WorldWideScience

Sample records for colloidal ceramic processing

  1. Colloidal processing of Fe-based metal ceramic composites with high content of ceramic reinforcement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escribano, J. A.; Ferrari, B.; Alvaredo, P.; Gordo, E.; Sanchez-Herencia, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    Major difficulties of processing metal-matrix composites by means of conventional powder metallurgy techniques are the lack of dispersion of the phases within the final microstructure. In this work, processing through colloidal techniques of the Fe-based metal-matrix composites, with a high content of a ceramic reinforcement (Ti(C,N) ), is presented for the first time in the literature. The colloidal approach allows a higher control of the powders packing and a better homogenization of phases since powders are mixed in a liquid medium. The chemical stability of Fe in aqueous medium determines the dispersion conditions of the mixture. The Fe slurries were formulated by optimising their zeta potential and their rheology, in order to shape bulk pieces by slip-casting. Preliminary results demonstrate the viability of this procedure, also opening new paths to the microstructural design of fully sintered Fe-based hard metal, with 50 vol. % of Ti(C,N) in its composition. (Author)

  2. On the theory of the ceramic densification process an of recrystallization in colloidal solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, G.H.

    1972-01-01

    In a short survey the analogy between the theories on diffusion in solids and in solutions is shown. As a result, analogous theories are developed for the ceramic sintering process and the recrystallization in colloidal solutions. By a thermodynamic method a description is given of the available fre

  3. Colloidal forming of metal/ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Herencia, A.J.; Gutierrez, C.A.; Millan, A.J.; Nieto, M.I.; Moreno, R. [Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Metal/Ceramic composites have very attractive properties as either structural or electronic materials. For certain applications, complex microstructures and shapes are required. Colloidal processing of ceramics has proved to provide better properties and allows to obtain near net complex shaped parts. However colloidal processing has not received a similar attention in powder metallurgy. This work deals with the colloidal approach to the forming of metallic and metal/ceramic composites in an aqueous medium. Rheological behavior of concentrated pure nickel, nickel/alumina and nickel/zirconia suspensions is studied and optimized for obtaining flat surfaces or near net shaped parts by tape casting and gel casting respectively. In each case the influence of the processing additives (acrylic binders for tape casting and carrageenans for gel casting) on the rheological behavior of the slurries is determined. Pure nickel and nickel/ceramic composites with different compositions have been prepared. Static and dynamic sintering studies were performed at different conditions in order to control the porosity and microstructure of the final bodies, which were characterized by optical microscopy. (orig.)

  4. Ceramic Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  5. Colloid process engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Peukert, Wolfgang; Rehage, Heinz; Schuchmann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with colloidal systems in technical processes and the influence of colloidal systems by technical processes. It explores how new measurement capabilities can offer the potential for a dynamic development of scientific and engineering, and examines the origin of colloidal systems and its use for new products. The future challenges to colloidal process engineering are the development of appropriate equipment and processes for the production and obtainment of multi-phase structures and energetic interactions in market-relevant quantities. The book explores the relevant processes and for controlled production and how they can be used across all scales.

  6. Freeforming of Ceramics and Composites from Colloidal Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CESARANO III,JOSEPH; DENHAM,HUGH B.; STUECKER,JOHN N.; BAER,THOMAS A.; GRIFFITH,MICHELLE L.

    1999-12-01

    This report is a summary of the work completed for an LDRD project. The objective of the project was to develop a solid freeform fabrication technique for ceramics and composites from fine particle slurries. The work was successful and resulted in the demonstration of a manufacturing technique called robocasting. Some ceramic components may pow be fabricated without the use of molds or tooling by dispensing colloidal suspensions through an orifice and stacking two-dimensional layers into three-dimensional shapes. Any conceivable two-dimensional pattern may be ''written'' layer by layer into a three-dimensional shape. Development of the robocasting technique required the materials expertise for fabrication and theological control of very highly concentrated fine particle slurries, and development of robotics for process control and optimization. Several ceramic materials have been manufactured and characterized. Development of techniques for robocasting multiple materials simultaneously have also been developed to build parts with unique structures or graded compositions.

  7. Processing Nanostructured Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    aspects of the processing of nanostructured ceramics, viz. • • • The production of a flowable and compactable dry nanopowder suitable for use in... composition due to the different synthesis routes used. Therefore, ‘industry-standard’ dispersants can cause flocculation rather than dispersion...stabilised zirconia (3-YSZ) were no higher than for conventional, micron-sized material of the same composition . However, detailed crystallographic

  8. Charge-transfer processes in semiconductor colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Prashant V.; Gopidas, K. R.

    1990-04-01

    A picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy technique has been employed to probe the charge transfer processes in Ti02 semiconductor colloids. The trapping of electrons at the TiO surface (Ti4+ sitesY was characterized from the appearance of a broad absorption in the region of 550-750 nm following the 355-nm laser pulse excitation of Ti02 colloids. The lifetime of these trapped charge carriers increased upon incorporation of a hole scavenger in the colloidal semiconductor system. The mechanistic and kinetic details of the charge injection from excited CdS into a large bandgap semiconductor such as AgI and Ti02 have also been inves-' t i ga ted.

  9. Colloidal processing and rapid prototyping of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liwu Wang

    1998-12-01

    Some progresses have been made in the wet shaping of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} based on a better understanding of the colloidal behavior of suspensions and by improved pressure casting with porous polystyrene (PS) molds. This work illustrated that the combination of proper colloidal processing and rapid prototyping is an effective way to fabricate high-performance ceramics with complex shapes. In colloidal processing the packing density and microstructure of green bodies can be controlled if the interaction between ceramic particles in suspensions and the conditions under which the suspensions are consolidated are understood. Therefore, detailed studies on the surface chemistry of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} powder, the dispersing behavior of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} suspensions, the influence of dispersants and the mechanism during powder consolidation into complex-shaped green bodies are performed. (orig.)

  10. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  11. Sustainable colloidal-silver-impregnated ceramic filter for point-of-use water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyanedel-Craver, Vinka A; Smith, James A

    2008-02-01

    Cylindrical colloidal-silver-impregnated ceramic filters for household (point-of-use) water treatment were manufactured and tested for performance in the laboratory with respect to flow rate and bacteria transport. Filters were manufactured by combining clay-rich soil with water, grog (previously fired clay), and flour, pressing them into cylinders, and firing them at 900 degrees C for 8 h. The pore-size distribution of the resulting ceramic filters was quantified by mercury porosimetry. Colloidal silver was applied to filters in different quantities and ways (dipping and painting). Filters were also tested without any colloidal-silver application. Hydraulic conductivity of the filters was quantified using changing-head permeability tests. [3H]H2O water was used as a conservative tracer to quantify advection velocities and the coefficient of hydrodynamic dispersion. Escherichia coli (E. coli) was used to quantify bacterial transport through the filters. Hydraulic conductivity and pore-size distribution varied with filter composition; hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 10(-5) cm/s and more than 50% of the pores for each filter had diameters ranging from 0.02 to 15 microm. The filters removed between 97.8% and 100% of the applied bacteria; colloidal-silver treatments improved filter performance, presumably by deactivation of bacteria. The quantity of colloidal silver applied per filter was more important to bacteria removal than the method of application. Silver concentrations in effluent filter water were initially greater than 0.1 mg/L, but dropped below this value after 200 min of continuous operation. These results indicate that colloidal-silver-impregnated ceramic filters, which can be made using primarily local materials and labor, show promise as an effective and sustainable point-of-use water treatment technology for the world's poorest communities.

  12. Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Knitter; W Bauer

    2003-02-01

    Fabrication of micropatterned ceramics or ceramic microparts make high demands on the precision and resolution of the moulding process. As finishing of miniaturised or micropatterned ceramic components is nearly impossible, shaping has to be done by a replication step in the green, unfired state. To avoid high tooling costs in product development, a rapid prototyping process chain has been established that enables rapid manufacturing of ceramic microcomponents from functional models to small lot series within a short time. This process chain combines the fast and inexpensive supply of master models by rapid prototyping with accurate and flexible ceramic manufacturing by low-pressure injection moulding. Besides proper feedstock preparation and sufficient small grain size, the quality of the final components is mainly influenced by the quality of the master model. Hence, the rapid prototyping method must be carefully selected to meet the requirements of the component to be fabricated.

  13. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  14. Corrosion processes in quantized semiconductor colloids studied by pulse radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenadovic, M.T.; Nedeljkovic, J.M.; Micic, O.I.

    1987-04-01

    Electron-transfer reactions from different electron donors to PbSe colloids with diameter size less than 5 nm were studied by pulse-radiolysis techniques. Colloidal particles accept electrons from redox couples whose redox potentials are more negative than -0.8 V (vs. NHE). The optical properties of injected electrons show formation of Pb/sup +/ in bulk semiconductor after 1 ms and then reduction to Pb/sup 0/ in a second slower step ca. 10 s after electron injection. This cathodic corrosion process is also the dominant process during illumination of the colloids in the presence of hole scavengers. The photoreductive corrosion can be partially suppressed in the presence of an electron acceptor. Reduction reactions that cannot occur in bulk materials can occur in sufficiently small particles. Other quantized metal selenides show similar behaviour. The largest yield of hydrogen was produced with extremely small ZnSe colloids.

  15. Production Process for Strong, Light Ceramic Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, G. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Tomer, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Proportions of ingredients and sintering time/temperature schedule changed. Production process for lightweight, high-strength ceramic insulating tiles for Space Shuttle more than just scaled-up version of laboratory process for making small tiles. Boron in aluminum borosilicate fibers allows fusion at points where fibers contact each other during sintering, thereby greatly strengthening tiles structure.

  16. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  17. Laser Synthesis and Processing of Colloids: Fundamentals and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongshi; Gökce, Bilal; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2017-03-08

    Driven by functionality and purity demand for applications of inorganic nanoparticle colloids in optics, biology, and energy, their surface chemistry has become a topic of intensive research interest. Consequently, ligand-free colloids are ideal reference materials for evaluating the effects of surface adsorbates from the initial state for application-oriented nanointegration purposes. After two decades of development, laser synthesis and processing of colloids (LSPC) has emerged as a convenient and scalable technique for the synthesis of ligand-free nanomaterials in sealed environments. In addition to the high-purity surface of LSPC-generated nanoparticles, other strengths of LSPC include its high throughput, convenience for preparing alloys or series of doped nanomaterials, and its continuous operation mode, suitable for downstream processing. Unscreened surface charge of LSPC-synthesized colloids is the key to achieving colloidal stability and high affinity to biomolecules as well as support materials, thereby enabling the fabrication of bioconjugates and heterogeneous catalysts. Accurate size control of LSPC-synthesized materials ranging from quantum dots to submicrometer spheres and recent upscaling advancement toward the multiple-gram scale are helpful for extending the applicability of LSPC-synthesized nanomaterials to various fields. By discussing key reports on both the fundamentals and the applications related to laser ablation, fragmentation, and melting in liquids, this Article presents a timely and critical review of this emerging topic.

  18. Properties of Ceramic Fiber and Ceramic Shot in Wet-laid Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Long-di

    2002-01-01

    The paper deals with the different sinking properties of ceramic fiber and the ceramic shot in wetlaid nonwoven processes. The difference between the sinking properties of the fiber and the shot is very great according to theory analysis and the test. From results of calculating and practical testing, the method of removing ceramic shots during manufacturing is put forward.

  19. Laser processing of ceramics for microelectronics manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposili, Robert S.; Bovatsek, James; Patel, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    Ceramic materials are used extensively in the microelectronics, semiconductor, and LED lighting industries because of their electrically insulating and thermally conductive properties, as well as for their high-temperature-service capabilities. However, their brittleness presents significant challenges for conventional machining processes. In this paper we report on a series of experiments that demonstrate and characterize the efficacy of pulsed nanosecond UV and green lasers in machining ceramics commonly used in microelectronics manufacturing, such as aluminum oxide (alumina) and aluminum nitride. With a series of laser pocket milling experiments, fundamental volume ablation rate and ablation efficiency data were generated. In addition, techniques for various industrial machining processes, such as shallow scribing and deep scribing, were developed and demonstrated. We demonstrate that lasers with higher average powers offer higher processing rates with the one exception of deep scribes in aluminum nitride, where a lower average power but higher pulse energy source outperformed a higher average power laser.

  20. Advanced methods for processing ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) is a flame assisted, open air chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The process is capable of producing textured, epitaxial coatings on single crystal substrates using low cost reagents. Combustion chemical vapor deposition is a relatively inexpensive, alternative thin film deposition process with potential to replace conventional coating technologies for certain applications. The goals of this project are to develop the CCVD process to the point that potential industrial applications can be identified and reliably assessed.

  1. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders: a comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Dolores R R; Bottino, Marco C; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H A

    2008-12-01

    (1) To synthesize 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. A coprecipitation route was used to synthesize a 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic processed by uniaxial compaction and pressureless sintering. Commercially available alumina or alumina/zirconia ceramics, namely Procera AllCeram (PA), In-Ceram Zirconia Block (CAZ) and In-Ceram Zirconia (IZ) were chosen for comparison. All specimens (6mmx5mmx5mm) were polished and ultrasonically cleaned. Qualitative phase analysis was performed by XRD and apparent densities were measured on the basis of Archimedes principle. Ceramics were also characterized using SEM, TEM and EDS. The hardness measurements were made employing Vickers hardness test. Fracture toughness (K(IC)) was calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). ANOVA revealed that the Vickers hardness (pceramic materials composition. It was confirmed that the PA ceramic was constituted of a rhombohedral alumina matrix, so-called alpha-alumina. Both CAZ and IZ ceramics presented tetragonal zirconia and alpha-alumina mixture of phases. The SEM/EDS analysis confirmed the presence of aluminum in PA ceramic. In the IZ and CAZ ceramics aluminum, zirconium and cerium in grains involved by a second phase containing aluminum, silicon and lanthanum were identified. PA showed significantly higher mean Vickers hardness values (H(V)) (18.4+/-0.5GPa) compared to vitreous CAZ (10.3+/-0.2GPa) and IZ (10.6+/-0.4GPa) ceramics. Experimental Y-TZP showed significantly lower results than that of the other monophased ceramic (PA) (pceramics (pceramic processing conditions led to ceramics with mechanical properties comparable to commercially available reinforced ceramic materials.

  2. Containerless processing of amorphous ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1990-01-01

    The absence of gravity allows containerless processing of materials which could not otherwise be processed. High melting point, hard materials such as borides, nitrides, and refractory metals are usually brittle in their crystalline form. The absence of dislocations in amorphous materials frequently endows them with flexibility and toughness. Systematic studies of the properties of many amorphous materials have not been carried out. The requirements for their production is that they can be processed in a controlled way without container interaction. Containerless processing in microgravity could permit the control necessary to produce amorphous forms of hard materials.

  3. Advanced methods for processing ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Combustion chemical vapor deposition (combustion CVD) is being developed for the deposition of high temperature oxide coatings. The process is being evaluated as an alternative to more capital intensive conventional coating processes. The thrusts during this reporting period were the development of the combustion CVD process for depositing lanthanum monazite, the determination of the influence of aerosol size on coating morphology, the incorporation of combustion CVD coatings into thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and related oxidation research, and continued work on the deposition of zirconia-yttria coatings.

  4. Sol-gel processing of ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Helmut K.

    1991-01-01

    The sol-gel process can be considered as an interesting method for the synthesis of tailor-made ceramic raw materials. Two points of view are of special interest: powder synthesis and the processing of ultrafine raw materials. In the case of powder synthesis, high quality and multicomponent powders can be synthesized by control of surface chemistry and agglomerate-free subµm powder can be obtained. The preparation of tailor-made sols offers the possibility of powder-free processing of coating...

  5. Colloidal quantum dot solids for solution-processed solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Mingjian

    2016-02-29

    Solution-processed photovoltaic technologies represent a promising way to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of solar energy harvesting. Among these, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot photovoltaics have the advantage of a spectrally tuneable infrared bandgap, which enables use in multi-junction cells, as well as the benefit of generating and harvesting multiple charge carrier pairs per absorbed photon. Here we review recent progress in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, focusing on three fronts. First, we examine strategies to manage the abundant surfaces of quantum dots, strategies that have led to progress in the removal of electronic trap states. Second, we consider new device architectures that have improved device performance to certified efficiencies of 10.6%. Third, we focus on progress in solution-phase chemical processing, such as spray-coating and centrifugal casting, which has led to the demonstration of manufacturing-ready process technologies.

  6. Colloidal quantum dot solids for solution-processed solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mingjian; Liu, Mengxia; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-03-01

    Solution-processed photovoltaic technologies represent a promising way to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of solar energy harvesting. Among these, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot photovoltaics have the advantage of a spectrally tuneable infrared bandgap, which enables use in multi-junction cells, as well as the benefit of generating and harvesting multiple charge carrier pairs per absorbed photon. Here we review recent progress in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, focusing on three fronts. First, we examine strategies to manage the abundant surfaces of quantum dots, strategies that have led to progress in the removal of electronic trap states. Second, we consider new device architectures that have improved device performance to certified efficiencies of 10.6%. Third, we focus on progress in solution-phase chemical processing, such as spray-coating and centrifugal casting, which has led to the demonstration of manufacturing-ready process technologies.

  7. Spark Plasma Sintered Si3N4/TiN Nanocomposites Obtained by a Colloidal Processing Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic Si3N4/TiN (22 vol% nanocomposites have been obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS. Our colloidal processing route allows obtaining dispersed nanoparticles of TiN smaller than 50 nm avoiding the presence of agglomerates. The nanostructured starting powders were obtained by using a colloidal method where commercial Si3N4 submicrometer particles were coated with anatase TiO2 nanocrystals. A later nitridation process led to the formation of TiN nanoparticles on the surface of Si3N4. A second set of powders was prepared by doping the above defined powders with yttrium and aluminium precursors using also a colloidal method as sources of alumina and yttria. After thermal nitridation and SPS treatment, it has been found that the addition of oxides dopants improves the mechanical performance (KIC, σf but increases the electrical resistivity and significantly reduces the hardness. This is due to the formation of a continuous insulating glassy phase that totally envelops the conductive TiN nanoparticles, avoiding the percolative contact between them. The combination of colloidal processing route and SPS allows the designing of tailor-made free glassy phase Si3N4/TiN nanocomposites with controlled microstructure. The microstructural features and the thermoelectrical and mechanical properties of both kinds of dense SPSed compacts are discussed in this work.

  8. Hybrid light emitting diodes based on solution processed polymers, colloidal quantum dots, and colloidal metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin

    This dissertation focuses on solution-processed light-emitting devices based on polymer, polymer/PbS quantum dot, and polymer/silver nanoparticle hybrid materials. Solution based materials and organic/inorganic hybrid light emitting diodes attracted significant interest recently due to many of their advantages over conventional light emitting diodes (LEDs) including low fabrication cost, flexible, high substrate compatibility, as well as tunable emission wavelength of the quantum dot materials. However, the application of these novel solution processed materials based devices is still limited due to their low performances. Material properties and fabrication parameters need to be carefully examined and understood for further device improvement. This thesis first investigates the impact of solvent property and evaporation rate on the polymer molecular chain morphology and packaging in device structures. Solvent is a key component to make the active material solution for spin coating fabrication process. Their impacts are observed and examined on both polymer blend system and mono-polymer device. Secondly, PbS colloidal quantum dot are introduced to form hybrid device with polymer and to migrate the device emission into near-IR range. As we show, the dithiol molecules used to cross-link quantum dots determine the optical and electrical property of the resulting thin films. By choosing a proper ligand for quantum dot ligand exchange, a high performance polymer/quantum dot hybrid LED is fabricated. In the end, the interaction of polymer exciton with surface plasmon mode in colloidal silver nanoparticles and the use of this effect to enhance solution processed LEDs' performances are investigated.

  9. Supported versus colloidal zinc oxide for advanced oxidation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxman, Karthik; Al Rashdi, Manal; Al Sabahi, Jamal; Al Abri, Mohammed; Dutta, Joydeep

    2017-07-01

    Photocatalysis is a green technology which typically utilizes either supported or colloidal catalysts for the mineralization of aqueous organic contaminants. Catalyst surface area and surface energy are the primary factors determining its efficiency, but correlation between the two is still unclear. This work explores their relation and hierarchy in a photocatalytic process involving both supported and colloidal catalysts. In order to do this the active surface areas of supported zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NR's) and colloidal zinc oxide nanoparticles (having different surface energies) were equalized and their phenol oxidation mechanism and capacity was analyzed. It was observed that while surface energy had subtle effects on the oxidation rate of the catalysts, the degradation efficiency was primarily a function of the surface area; which makes it a better parameter for comparison when studying different catalyst forms of the same material. Thus we build a case for the use of supported catalysts, wherein their catalytic efficiency was tested to be unaltered over several days under both natural and artificial light, suggesting their viability for practical applications.

  10. Oxidation process of lanthanum hexaboride ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Oxidation process of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) ceramic powder was investigated . The LaB6 powder samples were heated continually from room temperature to 1 473 K at a heating rate of 10 K/min by differential scanning calorimetry. The oxidation tests were conducted at different exposure temperatures. The phases and morphologies of the samples before and after exposure were analyzed by XRD and SEM. It was pointed out that before 1 273 K, LaB6 has high oxidation resistant ability, which was due to that the oxide layer hinders the oxygen diffusion from outer to the surface of LaB6 grains. The oxide layer was composed of the transition phases, which were composed of La2O3 and B2O3 formed from the initial oxidation; when the oxidation temperature exceeded 1 273 K, protective layer was destroyed due to the vaporization of liquid B2O3. Based on the results of X-ray diffraction analysis, oxidation process of LaB6 ceramic powder can be described as follows: Before 1 273 K, lanthanum borate,La(BO2)3 was formed on the surface of samples, then lanthanum oxide (La2O3) and boron oxide (B2O3) were present on the surface of samples oxidized when the temperature reached to 1 473 K.

  11. Processing of hornblende syenite for ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chairoj Rattanakawin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to preliminarily study the hornblende syenite processing. The study includes characterization,separation and evaluation. Characterization has been carried out using thin section, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescenceand electrokinetic measurement. A variety of techniques such as magnetic separation, froth flotation and combinationof these techniques were used to separate feldspar from syenite. Evaluation of the separations has been done using data fromyield of feldspar, X-ray fluorescence and cone firing test. The feldspar yield was used to evaluate the process efficiency.Besides chemical analysis, cone shrinkage, fired color and degree of vitrification were used to monitor the quality of therecovered feldspars. The feldspars were furthermore compared to the standard feldspar samples obtained from a ceramicmanufacturer. Finally, the processed feldspars were graded for using in various kinds of ceramics.

  12. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders : A comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazar, Dolores R. R.; Bottino, Marco C.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. (1) To synthesize 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. Methods.

  13. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders : A comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazar, Dolores R. R.; Bottino, Marco C.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. (1) To synthesize 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. Methods.

  14. Multi-Scale Porous Ultra High Temperature Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-08

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 28-Mar-2013 - 27-Sep-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multi-Scale Porous Ultra High Temperature Ceramics ...report summarizes the main outcomes of research to develop multi-scale porosity Ultra High Temperature Ceramic materials. Processing conditions were...flights. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ultra High Temperature Ceramics , Colloidal Powder Processing, Multi-scale Porous Materials, Lattice Monte

  15. Microelectrical Discharge Machining: A Suitable Process for Machining Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schubert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Today ceramics are used in many industrial applications, for example, in the biomedical field, for high-temperature components or for cutting tools. This is attributed to their excellent mechanical and physical properties, as low density, high strength, and hardness or chemical resistance. However, these specific mechanical properties lead to problems regarding the postprocessing of ceramics. In particular, cutting processes require expensive tools which cause high manufacturing costs to machine ceramics. Consequently, there is a demand for alternative machining processes. Microelectrical discharge machining (micro-EDM is a thermal abrasion process which is based on electrical discharges between a tool and a workpiece. The advantages of micro-EDM are more and more in focus for ceramic machining. These advantages include the process of being a noncontact technology, an independency of material brittleness and hardness, a low impact on the material, and the achievable microstructures. This paper presents the current state of investigations regarding micro-EDM of ceramics. Beside the process principle of EDM, the used procedures for machining ceramics and insulating ceramics are described. Furthermore several machining examples are presented to demonstrate the possibilities of the micro-EDM process with regard to the machining of ceramics.

  16. Characteristics of the secondary relaxation process in soft colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Debasish; Joshi, Yogesh M.; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2015-11-01

    A universal secondary relaxation process, known as the Johari-Goldstein (J-G) β-relaxation process, appears in glass formers. It involves all parts of the molecule and is particularly important in glassy systems because of its very close relationship with the α-relaxation process. However, the absence of a J-G β-relaxation mode in colloidal glasses raises questions regarding its universality. In the present work, we study the microscopic relaxation processes in Laponite suspensions, a model soft glassy material, by dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments. α- and β-relaxation timescales are estimated from the autocorrelation functions obtained by DLS measurements for Laponite suspensions with different concentrations, salt concentrations and temperatures. Our experimental results suggest that the β-relaxation process in Laponite suspensions involves all parts of the constituent Laponite particle. The ergodicity breaking time is also seen to be correlated with the characteristic time of the β-relaxation process for all Laponite concentrations, salt concentrations and temperatures. The width of the primary relaxation process is observed to be correlated with the secondary relaxation time. The secondary relaxation time is also very sensitive to the concentration of Laponite. We measure primitive relaxation timescales from the α-relaxation time and the stretching exponent (β) by applying the coupling model for highly correlated systems. The order of magnitude of the primitive relaxation time is very close to the secondary relaxation time. These observations indicate the presence of a J-G β-relaxation mode for soft colloidal suspensions of Laponite.

  17. Analysis and development of an aqueous tape casting ceramic process

    OpenAIRE

    Mortara, L.

    2005-01-01

    The laboratory scale process developed by Navarro [Navarro, 2001 ] for the production of pyroelectric ceramics was used as a case study for the design of a high-level methodology for the scale-up of ceramic processes. A twofold approach was adopted as the basis of the methodology to perform the process scale-up. A "process focussed" approach was used that considered the sequence of processing operations, their feasibility on a larger scale and the potential problems foreseeable for a scale...

  18. Biomimetic processing of oriented crystalline ceramic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, J.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project was to develop the capabilities for Sandia to fabricate self assembled Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of various materials and to exploit their two-dimensional crystalline structure to promote the growth of oriented thin films of inorganic materials at room temperature. This includes the design and synthesis of Langmuir-active (amphiphilic) organic molecules with end groups offering high nucleation potential for various ceramics. A longer range goal is that of understanding the underlying principles, making it feasible to use the techniques presented in this report to fabricate unique oriented films of various materials for electronic, sensor, and membrane applications. Therefore, whenever possible, work completed in this report was completed with the intention of addressing the fundamental phenomena underlying the growth of crystalline, inorganic films on template layers of highly organized organic molecules. This problem was inspired by biological processes, which often produce exquisitely engineered structures via templated growth on polymeric layers. Seashells, for example, exhibit great toughness owing to their fine brick-and-mortar structure that results from templated growth of calcium carbonate on top of layers of ordered organic proteins. A key goal in this work, therefore, is to demonstrate a positive correlation between the order and orientation of the template layer and that of the crystalline ceramic material grown upon it. The work completed was comprised of several parallel efforts that encompassed the entire spectrum of biomimetic growth from solution. Studies were completed on seashells and the mechanisms of growth for calcium carbonate. Studies were completed on the characterization of LB films and the capability developed for the in-house fabrication of these films. Standard films of fatty acids were studied as well as novel polypeptides and porphyrins that were synthesized.

  19. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas Hian da; Lima, Erick de; Miranda, Ranulfo Benedito de Paula; Favero, Stéphanie Soares; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2017-08-28

    The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I) monolithic zirconia restorations; II) multilayered dental prostheses; III) new glass-ceramics; IV) polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V) novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  20. In-situ characterization of colloidal soft solution processes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallant, David Robert; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this program was to investigate methods to characterize the colloidal stability of nanoparticles during the synthesis reaction, and to characterize their organization related to interparticle forces. Studies were attempted using Raman spectroscopy and ultrasonic attenuation to observe the nucleation and growth process with characterization of stability parameters such as the zeta potential. The application of the techniques available showed that the instrumentation requires high sensitivity to the concentration of the system. Optical routes can be complicated by the scattering effects of colloidal suspensions, but dilution can cause a lowering of signal that prevents collection of data. Acoustic methods require a significant particle concentration, preventing the observation of nucleation events. Studies on the dispersion of nanoparticles show that electrostatic routes are unsuccessful with molecular surfactants at high particle concentration due to electrostatic interaction collapse by counterions. The study of molecular surfactants show that steric lengths on the order of 2 nm are successful for dispersion of nanoparticle systems at high particle concentration, similar to dispersion with commercial polyelectrolyte surfactants.

  1. Modification of ceramic microfilters with colloidal zirconia to promote the adsorption of viruses from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Markus; Michen, Benjamin; Luxbacher, Thomas; Fritsch, Johannes; Graule, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of modifying commercial microporous ceramic bacteria filters to promote adsorption of viruses. The internal surface of the filter medium was coated with ZrO(2) nanopowder via dip-coating and heat-treatment in order to impart a filter surface charge opposite to that of the target viruses. Streaming potential measurements revealed a shift in the isoelectric point from pH filter elements generally exhibited only 75% retention with respect to MS2 bacteriophages, the modified elements achieved a 7log removal (99.99999%) of these virus-like particles. The coating process also increased the specific surface area of the filters from approximately 2m(2)/g to between 12.5 and 25.5m(2)/g, thereby also potentially increasing their adsorption capacity. The results demonstrate that, given more development effort, the chosen manufacturing process has the potential to yield effective virus filters with throughputs superior to those of current virus filtration techniques.

  2. Pure colloidal metal and ceramic nanoparticles from high-power picosecond laser ablation in water and acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärsch, Niko; Jakobi, Jurij; Weiler, Sascha; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2009-11-04

    The generation of colloids by laser ablation of solids in a liquid offers a nearly unlimited material variety and a high purity as no chemical precursors are required. The use of novel high-power ultra-short-pulsed laser systems significantly increases the production rates even in inflammable organic solvents. By applying an average laser power of 50 W and pulse durations below 10 ps, up to 5 mg min(-1) of nanoparticles have been generated directly in acetone, marking a breakthrough in productivity of ultra-short-pulsed laser ablation in liquids. The produced colloids remain stable for more than six months. In the case of yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic, the nanoparticles retain the tetragonal crystal structure of the ablated target. Laser beam self-focusing plays an important role, as a beam radius change of 2% on the liquid surface can lead to a decrease of nanoparticle production rates of 90% if the target position is not re-adjusted.

  3. Final technical report to Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. ''Oxide ceramic alloys and microlaminates'' (1996-1999) and ''Low temperature processing and kinetics of ceramics and ceramic matrix composites with large interfacial areas'' (1999-2000)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I-Wei

    2001-03-26

    We have discovered a novel two-step sintering method that opened up a low temperature processing window within which fully dense nanocrystalline yttrium oxide was obtained with no concurrent grain growth during final-stage sintering. We have developed a new method of processing laminate ceramics using deformation processing in the green state. We have lastly developed a colloidal processing technique to encapsulate biomolecules at ambient, neutral-pH, aqueous conditions.

  4. Colloidal processing, tape casting and sintering of PLZT for development of piezoceramic/polymer interlayered composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jian-Huei

    Piezoceramic/polymer composites possess many advantages as compared to single-phase piezoceramics. One typical form of the composites is the interlayered structure, where the main requirement is to obtain thin, flat and dense ceramic sheets. Tape casting is a reliable process for producing such high-quality sheets. The colloidal processing of tape casting slurries is a critical step to achieve uniform ceramic bodies. Lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) was selected for making piezoceramic sheets due to its superior piezoelectric properties. The quality of green tapes depends mainly on the solvents and organic additives of tape casting slurries. The effects of xylenes/ethanol solvent mixtures on non-aqueous slurries were first investigated. Well-dispersed colloidal suspensions were obtained in xylenes-rich solvents with a minimum amount of menhaden fish oil as a dispersant. Adsorption of dispersant and PLZT solids content of unfired tapes are strongly affected by the solvent(s) utilized. Furthermore, when selecting solvent mixtures, one needs to consider other additives, such as binder that can affect the viscosity of slurries. Aqueous tape casting was performed using a polyelectrolyte dispersant, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) binders and various plasticizers. Zeta potential, conductivity and viscosity of PLZT suspensions containing dispersant were characterized. The effects of plasticizers and binders on properties of unfired tapes were also investigated. The tapes made from low molecular weight plasticizers showed higher plasticity. Glycerol was shown to be the most effective plasticizer for PVA. Strong hydrogen bonding in high hydrolysis PVA led to high strength and high bulk density of green tapes, but also caused deformation of the tapes after drying. There are many challenges for sintering PLZT tapes due to volatilization of PbO component at high temperatures and fragility of thin tapes. By using the proper setter powders and the sandwich method

  5. Lanthanum chromite colloidal processing; Processamento coloidal de cromito de lantanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setz, Luiz Fernando Grespan

    2009-07-01

    Lanthanum chromite (LaCrO{sub 3}) is currently the most studied material for applications such as solid oxide fuel cell inter connector (HTSOFC). The complexity of microstructures and geometries of HTSOFC devices, require a precise control of processing parameters to get the desired combination of properties and this, the use of techniques involving concentrated ceramic slips conformation are appropriate, therefore, is well controlled, assist in obtaining homogeneous parts, reproductive and complex geometries. Thus, studies involving the surface chemistry, the stability conditions and slips flow behaviour in the forming conditions, provide important elements for processes control in the inter connectors manufacture, where more applied settings have slots and channels for the gases passage. Thus, surface chemistry, stability and rheological behaviour of strontium and cobalt doped LaCrO{sub 3} (La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}Cr{sub 0.92}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 3}) slips prepared with ethanol and water, were studied. The doped lanthanum chromite was produced by combustion synthesis in the IPEN/SP labs. The influence of parameters: p H (water), dispersant concentration, homogenization times and conditions, solid concentration, different ratios binder:plasticizer in the stability and the flow behavior of ceramic suspensions prepared were evaluated. The La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}Cr{sub 0.92}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 3} products obtained by casting aqueous slips in a plaster mould, using alkaline p H and anionic polyelectrolyte and tapes obtained by using ethanol as a dispersant medium, after sintering at 1600 deg C/4h presented theoretical density > 94%, suitable for use as HTSOFC inter connector. (author)

  6. Lanthanum chromite colloidal processing; Processamento coloidal de cromito de lantanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setz, Luiz Fernando Grespan

    2009-07-01

    Lanthanum chromite (LaCrO{sub 3}) is currently the most studied material for applications such as solid oxide fuel cell inter connector (HTSOFC). The complexity of microstructures and geometries of HTSOFC devices, require a precise control of processing parameters to get the desired combination of properties and this, the use of techniques involving concentrated ceramic slips conformation are appropriate, therefore, is well controlled, assist in obtaining homogeneous parts, reproductive and complex geometries. Thus, studies involving the surface chemistry, the stability conditions and slips flow behaviour in the forming conditions, provide important elements for processes control in the inter connectors manufacture, where more applied settings have slots and channels for the gases passage. Thus, surface chemistry, stability and rheological behaviour of strontium and cobalt doped LaCrO{sub 3} (La){sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.}2{sub 0}Cr{sub 0.92}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 3}) slips prepared with ethanol and water, were studied. The doped lanthanum chromite was produced by combustion synthesis in the IPEN/SP labs. The influence of parameters: pH (water), dispersant concentration, homogenization times and conditions, solid concentration, different ratios binder:plasticizer in the stability and the flow behavior of ceramic suspensions prepared were evaluated. The La){sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.}2{sub 0}Cr{sub 0.92}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 3} products obtained by casting aqueous slips in a plaster mould, using alkaline pH and anionic polyelectrolyte and tapes obtained by using ethanol as a dispersant medium, after sintering at 1600 degree C/4 hours presented theoretical density > 94%, suitable for use as HTSOFC inter connector. (author)

  7. Melt processed multiphase ceramic waste forms for nuclear waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, Jake, E-mail: jake.amoroso@srs.gov [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Marra, James C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lin, Ye; Chen, Fanglin [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Su, Dong [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Brinkman, Kyle S. [Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We explored the feasibility of melt processing multiphase titanate-based ceramics. • Melt processing produced phases obtained by alternative processing methods. • Phases incorporated multiple lanthanides and transition metals. • Processing in reducing atmosphere suppressed un-desirable Cs–Mo coupling. • Cr partitions to and stabilizes the hollandite phase, which promotes Cs retention. - Abstract: Ceramic waste forms are promising hosts for nuclear waste immobilization as they have the potential for increased durability and waste loading compared with conventional borosilicate glass waste forms. Ceramics are generally processed using hot pressing, spark plasma sintering, and conventional solid-state reaction, however such methods can be prohibitively expensive or impractical at production scales. Recently, melt processing has been investigated as an alternative to solid-state sintering methods. Given that melter technology is currently in use for High Level Waste (HLW) vitrification in several countries, the technology readiness of melt processing appears to be advantageous over sintering methods. This work reports the development of candidate multi-phase ceramic compositions processed from a melt. Cr additions, developed to promote the formation and stability of a Cs containing hollandite phase were successfully incorporated into melt processed multi-phase ceramics. Control of the reduction–oxidation (Redox) conditions suppressed undesirable Cs–Mo containing phases, and additions of Al and Fe reduced the melting temperature.

  8. Mullite glass-ceramic glazes synthesized through a sol-gel and ceramic mixed process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, I.; Hohemberger, J.M.; Carda, J.B. [Universitat Jaume I, Castellon (Spain). Dept. Quimica Inorganica y Organica; Jovani, M.A.; Nebot, A. [Colorobbia Espana S.A. Villafames, Castellon (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    The main objective of the present work is the development of a glass-ceramic glaze with similar properties to the mullite crystalline phase. We have developed new glass-ceramic materials, which are formed through devitrification of mullite. The synthesis process combines the traditional ceramic method and the more innovative sol-gel methodologies. Amorphous precursors for the glass-ceramic glazes were obtained through precalcination of previously synthesized gels. These amorphous materials served as crystallization nuclei when introduced in the enamel composition. Gels were synthesized by the polymeric sol-gel method using AlCl{sub 3}, t-BuOH and TEOS as precursors. Composition of frit was optimized in such a way that a frit rich in aluminum and silicon would have the adequate physical and chemical characteristics for the desired application. Microstructure and structure of all the obtained materials were characterized. DTA-TG profiles and mechanical, chemical and optical properties were evaluated. On the other hand, the glass-ceramic glazes were compared first to glass-crystalline mullite glazes, which were obtained by addition of mullite crystals to the frit and then, to the glaze derived of just the frit. (orig.)

  9. Ceramic/metal nanocomposites by lyophilization: Processing and HRTEM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez-Gonzalez, C.F. [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas - CSIC - Universidad de Oviedo - UO - Principado de Asturias - PA, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera (Spain); Agouram, S. [Department of Applied Physics and Electromagnetism, Universitat de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Torrecillas, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas - CSIC - Universidad de Oviedo -UO - Principado de Asturias- PA, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera (Spain); Moya, J.S. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Lopez-Esteban, S., E-mail: s.lopez@cinn.es [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas - CSIC - Universidad de Oviedo - UO - Principado de Asturias - PA, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cryogenic route has been used to obtain ceramic/metal nanostructured powders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The powders present good homogeneity and dispersion of metal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metal nanoparticle size distributions are centred in 17-35 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both phases, ceramic and metal, present a high degree of crystallinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good metal/ceramic interfaces due to epitaxial growth, studied by HRTEM. -- Abstract: This work describes a wet-processing route based on spray-freezing and subsequent lyophilization designed to obtain nanostructured ceramic/metal powders. Starting from the ceramic powder and the corresponding metal salt, a water-based suspension is sprayed on liquid nitrogen. The frozen powders are subsequently freeze-dried, calcined and reduced. The material was analyzed using X-ray diffraction analysis at all stages. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies showed a uniform distribution of metal nanoparticles on the ceramic grain surfaces, good interfaces and high crystallinity, with an average metal particle size in the nanometric range.

  10. METAL-CERAMIC INTERFACES PRODUCED BY LASER MELT INJECTION PROCESSING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEHOSSON, JTM; VANDENBURG, M; Burg, M. van den

    1995-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the mechanical performance of various ceramic coatings of Cr2O3 on steel (SAF2205), as produced by CO2 laser processing. It is concluded that a firmly bonded coating of Cr2O3 on steel could be produced by high power laser processing. The actual interface strength of a

  11. METAL-CERAMIC INTERFACES PRODUCED BY LASER MELT INJECTION PROCESSING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEHOSSON, JTM; VANDENBURG, M; Burg, M. van den

    1995-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the mechanical performance of various ceramic coatings of Cr2O3 on steel (SAF2205), as produced by CO2 laser processing. It is concluded that a firmly bonded coating of Cr2O3 on steel could be produced by high power laser processing. The actual interface strength of a (Fe,

  12. Efficient neighbor list calculation for molecular simulation of colloidal systems using graphics processing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Michael P.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Nikoubashman, Arash; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-06-01

    We present an algorithm based on linear bounding volume hierarchies (LBVHs) for computing neighbor (Verlet) lists using graphics processing units (GPUs) for colloidal systems characterized by large size disparities. We compare this to a GPU implementation of the current state-of-the-art CPU algorithm based on stenciled cell lists. We report benchmarks for both neighbor list algorithms in a Lennard-Jones binary mixture with synthetic interaction range disparity and a realistic colloid solution. LBVHs outperformed the stenciled cell lists for systems with moderate or large size disparity and dilute or semidilute fractions of large particles, conditions typical of colloidal systems.

  13. Colloidal processing of PMN-PT thick films for piezoelectric sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongyu

    65%Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-35%PbTiO3 (65PMN-35PT, or PMN-PT) is a highly piezoelectric ceramic with superior piezoelectric coefficients over the more popular Pb(Zr0.5Ti0.5)O 3 (PZT). Because of its complex chemistry and high volatility of lead above 1000°C, the perovskite phase of PMN-PT is hard to process and has prevented PMN-PT from various piezoelectric applications, especially in the new area of piezoelectric micro-electro-mechanical systems (PMEMS) involving thick or thin piezoelectric films. In this thesis, a novel precursor suspension method is introduced that substantially lowers the sintering temperature of PMN-PT to 850°C from a PMN precursor powder made by coating Mg(OH) 2 on Nb2O5 particles. The precursor suspension method entails suspending PMN powders in PT precursor and uses the reaction sintering capability of PMN with nano-sized PT in the temperature range of 800°C˜1000°C. Moreover, free-standing PMN-PT thick films were obtained by tape casting the PMN-PT powder. This new geometry of PMN-PT shows giant electric-field enhanced piezoelectric responses comparable with those of single crystals. As an example of application, the PMN-PT thick film is bonded to a thinner layer of copper by electroplating and made into piezoelectric cantilever sensors. In conclusion, the colloidal suspension processing method produces free-standing PMN-PT thick films with ultrahigh piezoelectric properties.

  14. Melt processed multiphase ceramic waste forms for nuclear waste immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James C.; Tang, Ming; Lin, Ye; Chen, Fanglin; Su, Dong; Brinkman, Kyle S.

    2014-11-01

    Ceramic waste forms are promising hosts for nuclear waste immobilization as they have the potential for increased durability and waste loading compared with conventional borosilicate glass waste forms. Ceramics are generally processed using hot pressing, spark plasma sintering, and conventional solid-state reaction, however such methods can be prohibitively expensive or impractical at production scales. Recently, melt processing has been investigated as an alternative to solid-state sintering methods. Given that melter technology is currently in use for High Level Waste (HLW) vitrification in several countries, the technology readiness of melt processing appears to be advantageous over sintering methods. This work reports the development of candidate multi-phase ceramic compositions processed from a melt. Cr additions, developed to promote the formation and stability of a Cs containing hollandite phase were successfully incorporated into melt processed multi-phase ceramics. Control of the reduction-oxidation (Redox) conditions suppressed undesirable Cs-Mo containing phases, and additions of Al and Fe reduced the melting temperature.

  15. The research on conformal acid etching process of glass ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kepeng; Guo, Peiji

    2014-08-01

    A series of experiments have been done to explore the effect of different conditions on the hydrofluoric acid etching. The hydrofluoric acid was used to etch the glass ceramic called "ZERODUR", which is invented by SCHOTT in Germany. The glass ceramic was processed into cylindrical samples. The hydrofluoric acid etching was done in a plastic beaker. The concentration of hydrofluoric acid and the etching time were changed to measure the changes of geometric tolerance and I observed the surface using a microscope in order to find an appropriate condition of hydrofluoric acid etching.

  16. Reinfiltration processes for polymer derived fiber reinforced ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, A. [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio; Aparicio, M. [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio; Rebstock, K. [Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG, Friedrichshafen (Germany). Dornier Forschung; Vogel, W.D. [Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG, Friedrichshafen (Germany). Dornier Forschung

    1997-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are candidate materials for applications like reentry heat-shields for spacecrafts or turbine parts for aircrafts. Taylored mechanical properties, improved oxidation resistance and environmental stability are very important for these materials. To improve the performance of liquid polymer derived ceramic matrix composites (LPI-CMCs), different techniques for reducing porosity by reinfiltration are discussed. Reinfiltration processes have been performed on a carbon fiber reinforced SiC ceramic, using injection of suitable polymers and sol-gel sols. It has been demonstrated that both methods can reduce the porosity and increase the mechanical properties. Different parameters have been controlled including impregnation pressures and times, heat curing and initial porosity of the substrates as well as composition, viscosity and concentration of the infiltrating solution. The infiltrated samples were characterized by Hg porosimetry, interlaminar shear strength and SEM as well as by oxidation tests. (orig.)

  17. Direct monitoring of molecular recognition processes using fluorescence enhancement at colloid-coated microplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobmaier, C; Hawa, G; Götzinger, M; Wirth, M; Pittner, F; Gabor, F

    2001-01-01

    Direct monitoring of recognition processes at the molecular level is a valuable tool for studying reaction kinetics to assess affinity constants (e.g. drugs to receptors) and for designing rapid single step immunoassays. Methods currently used to gain information about binding processes predominantly depend on surface plasmon resonance. These systems use excitation with coherent light in attenuated total reflection geometry to obtain discrimination between surface-bound and free molecules in solution. Therefore labeling of the compounds is not necessary, but due to the complexity of the measuring setup the method is rather costly. In this contribution we present a simple method for performing kinetic single step biorecognition assays with fluorophore labeled compounds using the fluorescence enhancement properties of surface bound silver colloids. Silver colloids are bound to standard microplates via silanization of the plastic surface. Fluorophores close to this colloid coated surface show a significant gain in fluorescence compared to fluorophores farther away in the bulk solution. Therefore discrimination between surface bound and free fluorophores is possible and the binding of, for example, fluorophore labeled antibodies to antigens immobilized on the colloid surface results in increasing fluorescence intensity. Utilization of standard microplates makes this method fully compatible with conventional microplate processing and reading devices. Neither excitation with coherent laser light nor ATR geometry is required, the measurement is performed in a standard fluorescence microplate reader in front face geometry with a xenon flash lamp as excitation source. Methods for the preparation of colloid-coated microplates and fluorescence-enhanced biorecognition assays are presented. Additionally the dependence of the system performance on the structure and properties of the metal colloid coated surface is described. A two-component biorecognition model system shows a

  18. Pretreatment with ceramic membrane microfiltration in the clarification process of sugarcane juice by ultrafiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla dos Santos Gaschi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the sugar cane juice from COCAFE Mill, was clarified using tubular ceramic membranes (α-Al2O3/TiO2 with pore size of 0.1 and 0.3 µm, and membrane area of 0.005 m2. Experiments were performed in batch with sugar cane juice, in a pilot unit of micro and ultrafiltration using the principle of tangential filtration. The sugar cane juice was settled for one hour and the supernatant was treated by microfiltration. After that, the MF permeate was ultrafiltered. The experiments of micro and ultrafiltration were carried out at 65ºC and 1 bar. The ceramic membranes were able to remove the colloidal particles, producing a limpid permeated juice with color reduction. The clarification process with micro- followed by ultrafiltration produced a good result with an average purity rise of 2.74 units, 99.4% lower turbidity and 44.8% lighter color in the permeate.

  19. Process Development of Porcelain Ceramic Material with Binder Jetting Process for Dental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaji, Hadi; Zhang, Shanshan; Lassell, Austin; Zandinejad, Amirali; Yang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Custom ceramic structures possess significant potentials in many applications such as dentistry and aerospace where extreme environments are present. Specifically, highly customized geometries with adequate performance are needed for various dental prostheses applications. This paper demonstrates the development of process and post-process parameters for a dental porcelain ceramic material using binder jetting additive manufacturing (AM). Various process parameters such as binder amount, drying power level, drying time and powder spread speed were studied experimentally for their effect on geometrical and mechanical characteristics of green parts. In addition, the effects of sintering and printing parameters on the qualities of the densified ceramic structures were also investigated experimentally. The results provide insights into the process-property relationships for the binder jetting AM process, and some of the challenges of the process that need to be further characterized for the successful adoption of the binder jetting technology in high quality ceramic fabrications are discussed.

  20. Properties of ceramic oxides processed by laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virto, M.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser floating zone melting method is of relevant importance. The high absorbance of the energy generated by CO2 and Nd:YAG laser systems into ceramics specimens allows its transformation in monocrystals structures (ZrO2 or Al2O3, in eutectic crystals (ZrO2-Ca, or in textured polycrystal as Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8. The flexible control of laser parameters allows to obtain products with interesting properties.

    La utilización de equipos láser como fuente de calor para el procesado de cerámicas presenta importantes ventajas, como el alcanzar temperaturas muy elevadas, próximas a los 3000 C, efectuar tratamientos muy localizados en superficies sin afectar el volumen del material, así como la realización de tratamientos en zonas de difícil acceso, entre muchas otras. La fusión zonal asistida por láser constituye actualmente una de las técnicas más versátiles en el campo del crecimiento cristalino; la elevada absorción de la energía láser generada con sistemas CO2 y YAG:Nd en el interior de un compacto cerámico permite su eficaz transformación en monocristal, como es el caso del ZrO2 y Al2O3, eutéctico monocristalino de dos o más fases, caso del ZrO2-CaO, o policristal texturado como el superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8. La flexibilidad de control de los parámetros de crecimiento permite obtener productos con propiedades muy atractivas para su utilización en dispositivos de diversa naturaleza y de gran interés comercial.

  1. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  2. Ceramics in gas turbine: Powder and process characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the intrinsic properties of various forms of Si3N4 and SiC are listed and limitations of such materials' availability are pointed out. The essential features/parameters to characterize a batch of powder are discussed including the standard techniques for such characterization. In process characterization, parameters in sintering, reaction sintering, and hot pressing processes are discussed including the factors responsible for strength limitations in ceramic bodies. Significant improvements in material properties can be achieved by reducing or eliminating the strength limiting factors with consistent powder and process characterization along with process control.

  3. Crystallization behavior during melt-processing of ceramic waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumurugoti, Priyatham; Sundaram, S. K.; Misture, Scott T.; Marra, James C.; Amoroso, Jake

    2016-05-01

    Multiphase ceramic waste forms based on natural mineral analogs are of great interest for their high chemical durability, radiation resistance, and thermodynamic stability. Melt-processed ceramic waste forms that leverage existing melter technologies will broaden the available disposal options for high-level nuclear waste. This work reports on the crystallization behavior in selected melt-processed ceramics for waste immobilization. The phase assemblage and evolution of hollandite, zirconolite, pyrochlore, and perovskite type structures during melt processing were studied using thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. Samples prepared by melting followed by annealing and quenching were analyzed to determine and measure the progression of the phase assemblage. Samples were melted at 1500 °C and heat-treated at crystallization temperatures of 1285 °C and 1325 °C corresponding to exothermic events identified from differential scanning calorimetry measurements. Results indicate that the selected multiphase composition partially melts at 1500 °C with hollandite coexisting as crystalline phase. Perovskite and zirconolite phases crystallized from the residual melt at temperatures below 1350 °C. Depending on their respective thermal histories, different quenched samples were found to have different phase assemblages including phases such as perovskite, zirconolite and TiO2.

  4. Porous nickel coatings on steel tubes formed by aqueous colloidal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, B.; Sanchez-Herencia, A.J.; Moreno, R. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, Carretera de Valencia Km. 24,300, Arganda del Rey, E-28500 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-09-01

    A main goal in the manufacture of composite materials is the possibility of applying the colloidal approach to powder metallurgy. Here porous nickel coatings have been prepared in the inner walls of steel tubes by a simple, low-cost colloidal process. Coatings treated at 650 C show good adhesion to the steel surface and a higher porosity that bulk bodies, as desired for manufacturing inner linings on long steel tubes such as those used for heat-exchange applications. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Dynamics of Intraband and Interband Auger Processes in Colloidal Core-Shell Qauntum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouw, F.T.; Vaxenburg, R.; Bakulin, A.A.; van Dijk-Moes, R.J.A.; Bakker, H.J.; Rodina, A.; Lifshitz, E.; Efros, A.L.; Koenderink, A.F.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional colloidal quantum dots (QDs) suffer from rapid energy losses by nonradiative (Auger) processes, leading to sub-ns lifetimes in all excited states but the lowest-energy single exciton. Suppression of interband Auger decay, such as biexciton Auger recombination, has been achieved with the

  6. Colloidal processing of alumina with MgO additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyckfeldt, O. [Swedish Ceramic Inst., Goeteborg (Sweden); Ferreira, J.M.F. [Dept. of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, Univ. of Aveiro (Portugal)

    1997-12-31

    Both rheological studies and casting studies were made to evaluate the effects of adding MgO (0.10 wt%) to alumina slips with a solids loading of 45 vol%, stabilised either with a polyacrylic acid (Dispex A40, Allied Colloids Ltd, UK) or with a low M{sub w} sulphonic acid (Tiron, Aldrich Chemie, Germany). Tiron and Dispex are expected to give electrostatic and electrosteric stabilisation, respectively. The addition of MgO gave significant effects displayed by increased viscosity and elasticity of the slips and a considerable decrease in density of slip-cast and filter-pressed bodies. When the casting pressure increased, there was also a general tendency that the density of filter-pressed bodies decreased with well-stabilised slips (without MgO), but increased when the slip was weakly flocculated (with MgO). This was explained by the casting rate dependency under stabilised slip conditions, and the compressibility of the filter-pressed cakes formed using flocculated slips. Furthermore, it was shown that Tiron gave a higher degree of deflocculation both with addition of MgO and without MgO, indicating that the electrostatic stabilising mechanism dominates the particle interactions whereas steric effects are less important at the solids loading used. (orig.) 5 refs.

  7. Ceramic processing of boron nitride insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, C. S.; McCulloch, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel pin simulators (FPS) are the prime elements of several test facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These experimental facilities are used to conduct out-of-reactor thermal-hydraulic and mechanical interaction safety tests for both light-water and breeder reactor programs. The FPS units simulate the geometry, heat flux profiles, and operational capabilities of a reactor core element under steady-state and transient conditions. They are subjected to temperatures as high as 1600/sup 0/C (2900/sup 0/F) and power levels as high as 57.5 kW/m (17.5 kW/ft) as well as severe thermal stresses during transient tests. The insulating material in the narrow annulus between the heating coil and the FPS sheath is subjected to very rigorous conditions. Accuracy of the reactor safety test information and validity of the test data depend on the heat flux uniformity under all test conditions and on the reliable operation of all fuel pin simulators and their internal thermocouples. Boron nitride (BN), because of its high degree of chemical inertness combined with its relatively unique properties of high thermal conductivity and low electrical conductivity, is the most suitable insulating material for FPS. The important BN properties, thermal conductivity and electrical resistance, are strongly influenced by crystallite orientation and by impurities. The article describes new BN powder processing techniques, which optimize these properties.

  8. Osteogenesis process of tricalcium phosphate ceramics in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴红莲; 李世普; 闫玉华; 李小溪; 贾莉

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the osteogenesis of calcium phosphate ceramics, β-TCP ceramics were implanted into thecondyle femur of rabbits, and tetracycline was injected termly. Specimens were host at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 months af-ter implanted. The new bone formation and osteogenesis process were observed by the histomorphology, fluorescentmicroscope, SEM and EPMA. The results demonstrate that, osteogenesis is active, there are abundant osteoblastson the surface of osteoid, mesenchymal cell hyperplasia and incursion is found in materials after 1 month. After 2months, there is blood vessel formation and macrophage soakage within materials. Bone-island appears and connectsby bone-bridge after 3 months. β-TCP ceramics degrade and are dispersed by new formation bone. Woven boneturns into bone lamella by rebuilding and calcification. The materials entirely change their original shape and com-bines with bone tissue as a whole after 6 months. The typical structure of spongy bone forms. It is confirmed thatβ-TCP is a degradable biocompatible artificial bone material which can incorporating in life.

  9. Colloidal Gelation-2 and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 Investigations Conducted on STS-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Monica T.

    2000-01-01

    The Colloidal Gelation-2 (CGEL 2) and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 (CDOT 2) investigations flew on Space Shuttle Discovery mission STS-95 (also known as the John Glenn Mission). These investigations were part of a series of colloid experiments designed to help scientists answer fundamental science questions and reduce the trial and error involved in developing new and better materials. Industries dealing with semiconductors, electro-optics, ceramics, and composites are just a few that may benefit from this knowledge. The goal of the CGEL 2 investigation was to study the fundamental properties of colloids to help scientists better understand their nature and make them more useful for technology. Colloids consist of very small (submicron) particles suspended in a fluid. They play a critical role in the technology of this country, finding uses in materials ranging from paints and coatings to drugs, cosmetics, food, and drink. Although these products are routinely produced and used, there are still many aspects of their behavior about which scientists know little. Understanding their structures may allow scientists to manipulate the physical properties of colloids (a process called "colloidal engineering") to produce new materials and products. Colloid research may even improve the processing of known products to enhance their desirable properties.

  10. Ceramics in gas turbines - Powder and process characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S.

    1977-01-01

    The role of powder and process characterization in producing high quality silicon nitride and silicon carbide components, for gas turbine applications, is described. Some of the intrinsic properties of various forms of Si3N4 and SiC are listed and limitations of such materials' availability have been pointed out. The essential features/parameters to characterize a batch of powder have been discussed including the standard techniques for such characterization. In process characterization, parameters in sintering, reaction sintering, and hot pressing processes are discussed including the factors responsible for strength limitations in ceramic bodies. It is inevitable that significant improvements in material properties can be achieved by reducing or eliminating the strength limiting factors with consistent powder and process characterization along with process control.

  11. Solution-processed colloidal lead sulfide quantum dots for near-infrared quantum information processing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Ranojoy

    In this thesis, we study solution-processed lead sulfide quantum dots for near-infrared quantum information and communication applications. Quantum dots processed through synthetic routes and colloidally suspended in solution offer far-reaching device application possibilities that are unparalelled in traditional self-assembled quantum dots. Lead sulfide quantum dots are especially promising for near-infrared quantum optics due to their optical emission at the wavelengths of fiber-optic communications (1.3--1.5 microm). The broad absorption spectrum of these quantum dots can be used for solar light-harvesting applications, to which end the results of Chapter 2---where we study Forster resonance energy transfer in quantum dot solids---provide remarkable insights into photon emission from quantum-dot based solar cells. In subsequent chapters, we explore quantum-dot photonic crystal applications, where exciton-photon interactions in the cavity environment remarkably allow for the emission of indistinguishable single photons that are important for distribution of high-security quantum keys---being highly sensitive to 'eavesdropping'. Particularly, the suggestion of the solution-processed QED system is novel compared to traditional self-assembled systems, and as we will discuss, offer integration and processing capabilities that are unprecedented, and perform well at wavelength ranges where standard QED systems scale poorly. The results of chapters 3--6 are therefore significant in the general field of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  12. Colloidal polypyrrole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized aromatic heterocyclic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a vinyl pyridine-containing polymer and dopant anions and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are disclosed.

  13. An 8-year evaluation of sintered ceramic and glass ceramic inlays processed by the Cerec CAD/CAM system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, U.; Dijken van, J.W.V.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Cerec CAD/CAM inlays processed of two industrially made machinable ceramics during an 8-yr follow-up period. Each of 16 patients received two similar ceramic inlays. Half the number of the inlays were made of a feldspathic (Vita Mark II) and the other...... of a glass ceramic (Dicor MGC) block. The inlays were luted with a dual resin composite and evaluated clinically using modified USPHS criteria at baseline, 8 months, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8 yr, and indirectly using models. At baseline, 84% of the inlays were estimated as optimal and 16% as acceptable. Postoperative...... sensitivity was reported by one patient for 8 months. Of the 32 inlays evaluated during the 8 yr, 3 failed due to fracture of the material. No secondary caries was found adjacent to the inlays. No significant differences in the clinical performance were found between inlays made of the two ceramics. It can...

  14. Safety assessment of the liquid-fed ceramic melter process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelt, J.L.; Partain, W.L.

    1980-08-01

    As part of its development program for the solidification of high-level nuclear waste, Pacific Northwest Laboratory assessed the safety issues for a complete liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) process. The LFCM process, an adaption of commercial glass-making technology, is being developed to convert high-level liquid waste from the nuclear fuel cycle into glass. This safety assessment uncovered no unresolved or significant safety problems with the LFCM process. Although in this assessment the LFCM process was not directly compared with other solidification processes, the safety hazards of the LFCM process are comparable to those of other processes. The high processing temperatures of the glass in the LFCM pose no additional significant safety concerns, and the dispersible inventory of dried waste (calcine) is small. This safety assessment was based on the nuclear power waste flowsheet, since power waste is more radioactive than defense waste at the time of solidification, and all accident conditions for the power waste would have greater radiological consequences than those for defense waste. An exhaustive list of possible off-standard conditions and equipment failures was compiled. These accidents were then classified according to severity of consequence and type of accident. Radionuclide releases to the stack were calculated for each group of accidents using conservative assumptions regarding the retention and decontamination features of the process and facility. Two recommendations that should be considered by process designers are given in the safety assessment.

  15. New ceramic coating technique using laser spraying process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Koichi; Yanagisawa, Takeshi; Uchiyama, Futodhi; Obara, Akira; Okutomi, Mamoru; Kimura, Shinji; Yamada, Akimasa; Shen, Hong L.; Wang, Zhongcheng; Shen, Qinwo; Chatterjee, Udit; Bhar, Gopal C.

    1998-08-01

    A new ceramic coating technique using a CO2 laser has been developed. A high power density laser beam passes near the substrate. Coating materials are supplied by an extra-high accuracy powder supply device and pass across the laser beam. The coating materials are melted in the laser beam and deposited on the substrate surface. A YSZ (Yttria Stabilized Zirconia) layer and a LaCoO3 layer are made for high temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The crystal structures of the coated layers are the same as that of the original coating materials. Superconducting BPSCCO ceramic films are also made with this process. The films show super-conductivity with Tc at 81 K. The Jc of the specimen is 440 A/cm2 at 77 K. We can easily handle and arrange not only metal but also refractory materials. By adopting a multi-axis robot and a surface treatment laser technique, the laser spraying method described here makes it possible to produce highly functional and three dimensional parts of devices directly from raw powder materials. Thus the proposed method will open the path to an unexplored field of key production technology.

  16. Advanced processing of the Zerodur R glass ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Thomas A.

    1991-11-01

    The Zerodur glass ceramic is an extraordinary material possessing a very low thermal expansion over a broad temperature range. Depending on the size of the castings, a continuous or a discontinuous melting technology is used in the manufacture of Zerodur. Continuous melters are being operated regularly in Germany and recently in the United States. The latest generation of discontinuous melters started production of 8.2 m spincast telescope blanks in early 1991. Zerodur fusion is a special process to generate lightweighted mirror blanks and special components. It requires glassy material and generates bonds that are as strong as the bulk material. Further process development such as waterjet cutting and insertion technologies are underway and may generate components of unique shapes and performance.

  17. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications, Phase 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Wilkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The program goals were to develop and demonstrate significant improvements in processing methods, process controls and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1,370{degrees}C. The program focused on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} high temperature ceramic composition and hot-isostatic-pressing as the method of densification. Stage I had as major objectives: (1) comparing injection molding and colloidal consolidation process routes, and selecting one route for subsequent optimization, (2) comparing the performance of water milled and alcohol milled powder and selecting one on the basis of performance data, and (3) adapting several NDE methods to the needs of ceramic processing. The NDE methods considered were microfocus X-ray radiography, computed tomography, ultrasonics, NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent liquid dye penetrant and X-ray diffraction residual stress analysis. The colloidal consolidation process route was selected and approved as the forming technique for the remainder of the program. The material produced by the final Stage II optimized process has been given the designation NCX 5102 silicon nitride. According to plan, a large number of specimens were produced and tested during Stage III to establish a statistically robust room temperature tensile strength database for this material. Highlights of the Stage III process demonstration and resultant database are included in the main text of the report, along with a synopsis of the NCX-5102 aqueous based colloidal process. The R and D accomplishments for Stage I are discussed in Appendices 1--4, while the tensile strength-fractography database for the Stage III NCX-5102 process demonstration is provided in Appendix 5. 4 refs., 108 figs., 23 tabs.

  18. Investigation of the beryllia ceramics molding process by the hot casting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhapbasbaev, U. K.; Ramazanova, G. I.; Sattinova, Z. K.

    2013-03-01

    Results of mathematical simulation of the ceramics molding process by the hot casting method are presented. The mathematical model describes the motion of beryllia liquid thermoplastic slurry in a form-building cavity subject to solidification. Velocity and temperature profiles providing homogeneous properties of the beryllia ceramics in the process of molding by the hot casting method are obtained.

  19. Ambient-processed colloidal quantum dot solar cells via individual pre-encapsulation of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Ratan; Tang, Jiang; Barkhouse, D Aaron; Wang, Xihua; Pattantyus-Abraham, Andras G; Brzozowski, Lukasz; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2010-05-05

    We report colloidal quantum dot solar cells fabricated under ambient atmosphere with an active area of 2.9 mm(2) that exhibit 3.6% solar power conversion efficiency. The devices are based on PbS tuned via the quantum size effect to have a first excitonic peak at 950 nm. Because the formation of native oxides and sulfates on PbS leads to p-type doping and deep trap formation and because such dopants and traps dramatically influence device performance, prior reports of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have insisted on processing under an inert atmosphere. Here we report a novel ligand strategy in which we first encapsulate the quantum dots in the solution phase with the aid of a strongly bound N-2,4,6-trimethylphenyl-N-methyldithiocarbamate ligand. This allows us to carry out film formation and all subsequent device fabrication under an air atmosphere.

  20. Ambient-Processed Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells via Individual Pre-Encapsulation of Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Debnath, Ratan

    2010-05-05

    We report colloidal quantum dot solar cells fabricated under ambient atmosphere with an active area of 2.9 mm2 that exhibit 3.6% solar power conversion efficiency. The devices are based on PbS tuned via the quantum size effect to have a first excitonic peak at 950 nm. Because the formation of native oxides and sulfates on PbS leads to p-type doping and deep trap formation and because such dopants and traps dramatically influence device performance, prior reports of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have insisted on processing under an inert atmosphere. Here we report a novel ligand strategy in which we first encapsulate the quantum dots in the solution phase with the aid of a strongly bound N-2,4,6-trimethylphenyl-N-methyldithiocarbamate ligand. This allows us to carry out film formation and all subsequent device fabrication under an air atmosphere. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Dynamic analysis of the photoenhancement process of colloidal quantum dots with different surface modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valledor Llopis, Marta; Campo Rodriguez, Juan Carlos; Ferrero Martin, Francisco J [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Electronica, C y S Universidad de Oviedo, Campus de Gijon s/n, 33204 Gijon, Asturias, (Spain); Coto, Ana Maria; Fernandez-Argueelles, Maria T; Costa-Fernandez, J M; Sanz-Medel, A [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Oviedo, Campus del Cristo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain)

    2011-09-23

    Photoinduced fluorescence enhancement of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) is a hot topic addressed in many studies due to its great influence on the bioanalytical performance of such nanoparticles. However, understanding of this process is not a simple task, and it cannot be explained by a general mechanism as it greatly depends on the QDs' nature, solubilization strategies, surrounding environment, etc. In this vein, we have critically compared the behavior of CdSe QDs (widely used in bioanalytical applications) with different surface modifications (ligand exchange and polymer coating), in different controlled experimental conditions, in the presence-absence of the ZnS layer and in different media when exposed for long times to intense UV irradiation. Thus six different types of colloidal QDs were finally studied. This research was carried out from a novel perspective, based on the analysis of the dynamic behavior of the photoactivation process (of great interest for further applications of QDs as labels in biomedical applications). The results showed a different behavior of the studied colloidal QDs after UV irradiation in terms of their photoluminescence characteristics, potential toxicity due to metal release to the environment, nanoparticle stability and surface coating degradation.

  2. Processing and properties of large-sized ceramic slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fossa, L.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Large-sized ceramic slabs – with dimensions up to 360x120 cm2 and thickness down to 2 mm – are manufactured through an innovative ceramic process, starting from porcelain stoneware formulations and involving wet ball milling, spray drying, die-less slow-rate pressing, a single stage of fast drying-firing, and finishing (trimming, assembling of ceramic-fiberglass composites. Fired and unfired industrial slabs were selected and characterized from the technological, compositional (XRF, XRD and microstructural (SEM viewpoints. Semi-finished products exhibit a remarkable microstructural uniformity and stability in a rather wide window of firing schedules. The phase composition and compact microstructure of fired slabs are very similar to those of porcelain stoneware tiles. The values of water absorption, bulk density, closed porosity, functional performances as well as mechanical and tribological properties conform to the top quality range of porcelain stoneware tiles. However, the large size coupled with low thickness bestow on the slab a certain degree of flexibility, which is emphasized in ceramic-fiberglass composites. These outstanding performances make the large-sized slabs suitable to be used in novel applications: building and construction (new floorings without dismantling the previous paving, ventilated façades, tunnel coverings, insulating panelling, indoor furnitures (table tops, doors, support for photovoltaic ceramic panels.

    Se han fabricado piezas de gran formato, con dimensiones de hasta 360x120 cm, y menos de 2 mm, de espesor, empleando métodos innovadores de fabricación, partiendo de composiciones de gres porcelánico y utilizando, molienda con bolas por vía húmeda, atomización, prensado a baja velocidad sin boquilla de extrusión, secado y cocción rápido en una sola etapa, y un acabado que incluye la adhesión de fibra de vidrio al soporte cerámico y el rectificado de la pieza final. Se han

  3. Conventional and novel processing methods for cellular ceramics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paolo Colombo

    2006-01-01

    Cellular ceramics are a class of highly porous materials that covers a wide range of structures, such as foams, honeycombs, interconnected rods, interconnected fibres, interconnected hollow spheres...

  4. Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms: Comparison Of Reference Process For Ceramic Waste Form Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K. S. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Marra, J. C. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Amoroso, J. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Tang, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2013-08-22

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explore the phase formation and microstructural differences between lab scale melt processing in varying gas environments with alternative densification processes such as Hot Pressing (HP) and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a simulant derived from a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. Melt processing as well as solid state sintering routes SPS and HP demonstrated the formation of the targeted phases; however differences in microstructure and elemental partitioning were observed. In SPS and HP samples, hollandite, pervoskite/pyrochlore, zirconolite, metallic alloy and TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were observed distributed in a network of fine grains with small residual pores

  5. Composition, Processing Technology and Property of Ceramic Die Materials Containing Rare Earth Additives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Guangchun; Xu Chonghai; Fang Bin

    2007-01-01

    Development and application of new ceramic die materials is one of the important topics in the field of die research. The composition, processing technology, mechanical property and engineering performance of the ceramic materials such as cermet, ZTA, TZP, TZP/Al2O3, TZP/TiC/Al2O3, PSZ and Sialon, etc., with rare earth yttrium, lanthanum and cerium, and so on working as additives, were investigated and analyzed in the present study. Problems existed in the research and application of rare earth ceramic die materials were discussed. Rare earth additives can effectively improve the mechanical property and engineering performance of ceramic die materials. Thus, it will have further perspectives of wider application. More attention should be paid in the future to the toughening and strengthening of the ceramic die materials, the adding forms and kinds of rare earth elements and acting mechanisms of rare earth additives in ceramic die materials.

  6. Metastable zirconia-yttria-alumina ceramics: Structure, processing and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinzhang

    2002-09-01

    properties. Thirdly, reduced phase transformation temperatures will also find their applications in ceramic processing.

  7. Modelling and analysis of CVD processes in porous media for ceramic composite preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y.S.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    A continuum phenomenological model is presented to describe chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of solid product inside porous substrate media for the preparation of reinforced ceramic-matrix composites [by the chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) process] and ceramic membrane composites (by a modified C

  8. Processing and optimization of functional ceramic coatings and inorganic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyutu, Edward Kennedy G.

    Processing of functional inorganic materials including zero (0-D) dimensional (e.g. nanoparticles), 1-D (nanorods, nanofibers), and 2-D (films/coating) structures is of fundamental and technological interest. This research will have two major sections. The first part of section one focuses on the deposition of silicon dioxide onto a pre-deposited molybdenum disilicide coating on molybdenum substrates for both high (>1000 °C) and moderate (500-600 °C) temperature oxidation protection. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD/MOCVD) techniques will be utilized to deposit the metal suicide and oxide coatings. The focus of this study will be to establish optimum deposition conditions and evaluate the metal oxide coating as oxidation - thermal barriers for Mo substrates under both isothermal (static) and cyclic oxidation conditions. The second part of this section will involve a systematic evaluation of a boron nitride (BN) interface coating prepared by chemical vapor deposition. Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are prospective candidates for high (>1000 °C) temperature applications and fiber- matrix interfaces are the dominant design parameters in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). An important goal of the study is to determine a set of process parameters, which would define a boron nitride (BN) interface coating by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process with respect to coating. In the first part of the second section, we will investigate a new approach to synthesize ultrafine metal oxides that combines microwave heating and an in-situ ultrasonic mixing of two or more liquid precursors with a tubular flow reactor. Different metal oxides such as nickel ferrite and zinc aluminate spinels will be studied. The synthesis of metal oxides were investigated in order to study the effects of the nozzle and microwave (INM process) on the purity, composition, and particle size of the resulting powders. The second part of this research section involves a study of microwave frequency

  9. Effect of machining fluid on the process performance of wire electrical discharge machining of nanocomposite ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chengmao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wire electric discharge machining (WEDM promise to be effective and economical techniques for the production of tools and parts from conducting ceramic blanks. However, the manufacturing of nanocomposite ceramics blanks with these processes is a long and costly process. This paper presents a new process of machining nanocomposite ceramics using WEDM. WEDM uses water based emulsion, polyvinyl alcohol and distilled water as the machining fluid. Machining fluid is a primary factor that affects the material removal rate and surface quality of WEDM. The effects of emulsion concentration, polyvinyl alcohol concentration and distilled water of the machining fluid on the process performance have been investigated.

  10. Nanocrystalline-oxide ceramics: Synthesis, diagnostics, and processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Jia

    A flat-flame combustion process is employed to synthesize oxide-ceramic powder with nanoparticle size. An extensive study is made of the influence of processing parameters on final particle size. The parameters include precursor feed rate, burner-to-chill distance, chamber pressure, and location in the reaction chamber. Laser induced fluorescence is used as an in-situ diagnostic tool to obtain information on precursor concentration, the extent of precursor decomposition, particle formation, and temperature profiles. It is found that the precursor feed rate affects the precursor decomposition rate, and that most of the precursor decomposition is complete at one third of the burner-to-chill distance. Evidence for nanoparticle formation, which immediately follows precursor decomposition, is obtained from visible light emission. The effect of the chill is to establish a fixed aspect ratio (burner diameter to burner-to-chill distance) and to ensure one-dimensional flow. Decomposition of the precursor is complete within the stand-off distance, while particle coalescence is the main feature outside the burner region. A non-agglomerated nanopowder with particle size ranging from several to tens of nanometers is easily obtained using the flat-flame combustion process. After the optimum powder processing conditions are established, the as-synthesized powder is collected and used as starting material for a sintering study. A torroidal type of high pressure apparatus is used to sinter the green compacts, using a wide range of sintering conditions up to 8GPa and 2000°C. To sinter the nanopowder into single-phase material, while maintaining nano-sized grains, pressures in the GPa range are required to close the pores, because of the small pore size and associated high curvature. In the sintering of nanoparticles involving a phase transformation, accompanied by a reduced molar volume, pressure acts as a nucleation promoter. By applying high pressure, the sintering temperature is

  11. A study of ceramic-lined composite steel pipes prepared by SHS centrifugal-thermite process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3 ceramic-lined steel pipe was produced by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis centrifugal thermite process (SHS C-T process from Fe2O3 and Al as the raw materials. The composition, phase separation and microstructures were investigated. The result showed the ceramic lined pipe is composed of the three main layers of various compositions, which were subsequently determined to be Fe layer, the transition layer and the ceramic layer. Fe layer is composed of austenite and ferrite, the transition layer consisted of Al2O3 ceramic and Fe, the ceramic layer consisted of the dendritic-shaped Al2O3 and the spinel-shaped structured FeAl2O4.

  12. Numerical modelling of evaporation in a ceramic layer in the tape casting process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Jambhekar, V. A.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Evaporation of water from a ceramic layer is a key phenomenon in the drying process for the manufacturing of tape cast ceramics. This process contains mass, momentum and energy exchange between the porous medium and the free-flow region. In order to analyze such interaction processes, a Represent......Evaporation of water from a ceramic layer is a key phenomenon in the drying process for the manufacturing of tape cast ceramics. This process contains mass, momentum and energy exchange between the porous medium and the free-flow region. In order to analyze such interaction processes......, a Representative Elementary Volume (REV)-scale model concept is presented for coupling non-isothermal multi-phase compositional porous-media flow and single-phase compositional laminar free-flow. The preliminary results show the typical expected evaporation behaviour from a porous medium initially saturated...

  13. Numerical modelling of evaporation in a ceramic layer in the tape casting process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Jambhekar, V. A.; Hattel, Jesper Henri;

    2016-01-01

    Evaporation of water from a ceramic layer is a key phenomenon in the drying process for the manufacturing of tape cast ceramics. This process contains mass, momentum and energy exchange between the porous medium and the free-flow region. In order to analyze such interaction processes, a Represent......Evaporation of water from a ceramic layer is a key phenomenon in the drying process for the manufacturing of tape cast ceramics. This process contains mass, momentum and energy exchange between the porous medium and the free-flow region. In order to analyze such interaction processes......, a Representative Elementary Volume (REV)-scale model concept is presented for coupling non-isothermal multi-phase compositional porous-media flow and single-phase compositional laminar free-flow. The preliminary results show the typical expected evaporation behaviour from a porous medium initially saturated...

  14. Preconceptual design of a salt splitting process using ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D.E.; Brooks, K.P.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Clemmer, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Balagopal, S.; Landro, T.; Sutija, D.P. [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic ceramic membranes for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions are being developed for treating U. S. Department of Energy tank wastes. The process consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON) membranes. The primary NaSICON compositions being investigated are based on rare- earth ions (RE-NaSICON). Potential applications include: caustic recycling for sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes; reducing the volume of low-level wastes volume to be disposed of; adjusting pH and reducing competing cations to enhance cesium ion exchange processes; reducing sodium in high-level-waste sludges; and removing sodium from acidic wastes to facilitate calcining. These applications encompass wastes stored at the Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sites. The overall project objective is to supply a salt splitting process unit that impacts the waste treatment and disposal flowsheets and meets user requirements. The potential flowsheet impacts include improving the efficiency of the waste pretreatment processes, reducing volume, and increasing the quality of the final waste disposal forms. Meeting user requirements implies developing the technology to the point where it is available as standard equipment with predictable and reliable performance. This report presents two preconceptual designs for a full-scale salt splitting process based on the RE-NaSICON membranes to distinguish critical items for testing and to provide a vision that site users can evaluate.

  15. Optical tweezers manipulation of colloids and biopolymers: non-equilibrium processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G. M.; Sevick, E. M.

    2008-08-01

    The Fluctuation Theorems (FTs) of Evans & Searles and of Crooks are fundamental theorems of modern thermodynamics that have been suggested to be of practical use to scientists and engineers. Non-equilibrium processes with energy fluctuations on the order of thermal energy, κBT, are described by the FTs; examples include the stretching of a DNA molecule, the localisation of a colloidal particle in an optical trap of changing strength, and translation of an optically trapped colloidal particle. If the path or process is traversed over long times or the system is sufficiently large that it can be considered in the classical, thermodynamic limit, then, in principle, there is only one value of the energy characterising the path. However, for small systems, there exists a distribution of energy values and this distribution is associated with non-equilibrium fluctuations of the system that do not average out over short time. The FT of Evans & Searles, as well as the FT of Crooks (from which the Jarzynski relation is derived), describe the symmetry of this energy distribution about zero. This distribution is inherent to the dynamics of small systems, such as nano-machines and single molecular motors. In this paper we present the FTs in a single unified language, considering that the work done on the system is either purely dissipative, achieves a change in thermodynamic state of the system, or a combination of these. We demonstrate this with a single colloidal particle in an optical trap and a single DNA molecule stretched in an OT experiment.

  16. Freeze-Spray Processing of Layered Ceramic Composites (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    remove the ice by sublimation . In order to study the effect of green density on the sintered microstructure, a set of samples were isostatically...Ceram. Forum Int., 79 ( 9 , E35-E38, (2002). ’K. Araki and J. W. Halloran, "Room-Temperature Freeze Casting for Ceramics with Nonaqueous Sublimable ...Vehicles in the Naphtalene- Camphor Eutectic System," J. Am. Cerum Soc. 87 (1 1) 2014-2019 (2004). 9 ~ . Reed, Introduction to the Principles of

  17. Ceramic films produced by a gel-dipping process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santacruz, I.; Ferrari, B.; Nieto, M.I.; Moreno, R. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, Camino de Valdelatas s/n, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2003-09-01

    A novel method for manufacturing self-supporting ceramic films is based on the use of aqueous suspensions containing low concentrations of a biopolymer (carrageenan) and the formation of the film by immersion of a graphite substrate into the ceramic suspension heated at 60 C. A film is obtained by dipping after cooling at RT; burning out graphite during sintering leaves homogeneous, dense, and self-supported films (see Figure for an SEM image). (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Ultra High Temperature Ceramics' Processing Routes and Microstructures Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusman, Michael; Stackpoole, Mairead; Johnson, Sylvia; Gasch, Matt; Lau, Kai-Hung; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs), such as HfB2 and ZrB2 composites containing SiC, are known to have good thermal shock resistance and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. These UHTCs have been proposed for a number of structural applications in hypersonic vehicles, nozzles, and sharp leading edges. NASA Ames is working on controlling UHTC properties (especially, mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, and oxidation resistance) through processing, composition, and microstructure. In addition to using traditional methods of combining additives to boride powders, we are preparing UHTCs using coat ing powders to produce both borides and additives. These coatings and additions to the powders are used to manipulate and control grain-boundary composition and second- and third-phase variations within the UHTCs. Controlling the composition of high temperature oxidation by-products is also an important consideration. The powders are consolidated by hot-pressing or field-assisted sintering (FAS). Comparisons of microstructures and hardness data will be presented.

  19. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals as charge transporting layers for solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyong; Bai, Sai; Wang, Xin; Dai, Xingliang; Gao, Feng; Sun, Baoquan; Ning, Zhijun; Ye, Zhizhen; Jin, Yizheng

    2017-02-28

    Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals offer a unique combination of excellent low-temperature solution processability, rich and tuneable optoelectronic properties and intrinsic stability, which makes them an ideal class of materials as charge transporting layers in solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells. Developing new material chemistry and custom-tailoring processing and properties of charge transporting layers based on oxide nanocrystals hold the key to boosting the efficiency and lifetime of all-solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells, and thereby realizing an unprecedented generation of high-performance, low-cost, large-area and flexible optoelectronic devices. This review aims to bridge two research fields, chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals and interfacial engineering of optoelectronic devices, focusing on the relationship between chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, processing and properties of charge transporting layers and device performance. Synthetic chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, ligand chemistry that may be applied to colloidal oxide nanocrystals and chemistry associated with post-deposition treatments are discussed to highlight the ability of optimizing processing and optoelectronic properties of charge transporting layers. Selected examples of solution-processed solar cells and light-emitting diodes with oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers are examined. The emphasis is placed on the correlation between the properties of oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers and device performance. Finally, three major challenges that need to be addressed in the future are outlined. We anticipate that this review will spur new material design and simulate new chemistry for colloidal oxide nanocrystals, leading to charge transporting layers and solution-processed optoelectronic devices beyond the state-of-the-art.

  20. Low-Cost Innovative Hi-Temp Fiber Coating Process for Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MATECH GSM (MG) proposes 1) to demonstrate a low-cost innovative Hi-Temp Si-doped in-situ BN fiber coating process for advanced ceramic matrix composites in order to...

  1. Generation of colloidal granules and capsules from double emulsion drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Kathryn S.

    Assemblies of colloidal particles are extensively used in ceramic processing, pharmaceuticals, inks and coatings. In this project, the aim was to develop a new technique to fabricate monodispersed colloidal assemblies. The use of microfluidic devices and emulsion processing allows for the fabrication of complex materials that can be used in a variety of applications. A microfluidic device is used to create monodispersed water/oil/water (w/o/w) double emulsions with interior droplets of colloidal silica suspension ranging in size from tens to hundreds of microns. By tailoring the osmotic pressure using glycerol as a solute in the continuous and inner phases of the emulsion, we can control the final volume size of the monodispersed silica colloidal crystals that form in the inner droplets of the double emulsion. Modifying the ionic strength in the colloidal dispersion can be used to affect the particle-particle interactions and crystal formation of the final colloidal particle. This w/o/w technique has been used with other systems of metal oxide colloids and cellulose nanocrystals. Encapsulation of the colloidal suspension in a polymer shell for the generation of ceramic-polymer core-shell particles has also been developed. These core-shell particles have spawned new research in the field of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. Systems and chemistries for creating cellulose hydrogels within the double emulsions have also been researched. Water in oil single emulsions and double emulsions have been used to create cellulose hydrogel spheres in the sub-100 micron diameter range. Oil/water/oil double emulsions allow us to create stable cellulose capsules. The addition of a second hydrogel polymer, such as acrylate or alginate, further strengthens the cellulose gel network and can also be processed into capsules and particles using the microfluidic device. This work could have promising applications in acoustic metamaterials, personal care products, pharmaceuticals

  2. New Applications of Magnetic Separation Using Superconducting Magnets and Colloid Chemical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, S.; Yu, S.-J.; Nakahira, A.; Izumi, Y.; Nishijima, S.; Watanabe, T.

    2005-07-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) can be a promising new environmental purification technique as it produces no contaminants, such as flocculants, and could possibly treat large amounts of waste water within a short time frame. A colloid chemical process for magnetic seeding can allow us to rapidly recover a large quantity of adsorbate and to strongly magnetize individual particles in order to improve the recovery efficiency of magnetic separation. In this paper, we will report on the fundamental study of the magnetic seeding process and purification processes using HGMS, and also on studies of applications of the water treatment system for actual factories. Emphasized is a report on a system constructed for water treatment from a paper-manufacturing factory.

  3. The Ceramic Waste Form Process at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Bateman; Stephen Priebe

    2006-08-01

    The treatment of spent nuclear fuel for disposition using an electrometallurgical technique results in two high-level waste forms: a ceramic waste form (CWF) and a metal waste form (MWF). The CWF is a composite of sodalite and glass, which stabilizes the active fission products (alkali, alkaline earths, and rare earths) and transuranic (TRU) elements. Reactive metal fuel constituents, including all the TRU metals and the majority of the fission products remain in the salt as chlorides and are processed into the CWF. The solidified salt is containerized and transferred to the CWF process where it is ground in an argon atmosphere. Zeolite 4A is dried in a mechanically-fluidized dryer to about 0.1 wt% moisture and ground to a particle-size range of 45µ to 250µ. The salt and zeolite are mixed in a V-mixer and heated to 500°C for about 18 hours. During this process, the salt occludes into the structure of the zeolite. The salt-loaded zeolite (SLZ) is cooled and then mixed with borosilicate glass frit with a comparable particle-size range. The SLZ/glass mixture is transferred to a crucible, which is placed in a furnace and heated to 925°C. During this process, known as pressureless consolidation, the zeolite is converted to the final sodalite form and the glass thoroughly encapsulates the sodalite, producing a dense, leach-resistant final waste form. During the last several years, changes have occurred to the process, including: particle size of input materials and conversion from hot isostatic pressing to pressureless consolidation, This paper is intended to provide the current status of the CWF process focusing on the adaptation to pressureless consolidation. Discussions will include impacts of particle size on final waste form and the pressureless consolidation cycle. A model will be presented that shows the heating and cooling cycles and the effect of radioactive decay heat on the amount of fission products that can be incorporated into the CWF.

  4. Toward understanding dynamic annealing processes in irradiated ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael Thomas

    High energy particle irradiation inevitably generates defects in solids in the form of collision cascades. The ballistic formation and thermalization of cascades occur rapidly and are believed to be reasonably well understood. However, knowledge of the evolution of defects after damage cascade thermalization, referred to as dynamic annealing, is quite limited. Unraveling the mechanisms associated with dynamic an- nealing is crucial since such processes play an important role in the formation of stable post-irradiation disorder in ion-beam-processed semiconductors and determines the "radiation tolerance" of many nuclear materials. The purpose of this dissertation is to further our understanding of the processes involved in dynamic annealing. In order to achieve this, two main tasks are undertaken. First, the effects of dynamic annealing are investigated in ZnO, a technologically relevant material that exhibits very high dynamic defect annealing at room temper- ature. Such high dynamic annealing leads to unusual defect accumulation in heavy ion bombarded ZnO. Through this work, the puzzling features that were observed more than a decade ago in ion-channeling spectra have finally been explained. We show that the presence of a polar surface substantially alters damage accumulation. Non-polar surface terminations of ZnO are shown to exhibit enhanced dynamic an- nealing compared to polar surface terminated ZnO. Additionally, we demonstrate one method to reduce radiation damage in polar surface terminated ZnO by means of a surface modification. These results advance our efforts in the long-sought-after goal of understanding complex radiation damage processes in ceramics. Second, a pulsed-ion-beam method is developed and demonstrated in the case of Si as a prototypical non-metallic target. Such a method is shown to be a novel experimental technique for direct extraction of dynamic annealing parameters. The relaxation times and effective diffusion lengths of mobile defects

  5. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  6. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai (Australia)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R&D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 16}) and rutile (TiO{sub 2}). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}), zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), and monazite (CePO{sub 4}), to name a few of the most promising. R&D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO{sub 2} powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues.

  7. The Colloidal Stabilization of Quantum Dots: Towards Manufacturable, Efficient Solution-Processed Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollny, Lisa

    Understanding colloidal stabilization can influence the design of optoelectronic devices and enable improvements to their performance and stability. For photovoltaics, important characteristics of the active layer material are high conductivity along with a minimum of recombination centers. In order to capitalize on the benefits of solution-processed materials, it is important to minimize the number of processing steps: ideally, to achieve a low-cost solution, materials would be deposited using a single process step compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing. Prior to this work, the highest-performing colloidal quantum dots (CQD) solar cells have relied on several deposition steps that are repeated in a layer-by-layer (LBL) fashion. The purpose of these process steps has been to remove the long insulating ligands used in synthesis and replace them with short ligands that allow electrical conduction. The large number of steps combined, typically implemented via spin coating, leads to inefficient materials utilization and fails to show a path to a manufacturable solution. In this work, the first CQD solar cells were designed, built, and characterized combining state-of-art performance with scalable manufacture. Firstly, I report the first automated CQD synthesis to result in CQDs that form high-performance CQD solar cells. I analyze the CQD synthesis and by separating it into two phases---nucleation and growth phase---my insights are used to create higher-quality CQDs exhibiting enhanced monodispersity. I then proceed to develop a CQD ink: a CQD solution ready for direct deposition to form a semiconducting film exhibiting low trap state density. In early trials the CQD ink showed only limited power conversion efficiencies of 2%. I designed a new ink strategy, which I term cleavable hemiketal ligands. This novel two-component ligand strategy enables the combination of colloidal stabilization (via this longer two-component ligand) and cleavability (enabling excellent

  8. Polymer/Ceramic Composite Membranes and Their Application in Pervaporation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘公平; 卫旺; 金万勤; 徐南平

    2012-01-01

    Pervaporation (PV), as an environmental friendly and energy-saving separation technology, has been received increasing attention in recent years. This article reviews the preparation and application of macroporous ceramic-supported polymer composite pervaporation membranes. The separation materials of polymer/ceramic composite membranes presented here include hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and hydrophilic poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), chitosan (CS) and polyelectrolytes. The effects of ceramic support treatment, polymer solution properties, interfacial adhesion and incorporating or blending modification on the membrane structure and PV performance are discussed. Two in-situ characterization methods developed for polymer/ceramic composite membranes are also covered in the discussio.n. The.applications of these composite_membranesi_n_ pervaporation process are summarized as well, which contain the bio-fuels recovery, gasoline desulfuration and PV coupled process using PDMS/ceramic composite membrane, and dehydration of alcohols and esters using ceramic-supported PVA or PVA-CS composite membrane. Finally, a brief conclusion remark on polymer/ceramic composite mem- branes is given and possible future research is outlined.

  9. Phonon induced pure dephasing process of excitonic state in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tongyun; Han, Peng; Wang, Xinke; Feng, Shengfei; Sun, Wenfeng; Ye, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical study on the pure dephasing process of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots induced by lattice vibrations using continuum model calculations. By solving the time dependent Liouville-von Neumann equation, we present the ultrafast Rabi oscillations between excitonic state and virtual state via exciton-phonon interaction and obtain the pure dephasing time from the fast decayed envelope of the Rabi oscillations. The interaction between exciton and longitudinal optical phonon vibration is found to dominate the pure dephasing process and the dephasing time increases nonlinearly with the reduction of exciton-phonon coupling strength. We further find that the pure dephasing time of large quantum dots is more sensitive to temperature than small quantum dots.

  10. Lead-free piezoelectric ceramic coatings fabricated by thermal spray process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kui; Chen, Shuting; Guo, Kun; Tan, Chee Kiang Ivan; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2017-09-04

    The paper starts from a review on the progress in fabrication of piezoelectric ceramic coatings by thermal spray method. For our experimental work, two types of lead-free piezoelectric ceramic coatings, including potassium sodium niobate (KNN)-based and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT)-based, are fabricated by thermal spray process, and their structure, morphology and piezoelectric properties are characterized. Our obtained lead-free ceramic coatings exhibit single phase of perovskite structure, relatively dense morphology, and competitive piezoelectric coefficients. The mechanism of forming the piezoelectric perovskite crystalline phase by thermal spray involving melting-recrystallization process is analyzed in comparison to that of ceramic synthesis through solid state reaction. Suppression of volatile loss and decomposition at high temperature due to the extremely high melting and cooling rate in the thermal spray process, and the impact on the resulting structure are discussed. Significant advantages of the thermal spray method over alternative processing methods for forming piezoelectric ceramic coatings are summarized. The combination of environmentally friendly lead-free compositions and the scalable thermal spray processing method will promote more applications of piezoelectric ceramic coatings for producing distributive sensors and transducers, and forming advanced smart structures and systems.

  11. Hot-pressed transparent PLZT ceramics from low cost chemical processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Santos

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT ceramics were obtained with high transmittance in the visible range by a combination of an inexpensive chemical processing and hot pressing. Optical, microstructural, pyroelectric, ferroelectric and dielectric properties characterized in this study attested the applicability of the employed method in the production of PLZT transparent ferroelectric ceramics. In fact, the corresponding analyzed physical parameters are in very good agreement with those obtained in samples traditionally prepared by other methods. Furthermore, due to high sample quality, a phenomenological analysis of the PLZT 10/65/35 relaxor features was performed in these ceramics.

  12. A novel processing of carbon nanotubes grown on molecular sieve coated porous ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Sangram; Sarkar, Naboneeta; Park, Jung Gyu; Zhao, Wei; Kim, Sukyoung; Kim, Ik Jin

    2015-08-01

    The present study focuses on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Fe-containing zeolites coated porous ceramics by implementing three different and independent techniques, successively. Direct foaming-derived porous ceramics were subjected to hydrothermal reaction for on-site growth of NaA zeolites within it. The porous ceramics-zeolite composite was subjected to ion-exchange reaction to obtain the catalyst for CNT synthesis. Multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) were grown by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) process using acetylene as carbon source. Microstructural, thermogravimetric and spectroscopic analyses showed distinctive differences in terms of hollow structural feature, yield and crystallinity of the MWCNTs with different reaction temperatures.

  13. Utilization of kaolin processing waste for the production of porous ceramic bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Romualdo R; Brasileiro, Maria I; Santana, Lisiane N L; Neves, Gelmires A; Lira, Helio L; Ferreira, Heber C

    2008-08-01

    The kaolin processing industry generates large amounts of waste in producing countries such as Brazil. The aim of this study was to characterize kaolin processing waste and evaluate its suitability as an alternative ceramic raw material for the production of porous technical ceramic bodies. The waste material was physically and chemically characterized and its thermal behaviour is described. Several formulations were prepared and sintered at different temperatures. The sintered samples were characterized to determine their porosity, water absorption, firing shrinkage and mechanical strength. Fired samples were microstructurally analysed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the waste consisted of quartz, kaolinite, and mica, and that ceramic formulations containing up to 66% of waste can be used for the production of ceramics with porosities higher than 40% and strength of about 70 MPa.

  14. Processing and properties of pressable ceramic with non-uniform reinforcement for selective-toughening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Wei [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); School of Dentistry, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Hu, Xiaozhi, E-mail: xiao.zhi.hu@uwa.edu.au [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Ichim, Paul [School of Dentistry, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Sun, Xudong [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Brittle low-strength and low-toughness pressable dental ceramic can be reinforced by ductile elongated gold-particles (GP). A customized crown structure can be adequately strengthened by distributing GP only in critical sections of the crown, where high tensile stresses are experienced. In the present study, a non-uniformly structured ceramic-matrix composite with excellent interfacial bonding, twofold fracture toughness and strength at desired locations, is fabricated using pressable dental ceramic and GP. The layout pattern and sequence of different GP/ceramic powder mixtures, high-temperature flow properties of these mixtures during hot-pressing and the sample mold geometry are used to control the distribution and locations of GP for selective toughening and strengthening. Nano-crystalline structures of the pressable ceramic-matrix and the nano-scaled interfacial region around GP have been revealed by high-magnification field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Toughening and strengthening mechanisms of the elongated GP including residual stresses from composite processing and ductile fracture of GP are discussed together with SEM observations. Bulk flexural strength and local micro-indentation fracture and deformation characteristics of the selective-toughened ceramic/metal composite have been compared to those of the monolithic pressable ceramic to validate the toughening and strengthening mechanisms.

  15. The rheology and processing of “edge sheared” colloidal polymer opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Hon Sum; Mackley, Malcolm, E-mail: mrm5@cam.ac.uk; Butler, Simon [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Baumberg, Jeremy; Snoswell, David; Finlayson, Chris; Zhao, Qibin [Cavendish Laboratory, NanoPhotonics Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    This paper is concerned with the rheology and processing of solvent-free core shell “polymer opals” that consist of a soft outer shell grafted to hard colloidal polymer core particles. Strong iridescent colors can be produced by shearing the material in a certain way that causes the initially disordered spheres to rearrange into ordered crystalline structures and produce colors by diffraction and interference of multiple light scattering, similar to gemstone opals. The basic linear viscoelastic rheology of a polymer opal sample was determined as a function of temperature, and the material was found to be highly viscoelastic at all tested temperatures. A Cambridge multipass rheometer was specifically modified in order to make controlled mechanical measurements of initially disordered polymer opal tapes that were sandwiched between protective polyethylene terephthalate sheets. Axial extension, simple shear, and a novel “edge shearing” geometry were all evaluated, and multiple successive experiments of the edge shearing test were carried out at different temperatures. The optical development of colloidal ordering, measured as optical opalescence, was quantified by spectroscopy using visible backscattered light. The development of opalescence was found to be sensitive to the geometry of deformation and a number of process variables suggesting a complex interaction of parameters that caused the opalescence. In order to identify aspects of the deformation mechanism of the edge shearing experiment, a separate series of in situ optical experiments were carried out and this helped indicate the extent of simple shear generated with each edge shear deformation. The results show that strong ordering can be induced by successive edge shearing deformation. The results are relevant to polymer opal rheology, processing, and mechanisms relating to ordering within complex viscoelastic fluids.

  16. Theory of activated-rate processes under shear with application to shear-induced aggregation of colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Gentili, Daniele; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-11-01

    Using an approximation scheme within the convective diffusion (two-body Smoluchowski) equation framework, we unveil the shear-driven aggregation mechanism at the origin of structure formation in sheared colloidal systems. The theory, verified against numerics and experiments, explains the induction time followed by explosive (irreversible) rise of viscosity observed in charge-stabilized colloidal and protein systems under steady shear. The Arrhenius-type equation with shear derived here, extending Kramers' theory in the presence of shear, clearly demonstrates the important role of shear drive in activated-rate processes as they are encountered in soft condensed matter.

  17. Microwave processing of a dental ceramic used in computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendola, Martin; Saha, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Because of their favorable mechanical properties and natural esthetics, ceramics are widely used in restorative dentistry. The conventional ceramic sintering process required for their use is usually slow, however, and the equipment has an elevated energy consumption. Sintering processes that use microwaves have several advantages compared to regular sintering: shorter processing times, lower energy consumption, and the capacity for volumetric heating. The objective of this study was to test the mechanical properties of a dental ceramic used in computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) after the specimens were processed with microwave hybrid sintering. Density, hardness, and bending strength were measured. When ceramic specimens were sintered with microwaves, the processing times were reduced and protocols were simplified. Hardness was improved almost 20% compared to regular sintering, and flexural strength measurements suggested that specimens were approximately 50% stronger than specimens sintered in a conventional system. Microwave hybrid sintering may preserve or improve the mechanical properties of dental ceramics designed for CAD/CAM processing systems, reducing processing and waiting times.

  18. Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvey, Gregg

    2010-05-01

    For more than 30 years, Compendium has provided its readers with university-based continuing education and editorial, demonstrating the latest advances in clinical procedures and techniques. Using the same peer-reviewed format and influence/direction from Compendium's distinguished editorial board, Special Report provides insight on the latest advances in product technologies and the resulting benefits to both you and your patients. A discussion by the author on new clinical/laboratory research and product development strategies, as well as what the results could mean for dental treatment, also is included. Focusing on one product category per issue provides a detailed review of the category and a comprehensive resource to help guide your treatment planning process.

  19. Hybrid halide perovskite solar cell precursors: colloidal chemistry and coordination engineering behind device processing for high efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Keyou; Long, Mingzhu; Zhang, Tiankai; Wei, Zhanhua; Chen, Haining; Yang, Shihe; Xu, Jianbin

    2015-04-01

    The precursor of solution-processed perovskite thin films is one of the most central components for high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. We first present the crucial colloidal chemistry visualization of the perovskite precursor solution based on analytical spectra and reveal that perovskite precursor solutions for solar cells are generally colloidal dispersions in a mother solution, with a colloidal size up to the mesoscale, rather than real solutions. The colloid is made of a soft coordination complex in the form of a lead polyhalide framework between organic and inorganic components and can be structurally tuned by the coordination degree, thereby primarily determining the basic film coverage and morphology of deposited thin films. By utilizing coordination engineering, particularly through employing additional methylammonium halide over the stoichiometric ratio for tuning the coordination degree and mode in the initial colloidal solution, along with a thermal leaching for the selective release of excess methylammonium halides, we achieved full and even coverage, the preferential orientation, and high purity of planar perovskite thin films. We have also identified that excess organic component can reduce the colloidal size of and tune the morphology of the coordination framework in relation to final perovskite grains and partial chlorine substitution can accelerate the crystalline nucleation process of perovskite. This work demonstrates the important fundamental chemistry of perovskite precursors and provides genuine guidelines for accurately controlling the high quality of hybrid perovskite thin films without any impurity, thereby delivering efficient planar perovskite solar cells with a power conversion efficiency as high as 17% without distinct hysteresis owing to the high quality of perovskite thin films.

  20. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Kunkel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the 7F0→5D0 transition in Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ∼15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfine levels. Additionally, different Eu3+ concentrations (up to 1.0% were studied, resulting in an increase of up to a factor of three in the peak absorption coefficient. These results suggest that transparent ceramics can be useful in applications where narrow and deep spectral holes can be burned into highly absorbing lines, such as quantum information processing and spectral filtering.

  1. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Nathalie; Ferrier, Alban; Thiel, Charles W.; Ramírez, Mariola O.; Bausá, Luisa E.; Cone, Rufus L.; Ikesue, Akio; Goldner, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the 7F0→5D0 transition in Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ˜15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfine levels. Additionally, different Eu3+ concentrations (up to 1.0%) were studied, resulting in an increase of up to a factor of three in the peak absorption coefficient. These results suggest that transparent ceramics can be useful in applications where narrow and deep spectral holes can be burned into highly absorbing lines, such as quantum information processing and spectral filtering.

  2. Reactive processing of ceramic binding systems for refractory castables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Guotian

    The general applied objective of this project is to develop hydratable alumina-bonded castables of properties comparable to the high-temperature fired basic bricks. This work is focused on improving the sintering of the ceramic binding systems at relatively low temperatures (˜1300°C) through incorporation of ultrafine powders. Ultrafine magnesium aluminate spinel powders were synthesized using already known and original methods. Combustible ingredients were incorporated to prevent the direct contacts of the precursor particles during drying and the combustibles leave a continuous pore network when they burn off during calcination at 700-800°C. Mechanical activation of the spinel precursor prepared using a heterogeneous sol-gel process decreased the activation energy for spinel formation from 688 kJ/mol to 468 kJ/mol, and lowered the incipient temperature of spinel formation from 900°C to 800°C, and the temperature of complete spinellization from >1280°C to 900°C. A new method for preparing homogeneous spine] precursor was presented and completely crystallized spinel with specific surface area of 105 m2/g, and crystallite size of 13 nm was formed from the precursor after calcination at 900°C. This work established the influence of ultrafine-sized powders on the sintering and strength development of multi-sized systems rich in large particles at relatively low temperatures, with emphasis on the temperatures around 1280°C. It was found that the relationship between the strength and linear shrinkage for the powder compacts consisting of uniform particle size distribution does not apply to the binding systems with wide particle size distributions (90 nm--90 mum). The addition of the ultrafine powders (≤0.5 mum median) up to 10% had no significant influence on strength in two-component binding systems after firing at 1280°C and 1450°C. However, the ultrafine powders increased the strength of three-component binding systems presumably because the addition of

  3. Development of tailored ceramic microstructures using recycled marble processing residue as pore-former

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domopoulou, A.; Spiliotis, X.; Charalampides, G.; Baklavaridis, A.; Papapolymerou, G.; Karayannis, V.

    2016-06-01

    Recycling of marble processing residue is significant since marble processing constitutes an important industrial sector. Therefore, the sustainable management and the valorisation, in an economically profitable manner, of this industrial by-product should be considered. In this work, the potential use of marble residue as pore-former into clayey mixtures for the production of lightweight, porous and thermal insulating ceramics is investigated. Four samples consisting of clayey ceramic body incorporating up to 50 wt.% fine marble residue powder were produced. The final ceramic products were produced upon firing (sintering) at 950oC. Porosity and thermal conductivity measurements were carried out in order to assess the thermal insulating behavior of the produced sintered ceramics. The porosity of the sintered ceramics increases substantially by increasing the marble residue admixture loading. This, in turn, leads to a decrease in thermal conductivity. Consequently, the marble residue can be successfully employed as pore-forming agent, in order to improve the insulating behavior of the ceramic materials.

  4. Process for Assembly of Multimode Hydrophone Ceramic Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    hydrophone 10 includes tangentially-poled ceramic (lead- zirconate titanate) rings 12, a Delrin washers 14, a LC-800 washers 16, 26 AWG insulated wire ...18, a stainless steel flange 20, an end cap 22, 30 AWG uninsulated bus wire 24, solder joints 26, ¼-28 socket head screw 28, and a phenolic feed...pressure waves. [0058] The washers 104 are made from Delrin. Delrin is a nylon -like material that can be easily machined yet is rigid enough to provide

  5. Comparative Study of the Effects of Long and Short Term Biological Processes on the Cycling of Colloidal Trace Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, P.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; West, A.

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticle (or colloids), with sizes operationally defined as ranging from 1nm to 1000nm diameter, are thought to play an important role in metal cycling in the ocean due to their high surface area to volume ratio and abundance in marine systems. In coastal waters, the bulk of marine nanoparticles are organic, so short and long term biological processes are expected to influence the dynamics of these types of particles in marine environments. This is, in turn, expected to influence metal concentrations. Here we selected two different environments to study the influence of long-term biological events (phytoplankton blooms) and short-term biological events (diel cycles of photosynthesis and respiration) on the cycling of colloidal trace metals. We focus on Cu and Fe, both biogeochemically important metals but with differing colloidal behavior. Long term processes (West Neck Bay): A bay (West Neck Bay, Long Island) with predictable natural phytoplankton blooms, but with limited inputs of freshwater, nutrients and metals, was selected to study the partitioning of Cu and Fe between colloidal and soluble pools over the course of a bloom. During the bloom, there was a significant build-up of Cu associated with DOM accumulation and a removal of Fe via particle stripping. Fraction-specific metal concentrations, and metal accumulation and removal rates, were found to be significantly correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration and with dissolved organic matter (DOM). Short term processes (Catalina Island): To identify the cyclical variation in metal speciation during diel (24-hour) cycles of photosynthesis and respiration, we conducted a study off Catalina Island, a pristine environment where trace metal cycling is solely controlled by biological processes and changes in the phytoplankton community are well characterized. The speciation of Fe between soluble and colloidal pools showed that Fe has a high affinity for colloidal material and that the distribution between

  6. Challenges and Opportunities in Reactive Processing and Applications of Advanced Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2003-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in the research, development, and commercialization of innovative synthesis and processing technologies for advanced ceramics and composite materials. Reactive processing approaches have been actively considered due to their robustness, flexibility, and affordability. A wide variety of silicon carbide-based advanced ceramics and composites are currently being fabricated using the processing approaches involving reactive infiltration of liquid and gaseous species into engineered fibrous or microporous carbon performs. The microporous carbon performs have been fabricated using the temperature induced phase separation and pyrolysis of two phase organic (resin-pore former) mixtures and fiber reinforcement of carbon and ceramic particulate bodies. In addition, pyrolyzed native plant cellulose tissues also provide unique carbon templates for manufacturing of non-oxide and oxide ceramics. In spite of great interest in this technology due to their affordability and robustness, there is a lack of scientific basis for process understanding and many technical challenges still remain. The influence of perform properties and other parameters on the resulting microstructure and properties of final material is not well understood. In this presentation, mechanism of silicon-carbon reaction in various systems and the effect of perform microstructure on the mechanical properties of advanced silicon carbide based materials will be discussed. Various examples of applications of reactively processed advanced silicon carbide ceramics and composite materials will be presented.

  7. Lightweight ceramic filter components: Evaluation and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggerstedt, P.M.

    1995-11-01

    Ceramic candle filtration is an attractive technology for particulate removal at high temperatures. The primary objective of this SBIR research program is to increase the performance, durability, and corrosion resistance of lightweight filter candles and filter tubesheet components (Fibrosic{trademark}), fabricated from vacuum formed chopped ceramic fiber (VFCCF), for use in advanced coal utilization applications. Phase 1 results proved that significant gains in material strength and particle retentivity are possible by treatment of VFCCF materials with colloidal ceramic oxides. Phase 2 effort will show how these treated materials tolerate high temperature and vapor-phase alkali species, on a long-term basis. With good durability and corrosion resistance, high temperature capability, and a low installed and replacement cost, these novel materials will help promote commercial acceptance of ceramic candle filter technology, as well as increase the efficiency and reliability of coal utilization processes in general.

  8. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  9. Rheology of stabilized cerium-gadolinium oxide (CGO) colloidal system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marani, Debora; Hjelm, Johan; Wandel, Marie

    Achievement of stable dispersion with high solid loadings and low viscosity is crucial issue in ceramic films processing. In this work, systematic analysis of the rheological properties of CGO colloidal suspension was performed. The study aimed to define methods for evaluating fully stabilized...... conditions and critical parameters. The influences of dispersant and inorganic contents on suspensions properties were investigated. The optimization of dispersant content was achieved by studying flow behaviour of suspensions at different amounts of dispersant. Rotational and oscillatory tests were...

  10. Designing Advanced Ceramic Waste Forms for Electrochemical Processing Salt Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Snyder, C. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frank, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Riley, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the scientific basis underlying the approach being followed to design and develop “advanced” glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form (ACWF) materials that can (1) accommodate higher salt waste loadings than the waste form developed in the 1990s for EBR-II waste salt and (2) provide greater flexibility for immobilizing extreme waste salt compositions. This is accomplished by using a binder glass having a much higher Na2O content than glass compositions used previously to provide enough Na+ to react with all of the Cl– in the waste salt and generate the maximum amount of sodalite. The phase compositions and degradation behaviors of prototype ACWF products that were made using five new binder glass formulations and with 11-14 mass% representative LiCl/KCl-based salt waste were evaluated and compared with results of similar tests run with CWF products made using the original binder glass with 8 mass% of the same salt to demonstrate the approach and select a composition for further studies. About twice the amount of sodalite was generated in all ACWF materials and the microstructures and degradation behaviors confirmed our understanding of the reactions occurring during waste form production and the efficacy of the approach. However, the porosities of the resulting ACWF materials were higher than is desired. These results indicate the capacity of these ACWF waste forms to accommodate LiCl/KCl-based salt wastes becomes limited by porosity due to the low glass-to-sodalite volume ratio. Three of the new binder glass compositions were acceptable and there is no benefit to further increasing the Na content as initially planned. Instead, further studies are needed to develop and evaluate alternative production methods to decrease the porosity, such as by increasing the amount of binder glass in the formulation or by processing waste forms in a hot isostatic press. Increasing the amount of binder glass to eliminate porosity will decrease the waste

  11. Designing Advanced Ceramic Waste Forms for Electrochemical Processing Salt Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Snyder, C. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frank, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Riley, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the scientific basis underlying the approach being followed to design and develop “advanced” glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form (ACWF) materials that can (1) accommodate higher salt waste loadings than the waste form developed in the 1990s for EBR-II waste salt and (2) provide greater flexibility for immobilizing extreme waste salt compositions. This is accomplished by using a binder glass having a much higher Na2O content than glass compositions used previously to provide enough Na+ to react with all of the Cl– in the waste salt and generate the maximum amount of sodalite. The phase compositions and degradation behaviors of prototype ACWF products that were made using five new binder glass formulations and with 11-14 mass% representative LiCl/KCl-based salt waste were evaluated and compared with results of similar tests run with CWF products made using the original binder glass with 8 mass% of the same salt to demonstrate the approach and select a composition for further studies. About twice the amount of sodalite was generated in all ACWF materials and the microstructures and degradation behaviors confirmed our understanding of the reactions occurring during waste form production and the efficacy of the approach. However, the porosities of the resulting ACWF materials were higher than is desired. These results indicate the capacity of these ACWF waste forms to accommodate LiCl/KCl-based salt wastes becomes limited by porosity due to the low glass-to-sodalite volume ratio. Three of the new binder glass compositions were acceptable and there is no benefit to further increasing the Na content as initially planned. Instead, further studies are needed to develop and evaluate alternative production methods to decrease the porosity, such as by increasing the amount of binder glass in the formulation or by processing waste forms in a hot isostatic press. Increasing the amount of binder glass to eliminate porosity will decrease

  12. Pulsed Lasers: Pulsed Lasers Employing Solution-Processed Plasmonic Cu3- x P Colloidal Nanocrystals (Adv. Mater. 18/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeke; Mu, Haoran; Xiao, Si; Wang, Rongbin; Wang, Zhiteng; Wang, Weiwei; Wang, Yongjie; Zhu, Xiangxiang; Lu, Kunyuan; Zhang, Han; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Bao, Qiaoliang; Ma, Wanli

    2016-05-01

    Q. Bao, W. Ma and co-workers demonstrate the usage of plasmonic Cu3-x P colloidal nanocrystals as a new type of tunable saturable absorber for the generation of high-energy pulses in a fiber laser. As described on page 3535, these low-cost, solution-processed, next-generation nonlinear optical materials can be harnessed for applications in signal processing and optical communication. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Colloidal Au-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging: application in a DNA hybridization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manera, M. G.; Spadavecchia, J.; Taurino, A.; Rella, R.

    2010-03-01

    The detection of the DNA hybridization mechanism using monodispersed gold nanoparticles as labels is an interesting alternative to increase the sensitivity of the SPR imaging technique. DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (DNA-Au NPs) containing single-stranded (ss) portions of DNA were prepared by monitoring their monolayer formation by UV-vis spectroscopy. The hybridization process between specific thio-oligonucleotides immobilized on the DNA-Au NPs and the corresponding complementary strands is reported and compared with the traditional hybridization process on properly self-assembled thin gold films deposited on glass substrates. A remarkable signal amplification is observed, following the incorporation of colloidal Au into a SPR biosensing experiment, resulting in an increased SPR response to DNA-DNA interactions. In particular Fusarium thiolated DNA (5'HS poly(T)15ATC CCT CAA AAA CTG CCG CT-3) and trichothecenes complementary DNA (5'-AGC GGC AGT TTT TGA GGG AT-3') sequences have been explored due to their possible application to agro-industry for the control of food quality.

  14. Effect of alkali cations on heterogeneous photo-Fenton process mediated by Prussian blue colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Shouqing, E-mail: shouqing_liu@hotmail.com [Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Suzhou University of Science and Technology, Suzhou 215009 (China); Cheng Shi; Feng Lianrong; Wang Xiaomei; Chen Zhigang [Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Suzhou University of Science and Technology, Suzhou 215009 (China)

    2010-10-15

    This article evaluates Prussian blue (iron hexacyanoferrate) colloids as a heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalyst for the degradation of Rhodamine B. The emphasis is laid on the effects of alkali metal cations on the photo-Fenton process. The facts show that alkali cations strongly affect the degradation rate of organic species. The degradation rates of Rhodamine B, Malachite Green, and Methyl Orange in the presence of KCl, KNO{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, respectively, are faster than their degradation rates in the presence of the corresponding sodium salts. The average degradation rates of Rhodamine B in 0.2 M KCl, NaCl, RbCl, and CsCl solution, decline in sequence, and the rate in KCl solution is greater than that without any salt added deliberately. Thus, potassium ions accelerate the degradation rate, but sodium, rubidium, and cesium ions slow the rate. The order of the rates is R{sub K} > R > R{sub Na} > R{sub Rb} > R{sub Cs}, which is consistent with that of the voltammetric oxidation currents of Prussian blue in the corresponding cation solutions. This phenomenon is attributed to the molecular recognition of the microstructure in Prussian blue nanoparticles to the alkali cations. The reaction mechanism of the photo-Fenton process has also been explored.

  15. Effect of alkali cations on heterogeneous photo-Fenton process mediated by Prussian blue colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shou-Qing; Cheng, Shi; Feng, Lian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Zhi-Gang

    2010-10-15

    This article evaluates Prussian blue (iron hexacyanoferrate) colloids as a heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalyst for the degradation of Rhodamine B. The emphasis is laid on the effects of alkali metal cations on the photo-Fenton process. The facts show that alkali cations strongly affect the degradation rate of organic species. The degradation rates of Rhodamine B, Malachite Green, and Methyl Orange in the presence of KCl, KNO(3), and K(2)SO(4), respectively, are faster than their degradation rates in the presence of the corresponding sodium salts. The average degradation rates of Rhodamine B in 0.2 M KCl, NaCl, RbCl, and CsCl solution, decline in sequence, and the rate in KCl solution is greater than that without any salt added deliberately. Thus, potassium ions accelerate the degradation rate, but sodium, rubidium, and cesium ions slow the rate. The order of the rates is R(K)>R>R(Na)>R(Rb)>R(Cs), which is consistent with that of the voltammetric oxidation currents of Prussian blue in the corresponding cation solutions. This phenomenon is attributed to the molecular recognition of the microstructure in Prussian blue nanoparticles to the alkali cations. The reaction mechanism of the photo-Fenton process has also been explored. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of exopolysaccharides to improve the performance of ceramic bodies in the unidirectional dry pressing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneira, Inês; Machado-Moreira, Bernardino; Dionísio, Amélia; Godinho, Vasco; Neves, Orquídia; Dias, Diamantino; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Miller, Ana Z.

    2015-04-01

    Ceramic industry represents an important sector of economic activity in the European countries and involves complex and numerous manufacturing processes. The unidirectional dry pressing process includes milling and stirring of raw materials (mainly clay and talc minerals) in aqueous suspensions, followed by spray drying to remove excess water obtaining spray-dried powders further subjected to dry pressing process (conformation). However, spray-dried ceramic powders exhibit an important variability in their performance when subjected to the dry pressing process, particularly in the adhesion to the mold and mechanical strength, affecting the quality of the final conformed ceramic products. Therefore, several synthetic additives (deflocculants, antifoams, binders, lubricants and plasticizers) are introduced in the ceramic slips to achieve uniform and homogeneous pastes, conditioning their rheological properties. However, an important variability associated with the performance of the conformed products is still reported. Exopolysaccharides or Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) are polymers excreted by living organisms, such as bacteria, fungi and algae, which may confer unique and potentially interesting properties with potential industrial uses, such as viscosity control, gelation, and flocculation. Polysaccharides, such as pullulan, gellan, carrageenan and xanthan have found a wide range of applications in food, pharmaceutical, petroleum, and in other industries. The aim of this study was the assessment of exopolysaccharides as natural additives to optimize the performance of spray-dried ceramic powders during the unidirectional dry pressing process, replacing the synthetic additives used in the ceramic production process. Six exopolysaccharides, namely pullulan, gellan, xanthan gum, κappa- and iota-carrageenan, and guar gum were tested in steatite-based spray-dried ceramic powders at different concentrations. Subsequently, these ceramic powders were

  17. Advanced Metals and Ceramics for Armor and Anti-Armor Applications. High-Fidelity Design and Processing of Advanced Armor Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    of TiO2 ceramics. ..................48 Figure 22. Effect of thickness of grain boundary on compressive yield stress of TiO2 ceramics...technology enables dense, nanograin-size materials to be fabricated without the difficulty of producing and processing nanoparticle -size powders. 2.5...were 300–500 μm in diameter. Pellets 3.8 cm in diameter and containing 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 volume-percent WC-Co inclusions were pressed. The

  18. Subsurface aeration of anaerobic groundwater : iron colloid formation and the nitrification process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthoorn, A.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Iron, anaerobic groundwater, groundwater purification, heterogeneous oxidation, iron colloid formation, electron microscopy, nitrification In anaerobic groundwater iron and ammonium can be found in relatively high concentrations. These substances need to be removed when groundwater is used

  19. Characterization of natural organic matter treated by iron oxide nanoparticle incorporated ceramic membrane-ozonation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hosik; Kim, Yohan; An, Byungryul; Choi, Heechul

    2012-11-15

    In this study, changes in the physical and structural properties of natural organic matter (NOM) were observed during hybrid ceramic membrane processes that combined ozonation with ultrafiltration ceramic membrane (CM) or with a reactive ceramic membrane (RM), namely, an iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) incorporated-CM. NOM from feed water and NOM from permeate treated with hybrid ceramic membrane processes were analyzed by employing several NOM characterization techniques. Specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and fractionation analyses showed that the hybrid ceramic membrane process effectively removed and transformed relatively high contents of aromatic, high molecular weight and hydrophobic NOM fractions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 3-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that this process caused a significant decrease of the aromaticity of humic-like structures and an increase in electron withdrawing groups. The highest removal efficiency (46%) of hydroxyl radical probe compound (i.e., para-Chlorobenzoic acid (pCBA)) in RM-ozonation process compared with that in CM without ozonation process (8%) revealed the hydroxyl radical formation by the surface-catalyzed reaction between ozone and IONs on the surface of RM. In addition, experimental results on flux decline showed that fouling of RM-ozonation process (15%) was reduced compared with that of CM without ozonation process (30%). These results indicated that the RM-ozonation process enhanced the destruction of NOM and reduced the fouling by generating hydroxyl radicals from the catalytic ozonation in the RM-ozonation process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural and electrical properties of microwave processed Ag modified KNN-LS ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palei, Prakash; Kumar, Pawan; Agrawal, Dinesh K

    2012-01-01

    Microwave processing steps of 0.95[(K0.5Na0.5)0.94Ag0.06NbO3]-0.05[LiSbO3]/(KNAN-LS) lead free ferroelectric ceramics were optimized for better densification and electrical properties. Calcination temperature and time for single perovskite phase formation were optimized and found to be 850 degrees C for 60 min., respectively. Crystal structural study revealed the presence of mixed structure in the microwave processed (MWP) KNAN-LS ceramics. The sintering of the KNAN-LS ceramics was carried out at 1080 degrees C for 10 min, 20 min and 30 min, respectively, and the sample sintered for 20 min exhibited best properties.

  1. Interfacial and volumetric sensitivity of the dry sintering process of polymer colloidal crystals: a thermal transport and photonic bandgap study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutz, Fabian A; Retsch, Markus

    2017-06-21

    We introduce the in situ characterization of the dry sintering process of face-centred cubic colloidal crystals by two complementary techniques: thermal transport and photonic stopband characterization. Therefore, we employed time-dependent, isothermal laser flash analysis and specular reflectivity experiments close to the glass transition temperature of the colloidal crystal. Both methods yield distinctly different time constants of the film formation process. This discrepancy can be attributed to a volume- (photonic stopband) and interface-driven (thermal transport) sensitivity of the respective characterization method. Nevertheless, both methods yield comparable apparent activation energies. Finally, we extended the sintering process characterization to further polymer compositions, with vastly different glass transition temperatures. We could show that the film formation rate is governed by the viscoelastic properties of the polymers at the respective annealing temperature.

  2. Colloidal organization

    CERN Document Server

    Okubo, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal Organization presents a chemical and physical study on colloidal organization phenomena including equilibrium systems such as colloidal crystallization, drying patterns as an example of a dissipative system and similar sized aggregation. This book outlines the fundamental science behind colloid and surface chemistry and the findings from the author's own laboratory. The text goes on to discuss in-depth colloidal crystallization, gel crystallization, drying dissipative structures of solutions, suspensions and gels, and similar-sized aggregates from nanosized particles. Special emphas

  3. Processing and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Mica Glass-Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Khani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to fabrication of transparent glass-ceramics with Li-mica nano crystals, the glasses with chemical composition of 94.9 mass% Li(1+xMg3AlSi3(1+xF2 (x=0.5 with 5.1 mass% MgF2 were crystallized. The glasses were fabricated via the conventional melt-quenching technique. Mica crystals were precipitated in the glass phase by later heat treatment. Glass samples had glass transition temperature (Tg, 557 ?C, softening temperature (Ts, 603 ?C, and crystallization peak temperature (Tp, 655 ?C. The fine mica crystals with size of separation. It’s confirmed that both as-quenched and heat-treated samples are transparent in the visible wave length.

  4. Mixed ionic and electronic conducting ceramic membranes for hydrocarbon processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Calcar, Pamela; Mackay, Richard; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to mixed phase materials for the preparation of catalytic membranes which exhibit ionic and electronic conduction and which exhibit improved mechanical strength compared to single phase ionic and electronic conducting materials. The mixed phase materials are useful for forming gas impermeable membranes either as dense ceramic membranes or as dense thin films coated onto porous substrates. The membranes and materials of this invention are useful in catalytic membrane reactors in a variety of applications including synthesis gas production. One or more crystalline second phases are present in the mixed phase material at a level sufficient to enhance the mechanical strength of the mixture to provide membranes for practical application in CMRs.

  5. Uniaxially aligned ceramic nanofibers obtained by chemical mechanical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tararam, R. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Instituto de Química, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni n° 55, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Foschini, C.R. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Bauru, Dept. de Eng. Mecanica, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo C. Coube 14-01, CEP 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Destro, F.B. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratinguetá, Guaratinguetá 12516-410, SP (Brazil); Simões, A.Z., E-mail: alezipo@yahoo.com [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratinguetá, Guaratinguetá 12516-410, SP (Brazil); Longo, E.; Varela, J.A. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Instituto de Química, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni n° 55, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    For this study, we investigated a simple method to generate well aligned nanofibers over large areas using an organic polymer stretched over the substrate surface With this method, ZnO and CuO 3D parallel nanowire arrays were successfully prepared by calcinations of the polymer fibers. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the copper oxide has a monoclinic structure while the zinc oxide has a hexagonal structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed ceramic nanofibers with an average diameter of 120 nm which were composed of small nanoparticles which are 10 nm in diameter. The ability to obtain uniaxially aligned nanofibers reveals a range of interesting properties with potential applications for sensors, catalysts and energy technologies.

  6. Effect of sodium citrate on preparation of nano-sized cobalt particles by organic colloidal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaping ZHU; Hao LI; Huiyu SONG; Shijun LIAO

    2009-01-01

    Nano-sized cobalt particles with the diameter of 2 nm were prepared via an organic colloidal process with sodium formate, ethylene glycol and sodium citrate as the reducing agent, the solvent and the complexing agent, respectively. The effects of sodium citrate on the yield, crystal structure, particle size and size distribution of the prepared nano-sized cobalt particles were then investigated. The results show that the average particle diameter decreases from 200 nm to 2 nm when the molar ratio of sodium citrate to cobalt chloride changes from 0 to 6. Furthermore, sodium citrate plays a crucial role in the controlling of size distribution of the nano-sized particles. The size distribution of the particle without sodium citrate addition is in range from tens of nanometers to 300 or 400 nm, while that with sodium citrate addition is limited in the range of (2±0.25) nm. Moreover, it is found that the addition of sodium citrate as a complex agent could decrease the yield of the nano-sized cobalt particle.

  7. Process of producing a ceramic matrix composite article and article formed thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Gregory Scot; McGuigan, Henry Charles; Brun, Milivoj Konstantin

    2011-10-25

    A CMC article and process for producing the article to have a layer on its surface that protects a reinforcement material within the article from damage. The method entails providing a body containing a ceramic reinforcement material in a matrix material that contains a precursor of a ceramic matrix material. A fraction of the reinforcement material is present and possibly exposed at a surface of the body. The body surface is then provided with a surface layer formed of a slurry containing a particulate material but lacking the reinforcement material of the body. The body and surface layer are heated to form the article by converting the precursor within the body to form the ceramic matrix material in which the reinforcement material is contained, and by converting the surface layer to form the protective layer that covers any fraction of the reinforcement material exposed at the body surface.

  8. A novel processing route for carbon nanotube reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2015-03-01

    The current study reports the establishment of a novel feasible way for processing glass- and ceramic- matrix composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The technique is based on high shear compaction of glass/ceramic and CNT blends in the presence of polymeric binders for the production of flexible green bodies which are subsequently sintered and densified by spark plasma sintering. The method was successfully applied on a borosilicate glass / multi-wall CNT composite with final density identical to that of the full-dense ceramic. Preliminary non-destructive evaluation of dynamic mechanical properties such as Young's and shear modulus and Poisson's ratio by ultrasonics show that property improvement maximizes up to a certain CNT loading; after this threshold is exceeded, properties degrade with further loading increase.

  9. Fully-Enclosed Ceramic Micro-burners Using Fugitive Phase and Powder-based Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Truong; Shin, Changseop; Kwon, Patrick; Yeom, Junghoon

    2016-08-01

    Ceramic-based microchemical systems (μCSs) are more suitable for operation under harsh environments such as high temperature and corrosive reactants compared to the more conventional μCS materials such as silicon and polymers. With the recent renewed interests in chemical manufacturing and process intensification, simple, inexpensive, and reliable ceramic manufacturing technologies are needed. The main objective of this paper is to introduce a new powder-based fabrication framework, which is a one-pot, cost-effective, and versatile process for ceramic μCS components. The proposed approach employs the compaction of metal-oxide sub-micron powders with a graphite fugitive phase that is burned out to create internal cavities and microchannels before full sintering. Pure alumina powder has been used without any binder phase, enabling more precise dimensional control and less structure shrinkage upon sintering. The key process steps such as powder compaction, graphite burnout during partial sintering, machining in a conventional machine tool, and final densification have been studied to characterize the process. This near-full density ceramic structure with the combustion chamber and various internal channels was fabricated to be used as a micro-burner for gas sensing applications.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Comparative Process Capabilities of Metal and Ceramic Injection Molding for Precision Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Giannekas, Nikolaos; Marhöfer, David Maximilian;

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to make a comparative study on the process capabilities of the two branches of the powder injection molding (PIM) process—metal injection molding (MIM) and ceramic injection molding (CIM), for high-end precision applications. The state-of-the-art literature does not m...

  11. The image simulation arithmetic of the degradating process of porous biologic ceramic in life-form

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zuo-bing; HUANG Jian-zhong; YAN Yu-hua; LI Shi-pu

    2001-01-01

    @@ It is a complex and difficult task to simulate the degradating process of porous biologic ceramic in life-form by computer. Because the evolvement of crystal' s structure deals with not only the mechanism of many factors, such as crystallography tropism, the reciprocity of wafer, interfacial movement, but also topology geometry mechanism of dimensional padding.

  12. Process control & monitoring for laser micromaching of Si3N4 ceramics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser machining which is a non-contact process that offers the advantage of machining advanced ceramics. In laser machining Si3N4, surface temperature is increased and controlled to evaporate the YSiAlON glassy phase of the Si3N4. However...

  13. Structure-property relationship of ceramic coatings on metals produced by laser processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; van den Burg, M.; Mazumder, J; Conde, O; Villar, R; Steen, W

    1996-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the mechanical performance of various ceramic coatings of Cr2O3 on steel (SAF2205), as produced by CO2 laser processing. The thickness of the coating that can be applied by laser coating is limited to about 200 mu m setting a limit to the maximum strain energy release rate

  14. MECHANICAL PERFORMANCE OF METAL-CERAMIC INTERFACES PRODUCED BY LASER PROCESSING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Burg, M.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the mechanical performance of various ceramic coatings of Cr2O3 on Steel (SAF2205), as produced by CO2 laser processing. The thickness of the coating that can be applied by laser coating is limited to about 200 mu m setting a limit to the maximum strain energy release rate

  15. Numerical Modeling of the Flow of a Power Law Ceramic Slurry in the Tape Casting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2012-01-01

    Multilayer ceramics and their application have increased recently. One of the most common ways used to produce these products is tape casting. In this process the wet tape thickness is one of the most determining parameters affecting the final properties of the product and it is therefore of great...

  16. MECHANICAL PERFORMANCE OF METAL-CERAMIC INTERFACES PRODUCED BY LASER PROCESSING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Burg, M.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the mechanical performance of various ceramic coatings of Cr2O3 on Steel (SAF2205), as produced by CO2 laser processing. The thickness of the coating that can be applied by laser coating is limited to about 200 mu m setting a limit to the maximum strain energy release rate

  17. Hertzian indentation of colloidally processed titanium carbide-nickel aluminide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, R. Bradley

    Advanced cermets based on titanium carbide (TiC), with a ductile nickel aluminide (Ni3Al) binder, have shown significant promise for use in a variety of demanding wear environments, due to a combination of high strength and good corrosion behaviour. A unique feature of TiC-Ni3Al cermets is that they show increasing strength from room temperature up to ˜1,000°C, while current materials such as tungsten carbide/cobalt (WC/Co) show significant strength degradation above ˜500°C. In this thesis, aqueous colloidal forming methods have been applied to process TiC preforms. The mechanisms and effectiveness of suspension stabilization were examined using methods such as zeta potential analysis, rheological measurements, and sedimentation trials for two common dispersants; an ammonium salt of polymethacrylate (PMA-NH 4) and two molecular weights (l,800 and 10,000) of polyethylenimine (PEI). TiC preforms were prepared by slip casting suspensions of up to 50 vol. % solids content. After drying, the TiC-based cermets were processed by melt infiltration with the Ni3Al alloy (IC-50) at 1475°C.Ni 3Al content was varied between 20 and 50 vol. % using this approach, resulting in final densities that exceeded 98% of theoretical. These samples were subjected to Hertzian indentation testing with loads ranging from 250 -- 2000 N, using WC-Co spheres with sizes ranging from 1.191 to 2.38 mm. Indentation stress-strain curves were produced from the indentation data and compared to the calculated elastic Hertzian response. The bonded interface method was used to examine the subsurface deformation of the material under load. Significant deformation of the binder and the eventual fracture of the TiC grains were observed. The nature of the quasi-plasticity of TiC-Ni 3Al and the effects of binder content on surface and subsurface deformation is examined.

  18. Three-dimensional ceramic molding process based on microstereolithography for the production of piezoelectric energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Shoji; Sugiyama, Kenji; Daicho, Yuya; Monri, Kensaku

    2014-03-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) molding process using a master polymer mold produced by microstereolithography has been developed for the production of piezoelectric ceramic elements. In this method, ceramic slurry is injected into a 3-D polymer mold via a centrifugal casting process. The polymer master mold is thermally decomposed so that complex 3-D piezoelectric ceramic elements can be produced. As an example of 3-D piezoelectric ceramic elements, we produced a spiral piezoelectric element that can convert multidirectional loads into a voltage. It was confirmed that a prototype of the spiral piezoelectric element could generate a voltage by applying a load in both parallel and lateral directions in relation to the helical axis. The power output of 123 pW was obtained by applying the maximum load of 2.8N at 2 Hz along the helical axis. In addition, to improve the performance of power generation, we utilized a two-step sintering process to obtain dense piezoelectric elements. As a result, we obtained a sintering body with relative density of 92.8%. Piezoelectric constant d31 of the sintered body attained to -40.0 pC/N. Furthermore we analyzed the open-circuit voltage of the spiral piezoelectric element using COMSOL multiphysics. As a result, it was found that use of patterned electrodes according to the surface potential distribution of the spiral piezoelectric element had a potential to provide high output voltage that was 20 times larger than that of uniform electrodes.

  19. Freeze granulation for the processing of silicon nitride ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyckfeldt, O. [Swedish Ceramic Inst., Goeteborg (Sweden); Rundgren, K. [Permascand AB, Ljungaverk (Sweden); Sjoestedt, M. [PowderPro HB, Hisings Backa (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Freeze granulation (LS-2, PowderPro HB, Sweden) has been demonstrated as a favourable alternative to conventional granulation methods (spray drying, sieve granulation etc) in the production of granules for the pressing of high-performance ceramic powders. Freeze granulation/freeze drying prevents the migration of pressing aids or particle fines to the granule surface, as is the case in spray drying. This ensures granule homogeneity and an easy breakdown of granules during pressing. This, in turn, results in defect minimisation and optimal conditions for the sintering and the development of the desired material properties. In this study silicon nitride materials have been produced using freeze granulation, pressing and sintering to validate the performance. Materials with competitive properties were manufactured based on medium-cost, direct-nitrided powders (SicoNide P95, Permascand AB, Sweden), various pressing and sintering aid compositions as well as various pressing and sintering schedules. MgO vs Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as sintering aid, PEG vs PVA as binder and higher pressure at the initial uniaxial pressing were found to promote the sintering performance. (orig.)

  20. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  1. Influence of constant magnetic field on aggregation processes in magnetite colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareev, K. G.; Kononova, I. E.; Levitckii, V. S.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Nalimova, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Colloids of Fe3O4/SiO2 nanoparticles derived by a two-stage technique on the base of tetraetoxisilane soles were studied. Phase composition of the particles was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that phase transition of Fe3O4 into α-Fe2O3 occurs at a laser power exceeding a threshold value. The aggregation of the particles to linear structures in a constant magnetic field was studied by atomic force microscopy. The data on the change in resistance of Fe3O4/SiO2 colloids under an applied magnetic field were obtained.

  2. Detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chang-Zhong; Tang, Yuanyuan; Lee, Po-Heng; Liu, Chengshuai; Shih, Kaimin; Li, Fangbai

    2017-01-05

    A promising strategy for the detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix is reported in this study. In the search for a more chemically durable matrix for COPR, the most critical crystalline phase for Cr immobilization was found to be a spinel solid solution with a chemical composition of MgCr1.32Fe0.19Al0.49O4. Using Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, we identified this final product is with the phases of spinel (3.5wt.%), diopside (5.2wt.%), and some amorphous contents (91.2wt.%). The partitioning ratio of Cr reveals that about 77% of the Cr was incorporated into the more chemically durable spinel phase. The results of Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy show that no Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic, which indicates successful detoxification of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic. The leaching performances of Cr2O3 and COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic were compared with a prolonged acid-leaching test, and the results demonstrate the superiority of the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic matrix in the immobilization of Cr. The overall results suggest that the use of affordable additives has potential in more reliably immobilizing COPR with a spinel-based glass-ceramic for safer disposal of this hazardous waste.

  3. Effects of Processing Technology on Property and Microstructure of Rare Earth Containing Ceramic Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chonghai

    2004-01-01

    Effects of processing technology on the properties such as relative density, flexural strength, fracture toughness, hardness, etc. and the microstructure of rare earth yttrium containing Al2O3/(W, Ti)C ceramic composite were experimentally investigated. It suggests that different processing parameters can undoubtedly result in different microstructures and different mechanical properties of the material. Under the experimental conditions, the suitable hot pressing temperature is 1720 ~ 1780 ℃, the time duration is 10 ~ 30 min and the hot pressing pressure is 30 ~ 35 MPa. The corresponding relative density can even be higher than 98 %. With SEM and TEM observation, each phases in the ceramic material is found to be in fine grains and distribute homogeneously. Typical fracture feature of the material is the mixture of both intergranular and introgranular fracture. Additionally, the existence of rare earth yttrium containing nanometer or sub-micron meter sized ceramic grains, dislocations and spontaneous microcracks can also contribute to the further improvement of the mechanical properties of the ceramic composite.

  4. Process Optimization for Suppressing Cracks in Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Al2O3 Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, F. Y.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, S.; Ma, G. Y.; Zhang, B.

    2017-03-01

    Direct additive manufacturing of ceramics (DAMC) without binders is a promising technique for rapidly fabricating high-purity components with good performance. Nevertheless, cracks are easily generated during fabrication as a result of the high intrinsic brittleness of ceramics and the great temperature gradients. Therefore, optimizing the DAMC process is a challenge. In this study, direct fabrication of Al2O3 single-bead wall structures are conducted with a laser engineered net shaping (LENS) system. A new process optimization method for suppressing cracks is proposed based on analytical models, and then the influence of process parameters on crack number is discussed experimentally. The results indicate that the crack number decreases obviously with the increase of scanning speed. Single-bead wall specimens without cracks are successfully fabricated by the optimized process.

  5. Electrolytic process to produce sodium hypochlorite using sodium ion conductive ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balagopal, Shekar; Malhotra, Vinod; Pendleton, Justin; Reid, Kathy Jo

    2012-09-18

    An electrochemical process for the production of sodium hypochlorite is disclosed. The process may potentially be used to produce sodium hypochlorite from seawater or low purity un-softened or NaCl-based salt solutions. The process utilizes a sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane, such as membranes based on NASICON-type materials, in an electrolytic cell. In the process, water is reduced at a cathode to form hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. Chloride ions from a sodium chloride solution are oxidized in the anolyte compartment to produce chlorine gas which reacts with water to produce hypochlorous and hydrochloric acid. Sodium ions are transported from the anolyte compartment to the catholyte compartment across the sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane. Sodium hydroxide is transported from the catholyte compartment to the anolyte compartment to produce sodium hypochlorite within the anolyte compartment.

  6. How To Functionalize Ceramics by Perfluoroalkylsilanes for Membrane Separation Process? Properties and Application of Hydrophobized Ceramic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawa, Joanna; Cerneaux, Sophie; Kujawski, Wojciech; Bryjak, Marek; Kujawski, Jan

    2016-03-23

    The combination of microscopic (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) and goniometric (static and dynamic measurements) techniques, and surface characterization (surface free energy determination, critical surface tension, liquid entry pressure, hydraulic permeability) was implemented to discuss the influence of perfluoroalkylsilanes structure and grafting time on the physicochemistry of the created hydrophobic surfaces on the titania ceramic membranes of 5 kD and 300 kD. The impact of molecular structure of perfluoroalkylsilanes modifiers (possessing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms in the fluorinated part of the alkyl chain) and the time of the functionalization process in the range of 5 to 35 h was studied. Based on the scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, it was found that the localization of grafting molecules depends on the membrane pore size (5 kD or 300 kD). In the case of 5 kD titania membranes, modifiers are attached mainly on the surface and only partially inside the membrane pores, whereas, for 300 kD membranes, the perfluoroalkylsilanes molecules are present within the whole porous structure of the membranes. The application of 4 various types of PFAS molecules enabled for interesting observations and remarks. It was explained how to obtain ceramic membrane surfaces with controlled material (contact angle, roughness, contact angle hysteresis) and separation properties. Highly hydrophobic surfaces with low values of contact angle hysteresis and low roughness were obtained. These surfaces possessed also low values of critical surface tension, which means that surfaces are highly resistant to wetting. This finding is crucial in membrane applicability in separation processes. The obtained and characterized hydrophobic membranes were subsequently applied in air-gap membrane distillation processes. All membranes were very efficient in MD processes, showing good transport and selective properties (∼99% of Na

  7. Effect of synthetic iron colloids on the microbiological NH4+ removal process during groundwater purification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthoorn, A.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2004-01-01

    Subsurface aeration is used to oxidise Fe in situ in groundwater that is used to make drinking water potable. In a groundwater system with pH>7 subsurface aeration results in non-mobile Fe precipitate and mobile Fe colloids. Since originally the goal of subsurface aeration is to remove iron in si

  8. Effects of rare earth addition on sintering process and dielectric property of cordierite based glass-ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国华; 刘心宇

    2004-01-01

    The effects of rare earth oxide on the sintering and dielectric property of cordierite-based glass-ceramics with non-stoichiometric composition prepared by quenching of molten droplets were investigated. The results show that the addition of rare earth oxide can lower the sintering temperature of cordierite glass-ceramics, improve the densification process and obviously reduce sintering activation energy. It is found that the densification of cordieritebased glass-ceramics is a liquid phase sintering process. The dielectric constant of the sintered compacts enhances with the increase of the density. When the sintering temperature is identical, the rare earth addition is found to have a noticeable effect on the dielectric loss of glass-ceramics. The properties of the glass-ceramics containing rare earth oxide appear to be correct for low firing temperature substrates.

  9. Nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings deposited by the liquid precursor plasma spraying process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanfeng; Song, Lei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Yi; Huang, Tao; Wu, Yao; Chen, Jiyong; Wu, Fang

    2011-01-01

    Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings have great potential in dental and orthopedic medical implant applications, due to its excellent bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoinductivity. However, most of the coating preparation techniques either produce only thin thickness coatings or require tedious preparation steps. In this study, a new attempt was made to deposit bioactive glass-ceramic coatings on titanium substrates by the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, triethyl phosphate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate solutions were mixed together to form a suspension after hydrolysis, and the liquid suspension was used as the feedstock for plasma spraying of P 2O 5-Na 2O-CaO-SiO 2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings. The in vitro bioactivities of the as-deposited coatings were evaluated by soaking the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 4 h, 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. The as-deposited coating and its microstructure evolution behavior under SBF soaking were systematically analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results showed that P 2O 5-Na 2O-CaO-SiO 2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with nanostructure had been successfully synthesized by the LPPS technique and the synthesized coatings showed quick formation of a nanostructured HCA layer after being soaked in SBF. Overall, our results indicate that the LPPS process is an effective and simple method to synthesize nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with good in vitro bioactivity.

  10. Layered Yb:YAG ceramics produced by two different methods: processing, characterization, and comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostaša, Jan; Biasini, Valentina; Piancastelli, Andreana; Vannini, Matteo; Toci, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Yb:YAG ceramic solid-state laser gain media have been of growing interest for high-repetition rate and high-power lasers during the last few years. A great advantage of ceramic technology compared with that of single crystals is the flexibility of shaping methods allowing the production of near-net-shape components with a well-defined internal structure. A favorable dopant distribution can enhance laser efficiency by mitigating thermal effects. The presented work reports on Yb:YAG transparent ceramics composed of layers with different Yb doping produced by two different shaping methods: dry pressing of spray-dried powders and tape casting, all sintered under high vacuum. The selected geometry of materials was based on numerical simulations. Optical quality of produced ceramics was characterized and discussed in connection with the microstructure and laser emission results. Output power of nearly 7 W and slope efficiency of 58.1% were obtained in quasi-continuous wave regime from bilayered 0% to 10% Yb:YAG. In the case of multilayered materials, higher scattering losses were observed. The comparison of the two processing methods highlighted that the tape-cast materials provided higher optical uniformity and the diffusion zone between the single layers with different dopant content was about 150 μm compared to about 250 μm in samples produced by pressing of powders.

  11. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunkel, Nathalie, E-mail: nathalie.kunkel@chimie-paristech.fr; Goldner, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.goldner@chimie-paristech.fr [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech–CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Ferrier, Alban [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech–CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Sorbonnes Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, 75005 Paris (France); Thiel, Charles W.; Cone, Rufus L. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States); Ramírez, Mariola O.; Bausá, Luisa E. [Departamento Física de Materiales and Instituto Nicolás Cabrera, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ikesue, Akio [World Laboratory, Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-0023 (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the {sup 7}F{sub 0}→{sup 5}D{sub 0} transition in Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ∼15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfine levels. Additionally, different Eu{sup 3+} concentrations (up to 1.0%) were studied, resulting in an increase of up to a factor of three in the peak absorption coefficient. These results suggest that transparent ceramics can be useful in applications where narrow and deep spectral holes can be burned into highly absorbing lines, such as quantum information processing and spectral filtering.

  12. SCALE UP OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR THE EBR-II SPENT FUEL TREATMENT PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew C. Morrison; Kenneth J. Bateman; Michael F. Simpson

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT SCALE UP OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR THE EBR-II SPENT FUEL TREATMENT PROCESS Matthew C. Morrison, Kenneth J. Bateman, Michael F. Simpson Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 The ceramic waste process is the intended method for disposing of waste salt electrolyte, which contains fission products from the fuel-processing electrorefiners (ER) at the INL. When mixed and processed with other materials, the waste salt can be stored in a durable ceramic waste form (CWF). The development of the CWF has recently progressed from small-scale testing and characterization to full-scale implementation and experimentation using surrogate materials in lieu of the ER electrolyte. Two full-scale (378 kg and 383 kg) CWF test runs have been successfully completed with final densities of 2.2 g/cm3 and 2.1 g/cm3, respectively. The purpose of the first CWF was to establish material preparation parameters. The emphasis of the second pre-qualification test run was to evaluate a preliminary multi-section CWF container design. Other considerations were to finalize material preparation parameters, measure the material height as it consolidates in the furnace, and identify when cracking occurs during the CWF cooldown process.

  13. Process-Dependent Properties in Colloidally Synthesized “Giant” Core/Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ghosh, Yagnaseni [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dennis, Allison M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mangum, Benjamin D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Young-Shin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kundu, Janardan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07

    Due to their characteristic bright and stable photoluminescence, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) have attracted much interest as efficient light emitters for applications from single-particle tracking to solid-state lighting. Despite their numerous enabling traits, however, NQD optical properties are frustratingly sensitive to their chemical environment, exhibit fluorescence intermittency ('blinking'), and are susceptible to Auger recombination, an efficient nonradiative decay process. Previously, we showed for the first time that colloidal CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) comprising ultrathick shells (number of shell monolayers, n, > 10) grown by protracted successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) leads to remarkable photostability and significantly suppressed blinking behavior as a function of increasing shell thickness. We have also shown that these so-called 'giant' NQDs (g-NQDs) afford nearly complete suppression of non-radiative Auger recombination, revealed in our studies as long biexciton lifetimes and efficient multiexciton emission. The unique behavior of this core/shell system prompted us to assess correlations between specific physicochemical properties - beyond shell thickness - and functionality. Here, we demonstrate the ability of particle shape/faceting, crystalline phase, and core size to determine ensemble and single-particle optical properties (quantum yield/brightness, blinking, radiative lifetimes). Significantly, we show how reaction process parameters (surface-stabilizing ligands, ligand:NQD ratio, choice of 'inert' solvent, and modifications to the SILAR method itself) can be tuned to modify these function-dictating NQD physical properties, ultimately leading to an optimized synthetic approach that results in the complete suppression of blinking. We find that the resulting 'guiding principles' can be applied to other NQD compositions, allowing us to

  14. Nano-colloidal functionalization of textiles based on polysiloxane as a novel photo-catalyst assistant: processing design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastjerdi, Roya; Montazer, Majid

    2011-11-01

    Due to the opposite surface charge of TiO(2) and silver nano-particles, at around neutral pH, it is expected that the interaction between these particles and cross-linkable polysiloxane (XPs) resin and thus their final properties would be affected by their processing technique. This paper has focused on the effect of processing design on the interaction, surface orientation and final properties of surface nano-colloidal functionalization. The results disclosed the key role of the applied process on the properties of the treated fabrics which have been well discussed through the modeling of this effect on orientations of nanoparticles on the surface. The developed models are interestingly verified by various characterizations. Applying a premixed TiO(2)/XPs colloid as an after treatment on Ag treated samples caused more enhanced stain photo-degradability and UV protection properties, while the reduction of enhanced hydrophobicity, washing durability, and stain-repellency were observed as compared to applying Ag/XPs premixed colloid on TiO(2). The role of processing on XPs stabilizing efficiency and its co-photo-catalytic function on TiO(2) nanoparticles has been concluded and deeply discussed. The appropriate processing design can be tailored in order to accomplish desirable hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity with a granted bioactivity. The results reveal that ideal bioactivity, stain photo-degradability, self-cleaning, UV protection, anti-staining properties, and washing durability can be achieved by applying a mixture of silver and XPs as an after-treatment on TiO(2) treated fabrics.

  15. Issues in nanocomposite ceramic engineering: focus on processing and properties of alumina-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Paola; Kern, Frank; Sommer, Frank; Lombardi, Mariangela; Gadow, Rainer; Montanaro, Laura

    2014-12-30

    Ceramic nanocomposites, containing at least one phase in the nanometric dimension, have received special interest in recent years. They have, in fact, demonstrated increased performance, reliability and lifetime with respect to monolithic ceramics. However, a successful approach to the production of tailored composite nanostructures requires the development of innovative concepts at each step of manufacturing, from the synthesis of composite nanopowders, to their processing and sintering.This review aims to deepen understanding of some of the critical issues associated with the manufacturing of nanocomposite ceramics, focusing on alumina-based composite systems. Two case studies are presented and briefly discussed. The former illustrates the benefits, in terms of sintered microstructure and related mechanical properties, resulting from the application of an engineering approach to a laboratory-scale protocol for the elaboration of nanocomposites in the system alumina-ZrO2-YAG (yttrium aluminium garnet). The latter illustrates the manufacturing of alumina-based composites for large-scale applications such as cutting tools, carried out by an injection molding process. The need for an engineering approach to be applied in all processing steps is demonstrated also in this second case study, where a tailored manufacturing process is required to obtain the desired results.

  16. Process for fabrication of large titanium diboride ceramic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Bomar, E. S.; Becher, Paul F.

    1989-01-01

    A process for manufacturing large, fully dense, high purity TiB.sub.2 articles by pressing powders with a sintering aid at relatively low temperatures to reduce grain growth. The process requires stringent temperature and pressure applications in the hot-pressing step to ensure maximum removal of sintering aid and to avoid damage to the fabricated article or the die.

  17. Machinability of lithium disilicate glass ceramic in in vitro dental diamond bur adjusting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Fei; Ren, Hai-Tao; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Esthetic high-strength lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDGC) are used for monolithic crowns and bridges produced in dental CAD/CAM and oral adjusting processes, which machinability affects the restorative quality. A machinability study has been made in the simulated oral clinical machining of LDGC with a dental handpiece and diamond burs, regarding the diamond tool wear and chip control, machining forces and energy, surface finish and integrity. Machining forces, speeds and energy in in vitro dental adjusting of LDGC were measured by a high-speed data acquisition and force sensor system. Machined LDGC surfaces were assessed using three-dimensional non-contact chromatic confocal optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Diamond bur morphology and LDGC chip shapes were also examined using SEM. Minimum tool wear but significant LDGC chip accumulations were found. Machining forces and energy significantly depended on machining conditions (pMachining speeds dropped more rapidly with increased removal rates than other glass ceramics (pmachinability indices associated with the hardness, Young's modulus and fracture toughness were derived based on the normal force-removal rate relations, which ranked LDGC the most difficult to machine among glass ceramics. Surface roughness for machined LDGC was comparable for other glass ceramics. The removal mechanisms of LDGC were dominated by penetration-induced brittle fracture and shear-induced plastic deformation. Unlike most other glass ceramics, distinct intergranular and transgranular fractures of lithium disilicate crystals were found in LDGC. This research provides the fundamental data for dental clinicians on the machinability of LDGC in intraoral adjustments.

  18. Encapsulation of biomaterials in porous glass-like matrices prepared via an aqueous colloidal sol-gel process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dean-Mo; Chen, I-Wei

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for the encapsulation of biologically important proteins into transparent, porous silica matrices by an alcohol-free, aqueous, colloidal sol-gel process, and to the biological materials encapsulated thereby. The process is exemplified by studies involving encapsulated cytochrome c, catalase, myoglobin, and hemoglobin, although non-proteinaceous biomaterials, such as active DNA or RNA fragments, cells or even tissues, may also be encapsulated in accordance with the present methods. Conformation, and hence activity of the biomaterial, is successfully retained after encapsulation as demonstrated by optical characterization of the molecules, even after long-term storage. The retained conformation of the biomaterial is strongly correlated to both the rate of gelation and the subsequent drying speed of the encapsulatng matrix. Moreover, in accordance with this process, gelation is accelerated by the use of a higher colloidal solid concentration and a lower synthesis pH than conventional methods, thereby enhancing structural stability and retained conformation of the biomaterials. Thus, the invention also provides a remarkable improvement in retaining the biological activity of the encapsulated biomaterial, as compared with those involved in conventional alkoxide-based processes. It further provides new methods for the quantitative and qualitative detection of test substances that are reactive to, or catalyzed by, the active, encapsulated biological materials.

  19. Experimental investigation of laser surface processing of flexure silicon nitride ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li; A. P. MALSHE; JIANG Wen-ping; P. H. MCCLUSKEY

    2006-01-01

    A continuous wave carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (λ=10.6μm) was employed to treat the surface of Si3N4 MOR (modulus of rupture) bars. The effects of the CO2 laser process on physical and mechanical properties of ground Si3N4 samples were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis shows that the area occupied by cavities and fracture is decreased by about 49.4% after laser treatments. Cross-sectional metallography results indicate that the secondary YSiAlON phase in the Si3N4 ceramic is softened/melted and flowed into the defects. Four-point bending tests show that the flexural strength of the treated samples is improved to 10.9%. Fractographic analysis show that the fracture origins move from the surface to subsurface. It is concluded that laser surface processing have significant effects on fracture behavior of flexure Si3N4 ceramic.

  20. In-situ real time monitoring of the polymerization in gel-cast ceramic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, S.; Dieckman, S.L.; Bostrom, G.A.; Waterfield, L.G.; Raptis, A.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Omatete, O.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Gelcasting requires making a mixture of a slurry of ceramic powder in a solution of organic monomers and casting it in a mold. Gelcasting is different from injection molding in that it separates mold filling from setting during conversion of the ceramic slurry to a formed green part. In this work, NMR spectroscopy and imaging were used for in-situ monitoring of the gelation process and gelcasting of alumina. {sup 1}H NMR spectra and images are obtained during polymerization of a mixture of soluble reactive acrylamide monomers. Polymerization was initiated by adding an initiator and an accelerator to form long- chain, crosslinked polymers. Multidimensional NMR imaging was used for in-situ monitoring of the process and for verification of homogeneous polymerization. Comparison of the modeled intensities with acquired images shows a direction extraction of T{sub 1} data from the images.

  1. Utilization of sludge waste from natural rubber manufacturing process as a raw material for clay-ceramic production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichaphund, S; Intiya, W; Kongkaew, A; Loykulnant, S; Thavorniti, P

    2012-12-01

    The possibility of utilization of the sludge waste obtained from the natural rubber manufacturing process as a raw material for producing clay ceramics was investigated. To prepared clay-based ceramic, the mixtures of traditional clay and sludge waste (10-30 wt%) were milled, uniaxilly pressed and sintered at a temperature between 1000 and 1200 degrees C. The effect of sludge waste on the properties of clay-based ceramic products was examined. The results showed that the amount of sludge waste addition had an effect on both sinterability and properties of the clay ceramics. Up to 30 wt% of sludge waste can be added into the clay ceramics, and the sintered samples showed good properties.

  2. Green and scalable production of colloidal perovskite nanocrystals and transparent sols by a controlled self-collection process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuangyi; Huang, Limin; Li, Wanlu; Liu, Xiaohua; Jing, Shui; Li, Jackie; O'Brien, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Colloidal perovskite oxide nanocrystals have attracted a great deal of interest owing to the ability to tune physical properties by virtue of the nanoscale, and generate thin film structures under mild chemical conditions, relying on self-assembly or heterogeneous mixing. This is particularly true for ferroelectric/dielectric perovskite oxide materials, for which device applications cover piezoelectrics, MEMs, memory, gate dielectrics and energy storage. The synthesis of complex oxide nanocrystals, however, continues to present issues pertaining to quality, yield, % crystallinity, purity and may also suffer from tedious separation and purification processes, which are disadvantageous to scaling production. We report a simple, green and scalable ``self-collection'' growth method that produces uniform and aggregate-free colloidal perovskite oxide nanocrystals including BaTiO3 (BT), BaxSr1-xTiO3 (BST) and quaternary oxide BaSrTiHfO3 (BSTH) in high crystallinity and high purity. The synthesis approach is solution processed, based on the sol-gel transformation of metal alkoxides in alcohol solvents with controlled or stoichiometric amounts of water and in the stark absence of surfactants and stabilizers, providing pure colloidal nanocrystals in a remarkably low temperature range (15 °C-55 °C). Under a static condition, the nanoscale hydrolysis of the metal alkoxides accomplishes a complete transformation to fully crystallized single domain perovskite nanocrystals with a passivated surface layer of hydroxyl/alkyl groups, such that the as-synthesized nanocrystals can exist in the form of super-stable and transparent sol, or self-accumulate to form a highly crystalline solid gel monolith of nearly 100% yield for easy separation/purification. The process produces high purity ligand-free nanocrystals excellent dispersibility in polar solvents, with no impurity remaining in the mother solution other than trace alcohol byproducts (such as isopropanol). The afforded stable

  3. Piezoelectric ultrafine polymer and ceramic fibers by electrospinning: process development and characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Yördem, Sinan Onur; Yordem, Sinan Onur

    2006-01-01

    Piezoelectric polymer and ceramic films and fiber mats that may be considered for actuator and sensor needs were fabricated. Solution casting and electrospinning were utilized for Poly(vinyldene fluoride) (PVDF) films and fiber mats, respectively, while zinc oxide (ZnO) fiber mats were fabricated by electrospinning process followed by calcination. Morphology, crystalline structure and mechanical properties of the piezoelectric films and fiber mats were examined and characterized for experimen...

  4. Design, Synthesis, and Chemical Processing of Hierarchical Ceramic Structures for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-30

    Figure 2. The alkoxides rapidly hydrolyze in moist air or of zirconium hydrous oxides , as shown in Figure 4. The water giving a series of condensed...utanoxanes, but quan- zirconium hydrous- oxide precipitate is converted to ZrO2 titative cleavage of all the alkoxy groups is difficult to thermally and...demonstrated that nanosized powders can be processed to obtain ceramic composites with ultrafine microstructures and high densities. Nanosized powders of

  5. Ceramics Vitreous China Produced by Utilizing Sediment Soil from Water Supply Treatment Process

    OpenAIRE

    Wangrakdiskul Ubolrat; Wanasbodee Jindakarn; Sansroi Pornnapa

    2017-01-01

    Due to generating the abundant of sediment soil, it makes the high burden of disposal cost to the metropolitan waterworks authority. Enhancing the value of sediment soil has been explored. This research aims to utilize the sediment soil, wastes of water supply treatment process for producing ceramics vitreous china. In this experiment, five types of raw materials are exploited, namely, sediment soil, ball clay, kaolin, feldspar and silica sand. The formulas have been divided into two groups. ...

  6. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  7. Toward understanding dynamic annealing processes in irradiated ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Michael Thomas [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2013-05-01

    High energy particle irradiation inevitably generates defects in solids. The ballistic formation and thermalization of the defect creation process occur rapidly, and are believed to be reasonably well understood. However, knowledge of the evolution of defects after damage cascade thermalization, referred to as dynamic annealing, is quite limited. Unraveling the mechanisms associated with dynamic annealing is crucial since such processes play an important role in the formation of stable postirradiation disorder in ion-beam-processing of semiconductors, and determines the “radiation tolerance” of many nuclear materials. The purpose of this dissertation is to further our understanding of the processes involved in dynamic annealing. In order to achieve this, two main tasks are undertaken.

  8. Ceramic Heat Exchangers and Chemical Reactors with Micro-Scale Features for In-Situ Resource Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It is proposed to develop compact and lightweight ceramic heat exchangers and chemical reactors suitable for high temperature processes. These devices will have...

  9. Final Air Toxics Standards for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing, Glass Manufacturing, and Secondary Nonferrous Metals Processing Area Sources Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains a December 2007 fact sheet with information regarding the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing, Glass Manufacturing, and Secondary Nonferrous Metals Processing Area Sources

  10. Kaolin processing waste applied in the manufacturing of ceramic tiles and mullite bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Romualdo R; Farias, Felipe F; Oliveira, Maurício F; Santana, Lisiane N L; Neves, Gelmires A; Lira, Helio L; Ferreira, Heber C

    2009-02-01

    In the last few years, mineral extraction and processing industries have been identified as sources of environmental contamination and pollution. The kaolin processing industry around the world generates large amounts of waste materials. The present study evaluated the suitability of kaolin processing waste as an alternative source of ceramic raw material for the production of ceramic tiles and dense mullite bodies. Several formulations were prepared and sintered at different temperatures. The sintered samples were characterized to determine their porosity, water absorption, firing shrinkage and mechanical strength. The fired samples were microstructurally analysed by X-ray diffraction. The results indicated that ceramic tile formulations containing up to 60% of waste could be used for the production of tiles with low water absorption (approximately 0.5%) and low sintering temperature (1150 degrees C). Mullite formulations with more than 40% of kaolin waste could be used in the production of bodies with high strength, of about 75 MPa, which can be used as refractory materials.

  11. The reliability of thermocouples in microwave ceramics processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Juan; Valdez, Zarel; Ortiz, Ubaldo

    2004-01-01

    It is not rare to hear arguments against the use of thermocouples for taking temperatures in processes that are taking place under microwave fields. However, the simplicity of this device makes it attractive to consider its use. One question that arises when thermocouples are employed is whether the electric field perturbs the measurement, and if the thermocouple affects the processing. The process that was chosen for conducting this test was the synthesis of spinel (MgAl2O4) using microwaves as a power supply and hematite (Fe2O3) as an additive for both spinel formation promotion and susceptor. The alumina-based systems are very important to study because this is one of the most common ingredients in refractory materials. There are many discussions about the improvement of the process when microwaves are used, but a kinetic comparison cannot be performed if the temperature is unknown, and that is the reason for emphasizing the measurement techniques. The analysis of the obtained samples was carried out by X-ray diffraction of powders. The results of this work show that there is no difference between the products obtained when the thermocouple was inserted in the system, compared to processing without it; hence the thermocouple is appropriate for this application.

  12. Research results on productivity stabilization by ultrasonic camera (plant with membrane ceramic elements during vine processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Antufyev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes solutions to the problems of declining productivity of ceramic membrane elements for wine processing on the final manufacturing phase. A relative stabilization of filtration velocity, venting efficiency and wine lightening were experimentally confirmed during contacts with oscillation waves of ultrasonic transmitter on the ceramic filter. Which significantly reduced the cost of various preservatives to increase periods storage. To study the processes of wine processing by the proposed method it was made an experimental installation on the basis of pilot machine MRp-1/2 for bottling of quiet liquids and an ultrasonic device "Volna– M" UZTA-1/22-OM with a firmly, waveguide which transmits sound, fixed filter frame on the ultrasound emitter. To stabilize the performance of ultrasonic units with ceramic membrane elements without quality deterioration of wines it was empirically determined rational parameters of power of ultrasound input and pressure in the system. The given derived dependencies and graphs allow to define the time of relatively stable operating filter regime. It was revealed a significant cost reduction on filtration, as it allows escape from the contamination of the product by various preservatives, and increasing of storage duration in a sealed container during aseptic filling without a thermal sterilization. Ultrasonic emitter contact by superposition wave vibrations on the ceramic filter increases not only the efficiency of gas removal, but also improves the organoleptic characteristics, stabilizes the filters, improves their productivity. Gas removal creates unfavorable conditions for development of the yeast, which in turn increases the shelf life of semisweet wine.

  13. Processing and Properties of High Performance Lead Free Electro-Optic Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Alexander Davis

    Electro-optic (EO) materials allow for the precise control of light using electrical signals, which has allowed for the advancement of an incredible array of photonic technologies such as laser systems and optical telecommunications. Most EO devices currently utilize single crystals, but high performance EO single crystals often have composition limitations since dopants can segregate and not all compositions can be grown using equilibrium restricted techniques. Bulk polycrystalline ceramic materials can potentially overcome such limitations and allow for the exploration of new EO systems. Due to the specific microstructures required for transparency, conventional processing techniques have difficulty in producing bulk polycrystalline EO ceramics. Reported here for the first time are the optical and EO properties of a new class of transparent lead free ceramic that outperforms EO materials in use today. This material is a barium titanate (BaTiO3) based solid solution, (1-x)Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O 3-x(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 referred to here as BXT. The EO material was successfully processed using the Current Activated Pressure Assisted Densification (CAPAD) technique, commonly called Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS), which has been shown to be effective at consolidating optical materials. Using this technique along with a new powder synthesis method, it was possible to produce a transparent EO BXT ceramic with a highly dense and homogeneously reacted microstructure. Densified BXT shows a remarkable EO coefficient of 530 pm/V, which is superior not only to state of the art LiNbO3 crystals but also top-quality lead containing ferroelectric ceramics such as PLZT. This exceptional coefficient will allow for miniaturized EO systems with reduced operating voltages. The mechanisms behind the high EO performance in BXT were determined using additional EO and ferroelectric measurements. These measurements indicate that BXT undergoes a field induced structural evolution which heavily

  14. Prediction of Dissociation Process of Ceramic Powder Materials under Plasma Heating Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangBoyi; TianWendong

    1993-01-01

    A model of the thermal dissocition process has been developed for the numerical simulation of ceramic powder processing in a d.c. plasma reactor.The temperature histories of zircon grains were calculated based on this model.Comparisons were carried out to determine the effects of plasma gas (N2 and Ar),free stream temperature (6000-15000)K and Reynolds number (0.0-1.0) as well as particle diameter(20-200μm)on the zircon dissociation process.The influences of proper Nusselt numer correlation and variable transport properties were discussed in detail.

  15. Process engineering of ceramic composite coatings for fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G.; Kim, H.; Chen, M.; Yang, Q.; Troczynski, T. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Researchers at UBCeram at the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering at the University of British Columbia have developed a technology to chemically bond composite sol-gel (CB-CSG) coating onto metallic surfaces of complex or concave shapes. The process has been optimized for electrically resistive coatings and corrosion-resistant coatings. The CSG is sprayed onto metallic surfaces and is heat-treated at 300 degrees C to partially dehydrate the hydroxides. The CSG film is then chemically bonded through reaction of active alumina with metal phosphates, such as aluminium phosphate. A new chromate-free process is being developed to address the issue of coatings porosity. The electrodeposition technique involves polymer particles mixed with suspended fine alumina particles which are co-deposited by electrophoretic means or by electrocoagulation. The composite e-coatings have excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as a protective coating for various components of fuel cell systems. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Creating Sub-50 Nm Nanofluidic Junctions in PDMS Microfluidic Chip via Self-Assembly Process of Colloidal Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xi; Syed, Abeer; Mao, Pan; Han, Jongyoon; Song, Yong-Ak

    2016-03-13

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the prevailing building material to make microfluidic devices due to its ease of molding and bonding as well as its transparency. Due to the softness of the PDMS material, however, it is challenging to use PDMS for building nanochannels. The channels tend to collapse easily during plasma bonding. In this paper, we present an evaporation-driven self-assembly method of silica colloidal nanoparticles to create nanofluidic junctions with sub-50 nm pores between two microchannels. The pore size as well as the surface charge of the nanofluidic junction is tunable simply by changing the colloidal silica bead size and surface functionalization outside of the assembled microfluidic device in a vial before the self-assembly process. Using the self-assembly of nanoparticles with a bead size of 300 nm, 500 nm, and 900 nm, it was possible to fabricate a porous membrane with a pore size of ~45 nm, ~75 nm and ~135 nm, respectively. Under electrical potential, this nanoporous membrane initiated ion concentration polarization (ICP) acting as a cation-selective membrane to concentrate DNA by ~1,700 times within 15 min. This non-lithographic nanofabrication process opens up a new opportunity to build a tunable nanofluidic junction for the study of nanoscale transport processes of ions and molecules inside a PDMS microfluidic chip.

  17. Finite element simulation of a ceramic drying process considering pore shape and porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Y. T.; Oh, J. W.

    2005-03-01

    When a green ceramic is dried, the particles flocculate into a fishnet structure in the gel phase. The range of pore size is between the micro-scale and the nano-scale. In general, the elastic properties of porous materials are affected by both pore shape and porosity. Using the homogenization method, the elastic tensor of nanoscopic gel unit cell, varying with the porosity, is first computed. Using the finite element method, the drying process of a green ceramic insulator is simulated, based on the elastic properties of a microscopic particle aggregate unit cell with circular and cross pores, found from the nanoscopic elastic tensor using the homogenization method. Consideration of the pore shape and porosities in a simulation can provide a more accurate residual stress distribution.

  18. Concept and construction process of the ceramic curtain of Vila-real Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Peñín Llobell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of the Library of Vila-real, selected in 2012 in the VIII Latin American Biennial of Architecture and Urbanism, highlights the importance of collaboration with industry for the development and application of its outer membrane. The analysis of the construction process of the ceramic cylindrical curtain that defines it, performed by white glazed ceramic, 5 cm diameter and 7.5 m height, reveals this fact. The system builds an interstitial space, essential for its use and environmental integration. At the same time it links the building to both local industrial fabric, which aims to establish itself as one of its exponents, and to the Mediterranean culture of filters. The procedure followed is ascribed to the postartesanal and pragmatic perspective that beyond the modern heroes, introduced characters like Jean Prouvé and that today, we state, should find natural and legal channels for its development, on behalf of the progress of the construction sector.

  19. Gaseous emissions from ceramics manufactured with urban sewage sludge during firing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusidó, J A; Cremades, L V; González, M

    2003-01-01

    The re-use of sewage sludge without any treatment as primary material-mixed with clays-in order to obtain structural ceramics for buildings has been successfully improved. In the Ecobrick project, the firing of a mixture of specific percentages of three components (clays, sludges and forest debris) resulted in a lighter and more thermal and acoustic insulating brick, compared with conventional clay-bricks. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission from the manufacturing of ceramics is the most important aspect to control. In the Ecobrick project VOC emissions were monitored by using a bench-scale furnace. The study was conducted using an EPA recommended sampling train and portable sampling tubes that were thermally desorbed and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Drying of raw sewage-sludge and firing processes were considered separately. In this paper, we present VOC emissions coming from the firing step of the Ecobrick production.

  20. Contact pressure distribution during the polishing process of ceramic tiles: A laboratory investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, A. S. A.; Sousa, F. J. P.; Hamedon, Z.; Azhari, A.

    2016-02-01

    During the polishing process of porcelain tiles the difference in scratching speed between innermost and peripheral abrasives leads to pressure gradients linearly distributed along the radial direction of the abrasive tool. The aim of this paper is to investigate such pressure gradient in laboratory scale. For this purpose polishing tests were performed on ceramic tiles according to the industrial practices using a custom-made CNC tribometer. Gradual wear on both abrasives and machined surface of the floor tile were measured. The experimental results suggested that the pressure gradient tends to cause an inclination of the abraded surfaces, which becomes stable after a given polishing period. In addition to the wear depth of the machined surface, the highest value of gloss and finest surface finish were observed at the lowest point of the worn out surface of the ceramic floor tile corresponding to the point of highest pressure and lowest scratching speed.

  1. Life Cycle Assessment for Proton Conducting Ceramics Synthesized by the Sol-Gel Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Sun Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this report, the environmental aspects of producing proton conducting ceramics are investigated by means of the environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA method. The proton conducting ceramics BaZr0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BZY, BaCe0.9Y0.1O2.95 (BCY10, and Sr(Ce0.9Zr0.10.95Yb0.05O3-δ (SCZY were prepared by the sol-gel process. Their material requirements and environmental emissions were inventoried, and their energy requirements were determined, based on actual production data. This latter point makes the present LCA especially worthy of attention as a preliminary indication of future environmental impact. The analysis was performed according to the recommendations of ISO norms 14040 and obtained using the Gabi 6 software. The performance of the analyzed samples was also compared with each other. The LCA results for these proton conducting ceramics production processes indicated that the marine aquatic ecotoxicity potential (MAETP made up the largest part, followed by fresh-water aquatic ecotoxicity potential (FAETP and Human Toxicity Potential (HTP. The largest contribution was from energy consumption during annealing and calcinations steps.

  2. ``Clean'' processing of polymers and smoothing of ceramics by pulsed laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarev, V. N.; Marine, W.; Prat, C.; Sentis, M.

    1995-05-01

    Surface stability during laser pulsed melting of polymers and ceramics is studied theoretically. Irradiation conditions and material parameters are found giving rise to the suppression of surface wavy relief of a nonresonant type (with period Λ≫λ, where λ is the radiation wavelength) and thus to the smooth flat irradiation spots. For example, for the polymers considered this process takes place for wavelengths where the absorption coefficient is sufficiently high: α(λ)≳105 cm-1. Thus, it is shown that the formation of such spots, previously referred to as ``clean ablation,'' can be explained using only a thermal mechanism without reference to the concept of ``photodecomposition.'' Moreover, laser smoothing and polishing of a surface, if it had roughness before irradiation, can be achieved by appropriate matching of the characteristic size of this roughness along the surface with the values of α(λ) and laser fluence. Methods are proposed to decrease the parasitic influence of droplets on the deposition of thin films by laser ablation of massive ceramic pellets. The results of theoretical modeling are shown to be in good agreement with experiments on smoothing of rough alumina ceramics and ``clean'' processing of polymers by excimer laser radiation.

  3. Eco-technological process of glass-ceramic production from galvanic sludge and aluminium slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisavljević M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods of purification of waste water which are most commonly used in the Republic of Serbia belong to the type of conventional systems for purification such as chemical oxidation and reduction, neutralization, sedimentation, coagulation, and flocculation. Consequently, these methods generate waste sludge which, unless adequately stabilized, represents hazardous matter. The aluminium slag generated by melting or diecasting aluminium and its alloys is also hazardous matter. In this sense, this paper establishes ecological risk of galvanic waste sludge and aluminium slag and then describes the process of stabilization of these waste materials by means of transformation into a glass-ceramic structure through sintering. The obtained product was analyzed with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The object of the paper is the eco-technological process of producing glass-ceramics from galvanic sludge and aluminium slag. The aim of the paper is to incorporate toxic metals from galvanic sludge and aluminium slag into the glass-ceramic product, in the form of solid solutions.

  4. Noble Metal/Ceramic Composites in Flame Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Heiko; Madler, Lutz; Strobel, Reto

    Noble metals on metal oxides play a major role in the performance of electrodes, catalysts and many other applications. Today, impregnation of noble metals on metal oxides is done in the wet phase involving multiple steps. The physicochemical nature of the support, the precursor and the reaction...... conditions influence the resulting noble metal particles size in those systems [1]. For every specific application the particle size and the metal/metal oxide interaction affect the performance of these nano-composite materials [2]. Recently, aerosol processes have been successfully used to produce platinum......-7] with metal particles smaller than 7 nm on the metal oxide [3-7]. This makes them attractive for reactions with mass transfer limitation and for high temperature applications. An intimate contact of the two particles was observed in HRTEM images [3-5,7]. For a specific metal oxide support the metal particle...

  5. Temperature-dependent gelation process in colloidal dispersions by diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaxue; Boyko, Volodymyr; Yi, Zhiyong; Men, Yongfeng

    2013-11-19

    Temperature-dependent microrheology of a concentrated charge-stabilized poly(methyl methacrylate) colloidal dispersion with different salt concentrations was investigated by diffusing wave spectroscopy in backscattering mode. The critical temperature where the system undergoes aggregation and gelation depends upon the particle volume fraction or salt concentration. The viscoelastic properties of the systems have been discussed using Maxwell and Kelvin-Voigt models. Temperature-dependent crossover (G' = G″) frequency has been used to calculate activation energies representing a critical energy of interaction of gel formation.

  6. Preparation of thin ceramic monofilaments for TEM observation with novel embedding processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Siwei [College of Materials, Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramic Fibers (Xiamen University), Ministry of Education, Xiamen 361005 (China); National Key Laboratory of Thermostructure Composite Materials, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Feng, Zude, E-mail: zdfeng@xmu.edu.cn [College of Materials, Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramic Fibers (Xiamen University), Ministry of Education, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhang, Litong [National Key Laboratory of Thermostructure Composite Materials, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wang, Yanyan; Chen, Lifu [College of Materials, Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramic Fibers (Xiamen University), Ministry of Education, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2011-01-15

    An applicable method to prepare transmission electron microscopy specimens from ceramic fibers for longitudinal and cross-sectional observations is investigated. The method includes novel embedding processes to fix fibers, a polishing process using a self-manufactured device to get uniformly low thickness (40 {mu}m for L-fiber, 60 {mu}m for C-fiber), a one-side dimpling process to grind the specimen to near electron transparency (about 5 {mu}m in thickness for both L-fiber and C-fiber) and an efficient ion milling process using calculated parameters. These techniques are reliable to accomplish the preparation with high quality in a relatively short time. Many factors related to the preparation processes are discussed. -- Research Highlights: {yields}We develop an applicable method to prepare TEM specimens from thin ceramic fibers. {yields}We develop novel embedding processes to enhance the polishing efficiency. {yields}A self-manufactured device is used to get uniformly low thickness. {yields}One-side dimpling method and calculated ion milling process are introduced. {yields}Samples with large thin area for longitudinal and cross-sectional view are obtained.

  7. The analysis of strength properties of ceramic preforms for infiltration process

    OpenAIRE

    P. Putyra; P. Kurtyka; L. Jaworska; M. Podsiadło; B Smuk

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this work is the optimization of sintering process of the ceramic preforms based on Si3N4 and Al2O3-Ti(C,N) materials. The influence of pore forming additives on porosity, microstructures and compressive strength are investigated. The aim of this study is to obtain the nitrides and carbides base preforms material for the infiltration process of molten aluminium alloys.Design/methodology/approach: The method of obtaining the silicon nitride and oxide-carbonitride porous pr...

  8. Corrosion investigation of multilayered ceramics and experimental nickel alloys in SCWO process environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, K.M.; Mizia, R.

    1995-02-01

    A corrosion investigation was done at MODAR, Inc., using a supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) vessel reactor. Several types of multilayered ceramic rings and experimental nickel alloy coupons were exposed to a chlorinated cutting oil TrimSol, in the SCWO process. A corrosion casing was designed and mounted in the vessel reactor with precautions to minimize chances of degrading the integrity of the pressure vessel. Fifteen of the ceramic coated rings were stacked vertically in the casing at one time for each test. There was a total of 36 rings. The rings were in groupings of three rings that formed five sections. Each section saw a different SCWO environment, ranging from 650 to 300{degrees}C. The metal coupons were mounted on horizontal threaded holders welded to a vertical rod attached to the casing cover in order to hang down the middle of the casing. The experimental nickel alloys performed better than the baseline nickel alloys. A titania multilayered ceramic system sprayed onto a titanium ring remained intact after 120-180 hours of exposure. This is the longest time any coating system has withstood such an environment without significant loss.

  9. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  10. Residual Stress Analysis of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coating Based on Thermal Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayuki; Wada, Eiji; Kishimoto, Kikuo

    Residual stress is generated in ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), which were sprayed by a plasma spray technology, due to the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion between the coating and the substrate. Previous experimental results obtained by the X-ray diffraction method indicated that the residual stress at the ceramic coating surface is tensile and could lead to TBC failure such as cracking and spalling of the ceramic coating. In this study, a numerical model that can predict the residual stress exactly is proposed by taking into account a thermal spray process. This numerical model is a layer-buildup model based on a shear-lag theory, and the residual stress contribution comes from two kinds of the following stress components: (1) quenching stress, which was generated in molten spray particles impinged onto the substrate, and (2) thermal stress, which was generated due to differences in thermal expansion between the deposited particle and the underlying substrate. It is shown herein that residual stress predicted by the proposed numerical model coincided with the experimental one obtained by the strain gage technique, with a good level of accuracy.

  11. The Characteristics of the Surface Topography of Excimer Laser Processed Al2O3 Ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYing; WENShi-zhu

    2004-01-01

    Surface of Al2O3 ceramic was processed by an excimer laser and the characteristics of topography were examined based on the application of thesystem(MEMS). It is indicated that the statistic pararueters of surface topography processed by the excimer laser have an obvioas regularity. The arithmeticmean value Ro and the root-mean square value Rq change with the changing of processing parameters in the same step and trend, and there is a quantitative relation between them. A simplified nuuIel is proposed for the excimer laser processing surface profile, whose results of the analysis and calculation agree basically with the experimental data. Furthermore, the surfaces processed by excimer laser are greatly fiat. Skewness root-mean-square value Zq changed little with the change of the technological parameters. The above characteristics depend on the processing principle of excimer laser, quite different from the cutting processing.

  12. Ceramic Methyltrioxorhenium

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, R; Eickerling, G; Helbig, C; Hauf, C; Miller, R; Mayr, F; Krug von Nidda, H A; Scheidt, E W; Scherer, W; Herrmann, Rudolf; Troester, Klaus; Eickerling, Georg; Helbig, Christian; Hauf, Christoph; Miller, Robert; Mayr, Franz; Nidda, Hans-Albrecht Krug von; Scheidt, Ernst-Wilhelm; Scherer, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The metal oxide polymeric methyltrioxorhenium [(CH3)xReO3] is an unique epresentative of a layered inherent conducting organometallic polymer which adopts the structural motifs of classical perovskites in two dimensions (2D) in form of methyl-deficient, corner-sharing ReO5(CH3) octahedra. In order to improve the characteristics of polymeric methyltrioxorhenium with respect to its physical properties and potential usage as an inherentconducting polymer we tried to optimise the synthetic routes of polymeric modifications of 1 to obtain a sintered ceramic material, denoted ceramic MTO. Ceramic MTO formed in a solvent-free synthesis via auto-polymerisation and subsequent sintering processing displays clearly different mechanical and physical properties from polymeric MTO synthesised in aqueous solution. Ceramic MTO is shown to display activated Re-C and Re=O bonds relative to MTO. These electronic and structural characteristics of ceramic MTO are also reflected by a different chemical reactivity compared with its...

  13. Materials processing strategies for colloidal quantum dot solar cells: advances, present-day limitations, and pathways to improvement

    KAUST Repository

    Carey, Graham H.

    2013-05-13

    Colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic devices have improved from initial, sub-1% solar power conversion efficiency to current record performance of over 7%. Rapid advances in materials processing and device physics have driven this impressive performance progress. The highest-efficiency approaches rely on a fabrication process that starts with nanocrystals in solution, initially capped with long organic molecules. This solution is deposited and the resultant film is treated using a solution containing a second, shorter capping ligand, leading to a cross-linked, non-redispersible, and dense layer. This procedure is repeated, leading to the widely employed layer-by-layer solid-state ligand exchange. We will review the properties and features of this process, and will also discuss innovative pathways to creating even higher-performing films and photovoltaic devices.

  14. Low-Temperature Processed Ga-Doped ZnO Coatings from Colloidal Inks

    KAUST Repository

    Della Gaspera, Enrico

    2013-03-06

    We present a new colloidal synthesis of gallium-doped zinc oxide nanocrystals that are transparent in the visible and absorb in the near-infrared. Thermal decomposition of zinc stearate and gallium nitrate after hot injection of the precursors in a mixture of organic amines leads to nanocrystals with tunable properties according to gallium amount. Substitutional Ga3+ ions trigger a plasmonic resonance in the infrared region resulting from an increase in the free electrons concentration. These nanocrystals can be deposited by spin coating, drop casting, and spray coating resulting in homogeneous and high-quality thin films. The optical transmission of the Ga-ZnO nanoparticle assemblies in the visible is greater than 90%, and at the same time, the near-infrared absorption of the nanocrystals is maintained in the films as well. Several strategies to improve the films electrical and optical properties have been presented, such as UV treatments to remove the organic compounds responsible for the observed interparticle resistance and reducing atmosphere treatments on both colloidal solutions and thin films to increase the free carriers concentration, enhancing electrical conductivity and infrared absorption. The electrical resistance of the nanoparticle assemblies is about 30 kΩ/sq for the as-deposited, UV-exposed films, and it drops down to 300 Ω/sq after annealing in forming gas at 450 °C, comparable with state of the art tin-doped indium oxide coatings deposited from nanocrystal inks. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Surface Modification of Colloidal Silica Nanoparticles: Controlling the size and Grafting Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Wentao; Wu, Danhua; Li, Juan; Zhang, Kai; Xiang, Yushu; Long, Lijuan; Qin, Shuhao; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Qin [Guizhou Univ., Guiyang (China)

    2013-09-15

    Surface modification of colloidal silica nanoparticles without disrupting the electric double layer of nanoparticles is a major challenge. In the work, silane was employed to modify colloidal silica nanoparticles without inducing bridge flocculation obviously. The effect of pH value of the silica sol, the amount of silane in feed, and reaction temperature on the graft amount and the final size of modified particles was investigated. The increased weight loss by TG and the appearance of T{sup 2} and T{sup 3} except for Q{sup 2} and Q{sup 3} signals by CP/MAS {sup 29}Si NMR of the modified samples verified the successful grafting of silane. The graft amount reached 0.57 mmol/g, which was slightly lower than theory value, and the particle size remained nearly the same as unmodified particles for acidic silica sol at the optimum condition. For alkaline silica sol after modification, aggregates composed of several nanoparticles connected together with silane moleculars as the bridge appeared.

  16. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

  17. Ceramic Top Coats of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Materials, Processes, and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Emine; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-08-01

    The ceramic top coat has a major influence on the performance of the thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs). Yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the top coat material frequently used, and the major deposition processes of the YSZ top coat are atmospheric plasma spraying and electron beam physical vapor deposition. Recently, also new thermal spray processes such as suspension plasma spraying or plasma spray-physical vapor deposition have been intensively investigated for TBC top coat deposition. These new processes and particularly the different coating microstructures that can be deposited with them will be reviewed in this article. Furthermore, the properties and the intrinsic-extrinsic degradation mechanisms of the YSZ will be discussed. Following the TBC deposition processes and standard YSZ material, alternative ceramic materials such as perovskites and hexaaluminates will be summarized, while properties of pyrochlores with regard to their crystal structure will be discussed more in detail. The merits of the pyrochlores such as good CMAS resistance as well as their weaknesses, e.g., low fracture toughness, processability issues, will be outlined.

  18. Green and scalable production of colloidal perovskite nanocrystals and transparent sols by a controlled self-collection process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuangyi; Huang, Limin; Li, Wanlu; Liu, Xiaohua; Jing, Shui; Li, Jackie; O'Brien, Stephen

    2015-07-21

    Colloidal perovskite oxide nanocrystals have attracted a great deal of interest owing to the ability to tune physical properties by virtue of the nanoscale, and generate thin film structures under mild chemical conditions, relying on self-assembly or heterogeneous mixing. This is particularly true for ferroelectric/dielectric perovskite oxide materials, for which device applications cover piezoelectrics, MEMs, memory, gate dielectrics and energy storage. The synthesis of complex oxide nanocrystals, however, continues to present issues pertaining to quality, yield, % crystallinity, purity and may also suffer from tedious separation and purification processes, which are disadvantageous to scaling production. We report a simple, green and scalable "self-collection" growth method that produces uniform and aggregate-free colloidal perovskite oxide nanocrystals including BaTiO3 (BT), Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3 (BST) and quaternary oxide BaSrTiHfO3 (BSTH) in high crystallinity and high purity. The synthesis approach is solution processed, based on the sol-gel transformation of metal alkoxides in alcohol solvents with controlled or stoichiometric amounts of water and in the stark absence of surfactants and stabilizers, providing pure colloidal nanocrystals in a remarkably low temperature range (15 °C-55 °C). Under a static condition, the nanoscale hydrolysis of the metal alkoxides accomplishes a complete transformation to fully crystallized single domain perovskite nanocrystals with a passivated surface layer of hydroxyl/alkyl groups, such that the as-synthesized nanocrystals can exist in the form of super-stable and transparent sol, or self-accumulate to form a highly crystalline solid gel monolith of nearly 100% yield for easy separation/purification. The process produces high purity ligand-free nanocrystals excellent dispersibility in polar solvents, with no impurity remaining in the mother solution other than trace alcohol byproducts (such as isopropanol). The afforded stable

  19. Preparation of thin ceramic monofilaments for TEM observation with novel embedding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwei; Feng, Zude; Zhang, Litong; Wang, Yanyan; Chen, Lifu

    2011-01-01

    An applicable method to prepare transmission electron microscopy specimens from ceramic fibers for longitudinal and cross-sectional observations is investigated. The method includes novel embedding processes to fix fibers, a polishing process using a self-manufactured device to get uniformly low thickness (40 μm for L-fiber, 60 μm for C-fiber), a one-side dimpling process to grind the specimen to near electron transparency (about 5 μm in thickness for both L-fiber and C-fiber) and an efficient ion milling process using calculated parameters. These techniques are reliable to accomplish the preparation with high quality in a relatively short time. Many factors related to the preparation processes are discussed.

  20. Processing of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites for ultra high temperature applications using organosilicon polymer precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, James Robert

    The current work is on the development of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic materials (CFCCs) for use in ultra high temperature applications. These applications subject materials to extremely high temperatures(> 2000°C). Monolithic ceramics are currently being used for these applications, but the tendency to fail catastrophically has driven the need for the next generation of material. Reinforcing with continuous fibers significantly improves the toughness of the monolithic materials; however, this is a manufacturing challenge. The development of commercial, low-viscosity preceramic polymers provides new opportunities to fabricate CFCCs. Preceramic polymers behave as polymers at low temperatures and are transformed into ceramics upon heating to high temperatures. The polymer precursors enable the adaptation of well-established polymer processing techniques to produce high quality materials at relatively low cost. In the present work, SMP-10 from Starfire Systems, and PURS from KiON Corp. were used to manufacture ZrB2-SiC/SiC CFCCs using low cost vacuum bagging process in conjunction with the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis process. The microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy and it was determined that the initial greenbody cure produced porosity of both closed and open pores. The open pores were found to be more successfully re-infiltrated using neat resin compared to slurry reinfiltrate; however, the closed pores were found to be impenetrable during subsequent reinfiltrations. The mechanical performance of the manufactured samples was evaluated using flexure tests and found the fiber reinforcement prevented catastrophic failure behavior by increasing fracture toughness. Wedge sample were fabricated and evaluated to demonstrate the ability to produce CFCC of complex geometry.

  1. High Temperature Advanced Structural Composites. Volume 2. Ceramic Matrix Composites, Fiber Processing and Properties, and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-02

    PROCESSING OF SiC/AIN and Si N /AiN SOLID SOLUTIONS FROM ORGANOtETALLIC PRECURSORS. LEONARD V. INTERRANTE CORINNA L. CZEKAJ , MICHEAL L.J. HACKNEY , GARY...I. M. T.; Ring, M. P. I.; Yu. H.; Sinclair, R. Am. Ceram. Soc. Bull. 1987,62,899- A. J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 1 1980, 76, 1520-1525. 903...8217Carbosilanes, Synthesis and Reactions", Springer-Verlar. Berlin, 1986. 10 Davidson, I.M.T.; Ring, MA. J. C. S. Faraday 1, 1980,76, 1520. Neudorfl

  2. Whiteness process of tile ceramics: using a synthetic flow as a modifier agent of color firing

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, G. R.; Pereira, M. C.; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; de Souza, S. D.; Morelli, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic flow is proposed as a modifier agent of color firing in tile ceramic mass during the sinterization process, turning the red color firing into whiteness. Therefore, the 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to understand how the interaction of the iron element in the mechanism of color firing mass occurs in this system. The results suggest that the change of color firing can be alternatively due to two main factors: (i) diluting the hematite content in the sample because of the use of synthetic flow and (ii) part of the hematite is converted in other uncolored crystal structures, which makes the final color firing lighter.

  3. New HYDRUS Modules for Simulating Preferential Flow, Colloid-Facilitated Contaminant Transport, and Various Biogeochemical Processes in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunek, J.; Sejna, M.; Jacques, D.; Langergraber, G.; Bradford, S. A.; van Genuchten, M. Th.

    2012-04-01

    We have dramatically expanded the capabilities of the HYDRUS (2D/3D) software package by developing new modules to account for processes not available in the standard HYDRUS version. These new modules include the DualPerm, C-Hitch, HP2/3, Wetland, and Unsatchem modules. The dual-permeability modeling approach of Gerke and van Genuchten [1993] simulating preferential flow and transport is implemented into the DualPerm module. Colloid transport and colloid-facilitated solute transport, the latter often observed for many contaminants, such as heavy metals, radionuclides, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and explosives [Šimůnek et al., 2006] are implemented into the C-Hitch module. HP2 and HP3 are the two and three-dimensional alternatives of the HP1 module, currently available with HYDRUS-1D [Jacques and Šimůnek, 2005], that couple HYDRUS flow and transport routines with the generic geochemical model PHREEQC of Parkhurst and Appelo [1999]. The Wetland module includes two alternative approaches (CW2D of Langergraber and Šimůnek [2005] and CWM1 of Langergraber et al. [2009]) for modeling aerobic, anaerobic, and anoxic biogeochemical processes in natural and constructed wetlands. Finally, the Unsatchem module simulates the transport and reactions of major ions in a soil profile. Brief descriptions and an application of each module will be presented. Except for HP3, all modules simulate flow and transport processes in two-dimensional transport domains. All modules are fully supported by the HYDRUS graphical user interface. Further development of these modules, as well as of several other new modules (such as Overland), is still envisioned. Continued feedback from the research community is encouraged.

  4. Tracing process of β-TCP ceramics in vivo with 45Ca

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世普; 戴红莲; 闫玉华; 王欣宇; 熊先立; 郑启新; 杜靖远

    2004-01-01

    The metabolic way of calcium ions which was released due to in vivo degradation of porous β-TCP ceram ics was studied by using the radioisotope 45 Ca as tracer. The result shows that some of the calcium ions enter blood and take part in the circulation. These calcium ions distribute into organs and tissues (such as liver, kidney, brain,heart, lung, spleen and stomach) and participate in the metabolisms of body. There is neither the accumulation of calcium ions, nor the lesion or pathologic calcification of the organs and tissues. Some of the calcium ions that enter the near-end femur, ulna and skull are reused by bony tissue to take part in both local mineralization processes during bone healing, or are stored in calcium pool which can participate in the whole body circulating. In the cyclical process, other calcium ions are excreted with urine and feces through kidney and liver. It is indicated that the degradation products of β-TCP ceramics can take part in the physiological metabolic process of normal bone and tissue.

  5. River Water Purification via a Coagulation-Porous Ceramic Membrane Hybrid Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张荟钦; 仲兆祥; 李卫星; 邢卫红; 金万勤

    2014-01-01

    Membrane filtration technology combined with coagulation is widely used to purify river water. In this study, microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) ceramic membranes were combined with coagulation to treat local river water located at Xinghua, Jiangsu province, China. The operation parameters, fouling mechanism and pilot-scale tests were investigated. The results show that the pore size of membrane has small effect on the pseudo-steady flux for dead-end filtration, and the increase of flux in MF process is more than that in UF process for cross-flow filtration with the same increase of cross-flow velocity. The membrane pore size has little influence on the water quality. The analysis on membrane fouling mechanism shows that the cake filtration has significant in-fluence on the pseudo-steady flux and water quality for the membrane with pore size of 50, 200 and 500 nm. For the membrane with pore size of 200 nm and backwashing employed in our pilot study, a constant flux of 150 L·m-2·h-1 was reached during stable operation, with the removal efficiency of turbidity, total organic carbon (TOC) and UV254 higher than 99%, 45%and 48%, respectively. The study demonstrates that coagulation-porous ceramic membrane hybrid process is a reliable method for river water purification.

  6. A Study of Ceramic-Lined Composite Steel Pipes Prepared by SHS Centrifugal-Thermite Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yuxin Li; Letao Jiang; Qing Lu; Peikang Bai; Bin Liu; Jianhong Wang

    2016-01-01

    .... The result showed the ceramic lined pipe is composed of the three main layers of various compositions, which were subsequently determined to be Fe layer, the transition layer and the ceramic layer...

  7. Solution processable colloidal nanoplates as building blocks for high-performance electronic thin films on flexible substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhaoyang; Chen, Yu; Yin, Anxiang; He, Qiyuan; Huang, Xiaoqing; Xu, Yuxi; Liu, Yuan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2014-11-12

    Low-temperature solution-processed electronic materials on plastic substrates are of considerable interest for flexible electronics. Solution dispersible inorganic nanostructures (e.g., zero-dimensional (0D) quantum dots or one-dimensional (1D) nanowires) have emerged as interesting ink materials for low-temperature solution processing of electronic thin films on flexible substrates, but usually with limited performance due to the large number of grain boundaries (0D) or incomplete surface coverage (1D). Here, we report two-dimensional (2D) colloidal nanoplates of layered materials as a new ink material for solution assembly of high-performance electronic thin films. The 2D colloidal nanoplates exhibit few dangling bonds and represent an ideal geometry for the assembly of highly uniform continuous thin films with greatly reduced grain boundaries dictated by large-area conformal plane-plane contact with atomically flat/clean interfaces. It can therefore promise efficient charge transport across neighboring nanoplates and throughout the entire thin film to enable unprecedented electronic performance. We show that Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3 nanoplates can be synthesized with well-controlled thickness (6-15 nm) and lateral dimension (0.5-3 μm) and can be used for the assembly of highly uniform continuous thin films with a full surface coverage and an excellent room temperature carrier mobility >100 cm(2)·V(-1)·s(-1), approaching that of chemical vapor deposition grown materials. Our study demonstrates a general strategy to using 2D nanoplates as a unique building block for the construction of high-performance electronic thin films on plastic substrates for future flexible electronics and optoelectronics.

  8. Enhancing the efficiency of solution-processed polymer:colloidal nanocrystal hybrid photovoltaic cells using ethanedithiol treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjia; Stalder, Romain; Xie, Dongping; Cao, Weiran; Zheng, Ying; Yang, Yixing; Plaisant, Marc; Holloway, Paul H; Schanze, Kirk S; Reynolds, John R; Xue, Jiangeng

    2013-06-25

    Advances in colloidal inorganic nanocrystal synthesis and processing have led to the demonstration of organic-inorganic hybrid photovoltaic (PV) cells using low-cost solution processes from blends of conjugated polymer and colloidal nanocrystals. However, the performance of such hybrid PV cells has been limited due to the lack of control at the complex interfaces between the organic and inorganic hybrid active materials. Here we show that the efficiency of hybrid PV devices can be significantly enhanced by engineering the polymer-nanocrystal interface with proper chemical treatment. Using two different conjugated polymers, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly[2,6-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta[2,1-b;3,4-b']-dithiophene)-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PCPDTBT), we show that treating the polymer:nanocrystal hybrid film in an ethanedithiol-containing acetonitrile solution can increase the efficiency of the hybrid PV devices by 30-90%, and a maximum power conversion efficiency of 5.2 ± 0.3% was obtained in the PCPDTBT:CdSe devices at 0.2 sun (AM 1.5G), which was slightly reduced to 4.7 ± 0.3% at 1 sun. The ethanedithiol treatment did not result in significant changes in the morphology and UV-vis optical absorption of the hybrid thin films; however, infrared absorption, NMR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies revealed the effective removal of organic ligands, especially the charged phosphonic acid ligands, from the CdSe nanorod surface after the treatment, accompanied by the possible monolayer passivation of nanorod surfaces with Cd-thiolates. We attribute the hybrid PV cell efficiency increase upon the ethanedithiol treatment to the reduction in charge and exciton recombination sites on the nanocrystal surface and the simultaneous increase in electron transport through the hybrid film.

  9. Process-generated nanoparticles from ceramic tile sintering: Emissions, exposure and environmental release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, A S; Maragkidou, A; Viana, M; Querol, X; Hämeri, K; de Francisco, I; Estepa, C; Borrell, C; Lennikov, V; de la Fuente, G F

    2016-09-15

    The ceramic industry is an industrial sector in need of significant process changes, which may benefit from innovative technologies such as laser sintering of ceramic tiles. Such innovations result in a considerable research gap within exposure assessment studies for process-generated ultrafine and nanoparticles. This study addresses this issue aiming to characterise particle formation, release mechanisms and their impact on personal exposure during a tile sintering activity in an industrial-scale pilot plant, as a follow-up of a previous study in a laboratory-scale plant. In addition, possible particle transformations in the exhaust system, the potential for particle release to the outdoor environment, and the effectiveness of the filtration system were also assessed. For this purpose, a tiered measurement strategy was conducted. The main findings evidence that nanoparticle emission patterns were strongly linked to temperature and tile chemical composition, and mainly independent of the laser treatment. Also, new particle formation (from gaseous precursors) events were detected, with nanoparticles tile sintering activity since workers would be exposed to concentrations above the nano reference value (NRV; 4×10(4)cm(-3)), with 8-hour time weighted average concentrations in the range of 1.4×10(5)cm(-3) and 5.3×10(5)cm(-3). A potential risk for nanoparticle and ultrafine particle release to the environment was also identified, despite the fact that the efficiency of the filtration system was successfully tested and evidenced a >87% efficiency in particle number concentrations removal.

  10. Processing and properties of ceramic matrix-polymer composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsuan Yao

    The basic composite structure of natural hard tissue was used to guide the design and processing of dental restorative materials. The design incorporates the methodology of using inorganic minerals as the main structural phase reinforced with a more ductile but tougher organic phase. Ceramic-polymer composites were prepared by slip casting a porous ceramic structure, heating and chemical treating the porous preform, infiltrating with monomer and then curing. The three factors that determined the mechanical properties of alumina-polymer composites were the type of polymer used, the method of silane treatments, and the type of bond between particles in the porous preforms. Without the use of silane coupling agents, the composites were measured to have a lower strength. The composite with a more "flexible" porous alumina network had a greater ability to plastically dissipate the energy of propagating cracks. However, the aggressive nature of the alumina particles on opposing enamel requires that these alumina-polymer composites have a wear compatible coating for practical application. A route to dense bioactive apatite wollastonite glass ceramics (AWGC)-polymer composites was developed. The problems associated with glass dissolution into the aqueous medium for slip casting were overcome with the use of silane. The role of heating rate and development of ceramic compact microstructure on composite properties was explored. In general, if isothermal heating was not applied, decreasing heating rate increased glass crystallinity and particle-particle fusion, but decreased pore volume. Also composite strength and fracture toughness decreased while modulus and hardness increased with decreasing heating rate. If isothermal heating was applied, glass crystallinity, pore content, and composite mechanical properties showed relatively little change regardless of the initial heating rate. The potential of AWGC-polymer composites for dental and implant applications was explored

  11. Engineering ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bengisu, Murat

    2001-01-01

    This is a comprehensive book applying especially to junior and senior engineering students pursuing Materials Science/ Engineering, Ceramic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering degrees. It is also a reference book for other disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering. Important properties of most engineering ceramics are given in detailed tables. Many current and possible applications of engineering ceramics are described, which can be used as a guide for materials selection and for potential future research. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials, processing properties, characterization and applications of engineering ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  12. Ceramic microparticles and capsules via microfluidic processing of a preceramic polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Congwang; Chen, Anthony; Colombo, Paolo; Martinez, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a robust technique to fabricate monodispersed solid and porous ceramic particles and capsules from single and double emulsion drops composed of silsesquioxane preceramic polymer. A microcapillary microfluidic device was used to generate the monodispersed drops. In this device, two round capillaries are aligned facing each other inside a square capillary. Three fluids are needed to generate the double emulsions. The inner fluid, which flows through the input capillary, and the middle fluid, which flows through the void space between the square and inner fluid capillaries, form a coaxial co-flow in a direction that is opposite to the flow of the outer fluid. As the three fluids are forced through the exit capillary, the inner and middle fluids break into monodispersed double emulsion drops in a single-step process, at rates of up to 2000 drops s−1. Once the drops are generated, the silsesquioxane is cross-linked in solution and the cross-linked particles are dried and pyrolysed in an inert atmosphere to form oxycarbide glass particles. Particles with diameters ranging from 30 to 180 µm, shell thicknesses ranging from 10 to 50 µm and shell pore diameters ranging from 1 to 10 µm were easily prepared by changing fluid flow rates, device dimensions and fluid composition. The produced particles and capsules can be used in their polymeric state or pyrolysed to ceramic. This technique can be extended to other preceramic polymers and can be used to generate unique core–shell multimaterial particles. PMID:20484226

  13. Ceramics Vitreous China Produced by Utilizing Sediment Soil from Water Supply Treatment Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangrakdiskul Ubolrat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to generating the abundant of sediment soil, it makes the high burden of disposal cost to the metropolitan waterworks authority. Enhancing the value of sediment soil has been explored. This research aims to utilize the sediment soil, wastes of water supply treatment process for producing ceramics vitreous china. In this experiment, five types of raw materials are exploited, namely, sediment soil, ball clay, kaolin, feldspar and silica sand. The formulas have been divided into two groups. Sediment soil has been used as substituted material in ball clay for the first group, and substituted in kaolin for the second group. The specimens of each formula are formed by uniaxial pressing at 100 bar of size 50×100×7 mm. Then they have been sintered at two different temperatures, 1200°C and 1250°C, with heating rate 400° C/ hr and soaking for 30 minutes. The result reveals that the suitable formula for ceramics vitreous china is No. 2_4 of Group 2 with sintering temperature 1250°C. Its mixture consists of 0% kaolin, 35% ball clay, 30% feldspar, 20% silica sand and 15% sediment soil. The properties of this formula are 9.4% shrinkage, 9.39 MPa of bending strength, 6.34×10−6/K coefficient of thermal expansion, and 0.66% water absorption.

  14. Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Coatings Synthesized by the Liquid Precursor Plasma Spraying Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanfeng; Song, Lei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Yi; Huang, Tao; Chen, Jiyong; Wu, Yao; Wu, Fang

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the liquid precursor plasma spraying process was used to manufacture P2O5-Na2O-CaO-SiO2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings (BGCCs), where sol and suspension were used as feedstocks for plasma spraying. The effect of precursor and spray parameters on the formation and crystallinity of BGCCs was systematically studied. The results indicated that coatings with higher crystallinity were obtained using the sol precursor, while nanostructured coatings predominantly consisting of amorphous phase were synthesized using the suspension precursor. For coatings manufactured from suspension, the fraction of the amorphous phase increased with the increase in plasma power and the decrease in liquid precursor feed rate. The coatings synthesized from the suspension plasma spray process also showed a good in vitro bioactivity, as suggested by the fast apatite formation when soaking into SBF.

  15. Optimization of solid-state synthesis process of advanced ceramics materials: influence of mixing conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakri Adel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of mixing process on solid state reaction of solid oxide material mixture was studied. Lead piezoelectric ceramic specimens 0.5 Pb(Zn1/3,Sb2/3O3-0.5 Pb0.98La0.02(Zr0.48,Ti0.52O3 prepared by different mixing procedures, were conducted under different conditions such as order, combination and mixing time. The phase formation, composition nature, structural properties of powder mixture was analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The obtained results for different mixing processes make the solid state reaction method more selective, taking into consideration the attraction forces between the reactants and the electronegativity of oxide reactants.

  16. Image Analysis on Detachment Process of Dust Cake on Ceramic Candle Filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姬忠礼; 焦海青; 陈鸿海

    2005-01-01

    Based on the analysis of high-speed video images, the detachment behavior of dust cake from the ceramic candle filter surface during pulse cleaning process is investigated. The influences of the dust cake loading,the reservoir pressure, and the filtration velocity on the cleaning effectiveness are analyzed. Experimental results show that there exists an optimum dust cake thickness for pulse-cleaning process. For thin dust cake, the patchy cleaning exists and the cleaning efficiency is low; if the dust cake is too thick, the pressure drop across the dust cake becomes higher and a higher reservoir pressure may be needed. At the same time there also exists an optimum reservoir pressure for a given filtration condition.

  17. Fabrication of ceramic layer on an Al-Si alloy by MAO process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The MAO (Micro-Arc Oxidation) process is applied to a eutectic Al-Si alloy (Al-12.0%Si-l.0%Cu-0.9%Mg(mass fraction)). The oxide ceramic layer was fabricated with about 220 μm thickness and 3000 Hv micro-hardness. ByXRD (X-ray diffractometry) and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) analyses, the oxide layer consists of amorphousAl2O3, which is distinct from the results reported by the other researchers. The SEM photographs of such layer show that thelayer is fixed tightly on the substrate alloy. So this alloy can be used in the high temperature and friction environment after itis treated with such process.

  18. Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

    2009-02-20

    A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

  19. Controlling the leakage of liquid bismuth cathode elements in ceramic crucibles used for the electrowinning process in pyroprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Young; Hwang, Il-Soon; Lee, Jong-Hyeon

    2016-09-01

    Pyroprocessing has shown promise as an alternative to wet processing for the recycling of transuranics with a high proliferation resistance. However, a critical issue for pyroprocessing is the ceramic crucibles used in the electrowinning process. These ceramic crucibles are frequently damaged by thermal stress, which results in significant volumes of crucible waste that must be properly disposed. Transuranic waste (TRU) elements intrude throughout the pores of a damaged crucible. The volume of generated radioactive waste is a concern when dealing with nuclear power plants and decontamination issues. In this study, laser treatment and sintering were performed on the crucibles to minimize the TRU elements trapped within. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to measure the intrusion depth of Li in the surface-treated ceramics.

  20. Crack-free cutting of thick and dense ceramics with CO 2 laser by single-pass process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lingfei; Yan, Yinzhou; Bao, Yong; Jiang, Yijian

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a laser crack-free cutting method of Al 2O 3 ceramics by single-pass process in internal straight and curve profiles. The thickness and theoretical density of the ceramics are up to 10 mm and about 99%, respectively. The effective cutting speed is about 0.23-0.42 mm/s corresponding to the laser head moving speed of 3 mm/s. The cutting process based on close-piercing lapping of piercing time of 0.1-0.5 s and piercing pitch of 0.03-0.05 mm is divided into two continuous stages. Appropriate time slot for each piercing, high peak power of 3500 W and low cycle duty (laser crack-free cutting method is a promising method to achieve complex profiles of ceramic cuts.

  1. Investigation of the nonlinear effects during the sedimentation process of a charged colloidal particle by direct numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Florian; Feist, Markus; Nirschl, Hermann; Dörfler, Willy

    2010-04-01

    In this article we study the settling process of a colloidal particle under the influence of a gravitational or centrifugal field in an unbounded electrolyte solution. Since particles in aqueous solutions normally carry a non-zero surface charge, a microscopic electric field develops which alters the sedimentation process compared to an uncharged particle. This process can be mathematically modelled via the Stokes-Poisson-Nernst-Planck system, a system of coupled partial differential equations that have to be solved in an exterior domain. After a dimensional analysis we investigate the influence of the various characteristic dimensionless numbers on the sedimentation velocity. Thereby the linear-response (weak-field) approximation that underpins almost all existing theoretical work on classical electrokinetic phenomena is relaxed, such that no additional assumption on the thickness of the double layer as well as on its displacement is needed. We show that there exists a strong influence of the fluid Reynolds number and the ionic strength on the sedimentation velocity. Further we have developed an asymptotic expansion to describe the limit of small values of the surface potential of a single particle. This expansion incorporates all nonlinear effects and extends the well-known results of Booth (1954) [1] and Ohshima et al. (1984) [2] to higher fluid Reynolds numbers.

  2. COLLOID RELEASE FROM DIFFERENT SOIL DEPTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring clay colloidal particles are heavily involved in sediment processes in the subsurface soil. Due to the import ance of these processes in the subsurface environment, the transport of clay colloidal particles has been studied in several disciplines, including soil sciences, petr ology, hydrology, etc. Specifically, in environmental engineering, clay colloid re lease and transport in the sediments have been extensively investigated, which are motiv ated by environmental concerns such as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in groundwater and the subsurface soil. Clay colloid release is resulted from physical alteration of subsurface sediments. Despite the potential importance of clay colloid activiti es, the detailed mechanisms of release and transport of clay colloidal particles with in natural sediments are poorly understood. Pore medium structure, properties and flow dynamics, etc. are factors that affect clay colloid generation, mobilization, and subse quent transport. Possible mechanisms of clay colloid generation in the sediments in clude precipitation, erosion and mobilization by changes in pore water chemistry and clay colloid release depends on a balance of applied hydrodynamic and resisting adhesive torques and forces. The coupled role of pore water chemistry and fluid hydrodynamics thus play key roles in controlling clay colloid release and transport in the sediment s. This paper investigated clay colloidal particle release and transport, especially th e colloidal particle release mechanisms as well as the process modeling in the sediments. In this research, colloidal particle release from intact sediment columns with variable length was examined and colloidal particle release curves were simulated using an im plicit, finite-difference scheme. Colloidal particle release rate coefficient was found to be an exponential function of the sediment depth. The simulated results demonstrated that transport parameters were

  3. Process Developed for Generating Ceramic Interconnects With Low Sintering Temperatures for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhi-Min; Goldsby, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been considered as premium future power generation devices because they have demonstrated high energy-conversion efficiency, high power density, and extremely low pollution, and have the flexibility of using hydrocarbon fuel. The Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and private industries, is leading the development and commercialization of SOFCs for low-cost stationary and automotive markets. The targeted power density for the initiative is rather low, so that the SECA SOFC can be operated at a relatively low temperature (approx. 700 C) and inexpensive metallic interconnects can be utilized in the SOFC stack. As only NASA can, the agency is investigating SOFCs for aerospace applications. Considerable high power density is required for the applications. As a result, the NASA SOFC will be operated at a high temperature (approx. 900 C) and ceramic interconnects will be employed. Lanthanum chromite-based materials have emerged as a leading candidate for the ceramic interconnects. The interconnects are expected to co-sinter with zirconia electrolyte to mitigate the interface electric resistance and to simplify the processing procedure. Lanthanum chromites made by the traditional method are sintered at 1500 C or above. They react with zirconia electrolytes (which typically sinter between 1300 and 1400 C) at the sintering temperature of lanthanum chromites. It has been envisioned that lanthanum chromites with lower sintering temperatures can be co-fired with zirconia electrolyte. Nonstoichiometric lanthanum chromites can be sintered at lower temperatures, but they are unstable and react with zirconia electrolyte during co-sintering. NASA Glenn Research Center s Ceramics Branch investigated a glycine nitrate process to generate fine powder of the lanthanum-chromite-based materials. By simultaneously doping calcium on the lanthanum site, and cobalt and aluminum on the

  4. Sintering process influence on microstructure and intergranular impedance of rare-earth modified BaTiO3-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitic V.V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sintering process is a complex of different synergetic effects during the ceramics materials consolidation. The microstructural level properties control is very important as a stage in advanced materials prognosis. SEM analysis of Yb/BaTiO3 doped ceramics showed that in samples doped with a low level of dopant and sintered at higher temperatures the grain size ranged from 10-60μm, while with the higher dopant concentration the grain size ranged between 2-15μm. The morphology of sintered BaTiO3-ceramics grains points out the validity of developing new structure analytical methods based on different geometries of grains' model systems. The idea of electrical properties of BaTiO3-ceramics being influenced by intergrain microcontacts can be successfully followed if we start with the two-sphere Coble’s model and also the correction of the Coble’s model. In this paper, the grains contact models based on spherical, ellipsoidal and polyhedral geometries are presented making a new modeling tool for structure research of BaTiO3-ceramics materials. Intergranular impedance analysis of grains clusters was also introduced. Obtained results enabled establishment of interrelation between structural and electrical parameters.

  5. Performance of Silicon carbide whisker reinforced ceramic inserts on Inconel 718 in end milling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M. M.; Joshua, C. X. H.

    2016-03-01

    An experimental investigation is planned in order to study the machinability of Inconel 718 with silicon carbide whisker reinforced ceramic inserts in end milling process. The relationship between the cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut against the response factors are studied to show the level of significance of each parameter. The cutting parameters are optimized by using Taguchi method. Implementing analysis of variance, the parameter which influences the surface roughness the most is determined to be the cutting speed, followed by the feed rate and depth of cut. Meanwhile, the optimal cutting condition is determined to have high cutting speed, low feed rate, and high depth of cut in the range of selected parameters.

  6. Sintering process influence on microstructure and intergranular impedance of rare-earth modified BaTiO3-ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Sintering process is a complex of different synergetic effects during the ceramics materials consolidation. The microstructural level properties control is very important as a stage in advanced materials prognosis. SEM analysis of Yb/BaTiO3 doped ceramics showed that in samples doped with a low level of dopant and sintered at higher temperatures the grain size ranged from 10-60μm, while with the higher dopant concentration the grain size ranged between 2-15μm. The morphology of sintered...

  7. Colloidal nematostatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Pergamenshchik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a review of the theory of large distance colloidal interaction via the nematic director field. The new area of nematic colloidal systems (or nematic emulsions has been guided by the analogy between the colloidal nematostatics and electrostatics. The elastic charge density representation of the colloidal nematostatics [V.M. Pergamenshchik, V.O. Uzunova, Eur. Phys. J. E, 2007, 23, 161; Phys. Rev. E, 2007, 76, 011707] develops this analogy at the level of charge density and Coulomb interaction. The analogy is shown to lie in common mathematics based on the solutions of Laplace equation. However, the 3d colloidal nematostatics substantially differs from electrostatics both in its mathematical structure and physical implications. The elastic charge is a vector fully determined by the torque exerted upon colloid, the role of Gauss' theorem is played by conservation of the torque components. Elastic multipoles consist of two tensors (dyads. Formulas for the elastic multipoles, the Coulomb-like, dipole-dipole, and quadrupole-quadrupole pair interaction potentials are derived and illustrated by particular examples. Based on the tensorial structure, we list possible types of elastic dipoles and quadrupoles. An elastic dipole is characterized by its isotropic strength, anisotropy, chirality, and its longitudinal component. An elastic quadrupole can be uniaxial and biaxial. Relation between the multipole type and its symmetry is discussed, sketches of some types of multipoles are given. Using the mirror image method of electrostatics as a guiding idea, we develop the mirror image method in nematostatics for arbitrary director tilt at the wall. The method is applied to the charge-wall and dipole-wall interaction.

  8. Improving the strength of ceramics by controlling the interparticle forces and rheology of the ceramic suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Y P

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the modification of the interparticle forces of colloidal ceramic particles in aqueous suspensions in order to improve the microstructural homogeneity, and hence the reliability and mechanical performances, of subsequently formed ceramic compacts. A concentrated stable fine ceramic powder suspension has been shown to be able to generate a higher density of a ceramic product with better mechanical, and also electrical, electrochemical and optical, properties of the ceramic body. This is because in a colloidally stable suspension there are no aggregates and so defect formation, which is responsible for the ceramic body performance below its theoretical maximum, is reduced. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to form a well dispersed ceramic suspension by ensuring the interparticle forces between the particles are repulsive, with as a high a loading with particles as possible. By examining the rheological behaviour and the results of Atomic Force Microscope, the dispersion ...

  9. Synthesis of ceramics by carbo-thermal reduction process of oxides by sugars; Elaboration de ceramiques par carboreduction d'oxydes par des sucres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschanels, X.; Magnin, V.; Diat, O.; Grandjean, A. [CEA Marcoule, Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule UMR 5257, 30 (France)

    2008-07-01

    This work deals with the synthesis of ceramics by carbo-thermal reduction of colloidal oxides by sugars. The synthesis is carried out in three steps: 1)mixing by mechanical stirring of sugar and of the precursor oxide colloidal solution 2)lyophilization of the suspension to produce a powder 3)pyrolysis under a neutral atmosphere to synthesize the carbide of the considered element. The first results obtained have allowed to synthesize ZrC and SiC. The powders obtained have a sub-micron grain size and a specific surface area relatively high and able to reach 300 m{sup 2}/g for the zirconium carbide. These powders have a residual carbon amount variable with the initial ratio sugar/oxide. (O.M.)

  10. Colloidal superballs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is organized in four parts as follows. Part 1 focuses on the synthetic aspects of the colloidal model systems that will be used throughout the work described in this thesis. In Chapter 2 we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of polycrystalline hematite superballs and super

  11. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  12. Leaching effect in gadolinia-doped ceria aqueous suspensions for ceramic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldarelli, A.; Mercadelli, E.; Presto, S.; Viviani, M.; Sanson, A.

    2016-09-01

    Gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) is a commonly used electrolytic material for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) and for this reason different shaping methods for its deposition are reported in literature. Most of these processes are based on the use of organic-based CGO suspensions, but water-based processes are acquiring increasingly interest for their economical and environmental friendly properties. In this paper we reported how the components of water-based suspension and some unexpected process parameters can deeply affect the functional properties of the final powder. In particular, we observed that CGO powders are strongly affected by ionic leaching induced by furoic acid used as dispersant: the extent of this leaching was related to the dispersant concentration and suspension's ball-milling-time; the phenomenon was confirmed by ICP-AES analyses on suspensions surnatant. Most importantly, ionic leaching affected the electrical properties of CGO: leached powder showed a higher ionic conductivity as a consequence of a partial removal of Gd ions at the grain boundaries. This work is therefore pointing out that when considering water-based suspensions, it is extremely important to carefully consider all the process parameters, including the organic components of the ceramic suspension, as these could lead to unexpected effects on the properties of the powder, affecting the performance of the final shaped material.

  13. Ultrafine particles derived from mineral processing: A case study of the Pb-Zn sulfide ore with emphasis on lead-bearing colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhlin, Yuri; Vorobyev, Sergey; Romanchenko, Alexander; Karasev, Sergey; Karacharov, Anton; Zharkov, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Although mining and mineral processing industry is a vast source of heavy metal pollutants, the formation and behavior of micrometer- and nanometer-sized particles and their aqueous colloids entered the environment from the technological media has received insufficient attention to date. Here, the yield and characteristics of ultrafine mineral entities produced by routine grinding of the Pb-Zn sulfide ore (Gorevskoe ore deposit, Russia) were studied using laser diffraction analysis (LDA), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurement, microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, with most attention given to toxic lead species. It was revealed, in particular, that the fraction of particles less that 1 μm in the ground ore typical reaches 0.4 vol. %. The aquatic particles in supernatants were micrometer size aggregates with increased content of zinc, sulfur, calcium as compared with the bulk ore concentrations. The hydrodynamic diameter of the colloidal species decreased with time, with their zeta potentials remaining about -12 mV. The colloids produced from galena were composed of 20-50 nm PbS nanoparticles associated with lead sulfate and thiosulfate, while the surface oxidation products at precipitated galena were largely lead oxyhydroxides. The size and zeta potential of the lead-bearing colloids decreased with time down to about 100 nm and from -15 mV to -30 mV, respectively. And, conversely, lead sulfide nanoparticles were mobilized before the aggregates during redispersion of the precipitates in fresh portions of water. The potential environmental impact of the metal-bearing colloids, which is due to the large-scale production and relative stability, is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Solution-Processed Environmentally Friendly Ag2S Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Broad Spectral Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor A. Öberg

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A facile heat-up synthesis route is used to synthesize environmentally friendly Ag2S colloidal quantum dots (CQDs that are applied as light absorbing material in solid state p-i-n junction solar cell devices. The as-synthesized Ag2S CQDs have an average size of around 3.5 nm and exhibit broad light absorption covering ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared wavelength regions. The solar cell devices are constructed with a device architecture of FTO/TiO2/Ag2S CQDs/hole transport material (HTM /Au using a solution-processed approach. Different HTMs, N2,N2,N2′,N2′,N7,N7,N7′,N7′-octakis(4-methoxyphenyl-9,9′-spirobi(9H-fluorene-2,2′,7,7′ tetramine (spiro-MeOTAD, poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl (P3HT, and poly((2,3-bis(3-octyloxyphenyl-5,8-quinoxalinediyl-2,5-thiophenediyl TQ1 are studied for maximizing the device photovoltaic performance. The solar cell device with P3HT as a hole transport material gives the highest performance and the solar cell exhibit broad spectral absorption. These results indicate that Ag2S CQD have high potential for utilization as environmentally friendly light absorbing materials for solar cell application and that the hole transport material is critical to maximize the solar cell photovoltaic performance.

  15. Charge transport in light emitting devices based on colloidal quantum dots and a solution-processed nickel oxide layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huu Tuan; Jeong, Huiseong; Park, Ji-Yong; Ahn, Y H; Lee, Soonil

    2014-05-28

    We fabricated hybrid light emitting devices based on colloidal CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots and a solution-processed NiO layer. The use of a sol-gel NiO layer as a hole injection layer (HIL) resulted in overall improvement in device operation compared to a control device with a more conventional poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) HIL. In particular, luminous efficiency increased substantially because of the suppression of excessive currents and became as large as 2.45 cd/A. To manifest the origin of current reduction, temperature- and electric field-dependent variations of currents with respect to bias voltages were investigated. In a low bias voltage range below the threshold for luminance turn-on, the Poole-Frenkel (PF) emission mechanism was responsible for the current-density variation. However, the space-charge-limited current modified with PF-type mobility ruled the current-density variation in high bias voltage range above the threshold.

  16. SRNL CRP progress report [Development of Melt Processed Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Marra, J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-10-02

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multiphase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing.

  17. Accuracy of Ceramic Mould Filling with Liquid AlSi9 Aluminium Alloy in the Process Using Back-pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karwiński

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effect of suction pressure exerted on the liquid AlSi alloy when it is introduced into a ceramic mould made in the investment process and the results compared with data obtained on gravity poured castings.The study used special pattern sets and ceramic moulds made with the alternately applied soluble silicate binder and ethyl silicate.Additionally, self-supported moulds based entirely on the Ekosil binder were used. In the analysis of castings, the following parameters were examined: a linear dimensional accuracy, the state of surface microgeometry and the possibility of metal penetration into a complex ceramic mould, allowing also for the presence of capillary phenomena. In the process of casting with back-pressure, the pressure values of 500 hPa, 600 hPa and 700 hPa were applied in the chamber where the ceramic mould was located, with the temperature of the said mould kept at a level of 150  10C.

  18. Effect of glass-ceramic-processing cycle on the metallurgical properties of candidate alloys for actuator housings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirick, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes the results from an investigation on the effect of a glass ceramic processing cycle on the metallurgical properties of metal candidates for actuator housings. The cycle consists of a 980/sup 0/C sealing step, a 650/sup 0/C crystallization step and a 475/sup 0/C annealing step. These temperatue excursions are within the same temperature regime as annealing and heat treating processes normally employed for metals. Therefore, the effect of the processing cycle on metallurgical properties of microstructure, strength, hardness and ductility were examined. It was found that metal candidates which are single phase or solid solution alloys (such as 21-6-9, Hastelloy C-276 and Inconel 625) were not affected whereas multiphase or precipitation hardened alloys (such as Inconel 718 and Titanium ..beta..-C) were changed by the processing cycle for the glass ceramic.

  19. A hydrometallurgical process for recovering total metal values from waste monolithic ceramic capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabaharan, G; Barik, S P; Kumar, B

    2016-06-01

    A hydrometallurgical process for recovering the total metal values from waste monolithic ceramic capacitors was investigated. The process parameters such as time, temperature, acid concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration and other reagents (amount of zinc dust and sodium formate) were optimized. Base metals such as Ba, Ti, Sn, Cu and Ni are leached out in two stages using HCl in stage 1 and HCl with H2O2 in stage 2. More than 99% of leaching efficiency for base metals (Cu, Ni, Ba, Ti and Sn) was achieved. Precious metals such as Au and Pd are leached out using aquaregia and nitric acid was used for the leaching of Ag. Base metals (Ba, Ti, Sn, Cu and Ni) are recovered by selective precipitation using H2SO4 and NaOH solution. In case of precious metals, Au and Pd from the leach solution were precipitated out using sodium metabisulphite and sodium formate, respectively. Sodium chloride was used for the precipitation of Ag from leach solution. Overall recovery for base metals and precious metals are 95% and 92%, respectively. Based on the results of the present study, a process flow diagram was proposed for commercial application.

  20. Processing, Microstructure and Electric Properties of Buried Resistors in Low Temperature Co-Fired Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimos, D.B.; Kotula, P.G.; Miera, B.K.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Yang, Pin

    1999-09-17

    The electrical properties were investigated for ruthenium oxide based devitrifiable resistors embedded within low temperature co-fired ceramics. Special attention was given to the processing conditions and their affects on resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). Results indicate that the conductance for these buried resistors is limited by tunneling of charge carriers through the thin glass layer between ruthenium oxide particles. A modified version of the tunneling barrier model is proposed to more accurately account for the microstructure ripening observed during thermal processing. The model parameters determined from curve fitting show that charging energy (i.e., the energy required for a charge carrier to tunnel through the glass barrier) is strongly dependent on particle size and particle-particle separation between ruthenium oxide grains. Initial coarsening of ruthenium oxide grains was found to reduce the charging energy and lower the resistance. However, when extended ripening occurs, the increase in particle-particle separation increases the charging energy, reduces the tunneling probability and gives rise to a higher resistance. The trade-off between these two effects results an optimum microstructure with a minimum resistance and TCR. Furthermore, the TCR of these resistors has been shown to be governed by the magnitude of the charging energy. Model parameters determined by our analysis appear to provide quantitative physical interpretations to the microstructural change in the resistor, which in turn, are controlled by the processing conditions.

  1. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kats, C. M.

    2008-10-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are searching for colloidal materials with specific physical properties to better understand our surrounding world.Until recently research in colloid science was mainly focused on spherical (isotropic) particles. Monodisperse spherical colloids serve as a model system as they exhibit similar phase behaviour as molecular and atomic systems. Nevertheless, in many cases the spherical shape is not sufficient to reach the desired research goals. Recently the more complex synthesis methods of anisotropic model colloids has strongly developed. This thesis should be regarded as a contribution to this research area. Anisotropic colloids can be used as a building block for complex structures and are expected not only to lead to the construction of full photonic band gap materials. They will also serve as new, more realistic, models systems for their molecular analogues. Therefore the term ‘molecular colloids” is sometimes used to qualify these anisotropic colloidal particles. In the introduction of this thesis, we give an overview of the main synthesis techniques for anisotropic colloids. Chapter 2 describes the method of etching silicon wafers to construct monodisperse silicon rods. They subsequently were oxidized and labeled (coated) with a fluorescent silica layer. The first explorative phase behaviour of these silica rods was studied. The particles showed a nematic ordering in charge stabilized suspensions. Chapter 3 describes the synthesis of colloidal gold rods and the (mesoporous) silica coating of gold rods. Chapter 4 describes the physical and optical properties of these particles when thermal energy is added. This is compared to the case where the particles are irradiated with

  2. Processing and characterization of phase boundaries in ceramic and metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Liang

    The goal of this dissertation work was to explore and describe advanced characterization of novel materials processing. These characterizations were carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and X-ray diffraction techniques. The materials studied included ceramics and metallic materials. The first part of this dissertation focuses on the processing, and the resulting interfacial microstructure of ceramics joined using spin-on interlayers. SEM, TEM, and indentation tests were used to investigate the interfacial microstructural and mechanical property evolution of polycrystalline zirconia bonded to glass ceramic MaCor(TM), and polycrystalline alumina to single crystal alumina. Interlayer assisted specimens were joined using a thin amorphous silica interlayer. This interlayer was produced by spin coating an organic based silica bond material precursor and curing at 200°C, followed by joining in a microwave cavity or conventional electric furnace. Experimental results indicate that in the joining of the zirconia and MaCor(TM) no significant interfacial microstructural and mechanical property differences developed between materials joined either with or without interlayers, due to the glassy nature of MaCor(TM). The bond interface was non-planar, as a result of the strong wetting of MaCor(TM) and silica and dissolution of the zirconia. However, without the aid of a silica interlayer, sapphire and 98% polycrystalline alumina failed to join under the experimental conditions under this study. A variety of interfacial morphologies have been observed, including amorphous regions, fine crystalline alumina, and intimate contact between the sapphire and polycrystalline alumina. In addition, the evolution of the joining process from the initial sputter-cure to the final joining state and joining mechanisms were characterized. The second part of this dissertation focused on the effects of working and heat treatment on microstructure, texture

  3. Conversion of Rapid Prototyping Models into Metallic Tools by Ceramic Moulding—an Indirect Rapid Tooling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teresa; P; DUARTE; J; M; FERREIRA; F; Jorge; LINO; A; BARBEDO; Rui; NETO

    2002-01-01

    A process to convert models made by rapid prototypi ng techniques like SL (stereolitography) and LOM (laminated object manufacturing) or by conventional techniques (silicones, resins, wax, etc.) into metallic mould s or tools has been developed. The main purpose of this technique is to rapidly obtain the first prototypes of parts, for plastics injection, forging or any oth er manufacturing process using the tools produced by casting a metal into a cera mic mould. Briefly, it can be said that the ceramic...

  4. Processamento e avaliação das propriedades de tubos cerâmicos porosos para microfiltração de emulsões Processing and evaluation of porous ceramics for micro filtration of emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Rosa

    2006-06-01

    from oil, and in the separation of proteins of the milk. The objective of this work is the production of porous ceramics tubes for fuel micro filtration. The first stage of the research was the production of porous ceramics by colloidal processing and evaluation of its final physical, fluid dynamic and mechanical properties. In a second stage the performance of these ceramic tubes during the micro filtration of fuel was analysed. The final properties of porous ceramics were evaluated according to the changes in the composition and sintering conditions. After firing, the ceramic tubes had their porosity in the range of 48 to 65%-vol, narrow distribution with pore diameters bellow than 1 µm and constants of Darcian (k1 and nonDarcian (k2 permeability of 10-15 m² and 10-11 m, respectively. These properties are similar to the commercial imported products and therefore these ceramics have a great potential of application in micro filtration processes.

  5. Cross-interaction drives stratification in drying film of binary colloidal mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jiajia; Jiang, Ying; Doi, Masao

    2017-01-01

    When a liquid film of colloidal solution consisting of particles of different sizes is dried on a substrate, the colloids often stratify, where smaller colloids are laid upon larger colloids. This phenomenon is counter intuitive because larger colloids which have smaller diffusion constant are expected to remain near the surface during the drying process, leaving the layer of larger colloids on top of smaller colloids. Here we show that the phenomenon is caused by the interaction between the ...

  6. Nucleation in food colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povey, Malcolm J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation in food colloids has been studied in detail using ultrasound spectroscopy. Our data show that classical nucleation theory (CNT) remains a sound basis from which to understand nucleation in food colloids and analogous model systems using n-alkanes. Various interpretations and modifications of CNT are discussed with regard to their relevance to food colloids. Much of the evidence presented is based on the ultrasound velocity spectrometry measurements which has many advantages for the study of nucleating systems compared to light scattering and NMR due to its sensitivity at low solid contents and its ability to measure true solid contents in the nucleation and early crystal growth stages. Ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy also responds to critical fluctuations in the induction region. We show, however, that a periodic pressure fluctuation such as a quasi-continuous (as opposed to a pulse comprising only a few pressure cycles) ultrasound field can alter the nucleation process, even at very low acoustic intensity. Thus care must be taken when using ultrasound techniques that the measurements do not alter the studied processes. Quasi-continuous ultrasound fields may enhance or suppress nucleation and the criteria to determine such effects are derived. The conclusions of this paper are relevant to colloidal systems in foods, pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals, cosmetics, and personal products.

  7. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the 7F0→5D0 transition in Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ∼15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfin...

  8. Fabrication and characterization of LiH ceramic pebbles by wet process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Maoqiao; Zhang, Yingchun, E-mail: zycustb@163.com; Hong, Ming; Liu, Zhiang; Leng, Jiaxun; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Wenchang

    2014-09-15

    Lithium hydride (LiH) ceramic pebbles, a new potential tritium breeding material in fusion–fission or fusion reactor blanket, were prepared by wet process for the first time. XRD results showed that LiOH, LiOH·H{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}O were found in the surface of LiH pebbles. However, the pure phase of LiH pebbles without cracks could be obtained by paraffin wax coating technique. The average value (a.v.) of the sphericity and the diameter were 1.01 and 0.98 mm, respectively. The LiH pebbles sintered at 450 °C for 3 h under 80 ml/min flowing argon, reached ∼92.3% of the theoretical density, with the grain size of 5.59 μm (a.v.). And the crush load was measured to be 15 N on average. The described wet process exhibited multiple advantages for fabricating LiH pebbles.

  9. FY16 Annual Accomplishments - Waste Form Development and Performance: Evaluation Of Ceramic Waste Forms - Comparison Of Hot Isostatic Pressed And Melt Processed Fabrication Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dandeneau, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-10-13

    FY16 efforts were focused on direct comparison of multi-phase ceramic waste forms produced via melt processing and HIP methods. Based on promising waste form compositions previously devised at SRNL, simulant material was prepared at SRNL and a portion was sent to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) for HIP treatments, while the remainder of the material was melt processed at SRNL. The microstructure, phase formation, elemental speciation, and leach behavior, and radiation stability of the fabricated ceramics was performed. In addition, melt-processed ceramics designed with different fractions of hollandite, zirconolite, perovskite, and pyrochlore phases were investigated. for performance and properties.

  10. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  11. Soil colloidal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent understanding that organic and inorganic contaminants are often transported via colloidal particles has increased interest in colloid science. The primary importance of colloids in soil science stems from their surface reactivity and charge characteristics. Characterizations of size, shape,...

  12. Synthesis, characterization and bioactivity of a calcium-phosphate glass-ceramics obtained by the sol-gel processing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jmal, Nouha; Bouaziz, Jamel

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a calcium-phosphate glass-ceramics was successfully obtained by heat treatment of a mixture of 26.52 in wt.% of fluorapatite (Fap) and 73.48 in wt.% of 77S (77 SiO214 CaO9 P2O5 in wt.%) gel. The calcium phosphate-glass-ceramics was prepared by sol-gel process with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), triethyl phosphate (TEP), calcium nitrate and fluorapatite. The synthesized powders were characterized by some commonly used tools such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and thin-film X-ray diffraction (TF-XRD). The obtained results seemed to confirm the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite (Hap) nano-phase in the glass. Moreover, an in-vitro evaluation of the glass-ceramic was performed. In addition, to assess its bioactive capacity, it was soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF) at different time intervals. The SEM, EDS and TF-XRD analyses showed the deposition of hydroxyapatite on the surface of the specimens after three days of immersion in SBF solution. The mechanical properties of the obtained material such as rupture strength, Vickers hardness and elastic modulus were measured. In addition, the friction coefficient of calcium phosphate-glass-ceramics was tested. The values of the composite of rupture strength (24MPa), Vickers hardness (214Hv), Young's modulus (52.3GPa), shear modulus (19GPa) and friction coefficient (0.327) were obtained. This glass-ceramics can have useful applications in dental prostheses. Indeed, this material may have promising applications for implants because of its content of fluorine, the effective protector against dental caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Indentation strength of silicon nitride ceramics processed by spark plasma sintering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeggagh, N. [Université de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, LaMCoS CNRS UMR5259, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Université de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS CNRS UMR5510, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Tohoku University, 6-6-11, Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Joly-Pottuz, L., E-mail: lucile.joly-pottuz@insa-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS CNRS UMR5510, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Chevalier, J. [Université de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS CNRS UMR5510, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Omori, M.; Hashida, T. [Tohoku University, 6-6-11, Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Nélias, D. [Université de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, LaMCoS CNRS UMR5259, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2015-09-17

    We investigated the influence of the microstructure on the true stress–strain curve of silicon nitride based ceramics. The materials were processed by spark plasma sintering technique. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with fine, average and coarse microstructures were obtained. Load versus displacement curves (P–h) were obtained by means of instrumented indentation technique using diamond coni-spherical tip. The experimental data were coupled with a minimization method based on the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm and the non-linear part of the mechanical response was identified. Based on the obtained stress–strain curves, rolling contact simulations were performed. In addition, the nature of Hertzian contact damage was examined in the material with coarse microstructure using diamond indenters of radii 0.2 and 1 mm. The surface damage was observed under optical microscopy while Focused Ion Beam Sectioning technique permitted to image the subsurface damage. An evident size effect was noticed: fracture consisting of classical ring cracks dominated at large scale while distributed microcracks beneath the indent dominated at small scale.

  14. COLLOID RELEASE FROM DIFFERENT SOIL DEPTH

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Chen; Yue Niu; Boya Wang; Kamal Tawfiq

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring clay colloidal particles are heavily involved in sediment processes in the subsurface soil. Due to the import ance of these processes in the subsurface environment, the transport of clay colloidal particles has been studied in several disciplines, including soil sciences, petr ology, hydrology, etc. Specifically, in environmental engineering, clay colloid re lease and transport in the sediments have been extensively investigated, which are motiv ated by environmental conce...

  15. Relaxation dynamics of the conductive processes in BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyet, Y., E-mail: yuri@cnt.uo.edu.cu [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales. Universidad de Oriente, Santiago de Cuba, C.P. 90500 (Cuba); Guerrero, F. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales. Universidad de Oriente, Santiago de Cuba, C.P. 90500 (Cuba); Perez de la Cruz, J. [INESCPorto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007, Porto (Portugal)

    2010-07-25

    The temperature and frequency dependences of the undoped BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics dielectric properties were measured between 25 deg. C and 700 deg. C and 100 Hz to 10 MHz, respectively. A dielectric anomaly was observed at low frequencies in the temperature range of 400-700 deg. C. This anomaly was associated to a low frequency dispersion process taking place at high temperature. The relaxation dynamics of the conductive process in BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics was investigated. A relaxation function in the time domain ({Phi}(t)) was determined from the frequency dependence of the dielectric modulus, using a relaxation function in the frequency domain (F*({omega})). In BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics context, the best relaxation functions (F*({omega})), in the temperature ranges of 220-400 deg. C and 425 deg. C and 630 deg. C, were found to be a Cole-Cole and Davidson-Cole distribution functions, respectively. The relaxation function (f(t)) obtained by the time domain method was found to be a Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) function type. The activation energy values (0.72 eV and 0.8 eV) reveal a mechanism correlated with the movement of single ionized oxygen vacancies and electrons of the second level of ionization, probably due to the formation of a titanium liquid phase during the sintering process.

  16. A process efficiency assessment of serum protein removal from milk using ceramic graded permeability microfiltration membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-Marchand, D; Doyen, A; Britten, M; Pouliot, Y

    2016-07-01

    Microfiltration (MF) is a well-known process that can be used in the dairy industry to separate caseins from serum proteins (SP) in skim milk using membranes with a pore diameter of 0.1μm. Graded permeability ceramic membranes have been studied widely as means of improving milk fractionation by overcoming problems encountered with other MF membranes. The ideal operating parameters for process efficiency in terms of membrane selectivity, permeate flux, casein loss, SP transmission, energy consumption, and dilution with water remain to be determined for this membrane. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of transmembrane pressure (TMP), volumetric concentration factor (VCF), and diafiltration on overall process efficiency. Skim milk was processed using a pilot-scale MF system equipped with 0.72-m(2) graded permeability membranes with a pore size of 0.1μm. In the first experiment, in full recycle mode, TMP was set at 124, 152, 179, or 207 kPa by adjusting the permeate pressure at the outlet. Whereas TMP had no significant effect on permeate and retentate composition, 152 kPa was found to be optimal for SP removal during concentration and concentration or diafiltration experiments. When VCF was increased to 3×, SP rejection coefficient increased along with energy consumption and total casein loss, whereas SP removal rate decreased. Diafiltering twice allowed an increase in total SP removal but resulted in a substantial increase in energy consumption and casein loss. It also reduced the SP removal rate by diluting permeate. The membrane surface area required for producing cheese milk by blending whole milk, cream, and MF retentate (at different VCF) was estimated for different cheese milk casein concentrations. For a given casein concentration, the same quantity of permeate and SP would be produced, but less membrane surface area would be needed at a lower retentate VCF. Microfiltration has great potential as a process of adding value to conventional

  17. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems).

  18. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  19. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  20. Processing, basic characterization and standard dielectric measurements on PLZT x/65/35 (4 ≤ x ≤ 11) ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Krzysztof; Suchanicz, Jan; Livinsh, Maris; Sternberg, Andris

    2014-11-01

    The influence of external stress (0-800 bar) on the dielectric properties of lead lanthanum zirconium titanate (PLZT) x/65/35 (4 ≤ x ≤ 11) ceramics was investigated. Applying uniaxial pressure leads to a change in the peak intensity of the electric permittivity (ɛ), in its frequency dispersion as well as in the dielectric hysteresis. The peak intensity of ɛ becomes broader and shifts to lower temperatures for PLZT x/65/35 with x = 4, 7, 9.75 and 11, with increasing pressure, on heating. It was concluded that applying uniaxial pressure induces an increase of Tm, and thus has a similar effect as the increase of the Ti ion concentration in the lead zirconium titanate (PZT) system. Results based on nanoregion switching processes under combined electromechanical loading were interpreted. Studies clearly showed that applied stress has a significant influence on the dielectric properties of PLZT ceramics.

  1. Influence of ceramic particulate type on microstructure and tensile strength of aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP was applied to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. Aluminum alloy AA6082 was used as the matrix material. Various ceramic particles, such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC, were used as reinforcement particle. AA6082 AMCs were produced using a set of optimized process parameters. The microstructure was studied using optical microscopy, filed emission scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diagram. The results indicated that the type of ceramic particle did not considerably vary the microstructure and ultimate tensile strength (UTS. Each type of ceramic particle provided a homogeneous dispersion in the stir zone irrespective of the location and good interfacial bonding. Nevertheless, AA6082/TiC AMC exhibited superior hardness and wear resistance compared to other AMCs produced in this work under the same set of experimental conditions. The strengthening mechanisms and the variation in the properties are correlated to the observed microstructure. The details of fracture mode are further presented.

  2. Study on an integrated process combining ozonation with ceramic ultra-filtration for decentralized supply of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia; Fan, Xiao J; Tao, Yi; Wei, De Q; Zhang, Xi H

    2014-09-19

    An integrated process was specifically developed for the decentralized supply of drinking water from micro-polluted surface water in the rural areas of China. The treatment process combined ozonation with ceramic ultra-filtration (UF), coagulation for pre-treatment and granular activated carbon filtration. A flat-sheet ceramic membrane was used with a cut-off of 60 nm and the measurement of 254 mm (length) × 240 mm (width) × 6 mm (thickness). Ozonation and ceramic UF was set up whthin one reactor. The experimental results showed that the removal efficiencies of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the formation potential of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and ammonia were 80%, 76%, 70% and 90%, respectively; that the turbidity of the product water was below 0.2 NTU and the particle count number (particles larger than 2 μm) was less than 50 counts per mL. The result also showed that all the pathogenic microorganisms were retained by the ceramic and that UF. Ozonation played a critical role in the control of membrane fouling and the removal of contaminants. Exactly, the membrane fouling can be controlled in situ with 3 mg L(-1) ozone at the permeate flux of 80 L m(-2) h(-1), yet the required dosage of ozone was dependent on the quality of the raw water. Therefore, this study is able to provide a highly compacted system for decentralized supply of high-quality drinking water in terms of both chemical and microbiological safety for the rural areas in China.

  3. Characterization of early-age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders using isothermal calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerman, Miloš; Tydlitát, Vratislav; Keppert, Martin; Čáchová, Monika; Černý, Robert, E-mail: cernyr@fsv.cvut.cz

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • Early age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders are analyzed within a wide range of component ratios. • The applied waste ceramic dust exhibits partial hydraulic properties, ettringite and calcite are formed. • Transition from tobermorite- to jennite-like structures is identified by SEM within the first 48 h. • The highest specific hydration heat after 300 h, 63 J/g, is measured for the binder containing 70% ceramic. • Substantial effect of the heat of wetting is observed, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. - Abstract: Early-age hydration processes in a lime-ceramic-water system are analyzed within the whole range of possible lime/ceramic ratios. The isothermal calorimetry shows a substantial effect of the heat of wetting on the total heat evolved, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. The highest specific hydration heat of 63 J/g during the analyzed 300-h hydration period exhibits the blended binder containing 70% ceramic and 30% lime which correlates well with the highest compressive and bending strengths of the paste prepared using this blend. Portlandite, ettringite and calcite are the main phases identified by the X-ray diffraction analysis after the hydration of ceramic-rich blends. According to the results of scanning electron microscopy, the initial course of pozzolanic reaction is for this type of binders characterized by the transition from tobermorite-like calcium-silicate-hydrate structures into jennite-like structures within the first 48 h. Blends with the ceramic content lower than 70% show a high portion of portlandite, calcite is present in low amount, and the jennite-like structures are observed after 48 h, following the initial formation of components with a very high Ca content. The favorable properties of the ceramic-rich blended binders can be explained by the partial hydraulic character of the ceramic. With the specific hydration heat of 29 J/g after 300 h and compressive strength

  4. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2017-02-15

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other. Electrostatic stabilization of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute-solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute-solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  5. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-02-01

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other. Electrostatic stabilization of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute–solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute–solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  6. Scientiifc Research on Ancient Ceramic Production Processes and Techniques%中国古陶瓷工艺与技术科学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶国珍; 叶宏明; 叶佳星

    2015-01-01

    中国古陶瓷发展史,是一个传统陶瓷工艺与传统陶瓷技术不断进步的发展过程。不同陶瓷材料的科学应用,不同地区陶瓷制作工艺和技术的改良与提升,使中国古陶瓷制作从原料自然应用发展到技术应用,从生活需求的制陶工艺发展到文化内涵的制瓷技术,这是中国陶瓷工艺技术科学应用取得的成就。中国陶瓷制作从原料科学应用上取得的成就,使陶瓷制作工艺技术得以不断精致发展,并在宋代达到了登峰造极的地步。%The history of Chinese ancient ceramics is a process in which traditional ceramic production technology steadily advanced. The scientiifc application of different ceramic materials and the improvement of ceramic making processes and techniques in different areas made possible the progress from the natural use to the technical use of ceramic materials and the transformation from the production of ceramics as life necessities to the manufacture of ceramics as cultural articles. The success in the scientiifc application of ceramic materials promoted the reifnement of ceramic production technology and brought it to its height of all time in Song Dynasty.

  7. Towards Directional Colloidal Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, M.

    2015-01-01

    Colloids are particles with a size on the scale of microns in at least one dimension. The central theme of this thesis is the synthesis of model colloids with anisotropic interactions - often called `patchy' colloids, as well as the search for new ways to assemble such colloids. Methods to build

  8. Adsorption, Desorption, Surface Diffusion, Lattice Defect Formation, and Kink Incorporation Processes of Particles on Growth Interfaces of Colloidal Crystals with Attractive Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Suzuki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Good model systems are required in order to understand crystal growth processes because, in many cases, precise incorporation processes of atoms or molecules cannot be visualized easily at the atomic or molecular level. Using a transmission-type optical microscope, we have successfully observed in situ adsorption, desorption, surface diffusion, lattice defect formation, and kink incorporation of particles on growth interfaces of colloidal crystals of polystyrene particles in aqueous sodium polyacrylate solutions. Precise surface transportation and kink incorporation processes of the particles into the colloidal crystals with attractive interactions were observed in situ at the particle level. In particular, contrary to the conventional expectations, the diffusion of particles along steps around a two-dimensional island of the growth interface was not the main route for kink incorporation. This is probably due to the number of bonds between adsorbed particles and particles in a crystal; the number exceeds the limit at which a particle easily exchanges its position to the adjacent one along the step. We also found novel desorption processes of particles from steps to terraces, attributing them to the assistance of attractive forces from additionally adsorbing particles to the particles on the steps.

  9. Preparation and characteristics of porous ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei SHAO; Peiping ZHANG; Liyan MA; Juanjuan LIU

    2007-01-01

    Pyrophyllite is always used for making porous ceramics. In order to design the preparation technics of porous ceramics with pyrophyllite reasonably we must know the classifications, characteristics, properties and applications of porous ceramics. The classification and characteristics of porous ceramics are reviewed in this article; and several common preparations with their advantages and disadvantages are also introduced. The authors discussed the problems existing in researching and developing process for porous ceramics, and forecasted the development prospect of porous ceramics.

  10. Decorative design of ceramic tiles adapted to inkjet printing employing digital image processing; Diseno decorativo de pavimentos ceramicos adaptado a inyeccion de tinta mediante tratamiento digital de imagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defez, B.; Santiago-Praderas, V.; Lluna, E.; Peris-Fajarnes, G.; Dunai, E.

    2013-09-01

    The ceramic tile sector is a very competitive industry. The designer's proficiency to offer new models of the decorated surface, adapted to the production means, plays a very important role in the competitiveness. In the present work, we analyze the evolution of the design process in the ceramic sector, as much as the changes experimented in parallel by the printing equipment. Afterwards, we present a new concept of ceramic design, based on digital image processing. This technique allows the generation of homogeneous and non-repetitive designs for large surfaces, especially thought for inkjet printing. With the programmed algorithms we have compiled a prototype software for the assistance of the ceramic design. This tool allows creating continuous designs for large surfaces saving developing time. (Author)

  11. On the Densification Behavior of (0.2, 0.5, and 1 Wt Pct) CNT-YSZ Ceramic Composites Processed via Spark Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanam, Abhinav; Bichler, Lukas; Fong, Randy

    2015-08-01

    Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) is a promising thermal insulating ceramic for high temperature applications due to its stability and chemical inertness. As was demonstrated with other technical ceramics ( e.g., Alumina), addition of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) to a ceramic matrix may significantly enhance its mechanical properties. In this work, 8 mol pct YSZ with 0.2, 0.5, and 1 wt pct CNT composites were fabricated via the spark plasma sintering process. The densification, Vicker's microhardness, specific gravity, and microstructure evolution of the composites were investigated. The results suggest that the addition of CNTs to YSZ hindered densification and grain growth during SPS processing leading to inhomogeneous grain size distribution. However, the CNTs had a profound impact on the hardness of the composite ceramics, with an increase from 697 HV (YSZ) to 1195 HV (1 wt pctCNT-YSZ).

  12. Research & Development of Materials/Processing Methods for Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Phase 2 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szweda, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Initiative that begun in 1992 has led the way for Industry, Academia, and Government to carry out a 10 year R&D plan to develop CFCCs for these industrial applications. In Phase II of this program, Dow Corning has led a team of OEM's, composite fabricators, and Government Laboratories to develop polymer derived CFCC materials and processes for selected industrial applications. During this phase, Dow Corning carried extensive process development and representative component demonstration activities on gas turbine components, chemical pump components and heat treatment furnace components.

  13. Continuing the Validation of CCIM Processability for Glass Ceramic HLLW Forms: Plan for Test AFY14CCIM-GC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vince Maio

    2014-04-01

    This test plan covers test AFY14CCIM-GC1which is the first of two scheduled FY-2014 test runs involving glass ceramic waste forms in the Idaho National Laboratory’s Cold Crucible Induction Melter Pilot Plant. The test plan is based on the successes and challenges of previous tests performed in FY-2012 and FY-2013. The purpose of this test is to continue to collect data for validating the glass ceramic High Level Liquid Waste form processability advantages using Cold Crucible Induction Melter technology. The major objective of AFYCCIM-GC1 is to complete additional proposed crucible pouring and post tapping controlled cooling experiments not completed during previous tests due to crucible drain failure. This is necessary to qualify that no heat treatments in standard waste disposal canisters are necessary for the operational scale production of glass ceramic waste forms. Other objectives include the production and post-test analysis of surrogate waste forms made from separate pours into the same graphite mold canister, testing the robustness of an upgraded crucible bottom drain and drain heater assembly, testing the effectiveness of inductive melt initiation using a resistive starter ring with a square wave configuration, and observing the tapped molten flow behavior in pans with areas identical to standard High Level Waste disposal canisters. Testing conditions, the surrogate waste composition, key testing steps, testing parameters, and sampling and analysis requirements are defined.

  14. Colloidal Covalent Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) polymer networks with designed topology and chemical functionality, permanent porosity, and high surface areas. These features are potentially useful for a broad range of applications, including catalysis, optoelectronics, and energy storage devices. But current COF syntheses offer poor control over the material’s morphology and final form, generally providing insoluble and unprocessable microcrystalline powder aggregates. COF polymerizations are often performed under conditions in which the monomers are only partially soluble in the reaction solvent, and this heterogeneity has hindered understanding of their polymerization or crystallization processes. Here we report homogeneous polymerization conditions for boronate ester-linked, 2D COFs that inhibit crystallite precipitation, resulting in stable colloidal suspensions of 2D COF nanoparticles. The hexagonal, layered structures of the colloids are confirmed by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and kinetic characterization provides insight into the growth process. The colloid size is modulated by solvent conditions, and the technique is demonstrated for four 2D boronate ester-linked COFs. The diameter of individual COF nanoparticles in solution is monitored and quantified during COF growth and stabilization at elevated temperature using in situ variable-temperature liquid cell transmission electron microscopy imaging, a new characterization technique that complements conventional bulk scattering techniques. Solution casting of the colloids yields a free-standing transparent COF film with retained crystallinity and porosity, as well as preferential crystallite orientation. Collectively this structural control provides new opportunities for understanding COF formation and designing morphologies for device applications. PMID:28149954

  15. Colloidal Covalent Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian J; Parent, Lucas R; Overholts, Anna C; Beaucage, Peter A; Bisbey, Ryan P; Chavez, Anton D; Hwang, Nicky; Park, Chiwoo; Evans, Austin M; Gianneschi, Nathan C; Dichtel, William R

    2017-01-25

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) polymer networks with designed topology and chemical functionality, permanent porosity, and high surface areas. These features are potentially useful for a broad range of applications, including catalysis, optoelectronics, and energy storage devices. But current COF syntheses offer poor control over the material's morphology and final form, generally providing insoluble and unprocessable microcrystalline powder aggregates. COF polymerizations are often performed under conditions in which the monomers are only partially soluble in the reaction solvent, and this heterogeneity has hindered understanding of their polymerization or crystallization processes. Here we report homogeneous polymerization conditions for boronate ester-linked, 2D COFs that inhibit crystallite precipitation, resulting in stable colloidal suspensions of 2D COF nanoparticles. The hexagonal, layered structures of the colloids are confirmed by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and kinetic characterization provides insight into the growth process. The colloid size is modulated by solvent conditions, and the technique is demonstrated for four 2D boronate ester-linked COFs. The diameter of individual COF nanoparticles in solution is monitored and quantified during COF growth and stabilization at elevated temperature using in situ variable-temperature liquid cell transmission electron microscopy imaging, a new characterization technique that complements conventional bulk scattering techniques. Solution casting of the colloids yields a free-standing transparent COF film with retained crystallinity and porosity, as well as preferential crystallite orientation. Collectively this structural control provides new opportunities for understanding COF formation and designing morphologies for device applications.

  16. Processing of Ceramics by Biopolymers. Ultrastructure-Property Relationships in Biocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-09

    Brandon and A. Rosen tI.rael University Press, Jerusalem. 1969), p. 209. 4. W. J. Minford. F. L. Kenna-d. R. C. Bradt, and V. S. Stubican, in Ceramic...N.J. I 15. Penman, A., and G. R. Sanderson . 1972. A Method for the Determination of Uronic Acid I Sequence in Alginates. Carbohy. Res. 25:273-282. I

  17. Laser melt injection of ceramic particles in metals : Processing, microstructure and properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelík, V.; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an overview of the possibilities of the laser melt injection (LMI) methodology to enhance the surface of light-weighted metals by adding hard ceramic particles in the top layer, with the aim to enhance the wear resistance and to increase the hardness. In par

  18. Dynamic Failure Processes Under Confining Stress in AlON, a Transparent Polycrystalline Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    using the Archimedes method, to be 3.673 g/cm3. Table 1 illustrates the representative properties of polycrystalline AlON (unless otherwise stated...Solids in press. [46] Hockey, B. J. (1971): J. Amer. Ceram. Soc. 54, 223-231. [47] Hill, R. (1950): The Mathematical Theory of Plasticity. Oxford

  19. A comparison of different powder compaction processes adopted for synthesis of lead-free piezoelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, M. L. V.; Bhanu Prasad, V. V.; James, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Barium zirconium titanate, Ba(Zr0.15Ti0.85)O3 nano-crystalline powders were synthesized using high energy ball milling. The calcined powders were compacted adopting two different approaches viz. the conventional uniaxial pressing and cold-isostatic pressing (CIP) and the compacts were sintered at 1350 °C. A single phase perovskite structure was observed in both cases. BZT ceramics compacted using CIP technique exhibited enhanced dielectric and ferroelectric properties compared to ceramics compacted by uniaxial pressing. The polarization current peaks have been used in this paper as an experimental evidence to prove the existence of ferroelectricity in the BZT ceramics under study. The peak polarization current was found to be ~700% higher in case of cold iso-statically compacted ceramics. Similarly electric field induces strain showed a maximum strain ( S max) of 0.08% at an electric field of 28 kV/cm. The dielectric and ferroelectric properties observed are comparable to single crystals of the same material.

  20. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  1. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  2. Low Temperature Processing of Nanocrystalline Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) Thick Films and Ceramics by a Modified Sol-Gel Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiguang; Wang, Zhihong; Zhao, Changlei; Tan, Ooi Kiang; Hng, Huey Hoon

    2002-11-01

    Dispersing fine particles into a sol-gel matrix is a promising process to get a thick 0-3 composite coating layer. In this paper, we have further improved this modified sol-gel process by nanocrystalline composite technique to realize the low temperature annealing. Dense Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) thick films of 10 to 50 μm in thickness have been obtained on the platinum-coated silicon substrates by spin-coating at sintering temperature of 600-700°C and fully developed submicron-sized grains have been demonstrated in screen-printing piezoelectric films on alumina substrates at sintering temperature of 700-800°C. The dependence of various properties such as microstructure, crystallization, ferroelectric and dielectric properties of such made thick films on the processing parameters have been investigated. For a 10 μm-thick film spin-coated on silicon wafer, the dielectric loss and relative permittivity are 0.010 and 1024, respectively, at 1 kHz. The remanent polarization (Pr) and the coercive field (Ec) are 13.6 μC/cm2 and 34.5 kV/cm, respectively. Obviously, such made thick film has comparable properties with bulk PZT ceramic. This novel technique can be extensively used in sol-gel, screen-printing, tape-casting, even in traditional ceramic process to reduce the process temperature.

  3. An in-situ Observation on Initial Aggregation Process of Colloidal Particles near Three-Phase Contact Line of Air, Water and Vertical Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Can; WANG Yu-Ren; LAN Ding; DUAN Li; KANG Qi

    2008-01-01

    The self-assembling process near the three-phase contact line of air, water and vertical substrate is widely used to produce various kinds of nanostructured materials and devices. We perform an in-situ observation on the selfassembling process in the vicinity of the three phase contact line. Three kinds of aggregations, i.e. particle-particle aggregation, particle-chain aggregation and chain-chain aggregation, in the initial stage of vertical deposition process are revealed by our experiments. It is found that the particle-particle aggregation and the particle-chain aggregation can be qualitatively explained by the theory of the capillary immersion force and mirror image force,while the chain-chain aggregation leaves an opening question for the further studies. The present study may provide more deep insight into the self-assembling process of colloidal particles.

  4. Continuous flow synthesis of nanoparticles using ceramic microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de Pedro, S; Puyol, M; Alonso-Chamarro, J

    2010-10-15

    A microfluidic system based on the low-temperature co-fired ceramics technology (LTCC) is proposed to reproducibly carry out a simple one-phase synthesis and functionalization of monodispersed gold nanoparticles. It takes advantage of the LTCC technology, offering a fast prototyping without the need to use sophisticated facilities, reducing significantly the cost and production time of microfluidic systems. Some other interesting advantages of the ceramic materials compared to glass, silicon or polymers are their versatility and chemical resistivity. The technology enables the construction of multilayered systems, which can integrate other mechanical, electronic and fluidic components in a single substrate. This approach allows rapid, easy, low cost and automated synthesis of the gold colloidal, thus it becomes a useful approach in the progression from laboratory scale to pilot-line scale processes, which is currently demanded.

  5. Influence of Solution Properties and Process Parameters on the Formation and Morphology of YSZ and NiO Ceramic Nanofibers by Electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadafalch Gazquez, Gerard; Smulders, Vera; Veldhuis, Sjoerd A; Wieringa, Paul; Moroni, Lorenzo; Boukamp, Bernard A; Ten Elshof, Johan E

    2017-01-13

    The fabrication process of ceramic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and nickel oxide nanofibers by electrospinning is reported. The preparation of hollow YSZ nanofibers and aligned nanofiber arrays is also demonstrated. The influence of the process parameters of the electrospinning process, the physicochemical properties of the spinning solutions, and the thermal treatment procedure on spinnability and final microstructure of the ceramic fibers was determined. The fiber diameter can be varied from hundreds of nanometers to more than a micrometer by controlling the solution properties of the electrospinning process, while the grain size and surface roughness of the resulting fibers are mainly controlled via the final thermal annealing process. Although most observed phenomena are in qualitative agreement with previous studies on the electrospinning of polymeric nanofibers, one of the main differences is the high ionic strength of ceramic precursor solutions, which may hamper the spinnability. A strategy to control the effective ionic strength of precursor solutions is also presented.

  6. Influence of Solution Properties and Process Parameters on the Formation and Morphology of YSZ and NiO Ceramic Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Cadafalch Gazquez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication process of ceramic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ and nickel oxide nanofibers by electrospinning is reported. The preparation of hollow YSZ nanofibers and aligned nanofiber arrays is also demonstrated. The influence of the process parameters of the electrospinning process, the physicochemical properties of the spinning solutions, and the thermal treatment procedure on spinnability and final microstructure of the ceramic fibers was determined. The fiber diameter can be varied from hundreds of nanometers to more than a micrometer by controlling the solution properties of the electrospinning process, while the grain size and surface roughness of the resulting fibers are mainly controlled via the final thermal annealing process. Although most observed phenomena are in qualitative agreement with previous studies on the electrospinning of polymeric nanofibers, one of the main differences is the high ionic strength of ceramic precursor solutions, which may hamper the spinnability. A strategy to control the effective ionic strength of precursor solutions is also presented.

  7. Novel processing of bioglass ceramics from silicone resins containing micro- and nano-sized oxide particle fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, L; Bernardo, E; Colombo, P; Cacciotti, I; Bianco, A; Bellucci, D; Sola, A; Cannillo, V

    2014-08-01

    Highly porous scaffolds with composition similar to those of 45S5 and 58S bioglasses were successfully produced by an innovative processing method based on preceramic polymers containing micro- and nano-sized fillers. Silica from the decomposition of the silicone resins reacted with the oxides deriving from the fillers, yielding glass ceramic components after heating at 1000°C. Despite the limited mechanical strength, the obtained samples possessed suitable porous architecture and promising biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics, as testified by preliminary in vitro tests.

  8. Processing and characterizations of BNT-KNN ceramics for actuator applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallam Chandrasekhar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BNT-KNN powder (with composition 0.93Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3–0.07K0.5Na0.5NbO3 was synthesized as a single perovskite phase by conventional solid state reaction route and dense ceramics were obtained by sintering of powder compacts at 1100 °C for 4 h. Dielectric study confirmed relaxor behaviour, whereas the microstructure study showed sharp cornered cubic like grains with an average grain size ∼1.15 µm. The saturated polarization vs. electric field (P-E hysteresis loops confirmed the ferroelectric (FE nature while the butterfly shaped strain vs. electric field (S-E loops suggested the piezoelectric nature of the BNT-KNN ceramic samples. Maximum electric field induced strain of ∼0.62% suggested the usefulness of this system for actuator applications.

  9. Processing and characterization of CaTiO3 perovskite ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Gralik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium titanate (CaTiO3 ceramics with perovskite structure were produced by solid state reaction. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3 and titanium dioxide (TiO2 were mixed (in molar ratios 1/1 and 3/2, and the obtained mixtures were calcined at 1150 °C in successive thermal cycles. The obtained samples were characterized by differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, measurement of particle size distribution and linear thermal shrinkage. XRD results indicated that the samples have perovskite CaTiO3 structure with small amount of secondary CaO and TiO2 phases, and their phase composition depends on the heat treatment conditions. The measured values of electrical resistivity were within the characteristic range of insulating materials and approach values corresponding to semiconducting ceramics.

  10. Processing and characterization of pure cordierite and zirconia-doped cordierite ceramic composite by precipitation technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Senthil Kumar; A Elaya Perumal; T R Vijayaram; Govindan Senguttuvan

    2015-06-01

    Pure cordierite and cordierite–ZrO2 composite (5–20 wt%) ceramics for various stoichiometric compositions were synthesized from standard raw materials by a novel precipitation technique. The analytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction, simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and bulk density were employed to evaluate the properties and microstructure. Results show that the ceramic composites consist of cordierite and zircon phases. The cordierite–zirconia (20 wt%) increased the fracture toughness value from 3.38 to 3.94 MPa, which is mainly due to martensitic transformation present in zirconia. The flexural strength of composite was found to increase from 126.46 to 297.62 MPa. The thermal expansion coefficients of cordierite and cordierite–zirconia (20 wt%) were 4.08 × 10−6 and 4.42 × 10−6 ° C−1 which may be due to the addition of zirconia.

  11. Processing, properties, and application of textured 0.72lead(magnesium niobate)-0.28lead titanate ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Kristen H.

    electromechanical coupling (k 33) of 81 vol% textured PMN-28PT (k33 = 0.79) was a significant fraction of single crystal (k33 = 0.91) and was higher than a commercial PMN-PT ceramic (k33 ˜ 0.74). The nonlinearity of the dielectric and piezoelectric response were investigated in textured ceramics and single crystal PMN-28PT using the Rayleigh approach. The reversible piezoelectric coefficient was found to increase significantly and the hysteretic contribution to the piezoelectric coefficient decreased significantly with an increase in texture volume. This indicates that increasing the texture volume decreases the non-180° domain wall contribution to the piezoelectric response in PMN-28PT. Finally, 81 vol% textured ceramics were also integrated into a Navy SONAR transducer design. In-water characterization of the transducers showed higher source levels, higher in-water coupling, higher acoustic intensity, and more bandwidth for the 81 vol% textured PMN-28PT tonpilz single elements compared to the ceramic PMN-28PT tonpilz element. In addition, an 81 vol% textured PMN-28PT tonpilz element showed large scale linearity in sound pressure levels as a function of drive level under high drive conditions (up to 2.33 kV/cm). The maximum electromechanical coupling obtained by the 81 vol% textured PMN-28PT transducer under high drive conditions was keff = 0.69. However, the resonance frequency shifted significantly during high drive tests (Deltafs = -19% at 3.7 kV/cm), evidence of a "soft" characteristic of the 81 vol% textured PMN-28PT, possibly caused by Sr2+ from the template particles. The results suggest there are limitations on the preload compressive stress (and thus drive level) for these textured ceramics, but this could be addressed with compositional modifications. The dielectric, piezoelectric and electromechanical properties have been significantly improved in textured PMN-PT ceramics of this study. Furthermore, scale-up in processing for incorporation into devices of highly

  12. Influence of Solution Properties and Process Parameters on the Formation and Morphology of YSZ and NiO Ceramic Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadafalch Gazquez, G.; Smulders, V.; Veldhuis, S.A.; Wieringa, P.; Moroni, L.; Boukamp, B.A.; Elshof, ten J.E.

    2017-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and nickel oxide nanofibers by electrospinning is reported. The preparation of hollow YSZ nanofibers and aligned nanofiber arrays is also demonstrated. The influence of the process parameters of the electrospinning process, the phys

  13. Industrial Ceramics: Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The expanding use of ceramic products in today's world can be seen in the areas of communications, construction, aerospace, textiles, metallurgy, atomic energy, and electronics. The demands of science have brought ceramics from an art to an industry using mass production and automated processes which requires the services of great numbers as the…

  14. Hybrid Processes Combining Photocatalysis and Ceramic Membrane Filtration for Degradation of Humic Acids in Saline Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Song

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the combined effects of photocatalysis with ceramic membrane filtration for the removal of humic acid in the presence of salt; to simulate saline wastewater conditions. The effects of operating parameters, such as salinity and TiO2 concentration on permeate fluxes, total organic carbon (TOC, and UV absorbance removal, were investigated. The interaction between the humic acids and TiO2 photocatalyst played an important role in the observed flux change during ceramic membrane filtration. The results for this hybrid system showed that the TOC removal was more than 70% for both without NaCl and with the 500 ppm NaCl concentration, and 62% and 66% for 1000 and 2000 ppm NaCl concentrations. The reduction in UV absorbance was more complete in the absence of NaCl compared to the presence of NaCl. The operation of the integrated photoreactor-ceramic membrane filter over five repeat cycles is described. It can be concluded that the overall removal performance of the hybrid system was influenced by the presence of salts, as salt leads to agglomeration of TiO2 particles by suppressing the stabilising effects of electrostatic repulsion and thereby reduces the effective surface contact between the pollutant and the photocatalyst.

  15. Hybrid Processes Combining Photocatalysis and Ceramic Membrane Filtration for Degradation of Humic Acids in Saline Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lili; Zhu, Bo; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel; Muthukumaran, Shobha

    2016-03-01

    This study explored the combined effects of photocatalysis with ceramic membrane filtration for the removal of humic acid in the presence of salt; to simulate saline wastewater conditions. The effects of operating parameters, such as salinity and TiO₂ concentration on permeate fluxes, total organic carbon (TOC), and UV absorbance removal, were investigated. The interaction between the humic acids and TiO₂ photocatalyst played an important role in the observed flux change during ceramic membrane filtration. The results for this hybrid system showed that the TOC removal was more than 70% for both without NaCl and with the 500 ppm NaCl concentration, and 62% and 66% for 1000 and 2000 ppm NaCl concentrations. The reduction in UV absorbance was more complete in the absence of NaCl compared to the presence of NaCl. The operation of the integrated photoreactor-ceramic membrane filter over five repeat cycles is described. It can be concluded that the overall removal performance of the hybrid system was influenced by the presence of salts, as salt leads to agglomeration of TiO₂ particles by suppressing the stabilising effects of electrostatic repulsion and thereby reduces the effective surface contact between the pollutant and the photocatalyst.

  16. Colloidal metal oxide nanoparticle systems: the new promising way to prevent antibiotic resistance during treatment of local infectious processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasenkov, Y.; Frolov, G.; Pogorelsky, I.; Latuta, N.; Gusev, A.; Kuznetsov, D.; Leont'ev, V.

    2015-11-01

    New bactericidal containing nanoparticles colloids for application in dentistry, maxillofacial surgery, urology, obstetrics, gynaecology, ENT, proctology have been developed. The various water colloidal nanodispersive systems of metals and oxides have been obtained by means of electric impulse - condensation (electroerosion) method. These systems are based pure elements and alloys of argentum (Ag), titanium dioxide (TiO2), iron oxide (Fe2O3), tantalum oxide (TaO), vanadium oxide (VO2), cobalt oxide (CoO), tantalum dioxide TaO2, zinc oxide (ZnO), copper oxide (CuO) and mixed suspensions of titanium, aluminium and molybdenum oxides. The research has been made on culture of dentobacterial plaque and mixed culture issued from gingival spaces. The composition of culture was identified with S.aureus, S.epidermidis and nonfermentable kinds of E.coli. The observation period lasted more than nineteen days. All solutions showed highly prolonged bactericidal activity in dilutions from the whole solution 1-20 mg/L. The bactericidal activity of powder specimen of silica containing Ag and Fe2O3 nanoparticles used as dental filling material and disintegrates of composite materials (produced by “StomaDent” CJSC) have been studied. Tested materials have long (up to 19 days and more) bactericidal activity.

  17. Colloidal aspects of texture perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.

    2010-01-01

    The perception of complex textures in food is strongly related to the way food is processed during eating, and is modulated by other basic characteristics, such as taste and aroma. An understanding at the colloidal level of the basic processes in the mouth is essential in order to link the compositi

  18. Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS): Microgravity Experiment Completed Operations on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Sankaran, Subramanian

    2003-01-01

    Immediately after mixing, the two-phase-like colloid-polymer critical point sample begins to phase separate, or de-mix, into two phases-one that resembles a gas and one that resembles a liquid, except that the particles are colloids and not atoms. The colloid-poor black regions (colloidal gas) grow bigger, and the colloid-rich white regions (colloidal liquid) become whiter as the domains further coarsen. Finally, complete phase separation is achieved, that is, just one region of each colloid-rich (white) and colloid-poor (black) phase. This process was studied over four decades of length scale, from 1 micrometer to 1 centimeter.

  19. Accelerated purification of colloidal silica sols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahnsen, E. B.; Garofalini, S.; Pechman, A.

    1979-01-01

    Accelerated purification process for colloidal sols using heat/deionization scheme, sharply reduces waiting time between deionization cycles from several months to a few days. Process produces same high purity silica sols as conventional methods.

  20. Electrolytic In-process Dressing (ELID) for high-efficiency, precision grinding of ceramic parts: An experiment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes Electrolytic In-process Dressing (ELID) as applied to the efficient, high-precision grinding of structural ceramics, and describes work performed jointly by Dr. B.P. Bandyopadhyay, University of North Dakota, and Dr. R. Ohmori, of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RINEN), Tokyo, Japan, from June through August, 1994. Dr. Ohmori pioneered the novel ELID grinding technology which incorporates electrolytically enhanced, in-process dressing of metal bonded superabrasive wheels. The principle of ELID grinding technology is discussed in the report as will its application for rough grinding and precision grinding. Two types of silicon nitride based ceramics (Kyocerals Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and Eaton`s SRBSN) were ground under various conditions with ELID methods. Mirror surface finishes were obtained with {number_sign} 4000 mesh size wheel (average grain size = 4 {mu}m). Results of these investigations are presented in this report. These include the effects of wheel bond type, type of power supply, abrasive grit friability, and cooling fluid composition. The effects of various parameters are discussed in terms of the mechanisms of ELID grinding, and in particular, the manner of boundary layer formation on the wheels and abrasive grit protrusion.

  1. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  2. Water-Vapor Sorption Processes in Nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 Ceramics: the PAL Spectroscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klym, Halyna; Ingram, Adam; Shpotyuk, Oleh; Hadzaman, Ivan; Solntsev, Viacheslav

    2016-12-01

    The water-vapor sorption processes in nanoporous MgO-Al2O3 ceramics are studied with positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy employing positron trapping and positronium (Ps)-decaying modes. It is demonstrated that the longest-lived components in the four-term reconstructed PAL spectra with characteristic lifetimes near 2 and 60-70 ns can be, respectively, attributed to ortho-positronium (o-Ps) traps in nanopores with 0.3- and 1.5-1.8-nm radii. The first o-Ps decaying process includes "pick-off" annihilation in the "bubbles" of liquid water, while the second is based on o-Ps interaction with physisorbed water molecules at the walls of the pores. In addition, the water vapor modifies structural defects located at the grain boundaries in a vicinity of pores, this process being accompanied by void fragmentation during water adsorption and agglomeration during water desorption after drying.

  3. FY16 Annual Accomplishments - Waste Form Development and Performance: Evaluation Of Ceramic Waste Forms - Comparison Of Hot Isostatic Pressed And Melt Processed Fabrication Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dandeneau, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-10-13

    FY16 efforts were focused on direct comparison of multi-phase ceramic waste forms produced via melt processing and HIP methods. Based on promising waste form compositions previously devised at SRNL[13], simulant material was prepared at SRNL and a portion was sent to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) for HIP treatments, while the remainder of the material was melt processed at SRNL. The microstructure, phase formation, elemental speciation, and leach behavior, and radiation stability of the fabricated ceramics was performed. In addition, melt-processed ceramics designed with different fractions of hollandite, zirconolite, perovskite, and pyrochlore phases were investigated. for performance and properties. Table 1 lists the samples studied.

  4. Colloid Transport and Retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Book Description: Colloidal science and technology is one of the fastest growing research and technology areas. This book explores the cutting edge research in colloidal science and technology that will be usefull in almost every aspect of modern society. This book has a depth of information...... related to historical prospective, synthesis, characterization, theoretical modeling and application of unique class of colloidal materials starting from colloidal gold to coated silica colloid and platinum, titania colloids. This book is unique in its design, content, providing depth of science about...... different colloidal materials and their applications in chemistry, physics, biological, medical sciences and environment. Graduate students, academic and industrial researchers and medical professionals will discover recently developed colloidal materials and their applications in many areas of human...

  5. Ceramic coated Y1 magnesium alloy surfaces by microarc oxidation process for marine applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V V Narulkar; S Prakash; K Chandra

    2007-08-01

    The magnesium alloys occupy an important place in marine applications, but their poor corrosion resistance, wear resistance, hardness and so on, have limited their application. To meet these defects, some techniques are developed. Microarc oxidation is a one such recently developed surface treatment technology under anodic oxidation in which ceramic coating is directly formed on the surface of magnesium alloy, by which its surface property is greatly improved. In this paper, a dense ceramic oxide coating, ∼ 20 m thick, was prepared on an Y1 magnesium alloy through microarc oxidation in a Na3SiO3–Na2WO4–KOH–Na2EDTA electrolytic solution. The property of corrosion resistance of ceramic coating was studied by CS300P electrochemistry–corrosion workstation, and the main impact factor of the corrosion resistance was also analysed. Microstructure and phase composition were analysed by SEM and XRD. The microhardness of the coating was also measured. The basic mechanism of microarc coating formation is explained in brief. The results show that the corrosion resistance property of microarc oxidation coating on the Y1 magnesium surface is superior to the original samples in the 3.5 wt% NaCl solutions. The microarc oxidation coating is relatively dense and uniform, mainly composed of MgO, MgAl2O4 and MgSiO3. The microhardness of the Y1 magnesium alloy surface attained 410 HV, which was much larger than that of the original Y1 magnesium alloy without microarc oxidation.

  6. Film Coating Process Research and Characterization of TiN Coated Racetrack-type Ceramic Pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Wei; Fan, Le; Pei, Xiangtao; Hong, Yuanzhi; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    TiN film was coated on the internal face of racetrack-type ceramic pipe by three different methods: radio-frequency sputtering, DC sputtering and DC magnetron sputtering. The deposition rates of TiN film under different coating methods were compared. According to the AFM, SEM, XPS test results,these properties were analyzed, such as TiN film roughness and surface morphology. At the same time, the deposition rates were studied under two types' cathode, Ti wires and Ti plate. According to the SEM test results, Ti plate cathode can improve the TiN/Ti film deposition rate obviously.

  7. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Colloidal Plasmas : Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Dwivedi

    2000-11-01

    Colloidal plasma is a distinct class of the impure plasmas with multispecies ionic composition. The distinction lies in the phase distribution of the impurity-ion species. The ability to tailor the electrostatic interactions between these colloidal particles provides a fertile ground for scientists to investigate the fundamental aspects of the Coulomb phase transition behavior. The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various acoustic modes, which are likely to exist in colloidal plasmas as well as in normal multi-ion species plasmas. Introductory ideas about the proposed physical models for the Coulomb phase transition in colloidal plasma will also be discussed.

  9. Insertion Process of Ceramic Nanoporous Microneedles by Means of a Novel Mechanical Applicator Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier H. M. Hartmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Arrays of microneedles (MNAs are integrated in an out-of-plane fashion with a base plate and can serve as patches for the release of drugs and vaccines. We used soft-lithography and micromolding to manufacture ceramic nanoporous (npMNAs. Failure modes of ceramic npMNAs are as yet poorly understood and the question remained: is our npMNA platform technology ready for microneedle (MN assembly into patches? We investigated npMNAs by microindentation, yielding average crack fracture forces above the required insertion force for a single MN to penetrate human skin. We further developed a thumb pressure-actuated applicator-assisted npMNA insertion method, which enables anchoring of MNs in the skin by an adhesive in one handling step. Using a set of simple artificial skin models, we found a puncture efficiency of this insertion method a factor three times higher than by applying thumb pressure on the npMNA base plate directly. In addition, this new method facilitated zero MN-breakage due to a well-defined force distribution exerted onto the MNs and the closely surrounding area prior to bringing the adhesive into contact with the skin. Owing to the fact that such parameter space exists, we can conclude that npMNAs by soft lithography are a platform technology for MN assembly into a patch.

  10. Processing, Structure and High Temperature Oxidation Properties of Polymer-Derived and Hafnium Oxide Based Ceramic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauds, Kalvis

    Demands for hypersonic aircraft are driving the development of ultra-high temperature structural materials. These aircraft, envisioned to sustain Mach 5+, are expected to experience continuous temperatures of 1200--1800°C on the aircraft surface and temperatures as high as 2800°C in combustion zones. Breakthroughs in the development of fiber based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are opening the door to a new class of high-tech UHT structures for aerospace applications. One limitation with current carbon fiber or silicon carbide fiber based CMC technology is the inherent problem of material oxidation, requiring new approaches for protective environmental barrier coatings (EBC) in extreme environments. This thesis focuses on the development and characterization of SiCN-HfO2 based ceramic composite EBC systems to be used as a protective layer for silicon carbide fiber based CMCs. The presented work covers three main architectures for protection (i) multilayer films, (ii) polymer-derived HfSiCNO, and (iii) composite SiCN-HfO 2 infiltration. The scope of this thesis covers processing development, material characterization, and high temperature oxidation behavior of these three SiCN-HfO2 based systems. This work shows that the SiCN-HfO 2 composite materials react upon oxidation to form HfSiO4, offering a stable EBC in streaming air and water vapor at 1600°C.

  11. Calcium-borosilicate glass-ceramics wasteforms to immobilize rare-earth oxide wastes from pyro-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miae; Heo, Jong

    2015-12-01

    Glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) oxide silicate [Ca2Nd8-xCex(SiO4)6O2] crystals were fabricated for the immobilization of radioactive wastes that contain large portions of rare-earth ions. Controlled crystallization of alkali borosilicate glasses by heating at T ≥ 750 °C for 3 h formed hexagonal Ca-silicate crystals. Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca-silicate crystals compared to the glass matrix; the rare-earth wastes are efficiently immobilized inside the crystalline phases. The concentrations of Ce and Nd ions released in a material characterization center-type 1 test were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb) of inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Normalized release values performed by a product consistency test were 2.64·10-6 g m-2 for Ce ion and 2.19·10-6 g m-2 for Nd ion. Results suggest that glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) silicate crystals are good candidate wasteforms for immobilization of lanthanide wastes generated by pyro-processing.

  12. Beta tricalcium phosphate ceramics with controlled crystal orientation fabricated by application of external magnetic field during the slip casting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagio, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazushige; Kohama, Takenori; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Iwai, Kazuhiko

    2013-07-01

    Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is a resorbable bioceramic that has hitherto been utilized in the medical field. Since it crystallizes in the anisotropic hexagonal system, properties such as chemical and physical ones are expected to depend on its crystal axis direction and/or on its crystal plane (anisotropy). Control of crystal orientation is thus important when used in polycrystalline form. Meanwhile, application of a strong magnetic field has been found to be a promising technique to control crystal orientation of anisotropic shape or structured crystals. In this work, we attempted to fabricate β-TCP ceramics with controlled crystal orientation by applying an external magnetic field during the slip casting process and subsequently sintering them at 1050°C, below the β-α transition temperature. Application of a vertical magnetic field increased intensities of planes perpendicular to c-plane on the top surface, while a horizontal one with simultaneous mechanical mold rotation decreased it. These results indicated that crystal orientation of β-TCP ceramics were successfully controlled by the external magnetic field and together that the magnetic susceptibility of β-TCP is χ(c[perpendicular])>χ(c//).

  13. Processing, Mechanical and Optical Properties of Additive-Free ZrC Ceramics Prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Musa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, nearly fully dense monolithic ZrC samples are produced and broadly characterized from microstructural, mechanical and optical points of view. Specifically, 98% dense products are obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS after 20 min dwell time at 1850 °C starting from powders preliminarily prepared by Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS followed by 20 min ball milling. A prolonged mechanical treatment up to 2 h of SHS powders does not lead to appreciable benefits. Vickers hardness of the resulting samples (17.5 ± 0.4 GPa is reasonably good for monolithic ceramics, but the mechanical strength (about 250 MPa up to 1000 °C could be further improved by suitable optimization of the starting powder characteristics. The very smoothly polished ZrC specimen subjected to optical measurements displays high absorption in the visible-near infrared region and low thermal emittance at longer wavelengths. Moreover, the sample exhibits goodspectral selectivity (2.1–2.4 in the 1000–1400 K temperature range. These preliminary results suggest that ZrC ceramics produced through the two-step SHS/SPS processing route can be considered as attractive reference materials for the development of innovative solar energy absorbers.

  14. Si3N4陶瓷球加工工艺的研究%Study on processing technology of Si3N4 ceramics ball

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王泉; 刘秀莲; 葛华伟

    2012-01-01

      According to the Si3N4 material performance, its certain characteristics are favorable for manufacturing rolling element, by researching Si3N4 ceramic ball test processing, the Si3N4 ceramic ball machining process was determined, ceramic ball meeting the G5 level requirements was developed.%  根据Si3N4的材料性能可知其某些特性对制造滚动体是有利的,通过对Si3N4陶瓷球试验加工工艺的研究,确定Si3N4陶瓷球加工工艺,研制出符合G5级要求的陶瓷球。

  15. Colloidal quantum dot solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Edward H.

    2012-03-01

    Solar cells based on solution-processed semiconductor nanoparticles -- colloidal quantum dots -- have seen rapid advances in recent years. By offering full-spectrum solar harvesting, these cells are poised to address the urgent need for low-cost, high-efficiency photovoltaics.

  16. Bottom-up processing of thermoelectric nanocomposites from colloidal nanocrystal building blocks: the case of Ag{sub 2}Te-PbTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadavid, Doris [Catalonia Institute for Energy Research, IREC (Spain); Ibanez, Maria [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Electronica (Spain); Gorsse, Stephane [Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, CNRS (France); Lopez, Antonio M. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica (Spain); Cirera, Albert [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Electronica (Spain); Morante, Joan Ramon; Cabot, Andreu, E-mail: acabot@irec.cat [Catalonia Institute for Energy Research, IREC (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Nanocomposites are highly promising materials to enhance the efficiency of current thermoelectric devices. A straightforward and at the same time highly versatile and controllable approach to produce nanocomposites is the assembly of solution-processed nanocrystal building blocks. The convenience of this bottom-up approach to produce nanocomposites with homogeneous phase distributions and adjustable composition is demonstrated here by blending Ag{sub 2}Te and PbTe colloidal nanocrystals to form Ag{sub 2}Te-PbTe bulk nanocomposites. The thermoelectric properties of these nanocomposites are analyzed in the temperature range from 300 to 700 K. The evolution of their electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient is discussed in terms of the blend composition and the characteristics of the constituent materials.

  17. Incipient flocculation molding: A new ceramic-forming technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrasmith, Steven Reade

    Incipient Flocculation Molding (IFM) was conceived as a new near-net-shape forming technique for ceramic components. It was hypothesized that the development of a temperature-dependent deflocculant would result in a forming technique that is flexible, efficient, and capable of producing a superior microstructure with improved mechanical properties from highly reactive, submicron ceramic powders. IFM utilizes a concentrated, nonaqueous, sterically stabilized ceramic powder and/or colloidal suspension which is injected into a non-porous mold. The suspension is then flocculated by destabilizing the suspension by lowering the temperature. Flocculation is both rapid and reversible. Cooling to -20°C produces a green body with sufficient strength for removal from the mold. The solvent is removed from the green body by evaporation. The dried green body is subsequently sintered to form a dense ceramic monolith. This is the first ceramic forming method based upon the manipulation of a sterically-stabilized suspension. To demonstrate IFM, the process of grafting polyethylene glycol (PEG), with molecular weights from 600 to 8000, to alumina powders was investigated. The maximum grafted amounts were achieved by the technique of dispersing the alumina powders in molten polymer at 195°C. The ungrafted PEG was then removed by repeated centrifuging and redispersion in fresh distilled water. The rheological behavior of suspensions of the PEG-grafted powders in water, 2-propanol and 2-butanol were characterized. All of the aqueous suspensions were shear thinning. The PEG 4600-grafted alumina powder aqueous suspensions were the most fluid. Sample rods and bars were molded from 52 vol% PEG-grafted alumina suspensions in 2-butanol. The best results were obtained with a preheated aluminum mold lubricated with a fluorinated oil mold-release. The samples were dried, sintered, and their microstructure and density were compared with sintered samples dry pressed from the same alumina powder

  18. On Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  19. Interactions between radioactively labeled colloids and natural particles: Evidence for colloidal pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liang-Saw; Santschi, Peter H.; Tang, Degui

    1997-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that colloidal forms of trace metals can be reactive intermediaries in the scavenging processes leading to the removal of their particulate forms. A series of radiotracer experiments using natural colloidal organic matter from Galveston Bay, USA were carried out in order to test this hypothesis. Suspended particle uptake of originally colloidally bound trace metals occurred in a matter of hours to days in estuarine waters. After ten days, the majority (>50%) of the colloidal trace metals had been transferred into the particulate phase (≥0.45 μm), except for 65Zn. Two distinctively different temporal regions of removal of colloidal trace metals were identified: a faster reaction during the first four hours, followed by a slower reaction after approximately one day. In a separate river water-seawater mixing experiment, the solid/solution partitioning of the radiotracers was investigated in the absence of suspended matter. About 30% of most of the elements, except Ag and Fe (˜60%), were associated with a newly formed particulate phase after eight days. There were two major trends: (1) the particulate fraction of 59Fe and 110Ag increased while the colloidal fraction decreased, suggesting a colloidal pumping mechanism. (2) The particulate fraction of 54Mn, 133Ba, 65Zn, 109Cd, 113Sn, and 60CO increased while the LMW (≤ 1 kDa) fraction decreased, suggesting a direct uptake into the particulate fraction with less involvement of a transitory colloidal phase. The values of the particle-water ( Kd) and colloid-water partitioning ( Kc) coefficients for most trace metals were similar to those observed in Galveston Bay waters, suggesting complementary results to field studies. The results from these experiments suggested two different pathways for colloidal tracer uptake by particles: (1) colloidal pumping of a major component (e.g., biopolymer) of the colloidal pool and (2) coagulation of trace components (e.g., phytochelatins) with varying

  20. New bio-ceramization processes applied to vegetable hierarchical structures for bone regeneration: an experimental model in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Tampieri, Anna; Cabezas-Rodríguez, Rafael; Di Martino, Alessandro; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Lelli, Marco; Martínez-Fernández, Julian; Martini, Lucia; Ramírez-Rico, Joaquin; Salamanna, Francesca; Sandri, Monica; Sprio, Simone; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2014-02-01

    Bone loss is still a major problem in orthopedics. The purpose of this experimental study is to evaluate the safety and regenerative potential of a new scaffold based on a bio-ceramization process for bone regeneration in long diaphyseal defects in a sheep model. The scaffold was obtained by transformation of wood pieces into porous biomorphic silicon carbide (BioSiC®). The process enabled the maintenance of the original wood microstructure, thus exhibiting hierarchically organized porosity and high mechanical strength. To improve cell adhesion and osseointegration, the external surface of the hollow cylinder was made more bioactive by electrodeposition of a uniform layer of collagen fibers that were mineralized with biomimetic hydroxyapatite, whereas the internal part was filled with a bio-hybrid HA/collagen composite. The final scaffold was then implanted in the metatarsus of 15 crossbred (Merinos-Sarda) adult sheep, divided into 3 groups: scaffold alone, scaffold with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, and scaffold with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) added during implantation. Radiological analysis was performed at 4, 8, 12 weeks, and 4 months, when animals were sacrificed for the final radiological, histological, and histomorphometric evaluation. In all tested treatments, these analyses highlighted the presence of newly formed bone at the bone scaffolds' interface. Although a lack of substantial effect of PRP was demonstrated, the scaffold+BMSC augmentation showed the highest value of bone-to-implant contact and new bone growth inside the scaffold. The findings of this study suggest the potential of bio-ceramization processes applied to vegetable hierarchical structures for the production of wood-derived bone scaffolds, and document a suitable augmentation procedure in enhancing bone regeneration, particularly when combined with BMSCs.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF PROCESSES ON TREATMENT OF PLASMA COATINGS MADE OF MATERIALS BASED ON MULTIFUNCTIONAL OXIDE CERAMICS WITH LASER IRRADIATION IMPULSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Okovity

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the presented paper is to optimize technological parameters of hardening high-energy processing used for sprayed coatings made of materials based on oxide ceramics with inclusions of solid lubricant. The paper presents results of the investigations on influence of power density and total number of laser irradiation impulses in a spot treatment on thickness of treated coating layers made of materials based on oxide ceramics. The considered wear-resistant coatings require increased cohesive and adhesive strength. Therefore, the total number of impulses should ensure melting and sealing of the coatings along the whole thickness that will fully contribute to obtain hardened nano-crystalline and amorphous structures.The work is based on complex metallography, X-ray diffraction and electron-microscopic investigations on modified structural elements of composite coatings being treated with highly concentrated energy sources. The following main processes of hardened plasma coating formations have been revealed in the paper: com paction of sprayed materials due to thermal and shock-wave impacts of laser irradiation impulses. In this case material porosity is decreasing, cohesive and adhesive strength of coatings is increasing, grain structure is crushed, amorphous and nano-crystalline phases of higher strength are formed all these facts are evidenced by an increase in average micro-hardness of deposited compositions. Duration of thermal laser irradiation impulse impact on the material is sufficient to activate chemical processes in the boundaries of main phases of the composite coating. This leads to formation of finely dispersed (including nanoparticle size compounds that strengthen boundaries of the main phases and the coating as a whole. This is confirmed by the results of an X-ray diffraction analysis.

  2. PROCESSING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TUBULAR CERAMIC SUPPORT FOR MICROFILTRATION MEMBRANE PREPARED FROM PYROPHYLLITE CLAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedallah Talidi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Tubular macroporous support for ceramic microfiltration membranes were prepared by extrusion followed by sintering of the low cost pyrophyllite clay. Clay powders mixed with some organic additives can be extruded to form a porous tubular support. The average pore size of the membrane is observed to increase from 5 µm to 10.8 µm when sintering temperature increase from 900 °C to 1200 °C. However, with the increase in temperature from 900 °C to 1200 °C, the support porosity is reduced from 47% to 30% and flexural strength is increased from 4 MPa to 17 MPa. The fabricated macro-porous supports are expected to have potential applications in the pre-treatment and also can be used like support for membranes of ultra-filtration.

  3. Development of a Chitosan-Based Biofoam: Application to the Processing of a Porous Ceramic Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Michaud

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing biofoams constitutes a challenging issue for several applications. The present study focuses on the development of a chitosan-based biofoam. Solutions of chitosan in acetic acid were dried under vacuum to generate foams with high-order structures. Chitosan concentration influenced significantly the morphology of developed porosity and the organization of pores in the material. Physico-chemical characterizations were performed to investigate the effects of chitosan concentration on density and thermal conductivity of foams. Even if chitosan-based biofoams exhibit interesting insulating properties (typically around 0.06 W·m−1·K−1, it has been shown that their durabilities are limited when submitted to a wet media. So, a way of application consists to elaborate a ceramic material with open porosity from a slurry prepared with an organic solvent infiltrating the porous network of the foam.

  4. Novel Processing of Unique Ceramic-Based Nuclear Materials and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Zhang; Raman P. Singh

    2008-11-30

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These include refractory alloys base on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as those based on silicon carbide (SiCf-SiC); carbon-carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor componets is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the materials used in nuclear fuels and other temperature critical components can lower the center-line fuel temperature and thereby enhance durability and reduce the risk of premature failure.

  5. Low frequency dielectric relaxation processes and ionic conductivity of montmorillonite clay nanoparticles colloidal suspension in poly(vinyl pyrrolidone−ethylene glycol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric dispersion behaviour of montmorillonite (MMT clay nanoparticles colloidal suspension in poly(vinyl pyrrolidone-ethylene glycol (PVP-EG blends were investigated over the frequency range 20 Hz to 1 MHz at 30°C. The 0, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 wt% MMT clay concentration of the weight of total solute (MMT+PVP were prepared in PVP-EG blends using EG as solvent. The complex relative dielectric function, alternating current (ac electrical conductivity, electric modulus and impedance spectra of these materials show the relaxation processes corresponding to the micro-Brownian motion of PVP chain, ion conduction and electrode polarization phenomena. The real part of ac conductivity spectra of these materials obeys Jonscher power law σ′(ω =σdc + Aωn in upper frequency end of the measurement, whereas dispersion in lower frequency end confirms the presence of electrode polarization effect. It was observed that the increase of clay concentration in the PVP-EG blends significantly increases the ac conductivity values, and simultaneously reduces the ionic conductivity relaxation time and electric double layer relaxation time, which suggests that PVP segmental dynamics and ionic motion are strongly coupled. The intercalation of EG structures in clay galleries and exfoliation of clay sheets by adsorption of PVP-EG structures on clay surfaces are discussed by considering the hydrogen bonding interactions between the hydroxyl group (–OH of EG molecules, carbonyl group (C=O of PVP monomer units, and the hydroxylated aluminate surfaces of the MMT clay particles. Results suggest that the colloidal suspension of MMT clay nano particles in the PVP-EG blends provide a convenient way to obtain an electrolyte solution with tailored electrical conduction properties.

  6. Demonstration of an approach to waste form qualification through simulation of liquid-fed ceramic melter process operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, P.W.; Kuhn, W.L.; Peters, R.D.; Pulsipher, B.A.

    1986-07-01

    During fiscal year 1982, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assigned responsibility for managing civilian nuclear waste treatment programs in the United States to the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). One of the principal objectives of this program is to establish relationships between vitrification process control and glass quality. Users of the liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) process will need such relationships in order to establish acceptance of vitrified high-level nuclear waste at a licensed federal repository without resorting to destructive examination of the canisters. The objective is to be able to supply a regulatory agency with an estimate of the composition, durability, and integrity of the glass in each waste glass canister produced from an LFCM process simply by examining the process data collected during the operation of the LFCM. The work described here will continue through FY-1987 and culminate in a final report on the ability to control and monitor an LFCM process through sampling and process control charting of the LFCM feed system.

  7. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, Task 17208: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  8. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, task 17208: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  9. Fabrication of low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) chip couplers for high frequencies : I. Effect of binder burnout process on the formation of electrode line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, N.T.; Shim, K.B.; Lee, S.W. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea); Koo, K.D. [K-Cera Inc., Yongin (Korea)

    1999-06-01

    In the fabrication of ceramic chip couplers for high frequency applications such as the mobile communication equipment, the formation of electrode lines and Ag diffusion were investigated with heat treatment conditions for removing organic binders. The deformation and densification of the electrode line greatly depended on the binder burnout process due to the overlapped temperature zone near 400{sup o} C of the binder dissociation and the solid phase sintering of the silver electrode. Ag ions were diffused into the glass ceramic substrate. The Ag diffusion was led by the glassy phase containing Pb ions rather than by the crystalline phase containing Ca ions. The fact suggests that the Ag diffusion could be controlled by managing the composition of the glass ceramic substrate. 9 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dimitri V.

    2017-02-16

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes1, 2, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other2. Electrostatic stabilization3, 4 of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains2, 5. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute–solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute–solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  11. Colloid-Associated Radionuclide Concentration Limits: ANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Mertz

    2000-12-21

    The purpose and scope of this report is to describe the analysis of available colloidal data from waste form corrosion tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to extract characteristics of these colloids that can be used in modeling their contribution to the source term for sparingly soluble radioelements (e.g., Pu). Specifically, the focus is on developing a useful description of the following waste form colloid characteristics: (1) composition, (2) size distribution, and (3) quantification of the rate of waste form colloid generation. The composition and size distribution information are intended to support analysis of the potential transport of the sparingly soluble radionuclides associated with the waste form colloids. The rate of colloid generation is intended to support analysis of the waste form colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. In addressing the above characteristics, available data are interpreted to address mechanisms controlling colloid formation and stability. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000). Because the end objective is to support the source term modeling we have organized the conclusions into two categories: (1) data analysis conclusions and (2) recommendations for colloid source term modeling. The second category is included to facilitate use of the conclusions from the data analysis in the abstraction of a colloid source term model. The data analyses and conclusions that are presented in this report are based on small-scale laboratory tests conducted on a limited number of waste glass compositions and spent fuel types.

  12. Out-of-equilibrium processes in suspensions of oppositely charged colloids: liquid-to-crystal nucleation and gel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We study the kinetics of the liquid-to-crystal transformation and of gel formation in colloidal suspensions of oppositely charged particles. We analyse, by means of both computer simulations and experiments, the evolution of a fluid quenched to a state point of the phase diagram where the most stable state is either a homogeneous crystalline solid or a solid phase in contact with a dilute gas. On the one hand, at high temperatures and high packing fractions, close to an ordered-solid/disordered-solid coexistence line, we find that the fluid-to-crystal pathway does not follow the minimum free energy route. On the other hand, a quench to a state point far from the ordered-crystal/disordered-crystal coexistence border is followed by a fluid-to-solid transition through the minimum free energy pathway. At low temperatures and packing fractions we observe that the system undergoes a gas-liquid spinodal decomposition that, at some point, arrests giving rise to a gel-like structure. Both our simulations and experiments suggest that increasing the interaction range favors crystallization over vitrification in gel-like structures. [4pt] In collaboration with Chantal Valeriani, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands and SUPA, School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, JCMB King's Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, UK; Teun Vissers, Andrea Fortini, Mirjam E. Leunissen, and Alfons van Blaaderen, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University; Daan Frenke, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW, Cambridge, UK; and Marjolein Dijkstra, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University.

  13. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  14. Sol-gel derived ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The synthesis of ceramic raw materials has become an important factor in ceramic technologies. The increasing demands to the performance of ceramic compounds has caused increased activities for the preparation of tailor-made raw materials. Amongst a variety of new syntheses like flame pyrolysis, reactive spray drying, plasma or laser assisted techniques, the sol-gel process plays an important and increasing role. The process describes the building up of an inorganic (in general an oxide) netw...

  15. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  16. Toxicology and occupational hazards of new materials and processes in metal surface treatment, powder metallurgy, technical ceramics, and fiber-reinforced plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midtgård, U; Jelnes, J E

    1991-12-01

    Many new materials and processes are about to find their way from the research laboratory into industry. The present paper describes some of these processes and provides an overview of possible occupational hazards and a list of chemicals used or produced in the processes. The technological areas that are considered are metal surface treatment (ion implantation, physical and chemical vapor deposition, plasma spraying), powder metallurgy, advanced technical ceramics, and fiber-reinforced plastics.

  17. Electric fatigue process in lead-free alkali niobate ceramics at various pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alexander; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-10-01

    Electric fatigue tests are important for evaluating the reliability of piezoceramics. However, these tests have not been the focus of studies of lead-free alkali niobate (NKN) ceramics so far. For this purpose, two different materials, Li0.06Na0.47K0.47NbO3 (LNKN6) and Na0.55K0.45NbO3 + 0.25% MnO (Mn-NKN), have been examined at various uniaxial pressures ranging from 0.1 to 100 MPa and various temperatures ranging from room temperature to 150 °C. It was shown that the harder ferroelectric Mn-NKN could maintain its piezoelectric properties at pressures up to 25 MPa. When bipolar fatigue occurred under pressures over the coercive stress of ∼30 MPa, the sample depolarized and formed microcracks. In contrast, the softer LNKN6 did not show fatigue at higher pressures between 25 and 50 MPa. However, in both materials, higher temperatures enhanced domain wall and charge carrier movements and conclusively domain wall pinning.

  18. Effect of Processing on Synthesis and Dielectric Behavior of Bismuth Sodium Titanate Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayeta Pal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An effort has been made to synthesize polycrystalline (Bi1−xLax0.5Na0.5TiO3 (abbreviated as BLNT system with compositions x = 0, 0.02, and 0.04 by novel semiwet technique. Preparation of A-site oxides of BLNT for composition x = 0 was optimized using two precursor solutions such as ethylene glycol and citric acid. The XRD patterns revealed that the sample prepared by ethylene glycol precursor solution has single phase perovskite structure with a rhombohedral symmetry at RT as compared to the sample prepared by citric acid. Ethylene glycol precursor has been found to play a significant role in the crystallization, phase transitions, and electrical properties. The studies on structure, phase transitions, and dielectric properties for all the samples have been carried out over the temperature range from RT to 450°C at 100 kHz frequency. It has been observed that two phase transitions (i ferroelectric to antiferroelectric and (ii antiferroelectric to paraelectric occur in all the samples. All samples exhibit a modified Curie-Weiss law above Tc. A linear fitting of the modified Curie-Weiss law to the experimental data shows diffuse-type transition. The dielectric as well as ferroelectric properties of BLNT ceramics have been found to be improved with the substitution of La elements.

  19. Accuracy of optical scanning methods of the Cerec®3D system in the process of making ceramic inlays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifković Branka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. One of the results of many years of Cerec® 3D CAD/CAM system technological development is implementation of one intraoral and two extraoral optical scanning methods which, depending on the current indications, are applied in making fixed restorations. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of precision of optical scanning methods by the use of the Cerec®3D CAD/CAM system in the process of making ceramic inlays. Methods. The study was conducted in three experimental groups of inlays prepared using the procedure of three methods of scanning Cerec ®3D system. Ceramic inlays made by conventional methodology were the control group. The accuracy of optical scanning methods of the Cerec®3D system computer aided designcomputer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM was indirectly examined by measuring a marginal gap size between inlays and demarcation preparation by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results. The results of the study showed a difference in the accuracy of the existing methods of scanning dental CAD/CAM systems. The highest level of accuracy was achieved by the extraoral optical superficial scanning technique. The value of marginal gap size inlays made with the technique of extraoral optical superficial scanning was 32.97 ± 13.17 μ. Techniques of intraoral optical superficial and extraoral point laser scanning showed a lower level of accuracy (40.29 ± 21.46 μ for inlays of intraoral optical superficial scanning and 99.67 ± 37.25 μ for inlays of extraoral point laser scanning. Conclusion. Optical scanning methods in dental CAM/CAM technologies are precise methods of digitizing the spatial models; application of extraoral optical scanning methods provides the hightest precision.

  20. Cohesive zone model for intergranular slow crack growth in ceramics: influence of the process and the microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero de la Osa, M.; Estevez, R.; Olagnon, C.; Chevalier, J.; Tallaron, C.

    2011-10-01

    Ceramic polycrystals are prone to slow crack growth (SCG) which is stress and environmentally assisted, similarly to observations reported for silica glasses. The kinetics of fracture are known to be dependent on the load level, the temperature and the relative humidity. In addition, evidence is available on the influence of the microstructure on the SCG rate with an increase in the crack velocity with decreasing the grain size. Crack propagation takes place beyond a load threshold, which is grain size dependent. We present a cohesive zone model for the intergranular failure process. The methodology accounts for an intrinsic opening that governs the length of the cohesive zone and allows the investigation of grain size effects. A rate and temperature-dependent cohesive model is proposed (Romero de la Osa M, Estevez R et al 2009 J. Mech. Adv. Mater. Struct. 16 623-31) to mimic the reaction-rupture mechanism. The formulation is inspired by Michalske and Freiman's picture (Michalske and Freiman 1983 J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 66 284-8) together with a recent study by Zhu et al (2005 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 53 1597-623) of the reaction-rupture mechanism. The present investigation extends a previous work (Romero de la Osa et al 2009 Int. J. Fracture 158 157-67) in which the problem is formulated. Here, we explore the influence of the microstructure in terms of grain size, their elastic properties and residual thermal stresses originating from the cooling from the sintering temperature down to ambient conditions. Their influence on SCG for static loadings is reported and the predictions compared with experimental trends. We show that the initial stress state is responsible for the grain size dependence reported experimentally for SCG. Furthermore, the account for the initial stresses enables the prediction of a load threshold below which no crack growth is observed: a crack arrest takes place when the crack path meets a region in compression.

  1. Flow Cytometry for rapid characterization of colloidal particles of various types in process waters; Floedescytometri foer snabb karaktaerisering av kolloidala partiklar av olika typ i bakvatten - MPKT 05

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degerth, R.; Holmbom, B. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Since more than ten years Flow Cytometry (FCM) has been used for characterization of blood cells and bacteria and has become indispensable for medical and biological use. FCM is able to count thousands of particles per second and simultaneously determine their the type and size ending up in a statistically significant report within less than a minute. The principle of FCM is based on a light excitation of a `lined up` particle stream and a multi-channel determination of scatter and fluorescence. This rapid technology has so far not been used in a greater extent within process industry, except for counting bacteria in milk and beer. BASF of Germany has developed and patented a single-channel fluorescence counter for determination of resin droplets in the process waters of paper making. The FCM, however, is a far more effective and reliable method, being able not only to detect resin droplets but also bacteria, live or dead, as well as other occurring particles. We know we are able to determine bacteria, we have seen resin and we aim to show that FCM is able to give a comprehensive view of the colloidal contents of process waters in paper mills by exploring means to selectively stain the different types of particles. (orig.) 3 refs. CACTUS Research Programme

  2. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  3. Colloid Transport and Retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    different colloidal materials and their applications in chemistry, physics, biological, medical sciences and environment. Graduate students, academic and industrial researchers and medical professionals will discover recently developed colloidal materials and their applications in many areas of human......Book Description: Colloidal science and technology is one of the fastest growing research and technology areas. This book explores the cutting edge research in colloidal science and technology that will be usefull in almost every aspect of modern society. This book has a depth of information...

  4. Interactions between radioactively labeled colloids and natural particles: Evidence for colloidal pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, L.S.; Santschi, P.H.; Tang, D. [Texas A & M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States)

    1997-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that colloidal forms of trace metals can be reactive intermediaries in the scavenging processes leading to the removal of their particulate forms. A series of radiotracer experiments using natural colloidal organic matter from Galveston Bay, USA were carried out in order to test this hypothesis. Suspended particle uptake of originally colloidally bound trace metals occurred in a matter of hours to days in estuarine waters. After ten days, the majority ( >50%) of the colloidal trace metals had been transferred into the particulate phase ({ge} 0.45{mu}m), except for {sup 65}Zn. Two distinctively different temporal regions of removal of colloidal trace metals were identified: a faster reaction during the first four hours, followed by a slower reaction after approximately one day. In a separate river water-seawater mixing experiment, the solid/solution partitioning of the radiotracers was investigated in the absence of suspended matter. About 30% of most of the elements, except Ag and Fe ({approximately}60%), were associated with a newly formed particulate phase after eight days. There were two major trends: (1) the particulate fraction of {sup 59}Fe and {sup 110}Ag increased while the colloidal fraction decreased, suggesting a colloidal pumping mechanism. (2) The particulate fraction of {sup 54}Mn, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 113}Sn, and {sup 60}Co increased while the LMW({le}1 kDa) fraction decreased, suggesting a direct uptake into the particulate fraction with less involvement of a transitory colloidal phase. The results from these experiments suggested two different pathways for colloidal tracer uptake by particles: (1) colloidal pumping of a major component (e.g., biopolymer) of the colloidal pool and (2) coagulation of trace components (e.g., phytochelatins) with varying affinities for different trace metals. 39 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Processing of pure titanium containing titanium-based reinforcing ceramics additives using spark plasma sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondiu Olayinka DUROWOJU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The densification behaviour, microstructural changes and hardness characteristics during spark plasma sintering of CP-Ti reinforced with TiC, TiN, TiCN and TiB2 were investigated. Commercially pure Ti powders were dry mixed with varied amounts (2.5 and 5 wt. % of the ceramic additives using a T2F Turbula mixer for 5 h and at a speed of 49 rpm. The blended composite powders were then sintered using spark plasma sintering system (model HHPD-25 from FCT Germany at a heating rate of 100oC min-1, dwell time of 5 min and sintering temperature of 950ºC. The sintering of CP-Ti was used as a base study to select the proper spark plasma sintering temperature for full density. Densification was monitored through analysis of the recorded punch displacement and the measured density of the sintered samples using Archimedes method. High densities ranging from 97.8% for 5% TiB2 addition to 99.6% for 5% TiCN addition were achieved at a relatively low temperature of 950°C. Microstructural analyses show a uniform distribution of the additives and finer structure showing their inhibitive effect on grain growth. An improved hardness was observed in all the cases with highest values obtained with TiCN as a result of the combined effect of TiC and TiN. A change in the fracture mode from trans granular to intergranular was also observed.

  6. Solid colloids with surface-mobile linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meulen, Stef A J; Helms, Gesa; Dogterom, Marileen

    2015-06-17

    In this report we review the possibilities of using colloids with surface mobile linkers for the study of colloidal self-assembly processes. A promising route to create systems with mobile linkers is the use of lipid (bi-)layers. These lipid layers can be either used in the form of vesicles or as coatings for hard colloids and emulsion droplets. Inside the lipid bilayers molecules can be inserted via membrane anchors. Due to the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, the anchored molecules remain mobile. The use of different lipid mixtures even allows creating Janus-like particles that exhibit directional bonding if linkers are used which have a preference for a certain lipid phase. In nature mobile linkers can be found e.g. as receptors in cells. Therefore, towards the end of the review, we also briefly address the possibility of using colloids with surface mobile linkers as model systems to mimic cell-cell interactions and cell adhesion processes.

  7. EXERGY ANALYSIS OF COMBUSTION PROCESS OF CERAMIC BURNER%陶瓷燃烧器燃烧过程的可用能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶荣水

    2001-01-01

    Based on exergy analysis of combustion process,the exergy loss rate was presented to estimate the irreversible exergy loss.The paper computed exergy loss rate of combustion process of ceramic burner,and the results showed that compared with tube in tube type ceramic burner,the new type ceramic burner could preheat air and gas,raise theoretical combustion temperature of gas,reduce exergy loss rate during combustion process and raise utilization efficiency of energy.The essential differences between new type ceramic burner and tube in tube type ceramic burner were revealed from the point of view of exergy analysis.%在燃烧过程可用能分析的基础上,提出可用能损失率指标,它可用于衡量燃烧过程不可逆损失的程度。对陶瓷燃烧器燃烧过程的可用能损失率,计算结果表明:与套筒式陶瓷燃烧器相比,新型陶瓷燃烧器对空、煤气有预热作用,可提高煤气的理论燃烧温度,降低燃烧过程的可用能损失率,提高能量的有效利用率。从可用能的观点揭示了新型陶瓷燃烧器与套筒式陶瓷燃烧器的本质区别。

  8. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  9. A Theoretical Model for Predicting Residual Stress Generation in Fabrication Process of Double-Ceramic-Layer Thermal Barrier Coating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Wu, Weijie; Xie, Feng; Liu, Yilun; Wang, Tiejun

    2017-01-01

    Residual stress arisen in fabrication process of Double-Ceramic-Layer Thermal Barrier Coating System (DCL-TBCs) has a significant effect on its quality and reliability. In this work, based on the practical fabrication process of DCL-TBCs and the force and moment equilibrium, a theoretical model was proposed at first to predict residual stress generation in its fabrication process, in which the temperature dependent material properties of DCL-TBCs were incorporated. Then, a Finite Element method (FEM) has been carried out to verify our theoretical model. Afterwards, some important geometric parameters for DCL-TBCs, such as the thickness ratio of stabilized Zirconia (YSZ, ZrO2-8%Y2O3) layer to Lanthanum Zirconate (LZ, La2Zr2O7) layer, which is adjustable in a wide range in the fabrication process, have a remarkable effect on its performance, therefore, the effect of this thickness ratio on residual stress generation in the fabrication process of DCL-TBCs has been systematically studied. In addition, some thermal spray treatment, such as the pre-heating treatment, its effect on residual stress generation has also been studied in this work. It is found that, the final residual stress mainly comes from the cooling down process in the fabrication of DCL-TBCs. Increasing the pre-heating temperature can obviously decrease the magnitude of residual stresses in LZ layer, YSZ layer and substrate. With the increase of the thickness ratio of YSZ layer to LZ layer, magnitudes of residual stresses arisen in LZ layer and YSZ layer will increase while residual stress in substrate will decrease.

  10. A Theoretical Model for Predicting Residual Stress Generation in Fabrication Process of Double-Ceramic-Layer Thermal Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Wu, Weijie; Xie, Feng; Liu, Yilun; Wang, Tiejun

    2017-01-01

    Residual stress arisen in fabrication process of Double-Ceramic-Layer Thermal Barrier Coating System (DCL-TBCs) has a significant effect on its quality and reliability. In this work, based on the practical fabrication process of DCL-TBCs and the force and moment equilibrium, a theoretical model was proposed at first to predict residual stress generation in its fabrication process, in which the temperature dependent material properties of DCL-TBCs were incorporated. Then, a Finite Element method (FEM) has been carried out to verify our theoretical model. Afterwards, some important geometric parameters for DCL-TBCs, such as the thickness ratio of stabilized Zirconia (YSZ, ZrO2-8%Y2O3) layer to Lanthanum Zirconate (LZ, La2Zr2O7) layer, which is adjustable in a wide range in the fabrication process, have a remarkable effect on its performance, therefore, the effect of this thickness ratio on residual stress generation in the fabrication process of DCL-TBCs has been systematically studied. In addition, some thermal spray treatment, such as the pre-heating treatment, its effect on residual stress generation has also been studied in this work. It is found that, the final residual stress mainly comes from the cooling down process in the fabrication of DCL-TBCs. Increasing the pre-heating temperature can obviously decrease the magnitude of residual stresses in LZ layer, YSZ layer and substrate. With the increase of the thickness ratio of YSZ layer to LZ layer, magnitudes of residual stresses arisen in LZ layer and YSZ layer will increase while residual stress in substrate will decrease. PMID:28103275

  11. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    movement were stronger than during the receding movement. Theory indicates that, for hydrophilic colloids, the advancing interface movement generally exerts a stronger detachment force than the receding, except when the hysteresis of the colloid-air-water contact angle is small. These results of our study are particularly relevant for colloid mobilization and transport related to three process in the vadose zone at Hanford: (1) water infiltration into sediments during rainfall or snowmelt events, (2) groundwater fluctuations as caused by river stage fluctuations, and (3) steady-state, low-flow recharge in deep vadose zone sediments. Transient water flow, like during infiltration or groundwater level fluctuations, are most conducive for colloid mobilization, but even during steady-state, low-flow recharge, colloids can be mobile, although to a much lesser extent. The results of this project have led to a comprehensive and fundamental understanding of colloid transport and mobilization under unsaturated flow conditions at the Hanford site.

  12. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  13. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Joel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-12-10

    Transparent ceramics match or exceed the performance of single-crystal materials in laser applications, with a more-robust fabrication process. Controlling the distribution of optical dopants in transparent ceramics would allow qualitative improvements in amplifier slab design by allowing gain and loss to be varied within the material. My work aims to achieve a controlled pattern or gradient of dopant prior to sintering, in order to produce tailored ceramics.

  14. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-01-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sint...

  15. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  16. Application of electrolytic in-process dressing for high-efficiency grinding of ceramic parts. Research activities 1995--96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-02-01

    The application of Electrolytic In-Process Dressing (ELID) for highly efficient and stable grinding of ceramic parts is discussed. This research was performed at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Tokyo, Japan, June 1995 through August 1995. Experiments were conducted using a vertical machining center. The silicon nitride work material, of Japanese manufacture and supplied in the form of a rectangular block, was clamped to a vice which was firmly fixed on the base of a strain gage dynamometer. The dynamometer was clamped on the machining center table. Reciprocating grinding was performed with a flat-faced diamond grinding wheel. The output from the dynamometer was recorded with a data acquisition system and the normal component of the force was monitored. Experiments were carried out under various cutting conditions, different ELID conditions, and various grinding wheel bonds types. Rough grinding wheels of grit sizes {number_sign}170 and {number_sign}140 were used in the experiments. Compared to conventional grinding, there was a significant reduction in grinding force with ELID grinding. Therefore, ELID grinding can be recommended for high material removal rate grinding, low rigidity machines, and low rigidity workpieces. Compared to normal grinding, a reduction in grinding ratio was observed when ELID grinding was performed. A negative aspect of the process, this reduced G-ratio derives from bond erosion and can be improved somewhat by adjustments in the ELID current. The results of this investigation are discussed in detail in this report.

  17. Correlation of Fracture Mode Transition of Ceramic Particle with Critical Velocity for Successful Deposition in Vacuum Kinetic Spraying Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyungkwon; Kim, Jinyoung; Lee, Sung Bo; Lee, Changhee

    2016-12-01

    Vacuum kinetic spraying (VKS) is a promising room-temperature process to fabricate dense ceramic films. However, unfortunately, the deposition mechanism is still not clearly understood. In this respect, the critical conditions for successful deposition were investigated. Based on simulation and microstructural analysis, it was found that as the particle velocity increased, fracture mode transition from tensile fracture to shear fracture occurred and particle did not bounce off anymore above a certain velocity. Simultaneously, particle underwent shock-induced plasticity and dynamic fragmentation. The plasticity assisted to prevent the fragments from rebounding by spending the excessive kinetic energy and fragmentation is essential for fragment bonding and film growth considering that the deposition rate increased as the fraction of fragmentation increased. Accordingly, plasticity and fragmentation take a crucial role for particle deposition. In this respect, the velocity that fracture mode transition occurs is newly defined as critical velocity. Consequently, for successful deposition, the particle should at least exceed the critical velocity and thus it is very crucial for film fabrication in VKS process at room temperature.

  18. The Powdering Process with a Set of Ceramic Mills for Green Tea Promoted Catechin Extraction and the ROS Inhibition Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Kouki; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shima, Hidekazu; Tomaru, Keiko; Saito, Hideki; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Yoshidome, Akihiro; Kawamura, Yuri; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2016-04-11

    For serving green tea, there are two prominent methods: steeping the leaf or the powdered leaf (matcha style) in hot water. The purpose of the present study was to reveal chemical and functional differences before and after the powdering process of green tea leaf, since powdered green tea may contribute to expanding the functionality because of the different ingesting style. In this study, we revealed that the powdering process with a ceramic mill and stirring in hot water increased the average extracted concentration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) by more than three times compared with that in leaf tea using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses. Moreover, powdered green tea has a higher inhibition effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in vitro compared with the same amount of leaf tea. Our data suggest that powdered green tea might have a different function from leaf tea due to the higher catechin contents and particles.

  19. The Powdering Process with a Set of Ceramic Mills for Green Tea Promoted Catechin Extraction and the ROS Inhibition Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki Fujioka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For serving green tea, there are two prominent methods: steeping the leaf or the powdered leaf (matcha style in hot water. The purpose of the present study was to reveal chemical and functional differences before and after the powdering process of green tea leaf, since powdered green tea may contribute to expanding the functionality because of the different ingesting style. In this study, we revealed that the powdering process with a ceramic mill and stirring in hot water increased the average extracted concentration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG by more than three times compared with that in leaf tea using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and liquid chromatography–tandem mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analyses. Moreover, powdered green tea has a higher inhibition effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS production in vitro compared with the same amount of leaf tea. Our data suggest that powdered green tea might have a different function from leaf tea due to the higher catechin contents and particles.

  20. Metal and ceramic matrix composites: Processing, modeling and mechanical behavior; Proceedings of the International Conference, Anaheim, CA, Feb. 19-22, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, R.B.; Clauer, A.H.; Kumar, P.; Ritter, A.M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States) Battelle Research Labs., Columbus, OH (United States) Cabot Corp., Boyertown, PA (United States) General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (United States))

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on metal matrix composite (MMC) and ceramic matrix composite (CMC) processing, fracture and fatigue characteristics, and interfacial and high temperature performance, gives attention to such topics as tape-cast MMC laminates, the fabrication of high temperature fiber-reinforced intermetallic MMCs, diffusion-bonded preform Al-Si MMCs with SiC fiber reinforcement, HIPed SiC particulate-reinforced 6061 Al alloy MMCs, the performance and economics of CMCs, and the shock compression-processing of high performance ceramics. Also discussed are the high temperature properties of Mg9Li laminates, the deformation processing of Al-alumina MMCs, modeling the thermomechanical behavior of glass-matrix composites, interfacial reactions in SiC fiber-reinforced Ti alloy and Ti aluminide composites, carbon fiber-reinforced tin-superconductor composites, and the stereology of some liquid phase-sintered MMCs.

  1. Manipulation of colloidal crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermolen, E.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal particles (approximately a micrometer in diameter) that are dispersed in a fluid, behave thermodynamically similar to atoms and molecules: at low concentrations they form a fluid, while at high concentrations they can crystallize into a colloidal crystal to gain entropy. The analogy with m

  2. Study on high temperature sintering processes of selective laser sintered Al2O3/ZrO2/TiC ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature sintering processes of selective laser sintered Al2O3/ZrO2/TiC ceramics were studied. The effects of the sintering temperature and the sintering time on the relative density, strength and fracture toughness of Al2O3/ZrO2/TiC ceramics were investigated. The results showed that the sintering temperature and sintering time had a great effect on the relative density and the mechanical properties of Al2O3/ZrO2/TiC ceramics. The mechanical strength increased from 120MPa to 360MPa and KIC increased from 3.7 J/m2 to 6.9 J/m2 when the sintering temperature increased from 1400ºC to 1600ºC, however, the mechanical strength decreased rapidly from 370MPa to 330MPa and KIC decreased from 6.9 J/m2 to 6.1 J/m2 when the sintering time increased from 30min to 90min. Furthermore, the addition of TiC and ZrO2 in the Al2O3 matrix significantly improved mechanical strength and fracture toughness of the Al2O3 matrix ceramics.

  3. Field-effect transistor-based solution-processed colloidal quantum dot photodetector with broad bandwidth into near-infrared region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengyi; Zhao, Na; Zhang, Li; Zhong, Haizheng; Liu, Ruibin; Zou, Bingsuo

    2012-06-29

    We demonstrate a solution-processed colloidal quantum dot (CQDs) photodetector with the configuration of a field-effect transistor (FET), in which the drain and source electrodes are fabricated by a shadow mask. By blending PbS CQDs into the hybrid blend, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C(61)-butyric acid methylester (PCBM), the photosensitive spectrum of the nanocomposite blend is extended into the near-infrared region. A FET-based photodetector ITO/PMMA (180 nm)/P3HT:PCBM:PbS (110 nm)/Al, in which PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) acts as the dielectric layer and P3HT:PCBM:PbS (in weight ratio of 1:1:1) as the active layer, shows a broad spectral bandwidth, a responsivity of 0.391 mA W(-1) and a specific detectivity of 1.31 × 10(11) Jones are obtained at V(GS) = 1 V under 600 nm illumination with an intensity of 30 μW cm(-2). Therefore, it provides an easy way to fabricate such a FET-based photodetector with a channel length of some hundreds of micrometers by a shadow mask.

  4. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R. [and others

    1996-02-01

    The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

  5. Fabrication of low specific resistance ceramic carbon composites by slip casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic carbon composites (CCCs utilize carbon as the conducting phase and can be used as resistors for high voltage electrical applications. To obtain superior mechanical properties it is desired to minimize the amount of carbon yet achieve desired electrical conductivity. Thus, electrically conducting nanosized carbon like carbon black (CB was used with the matrix materials. Uniform dispersion of CB in ceramic matrix leading to a percolating network at lowest possible volume fraction is a challenge. The present work reports colloidal processing approach to overcome these challenges. Fabrication of CCCs was done by slip casting. Two types of slurries, CB slurry and alumina–clay slurry, were made independently and mixed together at a later stage to make CCCs. Electrical, thermal and mechanical properties of the CCCs have been studied.

  6. Development of a sintering process for recycling oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash into glass ceramic composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin, E-mail: leeam@dlut.edu.cn

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Glass ceramic composite is prepared from oil shale fly ash and MSWI bottom ash. • A novel method for the production of glass ceramic composite is presented. • It provides simple route and lower energy consumption in terms of recycling waste. • The vitrified slag can promote the sintering densification process of glass ceramic. • The performances of products decrease with the increase of oil shale fly ash content. - Abstract: Oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash are industrial and municipal by-products that require further treatment before disposal to avoid polluting the environment. In the study, they were mixed and vitrified into the slag by the melt-quench process. The obtained vitrified slag was then mixed with various percentages of oil shale fly ash and converted into glass ceramic composites by the subsequent sintering process. Differential thermal analysis was used to study the thermal characteristics and determine the sintering temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to analyze the crystalline phase compositions. Sintering shrinkage, weight loss on ignition, density and compressive strength were tested to determine the optimum preparation condition and study the co-sintering mechanism of vitrified amorphous slag and oil shale fly ash. The results showed the product performances increased with the increase of sintering temperatures and the proportion of vitrified slag to oil shale fly ash. Glass ceramic composite (vitrified slag content of 80%, oil shale fly ash content of 20%, sintering temperature of 1000 °C and sintering time of 2 h) showed the properties of density of 1.92 ± 0.05 g/cm{sup 3}, weight loss on ignition of 6.14 ± 0.18%, sintering shrinkage of 22.06 ± 0.6% and compressive strength of 67 ± 14 MPa. The results indicated that it was a comparable waste-based material compared to previous researches. In particular, the energy consumption in the production process was reduced

  7. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  8. Initiating the Validation of CCIM Processability for Multi-phase all Ceramic (SYNROC) HLW Form: Plan for Test BFY14CCIM-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, Vince [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This plan covers test BFY14CCIM-C which will be a first–of–its-kind demonstration for the complete non-radioactive surrogate production of multi-phase ceramic (SYNROC) High Level Waste Forms (HLW) using Cold Crucible Induction Melting (CCIM) Technology. The test will occur in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) CCIM Pilot Plant and is tentatively scheduled for the week of September 15, 2014. The purpose of the test is to begin collecting qualitative data for validating the ceramic HLW form processability advantages using CCIM technology- as opposed to existing ceramic–lined Joule Heated Melters (JHM) currently producing BSG HLW forms. The major objectives of BFY14CCIM-C are to complete crystalline melt initiation with a new joule-heated resistive starter ring, sustain inductive melting at temperatures between 1600 to 1700°C for two different relatively high conductive materials representative of the SYNROC ceramic formation inclusive of a HLW surrogate, complete melter tapping and pouring of molten ceramic material in to a preheated 4 inch graphite canister and a similar canister at room temperature. Other goals include assessing the performance of a new crucible specially designed to accommodate the tapping and pouring of pure crystalline forms in contrast to less recalcitrant amorphous glass, assessing the overall operational effectiveness of melt initiation using a resistive starter ring with a dedicated power source, and observing the tapped molten flow and subsequent relatively quick crystallization behavior in pans with areas identical to standard HLW disposal canisters. Surrogate waste compositions with ceramic SYNROC forming additives and their measured properties for inductive melting, testing parameters, pre-test conditions and modifications, data collection requirements, and sampling/post-demonstration analysis requirements for the produced forms are provided and defined.

  9. Effects of sintering processes on mechanical properties and microstructure of TiB{sub 2}-TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni composite ceramic cutting tool material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou Bin, E-mail: zou20011110@163.com [Centre for Advanced Jet Engineering Technologies (CaJET), School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China) and Key Laboratory of High Efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture, Shandong University, Ministry of Education (China); Huang Chuanzhen; Song Jinpeng; Liu Ziye; Liu Lin; Zhao Yan [Centre for Advanced Jet Engineering Technologies (CaJET), School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Key Laboratory of High Efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture (Shandong University), Ministry of Education (China)

    2012-04-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiB{sub 2}-TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni ceramic tool material was sintered by six processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of material depended mainly on the holding stages and duration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP1 process was involved with the multiple holding stages and longer duration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP1 process led to many pores, and coarsening and brittle rupture of grains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tool material sintered by SP6 process exhibited the optimum mechanical properties. - Abstract: TiB{sub 2}-TiC composite powder was prepared by ball-milled with ethanol and vacuum dry, and TiB{sub 2}-TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni composite ceramic cutting tool material was sintered using vacuum hot-pressed sintering technique by six processes which included the different holding stages and times. The effects of sintering processes on the mechanical properties and microstructure were investigated. The polished surface and fracture surface of TiB{sub 2}-TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni ceramics sintered by the different sintering processes were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS), and the relationships between mechanical properties and microstructure were discussed. The mechanical properties and microstructure depended mainly on the total holding time and the different holding stages. The longer holding time and multiple holding stages led to coarsening of TiB{sub 2} and TiC grains, formation of pores and the brittle rupture of grains, which deteriorated the mechanical properties of TiB{sub 2}-TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni ceramic. TiB{sub 2}-TiC + 8 wt% nano-Ni composite ceramic cutting tool material sintered by SP6 process exhibited the optimum resultant mechanical properties because of its finer microstructure and higher relative density, and its flexural strength, fracture toughness and hardness were 916.8 MPa, 7.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} and 22.54 GPa

  10. Effect of silicon carbide ceramic coating process on the mirror surface quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peipei; Wang, Li; Wang, Gang; Bai, Yunli; Wang, Peng; Xiao, Zhenghang

    2016-10-01

    Silicon carbide, as a new reflector material, its excellent physical and chemical properties has been widely recognized by the industry. In order to make SiC mirror better used in space optical system, we used digital coating equipment during its coating process. By using ion-assisted electron evaporation method, we got a complete metal reflective film system on the surface of finely polished silicon carbide mirror. After automated coating process, by adjusting the coating parameters during the process, the surface roughness of silicon carbide improved from 7.8 nm to 5.1 nm, and the average optical reflectance of the surface reached 95% from visible to near-infrared. The metal reflective film system kept well after annealing and firmness test. As a result, the work of this paper will provide an important reference for high-precision coating process on large diameter SiC mirror.

  11. Synthesis and ceramic processing of alumina and zirconia based composites infiltrated with glass phase for dental applications; Sintese e processamento de compositos a base de alumina e zirconia com infiltracao de fase vitrea para aplicacoes odontologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Daniel Gomes

    2009-07-01

    The interest for the use of ceramic materials for dental applications started due to the good aesthetic appearance promoted by the similarity to natural teeth. However, the fragility of traditional ceramics was a limitation for their use in stress conditions. The development of alumina and zirconia based materials, that associate aesthetic results, biocompatibility and good mechanical behaviour, makes possible the employment of ceramics for fabrication of dental restorations. The incorporation of vitreous phase in these ceramics is an alternative to minimize the ceramic retraction and to improve the adhesion to resin-based cements, necessary for the union of ceramic frameworks to the remaining dental structure. In the dentistry field, alumina and zirconia ceramic infiltrated with glassy phase are represented commercially by the In-Ceram systems. Considering that the improvement of powder's synthesis routes and of techniques of ceramic processing contributes for good performance of these materials, the goal of the present work is the study of processing conditions of alumina and/or 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics infiltrated with aluminum borosilicate lanthanum glass. The powders, synthesized by hydroxide coprecipitation route, were pressed by uniaxial compaction and pre-sintered at temperature range between 950 and 1650 degree C in order to obtain porous ceramics bodies. Vitreous phase incorporation was performed by impregnation of aluminum borosilicate lanthanum powder, also prepared in this work, followed by heat treatment between 1200 and 1400 degree C .Ceramic powders were characterized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, gaseous adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. Sinterability of alumina and /or stabilized zirconia green pellets was evaluated by dilatometry. Pre-sintered ceramics were characterized by apparent density measurements (Archimedes method), X-ray diffraction and scanning

  12. Hysteresis of Colloid Retention and Release in Saturated Porous Media During Transients in Solution Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturated packed column and micromodel transport studies wereconducted to gain insightonmechanismsof colloid retention and release under unfavorable attachment conditions. The initial deposition of colloids in porous media was found to be a strongly coupled process that depended on solution chemistr...

  13. Colloids in Biotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Fanun, Monzer

    2010-01-01

    Colloids have come a long way from when Thomas Graham coined the term colloid to describe 'pseudo solutions'. This book enables scientists to close the gap between extensive research and translation into commercial options in biomedicine and biotechnology. It covers biosurfactants and surface properties, phase behavior, and orientational change of surfactant mixtures with peptides at the interface. It also covers adsorption of polymers and biopolymers on the surface and interface, discusses colloidal nanoparticles and their use in biotechnology, and delves into bioadhesion and microencapsulati

  14. Process parameters in the manufacture of ceramic ZnO nanofibers made by electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonato, Renato C.; Morales, Ana R.; Rocha, Mateus C.; Nista, Silvia V. G.; Mei, Lucia H. I.; Bonse, Baltus C.

    2017-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning under different conditions using a solution of poly(vinyl alcohol) and zinc acetate as precursor. A 23 factorial design was made to study the influence of the process parameters in the electrospinning (collector distance, flow rate and voltage), and a 22 factorial design was made to study the influence of the calcination process (time and temperature). SEM images were made to analyze the fiber morphology before and after calcination process, and the images were made to measure the nanofiber diameter. X-ray diffraction was made to analyze the total precursor conversion to ZnO and the elimination of the polymeric carrier.

  15. Colloids with high-definition surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Yeh; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Gulari, Erdogan; Lahann, Joerg

    2007-01-01

    Compared with the well equipped arsenal of surface modification methods for flat surfaces, techniques that are applicable to curved, colloidal surfaces are still in their infancy. This technological gap exists because spin-coating techniques used in traditional photolithographic processes are not applicable to the curved surfaces of spherical objects. By replacing spin-coated photoresist with a vapor-deposited, photodefinable polymer coating, we have now fabricated microstructured colloids with a wide range of surface patterns, including asymmetric and chiral surface structures, that so far were typically reserved for flat substrates. This high-throughput method can yield surface-structured colloidal particles at a rate of ≈107 to 108 particles per operator per day. Equipped with spatially defined binding pockets, microstructured colloids can engage in programmable interactions, which can lead to directed self-assembly. The ability to create a wide range of colloids with both simple and complex surface patterns may contribute to the genesis of previously unknown colloidal structures and may have important technological implications in a range of different applications, including photonic and phononic materials or chemical sensors. PMID:17592149

  16. Colloids with high-definition surface structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Yeh; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Gulari, Erdogan; Lahann, Joerg

    2007-07-03

    Compared with the well equipped arsenal of surface modification methods for flat surfaces, techniques that are applicable to curved, colloidal surfaces are still in their infancy. This technological gap exists because spin-coating techniques used in traditional photolithographic processes are not applicable to the curved surfaces of spherical objects. By replacing spin-coated photoresist with a vapor-deposited, photodefinable polymer coating, we have now fabricated microstructured colloids with a wide range of surface patterns, including asymmetric and chiral surface structures, that so far were typically reserved for flat substrates. This high-throughput method can yield surface-structured colloidal particles at a rate of approximately 10(7) to 10(8) particles per operator per day. Equipped with spatially defined binding pockets, microstructured colloids can engage in programmable interactions, which can lead to directed self-assembly. The ability to create a wide range of colloids with both simple and complex surface patterns may contribute to the genesis of previously unknown colloidal structures and may have important technological implications in a range of different applications, including photonic and phononic materials or chemical sensors.

  17. Raspberry Extract as Both a Stabilizer and a Reducing Agent in Environmentally Friendly Process of Receiving Colloidal Silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Pulit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An ecofriendly method of nanosilver obtaining has been studied. The process involves the chemical reduction method carried out in aqueous environment. Silver nitrate (V was applied as a silver ions source. Raspberry extract was used as a natural source of both reducing and stabilizing agents. The total amount of phenolic compounds was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Obtained nanoparticles were analyzed by the dynamic light scattering technique so as to determine the particles size and suspension stability which was characterized by an electrokinetic potential. The results confirmed that the size of some nanoparticles was under 100 nm.

  18. Two-substrate vertical deposition for stable colloidal crystal chips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xin; SUN Zhiqiang; CHEN Zhimin; ZHANG Kai; YANG Bai

    2005-01-01

    By combining vertical deposition with micromolding in capillaries method, we have demonstrated the two-substrate vertical deposition, an alternative and versatile procedure for fabricating high-quality stable colloidal crystal chips. Apparent bright colors, special UV-vis spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images all prove that high-quality colloidal crystal structures are formed in between the two substrates. During the two-substrate vertical deposition for colloidal crystal chips, capillary force and evaporation of the medium are critical to the formation of the colloidal crystals; while the confinement in between two close substrates makes the resulting colloidal crystal chips more stable. Due to the excellent stability, these colloidal crystal chips can be used to construct some composite optical devices via a simpler and more flexible process. Meanwhile, they can also be further used as the templates for ordered multiporous materials.

  19. Particle and substrate charge effects on colloidal self-assembly in a sessile drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qingfeng; Gao, Li; Sharma, Vyom; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Wong, C C

    2008-10-21

    By direct video monitoring of dynamic colloidal self-assembly during solvent evaporation in a sessile drop, we investigated the effect of surface charge on the ordering of colloidal spheres. The in situ observations revealed that the interaction between charged colloidal spheres and substrates affects the mobility of colloidal spheres during convective self-assembly, playing an important role in the colloidal crystal growth process. Both ordered and disordered growth was observed depending on different chemical conditions mediated by surface charge and surfactant additions to the sessile drop system. These different self-assembly behaviors were explained by the Coulombic and hydrophobic interactions between surface-charged colloidal spheres and substrates.

  20. Electrochemical behaviour of ceramic yttria stabilized zirconia on carbon steel synthesized via sol-gel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespo, M.A. Dominguez, E-mail: mdominguezc@ipn.m [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Altamira (CICATA-IPN) km 14.5 Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial, C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Murillo, A. Garcia; Torres-Huerta, A.M. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Altamira (CICATA-IPN) km 14.5 Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial, C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Yanez-Zamora, C. [Estudiante del postgrado en Tecnologia Avanzada del CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, km 14.5, Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial. C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Carrillo-Romo, F. de J [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Altamira (CICATA-IPN) km 14.5 Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial, C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico)

    2009-08-26

    Chromate conversion coatings have been widely applied for the corrosion of different metallic substrates. However, the waste containing Cr{sup 6+} has many limitations due to the environmental consideration and health hazards. An interesting alternative seems to be the deposition on metallic surface of thin layers of yttria or zirconia or both by the sol-gel process. In this study, Ytttria and Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, 8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films were used for coating commercial carbon steel substrates by sol-gel method and the dip-coating process. The evolution of organic compounds up to crystallization process as a function of heat treatments was study by FT-IR spectroscopy. The structure and morphology of the coatings were analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The anticorrosion performance of the coatings has been evaluated by using electrochemical techniques in an aggressive media (3.5 wt.% NaCl). The corrosion behaviour of sol-gel method was compared with traditional chromate conversion coatings. Differences in the electrochemical behaviour of YSZ coatings are related to the development of microcracks during the sintering process and to the presence of organic compounds during growth film. Electrochemical results showed that sol-gel YSZ and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings can act as protective barriers against wet corrosion; however yttria films displayed low adhesion to substrate. The corrosion parameters provide an explanation of the role of each film and show a considerable increase in the corrosion resistance for coated samples in comparison to the bare steel samples.

  1. Properties of Lead Zirconate Titanate Ceramics Determined Using Microwave and Hot-Press Hybrid Sintering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hirofumi; Kato, Kazuaki; Qiu, Jinhao; Tani, Junji; Nagata, Kunihiro

    2001-09-01

    Piezoelectric materials play an important role in smart material and structural systems, and high-performance piezoelectric actuators with larger force and displacement output are in demand. It was shown in our previous work that the hybrid sintering process using a 28 GHz microwave technique and hot pressing offers advantages over conventional technologies reference. It was also confirmed that the maximum achieved value of piezoelectric constant d31 of the specimens of the hybrid-sintering process is approximately 360× 10-12 m/V, which is about 38% larger than 260× 10-12 m/V, the d31 of the conventionally sintered specimens. In this study, the material properties, including electromechanical coupling factor, Young’s modulus, frequency constant, Curie temperature and dielectric constant, of the specimens fabricated with the microwave sintering process were further investigated for different sintering temperatures. The Curie point Tc decreases, but the dielectric constant \\varepsilonr at Tc increases with the grain size of specimens for all sintering methods. The influence of grain size on Tc and \\varepsilonr can be attributed to the residual stress induced by the lattice mismatch between the cubic phase and the tetragonal-rhombohedral mixed phase.

  2. Structure and Magnetic Properties of Bi5Ti3FeO15 Ceramics Prepared by Sintering, Mechanical Activation and Edamm Process. A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jartych E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Three different methods were used to obtain Bi5Ti3FeO15 ceramics, i.e. solid-state sintering, mechanical activation (MA with subsequent thermal treatment, and electrical discharge assisted mechanical milling (EDAMM. The structure and magnetic properties of produced Bi5Ti3FeO15 samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The purest Bi5Ti3FeO15 ceramics was obtained by standard solid-state sintering method. Mechanical milling methods are attractive because the Bi5Ti3FeO15 compound may be formed at lower temperature or without subsequent thermal treatment. In the case of EDAMM process also the time of processing is significantly shorter in comparison with solid-state sintering method. As revealed by Mössbauer spectroscopy, at room temperature the Bi5Ti3FeO15 ceramics produced by various methods is in paramagnetic state.

  3. Liquid crystal colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together the many concepts and discoveries in liquid crystal colloids contributed over the last twenty years and scattered across numerous articles and book chapters. It provides both a historical overview of the development of the field and a clear perspective on the future applications in photonics. The book covers all phenomena observed in liquid crystal colloids with an emphasis on experimental tools and applications of topology in condensed matter, as well as practical micro-photonics applications. It includes a number of spectacular manifestations of new topological phenomena not found or difficult to observe in other systems. Starting from the early works on nematic colloids, it explains the basics of topological defects in ordered media, charge and winding, and the elastic forces between colloidal particles in nematics. Following a detailed description of experimental methods, such as optical tweezing and particle tracking, the book eases the reader into the theoretical part, which de...

  4. Confocal microscopy of colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, V; Semwogerere, D; Weeks, Eric R [Department of Physics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)

    2007-03-21

    Colloids have increasingly been used to characterize or mimic many aspects of atomic and molecular systems. With confocal microscopy these colloidal particles can be tracked spatially in three dimensions with great precision over large time scales. This review discusses equilibrium phases such as crystals and liquids, and non-equilibrium phases such as glasses and gels. The phases that form depend strongly on the type of particle interaction that dominates. Hard-sphere-like colloids are the simplest, and interactions such as the attractive depletion force and electrostatic repulsion result in more non-trivial phases which can better model molecular materials. Furthermore, shearing or otherwise externally forcing these colloids while under microscopic observation helps connect the microscopic particle dynamics to the macroscopic flow behaviour. Finally, directions of future research in this field are discussed. (topical review)

  5. 无胶体型儿童再制干酪配方设计研究%Formulating of recipeof non colloid kids processed cheese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅幼华; 尹艳军; 解庆刚; 刘红雷

    2013-01-01

    By researching and optimizing the addition amount of natural cheese,condensed milk,Milk protein and water content,makes a formula of non colloid kids processed cheese:Mozzarella cheese 20%,old cheddar 4%,condensed milk 14%,butter 11%,skimmed milk power 6%,Malt syrup 5%,Milk protein 1.5%,emulsifying salts 1.3%,lactic acid 0.37%and water 36.8%.accelerated shelf life testing to prove that the product can be stored at least 9 months at under 10 ℃ refrigerated conditions.%通过对天然干酪、炼乳、乳蛋白添加量和目标水份的研究和优化,确定了无胶体型儿童再制干酪配方:马苏里拉20%,成熟车达4%,炼乳14%,黄油11%,脱脂乳粉6%,麦芽糖浆5%,牛乳蛋白1.5%,乳化盐1.3%,乳酸0.37%,加水量36.83%(均为质量分数).经一系列稳定实验说明该配方生产的产品在10℃左右冷藏条件下,至少可以贮存9个月.

  6. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  7. Investigation of mechanical properties based on grain growth and microstructure evolution of alumina ceramics during two step sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, U. A.; Hussain, A.; Shah, M.; Shuaib, M.; Qayyum, F.

    2016-08-01

    Alumina ceramics having small grain size and high density yield good mechanical properties, which are required in most mechanical applications. Two Step Sintering (TSS) is used to develop dense alumina ceramics. In this research work the effect of sintering temperatures on microstructure and density of the alumina specimens developed by using TSS has been investigated. It has been observed that TSS is more efficient in controlling grain growth and increasing the density as compared to One Step Sintering (OSS) of alumina. Scanning electron micrographs of sintered alumina specimens have been compared. It has been observed that TSS proves to be a better technique for increasing density and controlling grain growth of alumina ceramics than OSS. More relative density, hardness, fracture toughness and small grain size was achieved by using TSS over OSS technique.

  8. Complex permittivity measurements and mixing laws of ceramic materials and application to microwave processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, David Louis

    The complex permittivity of alumina composites was examined with respect to its dependence on the volume fraction of constituents, microstructure, processing temperature, and processing method. In addition, the effective permittivity of these composites was quantitatively modeled based on the permittivities, volume fractions, and microstructures of the constituents. The studies focused on the complex permittivity of alumina composites, which contained the lossy additives silicon carbide and copper oxide. Two composite systems were prepared by physically mixing alumina and one of the additives. A third composite system was produced by chemically precipitating copper oxide onto alumina. The two synthesis methods produced composites with different microstructures and complex permittivities. The imaginary part of the complex permittivity was generally larger in the chemically precipitated composites than in the physically mixed composites. The dependence of the complex permittivities of the composites on volume fraction and microstructure were compared with several algebraic mixing laws and with three dimensional, electrostatic numerical simulations. The algebraic mixing laws do not take into account for the dependence of the imaginary part of the complex permittivity on absorbed water and microstructure, which is affected by composite synthesis. By incorporating general physical characteristics of the composites, the electrostatic simulations were able to accurately predict their permittivity. Heating some selected alumina composites in conventional and microwave furnaces demonstrate several interesting results. The densification and dielectric proper-ties of the alumina/copper oxide composites varied due to processing temperature. The changes in these properties depended upon preparation method and not on heating method. The density and real part of the complex permittivity of alumina/silicon carbide also varied due to processing temperature and not on heating method

  9. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  10. Colloidal stability of Ni(OH){sub 2} in water and its dispersion into a ceramic matrix from the reaction media to obtain Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabanas-Polo, S.; Ferrari, B.; Sanchez-Herencia, A. J.

    2014-07-01

    Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites have been fabricated by slip casting of concentrated Ni(OH){sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} suspensions and subsequent in situ reduction to metallic nickel during sintering. For that, the synthesis assisted by ultrasound of both α- and β-Ni(OH){sub 2} polymorphs, as well as their colloidal stability, have been studied. The structural differences between both polymorphs have been thoroughly studied by means of XRD, FTIR, DTA-TG, SSA, SEM and TEM, in order to optimize the starting suspensions. This way, the IEP of both polymorphs have been established (9.7 y 12 for β- and α-Ni(OH){sub 2}, respectively), as well as the optimal content of an anionic dispersant (PAA) to stabilize the particles (0.8 wt. % for beta phase and 3.0 wt. % for alpha phase). Three different Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites, with a high dispersion degree of the metallic phase, have been obtained considering the potential vs. particles distance curve of the Ni(OH){sub 2}, and their structure has been discussed in terms of the strength of the agglomerates and/or aggregates of the Ni(OH){sub 2}. (Author)

  11. Electrical properties of BaZrO3 ceramic synthesized by flash pyrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Deepash S.; Bhattacharya, D.

    2016-04-01

    Barium Zirconate (BaZrO3) nanoparticles are synthesized by flash pyrolysis combustion process. Rietveld refinement of XRD pattern of calcined powder at 900 °C, 1100 °C and sintered at 1600 °C describes that a single-phase compound is formed of an Pm-3m cubic crystal structure with a lattice constant a = 4.19102, 4.192693, and 4.195276 Å respectively. Crystallize size of calcined powder at 900 °C, 1100 °C and sintered at 1600 °C is found 34.28, 37.7 and 47.14 nm respectively using Scherrer formula. The FESEM image of sintered pellet at 1600 °C for 4 h describes porous nature of the sample. The Nyquist plots indicate the dominant grain boundary effect in electrical processes in the sample. A decrease in the bulk resistance with increasing temperature demonstrates a semiconducting behavior. The temperature dependent relaxation and conduction mechanism brief involvements of different types of the charge species in the 250 to 500 °C temperature region as studied at different frequencies over 100 Hz to 1 MHz.

  12. Formation mechanism and characteristics of lanthanum-doped BaTiO{sub 3} powders and ceramics prepared by the sol–gel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianculescu, Adelina Carmen [Department of Oxide Materials Science and Engineering, Politehnica University of Bucharest, 17 Gh. Polizu, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Vasilescu, Catalina Andreea, E-mail: katyvasilescu85@yahoo.com [Department of Oxide Materials Science and Engineering, Politehnica University of Bucharest, 17 Gh. Polizu, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG54, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Crisan, Maria; Raileanu, Malina [Ilie Murgulescu Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Calugaru, Mihai [Department of Oxide Materials Science and Engineering, Politehnica University of Bucharest, 17 Gh. Polizu, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Crisan, Dorel; Dragan, Nicolae [Ilie Murgulescu Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Curecheriu, Lavinia; Mitoseriu, Liliana [Department of Physics, Al. I. Cuza University of Iasi, Blvd. Carol I 11, 700506 Iasi (Romania)

    2015-08-15

    Pure and lanthanum-doped barium titanate nanopowders described by two different formulae, as Ba{sub 1−x}La{sub x}TiO{sub 3}, for lower La concentrations (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.005) and Ba{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x/4}O{sub 3} for higher La concentration (x = 0.025) were prepared by an alkoxide sol–gel method. Single phase compositions were obtained after annealing at 900 °C for 2 h, in air. The increase of the lanthanum content causes structural and morphological changes in the oxide powders, including the evolution of the unit cell from tetragonal toward a cubic symmetry, the particle size decrease and a higher aggregation tendency. SEM investigations of the ceramics sintered at 1300 °C for 4 h indicate significant changes of the microstructural features (strong decrease of the average grain size and increase of the intergranular porosity) with the raise of La amount. Lanthanum addition to barium titanate prepared by sol–gel induces a more significant shift of the Curie temperature toward lower values, than that one reported in literature for ceramics of similar compositions, but processed by the conventional solid state method. The compositions with smaller La amount (x ≤ 0.005) show semiconducting properties at room temperature and high relative dielectric permittivity values, while the undoped ceramics and those doped with higher La content (x = 0.025) are good dielectrics. The ceramic with x = 0.025 exhibits acceptable low losses, a very diffuse ferroelectric–paraelectric transition and Curie temperature closed to the room temperature, being thus susceptible for high tunability applications. - Highlights: • Ba{sub 1−x}La{sub x}TiO{sub 3} (x ≤ 0.005) and Ba{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x/4}O{sub 3} (x = 0.025) were prepared by sol–gel. • Ceramics with x < 0.5 exhibit semiconductor and high dielectric properties. • Ceramic with x = 0.025 exhibits acceptable low losses and diffuse phase transition.

  13. Nucleation-growth of salicylic acid-oxoTiO{sub 2} colloids synthesized by sol-gel processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieng, S.; Jia, Z. [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 avenue J.-B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Subra-Paternault, P. [Laboratoire de Chimie et Biologie des Membranes et Nanoobjets, CBMN – UMR 5248, Bâtiment, 14B, Allée Geoffroy Saint Hilaire, 33600 Pessac (France); Kanaev, A. [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 avenue J.-B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Chhor, K., E-mail: khay.chhor@lspm.cnrs.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 avenue J.-B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, the preparation of hybrid oxo-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles modified by salicylic acid (SA) is reported. The size-selected TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized in a sol-gel reactor with rapid micromixing of reagents and binding of SA molecules occurs at the nucleation stage. UV-visible absorption, Raman spectroscopy and Light scattering measurements evidence the formation of a SA–oxo-TiO{sub 2} charge-transfer complex. In particularly, the C=O vibration mode of SA shifts to lower frequencies upon complexation while the C-O vibration modes of both carboxylate and phenolic groups retain their position. The absence of C-O shift comes from two effects that cancel each other, i.e. the hardening of this mode related to the C=O mode changes and its softening due to the replacement of hydrogen in COH group by Ti atoms. Kinetic studies of the oxo-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles nucleation and growth in presence of SA show that the acidic ligand at the nanoparticle surface acts as an attractor for another oxo-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle leading to polycondensation. This mechanism is responsible for the acceleration of the nanoparticle aggregation kinetics and shortening of the induction time. The hybrid nanoparticles are stable at pH ≤ 7.7 and release SA molecules at pH ≥ 8.5. - Highlights: • Hybrid oxo-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles modified by salicylic acid (SA) are prepared. • The synthesis is achieved during the nucleation stage of sol-gel process. • The formation of SA–oxo-TiO{sub 2} charge-transfer complex is evidenced. • Mechanism responsible for the acceleration of the nanoparticle aggregation kinetics is proposed. • SA-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are stable at pH ≤ 7.7 and release SA molecules at pH ≥ 8.5.

  14. Effect of Processing Temperature on Salts and Casein Colloid in Bovine Milk%热处理对牛乳中盐类组分及酪蛋白胶体特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王辉; 孙琦; 刘鹭; 张书文; 梁霄; 吕加平

    2012-01-01

    As important components of milk,salts and casein colloid play a key role in maintaining the stability of milk system.In order to explore the effect of processing temperature on salts and casein colloid in bovine milk,we measured indicators of milk quality at different temperatures.The results showed that processing temperature had a significant impact on the form and content of salts in milk(P0.05).As the temperature increased,the soluble calcium and soluble phosphorus were transferred to the colloidal phase;milk casein colloidal particle size,surface potential,hydration and other properties also revealed an obvious change due to the denaturation of whey protein.Therefore,there is a close relationship of processing temperature with salts and casein colloid in milk,which is important for the quality of milk.%为研究热处理对牛乳中盐类组分和酪蛋白胶体特性的影响,对不同温度处理后的牛乳进行相关指标的测定。结果表明:不同温度处理对牛乳中主要盐类的存在形态及含量有着显著影响(P〈0.05),随着温度的升高,溶解相的钙和磷逐渐向胶体相转变;同时,受乳清蛋白变性的影响,牛乳中酪蛋白胶体粒径、表面电势、水合作用等特性也发生了显著变化。因此,加工温度与牛乳中的盐类组分及酪蛋白胶体特性有着密切关联,是造成牛乳品质变化的一个重要因素。

  15. Investigation of the relaxor behavior of sol gel processed lanthanum lead titanium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limame, K. [Centre Régional des Metiers de l' Education et de la Formation (CRMEF) de Fès, Rue deKuwait, BP 49, Fès (Morocco); Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Sayouri, S., E-mail: ssayouri@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Yahyaoui, M.M. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Housni, A. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Institut Supérieur des Professions Infirmières et Techniques de Santé (ISPITS), Fès (Morocco); Jaber, B. [Centre National pour la Recherche Scientifique et Technique (CNRST), Angle Avenue Allal El Fassi avenue des FAR, Quartie Hay Ryad, BP8027 Nation Unies, Rabat (Morocco)

    2016-08-01

    A series of La doped lead titanate samples, with composition Pb{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x/4}O{sub 3} (PLTx), where x=0.00; 0.02; 0.04; 0.06; 0.07; 0.08; 0.10; 0.12; 0.14; 0.16; 0.18; 0.21 and 0.22 was prepared using the sol–gel process. Addition of La gives rise to the two well-known phenomena: diffuseness and relaxation around the ferro-to-paraelectric transition; the two parameters related to these phenomena, and which give a satisfactory interpretation of them, have been estimated using the Uchino's quadratic law. This diffuse phase transition (DPT) has been investigated with the help of the Landau–Devonshire cluster theory and the model of Cheng et al., to show that polar regions may be generated around the DPT and far from the temperature, T{sub m}, of the maximum of the dielectric permittivity, which have as a direct consequence a non vanishing polarization even if T>T{sub m}.

  16. Processing of Silicon Nitride Ceramics from Concentrated Aqueous Suspensions by Robocasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HE,GUOPING; HIRSCHFELD,DEIDRE A.; CESARANO III,JOSEPH; STUECKER,JOHN N.

    2000-08-14

    The optimization of concentrated AlliedSignal GS-44 silicon nitride aqueous slurries for robocasting was investigated. The dispersion mechanisms of GS-44 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} aqueous suspensions with and without polyacrylate were analyzed. The zero point of charge (ZPC) was at about pH 6. Well-dispersed GS-44 suspensions were obtained in the pH range from 7 to 11 by the addition of Darvan 821A. The influence of pH, amount of Darvan 821A and solids loading on the theological behavior of GS-44 aqueous suspensions was determined. A coagulant, aluminum nitrate, was used to control the yield stress and shear thinning behavior of highly loaded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} slurries. Homogeneous and stable suspensions of 52 vol% GS-44 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were robocast successfully at pH 7.8 to pH 8.5. The sintering process, mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of robocast GS-44 bars were determined.

  17. Experimental observations of thermal spikes in microwave processing of ceramic oxide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.; Unruh, W.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Thomas, J.R. Jr. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Microwave heating of alumina/silica fiber tows in a single-mode microwave cavity at 2.45 GHz have produced a surprising thermal spike behavior on the fiber bundles. During a thermal spike, a ``hot spot`` on the tow brightens rapidly, persists for a few seconds, and rapidly extinguishs. A hot spot can encompass the entire tow in the cavity or just a localized portion of the tow. Some local hot spots propagate along the fiber. Thermal spikes are triggered by relatively small (<15%) increases in power, thus having obvious implications for the development of practical microwave fiber processing systems. A tow can be heated through several successive thermal spikes, after which the tow is left substantially cooler than it was originally, although the applied microwave electric field is much larger. X-ray diffraction studies show that after each temperature spike there is a partial phase transformation of the tow material into mullite. After several excursions the tow has been largely transformed to the new, less lossy phase and is more difficult to heat. Heating experiments with Nextel 550 tows are examined for a pausible explanation of this microwave heating behavior.

  18. Influence of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloidal Force Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yi; Jayasuriya, Sunil; Manke, Charles W; Mao, Guangzhao

    2015-09-29

    Forces between colloidal particles determine the performances of many industrial processes and products. Colloidal force measurements conducted between a colloidal particle AFM probe and particles immobilized on a flat substrate are valuable in selecting appropriate surfactants for colloidal stabilization. One of the features of inorganic fillers and extenders is the prevalence of rough surfaces-even the polymer latex particles, often used as model colloidal systems including the current study, have rough surfaces albeit at a much smaller scale. Surface roughness is frequently cited as the reason for disparity between experimental observations and theoretical treatment but seldom verified by direct evidence. This work reports the effect of nanoscale surface roughness on colloidal force measurements carried out in the presence of surfactants. We applied a heating method to reduce the mean surface roughness of commercial latex particles from 30 to 1 nm. We conducted force measurements using the two types of particles at various salt and surfactant concentrations. The surfactants used were pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, Pluronic F108, and a styrene/acrylic copolymer, Joncryl 60. In the absence of the surfactant, nanometer surface roughness affects colloidal forces only in high salt conditions when the Debye length becomes smaller than the surface roughness. The adhesion is stronger between colloids with higher surface roughness and requires a higher surfactant concentration to be eliminated. The effect of surface roughness on colloidal forces was also investigated as a function of the adsorbed surfactant layer structure characterized by AFM indentation and dynamic light scattering. We found that when the layer thickness exceeds the surface roughness, the colloidal adhesion is less influenced by surfactant concentration variation. This study demonstrates that surface roughness at the nanoscale can influence colloidal forces significantly and should be taken

  19. Anomalous behavior of linear resistivity arising in intergrain ordering process of weak-sintered ceramic system YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, M., E-mail: hag@kit.ac.jp [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Fujii, A.; Hayashi, T.; Shima, T. [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Deguchi, H. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Tobata-Ku, Kitakyusyu 804-8550 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Ceramic system of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8} (Y124) shows intergrain ordering affected by frustration. Novel vanishing process of electric resistivity is caused by the frustration effect. Almost vanished resistivity around the critical temp. is restored below the region. Faint peak of resistivity appears certainly below the ordering point decided magnetically. Faint electric resistivity behavior is searched experimentally near and below intergrain ordering temperature of weakly sintered ceramic YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8} (Y124). For this purpose, a new method to detect linear and nonlinear resistivity sensitively by combination of pulse delta method and numerical Fourier-transformation has been designed. Making use of the experimental system for several weak sintered Y124 samples, it is revealed that linear resistivity just above the intergrain ordering point first drops toward zero steeply with decreasing temperature, and then turns abruptly upward to forms faint maximum at lower temperature. Such a novel behavior of 'revival of resistivity' is confirmed to be reproducible, and considered to be an essential frustration effect for d-wave type grain system with irregular or inhomogeneous ceramic structure.

  20. Novel Water Treatment Processes Based on Hybrid Membrane-Ozonation Systems: A Novel Ceramic Membrane Contactor for Bubbleless Ozonation of Emerging Micropollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos K. Stylianou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the presentation of novel water treatment systems based on ozonation combined with ceramic membranes for the treatment of refractory organic compounds found in natural water sources such as groundwater. This includes, firstly, a short review of possible membrane based hybrid processes for water treatment from various sources. Several practical and theoretical aspects for the application of hybrid membrane-ozonation systems are discussed, along with theoretical background regarding the transformation of target organic pollutants by ozone. Next, a novel ceramic membrane contactor, bringing into contact the gas phase (ozone and water phase without the creation of bubbles (bubbleless ozonation, is presented. Experimental data showing the membrane contactor efficiency for oxidation of atrazine, endosulfan, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE are shown and discussed. Almost complete endosulfan degradation was achieved with the use of the ceramic contactor, whereas atrazine degradation higher than 50% could not be achieved even after 60 min of reaction time. Single ozonation of water containing MTBE could not result in a significant MTBE degradation. MTBE mineralization by O3/H2O2 combination increased at higher pH values and O3/H2O2 molar ratio of 0.2 reaching a maximum of around 65%.

  1. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  2. Effects of improved process for CuO-doped NKN lead-free ceramics on high-power piezoelectric transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song-Ling; Tsai, Cheng-Che; Liou, Yi-Cheng; Hong, Cheng-Shong; Li, Bing-Jing; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the effects of the electrical proper- ties of CuO-doped (Na(0.5)K(0.5))NbO(3) (NKN) ceramics prepared separately using the B-site oxide precursor method (BO method) and conventional mixed-oxide method (MO method) on high-power piezoelectric transformers (PTs) were investigated. The performances of PTs made with these two substrates were compared. Experimental results showed that the output power and temperature stability of PTs could be enhanced because of the lower resonant impedance of the ceramics prepared using the BO method. In addition, the output power of PTs was more affected by the resonant impedance than by the mechanical quality factor (Q(m)) of the ceramics. The PTs fabricated with ceramics prepared using the BO method showed a high efficiency of more than 94% and a maximum output power of 8.98 W (power density: 18.3 W/cm(3)) with temperature increase of 3°C under the optimum load resistance (5 kΩ) and an input voltage of 150 V(pp). This output power of the lead-free disk-type PTs is the best reported so far.

  3. Structural Ceramics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  4. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  5. Plasmonic films based on colloidal lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bin; Yu, Ye; Möhwald, Helmuth; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Bai

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the field of plasmonic films fabricated by colloidal lithography. Compared with conventional lithography techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam lithography, the unconventional colloidal lithography technique with advantages of low-cost and high-throughput has made the fabrication process more efficient, and moreover brought out novel films that show remarkable surface plasmon features. These plasmonic films include those with nanohole arrays, nanovoid arrays and nanoshell arrays with precisely controlled shapes, sizes, and spacing. Based on these novel nanostructures, optical and sensing performances can be greatly enhanced. The introduction of colloidal lithography provides not only efficient fabrication processes but also plasmonic films with unique nanostructures, which are difficult to be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques.

  6. Remedial processing of oil shale fly ash (OSFA) and its value-added conversion into glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-12-01

    Recently, various solid wastes such as sewage sludge, coal fly ash and slag have been recycled into various products such as sintered bricks, ceramics and cement concrete. Application of these recycling approaches is much better and greener than conventional landfills since it can solve the problems of storage of industrial wastes and reduce exploration of natural resources for construction materials to protect the environment. Therefore, in this study, an attempt was made to recycle oil shale fly ash (OSFA), a by-product obtained from the extracting of shale oil in the oil shale industry, into a value-added glass-ceramic material via melting and sintering method. The influence of basicity (CaO/SiO2 ratio) by adding calcium oxide on the performance of glass-ceramics was studied in terms of phase transformation, mechanical properties, chemical resistances and heavy metals leaching tests. Crystallization kinetics results showed that the increase of basicity reduced the activation energies of crystallization but did not change the crystallization mechanism. When increasing the basicity from 0.2 to 0.5, the densification of sintering body was enhanced due to the promotion of viscous flow of glass powders, and therefore the compression strength and bending strength of glass-ceramics were increased. Heavy metals leaching results indicated that the produced OSFA-based glass-ceramics could be taken as non-hazardous materials. The maximum mechanical properties of compression strength of 186 ± 3 MPa, bending strength of 78 ± 6 MPa, good chemical resistances and low heavy metals leaching concentrations showed that it could be used as a substitute material for construction applications. The proposed approach will be one of the potential sustainable solutions in reducing the storage of oil shale fly ash as well as converting it into a value-added product.

  7. Preparation of Bauxite Ceramic Microsphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiaosu; LIU Pingan; LI Xiuyan; SHUI Anze; ZENG Lingke

    2007-01-01

    Ceramic microspheres were prepared by using Chinese bauxite as raw materials through the centrifugal spray drying method. The control technology of microsphere size, degree of sphericity was researched. The ceramic microspheres were sintered by a double sintering process. The microstructure and composition of ceramic microsphere were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy spectroscopy. The results show that the degree of sphericity of the ceramic microsphere was good and the particle size was 10-100 μm. The XRD analysis reveals that the main crystalline phase of the ceramic microsphere was α- Al2O3 and mullite (3Al2O3·2SiO2). The product can be used as reinforced material for composite material, especially for antiskid and hard wearing aluminum alloy coating.

  8. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  9. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi, E-mail: kinsakai@ngk.co.jp [Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya 467-8530 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R and D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  10. Processing of red ceramic using a fast-firing cycle Processamento de cerâmica vermelha usando um ciclo de queima rápido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Saleiro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work reports on the processing of red ceramic for civil construction using fast-firing cycles. The firing cycle is an important variable in the processing of red ceramic materials, which contributes to a high consumption of energy. The red ceramic pieces were prepared by industrial extrusion and fired at firing temperatures varying from 700 ºC to 1100 ºC using different firing cycles (slow-firing cycle - 1º C/min and fast-firing cycle - 10 ºC/min and 20 °C/min. The technological properties (linear shrinkage, water absorption, apparent porosity, apparent density, and flexural strength as function of the firing temperature and firing cycle are investigated. The development of the microstructure was followed by SEM/SEI. The results showed that fast-firing red ceramics exhibits technological properties and microstructure comparable to conventionally fired red ceramics, resulting in great advantages in energy saving.Este trabalho descreve o processamento de cerâmica vermelha para construção civil usando ciclos de queima rápido. O ciclo de queima é uma variável importante no processamento de materiais de cerâmica vermelha, o qual contribui para um alto consumo de energia. As peças de cerâmica vermelha foram preparadas por extrusão industrial e queimadas nas temperaturas de queima variando de 700 ºC a 1100 ºC utilizando diferentes ciclos de queima (ciclo de queima lento - 1 ºC/min e ciclos de queima rápidos - 10 ºC/ min e 20 ºC/min. As propriedades tecnológicas (retração linear, absorção de água, porosidade aparente, massa específica aparente e tensão de ruptura à flexão em função da temperatura de queima e ciclo de queima são investigadas. O desenvolvimento da microestrutura foi avaliado por SEM/SEI. Os resultados mostraram que as peças de cerâmica vermelha obtidas via processo de queima rápida exibiram propriedades tecnológicas e microestrutura comparáveis àquelas convencionalmente obtidas via queima lenta

  11. Ceramics in fission and fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    The role of ceramic components in fission and fusion reactors is described. Almost all of the functions normally performed by ceramics, except mechanical, are required of nuclear ceramics. The oxides of uranium and plutonium are of predominant importance in nuclear applications, but a number of other ceramics play peripheral roles. The unique service conditions under which nuclear ceramics must operate include intense radiation fields, high temperatures and large temperature gradients, and aggressive chemical environments. Examples of laboratory research designed to broaden understanding of the behavior of uranium dioxide in such conditions are given. The programs described include high temperature vaporization, diffusional processes, and interaction with hydrogen.

  12. The effect of linear velocity and flux on performance of ceramic graded permeability membranes when processing skim milk at 50°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulewska, Justyna; Barbano, David M

    2014-05-01

    Raw milk (about 500 kg) was cold (4°C) separated and then the skim milk was pasteurized at 72°C and a holding time of 16s. The milk was cooled to 4°C and stored at ≤ 4°C until processing. The skim milk was microfiltered using a pilot-scale ceramic graded permeability (GP) microfilter system equipped with 0.1-µm nominal pore diameter ceramic Membralox membranes. First, about 155 kg of pasteurized skim milk was flushed through the system to push the water out of the system. Then, additional pasteurized skim milk (about 320 kg) was microfiltered (stage 1) in a continuous feed-and-bleed 3× process using the same membranes. The retentate from stage 1 was diluted with pasteurized reverse osmosis water in a 1:2 ratio and microfiltered (stage 2) with a GP system. This was repeated 3 times, with total of 3 stages in the process (stage 1 = microfiltration; stages 2 and 3 = diafiltration). The results from first 3 stages of the experiment were compared with previous data when processing skim milk at 50°C using ceramic uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) membranes. Microfiltration of skim milk using ceramic UTP and GP membranes resulted in similar final retentate in terms of serum proteins (SP) removed. The SP removal rate (expressed by kilogram of SP removed per meter-squared of membrane area) was higher for GP membranes for each stage compared with UTP membranes. A higher passage of SP and SP removal rate for GP than UTP membranes was achieved by using a higher cross-flow velocity when processing skim milk. Increasing flux in subsequent stages did not affect membrane permeability and fouling. We operated under conditions that produced partial membrane fouling, due to using a flux that was less than limiting flux but higher than critical flux. Because the critical flux is a function of the cross-flow velocity, the difference in critical flux between UTP and GP membranes resulted only from operating under different cross-flow velocities (6.6 vs 7.12 for UTP and GP

  13. Studies of colloids and their importance for repository performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, M.; Skaarman, C. [GeoPoint AB, Sollentuna (Sweden); Degueldre, C. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland)

    1995-12-01

    The processes, parameters and data used to evaluate the potential of nuclide transport by a colloid facilitated mechanism are reviewed and discussed in this report. Both steady-state (present situation) and possible future non-steady-state hydrogeochemistry in the geosphere are covered. In the steady-state scenario, the colloid (clay, silica, iron(III)hydroxide) concentration is around 20-45 micrograms/l which is considered to be a low value. The low colloid concentration is justified by the large attachment factor to the rock which reduces the stability of the colloids in the aquifer. Both reversible and irreversible sorption processes are reviewed. In the non-steady-state scenario, changes of hydrogeochemical properties may induce larger colloid concentrations. The increase of concentration is however limited and relaxation is always observed after any change. Emphasis is placed on the glaciation-deglaciation scenario. 53 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs.

  14. Kinetic analysis of the temperature dependence of PbSe colloidal quantum dot photoluminescence: Effects of synthesis process and oxygen exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foell, Charles A.; Abel, Keith A.; van Veggel, Frank C. J. M.; Young, Jeff F.

    2014-01-01

    A kinetic model is derived and used to analyze recently published works and new data on the temperature dependence of the spectrally integrated photoluminescence (PL) from thick-film formulations of PbSe colloidal quantum dots (QDs), with particular attention to the effects of air exposure. The model assumes that the excitons thermalize within a ground-state manifold of states and treats the distribution of radiative and nonradiative decay rates within the distribution as generally as possible, while using a minimal number of free parameters. By adjusting the parameters of the model, good fits are obtained for the wide range of integrated PL behaviors reported in [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2, 889 (2011), 10.1021/jz2001979; ACS Nano 6, 5498 (2012), 10.1021/nn301405j; Phys. Rev. B 82, 165435 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.165435] and the new data presented in this manuscript. By comparing the extracted parameters we deduce the following: (i) All of the samples in the first two references emit from two distinct clusters of states separated by an energy of 55 to 80 meV regardless of air exposure, while there is only one cluster of emissive states that contributes to the emission reported in the third reference. (ii) In the absence of intentional air exposure, the nonradiative decay from all samples can be described by a single Arrhenius-like process. (iii) Although air-exposure effects are reversible in some samples and irreversible in others, the changes in integrated PL behavior brought about by air-exposure forces the introduction of a common, low-activation-energy nonradiative pathway in all cases. (iv) The low-lying emissive cluster of the two-emissive-cluster samples exhibits behavior similar to the single emissive cluster of the other samples. (v) Many hours of air exposure do not trend either the radiative or nonradiative behavior of the dual-emissive-cluster samples towards the behavior of the single-emissive-cluster samples.

  15. Formation of colloidal silver nanoparticles stabilized by Na+-poly(gamma-glutamic acid)-silver nitrate complex via chemical reduction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Da-Guang

    2007-10-01

    Macromolecular and polyanionic Na(+)-poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (PGA) silver nitrate complex acted as both a metal ion provider and a particle protector to fabricate nanosized silver colloids under chemical reduction by dextrose. The formation and size of particles have been characterized from transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering analysis and UV-vis spectrophotometer. The results showed that the average particle size was 17.2+/-3.4 to 37.3+/-5.5 nm, apparently depending on the complex concentration. It was found that the rate constant and conversion of silver nanoparticles were proportional to the concentration of PGA. The growth mechanism of nanosized silver colloid was fully discussed. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity evaluated by L929 fibroblasts proliferation and antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strain (methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative strain (P. aeruginosa) bacteria have been assessed.

  16. Use of solid waste from sand beneficiation process in the ceramic tile industry and its influence on the physical properties of the ceramic products; Uso do residuo solido proveniente do processo de beneficiamento de areia na industria de revestimentos ceramicos e sua influencia nas propriedades fisicas dos produtos ceramicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biff, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.biff@sc.senai.br [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Criciuma, SC (Brazil); Silva, Manoel Ribeiro da, E-mail: mrsilva@unifei.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    The current paper had as main aim characterize and assess the use viability of a solid waste from sand beneficiation process in the production of ceramic tiles. To determine the main components the solid waste was characterized by X-ray fluorescence and the main crystalline phases were determined by X-ray diffraction. To evaluate the addition effects of the solid waste over the solid waste was introduced into a ceramic composition in proportions of 5% and 10%. The ceramics materials obtained were subjected to the linear retraction, water absorption and flexural strength analysis according to the Brazilian standard NBR 13818 (1997). Additionally, the solid waste and the ceramic materials obtained in this study were classified according to the Brazilian standard NBR 10004 (2004) to assess the potential environmental impact. The main solid waste constituents identified were silicon dioxide and aluminum oxide, respectively 50.2% e 19.2%, distributed in the crystal forms of quartz and kaolinite. The ceramic materials obtained after firing at 1100 deg C, without and with 10% of solid waste presented respectively flexural strength of 13.86 MPa and 14,52Mpa. The results of water absorption without and with addition of 10% of solid waste were respectively 16.96% and 16.63%, both appropriate performances for use in ceramic tiles according to the Brazilian standard NBR 13818 (1997). On the other hand, the ceramic materials obtained with the addition of 10% of solid waste were classified as inert materials according to Brazilian standard NBR 10004 (2004), showing the capability of incorporating solid waste in ceramic materials. (author)

  17. Production Process and Pollution and Soutions about High-Tension Electronic Ceramics%高压电瓷的生产工艺及污染种类和解决措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨增玲

    2014-01-01

    在高压电瓷生产过程中会产生的大量废气、废水、和固体废物对环境造成污染。本文从生产工艺、污染的种类及处理措施等方面论述我国高压电瓷行业应该注意的问题,为高压电瓷的生产提供借鉴。%A large quantity of weste gas ,waste water ang waste solid material produced during the course of high -tension electronic ceramics ,production can pollute the environment .T he artical dis-cusses problem w hich the high -tension electronic ceramics industry should pay attention to ,from Production Process and Pollution and Soutions .provide some help for high -tension electronic ceram-ics .

  18. Silicon on Ceramic Process: Silicon Sheet Growth and Device Development for the Large-area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, P. W.; Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Pickering, C.; Grung, B. L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar cell quality sheet silicon was investigated. It was hoped this could be done by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Work was directed towards the solution of unique cell processing/design problems encountered with the silicon-ceramic (SOC) material due to its intimate contact with the ceramic substrate. Significant progress was demonstrated in the following areas; (1) the continuous coater succeeded in producing small-area coatings exhibiting unidirectional solidification and substatial grain size; (2) dip coater succeeded in producing thick (more than 500 micron) dendritic layers at coating speeds of 0.2-0.3 cm/sec; and (3) a standard for producing total area SOC solar cells using slotted ceramic substrates was developed.

  19. Development of a sintering process for recycling oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash into glass ceramic composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-04-01

    Oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash are industrial and municipal by-products that require further treatment before disposal to avoid polluting the environment. In the study, they were mixed and vitrified into the slag by the melt-quench process. The obtained vitrified slag was then mixed with various percentages of oil shale fly ash and converted into glass ceramic composites by the subsequent sintering process. Differential thermal analysis was used to study the thermal characteristics and determine the sintering temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to analyze the crystalline phase compositions. Sintering shrinkage, weight loss on ignition, density and compressive strength were tested to determine the optimum preparation condition and study the co-sintering mechanism of vitrified amorphous slag and oil shale fly ash. The results showed the product performances increased with the increase of sintering temperatures and the proportion of vitrified slag to oil shale fly ash. Glass ceramic composite (vitrified slag content of 80%, oil shale fly ash content of 20%, sintering temperature of 1000 °C and sintering time of 2h) showed the properties of density of 1.92 ± 0.05 g/cm(3), weight loss on ignition of 6.14 ± 0.18%, sintering shrinkage of 22.06 ± 0.6% and compressive strength of 67 ± 14 MPa. The results indicated that it was a comparable waste-based material compared to previous researches. In particular, the energy consumption in the production process was reduced compared to conventional vitrification and sintering method. Chemical resistance and heavy metals leaching results of glass ceramic composites further confirmed the possibility of its engineering applications.

  20. Colloids with continuously tunable surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ravensteijn, Bas G P; Kegel, Willem K

    2014-09-09

    In this paper, we present a robust way to tune the surface potential of polystyrene colloids without changing the pH, ionic strength, etc. The colloids are composed of a cross-linked polystyrene core and a cross-linked vinylbenzyl chloride layer. Besides the chlorine groups, the particle surface contains sulfate/sulfonate groups (arising from the polymerization initiators) that provide a negative surface potential. Performing a Menschutkin reaction on the surface chlorine groups with tertiary amines allows us to introduce quaternary, positively charged amines. The overall charge on the particles is then determined by the ratio between the sulfate/sulfonate moieties and the quaternary amines. Using this process, we were able to invert the charge in a continuous manner without losing colloidal stability upon passing the isoelectric point. The straightforward reaction mechanism together with the fact that the reaction could be quenched rapidly resulted in a colloidal system in which the ζ potential can be tuned between -80 and 45 mV. As proof of principle, the positively charged particles were used in heterocoagulation experiments with nanometer- and micrometer-sized negatively charged silica particles to create geometrically well-defined colloidal (nano) clusters.

  1. Colloidal pen lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mianqi; Cai, Xiaojing; Chen, Ghenfu

    2015-02-04

    Colloidal pen lithography, a low-cost, high-throughput scanning probe contact printing method, has been developed, which is based on self-assembled colloidal arrays embedded in a soft elastomeric stamp. Patterned protein arrays are demonstrated using this method, with a feature size ranging from 100 nm to several micrometers. A brief study into the specificity reorganization of protein gives evidence for the feasibility of this method for writing protein chips. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Fabrication of Li4SiO4 Ceramic Pebbles by Gelation Nodulizing and Solid-reaction Sintering Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xing; YANG; Hong-guang

    2013-01-01

    In fusion reactor,lithium ceramics are considered as the candidate solid tritium breeders in the blanket.Recently,Li4SiO4 and Li2TiO3 have been recognized as promising candidate material because of its highlithium density,good tritium release,chemical stability,compatibility with structural material and low-activation characteristics.Therefore,Li4SiO4 is considered as the first candidate material in the China

  3. Doped Colloidal ZnO Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizheng Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal ZnO nanocrystals are promising for a wide range of applications due to the combination of unique multifunctional nature and remarkable solution processability. Doping is an effective approach of enhancing the properties of colloidal ZnO nanocrystals in well-controlled manners. In this paper, we analyzed two synthetic strategies for the doped colloidal ZnO nanocrystals, emphasizing our understanding on the critical factors associated with the high temperature and nonaqueous approach. Latest advances of three topics, bandgap engineering, n-type doping, and dilute magnetic semiconductors related to doped ZnO nanocrystals were discussed to reveal the effects of dopants on the properties of the nanocrystalline materials.

  4. Targeted delivery of colloids by swimming bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumakis, N.; Lepore, A.; Maggi, C.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of exploiting motile microorganisms as tiny propellers represents a fascinating strategy for the transport of colloidal cargoes. However, delivery on target sites usually requires external control fields to steer propellers and trigger cargo release. The need for a constant feedback mechanism prevents the design of compact devices where biopropellers could perform their tasks autonomously. Here we show that properly designed three-dimensional (3D) microstructures can define accumulation areas where bacteria spontaneously and efficiently store colloidal beads. The process is stochastic in nature and results from the rectifying action of an asymmetric energy landscape over the fluctuating forces arising from collisions with swimming bacteria. As a result, the concentration of colloids over target areas can be strongly increased or depleted according to the topography of the underlying structures. Besides the significance to technological applications, our experiments pose some important questions regarding the structure of stationary probability distributions in non-equilibrium systems. PMID:24100868

  5. Laser and optical properties of Yb:YAG ceramics with layered doping distribution: design, characterization and evaluation of different production processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toci, Guido; Lapucci, Antonio; Ciofini, Marco; Esposito, Laura; Hostaša, Jan; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Labate, Luca; Ferrara, Paolo; Pirri, Angela; Vannini, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    The laser, optical and spectroscopic properties of multilayer Yb:YAG ceramic structures, differently activated, were investigated. The structures were designed by means of Finite Element Modeling, adjusting the doping distributions to reduce peak temperature, surface deformation and thermally induced stresses, depending on the pump and cooling geometry. Two ceramic processes were used, i.e. dry pressing of spray-dried powders (SD) and tape casting (TC), resulting in different defect density and size distribution: TC gives a more uniform transmission, whereas SD results in larger, unevenly scattered defects. The spectroscopic properties were found independent from the production process. The laser performance has been characterized under high intensity pumping in a longitudinally diode pumped laser cavity, comparing the behavior of the different structures in terms of slope efficiency, stability under increasing thermal load, spatial uniformity of laser emission. Slope efficiency values as high as 58% in Quasi-CW pumping conditions and 54% in CW conditions was measured in two-layers structures. The production process and the number of layers influenced the behavior of the samples, in particular regarding the spatial uniformity of the laser emission. Samples made by tape casting have shown overall a better thermal stability with respect to the samples made by spray drying.

  6. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  7. Strength and Microstructure of Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    34 microplasticity " stage in crack initiation from the flaw’ " for alumina ceramics has been carried out. Results of (from literal adaptations of the original...us to identify frontal-zone microcracking or even microplasticity . However. bridge degradation as a cause of the fatigue process. "Wear" direct...Ceramics", J. Aust. Ceram. Soc. 16 4-9. [24] A.W. Ruff and S.M. Wiederhorn (1979) "Erosion by Solid Particle Impact ", in Treatise on Materials Science and

  8. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  9. The hydrodynamics of colloidal gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Zsigmond; Wang, Gang; Swan, James

    2015-12-14

    Colloidal gels are formed during arrested phase separation. Sub-micron, mutually attractive particles aggregate to form a system spanning network with high interfacial area, far from equilibrium. Models for microstructural evolution during colloidal gelation have often struggled to match experimental results with long standing questions regarding the role of hydrodynamic interactions. In nearly all models, these interactions are neglected entirely. In the present work, we report simulations of gelation with and without hydrodynamic interactions between the suspended particles executed in HOOMD-blue. The disparities between these simulations are striking and mirror the experimental-theoretical mismatch in the literature. The hydrodynamic simulations agree with experimental observations, however. We explore a simple model of the competing transport processes in gelation that anticipates these disparities, and conclude that hydrodynamic forces are essential. Near the gel boundary, there exists a competition between compaction of individual aggregates which suppresses gelation and coagulation of aggregates which enhances it. The time scale for compaction is mildly slowed by hydrodynamic interactions, while the time scale for coagulation is greatly accelerated. This enhancement to coagulation leads to a shift in the gel boundary to lower strengths of attraction and lower particle concentrations when compared to models that neglect hydrodynamic interactions. Away from the gel boundary, differences in the nearest neighbor distribution and fractal dimension persist within gels produced by both simulation methods. This result necessitates a fundamental rethinking of how dynamic, discrete element models for gelation kinetics are developed as well as how collective hydrodynamic interactions influence the arrest of attractive colloidal dispersions.

  10. Medical applications of colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Matijevic, Egon

    2008-01-01

    The first book of its type on the medical and biomedical applications of colloids, although there are some related titles on different topicsDiscusses the effects of uniform particles in drug formulations and releaseEvaluates particle transport and deposition in the human body.

  11. Liquid crystal colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of "Condensed Matter Physics" focuses on the most recent developments in the study of a fascinating soft matter system, representing colloidal particles in a liquid crystalline environment. Furthermore, some articles address pioneering steps in the discovery of liquid crystals going back to 1861 paper by Julius Planer.

  12. Binary colloidal crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christova-Zdravkova, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Binary crystals are crystals composed of two types of particles having different properties like size, mass density, charge etc. In this thesis several new approaches to make binary crystals of colloidal particles that differ in size, material and charge are reported We found a variety of crystal st

  13. Electrodynamics of colloids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minor, M.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to deepen the insight into the non-equilibrium properties of the electric double layer of colloidal systems. Of basic interest are the ionic mobilities in the different regions of the electric double layer as well as the potential at the plane of shear, i.e., the ele

  14. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, E.G.D. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States); Schepper, I.M. de [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  15. Composition and cycling of colloids in marine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Laodong; Santschi, Peter H.

    1997-02-01

    Colloidal (COM) or macromolecular organic matter makes up a significant portion of the bulk dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool in aquatic environments. Because of their high specific surface areas and complexation capacities, marine colloids are of great importance not only in the global carbon cycle but also in the biogeochemical cycling of many particle-reactive nuclides and trace elements in the ocean. However, the colloidal pool as a whole is still poorly understood and largely uncharacterized. Recently, cross-flow ultrafiltration and other separation techniques, which have been successfully used to isolate marine colloids, combined with a multitracer approach, have greatly advanced our understanding of the cycling of COM and its associated trace elements in marine environments. In this paper we focus on recent developments on isotopic and elemental composition of colloids which allow organic matter cycling in marine environments to be constrained. Major sections review sampling techniques for aquatic colloids, concentrations and distribution of COM, biochemical and elemental (organic and inorganic) characterization, and stable isotopic (13C and 15N) and radioisotopic (14C and 234Th) characterization of marine colloids. We discuss sources and turnover rates of organic matter in the ocean, importance of benthic boundary layer processes in the cycling of DOM, changes in the paradigms of marine organic matter cycling, and research needs for a better understanding of the biogeochemistry of marine colloids.

  16. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  17. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  18. Development of a ceramics filter technology for aluminum recycling. Discussion on an unnecessary constituent reducing process by means of solid-liquid separation; Recycle arumiyo ceramics filter gijutsu no kaihatsu. Koeki bunrini yoru fuyo seibun teigen process no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saegusa, T.; Honma, K. [Hokkaido Electric Power Co. Inc., Sapporo (Japan); Narita, T.; Suzuki, T. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Matsubara, H.; Aoki, S. [Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya (Japan)

    2000-03-24

    A problem in recycling aluminum scraps is the existence of Fe and Pb as impurities, in addition to added alloy elements (Cu, Si, Mg and Zn). Discussion was given on an Fe concentration reducing method, in which molten Al-Cu-Fe-based alloy to simulate scrapped materials is filtered by an alumina ceramics filter at the solid-liquid phase coexisting temperature zone. The ceramics filter was formed by mixing thermally hardening resin into fine powder material. By using a method to drill through-holes during the forming stage, fine pores were optionally controlled in the sub-millimeter to millimeter order. In the filtration, if the Fe concentration is lower than that in the eutectic composition, Cu and Fe are condensed in the permeate phase, whereas primary crystal of aluminum is accumulated on the filter as the remaining phase, enhancing the aluminum purity. Filtration, repeated three times, has reduced the Fe concentration from 0.75 to 0.63% by atoms. If the Fe concentration is higher than eutectic concentration, since Fe is condensed in the form of intermetallic compound of FeAl{sub 3} as the remaining phase on the filter, the Fe concentration is reduced in the permeation phase, and three-time filtration reduced the Fe concentration from 1.5 to 0.70% by atoms. (NEDO)

  19. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  20. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 particulates and nickle aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m.sup.1/2, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa.

  1. Micellar casein concentrate production with a 3X, 3-stage, uniform transmembrane pressure ceramic membrane process at 50°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, E; Zulewska, J; Newbold, M; Barbano, D M

    2010-12-01

    The production of serum protein (SP) and micellar casein from skim milk can be accomplished using microfiltration (MF). Potential commercial applications exist for both SP and micellar casein. Our research objective was to determine the total SP removal and SP removal for each stage, and the composition of retentates and permeates, for a 3×, continuous bleed-and-feed, 3-stage, uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) system with 0.1-μm ceramic membranes, when processing pasteurized skim milk at 50°C with 2 stages of water diafiltration. For each of 4 replicates, about 1,100 kg of skim milk was pasteurized (72°C, 16s) and processed at 3× through the UTP MF system. Retentate from stage 1 was cooled to Kjeldahl methods; sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE analysis was also performed on the retentates from each stage. Theoretically, a 3-stage, 3× MF process could remove 97% of the SP from skim milk, with a cumulative SP removal of 68 and 90% after the first and second stages, respectively. The cumulative SP removal using a 3-stage, 3× MF process with a UTP system with 0.01-μm ceramic membranes in this experiment was 64.8 ± 0.8, 87.8 ± 1.6, and 98.3 ± 2.3% for the first, second, and third stages, respectively, when calculated using the mass of SP removed in the permeate of each stage. Various methods of calculation of SP removal were evaluated. Given the analytical limitations in the various methods for measuring SP removal, calculation of SP removal based on the mass of SP in the skim milk (determined by Kjeldahl) and the mass SP present in all of the permeate produced by the process (determined by Kjeldahl) provided the best estimate of SP removal for an MF process.

  2. ESEEM of industrial silica-bearing powders: reactivity of defects during wet processing in the ceramics production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Maurizio; Di Benedetto, Francesco; Fornaciai, Gabriele; Innocenti, Massimo; Montegrossi, Giordano; Pardi, Luca A.; Zoleo, Alfonso; Capacci, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    A study is undertaken to ascertain whether changes in the speciation of inorganic radicals are occurring during the ceramic industrial production that involves abundant silica powders as raw material. Industrial dusts were sampled in two ceramic firms, immediately after the wet mixing stage, performed with the aid of a relevant pressure. The dusts were then characterised by means of X-ray diffraction, analysis of the trace elements through chemical methods, granulometry, continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and pulsed electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies. The results of the characterisation point to a relevant change in the speciation of the two samples; namely, a prevailing contribution due to an inorganic radical different from that pertaining to pure quartz is pointed out. The combined interpretation of EPR and ESEEM data suggests the attribution of the main paramagnetic contribution to the A-centre in kaolinite, a constituent that is added to pure quartz at the initial stage of the ceramic production. In one of the two samples, a second weak EPR signal is attributed to the quartz's hAl species. By taking into account the relative quantities of quartz and kaolinite mixed in the two samples, and the relative abundances of the two radical species, we propose that the partial or complete suppression of the hAl species in favour of the A-centre of kaolinite has occurred. Although this change is apparently fostered by the mixture between quartz and another radical-bearing raw material, kaolinite, the suppression of the hAl centre of quartz is ascribed to the role played by the pressure and the wet environment during the industrial mixing procedure. This suppression provides a net change of radical speciation associated with quartz, when this phase is in contact with workers' respiratory system.

  3. Growth process and corrosion resistance of ceramic coatings of micro-arc oxidation on Mg-Gd-Y magnesium alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萍; 李建平; 郭永春; 杨忠

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of ceramic coating formed by micro-arc oxidation on Mg-11Gd-1Y-0.5Zn (wt.%) magnesium alloys was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The relation of phase structure and corrosion resistance of MgO coating formed by micro-arc oxidation in different growth stages was analyzed. The results showed that the growth of coating accorded with linear regularity in the initial stage of micro-arc oxidation, which was the stage of anodic oxidation controlled ...

  4. Colloids and Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range

  5. Stabilization and Control of Rheological Properties of Fe2O3/Al(OH)(3)-rich Colloidal Slurries Under High Ionic Strength and pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Jaehun; Poloski, Adam P.; Hansen, E. K.

    2010-08-01

    Controlling the stability and rheological properties of colloidal slurries has been an important but challenging issue for various applications such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. For example, at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford and Savannah River sites, operation of the waste treatment facilities with increased solids loading affects waste processing rates but impacts the rheological properties. We investigated various rheological modifiers on a Fe2O3-rich nuclear waste simulant, characterized by high ionic strength and pH, in order to reduce rheological properties of the colloidal slurry. Rheological modifiers change particle interactions in colloidal slurries; they mainly alter the electrostatic and steric interactions between particles, leading to a change in rheological properties. Weak acid type rheological modifiers strengthen electrostatic repulsion whereas nonionic/polymer surfactant type rheological modifiers introduce a steric repulsion. Using rheological analysis, it was found that citric acid and polyacrylic acid are good rheological modifiers for the simulant tested, effectively reducing yield stresses by as much as 70%. Further analysis supports that addition of such rheological modifiers increases the stability of the slurry. Binding cations in bulk solution and adsorption on the surface of the particles are identified as a reasonable working mechanism for citric acid and polyacrylic acid.

  6. Colloidal Thermal Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotzadeh, Saba

    In this dissertation, a reversible system with a well controlled degree of particle aggregation was developed. By surface modification of colloidal silica with aminosilanes, interactions among the particles were tuned in a controlled way to produce stable sized clusters at different pH values ranges from well-disposed to a colloidal gel. N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (TMPE) monolayer on particle surface not only removes all the reactive sites to prevent chemical aggregation, also provides steric stabilization in the absence of any repulsion. After surface modification, electrokinetic behavior of silica particles were changed to that of amino groups, positive in acidic pH and neutral at basic pH values. By tuning the pH, the balance between electrostatic repulsion and hydrophobic interactions was reversibly controlled. As a result, clusters with different sizes were developed. The effect of clustering on the thermal conductivity of colloidal dispersions was quantified using silane-treated silica, a system engineered to exhibit reversible clustering under well-controlled conditions. Thermal conductivity of this system was measured by transient hot wire, the standard method of thermal conductivity measurements in liquids. We show that the thermal conductivity increases monotonically with cluster size and spans the entire range between the two limits of Maxwell's theory. The results, corroborated by numerical simulation, demonstrate that large increases of the thermal conductivity of colloidal dispersions are possible, yet fully within the predictions of classical theory. Numerical calculations were performed to evaluate the importance of structural properties of particles/aggregates on thermal conduction in colloidal particles. Thermal conductivity of non-spherical particles including hollow particles, cubic particles and rods was studied using a Monte Carlo algorithm. We show that anisotropic shapes, increase conductivity above that of isotropic

  7. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  8. Ceramic Forum International yearbook 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reh, H. (ed.)

    2004-12-01

    This is the second English-language edition of our 'ceramic forum international Yearbook'. In this year's 'Ceramics World', the perpetually updated textbook section, you will find papers surveying the already in technical ceramics established fields of 'bioceramics' and 'ceramic armouring'. From the traditional ceramics sector, from which news of more and more innovations have been reaching us in recent months, we have picked out 'decorating processes for ceramic tiles' as these are currently enjoying an undreamt-of boom thanks to the development of completely new shaping processes. A soundly researched study on 'rheology in ceramics' completes this section of the yearbook. Interested ceramists will again find everything they need for their day-to-day work - the index will help them to find the information they need fast. This information is available under the following headings: (A) Product News: Short notes on outstanding new machines, kilns, plants and equipment as well as new raw materials on the market, supplied by both European and overseas suppliers. (B) Abstracts: A compilation of abridged articles, all of which published during the last 12 months, discussing interesting processes and products or new directions in research. (C) ESD - European Suppliers Directory: Who supplies what? In English, German, Spanish, Italian and French with about 220 company entries. (D) Appendix: Listing ceramics laboratories in Europe; the periodic system; the most important physical units and the conversion of older ones to SI units (and vice versa); essential formulas for use in the ceramist's daily practice. (orig.)

  9. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  10. Fabrication of ceramic oxide-coated SWNT composites by sol-gel process with a polymer glue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Cheng; Gao Lei; Chen Yongming, E-mail: ymchen@iccas.ac.cn [Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry (China)

    2011-09-15

    The functional copolymer bearing alkoxysilyl and pyrene groups, poly[3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate]-co-[(1-pyrene-methyl) methacrylate] (TEPM{sub 13}-co-PyMMA{sub 3}), was synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization. Attributing the {pi}-{pi} interaction of pyrene units with the walls of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), this polymer could disperse and exfoliate SWNTs in different solvents through physical interaction as demonstrated by TEM, UV/Vis absorption, and FT-IR analysis. The alkoxysilyl groups functionalized SWNTs were reacted with different inorganic precursors via sol-gel reaction, and, as a results, silica, titania, and alumina were coated onto the surface of SWNTs, respectively via copolymers as a molecular glue. The nanocomposites of ceramic oxides/SWNTs were characterized by SEM analysis. Dependent upon the feed, the thickness of inorganic coating can be tuned easily. This study supplies a facile and general way to coat SWNTs with ceramic oxides without deteriorating the properties of pristine SWNTs.

  11. Software for fitting and simulating fate and transport of dense colloids and biocolloids in one-dimensional porous media: Re-introducing ColloidFit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzourakis, Vasileios; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2016-04-01

    The present work re-introduces ColloidFit, which is an autonomous, modular, multipurpose fitting software for dense colloid and biocolloid transport phenomena in porous media. The initial version of ColloidFit, introduced by Sim and Chrysikopoulos (1995), was substantially improved and combined with a relatively intuitive and easy to use graphical user interface. The re-introduced ColloidFit can simulate the migration of suspended colloid or biocolloid particles in one-dimensional, water saturated, homogeneous porous media with uniform flow, accounting for non-equilibrium attachment onto the solid matrix, as well as gravitational effects. Furthermore, the improved ColloidFit software employs a variety of non-equilibrium, linear and nonlinear models for the simulation of colloid attachment onto a solid matrix under batch experimental conditions. The re-introduced ColloidFit uses the state of the art fitting software "Pest" to estimate unknown model parameter values, together with their 95% confidence intervals. Pest is a model-independent parameter estimation software capable of adjusting model parameters, so that discrepancies between model-generated data and the corresponding experimental measurements are reduced to a user preselected minimum. The fitting process is graphed and displayed in real time. The user is allowed to overview every step of the fitting progress, and if needed to change the initial parameter values. The re-introduced ColloidFit software is expected to make the fitting process of colloid and biocolloid transport data, just a simple task.

  12. Influence of sintering temperature on microstructures and energy-storage properties of barium strontium titanate glass-ceramics prepared by sol-gel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jia; Zhang, Yong; Song, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Dongliang; Chen, Yongzhou [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The sol-gel processing, microstructures, dielectric properties and energy-storage properties of barium strontium titanate glass-ceramics over the sintering temperature range of 1000-1150 C were studied. Through the X-ray diffraction result, it is revealed that the crystallinity increases as the sintering temperature increased from 1000 to 1080 C and has reached a steady-state regime above 1100 C. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that with the increase of sintering temperature, the crystal size increased. Dielectric measurements revealed that the increase in the sintering temperature resulted in a significant increase in the dielectric constant, a strong sharpness of the temperature-dependent dielectric response and a pronounced decrease of the temperature of the dielectric maximum. The correlation between charge spreading behavior and activation energies of crystal and glass was discussed by the employment of the impedance spectroscopy studies. As a result of polarization-electric field hysteresis loops, both the charged and discharged densities increased with increasing sintering temperature. And the maximum value of energy storage efficiency was found to occur at 1130 C. Finally, the dependence of released energy and power densities calculated from the discharged current-time (I-t) curves on the sintering temperature was studied. The relationship between the energy storage properties and microstructure was correlated. Polarization-electric field hysteresis loops for the BST glass-ceramics sintered at different temperatures. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Chromatic thermometry used in ceramic sintering process%比色测温在陶瓷生产中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶伟; 吴国俊; 关云天

    2012-01-01

    The method of chromatic thermometry was introduced into the on-line thermometry of ceramic sintering. The thermometry system was designed according to Planck law. The calculation methods of key parameters, such as wavelength, emissivity, rate of conversion, were presented. The relation between wavelength and energy/sensitivity was comprehensively analyzed. The prototype was set up and tested according to the characteristics of ceramic sintering process, and the results indicated the metering error was less than 10 K during 1 300 K~2 000 K.%针对陶瓷制品烧结过程中的在线温度检测,引入了比色测温方法.根据比色测温的原理构建了比色测温系统.提出了系统关键参数比色波长、发射/转化率的确定方法,其中重点分析和推导了波长与能量、灵敏度的关系.根据陶瓷烧结过程特点搭建了样机,并进行了测试,结果表明在1 300 K~2 000 K范围内测温误差小于10 K.

  14. Ordered ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.A.; Hill, C.G. Jr.; Zeltner, W.A.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic membranes have been formed from colloidal sols coated on porous clay supports. These supported membranes have been characterized in terms of their permeabilities and permselectivities to various aqueous test solutions. The thermal stabilities and pore structures of these membranes have been characterized by preparing unsupported membranes of the correpsonding material and performing N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and X-ray diffraction studies on these membranes. To date, membranes have been prepared from a variety of oxides, including TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as Zr-, Fe-, and Nb-doped TiO{sub 2}. In many of these membranes pore diameters are less than 2 nm, while in others the pore diameters are between 3 and 5 nm. Procedures for fabricating porous clay supports with reproducible permeabilities for pure water are also discussed. 30 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

  15. Study on Ceramic Cutting by Plasma Arc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Engineering ceramics are typical difficult-to-machine materials because of high hardness and brittleness. PAC (Plasma Arc Cutting) is a very important thermal cutting process and has been successfully used in cutting stainless steel and other difficult-to-machine alloys. PAC's application in cutting ceramics, however, is still limited because the most ceramics are not good electronic conducts, and transferred plasma arc cannot be produced between cathode and work-piece. So we presented a method of plasma ...

  16. Fractal nematic colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter. PMID:28117325

  17. Fractal nematic colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter.

  18. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  19. MOBILIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS GENERATED FROM CEMENT LEACHATES MOVING THROUGH A SRS SANDY SEDIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Seaman, J.

    2011-09-20

    Naturally occurring mobile colloids are ubiquitous and are involved in many important processes in the subsurface zone. For example, colloid generation and subsequent mobilization represent a possible mechanism for the transport of contaminants including radionuclides in the subsurface environments. For colloid-facilitated transport to be significant, three criteria must be met: (1) colloids must be generated; (2) contaminants must associate with the colloids preferentially to the immobile solid phase (aquifer); and (3) colloids must be transported through the groundwater or in subsurface environments - once these colloids start moving they become 'mobile colloids'. Although some experimental investigations of particle release in natural porous media have been conducted, the detailed mechanisms of release and re-deposition of colloidal particles within natural porous media are poorly understood. Even though this vector of transport is known, the extent of its importance is not known yet. Colloid-facilitated transport of trace radionuclides has been observed in the field, thus demonstrating a possible radiological risk associated with the colloids. The objective of this study was to determine if cementitious leachate would promote the in situ mobilization of natural colloidal particles from a SRS sandy sediment. The intent was to determine whether cementitious surface or subsurface structure would create plumes that could produce conditions conducive to sediment dispersion and mobile colloid generation. Column studies were conducted and the cation chemistries of influents and effluents were analyzed by ICP-OES, while the mobilized colloids were characterized using XRD, SEM, EDX, PSD and Zeta potential. The mobilization mechanisms of colloids in a SRS sandy sediment by cement leachates were studied.

  20. Flocking ferromagnetic colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S.

    2017-01-01

    Assemblages of microscopic colloidal particles exhibit fascinating collective motion when energized by electric or magnetic fields. The behaviors range from coherent vortical motion to phase separation and dynamic self-assembly. Although colloidal systems are relatively simple, understanding their collective response, especially under out-of-equilibrium conditions, remains elusive. We report on the emergence of flocking and global rotation in the system of rolling ferromagnetic microparticles energized by a vertical alternating magnetic field. By combing experiments and discrete particle simulations, we have identified primary physical mechanisms, leading to the emergence of large-scale collective motion: spontaneous symmetry breaking of the clockwise/counterclockwise particle rotation, collisional alignment of particle velocities, and random particle reorientations due to shape imperfections. We have also shown that hydrodynamic interactions between the particles do not have a qualitative effect on the collective dynamics. Our findings shed light on the onset of spatial and temporal coherence in a large class of active systems, both synthetic (colloids, swarms of robots, and biopolymers) and living (suspensions of bacteria, cell colonies, and bird flocks). PMID:28246633

  1. Increasing entropy for colloidal stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Songping; Shao, Xuefeng; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-11-01

    Stability is of paramount importance in colloidal applications. Attraction between colloidal particles is believed to lead to particle aggregation and phase separation; hence, stability improvement can be achieved through either increasing repulsion or reducing attraction by modifying the fluid medium or by using additives. Two traditional mechanisms for colloidal stability are electrostatic stabilization and steric stabilization. However, stability improvement by mixing attractive and unstable particles has rarely been considered. Here, we emphasize the function of mixing entropy in colloidal stabilization. Dispersion stability improvement is demonstrated by mixing suspensions of attractive nanosized titania spheres and platelets. A three-dimensional phase diagram is proposed to illustrate the collaborative effects of particle mixing and particle attraction on colloidal stability. This discovery provides a novel method for enhancing colloidal stability and opens a novel opportunity for engineering applications.

  2. Incorporation of gypsum waste in ceramic block production: Proposal for a minimal battery of tests to evaluate technical and environmental viability of this recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho-Castro, Alcione P; Testolin, Renan C; Janke, Leandro; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2012-01-01

    Civil engineering-related construction and demolition debris is an important source of waste disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. After clay materials, gypsum waste is the second largest contributor to the residential construction waste stream. As demand for sustainable building practices grows, interest in recovering gypsum waste from construction and demolition debris is increasing, but there is a lack of standardized tests to evaluate the technical and environmental viability of this solid waste recycling process. By recycling gypsum waste, natural deposits of gypsum might be conserved and high amounts of the waste by-product could be reused in the civil construction industry. In this context, this paper investigates a physical property (i.e., resistance to axial compression), the chemical composition and the ecotoxicological potential of ceramic blocks constructed with different proportions of clay, cement and gypsum waste, and assesses the feasibility of using a minimal battery of tests to evaluate the viability of this recycling process. Consideration of the results for the resistance to axial compression tests together with production costs revealed that the best formulation was 35% of plastic clay, 35% of non-plastic clay, 10% of Portland cement and 20% of gypsum waste, which showed a mean resistance of 4.64MPa. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry showed calcium and sulfur to be the main elements, while quartz, gypsum, ettringite and nacrite were the main crystalline compounds found in this formulation. Ecotoxicity tests showed that leachate from this formulation is weakly toxic toward daphnids and bacteria (EC(20%)=69.0 and 75.0, respectively), while for algae and fish the leachate samples were not toxic at the EC(50%) level. Overall, these results show that the addition of 20% of gypsum waste to the ceramic blocks could provide a viable substitute for clay in the ceramics industry and the tests applied in this study proved to be a useful tool

  3. Using microwave for processing nanostructured PZT ceramics; Utilizacao de microondas no processamento de ceramicas nanoestruturadas de PZT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanza, A.C.; Berti, T.G.; Thomazini, D.; Gelfuso, M.V., E-mail: lanza.work@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica; Eiras, J.A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    The PZT ceramics have dielectric and piezoelectric properties of technological interest. The method of microwave assisted hydrothermal synthesis becomes interesting since it occurs in a closed environment, the low temperature and time, compared to conventional methods. In this work, PZT powders were dissolved in acid medium, and by adjusting the pH of the solutions obtained were precipitated, subjected to hydrothermal treatment at 120 °C for intervals of 15, 30 and 60 min. The powders were characterized by differential thermal and gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results confirm the formation of PZT phase in one hour with particle size around 55 nm, showing the feasibility of the proposed method. (author)

  4. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  5. Impact of Redox Reactions on Colloid Transport in Saturated Porous Media: An Example of Ferrihydrite Colloids Transport in the Presence of Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Wang, Dengjun

    2016-10-18

    Transport of colloids in the subsurface is an important environmental process with most research interests centered on the transport in chemically stable conditions. While colloids can be formed under dynamic redox conditions, the impact of redox reactions on their transport is largely overlooked. Taking the redox reactions between ferrihydrite colloids and sulfide as an example, we investigated how and to what extent the redox reactions modulated the transport of ferrihydrite colloids in anoxic sand columns over a range of environmentally relevant conditions. Our results reveal that the presence of sulfide (7.8-46.9 μM) significantly decreased the breakthrough of ferrihydrite colloids in the sand column. The estimated travel distance of ferrihydrite colloids in the absence of sulfide was nearly 7-fold larger than that in the presence of 46.9 μM sulfide. The reduced breakthrough was primarily attributed to the reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite colloids by sulfide in parallel with formation of elemental sulfur (S(0)) particles from sulfide oxidation. Reductive dissolution decreased the total mass of ferrihydrite colloids, while the negatively charged S(0) decreased the overall zeta potential of ferrihydrite colloids by attaching onto their surfaces and thus enhanced their retention in the sand. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical role of redox reactions on the transport of redox-sensitive colloids in saturated porous media.

  6. 拜耳法赤泥质陶粒滤料处理含铜废水%Experimental Study on Treatment of Copper-contained Waste Water with Porous Ceramics Filtering Materials with Red Mud from Bayer Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘嘉芬; 李梦红; 刘爱菊

    2012-01-01

    以自制拜耳法赤泥质陶粒滤料为吸附剂,进行了模拟废水中铜离子吸附效果和吸附饱和陶粒再生的研究.结果表明,拜耳法赤泥质陶粒滤料对废水中铜离子具有较好的吸附效果和耐久性;吸附饱和后的陶粒在pH=3的硝酸溶液中静态洗脱3次即可恢复至新鲜陶粒的吸附水平;拜耳法赤泥质陶粒用于废水中铜离子的吸附无论从技术上、经济上还是从二次资源的再利用上均具有显著优势,适合大规模推广应用.%The porous ceramics filtering materials with red mud derived from Bayer process is used as adsorbent to investigate the removal rate of copper in waste water and the regeneration of saturated porous ceramics. The research indicated that the porous ceramics filtering materials with red mud derived from Bayer process has a significant adsorbing performance and lasting quality. The adsorption-saturated ceramics can be restored to be fresh ceramics with fresh adsorption performance after regenerating 3 times in static status in a nitric acid solution of pH = 3. The copper removal from the waste water with the porous ceramics of red mud derived from Bayer Process has a significant advantage in techniques, economics and re-utilization of resources, and it is suitable for large-scale application.

  7. Crust formation in drying colloidal suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Style, R. W.

    2010-06-30

    During the drying of colloidal suspensions, the desiccation process causes the suspension near the air interface to consolidate into a connected porous matrix or crust. Fluid transport in the porous medium is governed by Darcy\\'s law and the equations of poroelasticity, while the equations of colloid physics govern processes in the suspension. We derive new equations describing this process, including unique boundary conditions coupling the two regions, yielding a moving-boundary model of the concentration and stress profiles during drying. A solution is found for the steady-state growth of a nedimensional crust during constant evaporation rate from the surface. The solution is used to demonstrate the importance of the system boundary conditions on stress profiles and diffusivity in a drying crust. © 2011 The Royal Society.

  8. Carbon nanofillers for machining insulating ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Malek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of ceramics in emerging applications is principally limited by the final machining process necessary for producing microcomponents with complex geometries. The addition of carbon nanotubes greatly enhances the electrical properties of insulating ceramics allowing electrical discharge machining to be used to manufacture intricate parts. Meanwhile other properties of the ceramic may be either preserved or even improved. For the first time, a silicon nitride/carbon nanotubes microgear is electrically discharge machined with a remarkably high material removal rate, low surface roughness, and low tool wear. This offers unprecedented opportunities for the manufacture of complicated ceramic parts by adding carbon nanotubes for new engineering and biomedical applications.

  9. Multifunctional assembly of micrometer-sized colloids for cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Chenyao; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Jiangyan; Cheng, Yongqiang; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2015-06-03

    Compared to the extensively studied nanometer-sized colloids, less attention has been paid to the assembly of micrometer-sized colloids with multifunctional characteristics. To address this need, a bottom-up approach is developed for constructing self-assemblies of micrometer-sized magnetic colloids possessing multifunctionality, including magnetic, optical, and biological activities. Biotinylated oligo (p-phenylene vinylene) (OPV) derivatives are designed to mediate the self-assembly of streptavidin-modified magnetic beads. The optical element OPV derivatives provide a fluorescence imaging ability for tracing the assembly process. Target cells can be recognized and assembled by the colloidal assembly with bioactive element antibodies. The colloidal assembly reveals better cell isolation performance by its amplified magnetic response in comparison to monodisperse colloids. The self-assembly of micrometer-sized magnetic colloids through a combination of different functional ingredients to realize multifunction is conceptually simple and easy to achieve. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Elasto-hydrodynamic network analysis of colloidal gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, James; Varga, Zsigmond

    Colloidal gels formed at low particle volume fractions result from a competition between two rate processes: aggregation of colloids and compaction of pre-gel aggregates. Recent work has shown that the former process is highly sensitive to the nature of the hydrodynamic interactions between suspended colloids. This same sensitivity to hydrodynamic flows within the gel leads to pronounced differences in the spectrum of relaxation times and response to deformation of the gel. This talk explores those differences and their consequences through computational simulations and the framework of elasto-hydrodynamic network analysis. We demonstrate a significant impact of hydrodynamic interactions between gelled colloids on macroscopic gel dynamics and rheology as well as the effect of hydrodynamic screening in gelled materials.

  11. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  12. Fragmentation process of vitrified ceramic waste (VCW) aiming its incorporation in silico-aluminous refractory concrete for production of refractory bricks; Processo de fragmentacao de residuos ceramicos vitrificados (RCV) visando sua incorporacao em concreto refratario silico-aluminoso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, L.B.; Brandalise, R.N.; Santos, V. dos, E-mail: lbgomes@ucs.br [Universidade de Caxias do Sul (UCS), RS (Brazil); Bergmann, C.P. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Ceramic industry generates large amounts of waste, usually disposed in landfills. Reuse could minimize their generation and provides sustainable solutions. However, the energy cost of grinding these waste becomes a hindrance to their reuse. This work aims to obtain particle sizes of vitrified ceramic waste (VCW) using a fast, efficient and low cost fragmentation process as well as its use in refractory concrete. The results shows a wide range of particle size of VCW, which can be used as a promising source of raw material for production of refractory concrete. (author)

  13. In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of oxygen vacancy ordering and dislocation annihilation in undoped and Sm-doped CeO2 ceramics during redox processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Chen, Yu; Pradel, Ken C.; Liu, Meilin; Lin Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Ceria (CeO2) based ceramics have been widely used for many applications due to their unique ionic, electronic, and catalytic properties. Here, we report our findings in investigating into the redox processes of undoped and Sm-doped CeO2 ceramics stimulated by high-energy electron beam irradiation within a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The reduced structure with oxygen vacancy ordering has been identified as the CeO1.68 (C-Ce2O3+δ) phase via high-resolution TEM. The reduction of Ce4+ to Ce3+ has been monitored by electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The decreased electronic conductivity of the Sm-doped CeO2 (Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9, SDC) is revealed by electron holography, as positive electrostatic charges accumulated at the surfaces of SDC grains under electron beam irradiation, but not at CeO2 grains. The formation of the reduced CeO1.68 domains corresponds to lattice expansion compared to the CeO2 matrix. Therefore, the growth of CeO1.68 nuclei builds up strain inside the matrix, causing annihilation of dislocations inside the grains. By using in-situ high-resolution TEM and a fast OneView camera recording system, we investigated dislocation motion inside both CeO2 and SDC grains under electron beam irradiation. The dislocations prefer to dissociate into Shockley partials bounded by stacking faults. Then, the partials can easily glide in the {111} planes to reach the grain surfaces. Even the Lomer-Cottrell lock can be swept away by the phase change induced strain field. Our results revealed the high mobility of dislocations inside CeO2 and SDC grains during their respective redox processes.

  14. CURRENT COLLOIDAL DISPERSION GELS ARE NOT SUPERIOR TO POLYMER FLOODING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seright Randy; Han Peihui; Wang Dongmei

    2006-01-01

    The suggestion that the colloidal-dispersion-gel (CDG) process is superior to normal polymer flooding is misleading and generally incorrect. Colloidal dispersion gels, in their present state of technological development, should not be advocated as an improvement to, or substitute for, polymer flooding. Gels made from aluminum-citrate crosslinked polyacrylamides can act as conventional gels and provide effective conformance improvement in treating some types of excess water production problems if sound scientific and engineering principles are respected.

  15. New ceramic materials; Nuevos materiales ceramicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-07-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  16. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Impact Physics Dept.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process.

  17. Polymers and colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schurtenberger, P. [ETH Zurich, Inst. fuer Polymere, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    A wealth of structural information from colloid and polymer solutions on a large range of length scales can be obtained using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments. After a general introduction to the field of soft condensed matter, I shall give a few selected examples on how SANS combined with suitable contrast variation schemes can be used to extract information on the size and conformation of polymer coils in solution and in the melt, and on the local structure and flexibility of polymerlike micelles and microemulsions. (author) 8 figs., tabs., 44 refs.

  18. Ultrasonic wave interactions with magnetic colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J R

    2001-01-01

    fluids have been performed in an effort to determine the relative stability of the fluids. The experimental results have been compared with a combined scattering and hydrodynamic model (Allegra and Hawley 1972) and the ultrasonic anisotropy theory of Skumiel (1997). An on-line quality assurance process is proposed. Originally invented as a method for moving spacecraft fuel in weightless conditions, magnetic colloids or ferrofluids are now used in applications as diverse as the dissipation of heat in the voice coils of a loudspeaker, and for the separation of scrap metal. It has been found that aqueous ferrofluids become unstable after a period of time and with dilution. Therefore, there is a need to characterize the colloidal fluid to study the effects of degradation. Additionally, due to the high cost of ferrofluids and the large volumes required for some applications, the fluid is recycled. It is therefore necessary to develop a system for quality assurance for the fluid reclamation process. Ultrasonic meth...

  19. Problems of YAG nanopowders compaction for laser ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Kaminskii, A. A.; Kopylov, Yu. L.; Kravchenko, V. B.

    2011-03-01

    Slip casting and colloidal slip casting at high pressure of yttrium aluminum garnet powders were investigated. It was found that the presence of residual pores in laser oxide ceramics was determined mainly by big size pores in the compact. The size of pore in compact is critical when it is greater than the mean size of initial particles. It was shown that formation of pores' structure in compact was controlled by appearance of quasi-particles in heavy loaded slurry. Pores concentration is critical for ceramics optical transmittance.

  20. Ceramic dentures manufactured with ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werelius, Kristian; Weigl, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Conventional manufacturing of individual ceramic dental prosthesis implies a handmade metallic framework, which is then veneered with ceramic layers. In order to manufacture all-ceramic dental prosthesis a CAD/CAM system is necessary due to the three dimensional shaping of high strength ceramics. Most CAD/CAM systems presently grind blocks of ceramic after the construction process in order to create the prosthesis. Using high-strength ceramics, such as Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIP)-zirconia, this is limited to copings. Anatomically shaped fixed dentures have a sculptured surface with small details, which can't be created by existing grinding tools. This procedure is also time consuming and subject to significant loss in mechanical strength and thus reduced survival rate once inserted. Ultra-short laser pulses offer a possibility in machining highly complex sculptured surfaces out of high-strength ceramic with negligible damage to the surface and bulk of the ceramic. In order to determine efficiency, quality and damage, several laser ablation parameters such as pulse duration, pulse energy and ablation strategies were studied. The maximum ablation rate was found using 400 fs at high pulse energies. High pulse energies such as 200μJ were used with low damage in mechanical strength compared to grinding. Due to the limitation of available laser systems in pulse repetition rates and power, the use of special ablation strategies provide a possibility to manufacture fully ceramic dental prosthesis efficiently.