyatskiy, Daniil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bertolazzi, Enrico [Univ. of Trento (Italy); Frego, Marco [Univ. of Trento (Italy)

    2014-09-30

    This is a strategy for the construction of monotone schemes in the framework of the mimetic finite difference method for the approximation of diffusion problems on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes.

  15. Robust structural identification via polyhedral template matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler Larsen, Peter; Schmidt, Søren; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2016-06-01

    Successful scientific applications of large-scale molecular dynamics often rely on automated methods for identifying the local crystalline structure of condensed phases. Many existing methods for structural identification, such as common neighbour analysis, rely on interatomic distances (or thresholds thereof) to classify atomic structure. As a consequence they are sensitive to strain and thermal displacements, and preprocessing such as quenching or temporal averaging of the atomic positions is necessary to provide reliable identifications. We propose a new method, polyhedral template matching (PTM), which classifies structures according to the topology of the local atomic environment, without any ambiguity in the classification, and with greater reliability than e.g. common neighbour analysis in the presence of thermal fluctuations. We demonstrate that the method can reliably be used to identify structures even in simulations near the melting point, and that it can identify the most common ordered alloy structures as well. In addition, the method makes it easy to identify the local lattice orientation in polycrystalline samples, and to calculate the local strain tensor. An implementation is made available under a Free and Open Source Software license.

  16. Self organized locomotion via polyhedral geometry: a minimal example

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Shankar; Bhattacharya, S; Nitsure, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we establish a geometrical route to self-organisation. We show that the relevant underlying geometry of the configuration space is a curvilinear polyhedral region. The energetics over the polyhedral region localizes the available space within the close proximity of a corner of this polyhedra. This results into a stronger entrapment of the state which provides it the observed geometrical shape, functionality, and maintains its stability. These theoretical considerations are borne out in the experiments where we study the case of an uphill locomotion of a self organised dumbbell pair placed in a rotating cylinder.

  17. Animation Visualization for Vertex Coloring of Polyhedral Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Nonaka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Vertex coloring of a graph is the assignment of labels to the vertices of the graph so that adjacent vertices have different labels. In the case of polyhedral graphs, the chromatic number is 2, 3, or 4. Edge coloring problem and face coloring problem can be converted to vertex coloring problem for appropriate polyhedral graphs. We have been developed an interactive learning system of polyhedra, based on graph operations and simulated elasticity potential method, mainly for educational purpose. In this paper, we introduce a learning subsystem of vertex coloring, edge coloring and face coloring, based on minimum spanning tree and degenerated polyhedron, which is introduced in this paper.

  18. Robust Hinf control of uncertain switched systems defined on polyhedral sets with Filippov solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, Mohamadreza; Mojallali, Hamed; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the control problem of a class of uncertain switched systems defined on polyhedral sets known as piecewise linear systems where, instead of the conventional Carathe ́odory solutions, Filippov solutions are studied. In other words, in contrast to the previous studies, solutions...... with infinite switching in finite time along the facets and on faces of arbitrary dimensions are also taken into account. Firstly, established upon previous studies, a set of linear matrix inequalities are brought forward which determines the asymptotic stability of piecewise linear systems with Filippov...... solutions. Subsequently, bilinear matrix inequality conditions for synthesizing a robust controller with a guaranteed Hinf performance are presented. Furthermore, these results has been generalized to the case of piecewise affine systems. Finally, a V–K iteration algorithm is proposed to deal...

  19. Parallelizing dynamic sequential programs using polyhedral process networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadezhkin, Dmitry

    2012-01-01

    The Polyhedral Process Network (PPN) is a suitable parallel model of computation (MoC) used to specify embedded streaming applications in a parallel form facilitating the efficient mapping onto embedded parallel execution platforms. Unfortunately, specifying an application using a parallel MoC is a

  20. Polyhedrical Heuristics of Periodical Qualities in the Numerical Divisibility Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Díaz Caballero

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work demonstrate how this polyhedral heuristic is also revealed in the Set of NaturalNumbers, where it is manifested numerical regularities similar to he platonic polyhedra developmentswhich open a wide field for the study of new numerical regularities as those associated to the periodicityvariation of its divisibility.

  1. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane grafted polymer in polymeric foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Bruce A.; Patankar, Kshitish A.; Costeux, Stephane; Jeon, Hyun K.

    2017-01-17

    A polymeric foam article with a polymer matrix defining multiple cells therein has a polymer component with a first polymer that is a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane grafted polymer that has a weight-average molecular weight of two kilograms per mole or higher and 200 kilograms per mole or lower.

  2. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane grafted polymer in polymeric foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bruce A.; Patankar, Kshitish A.; Costeux, Stephane; Jeon, Hyun K.

    2017-01-17

    A polymeric foam article with a polymer matrix defining multiple cells therein has a polymer component with a first polymer that is a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane grafted polymer that has a weight-average molecular weight of two kilograms per mole or higher and 200 kilograms per mole or lower.

  3. Estimation and optimization of the performance of polyhedral process networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastregt, Sven Joseph Johannes van

    2013-01-01

    A system-level design methodology such as Daedalus provides designers with a forward synthesis flow for automated design, programming, and implementation of multiprocessor systems-on-chip. Daedalus employs the polyhedral process network model of computation to represent applications. These networks

  4. Robustly stabilizing controllers for dissipative infinite-dimensional systems with colocated actuators and sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostveen, JC; Curtain, RF

    1997-01-01

    We solve the problem of robust stabilization with respect to normalized coprime factor perturbations for a new class of infinite-dimensional systems with finite-rank, colocated actuators and sensors and possibly infinitely many unstable eigenvalues on the imaginary axis. Such systems are often used

  5. Clustered deep shadow maps for integrated polyhedral and volume rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Bornik, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a hardware-accelerated approach for shadow computation in scenes containing both complex volumetric objects and polyhedral models. Our system is the first hardware accelerated complete implementation of deep shadow maps, which unifies the computation of volumetric and geometric shadows. Up to now such unified computation was limited to software-only rendering . Previous hardware accelerated techniques can handle only geometric or only volumetric scenes - both resulting in the loss of important properties of the original concept. Our approach supports interactive rendering of polyhedrally bounded volumetric objects on the GPU based on ray casting. The ray casting can be conveniently used for both the shadow map computation and the rendering. We show how anti-aliased high-quality shadows are feasible in scenes composed of multiple overlapping translucent objects, and how sparse scenes can be handled efficiently using clustered deep shadow maps. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Form-finding with polyhedral meshes made simple

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Chengcheng

    2014-07-27

    We solve the form-finding problem for polyhedral meshes in a way which combines form, function and fabrication; taking care of user-specified constraints like boundary interpolation, planarity of faces, statics, panel size and shape, enclosed volume, and last, but not least, cost. Our main application is the interactive modeling of meshes for architectural and industrial design. Our approach can be described as guided exploration of the constraint space whose algebraic structure is simplified by introducing auxiliary variables and ensuring that constraints are at most quadratic. Computationally, we perform a projection onto the constraint space which is biased towards low values of an energy which expresses desirable "soft" properties like fairness. We have created a tool which elegantly handles difficult tasks, such as taking boundary-alignment of polyhedral meshes into account, planarization, fairing under planarity side conditions, handling hybrid meshes, and extending the treatment of static equilibrium to shapes which possess overhanging parts.

  7. Symmetry and size of membrane protein polyhedral nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Di; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    In recent experiments [T. Basta et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 670 (2014)] lipids and membrane proteins were observed to self-assemble into membrane protein polyhedral nanoparticles (MPPNs) with a well-defined polyhedral protein arrangement and characteristic size. We develop a model of MPPN self-assembly in which the preferred symmetry and size of MPPNs emerge from the interplay of protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations, topological defects in protein packing, and thermal effects. With all model parameters determined directly from experiments, our model correctly predicts the observed symmetry and size of MPPNs. Our model suggests how key lipid and protein properties can be modified to produce a range of MPPN symmetries and sizes in experiments.

  8. Image of the World on polyhedral maps and globes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pędzich Paweł

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of polyhedrons as image surface in cartographic projections has a tradition of more than 200 years. The first maps relying on polyhedrons appeared in the 19th century. One of the first maps which based on an original polyhedral projection using a regular octahedron was constructed by the Californian architect Bernard Cahill in 1909. Other well known polyhedral projections and maps included Buckminster Fuller’s projection and map into icosahedron from 1954 and S. Waterman’s projection into truncated octahedron from 1996, which resulted in the “butterfly” map. Polyhedrons as image surface have the advantage of allowing a continuous image of continents of the Earth with low projection distortion. Such maps can be used for many purposes, such as presentation of tectonic plates or geographic discoveries.

  9. Flops and mutations for crepant resolutions of polyhedral singularities

    CERN Document Server

    de Celis, Alvaro Nolla

    2011-01-01

    We prove that any crepant resolution of a polyhedral singularity C^3/G for G a subgroup of SO(3) of types Z/nZ, D_{2n} and T is isomorphic to a moduli space of representations of a quiver with relations. Moreover we classify all crepant resolutions explicitly by giving an open cover and find a one-to-one correspondence between them and mutations of the McKay quiver.

  10. On the accuracy of uniform polyhedral approximations of the copositive cone

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldırım, Emre Alper

    2012-01-01

    We consider linear optimization problems over the cone of copositive matrices. Such conic optimization problems, called copositive programs, arise from the reformulation of a wide variety of difficult optimization problems. We propose a hierarchy of increasingly better outer polyhedral approximations to the copositive cone. We establish that the sequence of approximations is exact in the limit. By combining our outer polyhedral approximations with the inner polyhedral approximations due to de...

  11. Functional Perfluoroalkyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (F-POSS): Building Blocks for Low Surface Energy Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Functional Perfluoroalkyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (F...long chain fluorinated alkyl groups ranging from 6-12 carbon atoms in length. Herein, a disilanol perfluoroalkyl polyhedral oligomeric...FUNCTIONAL PERFLUOROALKYL POLYHEDRAL OLIGOMERIC SILSESQUIOXANES (F-POSS): BUILDING BLOCKS FOR LOW SURFACE ENERGY MATERIA LS Sean M Rami,.e:, Yvonne Dia

  12. When do the recession cones of a polyhedral complex form a fan?

    CERN Document Server

    Gil, José Ignacio Burgos

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of when the collection of the recession cones of a polyhedral complex forms also a complex. We exhibit an example showing that this is no always the case. We also show that if the support of the given polyhedral complex satisfies a Minkowski-Weyl type condition, then the answer is positive. As a consequence, we obtain a classification theorem for proper toric schemes over a discrete valuation ring in terms of complete strongly convex rational polyhedral complexes.

  13. The braid index of complicated DNA polyhedral links.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Sheng Cheng

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to determine the braid index of two types of complicated DNA polyhedral links introduced by chemists and biologists in recent years. We shall study it in a more broad context and actually consider so-called Jaeger's links (more general Traldi's links which contain, as special cases, both four types of simple polyhedral links whose braid indexes have been determined and the above two types of complicated DNA polyhedral links. Denote by b(L and c(L the braid index and crossing number of an oriented link L, respectively. Roughly speaking, in this paper, we prove that b(L = c(L/2 + 1 for any link L in a family including Jaeger's links and contained in Traldi's links, which is obtained by combining the MFW inequality and an Ohyama's result on upper bound of the braid index. Our result may be used to to characterize and analyze the structure and complexity of DNA polyhedra and entanglement in biopolymers.

  14. Polyhedral Boranes: A Versatile Building Block for Nanoporous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingerman, Daniel Jon

    The studies described in this dissertation examine several new concepts related to polyhedral boranes and their applications towards the synthesis of novel nanoporous materials. The unique thermal and chemical robustness, rigidity, quasi-spherical geometry, and high boron content of polyhedral boranes are explored to generate materials not possible with typical organic synthons. Aside from the fundamental synthetic work, this work was also aimed at solving larger global issues such as energy storage and new routes to therapeutics. Chapter 2 highlights the discovery of the first highly porous carborane-based metal-organic framework, where the spherical nature of the carborane increases volumetric surface area without reducing pore volume. Chapter 3 examines the first tritopic carborane-based ligand and the stabilizing effect the rigid, sterically bulky carboranyl groups have on highly porous topologies not stable with typical organic ligands. Chapters 4 and 5 describe the use of polyhedral borane-based ligands as a means to influence and generate unexpected topologies. Lastly, chapter 6 explores using a simple carborane-based ligand that harnesses the power of coordination-driven assembly to rapidly generate a high boron-containing supramolecular cuboctahedron.

  15. Uniqueness in inverse elastic scattering with finitely many incident waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elschner, Johannes [Weierstrass-Institut fuer Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS) im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany); Yamamoto, Masahiro [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences

    2009-07-01

    We consider the third and fourth exterior boundary value problems of linear isotropic elasticity and present uniqueness results for the corresponding inverse scattering problems with polyhedral-type obstacles and a finite number of incident plane elastic waves. Our approach is based on a reflection principle for the Navier equation. (orig.)

  16. Form-finding with polyhedral meshes made simple

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Chengcheng

    2015-08-09

    We solve the form-finding problem for polyhedral meshes in a way which combines form, function and fabrication; taking care of user-specified constraints like boundary interpolation, planarity of faces, statics, panel size and shape, enclosed volume, and cost. Our main application is the interactive modeling of meshes for architectural and industrial design. Our approach can be described as guided exploration of the constraint space whose algebraic structure is simplified by introducing auxiliary variables and ensuring that constraints are at most quadratic.

  17. Physical and numerical modeling of labyrinth weirs with polyhedral bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. San Mauro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to comply with the new safety regulations a significant number of Spanish dam spillways must be upgraded. In this scenario and with the aim of increasing the discharge capacity with a reduced investment innovative designs become interesting solutions. One of these innovative designs are the labyrinth weirs. Project POLILAB is carrying out with the objective of optimize the design of labyrinth weirs, physical and numerical tests exposed in this article were developed within this framework. The most relevant results are related with the discharge capacity, the flow pattern and the structural reinforcement achieved by the implementation of a polyhedral bottom.

  18. Temperature dependence of polyhedral cage volumes in clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.; Jones, C.Y.; Toby, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    The polyhedral cage volumes of structure I (sI) (carbon dioxide, methane, trimethylene oxide) and structure II (sII) (methane-ethane, propane, tetrahydrofuran, trimethylene oxide) hydrates are computed from atomic positions determined from neutron powder-diffraction data. The ideal structural formulas for sI and sII are, respectively, S2L6 ?? 46H2O and S16L???8 ?? 136H2O, where S denotes a polyhedral cage with 20 vertices, L a 24-cage, and L??? a 28-cage. The space-filling polyhedral cages are defined by the oxygen atoms of the hydrogen-bonded network of water molecules. Collectively, the mean cage volume ratio is 1.91 : 1.43 : 1 for the 28-cage : 24-cage : 20-cage, which correspond to equivalent sphere radii of 4.18, 3.79, and 3.37 A??, respectively. At 100 K, mean polyhedral volumes are 303.8, 227.8, and 158.8 A??3 for the 28-cage, 24-cage, and 20-cage, respectively. In general, the 20-cage volume for a sII is larger than that of a sI, although trimethylene oxide is an exception. The temperature dependence of the cage volumes reveals differences between apparently similar cages with similar occupants. In the case of trimethylene oxide hydrate, which forms both sI and sII, the 20-cages common to both structures contract quite differently. From 220 K, the sII 20-cage exhibits a smooth monotonic reduction in size, whereas the sI 20-cage initially expands upon cooling to 160 K, then contracts more rapidly to 10 K, and overall the sI 20-cage is larger than the sII 20-cage. The volumes of the large cages in both structures contract monotonically with decreasing temperature. These differences reflect reoriented motion of the trimethyelene oxide molecule in the 24-cage of sI, consistent with previous spectroscopic and calorimetric studies. For the 20-cages in methane hydrate (sI) and a mixed methane-ethane hydrate (sII), both containing methane as the guest molecule, the temperature dependence of the 20-cage volume in sII is much less than that in sI, but sII is overall

  19. Gauss images of hyperbolic cusps with convex polyhedral boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Fillastre, François

    2009-01-01

    We prove that a 3--dimensional hyperbolic cusp with convex polyhedral boundary is uniquely determined by its Gauss image. Furthermore, any spherical metric on the torus with cone singularities of negative curvature and all closed contractible geodesics of length greater than $2\\pi$ is the metric of the Gauss image of some convex polyhedral cusp. This result is an analog of the Rivin-Hodgson theorem characterizing compact convex hyperbolic polyhedra in terms of their Gauss images. The proof uses a variational method. Namely, a cusp with a given Gauss image is identified with a critical point of a functional on the space of cusps with cone-type singularities along a family of half-lines. The functional is shown to be concave and to attain maximum at an interior point of its domain. As a byproduct, we prove rigidity statements with respect to the Gauss image for cusps with or without cone-type singularities. In a special case, our theorem is equivalent to existence of a circle pattern on the torus, with prescrib...

  20. A new equi-dimensional fracture model using polyhedral cells for microseismic data sets

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar

    2017-04-09

    We present a method for modeling flow in porous media in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach utilizes the Mimetic Finite Difference (MFD) method. We employ a novel equi-dimensional approach for meshing fractures. By using polyhedral cells we avoid the common challenge in equi-dimensional fracture modeling of creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how polyhedra can mesh complex fractures without introducing a large number of cells. We use polyhedra and the MFD method a second time for embedding fracture boundaries in the matrix domain using a “cut-cell” paradigm. The embedding approach has the advantage of being simple and localizes irregular cells to the area around the fractures. It also circumvents the need for conventional mesh generation, which can be challenging when applied to complex fracture geometries. We present numerical results confirming the validity of our approach for complex fracture networks and for different flow models. In our first example, we compare our method to the popular dual-porosity technique. Our second example compares our method with directly meshed fractures (single-porosity) for two-phase flow. The third example demonstrates two-phase flow for the case of intersecting ellipsoid fractures in three-dimensions, which are typical in microseismic analysis of fractures. Finally, we demonstrate our method on a two-dimensional fracture network produced from microseismic field data.

  1. Green Nanocomposites from Renewable Plant Oils and Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tsujimoto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Green nanocomposites based on renewable plant oils and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS have been developed. An acid-catalyzed curing of epoxidized plant oils with oxirane-containing POSS derivatives produced transparent nanocomposite coatings with high gloss surface, in which the organic and inorganic components were linked via covalent bonds. The hardness and mechanical strength were improved by the incorporation of the POSS unit into the organic polymer matrix. Nanostructural analyses of the nanocomposites showed the formation of homogeneous structures at the micrometer scale. On the other hand, such improvements of the coating and mechanical properties were not observed in the composite without covalent bonds between the plant oil-based polymer and POSS unit. The study demonstrates the correlation between the nanostructure of composites and macroscopic properties.

  2. Ricci Curvature on Polyhedral Surfaces via Optimal Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Loisel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of correctly defining geometric objects, such as the curvature, is a hard one in discrete geometry. In 2009, Ollivier defined a notion of curvature applicable to a wide category of measured metric spaces, in particular to graphs. He named it coarse Ricci curvature because it coincides, up to some given factor, with the classical Ricci curvature, when the space is a smooth manifold. Lin, Lu and Yau and Jost and Liu have used and extended this notion for graphs, giving estimates for the curvature and, hence, the diameter, in terms of the combinatorics. In this paper, we describe a method for computing the coarse Ricci curvature and give sharper results, in the specific, but crucial case of polyhedral surfaces.

  3. Electrorheology of polystyrene filler/polyhedral silsesquioxane suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Ernest C; Yang, Hengxi; Green, Peter F

    2012-04-01

    An important challenge in the field of electrorheology is identifying low-viscosity fluids that would exhibit significant changes in viscosity, or a yield stress, upon the application of an external electric field. Our recent research showed that optimal compositions of mixtures, 10 wt % sulfonated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (s-POSS) mixed with polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS), exhibited significant electrorheological activity. Here we show that s-POSS/PDMS mixtures containing polystyrene (PS) fillers, of micrometer-sized dimensions, containing as little as ~1 wt % s-POSS, exhibited an increase in ER activity by an order of magnitude, beyond that of s-POSS/PDMS mixtures. The dynamic yield stress was found to scale with the particle diameter, a, as τ(y) is proportional to a(0.5) and with the electric field as τ(y) is proportional to E(1.5-2.5); this behavior is reasonably well understood within the context of dielectric electrorheological theory.

  4. The mimetic finite difference method for elliptic problems

    CERN Document Server

    Veiga, Lourenço Beirão; Manzini, Gianmarco

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the theoretical and computational aspects of the mimetic finite difference method for a wide class of multidimensional elliptic problems, which includes diffusion, advection-diffusion, Stokes, elasticity, magnetostatics and plate bending problems. The modern mimetic discretization technology developed in part by the Authors allows one to solve these equations on unstructured polygonal, polyhedral and generalized polyhedral meshes. The book provides a practical guide for those scientists and engineers that are interested in the computational properties of the mimetic finite difference method such as the accuracy, stability, robustness, and efficiency. Many examples are provided to help the reader to understand and implement this method. This monograph also provides the essential background material and describes basic mathematical tools required to develop further the mimetic discretization technology and to extend it to various applications.

  5. Polyhedral-based nonlinear optical materials. 2. Theoretical investigation of some new high nonlinear optical response compounds involving polyhedral bridges with charged aromatic donors and acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allis, D G; Spencer, J T

    2001-07-02

    A theoretical study of several new classes of polyhedral-based molecules has shown that these species display large calculated nonlinear optical responses. These new classes of molecules are based on charged aromatic subunits connected through polyhedral cluster bridges, such as closo-[1-(C(7)H(6))-12-(C(5)Me(4))C(2)B(10)H(10)]. These compounds show calculated first hyperpolarizabilities (beta) ranging from 6.5 to 8413.9 x 10(-30) cm(5) esu(-1). A basis for understanding the origin of these large responses is proposed based on the two-state model and consideration of the orbital and electronic features of the molecules. In general, the highest occupied molecular orbitals for these species are localized on the aromatic donor rings, such as the cyclopentadienyl system, while the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals are largely on the aromatic acceptor rings, such as the tropylium system. The electronic properties of these polyhedral-based systems appear to be significantly different from the analogous organic [5.6.7]quinarene system (tropyliumcyclopentadienylbenzene). The organic quinarene appears to behave as a completely electron-delocalized system over all three rings while the polyhedral-based compounds can best be described as consisting of two relatively independent, highly polarized regions.

  6. Fast polyhedral cell sorting for interactive rendering of unstructured grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combra, J; Klosowski, J T; Max, N; Silva, C T; Williams, P L

    1998-10-30

    Direct volume rendering based on projective methods works by projecting, in visibility order, the polyhedral cells of a mesh onto the image plane, and incrementally compositing the cell's color and opacity into the final image. Crucial to this method is the computation of a visibility ordering of the cells. If the mesh is ''well-behaved'' (acyclic and convex), then the MPVO method of Williams provides a very fast sorting algorithm; however, this method only computes an approximate ordering in general datasets, resulting in visual artifacts when rendered. A recent method of Silva et al. removed the assumption that the mesh is convex, by means of a sweep algorithm used in conjunction with the MPVO method; their algorithm is substantially faster than previous exact methods for general meshes. In this paper we propose a new technique, which we call BSP-XMPVO, which is based on a fast and simple way of using binary space partitions on the boundary elements of the mesh to augment the ordering produced by MPVO. Our results are shown to be orders of magnitude better than previous exact methods of sorting cells.

  7. Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Functionalized Carbon Dots for Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Hai, Xin; Mao, Quan-Xing; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-08-05

    In the present study, octa-aminopropyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane hydrochloride salt (OA-POSS) functionalized carbon dots (CDs/POSS) are prepared by a one-pot approach with glycerol as carbon source and solvent medium. OA-POSS serves as a passivation agent, and it is obtained via hydrolytic condensation of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). During the functionalization process, the amino groups on OA-POSS combine with carboxylic groups on the bare CDs via formation of amide bond to construct organic-inorganic hybrid carbon dots. The obtained CDs/POSS are well dispersed in aqueous medium with a diameter of ca. 3.6 nm. It is demonstrated that CDs/POSS provide favorable photoluminescent property with a quantum yield of 24.0%. They also exhibit resistance to photobleaching and excellent photoluminescence stability in the presence of biological sample matrix (characterized by heavy metals and organic molecules), which facilitate cell imaging in biological systems. Both the photoluminescent emission wavelength and the fluorescence intensity depend closely on the excitation wavelength, and thus, it provides a potential for multicolor imaging as demonstrated with HeLa cells and MCF-7 cells.

  8. Stable determination of sound-hard polyhedral scatterers by a minimal number of scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyu; Petrini, Michele; Rondi, Luca; Xiao, Jingni

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to establish optimal stability estimates for the determination of sound-hard polyhedral scatterers in RN, N ≥ 2, by a minimal number of far-field measurements. This work is a significant and highly nontrivial extension of the stability estimates for the determination of sound-soft polyhedral scatterers by far-field measurements, proved by one of the authors, to the much more challenging sound-hard case. The admissible polyhedral scatterers satisfy minimal a priori assumptions of Lipschitz type and may include at the same time solid obstacles and screen-type components. In this case we obtain a stability estimate with N far-field measurements. Important features of such an estimate are that we have an explicit dependence on the parameter h representing the minimal size of the cells forming the boundaries of the admissible polyhedral scatterers, and that the modulus of continuity, provided the error is small enough with respect to h, does not depend on h. If we restrict to N = 2 , 3 and to polyhedral obstacles, that is to polyhedra, then we obtain stability estimates with fewer measurements, namely first with N - 1 measurements and then with a single measurement. In this case the dependence on h is not explicit anymore and the modulus of continuity depends on h as well.

  9. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and polyhedral bodies of Chlorogloeopsis fritschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanaras, T; Codd, G A

    1981-11-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.39) activity was approximately equally distributed between supernatant and pellet fractions produced by differential centrifugation of disrupted cells of Chlorogloeopsis fritschii. Low ionic strength buffer favoured the recovery of particulate RuBP carboxylase. Density gradient centrifugation of resuspended cell-free particulate material produced a single band of RuBP carboxylase activity, which was associated with the polyhedral body fraction, rather than with the thylakoids or other observable particles. Isolated polyhedral body stability was improved by density gradient centrifugation through gradients of Percoll plus sucrose in buffer, which yielded apparently intact polyhedral bodies. These were 100 to 150 nm in diameter and contained ring-shaped, 12 nm diameter particles. It is inferred that the C. fritschii polyhedral bodies are carboxysomes. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of SDS-dissociated polyhedral bodies revealed 8 major polypeptides. The most abundant, with molecular weights of 52,000 and 13,000, correspond with the large and small subunits, respectively, of RuBP carboxylase.

  10. A LINEAR-PROGRAMMING ALGORITHM FOR INVARIANT POLYHEDRAL-SETS OF DISCRETE-TIME LINEAR-SYSTEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENDAM, AA; NIEUWENHUIS, JW

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we formulate necessary and sufficient conditions for an arbitrary polyhedral set to be a positively invariant set of a linear discrete-time system. Polyhedral cones and linear subspaces are included in the analysis. A linear programming algorithm is presented that enables practical

  11. System-wide immunohistochemical analysis of protein co-localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung Kim

    Full Text Available The analysis of co-localized protein expression in a tissue section is often conducted with immunofluorescence histochemical staining which is typically visualized in localized regions. On the other hand, chromogenic immunohistochemical staining, in general, is not suitable for the detection of protein co-localization. Here, we developed a new protocol, based on chromogenic immunohistochemical stain, for system-wide detection of protein co-localization and differential expression.In combination with a removable chromogenic stain, an efficient antibody stripping method was developed to enable sequential immunostaining with different primary antibodies regardless of antibody's host species. Sections were scanned after each staining, and the images were superimposed together for the detection of protein co-localization and differential expression. As a proof of principle, differential expression and co-localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase67 (GAD67 and parvalbumin proteins was examined in mouse cortex.All parvalbumin-containing neurons express GAD67 protein, and GAD67-positive neurons that do not express parvalbumin were readily visualized from thousands of other neurons across mouse cortex. The method provided a global view of protein co-localization as well as differential expression across an entire tissue section. Repeated use of the same section could combine assessments of co-localization and differential expression of multiple proteins.

  12. Bio-inspired synthesis of ZnO polyhedral single crystals under eggshell membrane direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Huilan; Song, Fang; Dong, Qun; Li, Tuoqi; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Di [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai (China)

    2011-07-15

    A simple and versatile technique was developed to prepare hierarchical ZnO single crystals by introducing eggshell membrane (ESM) to a bio-inspired approach. Based on the control of nucleation and gestation, ZnO nanocrystallites could grow at three dimensions into polyhedral single crystals through a surface sol-gel process followed by a calcination treatment. Different from traditional wet chemical techniques, our synthetic process depends more on the restrictive or directing functions of the ESM biomacromolecules. The hierarchical ZnO nanostructures doped with polyhedral single crystallites could be desirable for catalysts, photoelectrochemical devices, especially solar cells. (orig.)

  13. Colocalization of Multiple DNA Loci: A Physical Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Valentino; Scialdone, Antonio; Nicodemi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    A variety of important cellular processes require, for functional purposes, the colocalization of multiple DNA loci at specific time points. In most cases, the physical mechanisms responsible for bringing them in close proximity are still elusive. Here we show that the interaction of DNA loci with a concentration of diffusing molecular factors can induce spontaneously their colocalization, through a mechanism based on a thermodynamic phase transition. We consider up to four DNA loci and different valencies for diffusing molecular factors. In particular, our analysis illustrates that a variety of nontrivial stable spatial configurations is allowed in the system, depending on the details of the molecular factor/DNA binding-sites interaction. Finally, we discuss as a case study an application of our model to the pairing of X chromosome at X inactivation, one of the best-known examples of DNA colocalization. We also speculate on the possible links between X colocalization and inactivation. PMID:23200056

  14. Designing for social play in co-located mobile games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, William; Garner, Jayden; Jensen, Mads Møller

    2016-01-01

    of mobile, social, and colocated elements. Subsequently, we analyse and discuss this data to identify generalisability in these games. In our discussion we identify how these findings address game design problems of designing collaborative games. Furthermore, we contribute to theory of designing for social......In this paper we explore how mobile devices and co-location in mobile contexts contribute social play in game design, addressing the limited understanding of social interactivity in mobile games. Using the Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics (MDA) framework, we code four games illustrating effective use...... play from the perspectives of co-located mobile contexts in game design by identifying how mobility: (1) affords co-locating with other players in public spaces, (2) supports physical interactions using spatial context and players bodies, extending games beyond their formal system, (3) supports...

  15. Mining Co-Location Patterns from Spatial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C.; Xiao, W. D.; Tang, D. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the widespread application of geographic information systems (GIS) and GPS technology and the increasingly mature infrastructure for data collection, sharing, and integration, more and more research domains have gained access to high-quality geographic data and created new ways to incorporate spatial information and analysis in various studies. There is an urgent need for effective and efficient methods to extract unknown and unexpected information, e.g., co-location patterns, from spatial datasets of high dimensionality and complexity. A co-location pattern is defined as a subset of spatial items whose instances are often located together in spatial proximity. Current co-location mining algorithms are unable to quantify the spatial proximity of a co-location pattern. We propose a co-location pattern miner aiming to discover co-location patterns in a multidimensional spatial data by measuring the cohesion of a pattern. We present a model to measure the cohesion in an attempt to improve the efficiency of existing methods. The usefulness of our method is demonstrated by applying them on the publicly available spatial data of the city of Antwerp in Belgium. The experimental results show that our method is more efficient than existing methods.

  16. On the origin of the polyhedral protein of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Autographa californica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van der C.P.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the origin of the polyhedral protein of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the alfalfa looper, Autographa californica (AcNPV), one of the best characterized viruses of the family Baculoviridae. The present knowledge of the

  17. Polybenzimidazole and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane composite membranes for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Allward, Todd; Alfaro, Silvia Martinez

    2014-01-01

    Composite membranes based on poly(2,2′(m-phenylene)-5,5́bibenzimidazole) (PBI) and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (S-POSS) with S-POSS contents of 5 and 10wt.% were prepared by solution casting as base materials for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. With membranes...

  18. A Rare Colocalization of Lichen Planus and Vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Veitch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual manifestation of vitiligo colocalizing with lichen planus (LP. A 76-year-old Greek male presented with a history of a red, scaly, itchy, asymmetrical patch located at the umbilicus within a well-demarcated depigmented macule of vitiligo. Histology showed features of a lichenoid interface dermatitis, favouring a diagnosis of LP. Colocalization of LP and vitiligo has rarely been reported in the literature. After reviewing the literature, we believe that at present there is insufficient evidence to resolve the uncertainties in the aetiology of this colocalization. It seems to us that the association between LP and vitiligo is more than coincidental, but none of the theories discussed in this paper can sufficiently account for it. Rather, the association is likely to be multifactorial in its pathogenesis.

  19. Seeing an Embodied Virtual Hand is Analgesic Contingent on Colocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierula, Birgit; Martini, Matteo; Matamala-Gomez, Marta; Slater, Mel; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V

    2017-06-01

    Seeing one's own body has been reported to have analgesic properties. Analgesia has also been described when seeing an embodied virtual body colocated with the real one. However, there is controversy regarding whether this effect holds true when seeing an illusory-owned body part, such as during the rubber-hand illusion. A critical difference between these paradigms is the distance between the real and surrogate body part. Colocation of the real and surrogate arm is possible in an immersive virtual environment, but not during illusory ownership of a rubber arm. The present study aimed at testing whether the distance between a real and a virtual arm can explain such differences in terms of pain modulation. Using a paradigm of embodiment of a virtual body allowed us to evaluate heat pain thresholds at colocation and at a 30-cm distance between the real and the virtual arm. We observed a significantly higher heat pain threshold at colocation than at a 30-cm distance. The analgesic effects of seeing a virtual colocated arm were eliminated by increasing the distance between the real and the virtual arm, which explains why seeing an illusorily owned rubber arm does not consistently result in analgesia. These findings are relevant for the use of virtual reality in pain management. Looking at a virtual body has analgesic properties similar to looking at one's real body. We identify the importance of colocation between a real and a surrogate body for this to occur and thereby resolve a scientific controversy. This information is useful for exploiting immersive virtual reality in pain management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The colocalization transition of homologous chromosomes at meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemi, Mario; Panning, Barbara; Prisco, Antonella

    2008-06-01

    Meiosis is the specialized cell division required in sexual reproduction. During its early stages, in the mother cell nucleus, homologous chromosomes recognize each other and colocalize in a crucial step that remains one of the most mysterious of meiosis. Starting from recent discoveries on the system molecular components and interactions, we discuss a statistical mechanics model of chromosome early pairing. Binding molecules mediate long-distance interaction of special DNA recognition sequences and, if their concentration exceeds a critical threshold, they induce a spontaneous colocalization transition of chromosomes, otherwise independently diffusing.

  1. Anderson localization and colocalization of spatially entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2012-10-01

    We explore the propagation of light in a two-photon state in disordered optical systems that induce Anderson localization. We show that entangled-photon pairs demonstrate a surprising behavior that we call Anderson colocalization: While neither photon exhibits Anderson localization, the spatial correlations of the pair remain intact. Furthermore, we show that entangled-photon pairs colocalize faster than classical light localizes in the same system. We also explore the propagation of anticorrelated and partially entangled photon pairs in such systems. The results are developed using a linear systems theory that extends the scope of quantum imaging to incorporate disordered systems.

  2. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Polyhedral Borane Anions and Aluminum-Ammonia-Borane Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Safronov, Alexander V.; Lee, Han Beak; Wu, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Phase 1. Hydrolysis of borohydride compounds offer the potential for significant hydrogen storage capacity, but most work to date has focused on one particular anion, BH4-, which requires high pH for stability. Other borohydride compounds, in particular polyhedral borane anions offer comparable hydrogen storage capacity without requiring high pH media and their long term thermal and hydrolytic stability coupled with non-toxic nature make them a very attractive alternative to NaBH4. The University of Missouri project provided the overall program focal point for the investigation of catalytic hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions for hydrogen release. Due to their inherent stability, a transition metal catalyst was necessary for the hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions. Transition metal ions such as cobalt, nickel, palladium and rhodium were investigated for their catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of nido-KB11H14, closo-K2B10H10, and closo-K2B12H12. The rate of hydrolysis follows first-order kinetics with respect to the concentration of the polyhedral borane anion and surface area of the rhodium catalyst. The rate of hydrolysis depends upon a) choice of polyhedral borane anion, c) concentration of polyhedral borane anion, d) surface area of the rhodium catalyst and e) temperature of the reaction. In all cases the yield of hydrogen was 100% which corresponds to ~7 wt% of hydrogen (based on material wt%). Phase 2. The phase 2 of program at the University of Missouri was focused upon developing aluminum ammonia-boranes (Al-AB) as chemical hydrogen storage materials, specifically their synthesis and studies of their dehydrogenation. The ammonia borane molecule (AB) is a demonstrated source of chemically stored hydrogen (19.6 wt%) which meets DOE performance parameters except for its regeneration from spent AB and elemental hydrogen. The presence of an aluminum center bonded to multiple AB residues might combine the efficiency of AB dehydrogenation with an aluminum

  3. Gravity Anomalies of Arbitrary 3D Polyhedral Bodies with Horizontal and Vertical Mass Contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Chen, Chaojian; Pan, Kejia; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Maurer, Hansruedi; Tang, Jingtian

    2017-03-01

    During the last 15 years, more attention has been paid to derive analytic formulae for the gravitational potential and field of polyhedral mass bodies with complicated polynomial density contrasts, because such formulae can be more suitable to approximate the true mass density variations of the earth (e.g., sedimentary basins and bedrock topography) than methods that use finer volume discretization and constant density contrasts. In this study, we derive analytic formulae for gravity anomalies of arbitrary polyhedral bodies with complicated polynomial density contrasts in 3D space. The anomalous mass density is allowed to vary in both horizontal and vertical directions in a polynomial form of λ =ax^m+by^n+cz^t, where m, n, t are nonnegative integers and a, b, c are coefficients of mass density. First, the singular volume integrals of the gravity anomalies are transformed to regular or weakly singular surface integrals over each polygon of the polyhedral body. Then, in terms of the derived singularity-free analytic formulae of these surface integrals, singularity-free analytic formulae for gravity anomalies of arbitrary polyhedral bodies with horizontal and vertical polynomial density contrasts are obtained. For an arbitrary polyhedron, we successfully derived analytic formulae of the gravity potential and the gravity field in the case of m≤ 1, n≤ 1, t≤ 1, and an analytic formula of the gravity potential in the case of m=n=t=2. For a rectangular prism, we derive an analytic formula of the gravity potential for m≤ 3, n≤ 3 and t≤ 3 and closed forms of the gravity field are presented for m≤ 1, n≤ 1 and t≤ 4. Besides generalizing previously published closed-form solutions for cases of constant and linear mass density contrasts to higher polynomial order, to our best knowledge, this is the first time that closed-form solutions are presented for the gravitational potential of a general polyhedral body with quadratic density contrast in all spatial

  4. Polyhedral models for generalized associahedra via Coxeter elements

    CERN Document Server

    Stella, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the theory of cluster algebras, S. Fomin and A. Zelevinsky have associated to each finite type root system a simple convex polytope called generalized associahedron. We give a new family of geometric realizations of these polytopes, associated with arbitrary orientations of the Dynkin diagram. Our construction uses a parametrization of cluster variables by their $g$-vectors explicitly computed by S.-W. Yang and A. Zelevinsky. We also show that our construction agrees with the one given by C. Hohlweg, C. Lange, H. Thomas in the setup of Cambrian fans developed by N. Reading and D. Speyer.

  5. Strict Anatomical Colocalization of Vitiligo and Elastolytic Granulomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Merino de Paz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is the most common depigmenting disorder, with a worldwide occurrence of 0.1–2% in the general population. Multiple conditions have been described colocalized in vitiligo patches, like psoriasis or lichen planus. However, actinic granuloma has not been described in association with vitiligo lesions so far.

  6. Analysis of three-dimensional image using Tutte polynomial for polyhedral graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez M., Alejandro

    2013-05-01

    All three-dimensional image, could be represented with a polyhedral graphs, where the number of edges and vertices is proportional to the quality of the image, and this image could be stored in an algebraic expression like a Tutte polynomial, allowing the reconstruction of any three-dimensional image. The Tutte polynomial is calculated using the package Graph Theory of Maple 16, which has been optimized for polyhedral graphs with a lot of edges and vertices, so this could be very useful with three-dimensional complex images or three-dimensional HD image. In this paper, I will present some examples of the useful Tutte polynomial, and for future work, I will investigate the use of Bollobás- Riordan polynomial.

  7. Controlled Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Uniform Hierarchical Polyhedral α-Fe2O3 Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Yang, Yong; Thi, Cao Minh; Phuc, Le Hong; Nogami, Masayuki

    2017-02-01

    The controlled synthesis of uniform hierarchical polyhedral iron (Fe) micro-/nanoscale oxide particles with the α-Fe2O3 structure is presented. The hierarchical polyhedral iron oxide particles were synthesized by modified polyol methods with sodium borohydride as a powerful and efficient reducing agent. A critical heat treatment process used during the synthesis allowed for the interesting formation of α-Fe2O3 hematite with a micro-/nanoscale structure. The structure and weak ferromagnetism of the α-Fe2O3 particles were investigated by x-ray diffraction with whole pattern fitting and Rietveld refinement, scanning electron microscopy, and by vibrating sample magnetometry. The as-prepared α-Fe2O3 particles and the three dimensional models presented have promising practical applications for energy storage and conversion in batteries, capacitors, and fuel cells, and related spintronic devices and technologies.

  8. Reactive bay functionalized perylene monoimide-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane organic electronic dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangatia Lodrick Makokha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation-induced quenching is particularly detrimental in perylene diimides, which are characterized by a near-unity fluorescence quantum yield in solution but are far less emissive in the solid state. Previously, perylene diimide has been improved by linking it to the inorganic cage of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes. As a further study on perylene diimidepolyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes, we report on a double functionalized molecular structure, which can be used for substitution at the bay area and as a side group in other materials. Typical solution absorption and emission features of the perylene diimide fragment have been observed in this new reactive perylene diimide-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane. Moreover, reduced stacking during aggregation and spherical particles exhibiting solid fluorescence have been obtained. Organic semiconducting material with enhanced solid state photophysical properties, like solid fluorescence is a subject of great interest owing to its possible high-tech applications in optoelectronic devices.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Polymers Containing Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Yao XU; Xiao Yan GAO; Shan Yi GUANG; Feng Zhi CHANG

    2005-01-01

    Hybrid polymers, poly(vinyl pyrrolidone-co-isobutyl styryl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes)s (PVP-POSS) were synthesized by one step polymerization and characterized using GPC and DSC. Addition of POSS significantly increases the Tg of polyvinylpyrrolidone at a fair high POSS content and obtained high molecular weight polymers with very narrow molecular distribution. The POSS content in the resulted hybrids can be controlled by varying the POSS feed ratio.

  10. Direct synthesis of hollow polyhedral ceria nano powders via a template-free mixed solvothermal route

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊亮; 颜雷鸣; 陈秀雷; 王绳芸; 张明; 田长安

    2015-01-01

    Novel mono-dispersed hollow polyhedral ceria nano powders with the average particle size of 250 nm were directly syn-thesized via a simple template-free mixed solvothermal method by using water-ethanol as the solvent. The formation of such hollow structure with the regular polyhedral particle shape was based on a solvent-controlled Ostwald ripening coupled self-templating proc-ess. The mixed solvent promoted the formation of the regular solid particles at the beginning of solvothermal reaction and drove the Ostwald ripening as the reaction went on. Owing to the Ostwald ripening and self-assembly of nano crystallites, ceria nano particles converted into the hollow structures with regular polyhedral shape during the solvothermal process just by increasing solvothermal reaction time. The as-synthesized hollow ceria nano powders exhibited strong absorptions in the UV-vis spectrum and the evaluated energy band gaps increased according to the shape evolution and size decrease of the nano particles, which demonstrated obvious blue shift effects.

  11. Self-assembly of uniform polyhedral silver nanocrystals into densest packings and exotic superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzie, Joel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Grünwald, Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science Division; Univ. of Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Chemistry; Geissler, Phillip L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science Division; Yang, Peidong [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2011-11-20

    Understanding how polyhedra pack into extended arrangements is integral to the design and discovery of crystalline materials at all length scales. Much progress has been made in enumerating and characterizing the packing of polyhedral shapes, and the self-assembly of polyhedral nanocrystals into ordered superstructures. However, directing the self-assembly of polyhedral nanocrystals into densest packings requires precise control of particle shape, polydispersity,interactions and driving forces. Here we show with experiment and computer simulation that a range of nanoscale Ag polyhedra can self-assemble into their conjectured densest packings. When passivated with adsorbing polymer, the polyhedra behave as quasi-hard particles and assemble into millimetre-sized three-dimensional supercrystals by sedimentation.We also show, by inducing depletion attraction through excess polymer in solution, that octahedra form an exotic superstructure with complex helical motifs rather than the densest Minkowski lattice. Such large-scale Ag supercrystals may facilitate the design of scalable three-dimensional plasmonic metamaterials for sensing, nanophotonics, and photocatalysis.

  12. Finite Automation

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This self-paced narrated tutorial covers the following about Finite Automata: Uses, Examples, Alphabet, strings, concatenation, powers of an alphabet, Languages (automata and formal languages), Deterministic finite automata (DFA) SW4600 Automata, Formal Specification and Run-time Verification

  13. Mimetic Finite Differences for Flow in Fractures from Microseismic Data

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for porous media flow in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach uses the Mimetic Finite Difference method (MFD) and takes advantage of MFD\\'s ability to solve over a general set of polyhedral cells. This flexibility is used to mesh fracture intersections in two and three-dimensional settings without creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how to use general polyhedra for embedding fracture boundaries in the reservoir domain. The target application is representing fracture networks inferred from microseismic analysis.

  14. Co-located collaborative visual analytics around a tabletop display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Petra; Fisher, Danyel; Paul, Sharoda A; Morris, Meredith Ringel; Inkpen, Kori; Czerwinski, Mary

    2012-05-01

    Co-located collaboration can be extremely valuable during complex visual analytics tasks. We present an exploratory study of a system designed to support collaborative visual analysis tasks on a digital tabletop display. Fifteen participant pairs employed Cambiera, a visual analytics system, to solve a problem involving 240 digital documents. Our analysis, supported by observations, system logs, questionnaires, and interview data, explores how pairs approached the problem around the table. We contribute a unique, rich understanding of how users worked together around the table and identify eight types of collaboration styles that can be used to identify how closely people work together while problem solving. We show how the closeness of teams’ collaboration and communication influenced how they performed on the task overall. We further discuss the role of the tabletop for visual analytics tasks and derive design implications for future co-located collaborative tabletop problem solving systems.

  15. An Adaptive Method for Mining Hierarchical Spatial Co-location Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAI Jiannan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mining spatial co-location patterns plays a key role in spatial data mining. Spatial co-location patterns refer to subsets of features whose objects are frequently located in close geographic proximity. Due to spatial heterogeneity, spatial co-location patterns are usually not the same across geographic space. However, existing methods are mainly designed to discover global spatial co-location patterns, and not suitable for detecting regional spatial co-location patterns. On that account, an adaptive method for mining hierarchical spatial co-location patterns is proposed in this paper. Firstly, global spatial co-location patterns are detected and other non-prevalent co-location patterns are identified as candidate regional co-location patterns. Then, for each candidate pattern, adaptive spatial clustering method is used to delineate localities of that pattern in the study area, and participation ratio is utilized to measure the prevalence of the candidate co-location pattern. Finally, an overlap operation is developed to deduce localities of (k+1-size co-location patterns from localities of k-size co-location patterns. Experiments on both simulated and real-life datasets show that the proposed method is effective for detecting hierarchical spatial co-location patterns.

  16. Improvement of prediction accuracy of large eddy simulation on colocated grids; Colocation koshi wo mochiita LES no keisan seido kaizen ni kansuru ichikosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, M.; Abe, K. [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan)

    1998-07-25

    With the recent advances in computers, large eddy simulation (LES) has become applicable to engineering prediction. However, most cases of the engineering applications need to use the nonorthgonal curvilimear coordinate systems. The staggered grids, usually used in LES in the orthgonal coordinates, don`t keep conservative properties in the nonorthgonal curvilinear coordinates. On the other hand, the colocated grids can be applied in the nonorthgonal curvilinear coordinates without losing its conservative properties, although its prediction accuracy isn`t so high as the staggered grid`s in the orthgonal coordinates especially with the coarse grids. In this research, the discretization method of the colocated grids is modified to improve its prediction accuracy. Plane channel flows are simulated on four grids of different resolution using the modified colocated grids and the original colocated grids. The results show that the modified colocated grids have higher accuracy than the original colocated grids. 17 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  17. The Galerkin finite element method for a multi-term time-fractional diffusion equation

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Bangti

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Authors. We consider the initial/boundary value problem for a diffusion equation involving multiple time-fractional derivatives on a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyze a space semidiscrete scheme based on the standard Galerkin finite element method using continuous piecewise linear functions. Nearly optimal error estimates for both cases of initial data and inhomogeneous term are derived, which cover both smooth and nonsmooth data. Further we develop a fully discrete scheme based on a finite difference discretization of the time-fractional derivatives, and discuss its stability and error estimate. Extensive numerical experiments for one- and two-dimensional problems confirm the theoretical convergence rates.

  18. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuno Natsume

    Full Text Available Giant vesicles (GVs encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of "crowding effect" which is the entropic interaction in the cell.

  19. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Yuno; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Giant vesicles (GVs) encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of "crowding effect" which is the entropic interaction in the cell.

  20. Thermo-mechanical characterization of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polystyrene composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, Ignazio, E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it; Bottino, Francesco A., E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it; Cicala, Gianluca, E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it; Cozzo, Giulia, E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it; Latteri, Alberta, E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it; Recca, Antonino, E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    The thermal and mechanical properties of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polystyrene (ph,hib-POSS/PS) composite were studied and compared with those of pristine polymer. ph,hib-POSS/PS system was prepared by solubilization and precipitation of Polystyrene (PS) in the presence of POSS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was performed to check the distribution of the filler in the polymer matrix. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was carried out to measure viscoelastic properties of solid samples. Degradations were carried out into a thermobalance and the obtained thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves were discussed and interpreted.

  1. Formation of polyhedral vesicles and polygonal membrane tubes induced by banana-shaped proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The shape transformations of fluid membranes induced by curved protein rods are studied using meshless membrane simulations. The rod assembly at low rod density induces a flat membrane tube and oblate vesicle. It is found that the polyhedral shapes are stabilized at high rod densities. The discrete shape transition between triangular and buckled discoidal tubes is obtained and their curvature energies are analyzed by a simple geometric model. For vesicles, triangular hosohedron and elliptic-disk shapes are formed in equilibrium, whereas tetrahedral and triangular prism shapes are obtained as metastable states.

  2. Thermo-mechanical characterization of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polystyrene composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Ignazio; Bottino, Francesco A.; Cicala, Gianluca; Cozzo, Giulia; Latteri, Alberta; Recca, Antonino

    2014-05-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polystyrene (ph,hib-POSS/PS) composite were studied and compared with those of pristine polymer. ph,hib-POSS/PS system was prepared by solubilization and precipitation of Polystyrene (PS) in the presence of POSS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was performed to check the distribution of the filler in the polymer matrix. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was carried out to measure viscoelastic properties of solid samples. Degradations were carried out into a thermobalance and the obtained thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves were discussed and interpreted.

  3. The r-step Fibonacci-Hurwitz sequences in the binary polyhedral group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveci, Ömür; Ćiçekci, Deniz

    2016-04-01

    In [1], Deveci et al. defined the r-step Fibonacci-Hurwitz sequences from the Hurwitz matrices obtained from the characteristic polynomial of the k-step Fibonacci sequence. Also, they extended the r-step Fibonacci-Hurwitz sequences to groups. In this work, we obtain the periods of the r-step Fibonacci-Hurwitz sequences in the binary polyhedral group for generating triple {x, y, z} and generating pair {y, z} by the aid of the periods of the r-step Fibonacci-Hurwitz sequences according to modulo m.

  4. Co-location opportunities for renewable energy and agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Sujith; Macknick, Jordan; Lobell, David; Field, Christopher; Elchinger, Michael; Stoltenberg, Blaise

    2015-04-01

    Solar energy installations in arid and semi-arid regions are rapidly increasing, due to technological advances and policy changes. Large-scale expansion of solar infrastructure can adversely impact land and water resources. A major challenge is how to meet the ever-expanding energy demand with limited land and water resources, in the context of increasing competition from agricultural and domestic consumption. We explored opportunities to co-locate solar infrastructures and agricultural crops or biofuel feedstocks to maximize the efficiency of land and water use. We considered energy inputs/outputs, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and economics of solar installations in comparison to location-specific agricultural /biofuel crops in different arid regions of the world. The life cycle analyses show that co-located systems are economically viable in some areas and may provide opportunities for electrification and stimulate economic growth in rural areas. The water inputs for cleaning solar panels (photo voltaic) or mirrors (concentrated solar) and dust suppression are similar to amounts required for the desert-adapted crops (e.g. agave, aloe) considered in the study, suggesting the possibility of integrating the two systems to maximize water and land use efficiency. A life-cycle analysis of a hypothetical co-location indicated higher returns per m3 of water used than either system alone. Arid and semi arid regions of the world are experiencing high population growth, creating additional demand for land and water resources. In these water limited areas, coupled solar infrastructure and agriculture could be established on marginal lands, thus minimizing the socioeconomic and environmental issues resulting from cultivation of high value non-food crops in prime agricultural lands.

  5. Colocalization of synapsin and actin during synaptic vesicle recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloom, Ona; Evergren, Emma; Tomilin, Nikolay;

    2003-01-01

    activity, however, synapsin was detected in the pool of vesicles proximal to the active zone. In addition, actin and synapsin were found colocalized in a dynamic filamentous cytomatrix at the sites of synaptic vesicle recycling, endocytic zones. Synapsin immunolabeling was not associated with clathrin......-coated intermediates but was found on vesicles that appeared to be recycling back to the cluster. Disruption of synapsin function by microinjection of antisynapsin antibodies resulted in a prominent reduction of the cytomatrix at endocytic zones of active synapses. Our data suggest that in addition to its known...

  6. Adipophilin distribution and colocalization with lipid droplets in skeletal muscle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shaw, Christopher S

    2009-05-01

    Intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) are stored as discrete lipid droplets which are associated with a number of proteins. The lipid droplet-associated protein adipophilin (the human orthologue of adipose differentiation-related protein) is ubiquitously expressed and is one of the predominant lipid droplet-proteins in skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the subcellular distribution of adipophilin in human muscle fibres and to measure the colocalization of adipophilin with IMCL. Muscle biopsies from six lean male cyclists (BMI 23.4 +\\/- 0.4, aged 31 +\\/- 2 years, W (max) 346 +\\/- 8) were stained for myosin heavy chain type 1, IMCL, adipophilin and mitochondria using immunofluorescence and viewed with widefield and confocal fluorescence microscopy. The present study shows that like IMCL, the adipophilin content is ~twofold greater in type I skeletal muscle fibres and is situated in the areas between the mitochondrial network. Colocalization analysis demonstrated that 61 +\\/- 2% of IMCL contain adipophilin. Although the majority of adipophilin is contained within IMCL, 36 +\\/- 4% of adipophilin is not associated with IMCL. In conclusion, this study indicates that the IMCL pool is heterogeneous, as the majority but not all IMCL contain adipophilin.

  7. A Featureless Approach to 3D Polyhedral Building Modeling from Aerial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Hammoudi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model-based approach for reconstructing 3D polyhedral building models from aerial images. The proposed approach exploits some geometric and photometric properties resulting from the perspective projection of planar structures. Data are provided by calibrated aerial images. The novelty of the approach lies in its featurelessness and in its use of direct optimization based on image rawbrightness. The proposed framework avoids feature extraction and matching. The 3D polyhedral model is directly estimated by optimizing an objective function that combines an image-based dissimilarity measure and a gradient score over several aerial images. The optimization process is carried out by the Differential Evolution algorithm. The proposed approach is intended to provide more accurate 3D reconstruction than feature-based approaches. Fast 3D model rectification and updating can take advantage of the proposed method. Several results and evaluations of performance from real and synthetic images show the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach.

  8. Towards reproducible experimental studies for non-convex polyhedral shaped particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Daniel N.; Pizette, Patrick; Govender, Nicolin; Abriak, Nor-Edine

    2017-06-01

    The packing density and flat bottomed hopper discharge of non-convex polyhedral particles are investigated in a systematic experimental study. The motivation for this study is two-fold. Firstly, to establish an approach to deliver quality experimental particle packing data for non-convex polyhedral particles that can be used for characterization and validation purposes of discrete element codes. Secondly, to make the reproducibility of experimental setups as convenient and readily available as possible using affordable and accessible technology. The primary technology for this study is fused deposition modeling used to 3D print polylactic acid (PLA) particles using readily available 3D printer technology. A total of 8000 biodegradable particles were printed, 1000 white particles and 1000 black particles for each of the four particle types considered in this study. Reproducibility is one benefit of using fused deposition modeling to print particles, but an extremely important additional benefit is that specific particle properties can be explicitly controlled. As an example in this study the volume fraction of each particle can be controlled i.e. the effective particle density can be adjusted. In this study the particle volumes reduces drastically as the non-convexity is increased, however all printed white particles in this study have the same mass within 2% of each other.

  9. Towards reproducible experimental studies for non-convex polyhedral shaped particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Daniel N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The packing density and flat bottomed hopper discharge of non-convex polyhedral particles are investigated in a systematic experimental study. The motivation for this study is two-fold. Firstly, to establish an approach to deliver quality experimental particle packing data for non-convex polyhedral particles that can be used for characterization and validation purposes of discrete element codes. Secondly, to make the reproducibility of experimental setups as convenient and readily available as possible using affordable and accessible technology. The primary technology for this study is fused deposition modeling used to 3D print polylactic acid (PLA particles using readily available 3D printer technology. A total of 8000 biodegradable particles were printed, 1000 white particles and 1000 black particles for each of the four particle types considered in this study. Reproducibility is one benefit of using fused deposition modeling to print particles, but an extremely important additional benefit is that specific particle properties can be explicitly controlled. As an example in this study the volume fraction of each particle can be controlled i.e. the effective particle density can be adjusted. In this study the particle volumes reduces drastically as the non-convexity is increased, however all printed white particles in this study have the same mass within 2% of each other.

  10. SURFACE FINITE ELEMENTS FOR PARABOLIC EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Dziuk; C.M. Elliott

    2007-01-01

    In this article we define a surface finite element method (SFEM) for the numerical solution of parabolic partial differential equations on hypersurfaces Γ in (R)n+1. The key idea is based on the approximation of Γ by a polyhedral surface Γh consisting of a union of simplices (triangles for n = 2, intervals for n = 1) with vertices on Γ. A finite element space of functions is then defined by taking the continuous functions on Γh which are linear affine on each simplex of the polygonal surface. We use surface gradients to define weak forms of elliptic operators and naturally generate weak formulations of elliptic and parabolic equations on Γ. Our finite element method is applied to weak forms of the equations. The computation of the mass and element stiffness matrices are simple and straightforward.We give an example of error bounds in the case of semi-discretization in space for a fourth order linear problem. Numerical experiments are described for several linear and nonlinear partial differential equations. In particular the power of the method is demonstrated by employing it to solve highly nonlinear second and fourth order problems such as surface Allen-Cahn and Cahn-Hilliard equations and surface level set equations for geodesic mean curvature flow.

  11. Combination of the discontinuous Galerkin method with finite differences for simulation of seismic wave propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisitsa, Vadim, E-mail: lisitsavv@ipgg.sbras.ru [Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tcheverda, Vladimir [Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kazakh–British Technical University, Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan); Botter, Charlotte [University of Stavanger (Norway)

    2016-04-15

    We present an algorithm for the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation in models with a complex near surface part and free surface topography. The approach is based on the combination of finite differences with the discontinuous Galerkin method. The discontinuous Galerkin method can be used on polyhedral meshes; thus, it is easy to handle the complex surfaces in the models. However, this approach is computationally intense in comparison with finite differences. Finite differences are computationally efficient, but in general, they require rectangular grids, leading to the stair-step approximation of the interfaces, which causes strong diffraction of the wavefield. In this research we present a hybrid algorithm where the discontinuous Galerkin method is used in a relatively small upper part of the model and finite differences are applied to the main part of the model.

  12. Finite superstrings

    CERN Document Server

    Restuccia, A; Taylor, J G

    1992-01-01

    This is the first complete account of the construction and finiteness analysis of multi-loop scattering amplitudes for superstrings, and of the guarantee that for certain superstrings (in particular the heterotic one), the symmetries of the theory in the embedding space-time are those of the super-poincaré group SP10 and that the multi-loop amplitudes are each finite. The book attempts to be self-contained in its analysis, although it draws on the works of many researchers. It also presents the first complete field theory for such superstrings. As such it demonstrates that gravity can be quant

  13. Efficient light-emitting devices based on platinum-complexes-anchored polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane materials

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2010-08-24

    The synthesis, photophysical, and electrochemical characterization of macromolecules, consisting of an emissive platinum complex and carbazole moieties covalently attached to a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) core, is reported. Organic light-emitting devices based on these POSS materials exhibit a peak external quantum efficiency of ca. 8%, which is significantly higher than that of the analogous devices with a physical blend of the platinum complexes and a polymer matrix, and they represent noticeable improvement in the device efficiency of solution-processable phosphorescent excimer devices. Furthermore, the ratio of monomer and excimer/aggregate electroluminescent emission intensity, as well as the device efficiency, increases as the platinum complex moiety presence on the POSS macromolecules decreases. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Efficiency of the estimate refinement method for polyhedral approximation of multidimensional balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenev, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    The estimate refinement method for the polyhedral approximation of convex compact bodies is analyzed. When applied to convex bodies with a smooth boundary, this method is known to generate polytopes with an optimal order of growth of the number of vertices and facets depending on the approximation error. In previous studies, for the approximation of a multidimensional ball, the convergence rates of the method were estimated in terms of the number of faces of all dimensions and the cardinality of the facial structure (the norm of the f-vector) of the constructed polytope was shown to have an optimal rate of growth. In this paper, the asymptotic convergence rate of the method with respect to faces of all dimensions is compared with the convergence rate of best approximation polytopes. Explicit expressions are obtained for the asymptotic efficiency, including the case of low dimensions. Theoretical estimates are compared with numerical results.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of luminescent organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposite from polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan

    2010-01-01

    A novel polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-based organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposite (EF-POSS) was prepared by Pt-catalyzed hydrosilylation reaction of octahydridosilsesquioxane (T8H8, POSS) with a luminescent substituted acetylene (2-ethynyl-7-(4-(4-methylstyryl)styryl)-9,9-dioctyl-9H-fluorene (EF)) in high yield. The hybrid nanocomposite was soluble in common solvents such as CH2Cl2, CHCl3, THF and 1,4-dioxane. Its structure and property were characterized by FTIR, NMR, TGA, UV and PL, respectively. The results show that the hybrid nanocomposite with high thermal stability emits stable blue light as a result of photo excitation and possesses high photoluminescence quantum efficiency (φfL).

  16. Properties of PMR Polyimides Improved by Preparation of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandi G.; Lee, Andre

    2005-01-01

    The field of hybrid organic-inorganic materials has grown drastically over the last several years. This interest stems from our ever-increasing ability to custom-build and control molecular structure at several length scales. This ability to control both the composition and structure of hybrid materials is sometimes broadly referred to as nanocomposite systems. One class of hybrid (organic-inorganic) nanostructured material is polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS), shown in the preceding diagram. The hybrid composition gives POSS materials dramatically enhanced properties relative to traditional hydrocarbons and inorganics. An important benefit of this technology is that it makes possible the formulations of nanostructured chemicals with excellent thermal and oxidative stability. This is largely due to the inorganic component.

  17. Development of highly open polyhedral networks from vitreous carbon for orthopaedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güiza-Argüello, V.; Bayona-Becerra, M.; Cruz-Orellana, S.; Córdoba-Tuta, E.

    2017-01-01

    Highly open polyhedral networks were fabricated using an economical and environmentally friendly template route. Recycled cellulose foams were impregnated with a sucrose resin and then pyrolyzed in order to produce reticulated vitreous carbon foams with morphological features that closely resemble trabecular bone. Also, cell sizes ~1mm were achieved, a trait that will allow the mechanical reinforcement of such scaffolds using a biomaterial coating without compromising the pore size that favors osteoblast cell infiltration and growth (200-500µm). Moreover, initial studies showed that carbonization conditions have an effect on the mechanical properties of the synthesized foams and, therefore, such process parameters could be further evaluated towards the enhancement of the mechanical resistance of the scaffolds. The materials developed here are visualized as the porous component of a synthetic bone graft with features that could help overcome the current limitations associated with the medical treatments used for bone defect repair.

  18. Tunable Gravimetric and Volumetric Hydrogen Storage Capacities in Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Amol; Chiu, Cheng-Chau; Chen, Yun-Wen; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2016-09-28

    We study the hydrogen adsorption in porous frameworks composed of silsesquioxane cages linked via boron substituted aromatic structures by first-principles modeling. Such polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) frameworks can be further modified by decorating them with metal atoms binding to the ring structures of the linkers. We have considered Sc- and Ti-doped frameworks which bind H2 via so-called Kubas interaction between hydrogen molecules and transition metal atoms. It will be demonstrated that the maximum H2 gravimetric capacity can be improved to more than 7.5 wt % by using longer linkers with more ring structures. However, the maximum H2 volumetric capacity can be tuned to more than 70 g/L by varying the size of silsesquioxane cages. We are optimistic that by varying the building blocks, POSS frameworks can be modified to meet the targets for the gravimetric and volumetric capacities set by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. Understanding Controls on Wetting at Fluorinated Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polymer Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yi; Tian, Ming; Zhang, Chen; Du, Zhongjie; Mi, Jianguo

    2016-01-12

    Fluorinated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (F-POSS) nanoparticles have been widely used to enhance the hydrophobicity or oleophobicity of polymer films via constructing the specific micro/nanoscale roughness. In this work, we study the oleophobicity of pure and F-POSS-decorated poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films using a dynamic density functional theory approach. The role of nanoparticle size and coverage and the chemical features of F-POSS and the polymer film in the wetting behavior of diiodomethane droplets has been integrated to the remaining ratio of surface potential to quantitatively characterize the corner effect. It is shown that, on the basis of universal force field parameters, the theoretically predicted contact angles are in general agreement with the available experimental data.

  20. Biodiesel production from microalgae: co-location with sugar mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrey, Christian; Kochergin, Vadim

    2012-03-01

    Co-location of algae production facilities with cane sugar mills can be a technically advantageous path towards production of biodiesel. Algal biodiesel production was integrated with cane sugar production in the material and energy balance simulation program Sugars™. A model was developed that allowed comparison of production scenarios involving dewatering the algae to 20% ds (dry solids) or 30% ds prior to thermal drying. The net energy ratio, E(R) (energy produced/energy consumed) of the proposed process was found to be 1.5. A sensitivity analysis showed that this number ranged from 0.9 to 1.7 when the range of values for oil content, CO(2) utilization, oil conversion, and harvest density reported in the literature were evaluated. By utilizing available waste-resources from a 10,000 ton/d cane sugar mill, a 530 ha algae farm can produce 5.8 million L of biodiesel/yr and reduce CO(2) emissions of the mill by 15% without the need for fossil fuels.

  1. Surveying co-located space geodesy techniques for ITRF computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, P.; Sillard, P.; Vittuari, L.

    2003-04-01

    We present a comprehensive operational methodology, based on classical geodesy triangulation and trilateration, that allows the determination of reference points of the five space geodesy techniques used in ITRF computation (i.e.: DORIS, GPS, LLR, SLR, VLBI). Most of the times, for a single technique, the reference point is not accessible and measurable directly. Likewise, no mechanically determined ex-center with respect to an external and measurable point is usually given. In these cases, it is not possible to directly measure the sought reference points and it is even less straightforward to obtain the statistical information relating these points for different techniques. We outline the most general practical surveying methodology that permits to recover the reference points of the different techniques regardless of their physical materialization. We also give a detailed analytical approach for less straightforward cases (e.g.: non geodetic VLBI antennae and SLR/LLR systems). We stress the importance of surveying instrumentation and procedure in achieving the best possible results and outline the impact of the information retrieved with our method in ITRF computation. In particular, we will give numerical examples of computation of the reference point of VLBI antennae (Ny Aalesund and Medicina) and the ex-centre vector computation linking co-located VLBI and GPS techniques in Medicina (Italy). A special attention was paid to the rigorous derivation of statistical elements. They will be presented in an other presentation.

  2. Co-Located Collaborative Learning Video Game with Single Display Groupware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Cristian; Weitz, Juan; Reyes, Tomas; Nussbaum, Miguel; Gomez, Florencia; Radovic, Darinka

    2010-01-01

    Role Game is a co-located CSCL video game played by three students sitting at one machine sharing a single screen, each with their own input device. Inspired by video console games, Role Game enables students to learn by doing, acquiring social abilities and mastering subject matter in a context of co-located collaboration. After describing the…

  3. Co-Orientation: Quantifying Simultaneous Co-Localization and Orientational Alignment of Filaments in Light Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, R.P.J.; Nahidiazar, L.; Manders, E.M.M.; Jalink, K.; Stallinga, S.; Rieger, B.

    2015-01-01

    Co-localization analysis is a widely used tool to seek evidence for functional interactions between molecules in different color channels in microscopic images. Here we extend the basic co-localization analysis by including the orientations of the structures on which the molecules reside. We refer t

  4. New Regional Co-location Pattern Mining Method Using Fuzzy Definition of Neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akbari

    Full Text Available Regional co-location patterns represent subsets of object types that are located together in space (i.e. region. Discovering regional spatial co-location patterns is an important problem with many application domains. There are different methods in this ...

  5. IGFBP3 colocalizes with and regulates hypocretin (orexin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Honda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sleep disorder narcolepsy is caused by a vast reduction in neurons producing the hypocretin (orexin neuropeptides. Based on the tight association with HLA, narcolepsy is believed to result from an autoimmune attack, but the cause of hypocretin cell loss is still unknown. We performed gene expression profiling in the hypothalamus to identify novel genes dysregulated in narcolepsy, as these may be the target of autoimmune attack or modulate hypocretin gene expression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used microarrays to compare the transcriptome in the posterior hypothalamus of (1 narcoleptic versus control postmortem human brains and (2 transgenic mice lacking hypocretin neurons versus wild type mice. Hypocretin was the most downregulated gene in human narcolepsy brains. Among many additional candidates, only one, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3, was downregulated in both human and mouse models and co-expressed in hypocretin neurons. Functional analysis indicated decreased hypocretin messenger RNA and peptide content, and increased sleep in transgenic mice overexpressing human IGFBP3, an effect possibly mediated through decreased hypocretin promotor activity in the presence of excessive IGFBP3. Although we found no IGFBP3 autoantibodies nor a genetic association with IGFBP3 polymorphisms in human narcolepsy, we found that an IGFBP3 polymorphism known to increase serum IGFBP3 levels was associated with lower CSF hypocretin-1 in normal individuals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Comparison of the transcriptome in narcolepsy and narcolepsy model mouse brains revealed a novel dysregulated gene which colocalized in hypocretin cells. Functional analysis indicated that the identified IGFBP3 is a new regulator of hypocretin cell physiology that may be involved not only in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy, but also in the regulation of sleep in normal individuals, most notably during adolescence. Further studies are

  6. Dual channel rank-based intensity weighting for quantitative co-localization of microscopy images

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Singan, Vasanth R

    2011-10-21

    Abstract Background Accurate quantitative co-localization is a key parameter in the context of understanding the spatial co-ordination of molecules and therefore their function in cells. Existing co-localization algorithms consider either the presence of co-occurring pixels or correlations of intensity in regions of interest. Depending on the image source, and the algorithm selected, the co-localization coefficients determined can be highly variable, and often inaccurate. Furthermore, this choice of whether co-occurrence or correlation is the best approach for quantifying co-localization remains controversial. Results We have developed a novel algorithm to quantify co-localization that improves on and addresses the major shortcomings of existing co-localization measures. This algorithm uses a non-parametric ranking of pixel intensities in each channel, and the difference in ranks of co-localizing pixel positions in the two channels is used to weight the coefficient. This weighting is applied to co-occurring pixels thereby efficiently combining both co-occurrence and correlation. Tests with synthetic data sets show that the algorithm is sensitive to both co-occurrence and correlation at varying levels of intensity. Analysis of biological data sets demonstrate that this new algorithm offers high sensitivity, and that it is capable of detecting subtle changes in co-localization, exemplified by studies on a well characterized cargo protein that moves through the secretory pathway of cells. Conclusions This algorithm provides a novel way to efficiently combine co-occurrence and correlation components in biological images, thereby generating an accurate measure of co-localization. This approach of rank weighting of intensities also eliminates the need for manual thresholding of the image, which is often a cause of error in co-localization quantification. We envisage that this tool will facilitate the quantitative analysis of a wide range of biological data sets

  7. Colocated MIMO Radar: Beamforming, Waveform design, and Target Parameter Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Jardak, Seifallah

    2014-04-01

    Thanks to its improved capabilities, the Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) radar is attracting the attention of researchers and practitioners alike. Because it transmits orthogonal or partially correlated waveforms, this emerging technology outperformed the phased array radar by providing better parametric identifiability, achieving higher spatial resolution, and designing complex beampatterns. To avoid jamming and enhance the signal to noise ratio, it is often interesting to maximize the transmitted power in a given region of interest and minimize it elsewhere. This problem is known as the transmit beampattern design and is usually tackled as a two-step process: a transmit covariance matrix is firstly designed by minimizing a convex optimization problem, which is then used to generate practical waveforms. In this work, we propose simple novel methods to generate correlated waveforms using finite alphabet constant and non-constant-envelope symbols. To generate finite alphabet waveforms, the proposed method maps easily generated Gaussian random variables onto the phase-shift-keying, pulse-amplitude, and quadrature-amplitude modulation schemes. For such mapping, the probability density function of Gaussian random variables is divided into M regions, where M is the number of alphabets in the corresponding modulation scheme. By exploiting the mapping function, the relationship between the cross-correlation of Gaussian and finite alphabet symbols is derived. The second part of this thesis covers the topic of target parameter estimation. To determine the reflection coefficient, spatial location, and Doppler shift of a target, maximum likelihood estimation yields the best performance. However, it requires a two dimensional search problem. Therefore, its computational complexity is prohibitively high. So, we proposed a reduced complexity and optimum performance algorithm which allows the two dimensional fast Fourier transform to jointly estimate the spatial location

  8. Structure-properties relationships of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS filled PS nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Schwab

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS additivated polystyrene (PS based nanocomposites were prepared by melt processing and the structure-properties relationships of the POSS-PS systems were compared to those of the neat PS. In order to investigate the effect of these structural parameters on the final properties of the polymer nanocomposites, five different kinds of POSS samples were used, in particular, POSS with different inorganic cage and with different organic pendent groups. The rheological investigation suggests clearly that the POSS acts as a plasticizer and that the processability of the PS was positively modified. The affinity between the POSS samples and the PS matrix was estimated by the calculated theoretical solubility parameters, considering the Hoy’s method and by morphology analysis. Minor difference between the solubility parameter of POSS and the matrix means better compatibility and no aggregation tendency. Furthermore, the POSS loading leads to a decrease of the rigidity, of the glass transition temperature and of the damping factor of the nanocomposite systems. The loading of different POSS molecules with open cage leads to a more pronounced effect on all the investigated properties that the loading of the POSS molecules with closed cage. Moreover, the melt properties are significantly influenced by the type of inorganic framework, by the type of the pendent organic groups and by the interaction between the POSS organic groups and the host matrix, while, the solid state properties appears to be influenced more by the kind of cage.

  9. Quantifying the thermodynamic interactions of polyhedral boranes in solution to guide nanocomposite fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutz, M [The University of Tennessee; Eastwood, Eric Allen [ORNL; LeeJr, Mark E [University of Missouri; BowenIII, Daniel E [Honeywell, Inc.; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The solubility of boron containing nanoparticles in a variety of solvents is quantified using static light scattering in conjunction with refractometry. Four polyhedral boranes were tested in this work, using refractometry to obtain dn/dc, while static light scattering quantifies A2. A2 obtained from these measurements was then used to calculate v, the solute solvent interaction parameter, and the ildebrand solubility parameter, d, which provides a quantifiable method to identify good solvents. Of the nanoparticles studied, 1,3-di-o-carboranylpropane is thermodynamically stable in toluene, with a v less than 0.5, a solubility limit of 2.47 mg/mL, and all solutions remaining clear with no visible particle settling. For all of the particles tested, there was good correlation between the physical observations of the solutions, v, and d. For instance, lower values of v correspond to a smaller radius of gyration (Rg). A list of suitable solvents based on d is also presented.

  10. Quantifying the thermodynamic interactions of polyhedral boranes in solution to guide nanocomposite fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutz, M. [University of Tennessee, Department of Chemistry (United States); Eastwood, Eric [Honeywell Kansas City Plant (United States); Lee, Mark E. [University of Missouri (United States); Bowen, Daniel E. [Honeywell Kansas City Plant (United States); Dadmun, M. D., E-mail: dad@utk.edu [University of Tennessee, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The solubility of boron containing nanoparticles in a variety of solvents is quantified using static light scattering in conjunction with refractometry. Four polyhedral boranes were tested in this work, using refractometry to obtain dn/dc, while static light scattering quantifies A{sub 2}. A{sub 2} obtained from these measurements was then used to calculate {chi}, the solute-solvent interaction parameter, and the Hildebrand solubility parameter, {delta}, which provides a quantifiable method to identify good solvents. Of the nanoparticles studied, 1,3-di-o-carboranylpropane is thermodynamically stable in toluene, with a {chi} less than 0.5, a solubility limit of 2.47 mg/mL, and all solutions remaining clear with no visible particle settling. For all of the particles tested, there was good correlation between the physical observations of the solutions, {chi}, and {delta}. For instance, lower values of {chi} correspond to a smaller radius of gyration (R{sub g}). A list of suitable solvents based on {delta} is also presented.

  11. Structure–property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Li; Gao, Yu; Ban, Jinghao; Shen, Lijuan; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS), have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group]) and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups]) were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials. PMID:24550674

  12. Structure-property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Li; Gao, Yu; Ban, Jinghao; Shen, Lijuan; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS), have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group]) and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups]) were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials.

  13. Strong Screening Effect of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS Nanoparticles on Hydrogen Bonded Polymer Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Wei Chiou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we used anionic living polymerization to prepare two different homopolymers: a poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA and a PMMA derivative presenting polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (PMA-POSS units as its side chains. We then employed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD to investigate the miscibility and specific interactions of PMMA and PMA-POSS with three hydrogen bonding donor compounds: poly(vinyl phenol (PVPh, phenolic resin, and bisphenol A (BPA. DSC revealed that all of the PVPh/PMMA, phenolic/PMMA, and BPA/PMMA blends exhibited a single glass transition temperature, characteristic of miscible systems; FTIR spectroscopic analyses revealed that such miscibility resulted from hydrogen bonding interactions between the C=O groups of PMMA and the OH groups of these three hydrogen bonding donor compounds. In contrast, all of the PVPh/PMA-POSS, phenolic/PMA-POSS, and BPA/PMA-POSS blends were immiscible: DSC revealed two glass transition temperatures arising from strong screening effects (FTIR spectroscopy and high degrees of aggregation (WAXD of the POSS nanoparticles. We propose that the value of the intramolecular screening effect (γ should be very close to 1 for all PMA-POSS blend systems when POSS nanoparticles appear as the side chains of PMMA, such that the OH groups of the hydrogen bonding donor compounds cannot interact with the C=O groups of PMA-POSS.

  14. Coatings of molecularly imprinted polymers based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane for open tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing-Li; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Li-Shun; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2016-05-15

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was successfully applied, for the first time, to prepare imprinted monolithic coating for capillary electrochromatography. The imprinted monolithic coating was synthesized with a mixture of PSS-(1-Propylmethacrylate)-heptaisobutyl substituted (MA 0702), S-amlodipine (template), methacrylic acid (functional monomer), and 2-methacrylamidopropyl methacrylate (crosslinker), in a porogenic mixture of toluene-isooctane. The influence of synthesis parameters on the imprinting effect and separation performance, including the amount of MA 0702, the ratio of template to monomer, and the ratio of monomer to crosslinker, was investigated. The greatest resolution for enantiomers separation on the imprinted monolithic column prepared with MA 0702 was up to 22.3, about 2 times higher than that prepared in absence of the POSS. Column efficiency on the POSS-based MIP coatings was beyond 30,000 plate m(-1). The comparisons between MIP coating synthesized with the POSS and without the POSS were made in terms of selectivity, column efficiency, and resolution. POSS-based MIP capillaries with naproxen or zopiclone was also prepared and separation of enantiomers can be achieved.

  15. Synthesis and Self-Assembly Behaviors of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Based Giant Molecular Shape Amphiphiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kan; Yu, Xinfei; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Cheng, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    Recently, our group has focus on the synthesis and characterization of novel giant molecular shape amphiphiles (GMSAs) based on functionalized molecular nanoparticles (MNPs), such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS), tethered with polymeric tails. A general synthetic method via the combination of sequential ?click? reactions has been developed and several model GMSAs with various tail lengths and distinct molecular topologies, which can be referred as the ?giant surfactants?, ?giant lipids?, ?giant gemini surfactants?, and ?giant bolaform surfactants? etc., have been demonstrated. Studies on their self-assembly behaviors in the bulk have revealed the formation of different ordered mesophase structures with feature sizes around 10 nanometers, which have been investigated in detail by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These findings have general implications on understanding the underlying principles of self-assembly behaviors of GMSAs, and might have potential applications in nano-patterning technology. This work is supported by NSF (DMR-0906898) and the Joint-Hope Foundation.

  16. Detection of long and short DNA using nanopores with graphitic polyhedral edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Kevin J; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Min Jun

    2013-06-25

    Graphene is a unique material with a thickness as low as a single atom, high in-plane conductivity and a robust lattice that is self-supporting over large length scales. Schematically, graphene is an ideal solid-state material for tuning the properties of a nanopore because self-supported sheets, ranging from single to multiple atomic layers, can create pores with near-arbitrary dimensions which can provide exquisite control of the electric field drop within the pore. In this study, we characterize the drilling kinetics of nanopores using a thermionic electron source and various electron beam fluxes to minimize secondary hole formation. Once established, we investigated the use of multilayer graphene to create highly tailored nanostructures including nanopores with graphite polyhedral crystals formed around the nanopore edge. Finally, we report on the translocation of double stranded and single stranded DNA through such graphene pores and show that the single stranded DNA translocates much slower allowing detection of extremely short fragments (25 nucleotides in length). Our findings suggest that the kinetic and controllable properties of graphene nanopores under sculpting conditions can be used to further enhance the detection of DNA analytes.

  17. Optical and dielectric properties of nanocomposites systems based on epoxy resins and reactive polyhedral oligosilsquioxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eed, H.; Hassouneh, O.; Ramadin, Y.; Zihlif, A.; Ragosta, G.; Elimat, Z. M.

    2013-01-01

    An epoxy network structure made of diglycidylether of bisphenol-A and diamino diphenylsulfone was modified by adding various amounts of an epoxy functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane. The obtained nanocomposites were characterized in terms of optical and dielectric properties. The UV-absorption spectra were collected in the wavelength range of 400-800 nm. The optical data were analyzed in terms of absorption formula for non-crystalline materials. The optical energy gap and other basic constants, such as energy tails, dielectric constants, refractive index and optical conductivity, were determined and showed a clear dependence on the POSS concentration. It was found that the optical energy gap for the neat epoxy resin is less than for nanocomposites, and it decreases with increase in the POSS content. The refractive index of nanocomposites was determined from the calculated values of absorption and reflectance. It was found that the refractive index and the dielectric constants increased with increase in the POSS concentration. The optical conductivity, which is a measure of the optical absorption, increased with the POSS content. Furthermore, it was found that the glass transition temperature and the optical energy gap correlate well with the POSS filler concentration.

  18. Design of novel nano-carriers for multi-enzyme co-localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Feng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to design novel nano-structured carriers and strategies to co-localize multiple enzymes to mimic the functionalities of MECs. In order to achieve this goal, distinct approaches for enzyme co-localization were developed and evaluated. Specifically, we investigated different polymeric nano-carriers, both flexible and rigid, as platforms for co-localization, as well as distinct enzyme attachment techniques using model enzyme systems using glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase to control the spatial arrangement of the multiple enzymes on the nanocarriers. This platform technology can be potentially used to co-localize various enzyme systems and its broad applicability will be tested using the sclareol biosynthesis process to control the formation of products through the formation of MECs with multiple enzymes NgCPS and sSsSS to regulate the pathway of reactive intermediate to enhance the final product conversion rate.

  19. Colocalization analysis in fluorescence micrographs: verification of a more accurate calculation of pearson's correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Andrew L; Macleod, Alasdair; Noppen, Samuel; Sanderson, Jeremy; Guérin, Christopher J

    2010-12-01

    One of the most routine uses of fluorescence microscopy is colocalization, i.e., the demonstration of a relationship between pairs of biological molecules. Frequently this is presented simplistically by the use of overlays of red and green images, with areas of yellow indicating colocalization of the molecules. Colocalization data are rarely quantified and can be misleading. Our results from both synthetic and biological datasets demonstrate that the generation of Pearson's correlation coefficient between pairs of images can overestimate positive correlation and fail to demonstrate negative correlation. We have demonstrated that the calculation of a thresholded Pearson's correlation coefficient using only intensity values over a determined threshold in both channels produces numerical values that more accurately describe both synthetic datasets and biological examples. Its use will bring clarity and accuracy to colocalization studies using fluorescent microscopy.

  20. Colocating health services: a way to improve coordination of children's health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Susanna

    2008-07-01

    Pediatric practices are faced with a growing demand that they address the healthy development of their patients. As pediatric practices strengthen their role as medical homes for their patients, they need either to provide expanded services or enhance their capacity to coordinate that care. One option for enhancing the existing capacity of pediatric practices is colocation with other providers and services in the same setting. This issue brief examines what is currently known about the use of colocation and its benefits. The literature and interviews used as information resources for the brief suggest that colocation of services is not a single strategy but rather a complex set of relationships, organizational structures, and other features meant to help practices deliver effective care. However, more thorough examination of current colocation approaches is needed before advice can be provided to practices considering this option.

  1. Analysis of Co-assembly and Co-localization of Ameloblastin and Amelogenin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prichita eMazumder

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Epithelially-derived ameloblasts secrete extracellular matrix proteins including amelogenin, enamelin and ameloblastin. Complex intermolecular interactions among these proteins are believed to be important in controlling enamel formation. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence of co-assembly and co-localization of ameloblastin with amelogenin using both biophysical and immunohistochemical methods. We performed co-localization studies using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy with paraffin-embedded tissue sections from mandibular molars of mice at 1, 5 and 8 days of age. Commercially-available ameloblastin antibody (M300 against mouse ameloblastin residues 107-407 and an antibody against full-length recombinant mouse (rM179 amelogenin were used. Ameloblastin-M300 clearly reacted along the secretory face of ameloblasts from days 1-8. Quantitative co-localization was analyzed (QCA in several configurations by choosing appropriate regions of interest (ROIs. Analysis of ROIs along the secretory face of ameloblasts revealed that at day 1, very high percentages of both the ameloblastin and amelogenin co-localized. At day 8 along the ameloblast cells the percentage of co-localization remained high for the ameloblastin whereas co-localization percentage was reduced for amelogenin. Analysis of the entire thickness on day 8 revealed no significant co-localization of amelogenin and ameloblastin. With the progress of amelogenesis and ameloblastin degradation, there was a segregation of ameloblastin and co-localization with the C-terminal region decreased. CD spectra indicated that structural changes in ameloblastin occurred upon addition of amelogenin. Our data suggest that amelogenin-ameloblastin complexes may be the functional entities at the early stage of enamel mineralization.

  2. GP and community nurse co-location in a disadvantaged community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Vanessa K; Harris, Elizabeth; Comino, Elizabeth; Anderson, Teresa; Harris, Mark F

    2011-01-01

    People living in socioeconomically disadvantaged communities have a high burden of disease but often receive 'inverse care'. We explored a model of general practitioner and community nurse co-location in a disadvantaged community in south-west Sydney, Australia. Co-location resulted in increased referrals from doctors to the community nurse, including an increase in referrals related to psychosocial issues. This small study suggests integrated primary health care might have an impact on specialised state-based psychosocial health services.

  3. Summary on Algorithms for Mining Spatial Co-location Patterns%空间 co-location 模式挖掘算法研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余翠兰

    2014-01-01

    Spatial co-location patterns are traditionally defined as the subsets of features whose instances are frequently located together in geographic space .It is an important research direction for spatial data mining .Firstly ,the concepts of co-location patterns are reviewed .Then ,many popular algorithms based on different data fields are described ,which highlights the processes and dominant features of different co-location algorithms .Finally ,the future work on co-location patterns min-ing algorithms are discussed .%空间co-location模式代表的是一组空间特征的子集,它们的实例在空间中频繁的关联。它是空间数据挖掘的一个重要研究方向。首先给出co-location模式的基本概念;然后描述了针对不同数据领域提出的各种算法,并重点分析了算法提出的思路及主要特点;最后对Co-location模式挖掘未来的研究方向作了探讨。

  4. New nanoplatforms based on UCNPs linking with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) for multimodal bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaoqian; Dong, Liang; Sun, Lining; Song, Zhengmei; Wei, Ruoyan; Shi, Liyi; Chen, Haige

    2015-04-01

    A new and facile method was used to transfer upconversion luminescent nanoparticles from hydrophobic to hydrophilic using polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) linking on the surface of upconversion nanoparticles. In comparison with the unmodified upconversion nanoparticles, the POSS modified upconversion nanoplatforms [POSS-UCNPs(Er), POSS-UCNPs(Tm)] displayed good monodispersion in water and exhibited good water-solubility, while their particle size did not change substantially. Due to the low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility as determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and histology and hematology analysis, the POSS modified upconversion nanoplatforms were successfully applied to upconversion luminescence imaging of living cells in vitro and nude mouse in vivo (upon excitation at 980 nm). In addition, the doped Gd3+ ion endows the POSS-UCNPs with effective T1 signal enhancement and the POSS-UCNPs were successfully applied to in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for a Kunming mouse, which makes them potential MRI positive-contrast agents. More importantly, the corner organic groups of POSS can be easily modified, resulting in kinds of POSS-UCNPs with many potential applications. Therefore, the method and results may provide more exciting opportunities for multimodal bioimaging and multifunctional applications.A new and facile method was used to transfer upconversion luminescent nanoparticles from hydrophobic to hydrophilic using polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) linking on the surface of upconversion nanoparticles. In comparison with the unmodified upconversion nanoparticles, the POSS modified upconversion nanoplatforms [POSS-UCNPs(Er), POSS-UCNPs(Tm)] displayed good monodispersion in water and exhibited good water-solubility, while their particle size did not change substantially. Due to the low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility as determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and histology and hematology

  5. Synthesis of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) functionalized carbon nanotubes for improved dispersion in polyurethane films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xiaonan

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) polymer nanocomposites are promising advanced materials. These materials exhibit the advantages of traditional polymeric materials, such as being light weight and easy to process, combined with the potential to exhibit enhanced mechanical, thermal and electrical properties compared to pure polymers. To achieve substantial improvement of composite properties at low CNT loading, uniform dispersion of CNTs in the polymer matrix and strong CNT-polymer interfacial interaction are needed. However, it is difficult to achieve adequate dispersion and interfacial interactions due to the inert nature of CNTs. In this project, polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane (POSS) will be used as a dispersing agent for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in polyurethane (PU) matrices. This dissertation consists of six chapters. Chapter I provides a detailed introduction of the fundamental knowledge of CNTs, PU, and POSS. At the end of this chapter, the motivation and rationale of this research are given. Chapter II establishes the overall goal and specific objectives of this research. Chapter III describes the synthesis and characterization of three POSS modified CNTs and one organosilane modified CNT. Grafting efficiency of the different grafted molecules are calculated and compared. Chapter IV discusses the dispersion behavior of four covalently modified CNTs in both solvents and PU matrices. Differences in dispersion behaviors of the modified CNTs are correlated to the solubility parameters of the grafting molecules and the surface structures of modified CNTs. Chapter V provides further discussion of the dispersion of POSS and silane modified CNTs by reviewing the assessment of the physical properties of PU composites containing the modified CNTs. Morphological, thermal, mechanical and electrical properties are used to estimate the interactions of the modified CNTs with the PU matrix. Chapter VI explores the function of the trisilanolphenyl POSS lithium salt

  6. Organic-inorganic hybrid compounds containing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane for conservation of stone heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seunghwan; Won, Jongok; Kim, Jeong-Jin; Jang, Yun Deuk; Kang, Yong Soo; Kim, Sa Dug

    2009-02-01

    Alkoxysilane solutions based on tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) have been widely used for the consolidation of decaying heritage stone surfaces. TEOS-based products polymerize within the porous structure of the decaying stone, significantly increasing the cohesion of the grains of stone components. However, they suffer from practical drawbacks, such as crack formation of the gel during the drying phase due to the developing capillary force and dense gel fractures left inside of the stone. In this study, a TEOS-based stone consolidant containing functional (3-glycidoxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPTMS) and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) has been prepared in order to reduce gel crack formation during the drying phase. The addition of nanometer-sized POSS and/or GPTMS having a flexible segment reduces the capillary force developed during solvent evaporation. The properties of the TEOS/GPTMS/POSS composite solutions were compared with those of commercial products (Wacker OH and Unil sandsteinfestiger OH 1:1). The gelation time was similar to that of commercial consolidants, and the TEOS/GPTMS/POSS solution was stable over a period of up to 6 months. The addition of POSS and GPTMS provided a crack-free gel, while the gel from the commercial consolidants exhibited cracks after drying. The surface hydrophobicity of the treated decayed granite increased with the addition of POSS and GPTMS, and it was higher than that of the commercial product, implying the possibility of POSS and GPTMS as barriers to the penetration of water. This result implies that the TEOS/GPTMS/POSS solution showed a high suitability for the consolidation of granite heritage.

  7. Marginal integrity of restorations produced with a model composite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Ribeiro CORREA NETTO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Marginal integrity is one of the most crucial aspects involved in the clinical longevity of resin composite restorations.Objective To analyze the marginal integrity of restorations produced with a model composite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS.Material and Methods A base composite (B was produced with an organic matrix with UDMA/TEGDMA and 70 wt.% of barium borosilicate glass particles. To produce the model composite, 25 wt.% of UDMA were replaced by POSS (P25. The composites P90 and TPH3 (TP3 were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Marginal integrity (%MI was analyzed in bonded class I cavities. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage (%VS and the polymerization shrinkage stress (Pss - MPa were also evaluated.Results The values for %MI were as follows: P90 (100% = TP3 (98.3% = B (96.9% > P25 (93.2%, (p<0.05. The %VS ranged from 1.4% (P90 to 4.9% (P25, while Pss ranged from 2.3 MPa (P90 to 3.9 MPa (B. For both properties, the composite P25 presented the worst results (4.9% and 3.6 MPa. Linear regression analysis showed a strong positive correlation between %VS and Pss (r=0.97, whereas the correlation between Pss and %MI was found to be moderate (r=0.76.Conclusions The addition of 25 wt.% of POSS in methacrylate organic matrix did not improve the marginal integrity of class I restorations. Filtek P90 showed lower polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress when compared to the experimental and commercial methacrylate composite.

  8. Bioactivity and properties of a dental adhesive functionalized with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) and bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Marta; Hohlfeld, Lisa; Thanh, Loan Tao; Biehl, Ralf; Lühmann, Nicole; Mohn, Dirk; Wiegand, Annette

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of infiltrating a commercial adhesive with nanosized bioactive glass (BG-Bi) particles or methacryl-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) on material properties and bioactivity. An acetone-based dental adhesive (Solobond Plus adhesive, VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany) was infiltrated with nanosized bioactive glass particles (0.1 or 1wt%), or with monofunctional or multifunctional POSS particles (10 or 20wt%). Unfilled adhesive served as control. Dispersion and hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles were studied by dynamic light scattering. Set specimens were immersed for 28days in artificial saliva at 37°C, and surfaces were mapped for the formation of calcium phospate (Ca/P) precipitates (scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). Viscosity (rheometry) and the structural characteristic of the networks were studied, such as degree of conversion (FTIR spectroscopy), sol fraction and water sorption. POSS particles showed a good dispersion of the particles for both types of particles being smaller than 3nm, while the bioactive glass particles had a strong tendency to agglomerate. All nanoparticles induced the formation of Ca/P precipitates. The viscosity of the adhesive was not or only slightly increased by POSS particle addition but strongly increased by the bioactive glass particles. The degree of conversion, water sorption and sol fraction showed a maintained or improved network structure and properties when filled with BG-Bi and multifunctional POSS, however, less polymerization was found when loading a monofunctional POSS. Multifunctional POSS may be incorporated into dental adhesives to provide a bioactive potential without changing material properties adversely. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure–property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang WG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Weiguo Wang,1,* Xiang Sun,1,* Li Huang,2,* Yu Gao,1 Jinghao Ban,1 Lijuan Shen,1 Jihua Chen1 1Department of Prosthodontics, 2Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS, have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group] and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups] were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials

  10. Investigation of Crack Propagation in Rock using Discrete Sphero-Polyhedral Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behraftar, S.; Galindo-torres, S. A.; Scheuermann, A.; Li, L.; Williams, D.

    2014-12-01

    In this study a micro-mechanical model is developed to study the fracture propagation process in rocks. The model is represented by an array of bonded particles simulated by the Discrete Sphero-Polyhedral Element Model (DSEM), which was introduced by the authors previously and has been shown to be a suitable technique to model rock [1]. It allows the modelling of particles of general shape, with no internal porosity. The motivation behind using this technique is the desire to microscopically investigate the fracture propagation process and study the relationship between the microscopic and macroscopic behaviour of rock. The DSEM method is used to model the Crack Chevron Notch Brazilian Disc (CCNBD) test suggested by the International Society of Rock Mechanics (ISRM) for determining the fracture toughness of rock specimens. CCNBD samples with different crack inclination angles, are modelled to investigate their fracture mode. The Crack Mouth Opening Displacement (CMOD) is simulated and the results are validated using experimental results obtained from a previous study [2]. Fig. 1 shows the simulated and experimental results of crack propagation for different inclination angles of CCNBD specimens. The DSEM method can be used to predict crack trajectory and quantify crack propagation during loading. References: 1. Galindo-Torres, S. A., et al. "Breaking processes in three-dimensional bonded granular materials with general shapes." Computer Physics Communications 183.2 (2012): 266-277. 2. Erarslan, N., and D. J. Williams. "Mixed-mode fracturing of rocks under static and cyclic loading." Rock mechanics and rock engineering 46.5 (2013): 1035-1052.

  11. Composite polymer electrolyte containing ionic liquid and functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes for anhydrous PEM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subianto, Surya; Mistry, Mayur K; Choudhury, Namita Roy; Dutta, Naba K; Knott, Robert

    2009-06-01

    A new type of supported liquid membrane was made by combining an ionic liquid (IL) with a Nafion membrane reinforced with multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSSs) using a layer-by-layer strategy for anhydrous proton-exchange membrane (PEM) application. The POSS was functionalized by direct sulfonation, and the sulfonated POSS (S-POSS) was incorporated into Nafion 117 membranes by the infiltration method. The resultant hybrid membrane shows strong ionic interaction between the Nafion matrix and the multifunctional POSS, resulting in increased glass transition temperature and thermal stability at very low loadings of S-POSS (1%). The presence of S-POSS has also improved the proton conductivity especially at low humidities, where it shows a marked increase due to its confinement in the ionic domains and promotes water uptake by capillary condensation. In order to achieve anhydrous conductivity, the IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMI-BTSI) was incorporated into these membranes to provide proton conduction in the absence of water. Although the incorporation of an IL shows a plasticizing effect on the Nafion membrane, the S-POSS composite membrane with an IL shows a higher modulus at high temperatures compared to Nafion 117 and a Nafion-IL membrane, with significantly higher proton conductivity (5 mS/cm at 150 degrees C with 20% IL). This shows the ability of the multifunctional POSS and IL to work symbiotically to achieve the desirable proton conductivity and mechanical properties of such membranes by enhancing the ionic interaction within the material.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of polyhedral oligomeric titanized silsesquioxane: A new biocompatible cage like molecule for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahyaei, Hossein [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohseni, Mohsen, E-mail: mmohseni@aut.ac.ir [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanbari, Hossein [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Messori, Massimo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria ‘Enzo Ferrari’, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Organic–inorganic hybrid materials have shown improved properties to be used as biocompatible coating in biomedical applications. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) containing coatings are among hybrid materials showing promising properties for these applications. In this work an open cage POSS has been reacted with a titanium alkoxide to end cap the POSS molecule with titanium atom to obtain a so called polyhedral oligomeric metalized silsesquioxane (POMS). The synthesized POMS was characterized by FTIR, RAMAN and UV–visible spectroscopy as well as {sup 29}Si NMR and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) techniques. Appearance of peaks at 920 cm{sup −1} in FTIR and 491 cm{sup −1} and 1083 cm{sup −1} in Raman spectra confirmed Si–O–Ti linkage formation. It was also demonstrated that POMS was in a monomeric form. To evaluate the biocompatibility of hybrids films, pristine POSS and synthesized POMS were used in synthesis of a polycarbonate urethane polymer. Results revealed that POMS containing hybrid, not only had notable thermal and mechanical stability compared to POSS containing one, as demonstrated by DSC and DMTA analysis, they also showed controlled surface properties in such a manner that hydrophobicity and biocompatibility were both reachable to give rise to improved cell viability in presence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and MRC-5 cells. - Highlight: • Polyhedral Oligomeric Metalized Silsesquioxane (POMS) based on titanium was synthesized. • POMS can improve mechanical properties of polyurethane. • POMS increases hydrophobicity of polyurethane. • POMS is a unique nanocage to enhance biocompatibility of polyurethane.

  13. Mechanical property and thermal stability of polyurethane composites reinforced with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes and inorganic flame retardant filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kwon, Younghwan; Kim, Chang Kee

    2014-08-01

    Mechanical properties and thermal stability of polyurethane composites were investigated with a combination of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules and inorganic barium sulfate. These hybrid composites were prepared using one-step method through the incorporation of flexible hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene prepolymer, reactive POSS nanoparticles, and barium sulfate under isophorone diisocyanate curative system. In polyurethane composites, POSS and inorganic barium sulfate were utilized for mechanical reinforcement and flame retardant filler, respectively. The decomposition of POSS molecules during oxyacetylene torch exposure resulted in the formation of silica-based nanosized droplets, contributing on ablation behavior.

  14. Investigation of prototypal MOFs consisting of polyhedral cages with accessible Lewis-acid sites for quinoline synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wen-Yang; Leng, Kunyue; Cash, Lindsay; Chrzanowski, Matthew; Stackhouse, Chavis A; Sun, Yinyong; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-03-21

    A series of prototypal metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consisting of polyhedral cages with accessible Lewis-acid sites, have been systematically investigated for Friedländer annulation reaction, a straightforward approach to synthesizing quinoline and its derivatives. Amongst them MMCF-2 demonstrates significantly enhanced catalytic activity compared with the benchmark MOFs, HKUST-1 and MOF-505, as a result of a high-density of accessible Cu(II) Lewis acid sites and large window size in the cuboctahedral cage-based nanoreactor of MMCF-2.

  15. A New Star-shaped Carbazole Derivative with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Core: Crystal Structure and Unique Photoluminescence Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zixuan; Yu, Tianzhi; Zhao, Yuling; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Guoyun; Li, Jianfeng; Chai, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    A new inorganic–organic hybrid material based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) capped with carbazolyl substituents, octakis[3-(carbazol-9-yl)propyldimethylsiloxy]-silsesquioxane (POSS-8Cz), was successfully synthesized and characterized. The X-ray crystal structure of POSS-8Cz were described. The photophysical properties of POSS-8Cz were investigated by using UV–vis,photoluminescence spectroscopic analysis. The hybrid material exhibits blue emission in the solution and the solid film.The morphology and thermal stablity properties were measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TG-DTA analysis.

  16. Can the structure of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide be described in terms of a few polyhedral motifs?

    OpenAIRE

    Divya; Prasad, R; Deepak

    2016-01-01

    The coordination polyhedra around the cations are the building blocks of ionic solids. In context of amorphous InGaZn oxide (a-IGZO), even though the coordination polyhedra are irregularly arranged, it will be beneficial to identify them. In this work, we address the questions, (a) is it possible to classify all the polyhedra that occur in a-IGZO into only a few distinct groups? and (b) are these the same polyhedral motifs as those observed in the crystalline indium gallium zinc oxide (c-IGZO...

  17. Functionalization of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes with bis(hydroxyethyl) ester and preparation of the corresponding degradable nanohybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Tao Wang; Yan Zhang; Ping Zhang; Zheng Ping Fang

    2012-01-01

    One novel difunctionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) derivative was designed and synthesized by a convenient method with high yield.1H NMR and FT-IR characterizations suggested that Michael addition reaction successfully took place between 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA) and aminopropylisobutyl POSS (POSS-NH2) under mild conditions,which finally formed bi(hydroxyethyl) ester-functionalized POSS derivatives (BH-POSS).Due to the similar functional groups and high reactivity,BH-POSS could be easily incorporated into the main-chain of biodegradable aliphatic-aromatic copolyesters PBTL via in situ melt polycondensation to prepare corresponding degradable nanohybrids with high mechanical properties.

  18. Dispersion states and surface characteristics of physically blended polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polymer hybrid nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Rahul

    Control of dispersion and segregation states of nanostructured additives is one of the biggest challenges in realizing the optimum potential of high performance hybrid polymer nanocomposites. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanostructured chemicals, with their hybrid organic-inorganic nature and flexible functionalization with a variety of organic substituents, yield possibilities to control dispersion and tune compatibility in a wide range of polymer systems. The overall goal of this research is to investigate the fundamental parameters that influence the dispersion and segregation states of POSS nanostructured chemicals, and to understand chain dynamics and conformations in physically blended POSS hybrid polymer nanocomposites (HPNC's). Multiple structural and mechanical factors influencing macro to nano scale surface and bulk properties were successfully investigated and correlated. A strategy based on thermodynamic principles for selective control of POSS dispersion states in a given polymer matrix is developed and discussed. This dissertation consists of eight chapters. Chapter 1 provides a detailed introduction about the development and current research interest in POSS/polymer nanocomposites. This chapter also discusses limitations of current advanced nanoprobe techniques. Chapter 2 establishes the overall goal of this research and specific research ii objectives. Chapter 3 establishes the preferential surface migration behavior of physically dispersed, non-reactive, closed cage octaisobutyl POSS (Oib-POSS) in a non-polar polypropylene matrix. Furthermore, influence of POSS surface segregation on the surface properties, especially nano-tribomechanical behavior is also discussed. Chapter 4 expands the studies by melt blending two different types of POSS molecules, a non-reactive, closed cage Oib-POSS and an open cage trisilanolphenyl POSS (Tsp-POSS), in a nylon 6 matrix. This chapter discusses the morphology, nano-dispersion and macro- to

  19. Better Together: Co-Location of Dental and Primary Care Provides Opportunities to Improve Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nadereh; Martinez, Ana E; Crall, James J

    2015-09-01

    Community Health Centers (CHCs) are one of the principal safety-net providers of health care for low-income and uninsured populations. Co-locating dental services in primary care settings provides an opportunity to improve access to dental care. Yet this study of California CHCs that provide primary care services shows that only about one-third of them co-located primary and dental care services on-site. An additional one-third were members of multisite organizations in which at least one other site provided dental care. The remaining one-third of CHC sites had no dental care capacity. Policy options to promote co-location include requiring on-site availability of dental services, providing infrastructure funding to build and equip dental facilities, and offering financial incentives to provide dental care and recruit dental providers.

  20. Searching for stochastic gravitational waves using data from the two co-located LIGO Hanford detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amado; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderó; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constanci., M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Da; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Pozzo, W De; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; Rosa, R D; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Fiore, L D; Lieto, A D; Palma, I D; Virgilio, A D; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, D; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Hari; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; King, E; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kucharczyk, C; Kudla, S; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, D Nand; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C -H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J J; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Roux, A L; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levine, B; Lewis, J B; Lhuillier, V; Li, T G F; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lloyd, D; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Luan, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martini, G; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Mokler, F; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R; Necula, V; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishida, E; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; Larcher, W Orteg; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Ou, J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Peiris, P; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pindor, B; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poole, V; Postiglione, F; Poux, C; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Roever, C; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Soden, K; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stevens, D; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tang, L; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; Braack, A P M te; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J va de; Broeck, C Va De; Putten, S va de; Sluys, M V va de; Heijningen, J va; Veggel, A A va; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, P J; Veitch, J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vlcek, B; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vrinceanu, D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, J; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wibowo, S; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yum, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2014-01-01

    Searches for a stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) using terrestrial detectors typically involve cross-correlating data from pairs of detectors. The sensitivity of such cross-correlation analyses depends, among other things, on the separation between the two detectors: the smaller the separation, the better the sensitivity. Hence, a co-located detector pair is more sensitive to a gravitational-wave background than a non-co-located detector pair. However, co-located detectors are also expected to suffer from correlated noise from instrumental and environmental effects that could contaminate the measurement of the background. Hence, methods to identify and mitigate the effects of correlated noise are necessary to achieve the potential increase in sensitivity of co-located detectors. Here we report on the first SGWB analysis using the two LIGO Hanford detectors and address the complications arising from correlated environmental noise. We apply correlated noise identification and mitigation techniques...

  1. The geo-control system for station keeping and colocation of geostationary satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenbruck, O.; Eckstein, M. C.; Gonner, J.

    1993-01-01

    GeoControl is a compact but powerful and accurate software system for station keeping of single and colocated satellites, which has been developed at the German Space Operations Center. It includes four core modules for orbit determination (including maneuver estimation), maneuver planning, monitoring of proximities between colocated satellites, and interference and event prediction. A simple database containing state vector and maneuver information at selected epochs is maintained as a central interface between the modules. A menu driven shell utilizing form screens for data input serves as the central user interface. The software is written in Ada and FORTRAN and may be used on VAX workstations or mainframes under the VMS operating system.

  2. Colocation as a hybrid ICT sourcing strategy to improve operational agility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Roman; Pahlke, Immanuel; Vykoukal, Jens

    2016-01-01

    and responding to market- and technology-based challenges. Accordingly, a responsive and high-performance ICT infrastructure remains a top priority for firms. Thus, new ICT sourcing strategies may lead to significant competitive advantages, especially in dynamic business environments. This article analyzes...... a hybrid ICT sourcing strategy called colocation that allows firms to operate their own ICT resources in facilities of special-ized data center providers. Grounded in the theory of dynamic capabilities, we theorize and empirically ex-amine how colocation and top management support enable firms to improve...

  3. Perception of Visual-Tactile Colocation in the First Year of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freier, Livia; Mason, Luke; Bremner, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    An ability to perceive tactile and visual stimuli in a common spatial frame of reference is a crucial ingredient in forming a representation of one's own body and the interface between bodily and external space. In this study, the authors investigated young infants' abilities to perceive colocation between tactile and visual stimuli presented on…

  4. Signal Waveforms and Range/Angle Coupling in Coherent Colocated MIMO Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-09

    Signal Waveforms and Range/Angle Coupling in Coherent Colocated MIMO Radar Olivier Rabaste, Laurent Savy, Mathieu Cattenoz ONERA , The French...tests with a real MIMO radar: HYCAM. A. The HYCAM platform A multifunction MIMO radar - named HYCAM - has been designed and build by ONERA . The

  5. Colocalization of Serum Amyloid A with Microtubules in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Lakota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum amyloid A (SAA acts as a major acute phase protein and represents a sensitive and accurate marker of inflammation. Besides its hepatic origin, as the main source of serum SAA, this protein is also produced extrahepatically. The mRNA levels of SAA become significantly elevated following proinflammatory stimuli, as well as, are induced through their own positive feedback in human primary coronary artery endothelial cells. However, the intracellular functions of SAA are so far unknown. Colocalization of SAA with cytoskeletal filaments has previously been proposed, so we analyzed the colocalization of SAA with all three cytoskeletal elements: actin filaments, vimentin filaments, and microtubules. Immunofluorescent double-labeling analyses confirmed by PLA method revealed a strict colocalization of SAA with microtubules and a very infrequent attachment to vimentin while the distribution of actin filaments appeared clearly separated from SAA staining. Also, no significant colocalization was found between SAA and endomembranes labeled with the fluorescent lipid stain DiO6. However, SAA appears to be located also unbound in the cytosol, as well as inside the nucleus and within nanotubes extending from the cells or bridging neighboring cells. These different locations of SAA in endothelial cells strongly indicate multiple potential functions of this protein.

  6. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  7. A method for improved clustering and classification of microscopy images using quantitative co-localization coefficients

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Singan, Vasanth R

    2012-06-08

    AbstractBackgroundThe localization of proteins to specific subcellular structures in eukaryotic cells provides important information with respect to their function. Fluorescence microscopy approaches to determine localization distribution have proved to be an essential tool in the characterization of unknown proteins, and are now particularly pertinent as a result of the wide availability of fluorescently-tagged constructs and antibodies. However, there are currently very few image analysis options able to effectively discriminate proteins with apparently similar distributions in cells, despite this information being important for protein characterization.FindingsWe have developed a novel method for combining two existing image analysis approaches, which results in highly efficient and accurate discrimination of proteins with seemingly similar distributions. We have combined image texture-based analysis with quantitative co-localization coefficients, a method that has traditionally only been used to study the spatial overlap between two populations of molecules. Here we describe and present a novel application for quantitative co-localization, as applied to the study of Rab family small GTP binding proteins localizing to the endomembrane system of cultured cells.ConclusionsWe show how quantitative co-localization can be used alongside texture feature analysis, resulting in improved clustering of microscopy images. The use of co-localization as an additional clustering parameter is non-biased and highly applicable to high-throughput image data sets.

  8. Co-Location versus Disintegration of Manufacturing and R&D in Emerging Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates what makes it more or less relevant to co-locate manufacturing activities and R&D activities in emerging markets within multinational companies. A framework to this end is developed and illustrated in relation to four cases from multinational companies, which have established...

  9. HeliCis: a DNA motif discovery tool for colocalized motif pairs with periodic spacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostad Petter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Correct temporal and spatial gene expression during metazoan development relies on combinatorial interactions between different transcription factors. As a consequence, cis-regulatory elements often colocalize in clusters termed cis-regulatory modules. These may have requirements on organizational features such as spacing, order and helical phasing (periodic spacing between binding sites. Due to the turning of the DNA helix, a small modification of the distance between a pair of sites may sometimes drastically disrupt function, while insertion of a full helical turn of DNA (10–11 bp between cis elements may cause functionality to be restored. Recently, de novo motif discovery methods which incorporate organizational properties such as colocalization and order preferences have been developed, but there are no tools which incorporate periodic spacing into the model. Results We have developed a web based motif discovery tool, HeliCis, which features a flexible model which allows de novo detection of motifs with periodic spacing. Depending on the parameter settings it may also be used for discovering colocalized motifs without periodicity or motifs separated by a fixed gap of known or unknown length. We show on simulated data that it can efficiently capture the synergistic effects of colocalization and periodic spacing to improve detection of weak DNA motifs. It provides a simple to use web interface which interactively visualizes the current settings and thereby makes it easy to understand the parameters and the model structure. Conclusion HeliCis provides simple and efficient de novo discovery of colocalized DNA motif pairs, with or without periodic spacing. Our evaluations show that it can detect weak periodic patterns which are not easily discovered using a sequential approach, i.e. first finding the binding sites and second analyzing the properties of their pairwise distances.

  10. Overview of Opportunities for Co-Location of Solar Energy Technologies and Vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beatty, Brenda [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hill, Graham [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale solar facilities have the potential to contribute significantly to national electricity production. Many solar installations are large-scale or utility-scale, with a capacity over 1 MW and connected directly to the electric grid. Large-scale solar facilities offer an opportunity to achieve economies of scale in solar deployment, yet there have been concerns about the amount of land required for solar projects and the impact of solar projects on local habitat. During the site preparation phase for utility-scale solar facilities, developers often grade land and remove all vegetation to minimize installation and operational costs, prevent plants from shading panels, and minimize potential fire or wildlife risks. However, the common site preparation practice of removing vegetation can be avoided in certain circumstances, and there have been successful examples where solar facilities have been co-located with agricultural operations or have native vegetation growing beneath the panels. In this study we outline some of the impacts that large-scale solar facilities can have on the local environment, provide examples of installations where impacts have been minimized through co-location with vegetation, characterize the types of co-location, and give an overview of the potential benefits from co-location of solar energy projects and vegetation. The varieties of co-location can be replicated or modified for site-specific use at other solar energy installations around the world. We conclude with opportunities to improve upon our understanding of ways to reduce the environmental impacts of large-scale solar installations.

  11. Thermal Stability and Ablation Behavior of Modified Polydimethylsiloxane-Based Polyurethane Composites Reinforced with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhongyou; Xi, Yukun; Kwon, Younghwan

    2016-02-01

    Series of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based polyurethane (PU)/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) composites are prepared using ether or polyether modified diol/polyol PDMS prepolymers, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and either non-reactive or reactive POSS. The effect of POSS incorporated chemically or physically, number of ethylene oxide units and crosslinking on PDMS based PU is investigated in terms of thermal stability and ablation properties. The ablation property is measured using an oxyacetylene torch test, and the ablation rate is evaluated. The results show that POSS molecules make a considerable influence on the ablative resistance, because they act as protective silica forming precursors under oxyacetylene condition. POSS molecules, especially methyl POSS, in PU matrix leads to the formation of densely accumulated spherical silica layers on the top of the ablated surface, resulting in improved ablation resistance.

  12. Crystallization and mechanical properties of biodegradable poly(p-dioxanone)/octamethyl-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes nanocomposites via simple solution casting method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhecun Wang; Chengdong Xiong; Qing Li

    2015-10-01

    In this study, biodegradable poly(p-dioxanone) (PPDO)/octamethyl-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (ome-POSS) nanocomposites were fabricated by the simple solution casting method with various ome-POSS loadings. Scanning electron microscopic observations indicate that ome-POSS is well dispersed in the PPDO matrix. Effect of ome-POSS on the isothermal melt crystallization and dynamic mechanical properties of PPDO in the nanocomposites were studied in detail. It shows that the overall crystallization rates are faster in the nanocomposites than in neat PPDO and increase with the increase in ome-POSS loadings; however, X-ray diffraction patterns, POM and the Avrami exponent suggest that the crystal structure and the crystallization mechanism do not change despite the presence of ome-POSS. The mechanical property of PPDO/ome-POSS nanocomposites was enhanced with respect to neat PPDO.

  13. Polyhedral Palladium-Silver Alloy Nanocrystals as Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalysts for the Formic Acid Oxidation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Geng-Tao; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Yu; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2015-09-01

    Polyhedral noble-metal nanocrystals have received much attention and wide applications as electrical and optical devices as well as catalysts. In this work, a straightforward and effective hydrothermal route for the controllable synthesis of the high-quality Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons with uniform size is presented. The morphology, composition and structure of the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are fully characterized by the various physical techniques, demonstrating the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are highly alloying. The formation/growth mechanisms of the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are explored and discussed based on the experimental observations and discussions. As a preliminary electrochemical application, the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are applied in the formic acid oxidation reaction, which shows higher electrocatalytic activity and stability than commercially available Pd black due to the “synergistic effects” between Pd and Ag atoms.

  14. Polyhedral C2@Agn cages distorted by ancillary pyridine N-oxide ligands in silver-acetylenediide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Lin-Ping; Mak, Thomas C W

    2006-07-01

    Reactions of the pyridine N-oxide ligands L, L2 and L3 with the silver acetylenediide-containing system under hydrothermal conditions gave rise to four silver-acetylenediide complexes bearing interesting C2@Agn motifs: (Ag2C2)2(AgCF3CO2)8(L1)3.5 (1), (Ag2C2)2(AgCF3CO2)8(L2)2 (2), (Ag2C2)(AgCF3CO2)4(L3) (3) and [(Ag7(C2)(CF3SO3)3(L3)2(H2O)2] x 2CF3SO3 (4) (L = nicotinic acid N-oxide, L(1) = pyridine N-oxide, L2 = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane N,N'-dioxide, L3 = 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane N,N'-dioxide), which exhibit new distorted polyhedral C2@Agn cage motifs. Complex 1 has a pair of acetylenediide dianions encapsulated in a Ag(14) aggregate composed of three polyhedral parts, whereas 2 contains an irregular (C2)2@Ag13 double cage. In 3, the basic building unit is a centrosymmetric (C2)2@Ag12 double cage with each component single cage taking the shape of a highly distorted triangulated dodecahedron with one missing vertex. As to complex 4, the core is a C2@Ag7 single cage in the form of a slightly distorted monocapped trigonal prism with four cleaved edges that include all three vertical sides. Furthermore, in the silver-rich environment, the pyO-type ligands are induced to exhibit unprecedented coordination modes, such as the mu(5)-O,O,O,O',O' ligation mode of L2 in 2 and the mu4-O,O,O',O' mode of L3 in 3 and 4.

  15. Structure of Pareto Solutions of Generalized Polyhedral-Valued Vector Optimization Problems in Banach Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghai He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In general Banach spaces, we consider a vector optimization problem (SVOP in which the objective is a set-valued mapping whose graph is the union of finitely many polyhedra or the union of finitely many generalized polyhedra. Dropping the compactness assumption, we establish some results on structure of the weak Pareto solution set, Pareto solution set, weak Pareto optimal value set, and Pareto optimal value set of (SVOP and on connectedness of Pareto solution set and Pareto optimal value set of (SVOP. In particular, we improved and generalize, Arrow, Barankin, and Blackwell’s classical results in Euclidean spaces and Zheng and Yang’s results in general Banach spaces.

  16. Squeeze: designing for playful experiences among co-located people in homes. (received first prize people's choice award)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2007-01-01

    Squeeze is a multi-person, flexible and interactive furniture that allows for collective and playful exploration of the family history among co-located people in homes. It is designed to explore how we can use digital technology to create settings where co-located family members can collectively ...

  17. Squeeze: designing for playful experiences among co-located people in homes. (received first prize people's choice award)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2007-01-01

    Squeeze is a multi-person, flexible and interactive furniture that allows for collective and playful exploration of the family history among co-located people in homes. It is designed to explore how we can use digital technology to create settings where co-located family members can collectively...

  18. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite...

  19. Beyond co-localization: inferring spatial interactions between sub-cellular structures from microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grégory

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-cellular structures interact in numerous direct and indirect ways in order to fulfill cellular functions. While direct molecular interactions crucially depend on spatial proximity, other interactions typically result in spatial correlations between the interacting structures. Such correlations are the target of microscopy-based co-localization analysis, which can provide hints of potential interactions. Two complementary approaches to co-localization analysis can be distinguished: intensity correlation methods capitalize on pattern discovery, whereas object-based methods emphasize detection power. Results We first reinvestigate the classical co-localization measure in the context of spatial point pattern analysis. This allows us to unravel the set of implicit assumptions inherent to this measure and to identify potential confounding factors commonly ignored. We generalize object-based co-localization analysis to a statistical framework involving spatial point processes. In this framework, interactions are understood as position co-dependencies in the observed localization patterns. The framework is based on a model of effective pairwise interaction potentials and the specification of a null hypothesis for the expected pattern in the absence of interaction. Inferred interaction potentials thus reflect all significant effects that are not explained by the null hypothesis. Our model enables the use of a wealth of well-known statistical methods for analyzing experimental data, as demonstrated on synthetic data and in a case study considering virus entry into live cells. We show that the classical co-localization measure typically under-exploits the information contained in our data. Conclusions We establish a connection between co-localization and spatial interaction of sub-cellular structures by formulating the object-based interaction analysis problem in a spatial statistics framework based on nearest-neighbor distance

  20. R Implementation of a Polyhedral Approximation to a 3D Set of Points Using the ?-Shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lafarge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the implementation in R of the ?-shape of a finite set of points in the three-dimensional space R3. This geometric structure generalizes the convex hull and allows to recover the shape of non-convex and even non-connected sets in 3D, given a ran- dom sample of points taken into it. Besides the computation of the ?-shape, the R package alphashape3d provides users with tools to facilitate the three-dimensional graphical visu- alization of the estimated set as well as the computation of important characteristics such as the connected components or the volume, among others.

  1. Statistical Colocalization of Genetic Risk Variants for Related Autoimmune Diseases in the Context of Common Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortune, Mary D.; Guo, Hui; Burren, Oliver; Schofield, Ellen; Walker, Neil M.; Ban, Maria; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Bowes, John; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Ann; Eyre, Steve; Todd, John A.; Wallace, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Identifying whether potential causal variants for related diseases are shared can identify overlapping etiologies of multifactorial disorders. Colocalization methods disentangle shared and distinct causal variants. However, existing approaches require independent datasets. Here we extend two colocalization methods to allow for the shared control design commonly used in comparison of genome-wide association study results across diseases. Our analysis of four autoimmune diseases, type 1 diabetes (T1D), rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease and multiple sclerosis, revealed 90 regions that were associated with at least one disease, 33 (37%) of which with two or more disorders. Nevertheless, for 14 of these 33 shared regions there was evidence that causal variants differed. We identified novel disease associations in 11 regions previously associated with one or more of the other three disorders. Four of eight T1D-specific regions contained known type 2 diabetes candidate genes: COBL, GLIS3, RNLS and BCAR1, suggesting a shared cellular etiology. PMID:26053495

  2. Substance P and neurokinin A are codistributed and colocalized in the porcine gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Bersani, M; Holst, J J;

    1991-01-01

    Immunoreactive substance P and neurokinin A were measured with radioimmunoassay in extracts of different segments of porcine gastrointestinal tract using C-terminally directed antisera. In all segments, the concentrations of substance P and neurokinin A were similar. The largest concentrations....... By immunohistochemistry of porcine duodenum, jejunum, ileum and mid-colon, identical localization patterns were found for substance P and neurokinin A, and the two peptides demonstrated by double immunofluorescence to be colocalized in the enteric nervous system of the ileum. We conclude that the tachykinins substance P...... and neurokinin A are codistributed and colocalized in the procine gastrointestinal tract and suggest that the two peptides are produced from a common precursor, beta- and/or gamma-preprotachykinin, in the same neurons....

  3. Experiments on co-located feedback vibration suppression in a space frame using new magnetic actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P.-Y.; Moon, Francis C.

    A 6.5-m experimental space truss was built to implement the concept of colocated velocity-feedback control with multiple channels using magnetic actuators to damp out large motions. Nonlocal self-equilibrated internal control forces are applied to suppress the bending vibration of this experimental truss. The control forces are generated through voice-coil type magnetic actuators with a high force-to-mass ratio. A moving magnet inside a solenoid is employed to pick up the corresponding velocity signal. This magnetic velocity sensor was designed as an integral part of the actuator to achieve colocation of sensor and actuator force. In order to transmit the nonlocal torque-free control forces, an actuator mechanism is invented which is not prestressed so that the truss members are not weakened. It is shown that there exist optimal damping ratios for the feedback gains. Vibration amplitudes of several centimeters can be suppressed with this device.

  4. GLP-1 and GIP are colocalized in a subset of endocrine cells in the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristine; Christensen, Louise Lundby; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incretin hormones GIP and GLP-1 are thought to be produced in separate endocrine cells located in the proximal and distal ends of the mammalian small intestine, respectively. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using double immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we found that GLP-1...... was colocalized with either GIP or PYY in endocrine cells of the porcine, rat, and human small intestines, whereas GIP and PYY were rarely colocalized. Thus, of all the cells staining positively for either GLP-1, GIP, or both, 55-75% were GLP-1 and GIP double-stained in the mid-small intestine. Concentrations...... of extractable GIP and PYY were highest in the midjejunum [154 (95-167) and 141 (67-158) pmol/g, median and range, respectively], whereas GLP-1 concentrations were highest in the ileum [92 (80-207) pmol/l], but GLP-1, GIP, and PYY immunoreactive cells were found throughout the porcine small intestine...

  5. Towards a robust algorithm to determine topological domains from colocalization data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Moscalets

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important tasks in understanding the complex spatial organization of the genome consists in extracting information about this spatial organization, the function and structure of chromatin topological domains from existing experimental data, in particular, from genome colocalization (Hi-C matrices. Here we present an algorithm allowing to reveal the underlying hierarchical domain structure of a polymer conformation from analyzing the modularity of colocalization matrices. We also test this algorithm on several model polymer structures: equilibrium globules, random fractal globules and regular fractal (Peano conformations. We define what we call a spectrum of cluster borders, and show that these spectra behave strikingly di erently for equilibrium and fractal conformations, allowing us to suggest an additional criterion to identify fractal polymer conformations.

  6. Towards a robust algorithm to determine topological domains from colocalization data

    CERN Document Server

    Moscalets, Alexander P; Tamm, Mikhail V

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important tasks in understanding the complex spatial organization of the genome consists in extracting information about this spatial organization, the function and structure of chromatin topological domains from existing experimental data, in particular, from genome colocalization (Hi-C) matrices. Here we present an algorithm allowing to reveal the underlying hierarchical domain structure of a polymer conformation from analyzing the modularity of colocalization matrices. We also test this algorithm on several model polymer structures: equilibrium globules, random fractal globules and regular fractal (Peano) conformations. We define what we call a spectrum of cluster borders, and show that these spectra behave strikingly differently for equilibrium and fractal conformations, allowing us to suggest an additional criterion to identify fractal polymer conformations.

  7. Symmetry of the Lorentz boost: the relativity of colocality and Lorentz time contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jonathan C.

    2016-09-01

    Since the Lorentz boost is symmetric under exchange of x and ct, special relativistic phenomena will also manifest this symmetry. Firstly, simultaneity becomes paired with ‘colocality’ (‘at the same place’), and the ‘Relativity of Colocality’ becomes the dual to the well-known ‘Relativity of Simultaneity’. Further, Lorentz time contraction arises from reversal of the observation conditions pertaining to time dilation, expressible figuratively as ‘Moving clocks run slow, but moving time runs fast’. Symmetry also dictates that the most fundamental observational modes are: (1) the simultaneous observation of length, a process involving both the relativity of simultaneity and length contraction; and (2) the colocal measurement of duration, involving both the relativity of colocality and time contraction. Only the first of these modes is well known. The adoption of this symmetrical lexicon provides a necessary logical basis for interpretational studies of observation and measurement in special relativity.

  8. The role of co-located storage for wind power producers in conventional electricity markets

    KAUST Repository

    Bitar, E.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we study the problem of optimizing contract offerings for an independent wind power producer (WPP) participating in conventional day-ahead forward electricity markets for energy. As wind power is an inherently variable source of energy and is difficult to predict, we explore the extent to which co-located energy storage can be used to improve expected profit and mitigate the the financial risk associated with shorting on the offered contracts. Using a simple stochastic model for wind power production and a model for the electricity market, we show that the problem of determining optimal contract offerings for a WPP with co-located energy storage can be solved using convex programming.

  9. Registration of whole immunohistochemical slide images: an efficient way to characterize biomarker colocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moles Lopez, Xavier; Barbot, Paul; Van Eycke, Yves-Rémi; Verset, Laurine; Trépant, Anne-Laure; Larbanoix, Lionel; Salmon, Isabelle; Decaestecker, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Extracting accurate information from complex biological processes involved in diseases, such as cancers, requires the simultaneous targeting of multiple proteins and locating their respective expression in tissue samples. This information can be collected by imaging and registering adjacent sections from the same tissue sample and stained by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Registration accuracy should be on the scale of a few cells to enable protein colocalization to be assessed. We propose a simple and efficient method based on the open-source elastix framework to register virtual slides of adjacent sections from the same tissue sample. We characterize registration accuracies for different types of tissue and IHC staining. Our results indicate that this technique is suitable for the evaluation of the colocalization of biomarkers on the scale of a few cells. We also show that using this technique in conjunction with a sequential IHC labeling and erasing technique offers improved registration accuracies. Brightfield IHC enables to address the problem of large series of tissue samples, which are usually required in clinical research. However, this approach, which is simple at the tissue processing level, requires challenging image analysis processes, such as accurate registration, to view and extract the protein colocalization information. The method proposed in this work enables accurate registration (on the scale of a few cells) of virtual slides of adjacent tissue sections on which the expression of different proteins is evidenced by standard IHC. Furthermore, combining our method with a sequential labeling and erasing technique enables cell-scale colocalization. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comFor numbered affiliations see end of article.

  10. GABA and Glutamate are not colocalized in mossy fiber terminals of developing rodent hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Guoxiang; Zhang, Lei; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Arroyo, Edguardo; Elkind, Jaclynn; Kundu, Suhali; Johnson, Brian; Smith, Colin J.; Cohen, Noam A.; Grady, Sean M.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that, in the developing rodent hippocampus, mossy fiber terminals release GABA together with glutamate. Here, we used transgenic glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67)-GFP expressing mice and multi-label immunohistochemistry to address whether glutamatergic and GABAergic markers are colocalized. We demonstrate that in the dentate gyrus, interneurons positive for GABA/GAD are sparsely distributed along the edge of the hilus, in a different pattern than the densely pack...

  11. Co-Location versus Disintegration of Manufacturing and R&D in Emerging Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates what makes it more or less relevant to co-locate manufacturing activities and R&D activities in emerging markets within multinational companies. A framework to this end is developed and illustrated in relation to four cases from multinational companies, which have established...... R&D and manufacturing in China or India. The findings point to the importance of contingencies such as clockspeed, technological complexity, as well as the extent to which local adaptation is needed....

  12. Manifold Learning Co-Location Decision Tree for Remotely Sensed Imagery Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Because traditional decision tree (DT induction methods cannot efficiently take advantage of geospatial knowledge in the classification of remotely sensed imagery, several researchers have presented a co-location decision tree (CL-DT method that combines the co-location technique with the traditional DT method. However, the CL-DT method only considers the Euclidean distance of neighborhood events, which cannot truly reflect the co-location relationship between instances for which there is a nonlinear distribution in a high-dimensional space. For this reason, this paper develops the theory and method for a maximum variance unfolding (MVU-based CL-DT method (known as MVU-based CL-DT, which includes unfolding input data, unfolded distance calculations, MVU-based co-location rule generation, and MVU-based CL-DT generation. The proposed method has been validated by classifying remotely sensed imagery and is compared with four other types of methods, i.e., CL-DT, classification and regression tree (CART, random forests (RFs, and stacked auto-encoders (SAE, whose classification results are taken as “true values.” The experimental results demonstrate that: (1 the relative classification accuracies of the proposed method in three test areas are higher than CL-DT and CART, and are at the same level compared to RFs; and (2 the total number of nodes, the number of leaf nodes, and the number of levels are significantly decreased by the proposed method. The time taken for the data processing, decision tree generation, drawing of the tree, and generation of the rules are also shortened by the proposed method compared to CL-DT, CART, and RFs.

  13. Collaborative Visualization : Designing and evaluating systems for co-located work

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler Pettersson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    This thesis investigates new ways of using information visualization to support collaboration in co-located work. To study this phenomenon, Multiple Viewer Display Environments (MVDEs) with independent views have been applied to present information such that all viewers at the same time and in the same display can see correct views of 3D models, see correctly oriented text and see different parts and aspects of information in each view. Several prototypes have been developed either as proof o...

  14. Expression and colocalization of β-catenin and lymphoid enhancing factor-1 in prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Tyler M; Vezina, Chad M; Ricke, Emily A; Halberg, Richard B; Huang, Wei; Peterson, Richard E; Ricke, William A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to objectively investigate β-catenin and LEF1 abundance, subcellular localization, and colocalization across benign and staged prostate cancer (PCa) specimens. A tissue microarray containing tumor-adjacent histologically benign prostate tissue (BPT; n = 48 patients), high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN; n = 25), localized PCa (n = 42), aggressive PCa (n = 31), and metastases (n = 22) was stained using multiplexed immunohistochemistry with antibodies toward E-cadherin, β-catenin, and LEF1. Multispectral imaging was used for quantitation, and protein expression and colocalization was evaluated across PCa progression. Stromal nuclear β-catenin abundance was greater in HGPIN and PCa compared with BPT (P .05). We conclude that β-catenin and LEF1 colocalization is increased in HGPIN and metastasis relative to BPT, suggesting a role for β-catenin/LEF1-mediated transcription in both malignant transformation and metastasis of PCa. Furthermore, our results suggest that LEF1 abundance alone is not a reliable readout for β-catenin activity in prostate tissues.

  15. Co-Orientation: Quantifying Simultaneous Co-Localization and Orientational Alignment of Filaments in Light Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P J Nieuwenhuizen

    Full Text Available Co-localization analysis is a widely used tool to seek evidence for functional interactions between molecules in different color channels in microscopic images. Here we extend the basic co-localization analysis by including the orientations of the structures on which the molecules reside. We refer to the combination of co-localization of molecules and orientational alignment of the structures on which they reside as co-orientation. Because the orientation varies with the length scale at which it is evaluated, we consider this scale as a separate informative dimension in the analysis. Additionally we introduce a data driven method for testing the statistical significance of the co-orientation and provide a method for visualizing the local co-orientation strength in images. We demonstrate our methods on simulated localization microscopy data of filamentous structures, as well as experimental images of similar structures acquired with localization microscopy in different color channels. We also show that in cultured primary HUVEC endothelial cells, filaments of the intermediate filament vimentin run close to and parallel with microtubuli. In contrast, no co-orientation was found between keratin and actin filaments. Co-orientation between vimentin and tubulin was also observed in an endothelial cell line, albeit to a lesser extent, but not in 3T3 fibroblasts. These data therefore suggest that microtubuli functionally interact with the vimentin network in a cell-type specific manner.

  16. Co-Orientation: Quantifying Simultaneous Co-Localization and Orientational Alignment of Filaments in Light Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P J; Nahidiazar, Leila; Manders, Erik M M; Jalink, Kees; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Rieger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Co-localization analysis is a widely used tool to seek evidence for functional interactions between molecules in different color channels in microscopic images. Here we extend the basic co-localization analysis by including the orientations of the structures on which the molecules reside. We refer to the combination of co-localization of molecules and orientational alignment of the structures on which they reside as co-orientation. Because the orientation varies with the length scale at which it is evaluated, we consider this scale as a separate informative dimension in the analysis. Additionally we introduce a data driven method for testing the statistical significance of the co-orientation and provide a method for visualizing the local co-orientation strength in images. We demonstrate our methods on simulated localization microscopy data of filamentous structures, as well as experimental images of similar structures acquired with localization microscopy in different color channels. We also show that in cultured primary HUVEC endothelial cells, filaments of the intermediate filament vimentin run close to and parallel with microtubuli. In contrast, no co-orientation was found between keratin and actin filaments. Co-orientation between vimentin and tubulin was also observed in an endothelial cell line, albeit to a lesser extent, but not in 3T3 fibroblasts. These data therefore suggest that microtubuli functionally interact with the vimentin network in a cell-type specific manner.

  17. Searching for Stochastic Gravitational Waves Using Data from the Two Co-Located LIGO Hanford Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Camp, Jordan B; Gehrels, N.; Kanner, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Searches for a stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) using terrestrial detectors typically involve cross-correlating data from pairs of detectors. The sensitivity of such cross-correlation analyses depends, among other things, on the separation between the two detectors: the smaller the separation, the better the sensitivity. Hence, a co-located detector pair is more sensitive to a gravitational-wave background than a nonco- located detector pair. However, co-located detectors are also expected to suffer from correlated noise from instrumental and environmental effects that could contaminate the measurement of the background. Hence, methods to identify and mitigate the effects of correlated noise are necessary to achieve the potential increase in sensitivity of co-located detectors. Here we report on the first SGWB analysis using the two LIGO Hanford detectors and address the complications arising from correlated environmental noise. We apply correlated noise identification and mitigation techniques to data taken by the two LIGO Hanford detectors, H1 and H2, during LIGO's fifth science run. At low frequencies, 40-460Hz, we are unable to sufficiently mitigate the correlated noise to a level where we may confidently measure or bound the stochastic gravitational-wave signal. However, at high frequencies, 460 - 1000Hz, these techniques are sufficient to set a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit on the gravitational-wave energy density of Omega(f) advanced detectors, where correlated noise (e.g., from global magnetic fields) may affect even widely separated detectors.

  18. Error analysis of semidiscrete finite element methods for inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, B.

    2014-05-30

    © 2014 Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved. We consider the initial-boundary value problem for an inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion equation with a homogeneous Dirichlet boundary condition, a vanishing initial data and a nonsmooth right-hand side in a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyse two semidiscrete schemes based on the standard Galerkin and lumped mass finite element methods. Almost optimal error estimates are obtained for right-hand side data f (x, t) ε L∞ (0, T; Hq(ω)), ≤1≥ 1, for both semidiscrete schemes. For the lumped mass method, the optimal L2(ω)-norm error estimate requires symmetric meshes. Finally, twodimensional numerical experiments are presented to verify our theoretical results.

  19. DiAna, an ImageJ tool for object-based 3D co-localization and distance analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We present a new plugin for ImageJ called DiAna, for Distance Analysis, which comes with a user-friendly interface. DiAna proposes robust and accurate 3D segmentation for object extraction. The plugin performs automated object-based co-localization and distance analysis. DiAna offers an in-depth analysis of co-localization between objects and retrieves 3D measurements including co-localizing volumes and surfaces of contact. It also computes the distribution of distance...

  20. Simple Finite Jordan Pseudoalgebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Kolesnikov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the structure of Jordan H-pseudoalgebras which are linearly finitely generated over a Hopf algebra H. There are two cases under consideration: H = U(h and H = U(h # C[Γ], where h is a finite-dimensional Lie algebra over C, Γ is an arbitrary group acting on U(h by automorphisms. We construct an analogue of the Tits-Kantor-Koecher construction for finite Jordan pseudoalgebras and describe all simple ones.

  1. Simple Finite Jordan Pseudoalgebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We consider the structure of Jordan H-pseudoalgebras which are linearly finitely generated over a Hopf algebra H. There are two cases under consideration: H = U(h) and H = U(h) # C[Γ], where h is a finite-dimensional Lie algebra over C, Γ is an arbitrary group acting on U(h) by automorphisms. We construct an analogue of the Tits-Kantor-Koecher construction for finite Jordan pseudoalgebras and describe all simple ones.

  2. Finite Unification: phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemeyer, S; Ma, E; Mondragon, M; Zoupanos, G, E-mail: sven.heinemeyer@cern.ch, E-mail: ma@phyun8.ucr.edu, E-mail: myriarn@fisica.unam.mx, E-mail: george.zoupanos@cern.ch

    2010-11-01

    We study the phenomenological implications of Finite Unified Theories (FUTs). In particular we look at the predictions for the lightest Higgs mass and the s-spectra of two all-loop finite models with SU(5) as gauge group. We also consider a two-loop finite model with gauge group SU(3){sup 3}, which is finite if and only if there are exactly three generations. In this latter model we concetrate here only on the predictions for the third generation of quark masses.

  3. Finite element procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Bathe, Klaus-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Finite element procedures are now an important and frequently indispensable part of engineering analyses and scientific investigations. This book focuses on finite element procedures that are very useful and are widely employed. Formulations for the linear and nonlinear analyses of solids and structures, fluids, and multiphysics problems are presented, appropriate finite elements are discussed, and solution techniques for the governing finite element equations are given. The book presents general, reliable, and effective procedures that are fundamental and can be expected to be in use for a long time. The given procedures form also the foundations of recent developments in the field.

  4. Handbook of finite fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mullen, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    Poised to become the leading reference in the field, the Handbook of Finite Fields is exclusively devoted to the theory and applications of finite fields. More than 80 international contributors compile state-of-the-art research in this definitive handbook. Edited by two renowned researchers, the book uses a uniform style and format throughout and each chapter is self contained and peer reviewed. The first part of the book traces the history of finite fields through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The second part presents theoretical properties of finite fields, covering polynomials,

  5. Finite Symplectic Matrix Groups

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The finite subgroups of GL(m, Q) are those subgroups that fix a full lattice in Q^m together with some positive definite symmetric form. A subgroup of GL(m, Q) is called symplectic, if it fixes a nondegenerate skewsymmetric form. Such groups only exist if m is even. A symplectic subgroup of GL(2n, Q) is called maximal finite symplectic if it is not properly contained in some finite symplectic subgroup of GL(2n, Q). This thesis classifies all conjugacy classes of maximal finite symplectic subg...

  6. Feasibility study for co-locating and integrating ethanol production plants from corn starch and lignocellulosic feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ibsen, Kelly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McAloon, Andrew [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. (United States); Yee, Winnie [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of the feasibility of co-locating corn-grain-to-ethanol and lignocellulosic ethanol plants and potential savings from combining utilities, ethanol purification, product processing, and fermentation.

  7. Novel polyhedral gold nanoparticles: green synthesis, optimization and characterization by environmental isolate of Acinetobacter sp. SW30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwani, Sweety A; Shedbalkar, Utkarsha U; Singh, Richa; Karve, Meena S; Chopade, Balu A

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles have enormous applications in cancer treatment, drug delivery and nanobiosensor due to their biocompatibility. Biological route of synthesis of metal nanoparticles are cost effective and eco-friendly. Acinetobacter sp. SW 30 isolated from activated sewage sludge produced cell bound as well as intracellular gold nanoparticles when challenged with HAuCl4 salt solution. We first time report the optimization of various physiological parameters such as age of culture, cell density and physicochemical parameters viz HAuCl4 concentration, temperature and pH which influence the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles thus produced were characterized by various analytical techniques viz. UV-Visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Polyhedral gold nanoparticles of size 20 ± 10 nm were synthesized by 24 h grown culture of cell density 2.4 × 10(9) cfu/ml at 50 °C and pH 9 in 0.5 mM HAuCl4. It was found that most of the gold nanoparticles were released into solution from bacterial cell surface of Acinetobacter sp. at pH 9 and 50 °C.

  8. Fouling behaviors of polybenzimidazole (PBI)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membranes for engineering osmosis processes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Sicong

    2014-02-01

    This paper investigated the individual effects of reverse salt flux and permeate flux on fouling behaviors of as-spun and annealed polybenzimidazole (PBI)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membranes under forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) processes. Two types of membrane fouling had been studied; namely, inorganic fouling (CaSO4·2H2O gypsum scaling) during FO operations and organic fouling (sodium alginate fouling) during PRO operations. It is found that gypsum scaling on the membrane surface may be inhibited and even eliminated with an increase in reverse MgCl2 flux due to competitive formations of MgSO4° and CaSO4·2H2O. In contrast, the increase of reverse NaCl flux exhibits a slight enhancement on alginate fouling in both FO and PRO processes. Comparing to the reverse salt flux, the permeate flux always plays a dominant role in fouling. Therefore, lesser fouling has been observed on the membrane surface under the pressurized PRO process than FO process because the reduced initial flux mitigates the fouling phenomena more significantly than the enhancement caused by an increase in reverse NaCl flux. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Investigation of the mechanical properties and porosity relationships in selective laser-sintered polyhedral for functionally graded scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarmadji, N; Tan, J Y; Leong, K F; Chua, C K; Loh, Y T

    2011-02-01

    An important requirement for a bone tissue engineering scaffold is a stiffness gradient that mimics that of native bone. Such scaffolds can be achieved by controlling their structure and porosity and are termed functionally graded scaffolds (FGS). Currently, the main challenges in FGS fabrication include the iterative and tedious design process as well as a heavy reliance on the user's CAD/CAM skills. This work aims to bring automated FGS production a step closer by providing a database that correlates scaffold porosity values and the corresponding compressive stiffness and integrating it into the design process. To achieve this goal, scaffolds with different structural configurations were designed using CASTS (Computer Aided System for Tissue Scaffolds), an in-house developed library system consisting of 13 different polyhedral units that can be assembled into scaffold structures. Polycaprolactone (PCL) was chosen as the scaffold material, while selective laser sintering, a powder-based rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing system was employed to fabricate the scaffolds. Mathematical relations correlating scaffold porosity and compressive stiffness readings were formulated and compiled. In addition, cytotoxicity assessment was conducted to evaluate the toxicity of the fabricated PCL scaffolds. Lastly, a brief demonstration of how the formulated relations are used in the FGS design process is presented.

  10. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane trisilanols as pigment surface modifiers for fluoropolymer based thickness sensitive spectrally selective (TSSS) paint coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerman, I.; Mihelcic, M.; Orel, B. [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Verhovsek, D. [Cinkarna - METALURSKO KEMICNA INDUSTRIJA CELJE, d.d. Kidriceva 26, 3001 Celje (Slovenia); Kovac, J. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-02-15

    Thickness insensitive spectrally selective (TISS) paint coatings based on black pigment (PK 3060, Ferro Company) dispersed in a fluoropolymeric resin binder (Lumiflon, Asahi Company, Japan) have recently been made without added aluminium flakes and their properties have been reported for the first time. In this study we investigated in more detail the effect of trisilanol isobutyl (IB{sub 7} T{sub 7}(OH){sub 3}) polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (trisilanol POSS) on the surface modification of PK 3060 pigment. Infrared spectral analysis of the surface modified pigment particles provided firm evidence for the formation of a POSS layer on the surface of the pigment particles, substantiated by the corresponding TEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS) measurements of functionalized and as-received pigments. SEM micrographs of the diluted dispersions in fluoropolymeric resin binder revealed uniform distribution of pigment particles with an average size of {proportional_to}300 nm and the beneficial effect of the pigment functionalization was assessed from the measured spectral selectivity of coatings of various thicknesses. (author)

  11. Unusual Emission of Polystyrene-Based Alternating Copolymers Incorporating Aminobutyl Maleimide Fluorophore-Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we synthesized an unusual 2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (MIPOSS-NHBu monomer lacking conventional fluorescent groups. We then prepared poly(styrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(S-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] and poly(4-acetoxystyrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] copolymers through facile free radical copolymerizations using azobisisobutyronitrile as the initiator and tetrahydrofuran as the solvent. A poly(4-hydroxystyrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(HS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] copolymer was prepared through acetoxyl hydrazinolysis of poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu. We employed 1H, 13C, and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; differential scanning calorimetry; and photoluminescence spectroscopy to investigate the structures and the thermal and optical properties of the monomers and novel POSS-containing alternating copolymers. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the amino and dihydrofuran-2,5-dione group and clustering of the locked C=O groups from the POSS nanoparticles in the MIPOSS-NHBu units restricted the intramolecular motion of the polymer chain, causing it to exhibit strong light emission. As a result, the MIPOSS-NHBu monomer and the poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu copolymer both have potential applicability in the detection of metal ions with good selectivity.

  12. Shape-controlled synthesis of Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles exhibiting polyhedral morphologies by modified polyol method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Nguyen Viet, E-mail: nguyenviet_long@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Posts and Telecommunications Institute of Technology, Nguyen Trai, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Asaka, Toru; Matsubara, Takashi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nogami, Masayuki, E-mail: nogami@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple synthetic method. First, Pt nanoparticles were synthesized in a controlled manner via the reduction of chloroplantinic acid hexahydrate in ethylene glycol (EG) at 160 deg. C in the presence of silver nitrate and the stabilization of polyvinylpyrrolidon. AgNO{sub 3} used acts as a structure-modifying agent to the morphology of the Pt nanoparticles. These Pt nanoparticles function as the seeds for the successive reduction of sodium tetrachloropalladate (II) hydrate in EG under stirring for 15 min at 160 deg. C in order to synthesize Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles. To characterize the as-prepared Pt-Pd nanoparticles, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM are used. The high-resolution elemental mappings were carried out using the combination of scanning TEM and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The results also demonstrate the homogeneous nucleation and growth of the Pd metal shell on the definite Pt core. The synthesized Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles exhibit a sharp and polyhedral morphology. The epitaxial growth of the controlled Pd shells on the Pt cores via a polyol method was observed. It is suggested that Frank-van der Merwe and Stranski-Krastanov growth modes coexisted in the nucleation and growth of Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles.

  13. Procedimiento de corte en cuerpos sólidos poliédricos // Section procedure in solid polyhedral bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Miguel Iznaga Benítez

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available El conocimiento de la estructura de datos de los modelos geométricos ha posibilitado el desarrollo de algoritmos parasolucionar problemas complejos. Estos algoritmos han facilitado a su vez, la automatización en las oficinas de diseño através de los medios computacionales.Por tal motivo, se presenta el desarrollo de un algoritmo para la obtención de cortes y secciones en cuerpos geométricospoliédricos, se plantean las etapas fundamentales del algoritmo y a través de un ejercicio se ejemplifica el mismo.Este algoritmo puede ser utilizado en la creación de software que ayuden al proceso docente.Palabras claves: enseñanza, gráfica, separación de sólidos, geometría, dibujo, algoritmo, CAD._________________________________________________________________________Abstract:The knowledge of data structure in geometric models has facilitated the development of algorithms to solve complexproblems. These algorithms have facilitated in turn, the automation in the design by computational means. For such reason,is presented the development of an algorithm for the obtaining of sections in polyhedral geometric bodies, the fundamentalstages of the algorithm are stated and illustrated using an example.This algorithm can be use in the software creation that will help to the educational processKey words: section, separation of solids, algorithm, geometric modeling, graphic, CAD. teaching.

  14. Silver and Copper Complexes with closo-Polyhedral Borane, Carborane and Metallacarborane Anions: Synthesis and X-ray Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varvara V. Avdeeva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and structure of silver and copper salts and complexes with polyhedral boron hydride anions, including closo-decaborate [B10H10]2−, closo-dodecaborate [B12H12]2−, 1-carba-closo- decaborate [1-CB9H10]−, carba-closo-dodecaborate [CB11H12]−, and cobalt bis(dicarbollide [3,3′-Co(1,2-C2B9H112]− anions and their derivatives, are reviewed. The complexes demonstrate a wide variety of structural types, relating to both the metal coordination environment and coordination modes of boron hydride anions. The latter can range from strong coordination via the polyhedron triangular face including formation of 3c-2e MHB bonds in the case of the [B10H10]2− dianion, the structure of which contains two four-coordinated boron atoms, to very weak M…H interactions with the hydride atoms in the case of bulky [3,3′-Co(1,2-C2B9H112]− monoanion.

  15. Highly stable nanofluid based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-decorated graphene oxide nanosheets and its enhanced electro-responsive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizhuo; Guan, Yanqing; Liu, Yang; Yin, Jianbo; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) shows potential as an anisotropic nanofiller or a dispersed phase of electro-responsive electrorheological (ER) nanofluid due to its small size and high aspect ratio. But it is difficult to disperse GO in non-polar oil due to the hydrophilic nature of GO and thus the resulting fluid is often subject to dispersion instability and low ER effect. These disadvantages largely limit the real application of GO-based ER nanofluid. In this paper, we develop the polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-decorated GO (POSS-GO) nanosheets and demonstrate that decorating with POSS overcomes the dispersion instability of GO in silicone oil and enhances the ER effect. The morphology and structure of samples are characterized by atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and x-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy. The results show that the POSS-GO nanosheets are ultrathin with ∼3 nm thickness and have good compatibility with silicone oil and, as a result, the nanofluid of POSS-GO nanosheets in silicone oil shows high dispersion stability. After standing for one year at room temperature, no sedimentation occurs. Under an external electric field, the ER efficiency of the POSS-GO nanofluid is ten times as high as that of the pure GO fluid. This enhanced electro-responsive behavior is related to the fact that decorating with POSS partly reduces the GO and compresses the dielectrophoretic effect of the negatively charged pure GO fluid.

  16. Erosion effects of atomic oxygen on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-polyimide hybrid films in low earth orbit space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duo, Shuwang; Song, Mimi; Liu, Tingzhi; Hu, Changyuan; Li, Meishuan

    2013-02-01

    A novel polyimide (PI) hybrid nanocomposite containing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) had been prepared by copolymerization of trisilanolphenyl-POSS, 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA), and pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA). The AO resistance of these PI/POSS hybrid films was tested in the ground-based AO simulation facility. Exposed and unexposed surfaces were characterized by SEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. SEM images showed that the surface of the 20 wt% PI/POSS became much less rough than that of the pristine polyimide. Mass measurements of the samples showed that the erosion yield of the PI/POSS (20 wt.%) hybrid film was 1.2 x 10(-25) cm3/atom, and reduced to 4% of the polyimide film. The XPS data indicated that the carbon content of the near-surface region was decreased from 60.1 to 13.2 at% after AO exposure. The oxygen and silicon concentrations in the near-surface region increased to 1.96 after AO exposure. The nanometer-sized structure of POSS, with its large surface area, had led AO-irradiated samples to form a SiO2 passivation layer, which protected the underlying polymer from further AO attack. The incorporation of POSS into the polyimide could dramatically improve the AO resistance of polyimide films in low earth orbit environment.

  17. Solid-phase single molecule biosensing using dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dong

    2013-10-01

    The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to the QD560-TBA I substrate. Thus, the presence of the target thrombin can be determined based on fluorescent colocalization measurements of the nanoassemblies, without target amplification or probe separation. The detection limit of this assay reached 0.8 pM. This fluorescent colocalization assay has enabled single molecule recognition in a separation-free detection format, and can serve as a sensitive biosensing platform that greatly suppresses the nonspecific adsorption false-positive signal. This method can be extended to other areas such as multiplexed immunoassay, single cell analysis, and real time biomolecule interaction studies.The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to

  18. Finite Boltzmann schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the special case of relaxation parameter = 1 lattice Boltzmann schemes for (convection) diffusion and fluid flow are equivalent to finite difference/volume (FD) schemes, and are thus coined finite Boltzmann (FB) schemes. We show that the equivalence is inherent to the homology of the

  19. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  20. Phosphorylated LIM kinases colocalize with gamma-tubulin in centrosomes during early stages of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Ratna; Jones, Jennifer L; Oelschlager, Denise K; Tapia, Tenekua; Tousson, Albert; Grizzle, William E

    2007-12-01

    LIM kinases (LIMK1 and LIMK2) are LIM domain containing serine/threonine kinases that modulate reorganization of actin cytoskeleton through inactivating phosphorylation of cofilin. The Rho family of small GTPases regulates the catalytic activity of LIMK1 and LIMK2 through activating phosphorylation by ROCK or by p21 kinase. Recent studies have suggested that LIMK1 could play a role in modulation of cellular growth by alteration of the cell cycle in breast and prostate tumor cells; however, the direct mitogenic effects of LIMK1 in these tumor cells is yet to be elucidated. Via immunofluorescence, in this study, we show that phosphorylated LIM kinases (pLIMK1/2) are colocalized with gamma-tubulin in the centrosomes during the early mitotic phases of human breast and prostate cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and DU145); apparent colocalization begins in the centrosomes in prophase. As shown by both bright field (MDA-MB-231) and fluorescent immunohistochemistry (MDA-MB-231 and DU145), pLIMK1/2 does not localize to centrosomes during interphase. By bright field immunohistochemistry, the largest area of the centrosome that is stained with pLIMK1/2 occurs at anaphase. In early telophase, reduced staining of pLIMK1/2 at the spindle poles and concomitant accumulation of pLIMK1/2 at the cleavage furrow begins to occur. In late telophase, loss of staining of pLIMK1/2 and of colocalization with gamma-tubulin occurs at the poles and pLIMK1/2 became further concentrated at the junction between the two daughter cells. Co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that gamma-tubulin associates with phosphorylated LIMK1 and LIMK2 but not with dephosphorylated LIMK1 or LIMK2. The results suggest that activated LIMK1/2 may associate with gamma-tubulin and play a role in mitotic spindle assembly.

  1. Co-location opportunities for renewable energy and agriculture in Northwestern India: Tradeoffs and Synergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, S.; Macknick, J.; Lobell, D. B.; Field, C. B.; Ganesan, K.; Jain, R.; Elchinger, M.; Stoltenberg, B.

    2014-12-01

    Solar energy installations in arid and semi-arid regions of India are rapidly increasing, due to technological advances and policy support. Even though solar energy provides several benefits such as reduction of greenhouse gases, reclamation of degraded land, and improving the quality of life, the deployment of large-scale solar energy infrastructure can adversely impact land and water resources. A major challenge is how to meet the ever-expanding energy demand with limited land and water resources, in the context of increasing competition from agricultural and domestic consumption. We investigated whether water consumption for solar energy development in northwestern India could impact other water and land uses, and explored opportunities to co-locate solar infrastructures and agricultural crops to maximize the efficiency of land and water use. We considered energy inputs/outputs, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and economics of solar installations in northwestern India in comparison to Aloe vera cultivation, a widely promoted land use in the region. The life cycle analyses show that co-located systems are economically viable in some rural areas and may provide opportunities for rural electrification and stimulate economic growth. The water inputs for cleaning solar panels and dust suppression are similar to amounts required for aloe, suggesting the possibility of integrating the two systems to maximize water and land use efficiency. A life-cycle analysis of a hypothetical co-location indicated higher returns per m3 of water used than either system alone. The northwestern region of India is experiencing high population growth, creating additional demand for land and water resources. In these water limited areas, coupled solar infrastructure and agriculture could be established on marginal lands, thus minimizing the socioeconomic and environmental issues resulting from cultivation of non-food crops (e.g. Aloe) in prime agricultural lands.

  2. Searching for stochastic gravitational waves using data from the two colocated LIGO Hanford detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Iafrate, J.

    2015-01-01

    Searches for a stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) using terrestrial detectors typically involve cross-correlating data from pairs of detectors. The sensitivity of such cross-correlation analyses depends, among other things, on the separation between the two detectors: the smaller the separation, the better the sensitivity. Hence, a colocated detector pair is more sensitive to a gravitational-wave background than a noncolocated detector pair. However, colocated detectors are also expected to suffer from correlated noise from instrumental and environmental effects that could contaminate the measurement of the background. Hence, methods to identify and mitigate the effects of correlated noise are necessary to achieve the potential increase in sensitivity of colocated detectors. Here we report on the first SGWB analysis using the two LIGO Hanford detectors and address the complications arising from correlated environmental noise. We apply correlated noise identification and mitigation techniques to data taken by the two LIGO Hanford detectors, H1 and H2, during LIGO's fifth science run. At low frequencies, 40-460 Hz, we are unable to sufficiently mitigate the correlated noise to a level where we may confidently measure or bound the stochastic gravitational-wave signal. However, at high frequencies, 460-1000 Hz, these techniques are sufficient to set a 95% confidence level upper limit on the gravitational-wave energy density of Ω (f )<7.7 ×1 0-4(f /900 Hz )3 , which improves on the previous upper limit by a factor of ˜180 . In doing so, we demonstrate techniques that will be useful for future searches using advanced detectors, where correlated noise (e.g., from global magnetic fields) may affect even widely separated detectors.

  3. A phase coherence approach to identifying co-located earthquakes and tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, J. C.; Ampuero, J.-P.

    2017-01-01

    We present and use a phase coherence approach to identify seismic signals that have similar path effects but different source time functions: co-located earthquakes and tremor. The method used is a phase coherence-based implementation of empirical matched field processing, modified to suit tremor analysis. It works by comparing the frequency-domain phases of waveforms generated by two sources recorded at multiple stations. We first cross-correlate the records of the two sources at a single station. If the sources are co-located, this cross-correlation eliminates the phases of the Green's function. It leaves the relative phases of the source time functions, which should be the same across all stations so long as the spatial extent of the sources are small compared with the seismic wavelength. We therefore search for cross-correlation phases that are consistent across stations as an indication of co-located sources. We also introduce a method to obtain relative locations between the two sources, based on back-projection of inter-station phase coherence. We apply this technique to analyze two tremor-like signals that are thought to be composed of a number of earthquakes. First, we analyze a 20-second-long seismic precursor to a M 3.9 earthquake in central Alaska. The analysis locates the precursor to within 2 km of the mainshock, and it identifies several bursts of energy-potentially foreshocks or groups of foreshocks-within the precursor. Second, we examine several minutes of volcanic tremor prior to an eruption at Redoubt Volcano. We confirm that the tremor source is located close to repeating earthquakes identified earlier in the tremor sequence. The amplitude of the tremor diminishes about 30 seconds before the eruption, but the phase coherence results suggest that the tremor may persist at some level through this final interval.

  4. Satellite co-locations as a link between SLR, GPS and Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melachroinos, S. A.; Lemoine, F. G.; Chinn, D. S.; Nicolas, J. B.; Zelensky, N. P.; Wimert, J.; Radway, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The procedure applied for the determination of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) requires the combination of all four major techniques of Space Geodesy. This combination is only possibly realized by the introduction of the local-ties between co-located techniques. A local-tie is the lever arm vector between the marker points on the sites where two or more space geodesy instruments operate. The local ties are used as additional observations with proper variances. They are usually derived from local surveys using either classical geodesy or the global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). The Global Positioning System (GPS) plays a major role in the ITRF combination by linking together all the other three techniques SLR, DORIS and VLBI (Altamimi and Collilieux 2009). However, discrepancies between local ties and space geodesy estimates are well known although the reasons for these discrepancies are often not clear. These discrepancies could be either due to errors in local ties and in coordinate estimates or in both. In this study, we use the tracking to G05-35 and G06-36 and one LEO by SLR sites and their combined orbits, earth rotation parameters (ERPs) and station positions in order to establish space-based co-location ties on the stations. The LEO satellite used in this experiment is Jason-2, which carries both GPS and SLR. Therefore from the data-processing point of view the LEO satellite is used as a fast moving station (Thaller et al. 2011). Jason-2 is also equipped with DORIS, but it will be included into another combined analysis. Subsequently, we compare the consistency of our space-based co-locations to the ones from ITRF08 and SLRF08 - IGb08 solutions.

  5. On finitely recursive programs

    CERN Document Server

    Baselice, Sabrina; Criscuolo, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Disjunctive finitary programs are a class of logic programs admitting function symbols and hence infinite domains. They have very good computational properties, for example ground queries are decidable while in the general case the stable model semantics is highly undecidable. In this paper we prove that a larger class of programs, called finitely recursive programs, preserves most of the good properties of finitary programs under the stable model semantics, namely: (i) finitely recursive programs enjoy a compactness property; (ii) inconsistency checking and skeptical reasoning are semidecidable; (iii) skeptical resolution is complete for normal finitely recursive programs. Moreover, we show how to check inconsistency and answer skeptical queries using finite subsets of the ground program instantiation. We achieve this by extending the splitting sequence theorem by Lifschitz and Turner: We prove that if the input program P is finitely recursive, then the partial stable models determined by any smooth splittin...

  6. Resolution, target density and labeling effects in colocalization studies - suppression of false positives by nanoscopy and modified algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Rönnlund, Daniel; Aspenström, Pontus; Braun, Laura J; Gad, Annica K B; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-03-01

    Colocalization analyses of fluorescence images are extensively used to quantify molecular interactions in cells. In recent years, fluorescence nanoscopy has approached resolutions close to molecular dimensions. However, the extent to which image resolution influences different colocalization estimates has not been systematically investigated. In this work, we applied simulations and resolution-tunable stimulated emission depletion microscopy to evaluate how the resolution, molecular density and label size of targeted molecules influence estimates of the most commonly used colocalization algorithms (Pearson correlation coefficient, Manders' M1 and M2 coefficients), as well as estimates by the image cross-correlation spectroscopy method. We investigated the practically measureable extents of colocalization for stimulated emission depletion microscopy with positive and negative control samples with an aim to identifying the strengths and weaknesses of nanoscopic techniques for colocalization studies. At a typical optical resolution of a confocal microscope (200-300 nm), our results indicate that the extent of colocalization is typically overestimated by the tested algorithms, especially at high molecular densities. Only minor effects of this kind were observed at higher resolutions (algorithm, used in combination with correlation-based methods like the Pearson coefficient and the image cross-correlation spectroscopy approach, to set intensity thresholds separating background noise from signals.

  7. Intrasite motions and monument instabilities at Medicina ITRF co-location site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, Claudio; Legrand, Juliette; Bruyninx, Carine; Vittuari, Luca; Ray, Jim

    2013-03-01

    We process the total-station surveys performed at the ITRF co-location site Medicina (Northern Italy) over the decade (2001-2010) with the purpose of determining the extent of local intrasite motions and relating them to local geophysical processes, the geological setting and the design of the ground pillars. In addition, continuous observations acquired by two co-located GPS stations (MEDI and MSEL separated by ≈27 m) are analysed and their relative motion is cross-checked with the total-station results. The local ground control network extends over a small area (<100 × 100 m) but the results demonstrate significant anisotropic deformations with rates up to 1.6 mm a-1, primarily horizontal, a value comparable to intraplate tectonic deformations. The results derived from GPS and total-station observations are consistent and point to the presence of horizontal intrasite motions over very short distances possibly associated with varying environmental conditions in a very unfavourable local geological setting and unsuitable monument design, these latter being crucial aspects of the realization and maintenance of global permanent geodetic networks and the global terrestrial reference frame.

  8. Colocalization of coregulated genes: a steered molecular dynamics study of human chromosome 19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Di Stefano

    Full Text Available The connection between chromatin nuclear organization and gene activity is vividly illustrated by the observation that transcriptional coregulation of certain genes appears to be directly influenced by their spatial proximity. This fact poses the more general question of whether it is at all feasible that the numerous genes that are coregulated on a given chromosome, especially those at large genomic distances, might become proximate inside the nucleus. This problem is studied here using steered molecular dynamics simulations in order to enforce the colocalization of thousands of knowledge-based gene sequences on a model for the gene-rich human chromosome 19. Remarkably, it is found that most (≈ 88% gene pairs can be brought simultaneously into contact. This is made possible by the low degree of intra-chromosome entanglement and the large number of cliques in the gene coregulatory network. A clique is a set of genes coregulated all together as a group. The constrained conformations for the model chromosome 19 are further shown to be organized in spatial macrodomains that are similar to those inferred from recent HiC measurements. The findings indicate that gene coregulation and colocalization are largely compatible and that this relationship can be exploited to draft the overall spatial organization of the chromosome in vivo. The more general validity and implications of these findings could be investigated by applying to other eukaryotic chromosomes the general and transferable computational strategy introduced here.

  9. Colocalization and identification of interaction sites between IGFBP-3 and GalNAc-T14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen; Ma, Si-Si; Ge, Jian-Feng; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Tian, Huan-Na; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Fang-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Kang; Li, Qin-Jian

    2012-05-15

    GalNAc-T14 was identified as a novel IGFBP-3 binding partner in previous studies. Here, we furtherly confirmed the interaction between them by confocal microscopy, and identified the binding domain and probable interaction sites of GalNAc-T14 with IGFBP-3. The result of subcellular localization indicated that GalNAc-T14 was distributed in the cytosol, whereas IGFBP-3 existed in the cytosol and nucleolus. Confocal analyses demonstrated that IGFBP-3 and GalNAc-T14 colocalized in the cytosol. The result from yeast two hybrid assay showed that the C terminus of GalNAc-T14 (408-552aa) was essential for the interaction between GalNAc-T14 and IGFBP-3, especially Tyr(408), Pro(409), and Glu(410) of GalNAc-T14 may play key roles in the interaction with IGFBP-3. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated that IGFBP-3 and GalNAc-T14 are colocalized in MCF-7 cells and confirmed the interaction between IGFBP-3 and GalNAc-T14. This interaction may play an important role in the functional regulation of IGFBP-3.

  10. Does super-resolution fluorescence microscopy obsolete previous microscopic approaches to protein co-localization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Laura; Baldini, Giulia; Storrie, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional microscopy techniques, namely, the confocal microscope or deconvolution processes, are resolution limited to approximately 200-250 nm by the diffraction properties of light as developed by Ernst Abbe in 1873. This diffraction limit is appreciably above the size of most multi-protein complexes, which are typically 20-50 nm in diameter. In the mid-2000s, biophysicists moved beyond the diffraction barrier by structuring the illumination pattern and then applying mathematical principles and algorithms to allow a resolution of approximately 100 nm, sufficient to address protein subcellular co-localization questions. This "breaking" of the diffraction barrier, affording resolution beyond 200 nm, is termed super-resolution microscopy. More recent approaches include single-molecule localization (such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM)/stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM)) and point spread function engineering (such as stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy). In this review, we explain basic principles behind currently commercialized super-resolution setups and address advantages and considerations in applying these techniques to protein co-localization in biological systems.

  11. Quantifying colocalization by correlation: the Pearson correlation coefficient is superior to the Mander's overlap coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Jeremy; Parmryd, Ingela

    2010-08-01

    The Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) and the Mander's overlap coefficient (MOC) are used to quantify the degree of colocalization between fluorophores. The MOC was introduced to overcome perceived problems with the PCC. The two coefficients are mathematically similar, differing in the use of either the absolute intensities (MOC) or of the deviation from the mean (PCC). A range of correlated datasets, which extend to the limits of the PCC, only evoked a limited response from the MOC. The PCC is unaffected by changes to the offset while the MOC increases when the offset is positive. Both coefficients are independent of gain. The MOC is a confusing hybrid measurement, that combines correlation with a heavily weighted form of co-occurrence, favors high intensity combinations, downplays combinations in which either or both intensities are low and ignores blank pixels. The PCC only measures correlation. A surprising finding was that the addition of a second uncorrelated population can substantially increase the measured correlation, demonstrating the importance of excluding background pixels. Overall, since the MOC is unresponsive to substantial changes in the data and is hard to interpret, it is neither an alternative to nor a useful substitute for the PCC. The MOC is not suitable for making measurements of colocalization either by correlation or co-occurrence.

  12. Amyloid-beta colocalizes with apolipoprotein B in absorptive cells of the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Susan; Takechi, Ryusuke; Pallebage-Gamarallage, Menuka M S; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Mamo, John C L

    2009-10-22

    Amyloid-beta is recognized as the major constituent of senile plaque found in subjects with Alzheimer's disease. However, there is increasing evidence that in a physiological context amyloid-beta may serve as regulating apolipoprotein, primarily of the triglyceride enriched lipoproteins. To consider this hypothesis further, this study utilized an in vivo immunological approach to explore in lipogenic tissue whether amyloid-beta colocalizes with nascent triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. In murine absorptive epithelial cells of the small intestine, amyloid-beta had remarkable colocalization with chylomicrons (Manders overlap coefficient = 0.73 +/- 0.03 (SEM)), the latter identified as immunoreactive apolipoprotein B. A diet enriched in saturated fats doubled the abundance of both amyloid-beta and apo B and increased the overlap coefficient of the two proteins (0.87 +/- 0.02). However, there was no evidence that abundance of the two proteins was interdependent within the enterocytes (Pearson's Coefficient Coefficient beta is secreted by enterocytes as an apolipoprotein component of chylomicrons. However, secretion of amyloid-beta appears to be independent of chylomicron biogenesis.

  13. Handling realistic assumptions in hypothesis testing of 3D co-localization of genomic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Jonas; Lien, Tonje G; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Holden, Lars; Borgan, Ornulf; Glad, Ingrid K; Hovig, Eivind

    2013-05-01

    The study of chromatin 3D structure has recently gained much focus owing to novel techniques for detecting genome-wide chromatin contacts using next-generation sequencing. A deeper understanding of the architecture of the DNA inside the nucleus is crucial for gaining insight into fundamental processes such as transcriptional regulation, genome dynamics and genome stability. Chromatin conformation capture-based methods, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, are now paving the way for routine genome-wide studies of chromatin 3D structure in a range of organisms and tissues. However, appropriate methods for analyzing such data are lacking. Here, we propose a hypothesis test and an enrichment score of 3D co-localization of genomic elements that handles intra- or interchromosomal interactions, both separately and jointly, and that adjusts for biases caused by structural dependencies in the 3D data. We show that maintaining structural properties during resampling is essential to obtain valid estimation of P-values. We apply the method on chromatin states and a set of mutated regions in leukemia cells, and find significant co-localization of these elements, with varying enrichment scores, supporting the role of chromatin 3D structure in shaping the landscape of somatic mutations in cancer.

  14. Nodularin Exposure Induces SOD1 Phosphorylation and Disrupts SOD1 Co-localization with Actin Filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari E. Fladmark

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Apoptotic cell death is induced in primary hepatocytes by the Ser/Thr protein phosphatase inhibiting cyanobacterial toxin nodularin after only minutes of exposure. Nodularin-induced apoptosis involves a rapid development of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which can be delayed by the Ca2+/calmodulin protein kinase II inhibitor KN93. This apoptosis model provides us with a unique population of highly synchronized dying cells, making it possible to identify low abundant phosphoproteins participating in apoptosis signaling. Here, we show that nodularin induces phosphorylation and possibly also cysteine oxidation of the antioxidant Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1, without altering enzymatic SOD1 activity. The observed post-translational modifications of SOD1 could be regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin protein kinase II. In untreated hepatocytes, a high concentration of SOD1 was found in the sub-membranous area, co-localized with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. In the early phase of nodularin exposure, SOD1 was found in high concentration in evenly distributed apoptotic buds. Nodularin induced a rapid reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and, at the time of polarized budding, SOD1 and actin filaments no longer co-localized.

  15. Precise Haptic Device Co-Location for Visuo-Haptic Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Ulrich; Pankratz, Frieder; Sandor, Christian; Klinker, Gudrun; Laga, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    Visuo-haptic augmented reality systems enable users to see and touch digital information that is embedded in the real world. PHANToM haptic devices are often employed to provide haptic feedback. Precise co-location of computer-generated graphics and the haptic stylus is necessary to provide a realistic user experience. Previous work has focused on calibration procedures that compensate the non-linear position error caused by inaccuracies in the joint angle sensors. In this article we present a more complete procedure that additionally compensates for errors in the gimbal sensors and improves position calibration. The proposed procedure further includes software-based temporal alignment of sensor data and a method for the estimation of a reference for position calibration, resulting in increased robustness against haptic device initialization and external tracker noise. We designed our procedure to require minimal user input to maximize usability. We conducted an extensive evaluation with two different PHANToMs, two different optical trackers, and a mechanical tracker. Compared to state-of-the-art calibration procedures, our approach significantly improves the co-location of the haptic stylus. This results in higher fidelity visual and haptic augmentations, which are crucial for fine-motor tasks in areas such as medical training simulators, assembly planning tools, or rapid prototyping applications.

  16. In vitro colocalization of plasmonic nano-biolabels and biomolecules using plasmonic and Raman scattering microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2015-04-01

    An insight into the intracellular fate of theranostics is important for improving their potential in biological applications. In vivo efficacy of plasmonic theranostics depends on our ability to monitor temporal changes in their size, shape, and state of aggregation, and the identification of molecules adsorbed on their surfaces. We develop a technique which combines plasmonic and Raman scattering microspectroscopy to colocalize plasmonic scattering from metallic nanoparticles with the Raman signatures of biomolecules adsorbed on the surface of the former. Using this technique, we have colocalized biomolecules with the plasmonic scattering from silver nanoparticles in the vicinity of Escherichia coli bacteria. To prove the applicability of this setup for the measurements on mammalian cells, imaging of HEK293 cells treated with gold nanoparticles was performed. We discuss the importance of such correlated measurements over individual techniques, although the latter may lead to misinterpretation of results. Finally, with the above-mentioned examples, we have given criteria to improve the specificity of theranostics. We believe that this methodology will be considered as a prime development in the assessment of theranostics.

  17. CUTANEOUS LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS WITH AUTOANTIBODIES COLOCALIZING WITH GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu-Velez Ana Maria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE is a chronic, inflammatory skin disorder, presenting with scarring lesions predominating on sun exposed areas of the face and scalp. Case Report: A 43-year-old African American female was evaluated for possible DLE. Methods: Skin biopsies for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E examination, as well as for direct immunofluorescence (DIF analysis were performed. Results: H&E staining demonstrated classic features of cutaneous lupus erythematosus, with the pertinent presence of perineural lymphohistiocitic infiltrates, especially those associated with skin appendices. DIF revealed strong deposits of immunoglobulins IgG, IgM, fibrinogen and Complement/C3, present in a shaggy, linear pattern at or near the basement membrane zone (BMZ of selected eccrine and sebaceous glands, and around some blood vessels. The BMZ positivity in these structures consistently colocalized with positive staining in multiple, punctate areas for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, including within cytoid bodies. Conclusions:. The observed colocalization of the patient’s autoantibodies in cutaneous lupus with GFAP may have pathophysiologic relevance. Specifically, our data could be consistent with previously described DLE patients with or without overt central nervous system manifestations, or could represent an epiphenomenon. Additional, larger studies are needed to satisfactorily address this possibility.

  18. GABAA receptors: post-synaptic co-localization and cross-talk with other receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amulya Nidhi Shrivastava

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system (CNS, and importantly contribute to the functional regulation of the nervous system. Several studies in the last few decades have convincingly shown that GABA can be co-localized with other neurotransmitters in the same synapse, and can be co-released with these neurotransmitters either from the same vesicles or from different vesicle pools. The co-released transmitters may act on post-synaptically co-localized receptors resulting in a simultaneous activation of both receptors. Most of the studies investigating such co-activation observed a reduced efficacy of GABA for activating GABAARs and thus, a reduced inhibition of the postsynaptic neuron. Similarly, in several cases activation of GABAARs has been reported to suppress the response of the associated receptors. Such a receptor cross-talk is either mediated via a direct coupling between the two receptors or via the activation of intracellular signaling pathways and is used for fine tuning of inhibition in the nervous system. Recently, it was demonstrated that a direct interaction of different receptors might already occur in intracellular compartments and might also be used to specifically target the receptors to the cell membrane. In this article, we provide an overview on such cross-talks between GABAARs and several other neurotransmitter receptors and briefly discuss their possible physiological and clinical importance.

  19. Amyloid-β colocalizes with apolipoprotein B in absorptive cells of the small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaliwal Satvinder S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid-β is recognized as the major constituent of senile plaque found in subjects with Alzheimer's disease. However, there is increasing evidence that in a physiological context amyloid-β may serve as regulating apolipoprotein, primarily of the triglyceride enriched lipoproteins. To consider this hypothesis further, this study utilized an in vivo immunological approach to explore in lipogenic tissue whether amyloid-β colocalizes with nascent triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Results In murine absorptive epithelial cells of the small intestine, amyloid-β had remarkable colocalization with chylomicrons (Manders overlap coefficient = 0.73 ± 0.03 (SEM, the latter identified as immunoreactive apolipoprotein B. A diet enriched in saturated fats doubled the abundance of both amyloid-β and apo B and increased the overlap coefficient of the two proteins (0.87 ± 0.02. However, there was no evidence that abundance of the two proteins was interdependent within the enterocytes (Pearson's Coefficient Conclusion The findings of this study are consistent with the possibility that amyloid-β is secreted by enterocytes as an apolipoprotein component of chylomicrons. However, secretion of amyloid-β appears to be independent of chylomicron biogenesis.

  20. An Intercomparison of GPS RO Retrievals with Colocated Analysis and In Situ Observations within Tropical Cyclones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry R. Winterbottom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations from four Global Position System (GPS Radio Occultation (RO missions: Global Positioning System/Meteorology, CHAallenging Minisatellite Payload, Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C, and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate and Taiwan's FORMOsa SATellite Mission #3 (COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 are collected within a 600 km radius and ±180 minute temporal window of all observed tropical cyclones (TCs from 1995 to 2006 that were recorded in the global hurricane best-track reanalysis data set (Jarvinen et al. (1984; Davis et al. (1984. A composite analysis of tropical cyclone radial mean temperature and water vapor profiles is carried out using the GPS RO retrievals which are colocated with global analysis profiles and available in situ radiosonde observations. The differences between the respective observations and analysis profiles are quantified and the preliminary results show that the observations collected within TCs correspond favorably with both the analysis and radiosonde profiles which are colocated. It is concluded that GPS RO observations will contribute significantly to the understanding and modeling of TC structures, especially those related to vertical variability of the atmospheric state within TCs.

  1. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  2. Introduction to finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Kárteszi, F

    1976-01-01

    North-Holland Texts in Advanced Mathematics: Introduction to Finite Geometries focuses on the advancements in finite geometries, including mapping and combinatorics. The manuscript first offers information on the basic concepts on finite geometries and Galois geometries. Discussions focus on linear mapping of a given quadrangle onto another given quadrangle; point configurations of order 2 on a Galois plane of even order; canonical equation of curves of the second order on the Galois planes of even order; and set of collineations mapping a Galois plane onto itself. The text then ponders on geo

  3. A mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem with elected edge bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipnikov, K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berirao, L [DIPARTMENTO DI MATERMATICA

    2009-01-01

    A new mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem is proposed and analyzed. The unstable P{sub 1}-P{sub 0} discretization is stabilized by adding a small number of bubble functions to selected mesh edges. A simple strategy for selecting such edges is proposed and verified with numerical experiments. The discretizations schemes for Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations must satisfy the celebrated inf-sup (or the LBB) stability condition. The stability condition implies a balance between discrete spaces for velocity and pressure. In finite elements, this balance is frequently achieved by adding bubble functions to the velocity space. The goal of this article is to show that the stabilizing edge bubble functions can be added only to a small set of mesh edges. This results in a smaller algebraic system and potentially in a faster calculations. We employ the mimetic finite difference (MFD) discretization technique that works for general polyhedral meshes and can accomodate non-uniform distribution of stabilizing bubbles.

  4. Polyhedral shape model for terrain correction of gravity and gravity gradient data based on an adaptive mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhikui; Chen, Chao; Tao, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    Since 2007, there are four China Da yang cruises (CDCs), which have been carried out to investigate polymetallic sulfides in the southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) and have acquired both gravity data and bathymetry data on the corresponding survey lines(Tao et al., 2014). Sandwell et al. (2014) published a new global marine gravity model including the free air gravity data and its first order vertical gradient (Vzz). Gravity data and its gradient can be used to extract unknown density structure information(e.g. crust thickness) under surface of the earth, but they contain all the mass effect under the observation point. Therefore, how to get accurate gravity and its gradient effect of the existing density structure (e.g. terrain) has been a key issue. Using the bathymetry data or ETOPO1 (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/global/global.html) model at a full resolution to calculate the terrain effect could spend too much computation time. We expect to develop an effective method that takes less time but can still yield the desired accuracy. In this study, a constant-density polyhedral model is used to calculate the gravity field and its vertical gradient, which is based on the work of Tsoulis (2012). According to gravity field attenuation with distance and variance of bathymetry, we present an adaptive mesh refinement and coarsening strategies to merge both global topography data and multi-beam bathymetry data. The local coarsening or size of mesh depends on user-defined accuracy and terrain variation (Davis et al., 2011). To depict terrain better, triangular surface element and rectangular surface element are used in fine and coarse mesh respectively. This strategy can also be applied to spherical coordinate in large region and global scale. Finally, we applied this method to calculate Bouguer gravity anomaly (BGA), mantle Bouguer anomaly(MBA) and their vertical gradient in SWIR. Further, we compared the result with previous results in the literature. Both synthetic model

  5. Finite BMS transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnich, Glenn [Physique Théorique et Mathématique,Université Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes,Campus Plaine C.P. 231, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Troessaert, Cédric [Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECs),Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile)

    2016-03-24

    The action of finite BMS and Weyl transformations on the gravitational data at null infinity is worked out in three and four dimensions in the case of an arbitrary conformal factor for the boundary metric induced on Scri.

  6. Quarks in finite nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Guichon, P A M; Thomas, A W

    1996-01-01

    We describe the development of a theoretical description of the structure of finite nuclei based on a relativistic quark model of the structure of the bound nucleons which interact through the (self-consistent) exchange of scalar and vector mesons.

  7. Advanced finite element technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Wriggers, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The book presents an overview of the state of research of advanced finite element technologies. Besides the mathematical analysis, the finite element development and their engineering applications are shown to the reader. The authors give a survey of the methods and technologies concerning efficiency, robustness and performance aspects. The book covers the topics of mathematical foundations for variational approaches and the mathematical understanding of the analytical requirements of modern finite element methods. Special attention is paid to finite deformations, adaptive strategies, incompressible, isotropic or anisotropic material behavior and the mathematical and numerical treatment of the well-known locking phenomenon. Beyond that new results for the introduced approaches are presented especially for challenging nonlinear problems.

  8. One-bit-matching theorem for ICA, convex-concave programming on polyhedral set, and distribution approximation for combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei

    2007-02-01

    According to the proof by Liu, Chiu, and Xu (2004) on the so-called one-bit-matching conjecture (Xu, Cheung, and Amari, 1998a), all the sources can be separated as long as there is an one-to-one same-sign correspondence between the kurtosis signs of all source probability density functions (pdf's) and the kurtosis signs of all model pdf's, which is widely believed and implicitly supported by many empirical studies. However, this proof is made only in a weak sense that the conjecture is true when the global optimal solution of an independent component analysis criterion is reached. Thus, it cannot support the successes of many existing iterative algorithms that usually converge at one of the local optimal solutions. This article presents a new mathematical proof that is obtained in a strong sense that the conjecture is also true when any one of local optimal solutions is reached in helping to investigating convex-concave programming on a polyhedral set. Theorems are also provided not only on partial separation of sources when there is a partial matching between the kurtosis signs, but also on an interesting duality of maximization and minimization on source separation. Moreover, corollaries are obtained on an interesting duality, with supergaussian sources separated by maximization and subgaussian sources separated by minimization. Also, a corollary is obtained to confirm the symmetric orthogonalization implementation of the kurtosis extreme approach for separating multiple sources in parallel, which works empirically but lacks mathematical proof. Furthermore, a linkage has been set up to combinatorial optimization from a distribution approximation perspective and a Stiefel manifold perspective, with algorithms that guarantee convergence as well as satisfaction of constraints.

  9. Colocalization of endogenous TNF with a functional intracellular splice form of human TNF receptor type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schütze Stephan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF is a pleiotropic cytokine involved in a broad spectrum of inflammatory and immune responses including proliferation, differentiation, and cell death. The biological effects of TNF are mediated via two cell surface TNF receptors: p55TNFR (TNFR1; CD120a and p75TNFR (TNFR2; CD120b. Soluble forms of these two receptors consisting of the extracellular domains are proteolytically cleaved from the membrane and act as inhibitors. A novel p75TNFR isoform generated by the use of an additional transcriptional start site has been described and was termed hicp75TNFR. We focused on the characterization of this new isoform as this protein may be involved in chronic inflammatory processes. Methods Cell lines were retroviraly transduced with hp75TNFR isoforms. Subcellular localization and colocalization studies with TNF were performed using fluorescence microscopy including exhaustive photon reassignment software, flow cytometry, and receptosome isolation by magnetic means. Biochemical properties of the hicp75TNFR were determined by affinity chromatography, ELISA, and western blot techniques. Results We describe the localization and activation of a differentially spliced and mainly intracellularly expressed isoform of human p75TNFR, termed hicp75TNFR. Expression studies with hicp75TNFR cDNA in different cell types showed the resulting protein mostly retained in the trans-Golgi network and in endosomes and colocalizes with endogenous TNF. Surface expressed hicp75TNFR behaves like hp75TNFR demonstrating susceptibility for TACE-induced shedding and NFκB activation after TNF binding. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that intracellular hicp75TNFR is not accessible for exogenously provided TNF but colocalizes with endogenously produced TNF. These findings suggest a possible intracellular activation mechanism of hicp75TNFR by endogenous TNF. Subsequent NFκB activation might induce anti-apoptotic mechanisms to protect TNF

  10. Effect of the substituents on the thermal stability of hepta cyclopentyl, phenyl substitued - Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (hcp-POSS)/polystyrene (PS) nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Ignazio; Bottino, Francesco Agatino

    2012-07-01

    The thermal degradation of various Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polystyrene (POSS/PS) nanocomposites of formula R7 R'1 (SiO1.5)8/PS (where R- and R'- were a cyclopentyl and a substituted phenyl group), at various (3%, 5% and 10%) POSS concentration, was studied in both inert (flowing nitrogen) and oxidative (static air) atmospheres. Nanocomposites were prepared by the polymerization of styrene in the presence of POSS. Degradations were carried out into a thermobalance at various heating rates, and the obtained thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves were discussed and interpreted.

  11. Integrating molecular QTL data into genome-wide genetic association analysis: Probabilistic assessment of enrichment and colocalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel statistical framework for integrating the result from molecular quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping into genome-wide genetic association analysis of complex traits, with the primary objectives of quantitatively assessing the enrichment of the molecular QTLs in complex trait-associated genetic variants and the colocalizations of the two types of association signals. We introduce a natural Bayesian hierarchical model that treats the latent association status of molecular QTLs as SNP-level annotations for candidate SNPs of complex traits. We detail a computational procedure to seamlessly perform enrichment, fine-mapping and colocalization analyses, which is a distinct feature compared to the existing colocalization analysis procedures in the literature. The proposed approach is computationally efficient and requires only summary-level statistics. We evaluate and demonstrate the proposed computational approach through extensive simulation studies and analyses of blood lipid data and the whole blood eQTL data from the GTEx project. In addition, a useful utility from our proposed method enables the computation of expected colocalization signals using simple characteristics of the association data. Using this utility, we further illustrate the importance of enrichment analysis on the ability to discover colocalized signals and the potential limitations of currently available molecular QTL data. The software pipeline that implements the proposed computation procedures, enloc, is freely available at https://github.com/xqwen/integrative. PMID:28278150

  12. Fluorescence colocalization microscopy analysis can be improved by combining object‐recognition with pixel‐intensity‐correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Bernhard; Hochreiter, Bernhard; Herbst, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The question whether two proteins interact with each other or whether a protein localizes to a certain region of the cell is often addressed with fluorescence microscopy and analysis of a potential colocalization of fluorescence markers. Since a mere visual estimation does not allow quantification of the degree of colocalization, different statistical methods of pixel‐intensity correlation are commonly used to score it. We observed that these correlation coefficients are prone to false positive results and tend to show high values even for molecules that reside in different organelles. Our aim was to improve this type of analysis and we developed a novel method combining object‐recognition based colocalization analysis with pixel‐intensity correlation to calculate an object‐corrected Pearson coefficient. We designed a macro for the Fiji‐version of the software ImageJ and tested the performance systematically with various organelle markers revealing an improved robustness of our approach over classical methods. In order to prove that colocalization does not necessarily mean a physical interaction, we performed FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) microscopy. This confirmed that non‐interacting molecules can exhibit a nearly complete colocalization, but that they do not show any significant FRET signal in contrast to proteins that are bound to each other. PMID:27420480

  13. The Relation of Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokur, M.

    1976-01-01

    Finite element and finite difference methods are examined in order to bring out their relationship. It is shown that both methods use two types of discrete representations of continuous functions. They differ in that finite difference methods emphasize the discretization of independent variable, while finite element methods emphasize the discretization of dependent variable (referred to as functional approximations). An important point is that finite element methods use global piecewise functional approximations, while finite difference methods normally use local functional approximations. A general conclusion is that finite element methods are best designed to handle complex boundaries, while finite difference methods are superior for complex equations. It is also shown that finite volume difference methods possess many of the advantages attributed to finite element methods.

  14. Transmission Benefits of Co-Locating Concentrating Solar Power and Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2012-03-01

    In some areas of the U.S. transmission constraints are a limiting factor in deploying new wind and concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Texas is an example of one such location, where the best wind and solar resources are in the western part of the state, while major demand centers are in the east. The low capacity factor of wind is a compounding factor, increasing the relative cost of new transmission per unit of energy actually delivered. A possible method of increasing the utilization of new transmission is to co-locate both wind and concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage. In this work we examine the benefits and limits of using the dispatachability of thermal storage to increase the capacity factor of new transmission developed to access high quality solar and wind resources in remote locations.

  15. Co-localization of the heat shock protein and human immunoglobulin G in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Chun-guang; LIU Yan-fang; LI Kai-nan; YU Lu; CUI Ji-hong; LI Jing; YANG Shou-jing

    2005-01-01

    @@ Elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin observed in patients with cancers of epithelial origin, including carcinomas of breast, colon, and liver1,2 have been interpreted as humoral responses of host to cancer growth.3 Recently, Qiu et al4 described in detail that human cancers of epithelial origin, including carcinomas of breast, colon, liver, lung, established epithelial cancer lines, produce immunoglobulin G (IgG) in their cytoplasm. Under normal conditions, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have multiple cellular functions, such as folding and translocating newly synthesized proteins. When a cell is injured or under stress, HSPs refold damaged protein or facilitate degradation of proteins. In most cancers, heat shock proteins can capture tumour specific peptide to inhibit the growth of cancer. This study demonstrated that human IgG and HSPs are co-localized in hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. HU-GFP and DAPI co-localize on the Escherichia coli nucleoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wery, M; Woldringh, C L; Rouviere-Yaniv, J

    2001-02-01

    The heterodimeric HU protein, one of the most abundant DNA binding proteins, plays a pleiotropic role in bacteria. Among others, HU was shown to contribute to the maintenance of DNA superhelical density in Escherichia coli. By its properties HU shares some traits with histones and HMG proteins. More recently, its specific binding to DNA recombination and repair intermediates suggests that HU should be considered as a DNA damage sensor. For all these reasons, it will be of interest to follow the localization of HU within the living bacterial cells. To this end, we constructed HU-GFP fusion proteins and compared by microscopy the GFP green fluorescence with images of the nucleoid after DAPI staining. We show that DAPI and HU-GFP colocalize on the E. coli nucleoid. HU, therefore, can be considered as a natural tracer of DNA in the living bacterial cell.

  17. Measurement of Common Mental Health Conditions in VHA Co-located, Collaborative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beehler, Gregory P; King, Paul R; Vair, Christina L; Gass, Julie; Funderburk, Jennifer S

    2016-12-01

    The VA has integrated psychologists and other licensed mental health providers, known collectively as co-located collaborative care (CCC) providers, into patients' primary care medical homes to improve mental health services for veterans. However, it is unclear if CCC providers are routinely using mental health measures as part of evidence-based, coordinated care. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of CCC provider utilization of brief, validated measures. A retrospective review of VA electronic medical records from 8403 veterans diagnosed with depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, or anxiety disorder was conducted. Results indicated that 23 % of the sample had a screening or brief symptom measure documented by a CCC provider. Likelihood of measurement was predicted by primary diagnosis, length of care episode, CCC provider credential, and clinic setting. Future research should address factors impacting measurement practices of CCC providers in order to develop implementation strategies for advancing measurement-based mental health care.

  18. Designing for Co-located Social Media Use in the Home - Using the CASOME Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Ludvigsen, Martin; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2007-01-01

    A range of research has pointed to empirical studies of the use of domestic materials as a useful insight when designing future interactive systems for homes. In this paper we describe how we designed a system from the basis of lessons from such studies. Our system applies the CASOME infrastructure...... (context-aware interactive media platform for social computing in the home) to construct a system supporting distributed and collaborative handling of digital materials in a domestic context. It contains a collective platform for handling digital materials in the home and also contains a range of connected...... studies can be realized in a concrete system design, and it highlights how colocated, connected and social media use is an area which needs further exploration in concrete systems design....

  19. Colocalization of multiple DNA double-strand breaks at a single Rad52 repair centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, M.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Rothstein, R.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an essential process for preserving genomic integrity in all organisms. To investigate this process at the cellular level, we engineered a system of fluorescently marked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to visualize...... in vivo DSBR in single cells. Using this system, we demonstrate for the first time that Rad52 DNA repair foci and DSBs colocalize. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that the relocalization of Rad52 protein into a focal assembly is a rapid and reversible process. In addition, analysis of DNA damage checkpoint......-deficient cells provides direct evidence for coordination between DNA repair and subsequent release from checkpoint arrest. Finally, analyses of cells experiencing multiple DSBs demonstrate that Rad52 foci are centres of DNA repair capable of simultaneously recruiting more than one DSB....

  20. NFIA co-localizes with PPARγ and transcriptionally controls the brown fat gene program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiraike, Yuta; Waki, Hironori; Yu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    . NFIA and the master transcriptional regulator of adipogenesis, PPARγ, co-localize at the brown-fat-specific enhancers. Moreover, the binding of NFIA precedes and facilitates the binding of PPARγ, leading to increased chromatin accessibility and active transcription. Introduction of NFIA into myoblasts...... results in brown adipocyte differentiation. Conversely, the brown fat of NFIA-knockout mice displays impaired expression of the brown-fat-specific genes and reciprocal elevation of muscle genes. Finally, expression of NFIA and the brown-fat-specific genes is positively correlated in human brown fat......Brown fat dissipates energy as heat and protects against obesity. Here, we identified nuclear factor I-A (NFIA) as a transcriptional regulator of brown fat by a genome-wide open chromatin analysis of murine brown and white fat followed by motif analysis of brown-fat-specific open chromatin regions...

  1. Tissue transglutaminase colocalizes with extracellular matrix proteins in cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Mieke; van der Wildt, Berend; Schul, Emma; Bol, John G J M; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Drukarch, Benjamin; Wilhelmus, Micha M M

    2013-04-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a key histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch type (HCHWA-D). CAA is characterized by amyloid-beta (Aβ) depositions and remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in brain vessels and plays an important role in the development and progression of both AD and HCHWA-D. Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) modulates the ECM by molecular cross-linking of ECM proteins. Here, we investigated the distribution pattern, cellular source, and activity of tTG in CAA in control, AD, and HCHWA-D cases. We observed increased tTG immunoreactivity and colocalization with Aβ in the vessel wall in early stage CAA, whereas in later CAA stages, tTG and its cross-links were present in halos enclosing the Aβ deposition. In CAA, tTG and its cross-links at the abluminal side of the vessel were demonstrated to be either of astrocytic origin in parenchymal vessels, of fibroblastic origin in leptomeningeal vessels, and of endothelial origin at the luminal side of the deposited Aβ. Furthermore, the ECM proteins fibronectin and laminin colocalized with the tTG-positive halos surrounding the deposited Aβ in CAA. However, we observed that in situ tTG activity was present throughout the vessel wall in late stage CAA. Together, our data suggest that tTG and its activity might play a differential role in the development and progression of CAA, possibly evolving from direct modulation of Aβ aggregation to cross-linking of ECM proteins resulting in ECM restructuring.

  2. Quantitative Expression and Co-Localization of Wnt Signalling Related Proteins in Feline Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marote, Georgina; Abramo, Francesca; McKay, Jenny; Thomson, Calum; Beltran, Mariana; Millar, Michael; Priestnall, Simon; Dobson, Jane; Costantino-Casas, Fernando; Petrou, Terry; McGonnell, Imelda M.; Davies, Anthony J.; Weetman, Malcolm; Garden, Oliver A.; Masters, John R.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Ahmed, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (FOSCC) is an aggressive neoplasm in cats. Little is known about the possible molecular mechanisms that may be involved in the initiation, maintenance and progression of FOSCC. Wnt signalling is critical in development and disease, including many mammalian cancers. In this study, we have investigated the expression of Wnt signalling related proteins using quantitative immunohistochemical techniques on tissue arrays. We constructed tissue arrays with 58 individual replicate tissue samples. We tested for the expression of four key Wnt/ß-catenin transcription targets, namely Cyclin D1 (CCND1 or CD1), FRA1, c-Myc and MMP7. All antibodies showed cross reactivity in feline tissue except MMP7. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of single proteins (expressed as area fraction / amount of tissue for normal vs tumor, mean ± SE) showed that the expression of CD1 (3.9 ± 0.5 vs 12.2 ± 0.9), FRA1 (5.5 ± 0.6 vs 16.8 ± 1.1) and c-Myc (5.4 ± 0.5 vs 12.5 ± 0.9) was increased in FOSCC tissue by 2.3 to 3 fold compared to normal controls (ptissue. The global intersection coefficients, a measure of the proximity of two fluorophore labeled entities, showed that there was a significant change (p < 0.01) in the co-localization for all permutations (e.g. CD1/FRA1 etc), except for the nuclear localization of CD1. Our results show that putative targets of Wnt signalling transcription are up-regulated in FOSCC with alterations in the co-localization of these proteins and could serve as a useful marker for the disease. PMID:27559731

  3. Mining Spatial Maximal Co-Location Patterns%空间极大co-location模式挖掘研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡新; 王丽珍; 周丽华; 温佛生

    2014-01-01

    空间co-location模式代表了一组空间特征的子集,它们的实例在空间中频繁地关联。挖掘空间co-location模式的研究已经有很多,但是针对极大co-location模式挖掘的研究非常少。提出了一种新颖的空间极大co-location模式挖掘算法。首先扫描数据集得到二阶频繁模式,然后将二阶频繁模式转换为图,再通过极大团算法求解得到空间特征极大团,最后使用二阶频繁模式的表实例验证极大团得到空间极大co-location频繁模式。实验表明,该算法能够很好地挖掘空间极大co-location频繁模式。%A spatial co-location pattern is a group of spatial features whose instances are frequently located in the same region. The mining spatial co-location pattern problem had been investigated in the past, but a little for mining spatial maximal co-location patterns. This paper proposes a novel algorithm for mining spatial maximal co-location patterns. Firstly, the size2 co-location frequent patterns are generated based on the data sets, and then the size2 co-location frequent patterns are converted into a graph. Secondly, the maximal cliques in the graph are found through a maximal clique algorithm. Finally, spatial maximal co-location frequent patterns are obtained by verifying the maximal cliques based on table instances of size2 frequent patterns. The extensive experiments demonstrate that this algorithm is effective and efficient in mining spatial maximal co-location frequent patterns.

  4. Facet stability of crystals I. Factors determining the polyhedral (in)-stability of silver single crystals during electrocrystallization at high current densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Chr. N.; Rashkov, R. St.

    1992-06-01

    Loss of the polyhedral stability as a result of emerging depressions on crystal faces has been observed during both vapour and solution growth under diffusion control, as well as by electrocrystallization at high current densities. A difference was found only when a quantitative comparison of the stability of the crystal shapes with the existing theoretical predictions was attempted. With the growth of zinc and cadmium single crystals from the vapour phase this phenomenon appears earlier, i.e. at smaller sizes than the expected figures, while the silver single crystals are more steady — they withstand one order of magnitude higher of current densities than the calculated values before the appearance of the depressions, in spite of the fact that the presence of an (inhomogeneous) electrical field in the second case has to decrease the polyhedral stability. One possible explanation of this fact is that the electrocrystallization of silver proceeds in highly concentrated solutions, for which Seeger's equation, laying in the base of the quantitative elucidations in this case, does not hold true. Correspondingly, here (part I of the paper) we are trying a more general approach, while part II represents a new, alternative way for explaining the higher stability of the faceted forms of the silver single crystals.

  5. Finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    Finite element analysis is an engineering method for the numerical analysis of complex structures. This book provides a bird's eye view on this very broad matter through 27 original and innovative research studies exhibiting various investigation directions. Through its chapters the reader will have access to works related to Biomedical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Process Analysis and Civil Engineering. The text is addressed not only to researchers, but also to professional engineers, engineering lecturers and students seeking to gain a better understanding of where Finite Element Analysis stands today.

  6. The finite Bruck Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Baumeister, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    We continue the work by Aschbacher, Kinyon and Phillips [AKP] as well as of Glauberman [Glaub1,2] by describing the structure of the finite Bruck loops. We show essentially that a finite Bruck loop $X$ is the direct product of a Bruck loop of odd order with either a soluble Bruck loop of 2-power order or a product of loops related to the groups $PSL_2(q)$, $q= 9$ or $q \\geq 5$ a Fermat prime. The latter possibillity does occur as is shown in [Nag1, BS]. As corollaries we obtain versions of Sylow's, Lagrange's and Hall's Theorems for loops.

  7. Finite element mesh generation

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Daniel SH

    2014-01-01

    Highlights the Progression of Meshing Technologies and Their ApplicationsFinite Element Mesh Generation provides a concise and comprehensive guide to the application of finite element mesh generation over 2D domains, curved surfaces, and 3D space. Organised according to the geometry and dimension of the problem domains, it develops from the basic meshing algorithms to the most advanced schemes to deal with problems with specific requirements such as boundary conformity, adaptive and anisotropic elements, shape qualities, and mesh optimization. It sets out the fundamentals of popular techniques

  8. 聚氨酯/低聚倍半硅氧烷复合纤维的制备%Preparation of polyurethane/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposite fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖荣冬; 翁国星

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Althoughpolyurethane possesses excelent biocompatibility, its inherent inertness leads to its weak interactions with cels. So, its modification is necessary. OBJECTIVE:To prepare the polyurethane/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposite fibers with controlable morphology. METHODS:The polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane was dispersed in a certain concentration of polyurethane solution to prepare the polyurethane/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposite fibers using electrospinning method. Meanwhile, the effects of mass of polyurethane and oligomeric silsesquioxane, spinning voltage and spinning advance velocity on composite fiber morphology were analyzed. The optimum preparing conditions were filtrated. The stability of oligomeric silsesquioxane in polyurethane was determined. The morphology and composition of fibers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Oligomeric silsesquioxane stably existed in polyurethane. Polyurethane/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposite fibers were the most uniform when the mass fraction of polyurethane in composite fibers accounted for 20%, the mass ratio of polyurethane and oligomeric silsesquioxane was 10: 1, spinning voltage was 15 kV and spinning advance velocity was 0.5 mL/h. Compared with the pure polyurethane, the O/C ratio of polyurethane/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposites increased significantly.%背景:聚氨酯具有良好的生物相容性,然而其固有的惰性导致其与细胞之间的相互作用较弱,因此需要对其改性。目的:制备形貌可控的聚氨酯/低聚倍半硅氧烷纳米复合纤维。方法:将多面体低聚倍半硅氧烷分散到一定浓度的聚氨酯溶液中,通过静电纺丝制备聚氨酯/低聚倍半硅氧烷纳米复合纤维,同时分析聚氨酯质量、低聚倍半硅氧烷质量、纺丝电

  9. Finite q-oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, UNAM, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Klimyk, Anatoliy U [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, UNAM, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Wolf, Kurt Bernardo [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, UNAM, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-05-28

    The finite q-oscillator is a model that obeys the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator, with the operators of position, momentum and Hamiltonian being functions of elements of the q-algebra su{sub q}(2). The spectrum of position in this discrete system, in a fixed representation j, consists of 2j + 1 'sensor'-points x{sub s} = 1/2 [2s]{sub q}, s element of {l_brace}-j, -j+1, ..., j{r_brace}, and similarly for the momentum observable. The spectrum of energies is finite and equally spaced, so the system supports coherent states. The wavefunctions involve dual q-Kravchuk polynomials, which are solutions to a finite-difference Schroedinger equation. Time evolution (times a phase) defines the fractional Fourier-q-Kravchuk transform. In the classical limit as q {yields} 1 we recover the finite oscillator Lie algebra, the N = 2j {yields} {infinity} limit returns the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator and both limits contract the generators to the standard quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  10. Finite q-oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Klimyk, Anatoliy U.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2004-05-01

    The finite q-oscillator is a model that obeys the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator, with the operators of position, momentum and Hamiltonian being functions of elements of the q-algebra suq(2). The spectrum of position in this discrete system, in a fixed representation j, consists of 2j + 1 'sensor'-points x_s={\\case12}[2s]_q, s\\in\\{-j,-j+1,\\ldots,j\\} , and similarly for the momentum observable. The spectrum of energies is finite and equally spaced, so the system supports coherent states. The wavefunctions involve dual q-Kravchuk polynomials, which are solutions to a finite-difference Schrödinger equation. Time evolution (times a phase) defines the fractional Fourier-q-Kravchuk transform. In the classical limit as q rarr 1 we recover the finite oscillator Lie algebra, the N = 2j rarr infin limit returns the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator and both limits contract the generators to the standard quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  11. Gluons at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, P J; Dudal, D; Bicudo, P; Cardoso, N

    2016-01-01

    The gluon propagator is investigated at finite temperature via lattice simulations. In particular, we discuss its interpretation as a massive-type bosonic propagator. Moreover, we compute the corresponding spectral density and study the violation of spectral positivity. Finally, we explore the dependence of the gluon propagator on the phase of the Polyakov loop.

  12. Finite unified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapetanakis, D. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Mondragon, M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Zoupanos, G. (National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Physics Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  13. Algorithms for finite rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciocanea Teodorescu I.,

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we are interested in describing algorithms that answer questions arising in ring and module theory. Our focus is on deterministic polynomial-time algorithms and rings and modules that are finite. The first main result of this thesis is a solution to the module isomorphism problem in

  14. Finite Complements in English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ronald W. Langacker

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the conceptual basis of finite complimentation in English.It first considem the distinguishing property of a finite clause,namely grounding,effeeted by tense and the modals.Notions crucial for clausal grounding--including a reality conception and the striving for control at the effective and epistemic levelsalso figure in the semantic import of eomplementation.An essential feature of complement constructions is the involvement of multiple conceptualizers,each with their own conception of reality.The different types of complement and their grammatical markings can be characterized on this basis.Finite complements differ from other types by virtue of expressing an autonomous proposition capable of being apprehended by multiple conceptualizers,each from their own vantage point.Acognitive model representing phases in the striving for epistemic control provides a partial basis for the semantic description of predicates taking finite complements.The same model supports the description of both personal and impersonal complement constructions.

  15. Algorithms for finite rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciocanea Teodorescu I.,

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we are interested in describing algorithms that answer questions arising in ring and module theory. Our focus is on deterministic polynomial-time algorithms and rings and modules that are finite. The first main result of this thesis is a solution to the module isomorphism problem in

  16. Inside finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  17. Wind and flux measurements in a windfarm co-located with agricultural production (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takle, E. S.; Prueger, J. H.; Rajewski, D. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Aitken, M.; Rhodes, M. E.; Deppe, A. J.; Goodman, F. E.; Carter, K. C.; Mattison, L.; Rabideau, S. L.; Rosenberg, A. J.; Whitfield, C. L.; Hatfield, J.

    2010-12-01

    Co-locating wind farms in pre-existing agricultural fields represents multiple land uses for which there may be interactions. Agricultural producers have raised questions about the possible impact of changes in wind speed and turbulence on pollination, dew formation, and conditions favorable for diseases. During summer 2010 we measured wind speed and surface fluxes within a wind farm that was co-located with a landscape covered by corn and soybeans in central Iowa. We erected four 9.14 m towers in corn fields upwind and downwind of lines of 1.5 MW turbines. All towers were instrumented with sonic anemometers at 6.45 m above ground, three-cup anemometers at 9.06 m ,and two temperature and relative humidity probes at 5.30 and 9.06 m. In addition, LiCor 7500 CO2/H2O flux analyzers were mounted at 6.45 m on two towers. At the beginning of the field campaign (late June) the corn had a height of about 1.3 m and grew to about 2.2 m at maturity in late July. For a 2-week period beginning late June a vertically pointing lidar was located near a flux tower downwind of one of the turbines and collected horizontal winds from 40 m to 200 m above ground. Twenty-Hz data from the eddy covariance systems were recorded as were 5-min averaged values of wind speed, temperature, humidity, and fluxes of heat, momentum, moisture and CO2 day and night under a wide variety of weather conditions, including a two-week period when the turbines were shut down. Numerical simulations with the WRF (Weather Research and Forecast) model for select periods with no turbine influence provide opportunities for comparing modeled and measured values of surface conditions and vertical wind profiles. Results show clear evidence of changes in flow field conditions at the surface that influence fluxes. We will discuss diurnal changes in fluxes and influence of turbines. Lidar measurements of vertical profiles of wind speed compared against modeled undisturbed flow fields behind a turbine reveal significant

  18. The Impact of Co-Locating American Job Centers on Community College Campuses in North Carolina. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noy, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Relationships between community colleges and the public workforce system might have an important role in promoting students' success in the labor market and in college. In particular, the co-location of American Job Centers (AJC) on community college campuses is a particularly strong form of relationship that might benefit students. Yet little is…

  19. The Best of Both Worlds: Can District-Charter Co-Location Be a Win-Win?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeArmond, Michael; Nelson, Elizabeth Cooley; Bruns, Angela

    2015-01-01

    District schools and charter schools are often at odds. When the two school types share a school building--arrangements known as "co-locations"--the tensions can boil over. But what happens when district and charter leaders approach co-location as a tool to promote school improvement, rather than simply a real estate deal? Based on…

  20. Co-localization of Fyn with CD3 complex, CD45 or CD28 depends on different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Hausen, J D; Burn, P; Amrein, K E

    1997-10-01

    The Src family protein tyrosine kinase Fyn (p59fyn) plays an important role in thymocyte development and T cell receptor (TCR) signal transduction. Fyn has been shown to associate with the TCR-CD3 complex, the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 and several co-receptors such as CD28 which are crucial for initiating T cell activation and proliferation. The molecular basis of how Fyn is associated with these transmembrane proteins is largely unknown. To investigate the Fyn association with the TCR-CD3 complex, CD45 and CD28 at the molecular level, various Fyn/beta-galactosidase fusion proteins were constructed and expressed in Jurkat cells. Co-localization experiments applying antibody-induced co-capping and double immunofluorescence staining techniques were used to study the association of these fusion proteins with the TCR-CD3 complex, CD45 and CD28. Our results revealed that co-localization of Fyn with the TCR-CD3 complex requires the unique N terminus whereas co-localization with CD45 depends on the unique N terminus, the Src homology (SH)3- and a functional SH2 domain. CD28 co-localizes with Fyn molecules that contain the N terminus and a functional SH2 domain. These results suggest that Fyn association with the TCR-CD3 complex, CD45 and CD28 is mediated by different molecular mechanisms.

  1. Co-localization hypothesis: A mechanism for the intrapancreatic activation of digestive enzymes during the early phases of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gijs JD van Acker; George Perides; Michael L Steer

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is generally believed to be a disease in which the pancreas is injured by digestive enzymes that it normally produces. Most of the potentially harmful digestive enzymes produced by pancreatic acinar cells are synthesized and secreted as inactive zymogens which are normally activated only upon entry into the duodenum but, during the early stages of acute pancreatitis, those zymogens become prematurely activated within the pancreas and, presumably, that activation occurs within pancreatic acinar cells. The mechanisms responsible for intracellular activation of digestive enzyme zymogens have not been elucidated with certainty but, according to one widely recognized theory (the "co-localization hypothesis"), digestive enzyme zymogens are activated by lysosomal hydrolases when the two types of enzymes become co-localized within the same intracellular compartment. This review focuses on the evidence supporting the validity of the co-localization hypothesis as an explanation for digestive enzyme activation during the early stages of pancreatitis.The findings, summarized in this review, support the conclusion that co-localization of lysosomal hydrolases with digestive enzyme zymogens plays a critical role in permitting the intracellular activation of digestive enzymesthat leads to acinar cell injury and pancreatitis.

  2. Validation and application of three-dimensional discontinuous deformation analysis with tetrahedron finite element meshed block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Liu; Zheng Nan; Ping Yi

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade,three dimensional discontinuous deformation analyses (3D DDA) has attracted more and more attention of researchers and geotechnical engineers worldwide.The original DDA formulation utilizes a linear displacement function to describe the block movement and deformation,which would cause block expansion under rigid body rotation and thus limit its capability to model block deformation.In this paper,3D DDA is coupled with tetrahedron finite elements to tackle these two problems.Tetrahedron is the simplest in the 3D domain and makes it easy to implement automatic discretization,even for complex topology shape.Furthermore,element faces will remain planar and element edges will remain straight after deformation for tetrahedron finite elements and polyhedral contact detection schemes can be used directly.The matrices of equilibrium equations for this coupled method are given in detail and an effective contact searching algorithm is suggested.Validation is conducted by comparing the results of the proposed coupled method with that of physical model tests using one of the most common failure modes,i.e.,wedge failure.Most of the failure modes predicted by the coupled method agree with the physical model results except for 4 cases out of the total 65 cases.Finally,a complex rockslide example demonstrates the robustness and versatility of the coupled method.

  3. Ocean zoning for conservation, fisheries and marine renewable energy: assessing trade-offs and co-location opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Katherine L; Schoeman, David S; Klein, Carissa J

    2015-04-01

    Oceans, particularly coastal areas, are getting busier and within this increasingly human-dominated seascape, marine biodiversity continues to decline. Attempts to maintain and restore marine biodiversity are becoming more spatial, principally through the designation of marine protected areas (MPAs). MPAs compete for space with other uses, and the emergence of new industries, such as marine renewable energy generation, will increase competition for space. Decision makers require guidance on how to zone the ocean to conserve biodiversity, mitigate conflict and accommodate multiple uses. Here we used empirical data and freely available planning software to identified priority areas for multiple ocean zones, which incorporate goals for biodiversity conservation, two types of renewable energy, and three types of fishing. We developed an approached to evaluate trade-offs between industries and we investigated the impacts of co-locating some fishing activities within renewable energy sites. We observed non-linear trade-offs between industries. We also found that different subsectors within those industries experienced very different trade-off curves. Incorporating co-location resulted in significant reductions in cost to the fishing industry, including fisheries that were not co-located. Co-location also altered the optimal location of renewable energy zones with planning solutions. Our findings have broad implications for ocean zoning and marine spatial planning. In particular, they highlight the need to include industry subsectors when assessing trade-offs and they stress the importance of considering co-location opportunities from the outset. Our research reinforces the need for multi-industry ocean-zoning and demonstrates how it can be undertaken within the framework of strategic conservation planning.

  4. Experience with procuring, deploying and maintaining hardware at remote co-location centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärring, O.; Bonfillou, E.; Clement, B.; Coelho Dos Santos, M.; Dore, V.; Gentit, A.; Grossir, A.; Salter, W.; Valsan, L.; Xafi, A.

    2014-05-01

    In May 2012 CERN signed a contract with the Wigner Data Centre in Budapest for an extension to CERN's central computing facility beyond its current boundaries set by electrical power and cooling available for computing. The centre is operated as a remote co-location site providing rack-space, electrical power and cooling for server, storage and networking equipment acquired by CERN. The contract includes a 'remote-hands' services for physical handling of hardware (rack mounting, cabling, pushing power buttons, ...) and maintenance repairs (swapping disks, memory modules, ...). However, only CERN personnel have network and console access to the equipment for system administration. This report gives an insight to adaptations of hardware architecture, procurement and delivery procedures undertaken enabling remote physical handling of the hardware. We will also describe tools and procedures developed for automating the registration, burn-in testing, acceptance and maintenance of the equipment as well as an independent but important change to the IT assets management (ITAM) developed in parallel as part of the CERN IT Agile Infrastructure project. Finally, we will report on experience from the first large delivery of 400 servers and 80 SAS JBOD expansion units (24 drive bays) to Wigner in March 2013. Changes were made to the abstract file on 13/06/2014 to correct errors, the pdf file was unchanged.

  5. Spatial and topological organization of DNA chains induced by gene co-localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Junier

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional activity has been shown to relate to the organization of chromosomes in the eukaryotic nucleus and in the bacterial nucleoid. In particular, highly transcribed genes, RNA polymerases and transcription factors gather into discrete spatial foci called transcription factories. However, the mechanisms underlying the formation of these foci and the resulting topological order of the chromosome remain to be elucidated. Here we consider a thermodynamic framework based on a worm-like chain model of chromosomes where sparse designated sites along the DNA are able to interact whenever they are spatially close by. This is motivated by recurrent evidence that there exist physical interactions between genes that operate together. Three important results come out of this simple framework. First, the resulting formation of transcription foci can be viewed as a micro-phase separation of the interacting sites from the rest of the DNA. In this respect, a thermodynamic analysis suggests transcription factors to be appropriate candidates for mediating the physical interactions between genes. Next, numerical simulations of the polymer reveal a rich variety of phases that are associated with different topological orderings, each providing a way to increase the local concentrations of the interacting sites. Finally, the numerical results show that both one-dimensional clustering and periodic location of the binding sites along the DNA, which have been observed in several organisms, make the spatial co-localization of multiple families of genes particularly efficient.

  6. VISTILES: Coordinating and Combining Co-located Mobile Devices for Visual Data Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Ricardo; Horak, Tom; Dachselt, Raimund

    2017-08-29

    We present VISTILES, a conceptual framework that uses a set of mobile devices to distribute and coordinate visualization views for the exploration of multivariate data. In contrast to desktop-based interfaces for information visualization, mobile devices offer the potential to provide a dynamic and user-defined interface supporting co-located collaborative data exploration with different individual workflows. As part of our framework, we contribute concepts that enable users to interact with coordinated & multiple views (CMV) that are distributed across several mobile devices. The major components of the framework are: (i) dynamic and flexible layouts for CMV focusing on the distribution of views and (ii) an interaction concept for smart adaptations and combinations of visualizations utilizing explicit side-by-side arrangements of devices. As a result, users can benefit from the possibility to combine devices and organize them in meaningful spatial layouts. Furthermore, we present a web-based prototype implementation as a specific instance of our concepts. This implementation provides a practical application case enabling users to explore a multivariate data collection. We also illustrate the design process including feedback from a preliminary user study, which informed the design of both the concepts and the final prototype.

  7. Identification and ranging of lightning flashes using co-located antennas of different geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    A new technique for detecting and ranging lightning flashes up to approximately 100 km away is described. The technique uses a novel method of discriminating between lightning and non-lightning sources of quasi-electrostatic field change by comparison of the signal strength measured simultaneously on two co-located antennas, which is a function of their different geometry and exposure to the atmospheric electric field. In addition to detection of all types of lightning within range, the system also has the capability of detecting and classifying other sources of rapid electric field change associated with thunderstorm or shower cloud activity, such as from nearby corona brush discharge, strong space charge variability and charged precipitation. Real-time lightning flash detection and ranging combined with monitoring of initial storm electrification processes provides a comprehensive method of local severe weather warning. Since the operating frequency of 1-50 Hz lies below man-made sources of radio signals, the technique is considered especially useful for sites with strong radio interference.

  8. Strategic Co-Location in a Hybrid Process Involving Desalination and Pressure Retarded Osmosis (PRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Krantz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on a Hybrid Process that uses feed salinity dilution and osmotic power recovery from Pressure Retarded Osmosis (PRO to achieve higher overall water recovery. This reduces the energy consumption and capital costs of conventional seawater desalination and water reuse processes. The Hybrid Process increases the amount of water recovered from the current 66.7% for conventional seawater desalination and water reuse processes to a potential 80% through the use of reclaimed water brine as an impaired water source. A reduction of up to 23% in energy consumption is projected via the Hybrid Process. The attractiveness is amplified by potential capital cost savings ranging from 8.7%–20% compared to conventional designs of seawater desalination plants. A decision matrix in the form of a customizable scorecard is introduced for evaluating a Hybrid Process based on the importance of land space, capital costs, energy consumption and membrane fouling. This study provides a new perspective, looking at processes not as individual systems but as a whole utilizing strategic co-location to unlock the synergies available in the water-energy nexus for more sustainable desalination.

  9. Increased neuronal Rab5 immunoreactive endosomes do not colocalize with TDP-43 in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matej, Radoslav; Botond, Gergö; László, Lajos; Kopitar-Jerala, Natasa; Rusina, Robert; Budka, Herbert; Kovacs, Gabor G

    2010-09-01

    Sporadic motor neuron disease (MND) is characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons and intraneuronal cytoplasmic translocation and deposition of the nuclear protein TDP-43. There is a paucity of data on the subcellular mechanisms of the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of TDP-43, particularly about the precise role of the endosomal-lysosomal system (ELS). In the present study, using a neuron-specific morphometric approach, we examined the expression of the early endosomal marker Rab5 and lysosomal cathepsins B, D, F, and L as well as PAS-stained structures in the anterior horn cells in 11 individuals affected by sporadic MND and 5 age-matched controls. This was compared with the expression of ubiquitin, p62 and TDP-43 and its phosphorylated form. The principal finding was the increased expression of the endosomal marker Rab5 and lysosomal cathepsin D, and of PAS-positive structures in motor neurons of MND cases. Furthermore, the area-portion of Rab5 immunoreactivity correlated well with the intracellular accumulation of ubiquitin, p62 and (phosphorylated) TDP-43. However, double immunolabelling and immunogold electron microscopy excluded colocalization of phosphorylated TDP-43 with the ELS. These data contrast with observations on neuronal cytopathology in Alzheimer's or prion diseases where the disease-specific proteins are processed within endosomes, and suggest a distinct role of the ELS in MND.

  10. Fibrillarin redistributes to the spindle poles and partially colocalizes with NuMA during mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Fibrillarin, a major protein in the nucleolus, is known to redistribute during mitosis from the nucleolus to the cytosol, and is related to the dynamics of post-mitotic reassembly of the nucleolus. To better understand the dynamic behavior and the relationship with other cytoplasmic structures, we have now expressed fibrillarin-pDsRed1 fusion protein in HeLa cells. The results showed that a part of fibrillarin was associated with mitotic spindle poles in the mitotic cells. Nocodazole-induced microtubule depolymerization resulted in fibrillarin redistribution throughout the cytoplasm, and removal of nocodazole resulted in relocalization of fibrillarin at the polar region during the mitotic spindles reassembly. In a mitotic cell free system, fibrillarin was found in the center of taxol-induced microtubule asters. Moreover, fibrillarin was found to colocalize with the nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) at the poles of mitotic cells. Therefore, it is postulated that the polar redistribution of fibrillarin is mediated by microtubules.

  11. Strategic Co-Location in a Hybrid Process Involving Desalination and Pressure Retarded Osmosis (PRO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Victor S T; She, Qianhong; Chong, Tzyy Haur; Tang, Chuyang Y; Fane, Anthony G; Krantz, William B

    2013-07-04

    This paper focuses on a Hybrid Process that uses feed salinity dilution and osmotic power recovery from Pressure Retarded Osmosis (PRO) to achieve higher overall water recovery. This reduces the energy consumption and capital costs of conventional seawater desalination and water reuse processes. The Hybrid Process increases the amount of water recovered from the current 66.7% for conventional seawater desalination and water reuse processes to a potential 80% through the use of reclaimed water brine as an impaired water source. A reduction of up to 23% in energy consumption is projected via the Hybrid Process. The attractiveness is amplified by potential capital cost savings ranging from 8.7%-20% compared to conventional designs of seawater desalination plants. A decision matrix in the form of a customizable scorecard is introduced for evaluating a Hybrid Process based on the importance of land space, capital costs, energy consumption and membrane fouling. This study provides a new perspective, looking at processes not as individual systems but as a whole utilizing strategic co-location to unlock the synergies available in the water-energy nexus for more sustainable desalination.

  12. Fto colocalizes with a satiety mediator oxytocin in the brain and upregulates oxytocin gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Pawel K., E-mail: olsze005@umn.edu [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Minnesota Obesity Center, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Fredriksson, Robert; Eriksson, Jenny D. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Mitra, Anaya [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Radomska, Katarzyna J. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Gosnell, Blake A. [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Solvang, Maria N. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Levine, Allen S. [Minnesota Obesity Center, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Schioeth, Helgi B. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} The majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto. {yields} The level of colocalization is similar in the male and female brain. {yields} Fto overexpression in hypothalamic neurons increases oxytocin mRNA levels by 50%. {yields} Oxytocin does not affect Fto expression through negative feedback mechanisms. -- Abstract: Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been associated with obesity in humans. Alterations in Fto expression in transgenic animals affect body weight, energy expenditure and food intake. Fto, a nuclear protein and proposed transcription co-factor, has been speculated to affect energy balance through a functional relationship with specific genes encoding feeding-related peptides. Herein, we employed double immunohistochemistry and showed that the majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto in the brain of male and female mice. We then overexpressed Fto in a murine hypothalamic cell line and, using qPCR, detected a 50% increase in the level of oxytocin mRNA. Expression levels of several other feeding-related genes, including neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related protein (AgRP), were unaffected by the FTO transfection. Addition of 10 and 100 nmol oxytocin to the cell culture medium did not affect Fto expression in hypothalamic cells. We conclude that Fto, a proposed transcription co-factor, influences expression of the gene encoding a satiety mediator, oxytocin.

  13. Accuracy validation of T2L2 time transfer in co-location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas-Bourez, Myrtille; Courde, Clément; Samain, Etienne; Exertier, Pierre; Guillemot, Philippe; Torre, Jean-Marie; Martin, Nicolas; Foussard, Claude

    2015-02-01

    The Time Transfer by Laser Link (T2L2) experiment has been developed in close collaboration between Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales and Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur. The aim is to synchronize remote ultra-stable clocks over large-scale distances using two laser ranging stations. This ground to space time transfer has been derived from laser telemetry technology with dedicated space equipment designed to record arrival time of laser pulses on board the satellite. For 3 years, specific campaigns have been organized to prove T2L2 performance. In April 2012, we performed a 2-week campaign with our two laser ranging stations, Métrologie Optique and French Transportable Laser Ranging Station, to demonstrate the T2L2 time transfer accuracy in co-location. We have compared three independent time transfer techniques: T2L2, GPS, and direct measurement, with both an event timer and an interval counter. The most important result obtained in this campaign was a mean agreement between T2L2 and a direct comparison better than 200 ps. This is the first major step to validate the uncertainty budget of the entire T2L2 experiment. This paper focuses on this campaign setup and the obtained results.

  14. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 proteins associate in a complex and colocalize at replication factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Leva, Valentina; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2009-08-15

    DNA ligase I is the main DNA ligase activity involved in eukaryotic DNA replication acting in the joining of Okazaki fragments. This enzyme is also implicated in nucleotide excision repair and in the long-patch base excision repair while its role in the recombinational repair pathways is poorly understood. DNA ligase I is phosphorylated during cell cycle at several serine and threonine residues that regulate its participation in different DNA transactions by modulating the interaction with different protein partners. Here we use an antibody-based array method to identify novel DNA ligase-interacting partners. We show that DNA ligase I participates in several multiprotein complexes with proteins involved in DNA replication and repair, cell cycle control, and protein modification. In particular we demonstrate that DNA ligase I complexes with Nbs1, a core component of the MRN complex critical for detection, processing and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. The analysis of epitope tagged DNA ligase I mutants demonstrates that the association is mediated by the catalytic fragment of the enzyme. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 colocalize at replication factories during unperturbed replication and after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Since MRN complex is involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination at stalled replication forks our data support the notion that DNA ligase I participates in homology dependent pathways that deal with replication-associated lesions generated when replication fork encounters DNA damage.

  15. Non-DSB clustered DNA lesions. Does theory colocalize with the experiment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Nikolov, Vladimir; Mavragani, Ifigeneia V.; Plante, Ianik; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Iliakis, George; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.

    2016-11-01

    Ionizing radiation results in various kinds of DNA lesions such as double strand breaks (DSBs) and other non-DSB base lesions. These lesions may be formed in close proximity (i.e., within a few nanometers) resulting in clustered types of DNA lesions. These damage clusters are considered the fingerprint of ionizing radiation, notably charged particles of high linear energy transfer (LET). Accumulating theoretical and experimental evidence suggests that the induction of these clustered lesions appears under various irradiation conditions but also as a result of high levels of oxidative stress. The biological significance of these clustered DNA lesions pertains to the inability of cells to process them efficiently compared to isolated DNA lesions. The results in the case of unsuccessful or erroneous repair can vary from mutations up to chromosomal instability. In this mini review, we discuss of several Monte Carlo simulations codes and experimental evidence regarding the induction and repair of radiation-induced non-DSB complex DNA lesions. We also critically present the most widely used methodologies (i.e., gel electrophoresis and fluorescence microscopy [in situ colocalization assays]). Based on the comparison of different approaches, we provide examples and suggestions for the improved detection of these lesions in situ. Based on the current status of knowledge, we conclude that there is a great need for improvement of the detection techniques at the cellular or tissue level, which will provide valuable information for understanding the mechanisms used by the cell to process clustered DNA lesions.

  16. Differential calculi on finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Castellani, L

    1999-01-01

    A brief review of bicovariant differential calculi on finite groups is given, with some new developments on diffeomorphisms and integration. We illustrate the general theory with the example of the nonabelian finite group S_3.

  17. Finite unified theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondragon, M [Inst. de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 20-364, Mexico 01000 D.F. (Mexico); Zoupanos, G, E-mail: myriam@fisica.unam.m, E-mail: zoupanos@mail.cern.c [Physics Department, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus: Heroon Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou, Athens (Greece)

    2009-06-01

    All-loop Finite Unified Theories (FUTs) are very interesting N=1 GUTs in which a complete reduction of couplings has been achieved. FUTs realize an old field theoretical dream and have remarkable predictive power. Reduction of dimensionless couplings in N=1 GUTs is achieved by searching for renormalization group invariant (RGI) relations among them holding beyond the unification scale. Finiteness results from the fact that there exists RGI relations among dimensionless couplings that guarantee the vanishing of the beta-functions in certain N=1 supersymmetric GUTS even to all orders. Furthermore, developments in the soft supersymmetry breaking sector of N=1 GUTs and FUTs lead to exact RGI relations also in this dimensionful sector of the theories. Of particular interest for the construction of realistic theories is a RGI sum rule for the soft scalar masses holding to all orders.

  18. Finite Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Modesto, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We hereby present a class of multidimensional higher derivative theories of gravity that realizes an ultraviolet completion of Einstein general relativity. This class is marked by a "non-polynomal" entire function (form factor), which averts extra degrees of freedom (including ghosts) and improves the high energy behavior of the loop amplitudes. By power counting arguments, it is proved that the theory is super-renormalizable in any dimension, i.e. only one-loop divergences survive. Furthermore, in odd dimensions there are no counter terms for pure gravity and the theory turns out to be "finite." Finally, considering the infinite tower of massive states coming from dimensional reduction, quantum gravity is finite in even dimension as well.

  19. Confinement at Finite Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Nuno; Bicudo, Pedro; Cardoso, Marco

    2017-05-01

    We show the flux tubes produced by static quark-antiquark, quark-quark and quark-gluon charges at finite temperature. The sources are placed on the lattice with fundamental and adjoint Polyakov loops. We compute the squared strengths of the chromomagnetic and chromoelectric fields above and below the critical temperature. Our results are for pure gauge SU(3) gauge theory, they are invariant and all computations are done with GPUs using CUDA.

  20. The Leber congenital amaurosis protein AIPL1 and EB proteins co-localize at the photoreceptor cilium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Hidalgo-de-Quintana

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction and co-localization of novel interacting proteins with the Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA associated protein aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1.The CytoTrapXR yeast two-hybrid system was used to screen a bovine retinal cDNA library. A novel interaction between AIPL1 and members of the family of EB proteins was confirmed by directed yeast two-hybrid analysis and co-immunoprecipitation assays. The localization of AIPL1 and the EB proteins in cultured cells and in retinal cryosections was examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and cryo-immunogold electron microscopy.Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H analysis identified the interaction between AIPL1 and the EB proteins, EB1 and EB3. EB1 and EB3 were specifically co-immunoprecipitated with AIPL1 from SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells. In directed 1:1 Y2H analysis, the interaction of EB1 with AIPL1 harbouring the LCA-causing mutations A197P, C239R and W278X was severely compromised. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy revealed that AIPL1 did not co-localize with endogenous EB1 at the tips of microtubules, endogenous EB1 at the microtubule organising centre following disruption of the microtubule network, or with endogenous β-tubulin. Moreover, AIPL1 did not localize to primary cilia in ARPE-19 cells, whereas EB1 co-localized with the centrosomal marker pericentrin at the base of primary cilia. However, both AIPL1 and the EB proteins, EB1 and EB3, co-localized with centrin-3 in the connecting cilium of photoreceptor cells. Cryo-immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the co-localization of AIPL1 and EB1 in the connecting cilia in human retinal photoreceptors.AIPL1 and the EB proteins, EB1 and EB3, localize at the connecting cilia of retinal photoreceptor cells, but do not co-localize in the cellular microtubule network or in primary cilia in non-retinal cells. These findings suggest that AIPL1 function in these cells is not related

  1. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes/carbon nanotube/carbon fiber multiscale composite: Influence of a novel hierarchical reinforcement on the interfacial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R. L.; Wang, C. G.; Liu, L.; Cui, H. Z.; Gao, B.

    2015-10-01

    A novel hierarchical reinforcing carbon fiber through co-grafting carbon nanotube (CNTs) and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) was prepared in this paper. The structure and surface characteristics of the grafted carbon fiber were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetry (TG) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The surface energy and the functional groups of the carbon fiber surface were increased obviously after modification. The ILSS results showed that there was a remarkable improvement in the interfacial properties of the new hybrid CF-CNTs-POSS composites. The investigation can prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical performance of the fiber/resin composites on the desired application.

  2. A complementary electrochromic device based on polyaniline tethered polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Shanxin [Temasek Laboratories, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Ma, Jan; Lu, Xuehong [Temasek Laboratories, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2009-12-15

    A high-contrast complementary electrochromic device based on polyaniline (PANI) tethered polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) (POSS-PANI) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS) is assembled. The electrochromic properties, cyclic voltammetry behavior and coloration efficiency of the device are studied. Due to the loosely packed structure, POSS-PANI gives rise to a significantly higher electrochromic contrast, coloration efficiency and faster switching speed than PANI. Despite its high contrast, the combination of POSS-PANI with PEDOT:PSS still shows synergy in terms of contrast enhancement, which can be attributed to the additional driving force for the diffusion of dopants into PEDOT:PSS provided by the dedoping of POSS-PANI. (author)

  3. Fluorinated and Thermo-Cross-Linked Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes: New Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Materials for High-Performance Dielectric Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Sun, Jing; Zhou, Junfeng; Jin, Kaikai; Fang, Qiang

    2017-04-12

    A fluorinated and thermo-cross-linked polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) has been successfully synthesized by thermal polymerization of a fluorinated POSS monomer having an inorganic silsesquioxane core and organic side chains bearing thermo-cross-linkable trifluorovinyl ether groups. This new inorganic-organic hybrid polymer shows high thermostability with a 5 wt % loss temperature of 436 °C, as well as good transparency (a sheet with an average thickness of 1.5 mm shows high transmittance of 92% varying from 400 to 1100 nm). Moreover, the polymer exhibits both low dielectric constant (polymer also shows low water uptake (polymer is very suitable to be utilized as a high-performance dielectric material for fabrication of high-frequency printed circuit boards or encapsulation resins for integrated circuit dies in the microelectronic industry. Furthermore, this work also provides a route for the preparation of fluorinated POSS-based polymers.

  4. A Rapid One-Pot Synthesis of Novel High-Purity Methacrylic Phosphonic Acid (PA-Based Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS Frameworks via Thiol-Ene Click Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Karuppasamy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we demonstrate a facile methodology to synthesis a novel methacrylic phosphonic acid (PA-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSSs via thiol-ene click reaction using octamercapto thiol-POSS and ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate (EGMP monomer. The presence of phosphonic acid moieties and POSS-cage structure in POSS-S-PA was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H, 29Si and 31P-NMR analyses. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrum of POSS-S-PA acquired in a dithranol matrix, which has specifically designed for intractable polymeric materials. The observed characterization results signposted that novel organo-inorganic hybrid POSS-S-PA would be an efficacious material for fuel cells as a proton exchange membrane and high-temperature applications due to its thermal stability of 380 °C.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies against extra small virus show that it co-localizes with Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longyant, Siwaporn; Senapin, Saengchan; Sanont, Sirijantra; Wangman, Pradit; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin; Rukpratanporn, Sombat; Sithigorngul, Paisarn

    2012-07-25

    The capsid protein (CP) gene of extra small virus (XSV) expressed in Escherichia coli as a 42 kDa glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion protein (GST-XCP) or a 20 kDa His6-fusion protein (His6-XCP) were purified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), combined, and used to immunize Swiss mice to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Using dot blot, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods, 4 MAbs specific to the XSV CP detected XSV in the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii without cross-reaction to host proteins or to proteins of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) or 5 of the most pathogenic viruses of penaeid shrimp. In dot blots, the combined MAbs could detect down to ~10 to 20 fmol µl-1 of purified GST-XCP protein, which was somewhat more sensitive compared to any single MAb. Used in conjunction with an MrNV-specific MAb, white tail disease (WTD) was diagnosed more effectively. However, the sensitivity at which the combined 4 MAbs detected XSV CP was 1000-fold lower than XSV RNA detected by RT-PCR. IHC analysis of M. rosenbergii tissue sections using the MAbs showed XSV infection to co-localize at variable loads with MrNV infection in heart and muscle cells as well as cells of connective tissues in the hepatopancreas. Since XSV histopathology remained prominent in tissues of some prawns in which MAb reactivity for MrNV was low compared to MAb reactivity for XSV, XSV might play some role in WTD severity.

  6. Co-location and Self-Similar Topologies of Urban Infrastructure Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkhamer, Christopher; Zhan, Xianyuan; Ukkusuri, Satish; Elisabeth, Krueger; Paik, Kyungrock; Rao, Suresh

    2016-04-01

    The co-location of urban infrastructure is too obvious to be easily ignored. For reasons of practicality, reliability, and eminent domain, the spatial locations of many urban infrastructure networks, including drainage, sanitary sewers, and road networks, are well correlated. However, important questions dealing with correlations in the network topologies of differing infrastructure types remain unanswered. Here, we have extracted randomly distributed, nested subnets from the urban drainage, sanitary sewer, and road networks in two distinctly different cities: Amman, Jordan; and Indianapolis, USA. Network analyses were performed for each randomly chosen subnet (location and size), using a dual-mapping approach (Hierarchical Intersection Continuity Negotiation). Topological metrics for each infrastructure type were calculated and compared for all subnets in a given city. Despite large differences in the climate, governance, and populace of the two cities, and functional properties of the different infrastructure types, these infrastructure networks are shown to be highly spatially homogenous. Furthermore, strong correlations are found between topological metrics of differing types of surface and subsurface infrastructure networks. Also, the network topologies of each infrastructure type for both cities are shown to exhibit self-similar characteristics (i.e., power law node-degree distributions, [p(k) = ak-γ]. These findings can be used to assist city planners and engineers either expanding or retrofitting existing infrastructure, or in the case of developing countries, building new cities from the ground up. In addition, the self-similar nature of these infrastructure networks holds significant implications for the vulnerability of these critical infrastructure networks to external hazards and ways in which network resilience can be improved.

  7. Hippo pathway elements Co-localize with Occludin: A possible sensor system in pancreatic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravo, Ana Santos; Carter, Edward; Erkan, Mert; Harvey, Emma; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Mrsny, Randall

    2015-01-01

    External adherens junction-based cell-cell contacts involving E-cadherin interactions function to sense planar cell status and modulate epithelial cell proliferation through Hippo (Hpo) and non-canonical Wnt pathways signaling. We hypothesized these regulatory processes should also be sensitive to a similar cell-cell contact sensor associated with apical-basal polarity events at epithelial surfaces. We used 2 human pancreatic cancer cell lines to explore this hypothesis: one with the capacity to form functional tight junction structures and polarize (HPAFII) and one lacking this capacity (AsPc1). Occludin (Ocln), a tetraspanning protein associated with TJ structures and capable of establishing external cell-cell contacts, was observed to partially co-localize with Hpo elements YAP (c-yes associated protein) and TEAD (TEA-dependent), which function to drive a proliferative transcription program. Treatment with dobutamine, known to affect YAP, was shown to suppress proliferation in an Ocln-dependent manner. Blockade of protein kinase C-zeta (PKC-ζ) diminished transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of HPAFII monolayers that was not corrected by dobutamine treatment while the loss of TER resulting from inhibition of ROCK1 could be partially recovered. Examination of normal and cancerous human pancreatic biopsies showed that the cellular localization of Ocln, c-Yes, YAP, and TEAD were similar to HPAFII for normal cells and AsPc1 for cancerous cells. Together, these results suggest a link between Hpo and signals emanating from cell-cell contacts involving Ocln that may regulate pancreatic cell proliferation through the coordination of planar cell polarity with apical-basal polarity events.

  8. Analysis of co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations near clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Várnai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at helping synergistic studies in combining data from different satellites for gaining new insights into two critical yet poorly understood aspects of anthropogenic climate change, aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects. In particular, the paper examines the way cloud information from the MODIS imager can refine our perceptions based on CALIOP lidar measurements about the systematic aerosol changes that occur near clouds.

    The statistical analysis of a yearlong dataset of co-located global maritime observations from the Aqua and CALIPSO satellites reveals that MODIS's multispectral imaging ability can greatly help the interpretation of CALIOP observations. The results show that imagers on Aqua and CALIPSO yield very similar pictures, and that the discrepancies – due mainly to wind drift and differences in view angle – do not significantly hinder aerosol measurements near clouds. By detecting clouds outside the CALIOP track, MODIS reveals that clouds are usually closer to clear areas than CALIOP data alone would suggest. The paper finds statistical relationships between the distances to clouds in MODIS and CALIOP data, and proposes a rescaling approach to statistically account for the impact of clouds outside the CALIOP track even when MODIS cannot reliably detect low clouds, for example at night or over sea ice. Finally, the results show that the typical distance to clouds depends on both cloud coverage and cloud type, and accordingly varies with location and season. The global median distance to clouds in maritime clear-sky areas is in the 4–5 km range.

  9. Analysis of co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations near clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Várnai

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at helping synergistic studies in combining data from different satellites for gaining new insights into two critical yet poorly understood aspects of anthropogenic climate change, aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects. In particular, the paper examines the way cloud information from the MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer imager can refine our perceptions based on CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization lidar measurements about the systematic aerosol changes that occur near clouds.

    The statistical analysis of a yearlong dataset of co-located global maritime observations from the Aqua and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellites reveals that MODIS's multispectral imaging ability can greatly help the interpretation of CALIOP observations. The results show that imagers on Aqua and CALIPSO yield very similar pictures, and that the discrepancies – due mainly to wind drift and differences in view angle – do not significantly hinder aerosol measurements near clouds. By detecting clouds outside the CALIOP track, MODIS reveals that clouds are usually closer to clear areas than CALIOP data alone would suggest. The paper finds statistical relationships between the distances to clouds in MODIS and CALIOP data, and proposes a rescaling approach to statistically account for the impact of clouds outside the CALIOP track even when MODIS cannot reliably detect low clouds, for example at night or over sea ice. Finally, the results show that the typical distance to clouds depends on both cloud coverage and cloud type, and accordingly varies with location and season. In maritime areas perceived cloud free, the global median distance to clouds below 3 km altitude is in the 4–5 km range.

  10. Colocalized structural and functional changes in the cortex of patients with trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre F DaSilva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent data suggests that in chronic pain there are changes in gray matter consistent with decreased brain volume, indicating that the disease process may produce morphological changes in the brains of those affected. However, no study has evaluated cortical thickness in relation to specific functional changes in evoked pain. In this study we sought to investigate structural (gray matter thickness and functional (blood oxygenation dependent level - BOLD changes in cortical regions of precisely matched patients with chronic trigeminal neuropathic pain (TNP affecting the right maxillary (V2 division of the trigeminal nerve. The model has a number of advantages including the evaluation of specific changes that can be mapped to known somatotopic anatomy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cortical regions were chosen based on sensory (Somatosensory cortex (SI and SII, motor (MI and posterior insula, or emotional (DLPFC, Frontal, Anterior Insula, Cingulate processing of pain. Both structural and functional (to brush-induced allodynia scans were obtained and averaged from two different imaging sessions separated by 2-6 months in all patients. Age and gender-matched healthy controls were also scanned twice for cortical thickness measurement. Changes in cortical thickness of TNP patients were frequently colocalized and correlated with functional allodynic activations, and included both cortical thickening and thinning in sensorimotor regions, and predominantly thinning in emotional regions. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, such patterns of cortical thickness suggest a dynamic functionally-driven plasticity of the brain. These structural changes, which correlated with the pain duration, age-at-onset, pain intensity and cortical activity, may be specific targets for evaluating therapeutic interventions.

  11. Hippo pathway elements Co-localize with Occludin: A possible sensor system in pancreatic epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravo, Ana Santos; Carter, Edward; Erkan, Mert; Harvey, Emma; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Mrsny, Randall

    2015-01-01

    External adherens junction-based cell-cell contacts involving E-cadherin interactions function to sense planar cell status and modulate epithelial cell proliferation through Hippo (Hpo) and non-canonical Wnt pathways signaling. We hypothesized these regulatory processes should also be sensitive to a similar cell-cell contact sensor associated with apical-basal polarity events at epithelial surfaces. We used 2 human pancreatic cancer cell lines to explore this hypothesis: one with the capacity to form functional tight junction structures and polarize (HPAFII) and one lacking this capacity (AsPc1). Occludin (Ocln), a tetraspanning protein associated with TJ structures and capable of establishing external cell-cell contacts, was observed to partially co-localize with Hpo elements YAP (c-yes associated protein) and TEAD (TEA-dependent), which function to drive a proliferative transcription program. Treatment with dobutamine, known to affect YAP, was shown to suppress proliferation in an Ocln-dependent manner. Blockade of protein kinase C-zeta (PKC-ζ) diminished transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of HPAFII monolayers that was not corrected by dobutamine treatment while the loss of TER resulting from inhibition of ROCK1 could be partially recovered. Examination of normal and cancerous human pancreatic biopsies showed that the cellular localization of Ocln, c-Yes, YAP, and TEAD were similar to HPAFII for normal cells and AsPc1 for cancerous cells. Together, these results suggest a link between Hpo and signals emanating from cell-cell contacts involving Ocln that may regulate pancreatic cell proliferation through the coordination of planar cell polarity with apical-basal polarity events. PMID:26451343

  12. Colocalization of Fc gamma RI-targeted antigen with class I MHC: implications for antigen processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyre, C A; Barreda, M E; Swink, S L; Fanger, M W

    2001-02-15

    The high-affinity receptor for IgG (CD64 or FcgammaRI) is constitutively expressed exclusively on professional APCs (monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells). When Ag is targeted specifically to FcgammaRI, Ag presentation is markedly enhanced, although the mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. In an effort to elucidate the pathways involved in FcgammaRI targeting, we developed a model targeted Ag using enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). This molecule, wH22xeGFP, consists of the entire humanized anti-FcgammaRI mAb H22 with eGFP genetically fused to the C-terminal end of each CH3 domain. wH22xeGFP binds within the ligand-binding region by its Fc end, as well as outside the ligand-binding region by its Fab ends, thereby cross-linking FcgammaRI. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that wH22xeGFP was rapidly internalized by the high-FcgammaRI-expressing cell line U937 10.6, but did not associate with intracellular proteins Rab4, Rab5a, or Lamp-1, suggesting that the targeted fusion protein was not localized in early endosomes, recycling vesicles, or lysosomes. Interestingly, wH22xeGFP was found colocalized with intracellular MHC class I, suggesting that FcgammaRI-targeted Ags may converge upon a class I processing pathway. These data are in agreement with studies in the mouse showing that FcgammaRI targeting can lead to Ag-specific activation of cytotoxic T cells. Data obtained from these studies should lead to a better understanding of how Ags targeted to FcgammaRI are processed and under what conditions they lead to presentation of antigenic peptides in MHC class I, as a foundation for the use of FcgammaRI-targeted Ags as vaccines.

  13. Adsorption removal of Congo red from aqueous solution by polyhedral Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles: Kinetics, isotherms, thermodynamics and mechanism analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Jinxia [Chemical Synthesis and Pollution Control Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637002 (China); Wang, Zhonghua, E-mail: zhwangs@163.com [Chemical Synthesis and Pollution Control Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637002 (China); Huang, Yijiang; Huang, Ni [Chemical Synthesis and Pollution Control Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637002 (China); Ren, Chunguang [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Zhang, Wei [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Polyhedral Cu{sub 2}O NPs with rough surfaces were prepared by a one-pot sonochemical precipitation method. • The Cu{sub 2}O NPs show unprecedented adsorption capability toward Congo red. • CR adsorption onto Cu{sub 2}O is a spontaneous, endothermic and chemisorption process. • The Cu{sub 2}O adsorbent can be photocatalytically regenerated by visible light irradiation. - Abstract: Polyhedral cuprous oxide nanoparticles (Cu{sub 2}O NPs) with rough surfaces were prepared by a one-pot sonochemical precipitation method. The products were characterized by SEM, XRD, EDS, XPS, and UV–Vis DRS, respectively. The adsorption behavior of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solution onto the as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O NPs was systematically investigated. The equilibrium and kinetic studies suggested that the adsorption process followed Freundlich isotherm and pseudo-second order model, respectively. The as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O NPs exhibited remarkable adsorption properties toward CR. The maximum adsorption capacity at 20 °C was 3904 mg g{sup −1}, which was the highest reported value so far in adsorption removal of CR. Together with the evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy change, our results show that the adsorption of CR onto Cu{sub 2}O is a spontaneous, endothermic and chemisorption process. A putative interaction model between CR and Cu{sub 2}O NPs was proposed. Moreover, the Cu{sub 2}O adsorbent could be photocatalytically regenerated and reused without significant loss of its adsorption capability.

  14. Sphingosine kinase 2 is a chikungunya virus host factor co-localized with the viral replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, St Patrick; Tritsch, Sarah R; Kota, Krishna; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Dong, Lian; Kenny, Tara; Brueggemann, Ernest E; Ward, Michael D; Cazares, Lisa H; Bavari, Sina

    2015-10-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging alphavirus which causes severe and prolonged arthralgic febrile illness. The recent global spread of the virus and lack of approved therapeutic options makes it imperative to gain greater insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying CHIKV pathogenesis, in particular host factors recruited by the virus. In the current study, we identify sphingosine kinase 2 (SK2) as a CHIKV host factor co-localized with the viral replication complex (VRC) during infection. SK2 was demonstrated to co-localize with viral RNA and nonstructural proteins. Targeted impairment of SK2 expression or function significantly inhibited CHIKV infection. Furthermore, affinity purification-mass spectrometry studies revealed that SK2 associates with a number of proteins involved in cellular gene expression specifically during viral infection, suggesting a role in replication. Collectively these results identify SK2 as a novel CHIKV host factor.

  15. Effect of diabetic state on co-localization of substance P and serotonin in the gut in animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Spangeus, A.; Forsgren, Sture; El-Salhy, M.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the numbers of serotonin- and substance P-immunoreactive (IR) cells occur in severa1 animal models of diabetes. It is not known, however, whether these changes are a result of actual ceii loss or are caused by modified gene expression in ceíls showing co-localization of serotonin and substance P. The pattern of mono- and co-expression of serotonin, as well as of substance P, was therefore investigated in gastrointestinal endocrine cells from animal m...

  16. SeqX: a tool to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fördös Gergely

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interacting residues of protein and nucleic acid sequences are close to each other – they are co-located. Structure databases (like Protein Data Bank, PDB and Nucleic Acid Data Bank, NDB contain all information about these co-locations; however it is not an easy task to penetrate this complex information. We developed a JAVA tool, called SeqX for this purpose. Results SeqX tool is useful to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures. The user a. selects a structure from PDB; b. chooses an atom that is commonly present in every residues of the nucleic acid and/or protein structure(s c. defines a distance from these atoms (3–15 Å. The SeqX tool detects every residue that is located within the defined distances from the defined "backbone" atom(s; provides a DotPlot-like visualization (Residues Contact Map, and calculates the frequency of every possible residue pairs (Residue Contact Table in the observed structure. It is possible to exclude +/- 1 to 10 neighbor residues in the same polymeric chain from detection, which greatly improves the specificity of detections (up to 60% when tested on dsDNA. Results obtained on protein structures showed highly significant correlations with results obtained from literature (p Conclusion The tool is simple and easy to use and provides a quick and reliable visualization and analyses of residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures. Availability and requirements http://janbiro.com/Downloads.html SeqX, Java J2SE Runtime Environment 5.0 (available from [see Additional file 1] http://www.sun.com and at least a 1 GHz processor and with a minimum 256 Mb RAM. Source codes are available from the authors. Additional File 1 SeqX_1.041_05601.jar. see this article Click here for file

  17. Combinatorics of finite sets

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Coherent treatment provides comprehensive view of basic methods and results of the combinatorial study of finite set systems. The Clements-Lindstrom extension of the Kruskal-Katona theorem to multisets is explored, as is the Greene-Kleitman result concerning k-saturated chain partitions of general partially ordered sets. Connections with Dilworth's theorem, the marriage problem, and probability are also discussed. Each chapter ends with a helpful series of exercises and outline solutions appear at the end. ""An excellent text for a topics course in discrete mathematics."" - Bulletin of the Ame

  18. Finite Density Fat QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Aloisio, R; Di Carlo, G; Galante, A; Grillo, A F

    2000-01-01

    Lattice formulation of Finite Baryon Density QCD is problematic from computer simulation point of view; it is well known that for light quark masses the reconstructed partition function fails to be positive in a wide region of parameter space. For large bare quark masses, instead, it is possible to obtain more sensible results; problems are still present but restricted to a small region. We present evidence for a saturation transition independent from the gauge coupling $\\beta$ and for a transition line that, starting from the temperature critical point at $\\mu=0$, moves towards smaller $\\beta$ with increasing $\\mu$ as expected from simplified phenomenological arguments.

  19. A Joint Doppler Frequency Shift and DOA Estimation Algorithm Based on Sparse Representations for Colocated TDM-MIMO Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of a new joint Doppler frequency shift (DFS and direction of arrival (DOA estimation for colocated TDM-MIMO radar that is a novel technology applied to autocruise and safety driving system in recent years. The signal model of colocated TDM-MIMO radar with few transmitter or receiver channels is depicted and “time varying steering vector” model is proved. Inspired by sparse representations theory, we present a new processing scheme for joint DFS and DOA estimation based on the new input signal model of colocated TDM-MIMO radar. An ultracomplete redundancy dictionary for angle-frequency space is founded in order to complete sparse representations of the input signal. The SVD-SR algorithm which stands for joint estimation based on sparse representations using SVD decomposition with OMP algorithm and the improved M-FOCUSS algorithm which combines the classical M-FOCUSS with joint sparse recovery spectrum are applied to the new signal model’s calculation to solve the multiple measurement vectors (MMV problem. The improved M-FOCUSS algorithm can work more robust than SVD-SR and JS-SR algorithms in the aspects of coherent signals resolution and estimation accuracy. Finally, simulation experiments have shown that the proposed algorithms and schemes are feasible and can be further applied to practical application.

  20. Regional co-location pattern scoping on a street network considering distance decay effects of spatial interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenhao

    2017-01-01

    Regional co-location scoping intends to identify local regions where spatial features of interest are frequently located together. Most of the previous researches in this domain are conducted on a global scale and they assume that spatial objects are embedded in a 2-D space, but the movement in urban space is actually constrained by the street network. In this paper we refine the scope of co-location patterns to 1-D paths consisting of nodes and segments. Furthermore, since the relations between spatial events are usually inversely proportional to their separation distance, the proposed method introduces the “Distance Decay Effects” to improve the result. Specifically, our approach first subdivides the street edges into continuous small linear segments. Then a value representing the local distribution intensity of events is estimated for each linear segment using the distance-decay function. Each kind of geographic feature can lead to a tessellated network with density attribute, and the generated multiple networks for the pattern of interest will be finally combined into a composite network by calculating the co-location prevalence measure values, which are based on the density variation between different features. Our experiments verify that the proposed approach is effective in urban analysis. PMID:28763496

  1. The GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometry—Colocated (GROUP-C) Experiment on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzien, Scott A.; Powell, Steven P.; Psiaki, Mark; O'Hanlon, Brady; Stephan, Andrew W.; Bishop, Rebecca L.

    2015-04-01

    The GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometry—Colocated (GROUP-C) Experiment is an ionospheric remote sensing experiment manifested to fly on the International Space Station in early 2016. GROUP-C will operate aboard the Space Test Program Houston 5 (STP-H5) experiment pallet and provide ionospheric measurements in real-time. GROUP-C includes two sensors: the Fast Orbital TEC, Observables, and Navigation (FOTON) L1/L2 GPS receiver, which provides vertical electron density profiles and scintillation; and the Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP), a far-ultraviolet photometer for measuring horizontal ionosphere gradients. The FOTON receiver includes a capability for multipath mitigation using a multi-antenna array. The TIP photometer is similar to the photometers aboard the COSMIC satellites with minor improvements in optical performance.Ionospheric irregularities, also known as ionospheric bubbles, are transient features of the low and middle latitude ionosphere with important implications for operational systems. Understanding irregularity formation, development, and evolution is vital for efforts within NASA and DoD to forecast scintillation. Irregularity structures have been studied primarily using ground-based systems, though some spaced-based remote and in-situ sensing has been performed. In combination with GROUP-C, the Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) experiment on STP-H5 will serve as an interactive ionospheric observatory on the ISS. These experiments would provide new capability to study low- and mid-latitude ionospheric structures on a global scale. By combining for the first time high-sensitivity in-track photometry with vertical ionospheric airglow spectrographic imagery, and simultaneous GPS TEC and scintillation measurements, high-fidelity optical tomographic reconstruction of bubbles can be performed from the ISS. Ground-based imagery can supplement the tomography by providing all-sky images of

  2. Finite quantum gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Piva, Marco; Rachwał, Lesław

    2016-07-01

    We explicitly compute the one-loop exact beta function for a nonlocal extension of the standard gauge theory, in particular, Yang-Mills and QED. The theory, made of a weakly nonlocal kinetic term and a local potential of the gauge field, is unitary (ghost-free) and perturbatively super-renormalizable. Moreover, in the action we can always choose the potential (consisting of one "killer operator") to make zero the beta function of the running gauge coupling constant. The outcome is a UV finite theory for any gauge interaction. Our calculations are done in D =4 , but the results can be generalized to even or odd spacetime dimensions. We compute the contribution to the beta function from two different killer operators by using two independent techniques, namely, the Feynman diagrams and the Barvinsky-Vilkovisky traces. By making the theories finite, we are able to solve also the Landau pole problems, in particular, in QED. Without any potential, the beta function of the one-loop super-renormalizable theory shows a universal Landau pole in the running coupling constant in the ultraviolet regime (UV), regardless of the specific higher-derivative structure. However, the dressed propagator shows neither the Landau pole in the UV nor the singularities in the infrared regime (IR).

  3. [Tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dakang; An, Xinye; Ji, Bing; Cheng, Yanli; Gao, Honglian; Tian, Mingming

    2016-06-01

    Objective To examine whether tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) is colocalized with micronuclei and investigate the influence on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis. Methods The eukaryotic expression vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed, identified and then transfected into HEK293T cells. With 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole 2HCI (DAPI) staining, the colocalization between TRIM34 and micronuclei was observed under a fluorescence microscope. Moreover, MitoTracker(R)Deep Red was used to identify the colocalization between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria under a confocal microscope. Finally, the effect of TRIM34 on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis was examined. Results DNA sequencing confirmed that the vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed successfully. A fluorescence microscope revealed that TRIM34 could be colocalized with micronuclei in HEK293T cells transfected with TRIM34-pEGFP-N3. In the same manner, a confocal microscope distinctly showed that TRIM34 was colocalized with micronuclei similarly in appearance. However, there was no distinguished colocalization relationship between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria. Interestingly, the micronuclei chromosome conjugated with TRIM34 was hardly transferred to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis. Conclusion TRIM34 is colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate in mitosis.

  4. Deconvolution and chromatic aberration corrections in quantifying colocalization of a transcription factor in three-dimensional cellular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Thomas; Allan, Sarah E; Levings, Megan K

    2010-08-01

    In the realm of multi-dimensional confocal microscopy, colocalization analysis of fluorescent emission signals has proven to be an invaluable tool for detecting molecular interactions between biological macromolecules at the subcellular level. We show here that image processing operations such as the deconvolution and chromatic corrections play a crucial role in the accurate determination of colocalization between biological macromolecules particularly when the fluorescent signals are faint, and when the fluorescent signals are in the blue and red emission regions. The cellular system presented here describes quantification of an activated forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) transcription factor in three-dimensional (3D) cellular space. 293T cells transfected with a conditionally active form of FOXP3 were stained for anti-FOXP3 conjugated to a fluorescent red dye (Phycoerythrin), and counterstained for DNA (nucleus) with fluorescent blue dye (Hoechst). Due to the broad emission spectra of these dyes, the fluorescent signals were collected only from peak regions and were acquired sequentially. Since the PE signal was weak, a confocal pinhole size of two Airy size was used to collect the 3D image data sets. The raw images supplemented with the spectral data show the preferential association of activated FOXP3 molecules with the nucleus. However, the PE signals were found to be highly diffusive and colocalization quantification from these raw images was not possible. In order to deconvolve the 3D raw image data set, point spread functions (PSFs) of these emissions were measured. From the measured PSF, we found that chromatic shifts between the blue and red colors were quite considerable. Followed by the applications of both the axial and lateral chromatic corrections, colocalization analysis performed on the deconvolved-chromatic corrected-3D image data set showed that 98% of DNA molecules were associated with FOXP3 molecules, whereas only 66% of FOXP3 molecules were colocalized

  5. PAPST, a User Friendly and Powerful Java Platform for ChIP-Seq Peak Co-Localization Analysis and Beyond.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W Bible

    Full Text Available Comparative co-localization analysis of transcription factors (TFs and epigenetic marks (EMs in specific biological contexts is one of the most critical areas of ChIP-Seq data analysis beyond peak calling. Yet there is a significant lack of user-friendly and powerful tools geared towards co-localization analysis based exploratory research. Most tools currently used for co-localization analysis are command line only and require extensive installation procedures and Linux expertise. Online tools partially address the usability issues of command line tools, but slow response times and few customization features make them unsuitable for rapid data-driven interactive exploratory research. We have developed PAPST: Peak Assignment and Profile Search Tool, a user-friendly yet powerful platform with a unique design, which integrates both gene-centric and peak-centric co-localization analysis into a single package. Most of PAPST's functions can be completed in less than five seconds, allowing quick cycles of data-driven hypothesis generation and testing. With PAPST, a researcher with or without computational expertise can perform sophisticated co-localization pattern analysis of multiple TFs and EMs, either against all known genes or a set of genomic regions obtained from public repositories or prior analysis. PAPST is a versatile, efficient, and customizable tool for genome-wide data-driven exploratory research. Creatively used, PAPST can be quickly applied to any genomic data analysis that involves a comparison of two or more sets of genomic coordinate intervals, making it a powerful tool for a wide range of exploratory genomic research. We first present PAPST's general purpose features then apply it to several public ChIP-Seq data sets to demonstrate its rapid execution and potential for cutting-edge research with a case study in enhancer analysis. To our knowledge, PAPST is the first software of its kind to provide efficient and sophisticated post

  6. PAPST, a User Friendly and Powerful Java Platform for ChIP-Seq Peak Co-Localization Analysis and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Paul W; Kanno, Yuka; Wei, Lai; Brooks, Stephen R; O'Shea, John J; Morasso, Maria I; Loganantharaj, Rasiah; Sun, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Comparative co-localization analysis of transcription factors (TFs) and epigenetic marks (EMs) in specific biological contexts is one of the most critical areas of ChIP-Seq data analysis beyond peak calling. Yet there is a significant lack of user-friendly and powerful tools geared towards co-localization analysis based exploratory research. Most tools currently used for co-localization analysis are command line only and require extensive installation procedures and Linux expertise. Online tools partially address the usability issues of command line tools, but slow response times and few customization features make them unsuitable for rapid data-driven interactive exploratory research. We have developed PAPST: Peak Assignment and Profile Search Tool, a user-friendly yet powerful platform with a unique design, which integrates both gene-centric and peak-centric co-localization analysis into a single package. Most of PAPST's functions can be completed in less than five seconds, allowing quick cycles of data-driven hypothesis generation and testing. With PAPST, a researcher with or without computational expertise can perform sophisticated co-localization pattern analysis of multiple TFs and EMs, either against all known genes or a set of genomic regions obtained from public repositories or prior analysis. PAPST is a versatile, efficient, and customizable tool for genome-wide data-driven exploratory research. Creatively used, PAPST can be quickly applied to any genomic data analysis that involves a comparison of two or more sets of genomic coordinate intervals, making it a powerful tool for a wide range of exploratory genomic research. We first present PAPST's general purpose features then apply it to several public ChIP-Seq data sets to demonstrate its rapid execution and potential for cutting-edge research with a case study in enhancer analysis. To our knowledge, PAPST is the first software of its kind to provide efficient and sophisticated post peak-calling Ch

  7. Finite, primitive and euclidean spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efim Khalimsky

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Integer and digital spaces are playing a significant role in digital image processing, computer graphics, computer tomography, robot vision, and many other fields dealing with finitely or countable many objects. It is proven here that every finite T0-space is a quotient space of a subspace of some simplex, i.e. of some subspace of a Euclidean space. Thus finite and digital spaces can be considered as abstract simplicial structures of subspaces of Euclidean spaces. Primitive subspaces of finite, digital, and integer spaces are introduced. They prove to be useful in the investigation of connectedness structure, which can be represented as a poset, and also in consideration of the dimension of finite spaces. Essentially T0-spaces and finitely connected and primitively path connected spaces are discussed.

  8. 高温氧化物晶体界面非稳定性研究%Polyhedral Instability of High-temperature Oxide Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金蔚青; 蔡丽霞; 潘志雷; 苗宇

    2000-01-01

    设计了一套模拟实验, 以获得关于晶体形态和界面非稳定性的差异的可靠数据,如高温溶液生长的骸晶和枝蔓晶. 这些实验是在高温实时观察装置(HITISOT)内进行的. 高温溶液晶体生长实验是在环形铂金丝炉圈内进行的. 炉圈直径为2mm. 铂金丝既起加热又起支撑熔体的作用. 选用KNbO3和Li2B4O7?的混合物进行晶体生长实验. 在只存在扩散机制的快速生长过程中,会形成不同的晶体不完整性,如晶面凹坑、骸晶和枝蔓晶. 采用淬火实验以分辨不同的KNbO3晶体形态,并用扫描电镜研究Li2B4O7溶体中KNbO3?晶体生长的形貌. 在一般情况下,当晶体在气液界面附近液相区成核时,会产?生晶体界面非稳定性. 导致晶体形状不稳定的溶液层的厚度为60. 通过扫描电镜观察,发现晶体在这一溶液层中由多面体晶变为枝蔓晶. 骸晶和枝蔓?晶的各向异性反映了KNbO3的立方特性,也反映了界面非稳定性是沿[110]晶?棱扩大的. [110]晶棱方向的分支证实了晶体生长形状的各向异性. 形成界面非?稳定性的临界尺寸为10. 与此相反,保持稳定的晶面形状是通过60厚度以下的溶液内的晶体生长来实现的. 晶体生长过程是由高温实时观察装置进行实时观察和记录的,并能观察到晶体固液界面处的热溶质对流(如微对流).%Model experiments were designed in order to obtain more reliable data on the diversity of some crystal forms and polyhedral instability-skeletal and dendritic growth in high 妕emperature solution growth. These experiments were performed by High Temperature In Situ Observation Technique. Most of our investigations on high temperature solution growth were performed in a loop-shaped Pt wire heater, having a diameter about 2mm. The Pt wire (0.2mm) was used to heat and suspend the solution. A mixture of KNbO3 (20wt%) and Li2B4O7 was chosen for growth. Rapid growth

  9. Finite Random Domino Automaton

    CERN Document Server

    Bialecki, Mariusz

    2012-01-01

    Finite version of Random Domino Automaton (FRDA) - recently proposed a toy model of earthquakes - is investigated. Respective set of equations describing stationary state of the FRDA is derived and compared with infinite case. It is shown that for the system of big size, these equations are coincident with RDA equations. We demonstrate a non-existence of exact equations for size N bigger then 4 and propose appropriate approximations, the quality of which is studied in examples obtained within Markov chains framework. We derive several exact formulas describing properties of the automaton, including time aspects. In particular, a way to achieve a quasi-periodic like behaviour of RDA is presented. Thus, based on the same microscopic rule - which produces exponential and inverse-power like distributions - we extend applicability of the model to quasi-periodic phenomena.

  10. Finite energy electroweak dyon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimm, Kyoungtae [Seoul National University, Faculty of Liberal Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.H. [Konkuk University, Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Y.M. [Konkuk University, Administration Building 310-4, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    The latest MoEDAL experiment at LHC to detect the electroweak monopole makes the theoretical prediction of the monopole mass an urgent issue. We discuss three different ways to estimate the mass of the electroweak monopole. We first present the dimensional and scaling arguments which indicate the monopole mass to be around 4 to 10 TeV. To justify this we construct finite energy analytic dyon solutions which could be viewed as the regularized Cho-Maison dyon, modifying the coupling strength at short distance. Our result demonstrates that a genuine electroweak monopole whose mass scale is much smaller than the grand unification scale can exist, which can actually be detected at the present LHC. (orig.)

  11. Finite elements and finite differences for transonic flow calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.; Wellford, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews the chief finite difference and finite element techniques used for numerical solution of nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations governing transonic flow. The forms of the governing equations for unsteady two-dimensional transonic flow considered are the Euler equation, the full potential equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, the transonic small-disturbance equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, and the hodograph equations for the small-disturbance case and the full-potential case. Finite difference methods considered include time-dependent methods, relaxation methods, semidirect methods, and hybrid methods. Finite element methods include finite element Lax-Wendroff schemes, implicit Galerkin method, mixed variational principles, dual iterative procedures, optimal control methods and least squares.

  12. Data assimilation method for fractured reservoirs using mimetic finite differences and ensemble Kalman filter

    KAUST Repository

    Ping, Jing

    2017-05-19

    Optimal management of subsurface processes requires the characterization of the uncertainty in reservoir description and reservoir performance prediction. For fractured reservoirs, the location and orientation of fractures are crucial for predicting production characteristics. With the help of accurate and comprehensive knowledge of fracture distributions, early water/CO 2 breakthrough can be prevented and sweep efficiency can be improved. However, since the rock property fields are highly non-Gaussian in this case, it is a challenge to estimate fracture distributions by conventional history matching approaches. In this work, a method that combines vector-based level-set parameterization technique and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for estimating fracture distributions is presented. Performing the necessary forward modeling is particularly challenging. In addition to the large number of forward models needed, each model is used for sampling of randomly located fractures. Conventional mesh generation for such systems would be time consuming if possible at all. For these reasons, we rely on a novel polyhedral mesh method using the mimetic finite difference (MFD) method. A discrete fracture model is adopted that maintains the full geometry of the fracture network. By using a cut-cell paradigm, a computational mesh for the matrix can be generated quickly and reliably. In this research, we apply this workflow on 2D two-phase fractured reservoirs. The combination of MFD approach, level-set parameterization, and EnKF provides an effective solution to address the challenges in the history matching problem of highly non-Gaussian fractured reservoirs.

  13. A three-dimensional finite element model for the mechanics of cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viens, Denis; Brodland, G Wayne

    2007-10-01

    Technical challenges, including significant ones associated with cell rearrangement, have hampered the development of three-dimensional finite element models for the mechanics of embryonic cells. These challenges have been overcome by a new formulation in which the contents of each cell, assumed to have a viscosity mu, are modeled using a system of orthogonal dashpots. This approach overcomes a stiffening artifact that affects more traditional models, in which space-filling viscous elements are used to model the cytoplasm. Cells are assumed to be polyhedral in geometry, and each n-sided polygonal face is subdivided into n triangles with a common node at the face center so that it needs not remain flat. A constant tension gamma is assumed to act along each cell-cell interface, and cell rearrangements occur through one of two complementary topological transformations. The formulation predicts mechanical interactions between pairs of similar or dissimilar cells that are consistent with experiments, two-dimensional simulations, contact angle theory, and intracellular pressure calculations. Simulations of the partial engulfment of one tissue type by another show that the formulation is able to model aggregates of several hundred cells without difficulty. Simulations carried out using this formulation suggest new experimental approaches for measuring cell surface tensions and interfacial tensions. The formulation holds promise as a tool for gaining insight into the mechanics of isolated or aggregated embryonic cells and for the design and interpretation of experiments that involve them.

  14. Finite groups with transitive semipermutability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lifang WANG; Yanming WANG

    2008-01-01

    A group G is said to be a T-group (resp. PT-group, PST-group), if normality (resp. permutability, S-permutability) is a transitive relation. In this paper, we get the characterization of finite solvable PST-groups. We also give a new characterization of finite solvable PT-groups.

  15. THE FINITE-STATE PLAYGROUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hammond

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Finite-state methods are finding ever increasing use among linguists as a way of modeling phonology and morphology and as a method for manipulating and modeling text. This paper describes a suite of very simple finite-state tools written by the author that can be used to investigate this area and that can be used for simple analysis.

  16. Solution of Finite Element Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    An important step in solving any problem by the finite element method is the solution of the global equations. Numerical solution of linear equations is a subject covered in most courses in numerical analysis. However, the equations encountered in most finite element applications have some special...

  17. Classifying substance use disorder treatment facilities with co-located mental health services: A latent class analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Pia M; Furr-Holden, C Debra; Strain, Eric C; Crum, Rosa M; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2016-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act calls for increased integration and coordination of behavioral health services, as people with co-occurring disorders (CODs), meeting criteria for both substance use and psychiatric disorders, are overrepresented in treatment samples. Nationwide estimates of mental health (MH) service co-location in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment facilities are needed. We empirically derived a multiple-indicator categorization of services for CODs in SUD treatment facilities. We used latent class analysis to categorize 14,037 SUD treatment facilities in the United States and territories included in the 2012 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services. Latent class indicators included MH screening and diagnosis, MH support services, psychiatric medications, groups for CODs, and psychosocial approaches. Multinomial logistic regression compared facility-identified primary focus (i.e., SUD, MH, mix of SUD-MH, and general/other) and other facility characteristics across classes. A four-class solution was chosen with the following classes: Comprehensive MH/COD Services (25%), MH without COD Services (25%), MH Screening Services (21%), and Limited MH Services (29%). The former two classes with co-located MH services were less likely to report a SUD-primary focus than the latter classes reporting only MH screening or Limited MH Services. Only the Comprehensive MH/COD Services class also had a high probability of providing special groups for CODs. Approximately half of SUD treatment facilities were in classes with co-located mental health services, but only a quarter provided comprehensive COD services. Future studies should assess differences in patient experiences and treatment outcomes across facilities with and without COD services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Leptin receptor neurons in the mouse hypothalamus are colocalized with the neuropeptide galanin and mediate anorexigenic leptin action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laque, Amanda; Zhang, Yan; Gettys, Sarah; Nguyen, Tu-Anh; Bui, Kelly; Morrison, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    Leptin acts centrally via leptin receptor (LepRb)-expressing neurons to regulate food intake, energy expenditure, and other physiological functions. LepRb neurons are found throughout the brain, and several distinct populations contribute to energy homeostasis control. However, the function of most LepRb populations remains unknown, and their contribution to regulate energy homeostasis has not been studied. Galanin has been hypothesized to interact with the leptin signaling system, but literature investigating colocalization of LepRb and galanin has been inconsistent, which is likely due to technical difficulties to visualize both. We used reporter mice with green fluorescent protein expression from the galanin locus to recapitulate the colocalization of galanin and leptin-induced p-STAT3 as a marker for LepRb expression. Here, we report the existence of two populations of galanin-expressing LepRb neurons (Gal-LepRb neurons): in the hypothalamus overspanning the perifornical area and adjacent dorsomedial and lateral hypothalamus [collectively named extended perifornical area (exPFA)] and in the brainstem (nucleus of the solitary tract). Surprisingly, despite the known orexigenic galanin action, leptin induces galanin mRNA expression and stimulates LepRb neurons in the exPFA, thus conflicting with the expected anorexigenic leptin action. However, we confirmed that intra-exPFA leptin injections were indeed sufficient to mediate anorexic responses. Interestingly, LepRb and galanin-expressing neurons are distinct from orexin or melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-expressing neurons, but exPFA galanin neurons colocalized with the anorexigenic neuropeptides neurotensin and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). Based on galanin's known inhibitory function, we speculate that in exPFA Gal-LepRb neurons galanin acts inhibitory rather than orexigenic. PMID:23482448

  19. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Multi-technique comparison of atmospheric parameters at the DORIS co-location sites during CONT14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinkelmann, Robert; Willis, Pascal; Deng, Zhiguo; Dick, Galina; Nilsson, Tobias; Soja, Benedikt; Zus, Florian; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric parameters, zenith delays and gradients, obtained by the DORIS, GPS, VLBI, and numerical weather models, ECMWF and NCEP, are compared at five DORIS co-located sites during the 15 days of the CONT14 campaign from 2014-05-06 until 2014-05-20. Further examined are two different solutions of GPS, VLBI and NCEP: for GPS, a network solution comparable to the TIGA reprocessing analysis strategy and a precise point positioning solution, for VLBI, a least squares and a Kalman filtered and smoothed solution, and for NCEP two spatial resolutions, 0.5° and 1.0°, are tested. The different positions of the antenna reference points at co-location sites affect the atmospheric parameters and have to be considered prior to the comparison. We assess and discuss these differences, tropospheric ties, by comparing ray-traced atmospheric parameters obtained at the positions of the various antenna reference points. While ray-traced ZHD and ZWD at the co-located antennas significantly differ, the ray-traced gradients show only very small differences. Weather events can introduce larger disagreement between atmospheric parameters obtained at co-location sites. The various weather model solutions in general agree very well in providing tropospheric ties. The atmospheric parameters are compared using statistical methods, such as the mean difference and standard deviations with repect to a weighted mean value. While GPS and VLBI atmospheric parameters agree very well in general, the DORIS observations are in several cases not dense enough to achieve a comparable level of agreement. The estimated zenith delays from DORIS, however, are competitive with the other space geodetic techniques. If the DORIS observation geometry is insufficient for the estimation of an atmospheric gradient, less than three satellites observed during the definition interval, the DORIS atmospheric parameters degrade and show small quasi-periodic variations that correlate with the number of observations

  1. Estimate of Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism by colocated ring laser and seismograph

    OpenAIRE

    Tanimoto, T; Hadziioannou, C; H. Igel; Wasserman, J.; U. Schreiber; Gebauer, A.

    2015-01-01

    ©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Using a colocated ring laser and an STS-2 seismograph, we estimate the ratio of Rayleigh-to-Love waves in the secondary microseism at Wettzell, Germany, for frequencies between 0.13 and 0.30 Hz. Rayleigh wave surface acceleration was derived from the vertical component of STS-2, and Love wave surface acceleration was derived from the ring laser. Surface wave amplitudes are comparable; near the spectral peak about 0.22 Hz, Rayleigh wave a...

  2. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  3. A finiteness result for post-critically finite polynomials

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    We show that the set of complex points in the moduli space of polynomials of degree d corresponding to post-critically finite polynomials is a set of algebraic points of bounded height. It follows that for any B, the set of conjugacy classes of post-critically finite polynomials of degree d with coefficients of algebraic degree at most B is a finite and effectively computable set. In the case d=3 and B=1 we perform this computation. The proof of the main result comes down to finding a relation between the "naive" height on the moduli space, and Silverman's critical height.

  4. The Wyckoff positional order and polyhedral intergrowth in the M3B2- and M5B3-type boride precipitated in the Ni-based superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X. B.; Zhu, Y. L.; Sheng, N. C.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-12-01

    Ni-based single superalloys play a crucial role in the hottest parts of jet engines. However, due to the complex geometry and macro-segregation during the solidification process, the cast defect such as stray grains is inevitable. Therefore, the transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding which can join several small single crystalline castings together is gradually believed to be an effective method for improving the yields of production of the complex components. The melting point depressant element B is always added into the interlayer filler material. Consequently, borides including the M3B2 and M5B3 phase usually precipitate during the TLP bonding process. So a comprehensive knowledge of the fine structural characteristics of the borides is very critical for an accurate evaluation of the TLP bonding process. In this work, by means of the aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy, we show, at an atomic scale, the Wyckoff positional order phenomenon of the metal atoms in the unit cell of M3B2- and M5B3-type boride. Meanwhile, the defect along the (001) plane of the above two types of boride are determined to be the polyhedral intergrowth with complex configurations.

  5. Photophysical Studies of Ru(II)tris(2,2`-bipyridine) Confined within a Zn(II)-Trimesic Acid Polyhedral Metal-Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Randy W; Wojtas, Lukasz [USF

    2012-10-25

    The ability to confine photoactive catalysts within metal-organic framework (MOF) materials affords the opportunity to expand the functional diversity of these materials into solar based applications. Here, the confinement of Ru(II)tris(2,2'-bipyridine) (RuBpy) by a MOF material derived from Zn(II) ions and trimesic acid (hereafter, USF2) is examined. Although the encapsulated RuBpy could not be crystallographically resolved within the MOF framework, the photophysical properties of the complex are characteristic of confinement including extended triplet metal-to-ligand (3MLCT) lifetime (τethanol = 614 ns and {τUSF2 = 1.2 μs at 25 °C) and a slight hypsochromic shift in the steady-state emission spectrum relative to RuBpy in ethanol. The extended lifetime is attributed to a deactivation of a nonradiative 3dd that is antibonding with respect to the Ru(II)-bipyridine due to a confined molecular environment. These results represent one of the first examples of RuBpy encapsulation and photophysical characterization within a polyhedral MOF material.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of photoluminescent hybrids of poly( ɛ-caprolactone)-grafted-polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane by using a combination of ring-opening polymerization and click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuan Thang; Showkat, Ali Md; Bach, Long Giang; Jeong, Yeon Tae; Kim, Jong Soo; Lim, Kwon Taek; Gal, Yeong-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Photoluminescent hybrids of poly( ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) and terbium ions (Tb3+) were synthesized by using a combination of ring-opening polymerization (ROP), click chemistry and coordination chemistry. Initially, acetylene functionalized PCL (alkyne-PCL-COOH) was prepared by using ROP of ɛ-caprolactone with propargyl alcohol, and azide-substituted POSS (POSS-N3) was prepared by using the reaction of chloropropyl-heptaisobutyl-substituted POSS with NaN3. The click reaction between alkyne-PCL-COOH and POSS-N3 afforded POSS-g-PCL, which was subsequently coordinated with Tb3+ ions in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline to produce POSS-g-PCL-Tb3+-Phen. The structures and compositions of the hybrids were investigated by using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The optical properties of POSS-g-PCL-Tb3+-Phen complexes were characterized by using photoluminescence spectroscopy, which showed four high emission bands centered at 489, 545, 584, and 620 nm with excitation at 330 nm. The emission spectra of the europium-ion-coordinated hybrids, POSS-g-PCL-Eu3+-Phen, had four high-intensity peaks, 594, 617, 652 and 686 nm, for an excitation wavelength of 352 nm.

  7. Phenyl hepta cyclopentyl – polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (ph,hcp-POSS/Polystyrene (PS nanocomposites: the influence of substituents in the phenyl group on the thermal stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Blanco

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Some new Polystyrene (PS nanocomposites were prepared by using two Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSSs, namely RR’7(SiO1.58 (where R = 4-methoxyphenyl or 2,4-difluorophenyl and R’ = cyclopentyl, as fillers, and their degradation was studied to investigate the effect of the electron-donor or electron-withdrawing character of the phenyl group substituents on thermal stability. Nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ polymerization of styrene in the presence of various concentrations of POSS. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectra indicated that the POSS content in the obtained nanocomposites was higher than that in reactant mixtures. Inherent viscosity (ηinh and glass transition temperature (Tg determinations indicated that the average molar mass of polymer in 4-methoxynanocomposites was the same than neat PS, while it was much lower in 2,4-difluoro derivatives. Degradations were carried out in both flowing nitrogen and static air atmospheres, in the scanning mode, at various heating rates, and temperature at 5% mass loss (T5% and the activation energy (Ea of degradation of various nanocomposites were determined. The values obtained for 4-methoxyderivatives were higher than unfilled PS thus indicating higher thermal stability. Conversely, the values found for 2,4-difluoro derivatives were lower, in some cases even than those of neat PS. The results were discussed and interpreted.

  8. Preparation and characterization of polyhedral oligomer silsesquioxane nanocomposites incorporated in epoxy resin; Elaboracao e caracterizacao de nanocompositos de oligomero poliedrico de silsesquioxano incorporados na resina epoxidica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhi, Marielen; Zini, Lucas Pandolphi; Birriel, Eliena Jonko; Kunst, Sandra Raquel; Zattera, Ademir Jose, E-mail: marielen_longhi@hotmail.com [Universidade de Caxias do Sul (LPOL/UCS), RS (Brazil). Laboratorio de Polimeros; Pistor, Vinicius [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The incorporation of nanofiller in thermosetting like epoxy resin as has been studied in order to modify its properties. In this research, nanocomposites were obtained by incorporating 5% by weight of three polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) with different number of functionalization: Glicidilisobutil-POSS, Triglicidilisobutil- POSS and Glicicil POSS in an epoxy matrix by sonification process. The nanocomposites were characterized by analysis of X-ray diffraction (DRX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The DRX analysis showed the characteristic peak of POSS and TEM images showed that there is a difference in the dispersion of nanocages for the difference in the number of epoxy groups on the POSS. The incorporation of Glicidilisobutil-POSS showed a significant increase in the glass transition temperature (Tg) value, and also that the most effective from the viewpoint of the dispersion, on the other hand, the Glycidyl-POSS had a greater influence on the thermal stability demonstrating that the dispersion medium is an important characteristic to define the most desirable properties. (author)

  9. Organic-inorganic random copolymers from methacrylate-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) with 3-methacryloxypropylheptaphenyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane: synthesis via RAFT polymerization and self-assembly behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kun; Li, Lei; Zheng, Sixun; Wang, Ge; Liang, Qi

    2014-01-14

    In this contribution, we report the synthesis of organic-inorganic random polymers from methacrylate-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) (MAPEO) (Mn = 950) and 3-methacryloxypropylheptaphenyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (MAPOSS) macromers via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization with 4-cyano-4-(thiobenzoylthio) valeric acid (CTBTVA) as the chain transfer agent. The organic-inorganic random copolymers were characterized by means of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results of GPC indicate that the polymerizations were carried out in a controlled fashion. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the organic-inorganic random copolymers in bulk were microphase-separated and the POSS microdomains were formed via POSS-POSS interactions. In aqueous solutions the organic-inorganic random copolymers were capable of self-assembling into spherical nanoobjects as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic laser scattering (DLS). The self-assembly behavior of the organic-inorganic random copolymers was also found to occur in the mixtures with the precursors of epoxy. The nanostructures were further fixed via subsequent curing reaction and thus the organic-inorganic nanocomposites were obtained. The formation of nanophases in epoxy thermosets was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The organic-inorganic nanocomposites displayed the enhanced surface hydrophobicity as evidenced by surface contact angle measurements.

  10. Integration of co-localized glandular morphometry and protein biomarker expression in immunofluorescent images for prostate cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Richard; Khan, Faisal M.; Zeineh, Jack; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2015-03-01

    Immunofluorescent (IF) image analysis of tissue pathology has proven to be extremely valuable and robust in developing prognostic assessments of disease, particularly in prostate cancer. There have been significant advances in the literature in quantitative biomarker expression as well as characterization of glandular architectures in discrete gland rings. However, while biomarker and glandular morphometric features have been combined as separate predictors in multivariate models, there is a lack of integrative features for biomarkers co-localized within specific morphological sub-types; for example the evaluation of androgen receptor (AR) expression within Gleason 3 glands only. In this work we propose a novel framework employing multiple techniques to generate integrated metrics of morphology and biomarker expression. We demonstrate the utility of the approaches in predicting clinical disease progression in images from 326 prostate biopsies and 373 prostatectomies. Our proposed integrative approaches yield significant improvements over existing IF image feature metrics. This work presents some of the first algorithms for generating innovative characteristics in tissue diagnostics that integrate co-localized morphometry and protein biomarker expression.

  11. Mapping of ionomic traits in Mimulus guttatus reveals Mo and Cd QTLs that colocalize with MOT1 homologues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Lowry

    Full Text Available Natural variation in the regulation of the accumulation of mineral nutrients and trace elements in plant tissues is crucial to plant metabolism, development, and survival across different habitats. Studies of the genetic basis of natural variation in nutrient metabolism have been facilitated by the development of ionomics. Ionomics is a functional genomic approach for the identification of the genes and gene networks that regulate the elemental composition, or ionome, of an organism. In this study, we evaluated the genetic basis of divergence in elemental composition between an inland annual and a coastal perennial accession of Mimulus guttatus using a recombinant inbred line (RIL mapping population. Out of 20 elements evaluated, Mo and Cd were the most divergent in accumulation between the two accessions and were highly genetically correlated in the RILs across two replicated experiments. We discovered two major quantitative trait loci (QTL for Mo accumulation, the largest of which consistently colocalized with a QTL for Cd accumulation. Interestingly, both Mo QTLs also colocalized with the two M. guttatus homologues of MOT1, the only known plant transporter to be involved in natural variation in molybdate uptake.

  12. Colocalization of L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase for metabolic channeling in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achnine, Lahoucine; Blancaflor, Elison B; Rasmussen, Susanne; Dixon, Richard A

    2004-11-01

    Metabolic channeling has been proposed to occur at the entry point into plant phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. To determine whether isoforms of L-Phe ammonia-lyase (PAL), the first enzyme in the pathway, can associate with the next enzyme, the endomembrane-bound cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), to facilitate channeling, we generated transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants independently expressing epitope-tagged versions of two PAL isoforms (PAL1 and PAL2) and C4H. Subcellular fractionation and protein gel blot analysis using epitope- and PAL isoform-specific antibodies indicated both microsomal and cytosolic locations of PAL1 but only cytosolic localization of PAL2. However, both PAL isoforms were microsomally localized in plants overexpressing C4H. These results, which suggest that C4H itself may organize the complex for membrane association of PAL, were confirmed using PAL-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions with localization by confocal microscopy. Coexpression of unlabeled PAL1 with PAL2-GFP resulted in a shift of fluorescence localization from endomembranes to cytosol in C4H overexpressing plants, whereas coexpression of unlabeled PAL2 with PAL1-GFP did not affect PAL1-GFP localization, indicating that PAL1 has a higher affinity for its membrane localization site than does PAL2. Dual-labeling immunofluorescence and fluorescence energy resonance transfer (FRET) studies confirmed colocalization of PAL and C4H. However, FRET analysis with acceptor photobleaching suggested that the colocalization was not tight.

  13. Enhancing Wave Energy Competitiveness through Co-Located Wind and Wave Energy Farms. A Review on the Shadow Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharay Astariz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave energy is one of the most promising alternatives to fossil fuels due to the enormous available resource; however, its development may be slowed as it is often regarded as uneconomical. The largest cost reductions are expected to be obtained through economies of scale and technological progress. In this sense, the incorporation of wave energy systems into offshore wind energy farms is an opportunity to foster the development of wave energy. The synergies between both renewables can be realised through these co-located energy farms and, thus, some challenges of offshore wind energy can be met. Among them, this paper focuses on the longer non-operational periods of offshore wind turbines—relative to their onshore counterparts—typically caused by delays in maintenance due to the harsh marine conditions. Co-located wave energy converters would act as a barrier extracting energy from the waves and resulting in a shielding effect over the wind farm. On this basis, the aim of this paper is to analyse wave energy economics in a holistic way, as well as the synergies between wave and offshore wind energy, focusing on the shadow effect and the associated increase in the accessibility to the wind turbines.

  14. Organizational correlates of implementation of colocation of mental health and primary care in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G; Heslin, Kevin C; Chang, Evelyn; Fenwick, Karissa; Yano, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    This study explored the role of organizational factors in the ability of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) clinics to implement colocated mental health care in primary care settings (PC-MH). The study used data from the VHA Clinical Practice Organizational Survey collected in 2007 from 225 clinic administrators across the United States. Clinic degree of implementation of PC-MH was the dependent variable, whereas independent variables included policies and procedures, organizational context, and leaders' perceptions of barriers to change. Pearson bivariate correlations and multivariable linear regression were used to test hypotheses. Results show that depression care training for primary care providers and clinics' flexibility and participation were both positively correlated with implementation of PC-MH. However, after accounting for other factors, regressions show that only training primary care providers in depression care was marginally associated with degree of implementation of PC-MH (p = 0.051). Given the importance of this topic for implementing integrated care as part of health care reform, these null findings underscore the need to improve theory and testing of more proximal measures of colocation in future work.

  15. quadratic spline finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bahadir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer in a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC thermistor, which may form one element of an electric circuit, is solved numerically by a finite element method. The approach used is based on Galerkin finite element using quadratic splines as shape functions. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved by the finite difference method. Comparison is made with numerical and analytical solutions and the accuracy of the computed solutions indicates that the method is well suited for the solution of the PTC thermistor problem.

  16. Automatic Construction of Finite Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with model generation for equational theories,i.e.,automatically generating (finite)models of a given set of (logical) equations.Our method of finite model generation and a tool for automatic construction of finite algebras is described.Some examples are given to show the applications of our program.We argue that,the combination of model generators and theorem provers enables us to get a better understanding of logical theories.A brief comparison betwween our tool and other similar tools is also presented.

  17. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  18. Finite volume form factors and correlation functions at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Pozsgay, Balázs

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate finite size effects in 1+1 dimensional integrable QFT. In particular we consider matrix elements of local operators (finite volume form factors) and vacuum expectation values and correlation functions at finite temperature. In the first part of the thesis we give a complete description of the finite volume form factors in terms of the infinite volume form factors (solutions of the bootstrap program) and the S-matrix of the theory. The calculations are correct to all orders in the inverse of the volume, only exponentially decaying (residual) finite size effects are neglected. We also consider matrix elements with disconnected pieces and determine the general rule for evaluating such contributions in a finite volume. The analytic results are tested against numerical data obtained by the truncated conformal space approach in the Lee-Yang model and the Ising model in a magnetic field. In a separate section we also evaluate the leading exponential correction (the $\\mu$-term) associate...

  19. A B-Spline-Based Colocation Method to Approximate the Solutions to the Equations of Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Landon; R. W. Johnson

    1999-07-01

    The potential of a B-spline collocation method for numerically solving the equations of fluid dynamics is discussed. It is known that B-splines can resolve complex curves with drastically fewer data than can their standard shape function counterparts. This feature promises to allow much faster numerical simulations of fluid flow than standard finite volume/finite element methods without sacrificing accuracy. An example channel flow problem is solved using the method.

  20. A B-Spline-Based Colocation Method to Approximate the Solutions to the Equations of Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Richard Wayne; Landon, Mark Dee

    1999-07-01

    The potential of a B-spline collocation method for numerically solving the equations of fluid dynamics is discussed. It is known that B-splines can resolve curves with drastically fewer data than can their standard shape function counterparts. This feature promises to allow much faster numerical simulations of fluid flow than standard finite volume/finite element methods without sacrificing accuracy. An example channel flow problem is solved using the method.

  1. A B-Spline-Based Colocation Method to Approximate the Solutions to the Equations of Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Richard Wayne; Landon, Mark Dee

    1999-07-01

    The potential of a B-spline collocation method for numerically solving the equations of fluid dynamics is discussed. It is known that B-splines can resolve curves with drastically fewer data than can their standard shape function counterparts. This feature promises to allow much faster numerical simulations of fluid flow than standard finite volume/finite element methods without sacrificing accuracy. An example channel flow problem is solved using the method.

  2. A B-Spline-Based Colocation Method to Approximate the Solutions to the Equations of Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Landon; R. W. Johnson

    1999-07-01

    The potential of a B-spline collocation method for numerically solving the equations of fluid dynamics is discussed. It is known that B-splines can resolve complex curves with drastically fewer data than can their standard shape function counterparts. This feature promises to allow much faster numerical simulations of fluid flow than standard finite volume/finite element methods without sacrificing accuracy. An example channel flow problem is solved using the method.

  3. Language dynamics in finite populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Natalia L; Nowak, Martin A

    2003-04-01

    Any mechanism of language acquisition can only learn a restricted set of grammars. The human brain contains a mechanism for language acquisition which can learn a restricted set of grammars. The theory of this restricted set is universal grammar (UG). UG has to be sufficiently specific to induce linguistic coherence in a population. This phenomenon is known as "coherence threshold". Previously, we have calculated the coherence threshold for deterministic dynamics and infinitely large populations. Here, we extend the framework to stochastic processes and finite populations. If there is selection for communicative function (selective language dynamics), then the analytic results for infinite populations are excellent approximations for finite populations; as expected, finite populations need a slightly higher accuracy of language acquisition to maintain coherence. If there is no selection for communicative function (neutral language dynamics), then linguistic coherence is only possible for finite populations.

  4. Combinatorial Properties of Finite Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hubicka, Jan

    2010-01-01

    We study countable embedding-universal and homomorphism-universal structures and unify results related to both of these notions. We show that many universal and ultrahomogeneous structures allow a concise description (called here a finite presentation). Extending classical work of Rado (for the random graph), we find a finite presentation for each of the following classes: homogeneous undirected graphs, homogeneous tournaments and homogeneous partially ordered sets. We also give a finite presentation of the rational Urysohn metric space and some homogeneous directed graphs. We survey well known structures that are finitely presented. We focus on structures endowed with natural partial orders and prove their universality. These partial orders include partial orders on sets of words, partial orders formed by geometric objects, grammars, polynomials and homomorphism orders for various combinatorial objects. We give a new combinatorial proof of the existence of embedding-universal objects for homomorphism-defined...

  5. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  6. Colocalization and shared distribution of endomorphins with substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and the mu opioid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, Thomas N; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Inglis, Fiona M; Zadina, James E

    2007-07-10

    The endomorphins are endogenous opioids with high affinity and selectivity for the mu opioid receptor (MOR, MOR-1, MOP). Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH(2); EM1) and endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH(2); EM2) have been localized to many regions of the central nervous system (CNS), including those that regulate antinociception, autonomic function, and reward. Colocalization or shared distribution (overlap) of two neurotransmitters, or a transmitter and its cognate receptor, may imply an interaction of these elements in the regulation of functions mediated in that region. For example, previous evidence of colocalization of EM2 with substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and MOR in primary afferent neurons suggested an interaction of these peptides in pain modulation. We therefore investigated the colocalization of EM1 and EM2 with SP, CGRP, and MOR in other areas of the CNS. EM2 was colocalized with SP and CGRP in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and with SP, CGRP and MOR in the parabrachial nucleus. Several areas in which EM1 and EM2 showed extensive shared distributions, but no detectable colocalization with other signaling molecules, are also described.

  7. LONG-TERM STABILITY OF THE LOCAL GROUND CONTROL NETWORK AT THE CO-LOCATION SITE OF MEDICINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbondanza, C.; Sarti, P.; Legrand, J.

    2009-12-01

    ITRF combinations rely on the availability of accurate tie vectors linking reference points of space geodetic techniques. Co-located instruments are assumed to move consistently and no local relative motion is taken into account. Instabilities may degrade the quality of the co-location itself and perturb the result of ITRF combinations. This work aims to determine the stability of the local ground control network at Medicina (Italy) with independent surveying methods. The observatory hosts a co-location between a VLBI telescope and two GPS antennas, MEDI and MSEL. It is located in the Po Plain where thick layers of clays are the prevalent soil characteristics. Hence, provision of long term stability of geodetic monuments is a challenge and monitoring their stability is an issue. MEDI and the VLBI station regularly contribute to the determination of ITRF, while MSEL is part of the EUREF network. A set of five tie vectors observations linking the VLBI and MEDI reference points was acquired between 2001 and 2007. It is our main tool for performing local deformation analysis. Additionally, the GPS time series of MEDI and MSEL were used to cross check and confirm the local instability detected by terrestrial methods. To achieve a rigorous and reliable investigation of the local stability, multi-epoch terrestrial observations were homogeneously processed according to common parameterizations in a consistent reference frame. Similarly, continuous GPS observations from MEDI and MSEL were analysed according to the new EPN reprocessing strategy in order to monitor the short baseline between MEDI and MSEL; to spotlight any change in its length. Both approaches confirm differential motions at the site which can be related to monument instabilities originated by the particularly unfavourable local geological setting and the inapt design of the monuments foundation. The monuments move non homogeneously at rates reaching up to 1.6 mm/year, this value being comparable to intra

  8. Co-localization of P2Y1 receptor and NTPDase1/CD39 within caveolae in human placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kittel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1/ CD39 is the dominant ecto-nucleotidase of vascular and placental trophoblastic tissues and appears to modulate the functional expression of type-2 purinergic (P2 Gprotein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Hence, this ectoenzyme could regulate nucleotide-mediated signalling events in placental tissue. This immunohistochemical and immuno-electron microscopic study demonstrates the expression of NTPDase1/CD39, P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors in different cell types of human placenta. Specifically P2Y1 has an exclusive vascular distribution whereas P2Y2 is localized on trophoblastic villi. Co-localization of P2Y1 and NTPDase1/ CD39 are observed in caveolae, membrane microdomains of endothelial cells. The differential localization of these P2 receptors might indicate their unique roles in the regulation of extracellular nucleotide concentrations in human placental tissues and consequent effects on vascular tone and blood fluidity.

  9. Co-localization of neural cell adhesion molecule and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 in early embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterlund, Liselotte; Töhönen, Virpi; Hovatta, Outi; Kere, Juha

    2011-01-01

    During development there is a multitude of signaling events governing the assembly of the developing organism. Receptors for signaling molecules such as fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) enable the embryo to communicate with the surrounding environment and activate downstream pathways. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) was first characterized as a cell adhesion molecule highly expressed in the nervous system, but recent studies have shown that it is also a signaling receptor. Using a novel single oocyte adaptation of the proximity ligation assay, we here show a close association between NCAM and FGFR2 in mouse oocytes and 2-cell embryos. Real-time PCR analyses revealed the presence of messenger RNA encoding key proteins in downstream signaling pathways in oocytes and early mouse embryos. In summary these findings show a co-localization of NCAM and FGFR2 in early vertebrate development with intracellular signaling pathways present to enable a cellular response.

  10. Seasonal variations in the Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism from colocated ring laser and seismograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Hadziioannou, Céline; Igel, Heiner; Wassermann, Joachim; Schreiber, Ulrich; Gebauer, André; Chow, Bryant

    2016-04-01

    Monthly variations in the ratio of Rayleigh-to-Love waves in the secondary microseism are obtained from a colocated ring laser and an STS-2 seismograph at Wettzell, Germany. Two main conclusions are derived for the Rayleigh-to-Love wave kinetic energy ratios in the secondary microseism; first, the energy ratio is in the range 0.8-0.9 (Love wave energy is larger than Rayleigh wave energy most of the year by about 10-20%. Second, this ratio suddenly increases to 1.0-1.2 in June and July, indicating a larger fraction of Rayleigh wave energy. This change suggests that the locations and behaviors of excitation sources are different in these months.

  11. Quantitation of Protein Expression and Co-localization Using Multiplexed Immuno-histochemical Staining and Multispectral Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Tyler M; Ricke, Emily A; Drew, Sally A; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A

    2016-04-08

    Immunohistochemistry is a commonly used clinical and research lab detection technique for investigating protein expression and localization within tissues. Many semi-quantitative systems have been developed for scoring expression using immunohistochemistry, but inherent subjectivity limits reproducibility and accuracy of results. Furthermore, the investigation of spatially overlapping biomarkers such as nuclear transcription factors is difficult with current immunohistochemistry techniques. We have developed and optimized a system for simultaneous investigation of multiple proteins using high throughput methods of multiplexed immunohistochemistry and multispectral imaging. Multiplexed immunohistochemistry is performed by sequential application of primary antibodies with secondary antibodies conjugated to horseradish peroxidase or alkaline phosphatase. Different chromogens are used to detect each protein of interest. Stained slides are loaded into an automated slide scanner and a protocol is created for automated image acquisition. A spectral library is created by staining a set of slides with a single chromogen on each. A subset of representative stained images are imported into multispectral imaging software and an algorithm for distinguishing tissue type is created by defining tissue compartments on images. Subcellular compartments are segmented by using hematoxylin counterstain and adjusting the intrinsic algorithm. Thresholding is applied to determine positivity and protein co-localization. The final algorithm is then applied to the entire set of tissues. Resulting data allows the user to evaluate protein expression based on tissue type (ex. epithelia vs. stroma) and subcellular compartment (nucleus vs. cytoplasm vs. plasma membrane). Co-localization analysis allows for investigation of double-positive, double-negative, and single-positive cell types. Combining multispectral imaging with multiplexed immunohistochemistry and automated image acquisition is an

  12. Whither voluntary communities of co-located patients in Vietnam? Empirical evidence from a 2016 medical survey dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Hoang Vuong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Empirical evidence on quality of life of poor patients falls short for policy-making in Vietnam. Financial burdens and isolation give rise to Vietnamese voluntary co-location clusters where patients seek to rely on each other. These communities, although important, have been under-researched. Increasingly, there are questions about their sustainability. Aim & Objectives: This study aims to identify factors that affect sustainability of such co-location clusters, seeking to measure the community prospect through critical determinants as seen by member patients. An in-depth analysis is expected to yield insights that help shape future policies contributing to improvement of healthcare systems.  Material & Method: A dataset containing responses from 336 patients living in four clusters in Hanoi was obtained from a survey during 2015Q4-2016Q1. The processing of data is performed using R 3.2.3, employing baseline category logit models (BCL. Coefficients are estimated to compute empirical probabilities. Results: 1 There is a 50% probability that a patient seeing his/her benefits as unsatisfactory views the community prospect as dim; 2 The more a patient contributes time/effort, the less he/she believes in future growth; 3 There is a 80.8% probability that a patient who makes a significant financial contribution and receives back in-kind benefits predicts no growth. Conclusion: Patients predict community growth when receiving what they need/expect. There exists a kind of “liquidity preference”. Only 14% and 32% make significant financial and labor contributions, respectively. There exists a “risk aversion” attitude, viewing contribution as certain while future benefits to be uncertain.

  13. Poliovirus infection induces the co-localization of cellular protein SRp20 with TIA-1, a cytoplasmic stress granule protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kerry D; Semler, Bert L

    2013-09-01

    Different types of environmental stress cause mammalian cells to form cytoplasmic foci, termed stress granules, which contain mRNPs that are translationally silenced. These foci are transient and dynamic, and contain components of the cellular translation machinery as well as certain mRNAs and RNA binding proteins. Stress granules are known to be induced by conditions such as hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and oxidative stress, and a number of cellular factors have been identified that are commonly associated with these foci. More recently it was discovered that poliovirus infection also induces the formation of stress granules, although these cytoplasmic foci appear to be somewhat compositionally unique. Work described here examined the punctate pattern of SRp20 (a host cell mRNA splicing protein) localization in the cytoplasm of poliovirus-infected cells, demonstrating the partial co-localization of SRp20 with the stress granule marker protein TIA-1. We determined that SRp20 does not co-localize with TIA-1, however, under conditions of oxidative stress, indicating that the close association of these two proteins during poliovirus infection is not representative of a general response to cellular stress. We confirmed that the expression of a dominant negative version of TIA-1 (TIA-1-PRD) results in the dissociation of stress granules. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of wild type TIA-1 or dominant negative TIA-1-PRD in cells during poliovirus infection does not dramatically affect viral translation. Taken together, these studies provide a new example of the unique cytoplasmic foci that form during poliovirus infection.

  14. Phase Velocity and Full-Waveform Analysis of Co-located Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Channels and Geophone Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L.; Mellors, R. J.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A 762-meter Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) array with a channel spacing of one meter was deployed at the Garner Valley Downhole Array in Southern California. The array was approximately rectangular with dimensions of 180 meters by 80 meters. The array also included two subdiagonals within the rectangle along which three-component geophones were co-located. Several active sources were deployed, including a 45-kN, swept-frequency, shear-mass shaker, which produced strong Rayleigh waves across the array. Both DAS and geophone traces were filtered in 2-Hz steps between 4 and 20 Hz to obtain phase velocities as a function of frequency from fitting the moveout of travel times over distances of 35 meters or longer. As an alternative to this traditional means of finding phase velocity, it is theoretically possible to find the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity at each point of co-location as the ratio of DAS and geophone responses, because DAS is sensitive to ground strain and geophones are sensitive to ground velocity, after suitable corrections for instrument response (Mikumo & Aki, 1964). The concept was tested in WPP, a seismic wave propagation program, by first validating and then using a 3D synthetic, full-waveform seismic model to simulate the effect of increased levels of noise and uncertainty as data go from ideal to more realistic. The results obtained from this study provide a better understanding of the DAS response and its potential for being combined with traditional seismometers for obtaining phase velocity at a single location. This analysis is part of the PoroTomo project (Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology, http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo).

  15. DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4) colocalizes with cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Hyung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute and Pusan Cancer Center, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yun-Jeong; Jo, Jin-Ok; Ock, Mee Sun [Department of Parasitology and Genetics, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Soo Hyun; Suh, Dong Soo; Yoon, Man Soo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute and Pusan Cancer Center, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun-Sil [Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, MA (United States); Jeong, Namkung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Wan-Kyu [Department of Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Heung Yeol, E-mail: hykyale@yahoo.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Hee-Jae, E-mail: hcha@kosin.ac.kr [Department of Parasitology and Genetics, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Medical Science, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Germ cell marker DDX4 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • Ovarian cancer stem cell marker CD133 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. • CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4. • Germ cell marker DDX4 has the potential of ovarian cancer stem cell marker. - Abstract: DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4), characterized by the conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp (DEAD), is an RNA helicase which is implicated in various cellular processes involving the alteration of RNA secondary structure, such as translation initiation, nuclear and mitochondrial splicing, and ribosome and spliceosome assembly. DDX4 is known to be a germ cell-specific protein and is used as a sorting marker of germline stem cells for the production of oocytes. A recent report about DDX4 in ovarian cancer showed that DDX4 is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer and disrupts a DNA damage-induced G2 checkpoint. We investigated the relationship between DDX4 and ovarian cancer stem cells by analyzing the expression patterns of DDX4 and the cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers via tissue microarray. Both DDX4 and CD133 were significantly increased in ovarian cancer compared to benign tumors, and showed similar patterns of expression. In addition, DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. Furthermore, almost all CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4, suggesting a strong possibility that DDX4 plays an important role in cancer stem cells, and/or can be used as an ovarian cancer stem cell marker.

  16. Dynamic patterns of colocalization of calbindin, parvalbumin and GABA in subpopulations of mouse basolateral amygdalar cells during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, José Carlos; Olmos, Luis; Legaz, Isabel; Medina, Loreta; Guirado, Salvador; Real, Maria Angeles

    2008-01-01

    Calbindin cells represent a major interneuron subtype of the cortical/pallial regions, such as the basolateral amygdala, which are often analyzed in studies of tangential migration of interneurons from the subpallial ganglionic eminences to the pallium/cortex. However, previous evidence suggests that during development the calbindin cells may include more than one of the interneuron subtypes found in the adult pallium/cortex. Furthermore, in the adult basolateral amygdala, calbindin cells include a subpopulation of non-GABAergic (non-interneuron) cells. To better characterize these cells throughout development, in the present study we investigated the colocalization of calbindin, parvalbumin and GABA in cells of the mouse basolateral amygdala during late embryonic (E16.5) and several postnatal ages from birth until 4 weeks after birth (P0, P10 and P28). Our results indicate that CB, PV and GABA show a dynamic pattern of colocalization in cells of the mouse basolateral amygdalar nucleus throughout development. From E16.5 through P28, the majority of CB+ neurons and virtually all PV+ neurons are GABAergic. However, after P10, the percentage of GABAergic CB+ cells decline from 96% to 70%. Furthermore, while only 9% of CB+ neurons are PV+ at P10, this percentage raises to 42% at P28. At all postnatal ages studied, the majority of the PV+ cells are CB+, suggesting that PV+ interneurons develop postnatally mainly as a subpopulation within the CB+ cells of the basolateral amygdalar nucleus. These results are important for interpreting data from interneuron migration.

  17. Infinite to finite: An overview of finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srirekha A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of finite elements was developed at perfectly right times; growing computer capacities, growing human skills and industry demands for ever faster and cost effective product development providing unlimited possibilities for the researching community. This paper reviews the basic concept, current status, advances, advantages, limitations and applications of finite element method (FEM in restorative dentistry and endodontics. Finite element method is able to reveal the otherwise inaccessible stress distribution within the tooth-restoration complex and it has proven to be a useful tool in the thinking process for the understanding of tooth biomechanics and the biomimetic approach in restorative dentistry. Further improvement of the non-linear FEM solutions should be encouraged to widen the range of applications in dental and oral health science.

  18. A Finite Speed Curzon-Ahlborn Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    Curzon and Ahlborn achieved finite power output by introducing the concept of finite rate of heat transfer in a Carnot engine. The finite power can also be achieved through a finite speed of the piston on the four branches of the Carnot cycle. The present paper combines these two approaches to study the behaviour of output power in terms of…

  19. Geometrical Underpinning of Finite Dimensional Hilbert space

    CERN Document Server

    Revzen, M

    2011-01-01

    Finite geometry is employed to underpin operators in finite, d, dimensional Hilbert space. The central role of Hilbert space operators that form mutual unbiased bases (MUB) states projectors is exhibited. Interrelation among them revealed through their (finite) dual affine plane geometry (DAPG) underpinning is studied. Transcription to (finite) affine plane geometry (APG) is given and utilized for their interpretation.

  20. Geometrical Underpinning of Finite Dimensional Hilbert space

    OpenAIRE

    Revzen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Finite geometry is employed to underpin operators in finite, d, dimensional Hilbert space. The central role of mutual unbiased bases (MUB) states projectors is exhibited. Interrelation among operators in Hilbert space, revealed through their (finite) dual affine plane geometry (DAPG) underpinning is studied. Transcription to (finite) affine plane geometry (APG) is given and utilized for their interpretation.

  1. Plasma Surface Modification of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsequioxane-Poly(carbonate-urea) Urethane with Allylamine Enhances the Response and Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Camilo; Alshomer, Feras; Palgrave, Robert G; Kalaskar, Deepak M

    2016-07-27

    This study present amino functionalization of biocompatible polymer polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane-poly(carbonate-urea) urethane (POSS-PCU) using plasma polymerization process to induce osteogenic differentiation of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs). Optimization of plasma polymerization process was carried out keeping cell culture application in mind. Thus, samples were rigorously tested for retention of amino groups under both dry and wet conditions. Physio-chemical characterization was carried out using ninhydrin test, X-ray photon spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and static water contact analysis. Results from physio chemical characterization shows that functionalization of the amino group is not stable under wet conditions and optimization of plasma process is required for stable bonding of amino groups to the POSS-PCU polymer. Optimized samples were later tested in vitro in short and long-term culture to study differentiation of ADSCs on amino modified samples. Short-term cell culture shows that initial cell attachment was significantly (p < 0.001) improved on amine modified samples (NH2-POSS-PCU) compared to unmodified POSS-PCU. NH2-POSS-PCU samples also facilitates osteogenic differentiation of ADSCs as confirmed by immunological staining of cells for extracellular markers such as collagen Type I and osteopontin. Quantification of total collagen and ALP activity also shows significant (p < 0.001) increase on NH2-POSS-PCU samples compared to unmodified POSS-PCU. A pilot study also confirms that these optimized amino modified POSS-PCU samples can further be functionalized using bone inducing peptide such as KRSR using conventional wet chemistry. This further provides an opportunity for biofunctionalization of the polymer for various tissue specific applications.

  2. Coating of Carbon Fiber with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS to Enhance Mechanical Properties and Durability of Carbon/Vinyl Ester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Khan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Our continuing quest to improve the performance of polymer composites under moist and saltwater environments has gained momentum in recent years with the reinforcement of inorganic nanoparticles into the polymer. The key to mitigate degradation of composites under such environments is to maintain the integrity of the fiber/matrix (F/M interface. In this study, the F/M interface of carbon/vinyl ester composites has been modified by coating the carbon fiber with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS. POSS is a nanostructured inorganic-organic hybrid particle with a cubic structure having silicon atoms at the core and linked to oxygen atoms. The advantage of using POSS is that the silicon atoms can be linked to a substituent that can be almost any chemical group known in organic chemistry. Cubic silica cores are ‘hard particles’ and are about 0.53 nm in diameter. The peripheral organic unit is a sphere of about 1–3 nm in diameter. Further, cubic structure of POSS remains intact during the polymerization process and therefore with appropriate functional groups, if installed on the fiber surface, would provide a stable and strong F/M interface. Two POSS systems with two different functional groups; namely, octaisobutyl and trisilanolphenyl have been investigated. A set of chemical and mechanical procedures has been developed to coat carbon fibers with POSS, and to fabricate layered composites with vinyl ester resin. Interlaminar shear and low velocity impact tests have indicated around 17–38% improvement in mechanical properties with respect to control samples made without the POSS coating. Saltwater and hygrothermal tests at various environmental conditions have revealed that coating with POSS reduces water absorption by 20–30% and retains the composite properties.

  3. Preparation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-based hybrid monolith by ring-opening polymerization and post-functionalization via thiol-ene click reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongshan; Ou, Junjie; Lin, Hui; Wang, Hongwei; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-05-16

    A polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) hybrid monolith was simply prepared by using octaglycidyldimethylsilyl POSS (POSS-epoxy) and cystamine dihydrochloride as monomers via ring-opening polymerization. The effects of composition of prepolymerization solution and polycondensation temperature on the morphology and permeability of monolithic column were investigated in detail. The obtained POSS hybrid monolithic column showed 3D skeleton morphology and exhibited high column efficiency of ∼71,000 plates per meter in reversed-phase mechanism. Owing to this POSS hybrid monolith essentially possessing a great number of disulfide bonds, the monolith surface would expose thiol groups after reduction with dithiothreitol (DTT), which supplied active sites to functionalize with various alkene monomers via thiol-ene click reaction. The results indicated that the reduction with DTT could not destroy the 3D skeleton of hybrid monolith. Both stearyl methylacrylate (SMA) and benzyl methacrylate (BMA) were selected to functionalize the hybrid monolithic columns for reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), while [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl)-ammonium hydroxide (MSA) was used to modify the hybrid monolithic column in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). These modified hybrid monolithic columns could be successfully applied for separation of small molecules with high efficiency. It is demonstrated that thiol-ene click reaction supplies a facile way to introduce various functional groups to the hybrid monolith possessing thiol groups. Furthermore, due to good permeability of the resulting hybrid monoliths, we also prepared long hybrid monolithic columns in narrow-bore capillaries. The highest column efficiency reached to ∼70,000 plates using a 1-m-long column of 75μm i.d. with a peak capacity of 147 for isocratic chromatography, indicating potential application in separation and analysis of complex biosamples. Copyright © 2014

  4. Combinatorial Properties of Finite Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubicka, Jan

    2010-09-01

    We study countable embedding-universal and homomorphism-universal structures and unify results related to both of these notions. We show that many universal and ultrahomogeneous structures allow a concise description (called here a finite presentation). Extending classical work of Rado (for the random graph), we find a finite presentation for each of the following classes: homogeneous undirected graphs, homogeneous tournaments and homogeneous partially ordered sets. We also give a finite presentation of the rational Urysohn metric space and some homogeneous directed graphs. We survey well known structures that are finitely presented. We focus on structures endowed with natural partial orders and prove their universality. These partial orders include partial orders on sets of words, partial orders formed by geometric objects, grammars, polynomials and homomorphism orders for various combinatorial objects. We give a new combinatorial proof of the existence of embedding-universal objects for homomorphism-defined classes of structures. This relates countable embedding-universal structures to homomorphism dualities (finite homomorphism-universal structures) and Urysohn metric spaces. Our explicit construction also allows us to show several properties of these structures.

  5. Head-camera video recordings of trauma core competency procedures can evaluate surgical resident's technical performance as well as colocated evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Pasley, Jason; Garofalo, Evan; Shackelford, Stacy; Chen, Hegang; Longinaker, Nyaradzo; Granite, Guinevere; Pugh, Kristy; Hagegeorge, George; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2017-07-01

    Unbiased evaluation of trauma core competency procedures is necessary to determine if residency and predeployment training courses are useful. We tested whether a previously validated individual procedure score (IPS) for individual procedure vascular exposure and fasciotomy (FAS) performance skills could discriminate training status by comparing IPS of evaluators colocated with surgeons to blind video evaluations. Performance of axillary artery (AA), brachial artery (BA), and femoral artery (FA) vascular exposures and lower extremity FAS on fresh cadavers by 40 PGY-2 to PGY-6 residents was video-recorded from head-mounted cameras. Two colocated trained evaluators assessed IPS before and after training. One surgeon in each pretraining tertile of IPS for each procedure was randomly identified for blind video review. The same 12 surgeons were video-recorded repeating the procedures less than 4 weeks after training. Five evaluators independently reviewed all 96 randomly arranged deidentified videos. Inter-rater reliability/consistency, intraclass correlation coefficients were compared by colocated versus video review of IPS, and errors. Study methodology and bias were judged by Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument and the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies criteria. There were no differences (p ≥ 0.5) in IPS for AA, FA, FAS, whether evaluators were colocated or reviewed video recordings. Evaluator consistency was 0.29 (BA) - 0.77 (FA). Video and colocated evaluators were in total agreement (p = 1.0) for error recognition. Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.73 to 0.92, dependent on procedure. Correlations video versus colocated evaluations were 0.5 to 0.9. Except for BA, blinded video evaluators discriminated (p competency. Prognostic study, level II.

  6. A method for colocating satellite XCO2 data to ground-based data and its application to ACOS-GOSAT and TCCON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nguyen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite measurements are often compared with higher-precision ground-based measurements as part of validation efforts. The satellite soundings are rarely perfectly coincident in space and time with the ground-based measurements, so a colocation methodology is needed to aggregate "nearby" soundings into what the instrument would have seen at the location and time of interest. We are particularly interested in validation efforts for satellite-retrieved total column carbon dioxide (XCO2, where XCO2 data from Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT retrievals (ACOS, NIES, RemoteC, PPDF, etc. or SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCHIACHY are often colocated and compared to ground-based column XCO2 measurement from Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON. Current colocation methodologies for comparing satellite measurements of total column dry-air mole fractions of CO2 (XCO2 with ground-based measurements typically involve locating and averaging the satellite measurements within some latitudinal, longitudinal, and temporal window. We examine a geostatistical colocation methodology that takes a weighted average of satellite observations depending on the "distance" of each observation from a ground-based location of interest. The "distance" function that we use is a modified Euclidian distance with respect to latitude, longitude, time, and mid-tropospheric temperature at 700 hPa. We apply this methodology to XCO2 retrieved from Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT spectra by the ACOS team, cross-validate the results to TCCON XCO2 ground-based data, and present some comparison between our methodology and standard existing colocation methods showing that in general geostatistical colocation produces smaller mean-squared error.

  7. A method for colocating satellite XCO2 data to ground-based data and its application to ACOS-GOSAT and TCCON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H.; Osterman, G.; Wunch, D.; O'Dell, C.; Mandrake, L.; Wennberg, P.; Fisher, B.; Castano, R.

    2014-08-01

    Satellite measurements are often compared with higher-precision ground-based measurements as part of validation efforts. The satellite soundings are rarely perfectly coincident in space and time with the ground-based measurements, so a colocation methodology is needed to aggregate "nearby" soundings into what the instrument would have seen at the location and time of interest. We are particularly interested in validation efforts for satellite-retrieved total column carbon dioxide (XCO2), where XCO2 data from Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT) retrievals (ACOS, NIES, RemoteC, PPDF, etc.) or SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) are often colocated and compared to ground-based column XCO2 measurement from Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). Current colocation methodologies for comparing satellite measurements of total column dry-air mole fractions of CO2 (XCO2) with ground-based measurements typically involve locating and averaging the satellite measurements within a latitudinal, longitudinal, and temporal window. We examine a geostatistical colocation methodology that takes a weighted average of satellite observations depending on the "distance" of each observation from a ground-based location of interest. The "distance" function that we use is a modified Euclidian distance with respect to latitude, longitude, time, and midtropospheric temperature at 700 hPa. We apply this methodology to XCO2 retrieved from GOSAT spectra by the ACOS team, cross-validate the results to TCCON XCO2 ground-based data, and present some comparisons between our methodology and standard existing colocation methods showing that, in general, geostatistical colocation produces smaller mean-squared error.

  8. Una aproximació polièdrica al concepte microeconòmic A Polyhedral Approach to the Microeconomic Concept Una aproximación poliédrica al concepto microeconómico

    OpenAIRE

    Penélope Hernández; José Vila Gisbert

    2009-01-01

    Una aproximació polièdrica al concepte microeconòmicA Polyhedral Approach to the Microeconomic ConceptEste artículo propone un enfoque tridimensional de cualquier concepto en Microeconomía y analiza las implicaciones de esta multidimensionalidad en el proceso de aprendizaje-enseñanza de la microeconomía en educación universitaria. Las tres facetas del aprendizaje presentadas son la experiencial-vivencial, la gráfico-geométrica y la matemático-formal. En cada una de ellas el lenguaje utilizado...

  9. Finiteness conditions for unions of semigroups

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Ghazalh, Nabilah Hani

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we prove the following: The semigroup which is a disjoint union of two or three copies of a group is a Clifford semigroup, Rees matrix semigroup or a combination between a Rees matrix semigroup and a group. Furthermore, the semigroup which is a disjoint union of finitely many copies of a finitely presented (residually finite) group is finitely presented (residually finite) semigroup. The constructions of the semigroup which is a disjoint union of two copies of the f...

  10. Superrosy dependent groups having finitely satisfiable generics

    CERN Document Server

    Ealy, Clifton; Pillay, Anand

    2007-01-01

    We study a model theoretic context (finite thorn rank, NIP, with finitely satisfiable generics) which is a common generalization of groups of finite Morley rank and definably compact groups in o-minimal structures. We show that assuming thorn rank 1, the group is abelian-by-finite, and assuming thorn rank 2 the group is solvable by finite. Also a field is algebraically closed.

  11. Radon Transform in Finite Dimensional Hilbert Space

    OpenAIRE

    Revzen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Novel analysis of finite dimensional Hilbert space is outlined. The approach bypasses general, inherent, difficulties present in handling angular variables in finite dimensional problems: The finite dimensional, d, Hilbert space operators are underpinned with finite geometry which provide intuitive perspective to the physical operators. The analysis emphasizes a central role for projectors of mutual unbiased bases (MUB) states, extending thereby their use in finite dimensional quantum mechani...

  12. Sound radiation from finite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    A method to account for the effect of finite size in acoustic power radiation problem of planar surfaces using spatial windowing is developed. Cremer and Heckl presents a very useful formula for the power radiating from a structure using the spatially Fourier transformed velocity, which combined...... with spatially windowing of a plane waves can be used to take into account the finite size. In the present paper, this is developed by means of a radiation impedance for finite surfaces, that is used instead of the radiation impedance for infinite surfaces. In this way, the spatial windowing is included...... in the radiation formula directly, and no pre-windowing is needed. Examples are given for the radiation efficiency, and the results are compared with results found in the literature....

  13. Second order tensor finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, J. Tinsley; Fly, J.; Berry, C.; Tworzydlo, W.; Vadaketh, S.; Bass, J.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a research and software development effort are presented for the finite element modeling of the static and dynamic behavior of anisotropic materials, with emphasis on single crystal alloys. Various versions of two dimensional and three dimensional hybrid finite elements were implemented and compared with displacement-based elements. Both static and dynamic cases are considered. The hybrid elements developed in the project were incorporated into the SPAR finite element code. In an extension of the first phase of the project, optimization of experimental tests for anisotropic materials was addressed. In particular, the problem of calculating material properties from tensile tests and of calculating stresses from strain measurements were considered. For both cases, numerical procedures and software for the optimization of strain gauge and material axes orientation were developed.

  14. Finite element methods for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Roger T

    2013-01-01

    This book is intended as a textbook providing a deliberately simple introduction to finite element methods in a way that should be readily understandable to engineers, both students and practising professionals. Only the very simplest elements are considered, mainly two dimensional three-noded “constant strain triangles”, with simple linear variation of the relevant variables. Chapters of the book deal with structural problems (beams), classification of a broad range of engineering into harmonic and biharmonic types, finite element analysis of harmonic problems, and finite element analysis of biharmonic problems (plane stress and plane strain). Full Fortran programs are listed and explained in detail, and a range of practical problems solved in the text. Despite being somewhat unfashionable for general programming purposes, the Fortran language remains very widely used in engineering. The programs listed, which were originally developed for use on mainframe computers, have been thoroughly updated for use ...

  15. Finite and profinite quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vourdas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to finite quantum systems, a field at the interface between quantum information and number theory, with applications in quantum computation and condensed matter physics. The first major part of this monograph studies the so-called `qubits' and `qudits', systems with periodic finite lattice as position space. It also discusses the so-called mutually unbiased bases, which have applications in quantum information and quantum cryptography. Quantum logic and its applications to quantum gates is also studied. The second part studies finite quantum systems, where the position takes values in a Galois field. This combines quantum mechanics with Galois theory. The third part extends the discussion to quantum systems with variables in profinite groups, considering the limit where the dimension of the system becomes very large. It uses the concepts of inverse and direct limit and studies quantum mechanics on p-adic numbers. Applications of the formalism include quantum optics and ...

  16. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  17. Variational collocation on finite intervals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Cervantes, Mayra [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernandez, Francisco M [INIFTA (Conicet, UNLP), Diag. 113 y 64 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2007-10-26

    In this paper, we study a set of functions, defined on an interval of finite width, which are orthogonal and which reduce to the sinc functions when the appropriate limit is taken. We show that these functions can be used within a variational approach to obtain accurate results for a variety of problems. We have applied them to the interpolation of functions on finite domains and to the solution of the Schroedinger equation, and we have compared the performance of the present approach with others.

  18. Character theory of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Isaacs, I Martin

    2006-01-01

    Character theory is a powerful tool for understanding finite groups. In particular, the theory has been a key ingredient in the classification of finite simple groups. Characters are also of interest in their own right, and their properties are closely related to properties of the structure of the underlying group. The book begins by developing the module theory of complex group algebras. After the module-theoretic foundations are laid in the first chapter, the focus is primarily on characters. This enhances the accessibility of the material for students, which was a major consideration in the

  19. Finite elements of nonlinear continua

    CERN Document Server

    Oden, J T

    2000-01-01

    Geared toward undergraduate and graduate students, this text extends applications of the finite element method from linear problems in elastic structures to a broad class of practical, nonlinear problems in continuum mechanics. It treats both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view.The text reviews the thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method, and then brings them together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of these models are analyzed, along with the numerical s

  20. Existentially closed locally finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Shelah, Saharon

    2011-01-01

    We investigate this class of groups originally called ulf (universal locally finite groups) of cardinality lambda . We prove that for every locally finite group G there is a canonical existentially closed extention of the same cardinality, unique up to isomorphism and increasing with G . Also we get, e.g. existence of complete members (i.e. with no non-inner automorphisms) in many cardinals (provably in ZFC). We also get a parallel to stability theory in the sense of investigating definable types.

  1. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PECINGINA OLIMPIA-MIOARA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method is analytical when solutions can not be applied for deeper study analyzes static, dynamic or other types of requirements in different points of the structures .In practice it is necessary to know the behavior of the structure or certain parts components of the machine under the influence of certain factors static and dynamic . The application of finite element in the optimization of components leads to economic growth , to increase reliability and durability organs studied, thus the machine itself.

  2. Essays on Finite Mixture Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Dijk (Bram)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractFinite mixture distributions are a weighted average of a ¯nite number of distributions. The latter are usually called the mixture components. The weights are usually described by a multinomial distribution and are sometimes called mixing proportions. The mixture components may be the

  3. Finite-dimensional (*)-serial algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Let A be a finite-dimensional associative algebra with identity over a field k. In this paper we introduce the concept of (*)-serial algebras which is a generalization of serial algebras. We investigate the properties of (*)-serial algebras, and we obtain suficient and necessary conditions for an associative algebra to be (*)-serial.

  4. Symmetric relations of finite negativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaltenbaeck, M.; Winkler, H.; Woracek, H.; Forster, KH; Jonas, P; Langer, H

    2006-01-01

    We construct and investigate a space which is related to a symmetric linear relation S of finite negativity on an almost Pontryagin space. This space is the indefinite generalization of the completion of dom S with respect to (S.,.) for a strictly positive S on a Hilbert space.

  5. Finite length Taylor Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Axisymmetric numerical solutions of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for flow between concentric rotating cylinders of finite length are obtained by a spectral collocation method. These representative results pertain to two-cell/one-cell exchange process, and are compared with recent experiments.

  6. Essays on Finite Mixture Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Dijk (Bram)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractFinite mixture distributions are a weighted average of a ¯nite number of distributions. The latter are usually called the mixture components. The weights are usually described by a multinomial distribution and are sometimes called mixing proportions. The mixture components may be the sam

  7. Critical Phenomena in Finite Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bonasera, A; Chiba, S

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the dynamics of finite systems within molecular dynamics models. Signatures of a critical behavior are analyzed and compared to experimental data both in nucleus-nucleus and metallic cluster collisions. We suggest the possibility to explore the instability region via tunneling. In this way we can obtain fragments at very low temperatures and densities. We call these fragments quantum drops.

  8. Dopamine in the Auditory Brainstem and Midbrain: Co-localization with Amino Acid Neurotransmitters and Gene Expression following Cochlear Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avril Genene eHolt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA modulates the effects of amino acid neurotransmitters, including GABA and glutamate, in motor, visual, olfactory and reward systems (Hnasko et al., 2010; Stuber et al., 2010; Hnasko and Edwards, 2012. The results suggest that DA may play a similar modulatory role in the auditory pathways. Previous studies have shown that deafness results in decreased GABA release, changes in excitatory neurotransmitter levels, and increased spontaneous neuronal activity within brainstem regions related to auditory function. Modulation of the expression and localization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate limiting enzyme in the production of DA in the IC following cochlear trauma has been previously reported (Tong et al., 2005. In the current study the possibility of co-localization of TH with amino acid neurotransmitters (AANs was examined. Changes in the gene expression of TH were compared with changes in the gene expression of markers for AANs in the cochlear nucleus (CN and IC to determine whether those deafness related changes occur concurrently. The results indicate that bilateral cochlear ablation significantly reduced TH gene expression in the CN after two months while in the IC the reduction in TH was observed at both three days and two months following ablation. Furthermore, in the CN, glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2 and the GABA transporter (GABAtp were also significantly reduced only after two months. However, in the IC, DA receptor 1 (DRDA1, vesicular glutamate transporters 2 and 3 (vGluT2, vGluT3, GABAtp and GAD67 were reduced in expression both at the three day and two month time points. A close relationship between the distribution of TH and several of the AANs was determined in both the CN and the IC. In addition, GlyT2 and vGluT3 each co-localized with TH within IC somata and dendrites. Therefore, the results of the current study suggest that DA is spatially well positioned to influence the effects of AANs on auditory neurons.

  9. New algorithm to determine true colocalization in combination with image restoration and time-lapse confocal microscopy to MAP kinases in mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ignacio Villalta

    Full Text Available The subcellular localization and physiological functions of biomolecules are closely related and thus it is crucial to precisely determine the distribution of different molecules inside the intracellular structures. This is frequently accomplished by fluorescence microscopy with well-characterized markers and posterior evaluation of the signal colocalization. Rigorous study of colocalization requires statistical analysis of the data, albeit yet no single technique has been established as a standard method. Indeed, the few methods currently available are only accurate in images with particular characteristics. Here, we introduce a new algorithm to automatically obtain the true colocalization between images that is suitable for a wide variety of biological situations. To proceed, the algorithm contemplates the individual contribution of each pixel's fluorescence intensity in a pair of images to the overall Pearsońs correlation and Manders' overlap coefficients. The accuracy and reliability of the algorithm was validated on both simulated and real images that reflected the characteristics of a range of biological samples. We used this algorithm in combination with image restoration by deconvolution and time-lapse confocal microscopy to address the localization of MEK1 in the mitochondria of different cell lines. Appraising the previously described behavior of Akt1 corroborated the reliability of the combined use of these techniques. Together, the present work provides a novel statistical approach to accurately and reliably determine the colocalization in a variety of biological images.

  10. Osteopontin’s colocalization with the adhesion molecule CEACAM5 in cytoplasm of carcinoma of tongue and its correlation with the invasion of that diease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Fan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5 and correlate it with OPN expression and function in squamous carcinoma of tongue. Paraffin were sections of 80 samples with squamous carcinoma of tongue and 40 samples with normal tissue of tongue for benign lesion having undergone surgery. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was used to study the distribution of CEACAM5 and OPN, and double–labeling immunohistochemistry was used to observe the relationship between CEACAM5 and OPN expression. CEACAM5 and OPN are found in normal tissue of tongue, but with different expression pattern. CEACAM5 expression mainly with membranous staining is restricted on the superficial epithelium. However, OPN expression with mainly cytoplasmic staining is restricted on the deep epithelium. No colocalization of CEACAM5 and OPN have been observed in normal tissue of tongue. In squamous carcinoma of tongue, CEACAM5 expression with cytoplasmic staining is different from normal tongue tissue with membranous staining, and the transformation of CEACAM5 distribution from membrane to cytoplasm is an important incident for the invasion and differentiation of tumor. CEACAM5 and OPN are colocalized in cytoplasm, and a significant correlation was observed between the positive colocalization and the negative colocalization in the depth of invasion and the differentiation of the tumor.

  11. Colocalization of APC and PSD-95 in the nerve fiber as well as in the post-synapse of matured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onouchi, Takanori; Takamori, Nobutaka; Senda, Takao

    2012-06-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) is highly expressed in the nervous tissue, but its function there is not yet known. We previously found that the microtubule-bundling activity of APC is stimulated by its interaction with PSD-95, a neuronal scaffolding protein, in cultured COS-7 cells. In the present study, we investigated the distribution and localization of the intrinsic APC and PSD-95 in both cultured rat hippocampal neurons and in the rat cerebellum by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. In cultured neurons, most of the PSD-95 immunofluorescence puncta were colocalized with APC, and the APC and PSD-95 immunogolds were colocalized in the nerve fibers as well as in the postsynaptic site, but not in the presynaptic site. In the molecular layer of the rat cerebellum, colocalization of APC and PSD-95 was also detected in the nerve fibers and the postsynaptic site, but not in the presynaptic site. Based on these results, we conclude that APC and PSD-95 colocalize and bind to form a protein complex in nerve fibers as well as in postsynaptic sites in matured neurons, suggesting the involvement of the APC/PSD-95 complex in the microtubule functions within the nerve fibers and the synapse functions at the postsynaptic site.

  12. Prolyl oligopeptidase colocalizes with α-synuclein, β-amyloid, tau protein and astroglia in the post-mortem brain samples with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, M J; Myöhänen, T T; Tenorio-Laranga, J; Männistö, P T; Garcia-Horsman, J A

    2013-07-09

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.21.26, PREP) is a serine protease that hydrolyzes proline-containing peptides shorter than 30-mer but it has also nonhydrolytic functions. PREP has been shown to accelerate aggregation of wild-type α-synuclein (α-syn) under cell-free conditions, and PREP inhibitors can block this aggregation both in vitro and in vivo. α-syn is the main component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Lewy body dementia. To clarify the possible interaction of PREP with other markers of neurodegenerative diseases, we studied colocalizations of PREP and (1) α-syn, (2) β-amyloid, (3) tau protein and (4) astroglial and microglial cells in human post-mortem brain samples from PD, Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and in healthy control brain samples. In the substantia nigra of PD brains, an intense colocalization with PREP and α-syn was evident. PREP colocalized also with β-amyloid plaques in AD brains and with tau protein in AD and in healthy brains. PREP was also found in astroglial cells in PD, AD and control brains, but not in the microglia. Our findings are the first ones to demonstrate colocalization of PREP and pathological proteins in the human brain and support the view that, at least in spatial terms, PREP could be associated with pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Electronic origin of the dependence of hydrogen bond strengths on nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor hydrogen bonds in polyhedral water clusters (H2O)n, n = 8, 20 and 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Suehiro; Akase, Dai; Aida, Misako; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2016-08-04

    The relative stability and the characteristics of the hydrogen bond networks in the cubic cages of (H2O)8, dodecahedral cages of (H2O)20,and tetrakaidodecahedral cages of (H2O)24 are studied. The charge-transfer and dispersion interaction terms of every pair of the hydrogen bonds are evaluated by using the perturbation theory based on the locally-projected molecular orbital (LPMO PT). Every water molecule and every hydrogen-bonded pair in polyhedral clusters are classified by the types of the adjacent molecules and hydrogen bonds. The relative binding energies among the polyhedral clusters are grouped by these classifications. The necessary condition for the stable conformers and the rules of the ordering of the relative stability among the isomers are derived from the analysis. The O–O distances and the pair-wise charge-transfer terms are dependent not only on the types of the hydrogen donor and acceptor waters but also on the types of the adjacent waters. This dependence is analyzed with Mulliken’s charge-transfer theory. The work is partially supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Science Research of JSPS (SI, DA, MA). SSX was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy.

  14. A finite-volume module for simulating global all-scale atmospheric flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Deconinck, Willem; Hamrud, Mats; Kühnlein, Christian; Mozdzynski, George; Szmelter, Joanna; Wedi, Nils P.

    2016-06-01

    The paper documents the development of a global nonhydrostatic finite-volume module designed to enhance an established spectral-transform based numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. The module adheres to NWP standards, with formulation of the governing equations based on the classical meteorological latitude-longitude spherical framework. In the horizontal, a bespoke unstructured mesh with finite-volumes built about the reduced Gaussian grid of the existing NWP model circumvents the notorious stiffness in the polar regions of the spherical framework. All dependent variables are co-located, accommodating both spectral-transform and grid-point solutions at the same physical locations. In the vertical, a uniform finite-difference discretisation facilitates the solution of intricate elliptic problems in thin spherical shells, while the pliancy of the physical vertical coordinate is delegated to generalised continuous transformations between computational and physical space. The newly developed module assumes the compressible Euler equations as default, but includes reduced soundproof PDEs as an option. Furthermore, it employs semi-implicit forward-in-time integrators of the governing PDE systems, akin to but more general than those used in the NWP model. The module shares the equal regions parallelisation scheme with the NWP model, with multiple layers of parallelism hybridising MPI tasks and OpenMP threads. The efficacy of the developed nonhydrostatic module is illustrated with benchmarks of idealised global weather.

  15. Finite Dimensional KP \\tau-functions I. Finite Grassmannians

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, F; Harnad, J

    2014-01-01

    We study \\tau-functions of the KP hierarchy in terms of abelian group actions on finite dimensional Grassmannians, viewed as subquotients of the Hilbert space Grassmannians of Sato, Segal and Wilson. A determinantal formula of Gekhtman and Kasman involving exponentials of finite dimensional matrices is shown to follow naturally from such reductions. All reduced flows of exponential type generated by matrices with arbitrary nondegenerate Jordan forms are derived, both in the Grassmannian setting and within the fermionic operator formalism. A slightly more general determinantal formula involving resolvents of the matrices generating the flow, valid on the big cell of the Grassmannian, is also derived. An explicit expression is deduced for the Pl\\"ucker coordinates appearing as coefficients in the Schur function expansion of the \\tau-function.

  16. 多面体线框模型的表面识别技术%Identifying faces 0f polyhedral wireframe models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵军; 高满屯; 王三民

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient algorithm for extracting faces from polyhedral wireframe models. The main features of the algorithm are using the topological and geometric information of wireframe models and its stronger adaptability. First, the wireframe model is projected to a plane, and the "invisible" edges which are obstructed by another edge in projection are hidden. And the edges which have a common vertex are arranged into a set in counterclockwise.Then search the minimal circle based on rule of the smallest rotation angle in clockwise. At the same time the Moebius rule are use to delete the illegal circle and remove the finished edges which are accurately contained by two circles. When a " visible" edge is removed, "invisible" edges blocked by it may be "visible" ones. So the new minimal circle can be searched. Repeat this course until all edge is removed and there are no illegal circle and illegal edge. Finally, the remaining circle are all true face of the model and all point to outside of the object by adjusting their direction. Several typical examples are given to demonstrate the widespread adaptability and high efficiency of the algorithm.%提出一种综合利用线框模型几何信息和拓扑信息的表面识别算法.首先利用平行投影法将3维线框模型投影到2维平面上,隐藏被遮挡边和悬边悬链;然后在可见投影边线图中,根据各个顶点的关联边序列,按照顺时针最小转角原则搜索最小回路;最后根据Moebius规则和二流形体的性质,及时删除不是表面投影的非法回路和图中的完备边,并调整回路的方向,使其均指向体外.通过各类典型立体的表面识别实验表明,算法具有广泛的立体适应能力和较高的效率.

  17. Research Progress on Metal-containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes%含金属笼型倍半硅氧烷的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾碧榕; 许一婷; 罗伟昂; 戴李宗

    2012-01-01

    倍半硅氧烷作为催化剂载体硅胶表面结构与性能研究的模型,可以通过表征其表面反应性质来直观认识硅胶负载型催化剂的作用机制。过去几十年来,倍半硅氧烷的研究呈现飞跃式的发展态势,开发出许多新化合物和新合成方法,并在一些催化过程中得到应用。将倍半硅氧烷作为金属化合物的配体,极大地丰富了元素化学的内容。本文重点介绍了合成含金属笼型倍半硅氧烷的相关进展,同时介绍了含金属笼型倍半硅氧烷在聚合物材料应用中的研究。%Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxancs (POSS) is a kind of organic and inorganic hybrids molecules with cage-like nanostructure. Study on POSS has gained great interest and becomes a hot spot in the field of catalytic materials over the past decade. New synthetic approaches have been developed, and new complexes based on elements throughout the periodic table have been synthesized. Researchers have also developed many methods to incorporate silsesquioxanes into new materials. It showed that the metal-containing POSS complexes were models of silica immobilized with metal complexes, and could provide us an intimate knowledge of the reactions on the surface of silica support. This review introduces the development of the synthesis of metallasilsesquioxanes of main group and transition metals, and also presents the recent applications of metal-containing POSS in flame retardant polymers, photoelectric material and so on. In the future, the research will focus on the synthesis and characterization of novel metal-containing POSS compounds as well as their applications in the field of catalysts and functional materials.

  18. MHC class II up-regulation and co-localization with Fas in experimental models of immune-mediated bone marrow failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie, Andrew J.; Samsel, Leigh; Takaku, Tomoiku; Desierto, Marie J.; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; McCoy, J. Philip; Young, Neal S.; Chen, Jichun

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) promotes MHC class II expression on bone marrow (BM) cell targets that facilitates T cell-mediated BM destruction in immune-mediated BM failure. Materials and Methods Allogeneic lymph node (LN) cells were infused into MHC or minor histocompatibility antigen (minor-H) mismatched hosts to induce BM failure. MHC class II and Fas expression and cell apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. MHC class II-Fas co-localization was detected by ImageStream Imaging Flow Cytometry and other cell-cell associations were visualized by confocal microscopy. T cell-mediated BM cell apoptosis and effects of IFN-γ on MHC class II-Fas co-localization on normal BM cells were studied using cell culture in vitro followed by conventional and imaging flow cytometry. Results BM failure animals had significantly up-regulated MHC class II expression on CD4−CD8−CD11b−CD45R− residual BM cells and significantly increased MHC class II-Fas co-localization on BM CD150+ and CD34+ hematopoietic cells. MHC class II+Fas+ BM cells were closely associated with CD4+ T cells in the BM of affected animals, and they were significantly more responsive to T-cell mediated cell apoptosis relative to MHC class II−Fas− BM cells. Infusion of IFN-γ-deficient LN cells into minor-H mismatched recipients resulted in no MHC class II-Fas up-regulation and no clinically overt BM failure. Treatment with recombinant IFN-γ significantly increased both MHC class II-Fas co-expression and co-localization on normal BM cells. Conclusion Elevation of the inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ stimulated MHC class II expression and MHC class II-Fas co-localization, which may facilitate T-cell mediated cell destruction. PMID:21635935

  19. Co-located ground-based remote sensing and in situ measurements at the tropical atmospheric observatory in Suriname

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, T.; Petersen, K.; Gerbig, C.; Macatangay, R.; Koerner, S.; Jordan, A.; Rothe, M.; Notholt, J.; Schrems, O.

    2009-04-01

    The first ground-based remote sensing measurements of the column averaged volume mixing ratio of CO2 (XCO2) for the inner tropics have been obtained at Paramaribo, Suriname (5.8°N, 55.2°W). Due to the migration of the ITCZ over the measurement location the probed air masses belong to the northern or southern hemisphere depending on the time of the year. The XCO2 shows an average annual increase in the Southern Hemisphere of 2.2 ppm for the time period 2004 to 2007, which agrees within the error with model simulations. Co-located in-situ measurements are strongly influenced by a local source. From the isotopic composition of the air samples the local source component is suggested to be the terrestrial biosphere. Using d13C from the NOAA/ESRL stations Ascension Is. (ASC) and Ragged Point (RPB) the data has been corrected for the local source component. The corrected mixing ratios for the surface as well as the XCO2 qualitatively agree with model simulations.

  20. Co-location of health care services for homeless veterans: a case study of innovation in program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue-Howells, Jessica; McGuire, Jim; Nakashima, John

    2008-01-01

    This case study examines how the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System (GLA) improved homeless veteran service utilization through program innovation that addressed service fragmentation. The new program offered same-day co-located mental health, medical, and homeless services with a coordinated intake system. The program is analyzed using a framework proposed by Rosenheck (2001) that has four phases: the decision to implement, initial implementation, sustained maintenance, and termination or transformation. GLA was able to successfully implement a new program that remains in the sustained maintenance phase five years after the initial decision to implement. Key factors from the Rosenheck innovation model in the program's success included coalition building, linking the project to legitimate goals, program monitoring, and developing communities of practicing clinicians. The key lesson from the case study is the need for a coalition to persistently problem solve and act as advocates for the program, even after successful initial implementation. Social work leadership was critical in all phases of program implementation.

  1. Increased expression of the sonic hedgehog and vascular endothelial growth factor with co-localization in varicocele veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Ho; Yang, Wen-Kai; Lee, Jane-Dar

    2017-03-01

    Objectives Varicocele is characterized by dilatation and tortuosity of the internal spermatic vein. Sonic hedgehog plays an important role in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling under hypoxic stress. We studied the relationship and distribution of SHH and vascular endothelial growth factor in internal spermatic vein in patients diagnosed with varicocele. Methods Specimens of 1 cm were taken from the internal spermatic vein during left varicocele repair (N = 20). The control samples of ISV were obtained from eight male patients who underwent left inguinal herniorrhaphy. We analyzed the sonic hedgehog and vascular endothelial growth factor expression and distribution by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescent staining, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The data were analyzed using the Student's t test. Results Immunoblotting showed higher expression of sonic hedgehog and vascular endothelial growth factor proteins in varicocele veins than in the control group ( P sonic hedgehog and vascular endothelial growth factor with co-localization in varicocele veins which imply that the reducing hypoxia or using sonic hedgehog antagonists may be helpful for this vascular disease.

  2. Nanoparticle uptake and their co-localization with cell compartments - a confocal Raman microscopy study at single cell level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrela-Lopis, I; Donath, E [Institute of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Leipzig University, Haertelstrasse 16, 04107 Leipzig (Germany); Romero, G; Rojas, E; Moya, S E, E-mail: Irina.Estrela-Lopis@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [CIC biomaGUNE, Paseo Miramon 182 Edificio Empresarial C, 20009 San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain)

    2011-07-06

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, non-destructive and label-free technique, was employed to study the uptake and localization of nanoparticles (NPs) in the Hepatocarcinoma human cell line HepG2 at the level of single cells. Cells were exposed to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the surface of which was engineered with polyelectrolytes and lipid layers, aluminium oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles. Raman spectra deconvolution was applied to obtain the spatial distributions of NPs together with lipids/proteins in cells. The colocalization of the NPs with different intracellular environments, lipid bodies, protein and DNA, was inferred. Lipid coated CNTs associated preferentially with lipid rich regions, whereas polyelectrolyte coated CNTs were excluded from lipid rich regions. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs were found in the cytoplasm. CeO{sub 2} NPs were readily taken up and have been observed all over the cell. Raman z-scans proved the intracellular distribution of the respective NPs.

  3. Growth hormone (GH) and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH): Co-localization and action in the chicken testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; López-Marín, Luz M; Carranza, Martha; Giterman, Daniel; Harvey, Steve; Arámburo, Carlos; Luna, Maricela

    2014-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) gene expression is not confined to the pituitary gland and occurs in many extrapituitary tissues, including the chicken testis. The regulation and function of GH in extrapituitary tissues is, however, largely unknown. The possibility that chicken testicular GH might be regulated by GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), as in the avian pituitary gland, was investigated in the present study. GHRH co-localized with GH in the germinal epithelium and in interstitial zones within the chicken testes, particularly in the spermatogonia and spermatocytes. In testicular cell cultures, exogenous human GHRH1-44 induced (at 1, 10 and 100nM) a dose-related increase in GH release. Western blot analysis showed a heterogeneous pattern in the GH moieties released during GHRH stimulation. 26kDa monomer GH was the most abundant moiety under basal conditions, but 15 and 17kDa isoforms were more abundant after GHRH stimulation. GHRH treatment also increased the abundance of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) immunoreactivity in the testes. This may have been GH-mediated, since exogenous GH similarly increased the incorporation of ((3)H)-thymidine into cultured testicular cells and increased their metabolic activity, as determined by increased MTT reduction. Furthermore, GH and GHRH immunoneutralization blocked GHRH-stimulated proliferative activity. In summary, these results indicate that GHRH stimulates testicular GH secretion in an autocrine or paracrine manner. Data also demonstrate proliferative actions of GHRH on testicular cell number and suggest that this action is mediated by local GH production.

  4. When students from different professions are co-located: the importance of interprofessional rapport for learning to work together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Anne; Fisher, Karin; Smith, Tony

    2015-01-01

    With increasing interest and research into interprofessional learning, there is scope to more deeply understand what happens when students from different professions live and study in the same location. This study aimed to explore the issue of co-location and its effects on how students learn to work with other professions. The setting for this study was a rural health education facility in Australia with close links to local health care and community services. Philosophical hermeneutics informed the research method. Interviews were undertaken with 29 participants, including students, academic educators and clinical supervisors in diagnostic radiography, medicine, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, pharmacy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology. Photo-elicitation was used to facilitate participant engagement with the topic. The findings foreground the value of interprofessional rapport building opportunities for students learning to work together. Enabled by the proximity of different professions in shared educational, clinical and social spaces, interprofessional rapport building was contingent on contextual conditions (balance of professions, shared spaces and adequate time) and individual's interpersonal capabilities (being interested, being inclusive, developing interpersonal bonds, giving and receiving respect, bringing a sense of own profession and being patient-centred). In the absence of these conditions and capabilities, negative professional stereotypes may be inadvertently re-enforced. From these findings suggestions are made for nurturing interprofessional rapport building opportunities to enable students of different professions to learn to work together.

  5. Quantifying evidence for candidate gene polymorphisms: Bayesian analysis combining sequence-specific and quantitative trait loci colocation information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Roderick D

    2007-12-01

    We calculate posterior probabilities for candidate genes as a function of genomic location. Posterior probabilities for quantitative trait loci (QTL) presence in a small interval are calculated using a Bayesian model-selection approach based on the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) and used to combine QTL colocation information with sequence-specific evidence, e.g., from differential expression and/or association studies. Our method takes into account uncertainty in estimation of number and locations of QTL and estimated map position. Posterior probabilities for QTL presence were calculated for simulated data with n = 100, 300, and 1200 QTL progeny and compared with interval mapping and composite-interval mapping. Candidate genes that mapped to QTL regions had substantially larger posterior probabilities. Among candidates with a given Bayes factor, those that map near a QTL are more promising for further investigation with association studies and functional testing or for use in marker-aided selection. The BIC is shown to correspond very closely to Bayes factors for linear models with a nearly noninformative Zellner prior for the simulated QTL data with n > or = 100. It is shown how to modify the BIC to use a subjective prior for the QTL effects.

  6. Preliminary safety analysis of a PBMR supplying process heat to a co-located ethylene production plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarlat, Raluca O., E-mail: rscarlat@nuc.berkeley.edu [University of California Berkeley, Nuclear Engineering, 4118 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cisneros, Anselmo T. [University of California Berkeley, Nuclear Engineering, 4118 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Koutchesfahani, Tawni [University of California, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 201 Gilman Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hong, Rada; Peterson, Per F. [University of California Berkeley, Nuclear Engineering, 4118 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    This paper considers the safety analysis and licensing approach for co-locating a pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) to provide process heat to an ethylene production unit. The PBMR is an advanced nuclear reactor design that provides 400 MW of thermal energy. Ethylene production is an energy intensive process that utilizes large gas furnaces to provide the heat for the process. Coupling a PBMR with an ethylene production plant would open a new market for nuclear power, and would provide the chemical industry with a cleaner power source, helping to achieve the Clean Air Act standards, and eliminating the 0.5 ton of CO{sub 2} emissions per ton of produced ethylene. Our analysis uses the Chevron Phillips chemical plant in Sweeney, TX as a prototypical site. The plant has four ethylene production trains, with a total power consumption of 2.4 GW, for an ethylene output of 3.7 million tons per year, 4% of the global ethylene production capacity. This paper proposes replacement of the gas furnaces by low-emission PBMR modules, and presents the safety concerns and risk mitigation and management options for this coupled system. Two coupling design options are proposed, and the necessary changes to the design basis events and severe accidents for the PBMR licensing application are discussed. A joint effort between the chemical and the nuclear entities to optimize the coupling design, establish preventive maintenance procedures, and develop emergency response plans for both of the units is recommended.

  7. Elements with Square Roots in Finite Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.S. Lucido; M.R. Pournaki

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study the probability that a randomly chosen element in a finite group has a square root, in particular the simple groups of Lie type of rank 1, the sporadic finite simple groups and the alternating groups.

  8. Infinite Possibilities for the Finite Element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the uses of finite element methods in solving problems of heat transfer, fluid flow, etc. Suggests that engineers should know the general concepts and be able to apply the principles of finite element methods. (Author/WB)

  9. Conforming finite elements with embedded strong discontinuities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dias-da-Costa, D.; Alfaiate, J.; Sluys, L.J.; Areias, P.; Fernandes, C.; Julio, E.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of embedding strong discontinuities into finite elements allowed the simulation of different problems, namely, brickwork masonry fracture, dynamic fracture, failure in finite strain problems and simulation of reinforcement concrete members. However, despite the significant contributi

  10. DOLFIN: Automated Finite Element Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Logg, Anders; 10.1145/1731022.1731030

    2011-01-01

    We describe here a library aimed at automating the solution of partial differential equations using the finite element method. By employing novel techniques for automated code generation, the library combines a high level of expressiveness with efficient computation. Finite element variational forms may be expressed in near mathematical notation, from which low-level code is automatically generated, compiled and seamlessly integrated with efficient implementations of computational meshes and high-performance linear algebra. Easy-to-use object-oriented interfaces to the library are provided in the form of a C++ library and a Python module. This paper discusses the mathematical abstractions and methods used in the design of the library and its implementation. A number of examples are presented to demonstrate the use of the library in application code.

  11. Finite elements methods in mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eslami, M Reza

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all basic areas of mechanical engineering, such as fluid mechanics, heat conduction, beams, and elasticity with detailed derivations for the mass, stiffness, and force matrices. It is especially designed to give physical feeling to the reader for finite element approximation by the introduction of finite elements to the elevation of elastic membrane. A detailed treatment of computer methods with numerical examples are provided. In the fluid mechanics chapter, the conventional and vorticity transport formulations for viscous incompressible fluid flow with discussion on the method of solution are presented. The variational and Galerkin formulations of the heat conduction, beams, and elasticity problems are also discussed in detail. Three computer codes are provided to solve the elastic membrane problem. One of them solves the Poisson’s equation. The second computer program handles the two dimensional elasticity problems, and the third one presents the three dimensional transient heat conducti...

  12. Automation of finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Korelc, Jože

    2016-01-01

    New finite elements are needed as well in research as in industry environments for the development of virtual prediction techniques. The design and implementation of novel finite elements for specific purposes is a tedious and time consuming task, especially for nonlinear formulations. The automation of this process can help to speed up this process considerably since the generation of the final computer code can be accelerated by order of several magnitudes. This book provides the reader with the required knowledge needed to employ modern automatic tools like AceGen within solid mechanics in a successful way. It covers the range from the theoretical background, algorithmic treatments to many different applications. The book is written for advanced students in the engineering field and for researchers in educational and industrial environments.

  13. Representation theory of finite monoids

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This first text on the subject provides a comprehensive introduction to the representation theory of finite monoids. Carefully worked examples and exercises provide the bells and whistles for graduate accessibility, bringing a broad range of advanced readers to the forefront of research in the area. Highlights of the text include applications to probability theory, symbolic dynamics, and automata theory. Comfort with module theory, a familiarity with ordinary group representation theory, and the basics of Wedderburn theory, are prerequisites for advanced graduate level study. Researchers in algebra, algebraic combinatorics, automata theory, and probability theory, will find this text enriching with its thorough presentation of applications of the theory to these fields. Prior knowledge of semigroup theory is not expected for the diverse readership that may benefit from this exposition. The approach taken in this book is highly module-theoretic and follows the modern flavor of the theory of finite dimensional ...

  14. Selective Smoothed Finite Element Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The paper examines three selective schemes for the smoothed finite element method (SFEM) which was formulated by incorporating a cell-wise strain smoothing operation into the standard compatible finite element method (FEM). These selective SFEM schemes were formulated based on three selective integration FEM schemes with similar properties found between the number of smoothing cells in the SFEM and the number of Gaussian integration points in the FEM. Both scheme 1 and scheme 2 are free of nearly incompressible locking, but scheme 2 is more general and gives better results than scheme 1. In addition, scheme 2 can be applied to anisotropic and nonlinear situations, while scheme 1 can only be applied to isotropic and linear situations. Scheme 3 is free of shear locking. This scheme can be applied to plate and shell problems. Results of the numerical study show that the selective SFEM schemes give more accurate results than the FEM schemes.

  15. Quantum Computing over Finite Fields

    CERN Document Server

    James, Roshan P; Sabry, Amr

    2011-01-01

    In recent work, Benjamin Schumacher and Michael~D. Westmoreland investigate a version of quantum mechanics which they call "modal quantum theory" but which we prefer to call "discrete quantum theory". This theory is obtained by instantiating the mathematical framework of Hilbert spaces with a finite field instead of the field of complex numbers. This instantiation collapses much the structure of actual quantum mechanics but retains several of its distinguishing characteristics including the notions of superposition, interference, and entanglement. Furthermore, discrete quantum theory excludes local hidden variable models, has a no-cloning theorem, and can express natural counterparts of quantum information protocols such as superdense coding and teleportation. Our first result is to distill a model of discrete quantum computing from this quantum theory. The model is expressed using a monadic metalanguage built on top of a universal reversible language for finite computations, and hence is directly implementab...

  16. Factorization Properties of Finite Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Simkhovich, B; Zak, J; 10.1088/1751-8113/43/4/045301

    2010-01-01

    In 1960 Schwinger [J. Schwinger, Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci. 46 (1960) 570- 579] proposed the algorithm for factorization of unitary operators in the finite M dimensional Hilbert space according to a coprime decomposition of M. Using a special permutation operator A we generalize the Schwinger factorization to every decomposition of M. We obtain the factorized pairs of unitary operators and show that they obey the same commutation relations as Schwinger's. We apply the new factorization to two problems. First, we show how to generate two kq-like mutually unbiased bases for any composite dimension. Then, using a Harper-like Hamiltonian model in the finite dimension M = M1M2, we show how to design a physical system with M1 energy levels, each having degeneracy M2.

  17. Finite mathematics models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Carla C

    2015-01-01

    Features step-by-step examples based on actual data and connects fundamental mathematical modeling skills and decision making concepts to everyday applicability Featuring key linear programming, matrix, and probability concepts, Finite Mathematics: Models and Applications emphasizes cross-disciplinary applications that relate mathematics to everyday life. The book provides a unique combination of practical mathematical applications to illustrate the wide use of mathematics in fields ranging from business, economics, finance, management, operations research, and the life and social sciences.

  18. Maximal subgroups of finite groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Srinivasan

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In finite groups maximal subgroups play a very important role. Results in the literature show that if the maximal subgroup has a very small index in the whole group then it influences the structure of the group itself. In this paper we study the case when the index of the maximal subgroups of the groups have a special type of relation with the Fitting subgroup of the group.

  19. Commutators with Finite Spectrum Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nadia BOUDI

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study derivations d, d' defined on a Banach algebra A such that the spectrum σ([dx, d'x]) is finite for all x ∈ A. In particular we show that if the algebra is semisimple, then there exists an element a in the socle of A such that [d, d'] is the inner derivation implemented by a.

  20. Flux tubes at Finite Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Bicudo, Pedro; Cardoso, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We show the flux tubes produced by static quark-antiquark, quark-quark and quark-gluon charges at finite temperature. The sources are placed in the lattice with fundamental and adjoint Polyakov loops. We compute the square densities of the chromomagnetic and chromoelectric fields above and below the phase transition. Our results are gauge invariant and produced in pure gauge SU(3). The codes are written in CUDA and the computations are performed with GPUs.

  1. Finite Operator-Valued Frames

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Operator-valued frames are natural generalization of frames that have been used in quantum computing, packets encoding, etc. In this paper, we focus on developing the theory about operator-valued frames for finite Hilbert spaces. Some results concerning dilation, alternate dual, and existence of operator-valued frames are given. Then we characterize the optimal operator-valued frames under the case which one packet of data is lost in transmission. At last we construct the operator-valued fram...

  2. Strong reality of finite simple groups

    CERN Document Server

    Vdovin, E P

    2010-01-01

    The classification of finite simple strongly real groups is complete. It is easy to see that strong reality for every nonabelian finite simple group is equivalent to the fact that each element can be written as a product of two involutions. We thus obtain a solution to Problem 14.82 from the Kourovka notebook from the classification of finite simple strongly real groups.

  3. FINITE RIODAN MATRIX AND RIODAN GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Riodan Matrix is a lower triangular matrix of in finite order with certainly restricted conditions.In this paper,the author defines two kinds of finite Riodan matrices which are not limited to lower triangular.Properties of group theory of the two kinds matrices are considered.Applications of the finite Riodan matrices are researched.

  4. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly Negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul; Lisonek, P.; Markvorsen, Steen

    1998-01-01

    We prove that, if a finite metric space is of strictly negative type, then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by the infinite extender (load vector). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all spaces on two, three, or four points, all trees, and all finite subspaces of Eu...

  5. Selforthogonal modules with finite injective dimension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄兆泳

    2000-01-01

    The category consisting of finitely generated modules which are left orthogonal with a cotilting bimodule is shown to be functorially finite. The notion of left orthogonal dimension is introduced , and then a necessary and sufficient condition of selforthogonal modules having finite injective dimension and a characterization of cotilting modules are given.

  6. Selforthogonal modules with finite injective dimension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The category consisting of finitely generated modules which are left orthogonal with a cotilting bimodule is shown to be functorially finite. The notion of left orthogonal dimension is introduced, and then a necessary and sufficient condition of selforthogonal modules having finite injective dimension and a characterization of cotilting modules are given.

  7. 模糊对象的空间Co-location模式挖掘研究%Mining Spatial Co-Location Patterns for Fuzzy Objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳志平; 王丽珍; 陈红梅

    2011-01-01

    空间co-location模式表示的是空间对象的实例在一个相同的区域内频繁地空间并置.过去人们已经对确定及不确定数据的co-location模式挖掘问题进行了一些研究,但是针对模糊对象上进行的研究还没有.模糊对象在许多领域里都有着非常重要的应用,比如生物医学图像数据库和GIS.该文研究模糊对象的空间co-location模式挖掘问题.首先,定义模糊对象上空间co-location模式挖掘的相关概念,包括模糊参与率、模糊参与度等.其次,提出FB算法挖掘模糊对象的co-location模式.接着,提出了3种改进算法,包括剪枝对象、减少实例间连接、改进剪枝步,以提高挖掘性能、加快co-location规则的产生.最后通过大量的实验说明FB算法及其改进算法的效果和效率.%A spatial co-location pattern is a group or spatial objects whose instances are frequently located in the same region. The mining co-location pattern problem for certain and uncertain data had been investigated in the past, but not for fuzzy objects. Fuzzy objects could be applied to many areas such as biomedical image databases, GIS and more. This paper investigates the spatial co-location pattern mining problem for fuzzy objects. Firstly, it defines the related concepts of spatial co-location patterns mining on fuzzy objects, including fuzzy participation ratio, fuzzy participation index, etc. Secondly, this paper proposes an FB algorithm to mine co-location patterns from fuzzy objects. Then, three kinds of the improved algorithms, the pruning objects, reducing of the operation joining between spatial instances and optimizing the pruning steps, are put forward so as to improve the mining performance and accelerate the co-location rule generation. Finally, by extensive experiments, the efficiency and effectiveness of the algorithms are verified.

  8. Expression of VAMP-2-like protein in kidney collecting duct intracellular vesicles. Colocalization with Aquaporin-2 water channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S; Marples, D; Birn, H; Mohtashami, M; Dalby, N O; Trimble, M; Knepper, M

    1995-01-01

    Body water balance is controlled by vasopressin, which regulates Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels in kidney collecting duct cells by vesicular trafficking between intracellular vesicles and the plasma membrane. To examine the molecular apparatus involved in vesicle trafficking and vasopressin regulation of AQP2 in collecting duct cells, we tested if targeting proteins expressed in the synaptic vesicles, namely vesicle-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (VAMP1 and 2), are expressed in kidney collecting duct. Immunoblotting revealed specific labeling of VAMP2 (18-kD band) but not VAMP1 in membrane fractions prepared from kidney inner medulla. Controls using preadsorbed antibody or preimmune serum were negative. Bands of identical molecular size were detected in immunoblots of brain membrane vesicles and purified synaptic vesicles. VAMP2 in kidney membranes was cleaved by tetanus toxin, revealing a tetanus toxin-sensitive VAMP homologue. Similarly, tetanus toxin cleaved VAMP2 in synaptic vesicles. In kidney inner medulla, VAMP2 was predominantly expressed in the membrane fraction enriched for intracellular vesicles, with little or no VAMP2 in the plasma membrane enriched fraction. This was confirmed by immunocytochemistry using semithin cryosections, which showed mainly vesicular labeling in collecting duct principal cells, with no labeling of intercalated cells. VAMP2 immunolabeling colocalized with AQP2 labeling in intracellular vesicles, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy after double immunolabeling of isolated vesicles. Quantitative analysis of 1,310 vesicles revealed a highly significant association of both AQP2 and VAMP2 in the same vesicles (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, the presence of AQP2 in vesicles immunoisolated with anti-VAMP2 antibodies was confirmed by immunoblotting. In conclusion, VAMP2, a component of the neuronal SNARE complex, is expressed in vesicles carrying AQP2, suggesting a role in vasopressin-regulated vesicle trafficking of AQP2

  9. ProSAAS-derived peptides are colocalized with neuropeptide Y and function as neuropeptides in the regulation of food intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H Wardman

    Full Text Available ProSAAS is the precursor of a number of peptides that have been proposed to function as neuropeptides. Because proSAAS mRNA is highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, we examined the cellular localization of several proSAAS-derived peptides in the mouse hypothalamus and found that they generally colocalized with neuropeptide Y (NPY, but not α-melanocyte stimulating hormone. However, unlike proNPY mRNA, which is upregulated by food deprivation in the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither proSAAS mRNA nor proSAAS-derived peptides were significantly altered by 1-2 days of food deprivation in wild-type mice. Furthermore, while proSAAS mRNA levels in the mediobasal hypothalamus were significantly lower in Cpe(fat/fat mice as compared to wild-type littermates, proNPY mRNA levels in the mediobasal hypothalamus and in other subregions of the hypothalamus were not significantly different between wild-type and Cpe(fat/fat mice. Intracerebroventricular injections of antibodies to two proSAAS-derived peptides (big LEN and PEN significantly reduced food intake in fasted mice, while injections of antibodies to two other proSAAS-derived peptides (little LEN and little SAAS did not. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of parvocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, a target of arcuate NPY projections, showed that big LEN produced a rapid and reversible inhibition of synaptic glutamate release that was spike independent and abolished by blocking postsynaptic G protein activity, suggesting the involvement of a postsynaptic G protein-coupled receptor and the release of a retrograde synaptic messenger. Taken together with previous studies, these findings support a role for proSAAS-derived peptides such as big LEN as neuropeptides regulating food intake.

  10. Strain selection, biomass to biofuel conversion, and resource colocation have strong impacts on the economic performance of algae cultivation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik R. Venteris

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Decisions involving strain selection, biomass to biofuel technology, and the location of cultivation facilities can strongly influence the economic viability of an algae-based biofuel enterprise. We summarize our past results in a new analysis to explore the relative economic impact of these design choices. Our growth model is used to predict average biomass production for two saline strains (Nannocloropsis salina, Arthrospira sp., one fresh to brackish strain (Chlorella sp., DOE strain 1412, and one freshwater strain (order Sphaeropleales. Biomass to biofuel conversion is compared between lipid extraction (LE and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL technologies. National-scale models of water, CO2 (as flue gas, land acquisition, site leveling, construction of connecting roads, and transport of HTL oil to existing refineries are used in conjunction with estimates of fuel value (from HTL to prioritize and select from 88,692 unit farms (UF, 405 ha in pond area, a number sufficient to produce 136E+9 L yr-1 of renewable diesel (36 billion gallons yr-1. Strain selection and choice of conversion technology have large economic impacts, with differences between combinations of strains and biomass to biofuel technologies being up to $10 million dollars yr-1 UF-1. Results based on the most productive strain, HTL-based fuel conversion, and resource costs show that the economic potential between geographic locations within the selection can differ by up to $4 million yr-1 UF-1, with 1.8 BGY of production possible from the most cost-effective sites. The local spatial variability in site rank is extreme, with very high and low sites within 10s of km of each other. Colocation with flue gas sources has a strong influence on rank, but the most costly resource component varies from site to site. The highest rank UFs are located predominantly in Florida and Texas, but most states south of 37°N latitude contain promising locations.

  11. Development of rat tibia innervation: colocalization of autonomic nerve fiber markers with growth-associated protein 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Mariusz; Litwin, Jan A; Tabarowski, Zbigniew; Zagólski, Olaf; Cichocki, Tadeusz; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Development of autonomic innervation of the tibia was investigated in rat fetuses on gestational days (GD) 17-21 and in juvenile animals on postnatal days (PD) 1-28. Double immunofluorescence combined with confocal microscopy was applied to study colocalization of neuronal growth- associated protein 43 (GAP-43) and panneuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP) with markers of the autonomic nervous system: neuropeptide Y (NPY) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH) for adrenergic, as well as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) for cholinergic fibers. The first GAP-43-immunoreactive (GAP-IR) nerve fibers were seen on GD17 in the perichondrium of the proximal epiphysis. Further GAP- and PGP-IR innervation appeared in the perichondrium/periosteum of the diaphysis and in the distal epiphysis (GD19), then in the bone marrow and in the intercondylar eminence (GD21). On PD1, NPY-IR and DbetaH-IR fibers appeared within the diaphyseal periosteum and on PD4 within the bone marrow. From PD14, GAP-43 immunoreactivity of NPY-positive fibers decreased. From PD7 on, NPY-IR fibers were observed in cartilage canals of both epiphyses and in the intercondylar eminence. In secondary ossification centers, NPY-IR fibers were seen from PD10, and in the bone marrow of the epiphyses from PD14. First VIP-IR and VAChT-IR fibers were observed on PD4 within the periosteum, bone marrow and patellar ligament. From PD10 on, VIP-positive fibers were seen in the intercondylar eminence, and from PD14 in secondary ossification centers. GAP-43 proved to be superior to PGP 9.5 as marker of growing nerve fibers, mostly due to its earlier appearance. The presence of specific nerve fibers may suggest possible involvement of autonomic innervation in regulation of bone development.

  12. MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

  13. Global heterochromatic colocalization of transposable elements with minisatellites in the compact genome of the pufferfish Tetraodon nigroviridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Cécile; Bouneau, Laurence; Coutanceau, Jean-Pierre; Weissenbach, Jean; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine

    2004-07-21

    Because of its unusual high degree of compaction and paucity of repetitive sequences, the genome of the smooth pufferfish Tetraodon nigroviridis is the subject of a well-advanced sequencing project. An astonishing diversity of transposable elements not found in the human and the mouse has been observed in the genome of T. nigroviridis. Due to the difficulty of assembling repeat-rich regions, the whole genome shotgun sequencing approach will probably fail to reveal the general organisation of this compact vertebrate genome. Therefore, in order to gain new insights into the global distribution pattern of repeated DNA in the genome of T. nigroviridis, we have reconstructed partial/complete repetitive sequences from data generated by the genome project and performed double-colour fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for representatives of three major categories of repeated sequences including two minisatellites (ms100 and ms104), two DNA transposons (Tol2 and Buffy1) and two non-long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons (Rex3 and Babar). We show that DNA transposons and retroelements very frequently colocalize with minisatellites and mostly accumulate within heterochromatic regions. These results, which have not been reported so far for the fugu Takifugu rubripes, show that repeated elements are generally excluded from gene-rich regions in T. nigroviridis and underline the extreme degree of compartmentalization of this compact genome. The genome organization of the pufferfish is clearly different from that observed in humans, where repeated sequences make up an important fraction of euchromatic DNA, and is more similar to that observed in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

  14. Cross-regulation between colocalized nicotinic acetylcholine and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors on presynaptic nerve terminals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John J DOUGHERTY; Robert A NICHOLS

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Substantial colocalization of functionally independent a4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors on presynaptic terminals has been observed in brain. The present study was aimed at addressing whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors interact on the same presynaptic terminal, suggesting a convergence of cholinergic and serotonergic regulation.Methods: Ca2+ responses in individual, isolated nerve endings purified from rat striatum were measured using confocal imaging.Results: Application of 500 nmol/L nicotine following sustained stimulation with the highly selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide at 100 nmol/L resulted in markedly reduced Ca2* responses (28% of control) in only those striatal nerve endings that originally responded to m-chlorophenylbiguanide. The cross-regulation developed over several minutes. Presynaptic nerve endings that had not responded to m-chlorophenylbiguanide, indicating that 5-HT3 receptors were not present, displayed typical responses to nicotine. Application of m-chlorophenylbiguanide following sustained stimulation with nicotine resulted in partially attenuated Ca2* responses (49% of control). Application of m-chlorophenylbiguanide following sustained stimulation with m-chlorophenylbiguanide also resulted in a strong attenuation of Ca2+ responses (12% of control), whereas nicotine-induced Ca2t responses following sustained stimulation with nicotine were not significantly different from control.Conclusion: These results indicate that the presynaptic Ca2+ increases evoked by either 5-HT, receptor or nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation regulate subsequent responses to 5-HT3 receptor activation, but that only 5-HT3 receptors cross-regulate subsequent nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated responses. The findings suggest a specific interaction between the two receptor systems in the same striatal nerve terminal, likely involving Ca2+-dependent

  15. Histone H3 Interacts and Colocalizes with the Nuclear Shuttle Protein and the Movement Protein of a Geminivirus ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanchen; Rojas, Maria R.; Park, Mi-Ri; Seo, Young-Su; Lucas, William J.; Gilbertson, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Geminiviruses are plant-infecting viruses with small circular single-stranded DNA genomes. These viruses utilize nuclear shuttle proteins (NSPs) and movement proteins (MPs) for trafficking of infectious DNA through the nuclear pore complex and plasmodesmata, respectively. Here, a biochemical approach was used to identify host factors interacting with the NSP and MP of the geminivirus Bean dwarf mosaic virus (BDMV). Based on these studies, we identified and characterized a host nucleoprotein, histone H3, which interacts with both the NSP and MP. The specific nature of the interaction of histone H3 with these viral proteins was established by gel overlay and in vitro and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays. The NSP and MP interaction domains were mapped to the N-terminal region of histone H3. These experiments also revealed a direct interaction between the BDMV NSP and MP, as well as interactions between histone H3 and the capsid proteins of various geminiviruses. Transient-expression assays revealed the colocalization of histone H3 and NSP in the nucleus and nucleolus and of histone H3 and MP in the cell periphery and plasmodesmata. Finally, using in vivo co-IP assays with a Myc-tagged histone H3, a complex composed of histone H3, NSP, MP, and viral DNA was recovered. Taken together, these findings implicate the host factor histone H3 in the process by which an infectious geminiviral DNA complex forms within the nucleus for export to the cell periphery and cell-to-cell movement through plasmodesmata. PMID:21900168

  16. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    If a finite metric space is of strictly negative type then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by an infinite extent (“load vector''). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all trees, and all finite subspaces of Euclidean and Hyperbolic spaces. We prove that if the distan...... matrix of a finite metric space is both hypermetric and regular, then it is of strictly negative type. We show that the strictly negative type finite subspaces of spheres are precisely those which do not contain two pairs of antipodal points....

  17. Polyhedral Techniques in Combinatorial Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardal, K.I.; van Hoesel, S.

    1995-01-01

    Combinatorial optimization problems arise in several areas ranging from management to mathematics and graph theory. Most combinatorial optimization problems are compu- tationally hard due to the restriction that a subset of the variables have to take integral values. During the last two decades

  18. Polyhedral Scattering of Fundamental Monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Battye, R; Rychenkova, P; Sutcliffe, P; Battye, Richard; Gibbons, Gary; Rychenkova, Paulina; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of n slowly moving fundamental monopoles in the SU(n+1) BPS Yang-Mills-Higgs theory can be approximated by geodesic motion on the 4n-dimensional hyperkahler Lee-Weinberg-Yi manifold. In this paper we apply a variational method to construct some scaling geodesics on this manifold. These geodesics describe the scattering of n monopoles which lie on the vertices of a bouncing polyhedron; the polyhedron contracts from infinity to a point, representing the spherically symmetric n-monopole, and then expands back out to infinity. For different monopole masses the solutions generalize to form bouncing nested polyhedra. The relevance of these results to the dynamics of well separated SU(2) monopoles is also discussed.

  19. Symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on a linear finite element space,two symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions are constructed and analyzed.Some relationships between the finite element method and the finite difference method are addressed,too.

  20. Symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Xiaoying; YANG Zhang; ZHOU Aihui

    2008-01-01

    Based on a linear finite element space, two symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions are constructed and analyzed. Some relationships between the finite element method and the finite difference method are addressed, too.

  1. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  2. POSS基树枝状大分子的合成与应用%Synthesis and Application of Dendrimers Based on Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚敏; 王嘉骏; 顾雪萍; 冯连芳

    2012-01-01

    Dendrimer is one type of macromolecules with well-defined, highly-branched and nano-scaled architectures, composed of three distinct domains: core, branches and terminal groups. Its potential functions and applications are explored based on the unique physical and chemical features due to special molecular architecture. Using polyhedral oligomerie silsesquioxanes (POSS) as the core of dendrimers is an effective and facile way to simplify the tedious repetitive steps of preparation and separation. Since POSS allows eight branches to radiate from a silicon-oxygen rigid cubic core, the dendrimers can be constructed in a well-controlled globular, three- dimensional framework, and large numbers of peripheral groups can be obtained at relatively low generation numbers. As a kind of novel nano-hybrid supermolecules, POSS-based dendrimers have attracted considerable interest in materials science. In this review, we briefly introduce the synthetic approaches of some typical POSS- based dendrimers categorized by the different chemical composition of branching units, and then focus on the potential functions and applications of this nano-hybrid material in the fields of catalysis, gene and drug delivery, liquid crystals, light harvesting and energy transfer. The specific and excellent properties imparted by the incorporation of POSS into dendrimers are also presented. Finally, the advances of POSS-based dendrimers are prospected.%树枝状大分子(dendrimer)是一种高度支化、纳米尺度的人工合成大分子,具有独特的物理化学性能和重要的应用前景。利用具有8个可官能化顶点的多面体低聚倍半硅氧烷(POSS)作为树枝状大分子的核心,可在一定程度上简化树枝状大分子繁琐的合成与分离过程,在低代数时就可获得较大的表面官能团密度,并使树枝状分子呈现球形对称结构。POSS基树枝状大分子结合了POSS和树枝状分子结构与性能的优势,是一类

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of the wettability on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquiones (H-POSS)%H-POSS表面润湿性的分子动力学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周伟; 王嘉骏; 顾雪萍; 冯连芳

    2011-01-01

    Wetting behavior of water on the surface of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquiones (H-POSS) was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Force fields of COMPASS and SPC were applied for H-POSS and water, respectively. It is found that simulated density of H-POSS substrate is 1.84 g/cm3, and apparent diffraction peaks come out, which indicate that the substrate is crystallizable to some extent. It suggests that COMPASS force field is adaptable to the construction and investigation of H-POSS. The surface of H-POSS is hydrophobic with the water contact angle as 104.9° in the simulation. In addition, H-POSS was synthesized from trichlorosilane (HSiCl3) with direct hydrolytic condensation. Through the characterization by FT-IR, adsorption peaks take place at the wavenumber of 2260, 1142 and 871 cm"1. The experimental contact angle is 109.3° on the surface of H-POSS. Compared with the simulated contact angle, the relative error is merely 4 %. It's validated that molecular dynamic simulation can be utilized to calculate the wettability of H-POSS monomer. Besides, the hydrophobicity is weakened when system temperature is increased.Keywords: Wettability, H-POSS, Contact angle, Molecular dynamics simulationFluent software was used to simulate the wind flow field around a new-type porous fence with a porosity of 0.4 to indicate the changes of velocity, pressure coefficient and turbulence kinetic energy around a triangular prism model located behind the porous fence under different deflector forms. The numerical predictions showed that the deflectors play a guiding role and makes the flow up to a certain angle to reduce the direct influence on the windward of the prism. In addition, it showed that the form of gradual angels had the better perfomance comparing to other forms due to eliminiting the velocity recirculation zone between the fence and the windward surface and making the flow field behind the porous fence stable.%采用分子动力学模拟方法研究了水滴

  4. A Few Finite Trigonometric Sums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Datta

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Finite trigonometric sums occur in various branches of physics, mathematics, and their applications. These sums may contain various powers of one or more trigonometric functions. Sums with one trigonometric function are known; however, sums with products of trigonometric functions can become complicated, and may not have a simple expression in a number of cases. Some of these sums have interesting properties, and can have amazingly simple values. However, only some of them are available in the literature. We obtain a number of such sums using the method of residues.

  5. The Finiteness of Moffatt vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Kalita, Jiten C; Panda, Swapnendu; Unal, Aynur

    2016-01-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of internal viscous incompressible flows, widely known as Moffatt vortices was thought to be infinite. In this paper, we propose two topological equivalence classes of Moffatt vortices in terms of orientation-preserving homeomorphism as well as critical point theory. We further quantify the centers of vortices as fixed points through Brower fixed point theorem and define boundary of a vortex as circle cell. With the aid of these new developments and some existing theorems in topology, we provide six proofs establishing that the sequence of Moffatt vortices cannot be infinite; in fact it is at most finite.

  6. Functionals of finite Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Schiffer, Menahem

    2014-01-01

    This advanced monograph on finite Riemann surfaces, based on the authors' 1949-50 lectures at Princeton University, remains a fundamental book for graduate students. The Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society hailed the self-contained treatment as the source of ""a plethora of ideas, each interesting in its own right,"" noting that ""the patient reader will be richly rewarded."" Suitable for graduate-level courses, the text begins with three chapters that offer a development of the classical theory along historical lines, examining geometrical and physical considerations, existence theo

  7. Discrete and finite General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, M M; Souza, Manoelito M. de; Silveira, Robson N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop the General Theory of Relativity in a formalism with extended causality that describes physical interaction through discrete, transversal and localized pointlike fields. The homogeneous field equations are then solved for a finite, singularity-free, point-like field that we associate to a ``classical graviton". The standard Einstein's continuous formalism is retrieved by means of an averaging process, and its continuous solutions are determined by the chsosen imposed symetry. The Schwarzschild metric is obtained by the imposition of spherical symmetry on the averaged field.

  8. Finite Operator-Valued Frames

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Operator-valued frames are natural generalization of frames that have been used in quantum computing, packets encoding, etc. In this paper, we focus on developing the theory about operator-valued frames for finite Hilbert spaces. Some results concerning dilation, alternate dual, and existence of operator-valued frames are given. Then we characterize the optimal operator-valued frames under the case which one packet of data is lost in transmission. At last we construct the operator-valued frames $\\{V_j\\}_{j=1}^m$ with given frame operator $S$ and satisfying $V_jV_j^*=\\alpha_jI$, where $\\alpha_j's$ are positive numbers.

  9. Simulating QCD at finite density

    CERN Document Server

    de Forcrand, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In this review, I recall the nature and the inevitability of the "sign problem" which plagues attempts to simulate lattice QCD at finite baryon density. I present the main approaches used to circumvent the sign problem at small chemical potential. I sketch how one can predict analytically the severity of the sign problem, as well as the numerically accessible range of baryon densities. I review progress towards the determination of the pseudo-critical temperature T_c(mu), and towards the identification of a possible QCD critical point. Some promising advances with non-standard approaches are reviewed.

  10. Co-location of passive gear fisheries in offshore wind farms in the German EEZ of the North Sea: A first socio-economic scoping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzenmüller, V; Diekmann, R; Bastardie, F; Schulze, T; Berkenhagen, J; Kloppmann, M; Krause, G; Pogoda, B; Buck, B H; Kraus, G

    2016-12-01

    Worldwide the renewable energy sector is expanding at sea to address increasing demands. Recently the race for space in heavily used areas such as the North Sea triggered the proposal of co-locating other activities such as aquaculture or fisheries with passive gears in offshore wind farms (OWFs). Our interdisciplinary approach combined a quantification of spatial overlap of activities by using Vessel Monitoring System and logbook data with a stakeholder consultation to conclude and verify on the actual feasibility of co-location. In the German Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the North Sea up to 90% of Danish and 40% of German annual gillnet fleet landings of plaice overlapped with areas where OWFs are developed. Our results indicated further that the international gillnet fishery could lose up to 50% in landings within the North Sea German EEZ when OWF areas are closed entirely for fisheries. No spatial overlap was found for UK potters targeting brown crab in the German EEZ. We further identified a number of key issues and obstacles that to date hinder an actual implementation of co-location as a measure in the marine spatial planning process: defining the legal base; implementation of safety regulations; delineation of minimum requirements for fishing vessels such as capacities, quotas, technical equipment; implementation of a licensing process; and scoping for financial subsidies to set up business. The stakeholder consultation verified the scientific findings and highlighted that all those points need to be addressed in a planning process. In the German EEZ we have shown that the socio-economic importance of spatial overlap varies within planning boundaries. Therefore we recommend an interdisciplinary bottom-up approach when scoping for suitable areas of co-location. Hence, an informed marine spatial planning process requires comprehensive and spatial explicit socio-economic viability studies factoring in also ecological effects of OWFs on target species.

  11. Adenylyl cyclase type 6 overexpression selectively enhances β-adrenergic and prostacyclin receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac fibroblast function because of colocalization in lipid rafts

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Thangavel, Muthusamy; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Mahautmr, Penden; Stitham, Jeremiah; Hwa, John; Ostrom, Rennolds S.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts produce and degrade extracellular matrix and are critical in regulating cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Fibroblasts are activated by factors such as transforming growth factor β and inhibited by agents that elevate 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. cAMP signal generation and response is known to be compartmentalized in many cell types in part through the colocalization of receptors and specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in lipid rafts and caveolae. Th...

  12. Antigen processing of glycoconjugate vaccines; the polysaccharide portion of the pneumococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine co-localizes with MHC II on the antigen processing cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zengzu; Schreiber, John R

    2009-05-21

    Pneumococcal (Pn) polysaccharides (PS) are T-independent (TI) antigens and do not induce immunological memory or antibodies in infants. Conjugation of PnPS to the carrier protein CRM(197) induces PS-specific antibody in infants, and memory similar to T-dependent (Td) antigens. Conjugates have improved immunogenicity via antigen processing and presentation of carrier protein with MHC II and recruitment of T cell help, but the fate of the PS attached to the carrier is unknown. To determine the location of the PS component of PnPS-CRM(197) in the APC, we separately labeled PS and protein and tracked their location. The PS of types 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) was specifically labeled by Alexa Fluor 594 hydrazide (red). The CRM(197) was separately labeled red in a reaction that did not label PS. Labeled antigens were incubated with APC which were fixed, permeabilized and incubated with anti-MHC II antibody labeled green by Alexa Fluor 488, followed by confocal microscopy. Labeled CRM(197) was presented on APC surface and co-localized with MHC II (yellow). Labeled unconjugated 14 or 19F PS did not go to the APC surface, but PS labeled 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) was internalized and co-localized with MHC II. Monoclonal antibody to type 14 PS bound to intracellular type 14 PS and PS-CRM(197). Brefeldin A and chloroquine blocked both CRM(197) and PS labeled 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) from co-localizing with MHC II. These data suggest that the PS component of the CRM(197) glycoconjugate enters the endosome, travels with CRM(197) peptides to the APC surface and co-localizes with MHC II.

  13. FRET and colocalization analyzer--a method to validate measurements of sensitized emission FRET acquired by confocal microscopy and available as an ImageJ Plug-in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachet-Haas, Muriel; Converset, Noël; Marchal, Olivier; Matthes, Hans; Gioria, Sophie; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Lecat, Sandra

    2006-12-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between an adequate pair of fluorophores is an indication of closer proximity than colocalization and is used by biologists to study fluorescently modified protein interactions inside cells. We present a method for visualization of FRET images acquired by confocal sensitized emission, involving excitation of the donor fluorophore and detection of the energy transfer as an emission from the acceptor fluorophore into the FRET channel. Authentic FRET signal measurements require the correction from the FRET channel of the undesired bleed-through signals (BT) resulting from both the leak-through of the donor emission and the direct acceptor emission. Our method reduces the interference of the user to a minimum by analyzing the entire image, pixel by pixel. It proposes imaging treatments and the display of control images to validate the BT calculation and the image corrections. It displays FRET images as a function of the colocalization of the two fluorescent partners. Finally, it proposes an alternative to normalization of the FRET intensities to compare FRET signal variations between samples. This method called "FRET and Colocalization Analyzer" has been implemented in a Plug-in of the freely available ImageJ software. It is particularly adapted when transient expression of the fluorescent proteins is used thereby giving very variable expression levels or when the colocalization of the two partners is varying in proportion, in amount, and in size, as a function of time. The method and program are validated using the analysis of the spatio-temporal interactions between a G-protein coupled receptor, the tachykinin NK2 receptor, and the beta-arrestin 2 as an example.

  14. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the guinea-pig liver: distribution and colocalization with neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, F J; Jiménez, A; Fernández, A P; del Moral, M L; Sánchez-López, A M; Hernández, R; Garrosa, M; Pedrosa, J A; Rodrigo, J; Peinado, M A

    2001-12-01

    The innervation pattern of the guinea-pig liver is similar to that of the human liver. However, many aspects of the distribution of the neuronal isoform of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the guinea-pig liver and its colocalization with neuropeptides remain to be elucidated. The distribution of nNOS was studied in fixed guinea-pig liver by light microscopic immunohistochemistry. Confocal analysis was used to determine its colocalization with neuropeptide Y (NPY) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). nNOS-immunoreactive (nNOS-IR) nerves were observed in relation to hilar and interlobar vessels and in Glisson's capsule. A few nNOS-IR ganglia were observed in the extrahepatic bile duct and close to the interlobar portal triads. In addition, nNOS-IR fibers were located in the interlobular portal triads and pervading the parenchyma. Moreover, nNOS-IR nerves were demonstrated for the first time in the larger central veins and in the hepatic vein. nNOS-NPY and nNOS-CGRP colocalizations were detected in the fibromuscular layer of the bile duct and periductal plexus, respectively. These results support the phylogenetic conservation of the nNOS-IR hepatic innervation and its possible contribution to the regulation of hepatic blood flow and certain hepatic functions.

  15. Co-Localization of GABA Shunt Enzymes for the Efficient Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid via GABA Shunt Pathway in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-28

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid, which is an important inhibitor of neurotransmission in the human brain. GABA is also used as the precursor of biopolymer Nylon-4 production. In this study, the carbon flux from the tricarboxylic acid cycle was directed to the GABA shunt pathway for the production of GABA from glucose. The GABA shunt enzymes succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD) and GABA aminotransferase (GabT) were co-localized along with the GABA transporter (GadC) by using a synthetic scaffold complex. The co-localized enzyme scaffold complex produced 0.71 g/l of GABA from 10 g/l of glucose. Inactivation of competing metabolic pathways in mutant E. coli strains XBM1 and XBM6 increased GABA production 13% to reach 0.80 g/l GABA by the enzymes co-localized and expressed in the mutant strains. The recombinant E. coli system developed in this study demonstrated the possibility of the pathway of the GABA shunt as a novel GABA production pathway.

  16. Thermal decomposition studies of the polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane, POSSh, and when it is impregnated with the metallocene bis(eta5-cyclopentadienyl)zirconium (IV) dichloride or immobilized on silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, D; Butler, I S; Barsan, M M; Martens, W; Frost, R L; Galland, G B; dos Santos, J H Z

    2008-11-01

    Thermal decomposition studies of the free polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane, POSSh, and when this compound has been impregnated with Cp2ZrCl2 (Cp = eta5-C5H5) or immobilized on SiO2 were conducted using infrared emission spectroscopy (IES) over a 100-1000 degrees C temperature range and by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The organic groups in POSS(h) apparently decompose thermally into Si-CH3, Si-H and other fragments. Upon impregnation with Cp2ZrCl2, however, a different thermal decomposition pathway was followed and new infrared emission bands appeared in the 1000-900 cm(-1) region suggesting the formation of Si-O-Zr moieties. When immobilized on SiO2 and subjected to thermal decomposition, the POSSh compound lost its organic groups and the inorganic structure remaining was incorporated into the SiO2 framework.

  17. Aerosol indirect effect on warm clouds over South-East Atlantic, from co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of aerosol interaction with warm boundary layer clouds over the South-East Atlantic. We use aerosol and cloud parameters derived from MODIS observations, together with co-located CALIPSO estimates of the layer altitudes, to derive statistical relationships between aerosol concentration and cloud properties. The CALIPSO products are used to differentiate between cases of mixed cloud-aerosol layers from cases where the aerosol is located well-above the cloud top. This technique allows us to obtain more reliable estimates of the aerosol indirect effect than from simple relationships based on vertically integrated measurements of aerosol and cloud properties. Indeed, it permits us to somewhat distinguish the effects of aerosol and meteorology on the clouds, although it is not possible to fully ascertain the relative contribution of each on the derived statistics.

    Consistently with the results from previous studies, our statistics clearly show that aerosol affects cloud microphysics, decreasing the Cloud Droplet Radius (CDR. The same data indicate a concomitant strong decrease in cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP, which is inconsistent with the hypothesis of aerosol inhibition of precipitation (Albrecht, 1989. We hypothesise that the observed reduction in LWP is the consequence of dry air entrainment at cloud top. The combined effect of CDR decrease and LWP decrease leads to rather small sensitivity of the Cloud Optical Thickness (COT to an increase in aerosol concentration. The analysis of MODIS-CALIPSO coincidences also evidences an aerosol enhancement of low cloud cover. Surprisingly, the Cloud Fraction (CLF response to aerosol invigoration is much stronger when (absorbing particles are located above cloud top than in cases of physical interaction. This result suggests a relevant aerosol radiative effect on low cloud occurrence: absorbing particles above the cloud top may heat the

  18. Aerosol indirect effect on warm clouds over South-East Atlantic, from co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Costantino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of aerosol interaction with warm boundary layer clouds, over South-East Atlantic. We use MODIS retrievals to derive statistical relationships between aerosol concentration and cloud properties, together with co-located CALIPSO estimates of cloud and aerosol layer altitudes. The latter are used to differentiate between cases of mixed and interacting cloud-aerosol layers from cases where the aerosol is located well-above the cloud top. This strategy allows, to a certain extent, to isolate real aerosol-induced effect from meteorology.

    Similar to previous studies, statistics clearly show that aerosol affects cloud microphysics, decreasing the Cloud Droplet Radius (CDR. The same data indicate a concomitant strong decrease in cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP, in evident contrast with the hypothesis of aerosol inhibition of precipitation (Albrecht, 1989. Because of this water loss, probably due to the entrainment of dry air at cloud top, Cloud Optical Thickness (COT is found to be almost insensitive to changes in aerosol concentration. The analysis of MODIS-CALIPSO coincidences also evidenced an aerosol enhancement of low cloud cover. Surprising, the Cloud Fraction (CLF response to aerosol invigoration is much stronger when (absorbing particles are located above cloud top, than in cases of physical interaction, This result suggests a relevant aerosol radiative effect on low cloud occurrence. Heating the atmosphere above the inversion, absorbing particles above cloud top may decrease the vertical temperature gradient, increase the low tropospheric stability and provide favorable conditions for low cloud formation.

    We also focus on the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on precipitation, through the statistical analysis of CDR-COT co-variations. A COT value of 10 is found to be the threshold beyond which precipitation mostly forms, in both clean and polluted environments. For larger COT

  19. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Verhoelst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs, named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3 satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith–sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only

  20. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Verhoelst

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement uncertainties but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs, named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC comparisons between on the one hand GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3 satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and on the other hand direct-sun and zenith-sky reference measurements such as from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith scattered light (ZSL-DOAS instruments respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing

  1. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoelst, T.; Granville, J.; Hendrick, F.; Köhler, U.; Lerot, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Redondas, A.; Van Roozendael, M.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2015-12-01

    Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC) comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3) satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith-sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-)DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only play a role in the

  2. Strain selection, biomass to biofuel conversion, and resource colocation have strong impacts on the economic performance of algae cultivation sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard

    2014-09-16

    Decisions involving strain selection, biomass to biofuel technology, and the location of cultivation facilities can strongly influence the economic viability of an algae-based biofuel enterprise. In this contribution we summarize our past results in a new analysis to explore the relative economic impact of these design choices. We present strain-specific growth model results from two saline strains (Nannocloropsis salina, Arthrospira sp.), a fresh to brackish strain (Chlorella sp., DOE strain 1412), and a freshwater strain of the order Sphaeropleales. Biomass to biofuel conversion is compared between lipid extraction (LE) and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) technologies. National-scale models of water, CO2 (as flue gas), land acquisition, site leveling, construction of connecting roads, and transport of HTL oil to existing refineries are used in conjunction with estimates of fuel value (from HTL) to prioritize and select from 88,692 unit farms (UF, 405 ha in pond area), a number sufficient to produce 136E+9 L yr-1 of renewable diesel (36 billion gallons yr-1, BGY). Strain selection and choice of conversion technology have large economic impacts, with differences between combinations of strains and biomass to biofuel technologies being up to $10 million dollars yr-1 UF-1. Results based on the most productive species, HTL-based fuel conversion, and resource costs show that the economic potential between geographic locations within the selection can differ by up to $4 million yr-1 UF-1, with 2.0 BGY of production possible from the most cost-effective sites. The local spatial variability in site rank is extreme, with very high and low rank sites within 10s of km of each other. Colocation with flue gas sources has a strong influence on site rank, but the most costly resource component varies from site to site. The highest rank sites are located predominantly in Florida and Texas, but most states south of 37°N latitude contain promising locations. Keywords: algae

  3. Finite Unification: Theory and Predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Heinemeyer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available All-loop Finite Unified Theories (FUTs are very interesting N=1 supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (GUTs which not only realise an old field theoretic dream but also have a remarkable predictive power due to the required reduction of couplings. The reduction of the dimensionless couplings in N=1 GUTs is achieved by searching for renormalization group invariant (RGI relations among them holding beyond the unification scale. Finiteness results from the fact that there exist RGI relations among dimensionless couplings that guarantee the vanishing of all beta-functions in certain N=1 GUTs even to all orders. Furthermore developments in the soft supersymmetry breaking sector of N=1 GUTs and FUTs lead to exact RGI relations, i.e. reduction of couplings, in this dimensionful sector of the theory too. Based on the above theoretical framework phenomenologically consistent FUTS have been constructed. Here we present FUT models based on the SU(5 and SU(3^3 gauge groups and their predictions. Of particular interest is the Higgs mass prediction of one of the models which is expected to be tested at the LHC.

  4. Biset functors for finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bouc, Serge

    2010-01-01

    This volume exposes the theory of biset functors for finite groups, which yields a unified framework for operations of induction, restriction, inflation, deflation and transport by isomorphism. The first part recalls the basics on biset categories and biset functors. The second part is concerned with the Burnside functor and the functor of complex characters, together with semisimplicity issues and an overview of Green biset functors. The last part is devoted to biset functors defined over p-groups for a fixed prime number p. This includes the structure of the functor of rational representations and rational p-biset functors. The last two chapters expose three applications of biset functors to long-standing open problems, in particular the structure of the Dade group of an arbitrary finite p-group.This book is intended both to students and researchers, as it gives a didactic exposition of the basics and a rewriting of advanced results in the area, with some new ideas and proofs.

  5. Quasispecies theory for finite populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Man; Muñoz, Enrique; Deem, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    We present stochastic, finite-population formulations of the Crow-Kimura and Eigen models of quasispecies theory, for fitness functions that depend in an arbitrary way on the number of mutations from the wild type. We include back mutations in our description. We show that the fluctuation of the population numbers about the average values is exceedingly large in these physical models of evolution. We further show that horizontal gene transfer reduces by orders of magnitude the fluctuations in the population numbers and reduces the accumulation of deleterious mutations in the finite population due to Muller’s ratchet. Indeed, the population sizes needed to converge to the infinite population limit are often larger than those found in nature for smooth fitness functions in the absence of horizontal gene transfer. These analytical results are derived for the steady state by means of a field-theoretic representation. Numerical results are presented that indicate horizontal gene transfer speeds up the dynamics of evolution as well.

  6. Phase transitions in finite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), DSM-CEA / IN2P3-CNRS, 14 - Caen (France); Gulminelli, F. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire

    2002-07-01

    In this series of lectures we will first review the general theory of phase transition in the framework of information theory and briefly address some of the well known mean field solutions of three dimensional problems. The theory of phase transitions in finite systems will then be discussed, with a special emphasis to the conceptual problems linked to a thermodynamical description for small, short-lived, open systems as metal clusters and data samples coming from nuclear collisions. The concept of negative heat capacity developed in the early seventies in the context of self-gravitating systems will be reinterpreted in the general framework of convexity anomalies of thermo-statistical potentials. The connection with the distribution of the order parameter will lead us to a definition of first order phase transitions in finite systems based on topology anomalies of the event distribution in the space of observations. Finally a careful study of the thermodynamical limit will provide a bridge with the standard theory of phase transitions and show that in a wide class of physical situations the different statistical ensembles are irreducibly inequivalent. (authors)

  7. Discovering Co-Location from Spatial Data Sets with Fuzzy Attributes%带模糊属性的空间Co-Location模式挖掘研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴萍萍; 王丽珍; 周永恒

    2013-01-01

    As one of the important research in spatial data mining, the spatial co-location pattern mining attracts more and more attention. In practical applications, in addition to the spatial information, the spatial features usually contain the attribute information which is important for the decision-making. However, the previous works stressed the spatial information only. Firstly, based on the fuzzification of attribute information, this paper defines the related concepts, including fuzzy feature, fuzzy co-location pattern, etc. Secondly, similar to the related concepts of traditional co-location mining, this paper defines some concepts of fuzzy co-location pattern, such as table instance and partici-pation index, etc. Then, this paper proves the downward closure property of fuzzy co-location pattern, proposes a basic mining algorithm, and puts forward two pruning strategies so as to improve the mining performance. Finally, by extensive experiments, the efficiency and effectiveness of the algorithms are verified.%  空间Co-Location模式挖掘是空间数据挖掘的一个重要研究方向,正受到越来越多的关注。在实际应用中,空间特征不仅包含空间信息,还经常伴随着属性信息,这些属性信息对决策和知识发现有重要意义。然而现有的Co-Location挖掘方法只强调特征的空间信息,忽略了其属性信息。基于对属性信息的模糊化处理,定义了模糊特征和模糊Co-Location模式等概念。类似于传统空间Co-Location模式挖掘中的相关概念,定义了模糊Co-Location模式的表实例和参与度等概念。在证明模糊Co-Location模式的向下闭合性质的基础上,设计了一个基本挖掘算法。为提高算法的可伸缩性,提出了两个剪枝方法。在合成的和真实的数据集上进行了大量实验,验证了基本算法及其改进算法的效果和效率。

  8. Probabilistic sampling of finite renewal processes

    CERN Document Server

    Antunes, Nelson; 10.3150/10-BEJ321

    2012-01-01

    Consider a finite renewal process in the sense that interrenewal times are positive i.i.d. variables and the total number of renewals is a random variable, independent of interrenewal times. A finite point process can be obtained by probabilistic sampling of the finite renewal process, where each renewal is sampled with a fixed probability and independently of other renewals. The problem addressed in this work concerns statistical inference of the original distributions of the total number of renewals and interrenewal times from a sample of i.i.d. finite point processes obtained by sampling finite renewal processes. This problem is motivated by traffic measurements in the Internet in order to characterize flows of packets (which can be seen as finite renewal processes) and where the use of packet sampling is becoming prevalent due to increasing link speeds and limited storage and processing capacities.

  9. Finite element differential forms on cubical meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, Douglas N

    2012-01-01

    We develop a family of finite element spaces of differential forms defined on cubical meshes in any number of dimensions. The family contains elements of all polynomial degrees and all form degrees. In two dimensions, these include the serendipity finite elements and the rectangular BDM elements. In three dimensions they include a recent generalization of the serendipity spaces, and new H(curl) and H(div) finite element spaces. Spaces in the family can be combined to give finite element subcomplexes of the de Rham complex which satisfy the basic hypotheses of the finite element exterior calculus, and hence can be used for stable discretization of a variety of problems. The construction and properties of the spaces are established in a uniform manner using finite element exterior calculus.

  10. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  11. Finite type invariants of nanowords and nanophrases

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Homotopy classes of nanowords and nanophrases are combinatorial generalizations of virtual knots and links. Goussarov, Polyak and Viro defined finite type invariants for virtual knots and links via semi-virtual crossings. We extend their definition to nanowords and nanophrases. We study finite type invariants of low degrees. In particular, we show that the linking matrix and T invariant defined by Fukunaga are finite type of degree one and degree two respectively. We also give a finite type invariant of degree 4 for open homotopy of Gauss words.

  12. Unified Framework for Finite Element Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Alnæs, Martin Sandve; Mardal, Kent-Andre; Skavhaug, Ola; Langtangen, Hans Petter; 10.1504/IJCSE.2009.029160

    2012-01-01

    At the heart of any finite element simulation is the assembly of matrices and vectors from discrete variational forms. We propose a general interface between problem-specific and general-purpose components of finite element programs. This interface is called Unified Form-assembly Code (UFC). A wide range of finite element problems is covered, including mixed finite elements and discontinuous Galerkin methods. We discuss how the UFC interface enables implementations of variational form evaluation to be independent of mesh and linear algebra components. UFC does not depend on any external libraries, and is released into the public domain.

  13. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-05-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media.

  14. Computing with Hereditarily Finite Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Tarau, Paul

    2011-01-01

    e use Prolog as a flexible meta-language to provide executable specifications of some fundamental mathematical objects and their transformations. In the process, isomorphisms are unraveled between natural numbers and combinatorial objects (rooted ordered trees representing hereditarily finite sequences and rooted ordered binary trees representing G\\"odel's System {\\bf T} types). This paper focuses on an application that can be seen as an unexpected "paradigm shift": we provide recursive definitions showing that the resulting representations are directly usable to perform symbolically arbitrary-length integer computations. Besides the theoretically interesting fact of "breaking the arithmetic/symbolic barrier", the arithmetic operations performed with symbolic objects like trees or types turn out to be genuinely efficient -- we derive implementations with asymptotic performance comparable to ordinary bitstring implementations of arbitrary-length integer arithmetic. The source code of the paper, organized as a ...

  15. Electroweak relaxation from finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, Edward

    2015-01-01

    We study theories which naturally select a vacuum with parametrically small Electroweak Scale due to finite temperature effects in the early universe. In particular, there is a scalar with an approximate shift symmetry broken by a technically natural small coupling to the Higgs, and a temperature dependent potential. As the temperature of the universe drops, the scalar follows the minimum of its potential altering the Higgs mass squared parameter. The scalar also has a periodic potential with amplitude proportional to the Higgs expectation value, which traps it in a vacuum with a small Electroweak Scale. The required temperature dependence of the potential can occur through strong coupling effects in a hidden sector that are suppressed at high temperatures. Alternatively, it can be generated perturbatively from a one-loop thermal potential. In both cases, for the scalar to be displaced, a hidden sector must be reheated to temperatures significantly higher than the visible sector. However this does not violate...

  16. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  17. Quantum memories at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin J.; Loss, Daniel; Pachos, Jiannis K.; Self, Chris N.; Wootton, James R.

    2016-10-01

    To use quantum systems for technological applications one first needs to preserve their coherence for macroscopic time scales, even at finite temperature. Quantum error correction has made it possible to actively correct errors that affect a quantum memory. An attractive scenario is the construction of passive storage of quantum information with minimal active support. Indeed, passive protection is the basis of robust and scalable classical technology, physically realized in the form of the transistor and the ferromagnetic hard disk. The discovery of an analogous quantum system is a challenging open problem, plagued with a variety of no-go theorems. Several approaches have been devised to overcome these theorems by taking advantage of their loopholes. The state-of-the-art developments in this field are reviewed in an informative and pedagogical way. The main principles of self-correcting quantum memories are given and several milestone examples from the literature of two-, three- and higher-dimensional quantum memories are analyzed.

  18. Asymptotic Symmetries from finite boxes

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    It is natural to regulate an infinite-sized system by imposing a boundary condition at finite distance, placing the system in a "box." This breaks symmetries, though the breaking is small when the box is large. One should thus be able to obtain the asymptotic symmetries of the infinite system by studying regulated systems. We provide concrete examples in the context of Einstein-Hilbert gravity (with negative or zero cosmological constant) by showing in 4 or more dimensions how the Anti-de Sitter and Poincar\\'e asymptotic symmetries can be extracted from gravity in a spherical box with Dirichlet boundary conditions. In 2+1 dimensions we obtain the full double-Virasoro algebra of asymptotic symmetries for AdS$_3$ and, correspondingly, the full Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) algebra for asymptotically flat space. In higher dimensions, a related approach may continue to be useful for constructing a good asymptotically flat phase space with BMS asymptotic symmetries.

  19. Phase transitions at finite density

    CERN Document Server

    Friman, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    I discuss the analytic structure of thermodynamic quantities for complex values of thermodynamic variables within Landau theory. In particular, the singularities connected with phase transitions of second order, first order and cross over types are examined. A conformal mapping is introduced, which may be used to explore the thermodynamics of strongly interacting matter at finite values of the baryon chemical potential $\\mu$ starting from lattice QCD results at $\\mu^{2}\\leq 0$. This method allows us to improve the convergence of a Taylor expansion about $\\mu=0$ and to enhance the sensitivity to physical singularities in the complex $\\mu$ plane. The technique is illustrated by an application to a second-order transition in a chiral effective model.

  20. Radial flow of slightly compressible fluids: A finite element-finite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Radial flow of slightly compressible fluids: A finite element-finite differences approach. JA Akpobi, ED Akpobi ...