WorldWideScience

Sample records for collisional drift waves

  1. Collisional Drift Waves in Stellarator Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-10-07

    A computational study of resistive drift waves in the edge plasma of a stellarator with an helical magnetic axis is presented. Three coupled field equations, describing the collisional drift wave dynamics in the linear approximation, are solved as an initial-value problem along the magnetic field line. The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is obtained from a three-dimensional local equilibrium model. The use of a local magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium model allows for a computationally efficient systematic study of the impact of the magnetic field structure on drift wave stability.

  2. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae, E-mail: wol023@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Angus, J. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  3. Spatial mode structures of electrostatic drift waves in a collisional cylindrical helicon plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, C.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.;

    2004-01-01

    In a cylindrical helicon plasma, mode structures of coherent drift waves are studied in the poloidal plane, the plane perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The mode structures rotate with a constant angular velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift and show significant...

  4. Collisional Scaling of the Energy Transfer in Drift-Wave Zonal Flow Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B; Manz, P; Ramisch, M; Stroth, U

    2017-02-03

    The collisionality scaling of density and potential coupling together with zonal flow energy transfer and spectral power is investigated at the stellarator experiment TJ-K. With a poloidal probe array, consisting of 128 Langmuir probes, density and potential fluctuations are measured on four neighboring flux surfaces simultaneously over the complete poloidal circumference. By analyzing Reynolds stress and pseudo-Reynolds stress, it is found that, for increasing collisionality, the coupling between density and potential decreases which hinders the zonal flow drive. Also, as a consequence, the nonlinear energy transfer, as well as the zonal flow contribution to the complete turbulent spectrum, decreases the same way. This is in line with theoretical expectations and is a first experimental verification of the importance of collisionality for large-scale structure formation in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas.

  5. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-04-25

    A multi-grid part-in-cell algorithm for a shearless slab drift wave model with kinetic electrons is presented. The algorithm, which is based on an exact separation of adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, is used to investigate the presence of strange attractors in drift wave turbulence. Although the simulation model has a large number of degrees of freedom, it is found that the strange attractor is low-dimensional and that it is strongly affected by dissipative (collisional) effects.

  6. Surface waves in the magnetized, collisional dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B. P. [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia); Vladimirov, S. V. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Metamaterials Laboratory, National Research University of Information Technology, Mechanics, and Optics, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Ishihara, O. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    The properties of the low frequency surface waves in inhomogeneous, magnetized collisional complex dusty plasma are investigated in this work. The inhomogeneity is modelled by the two distinct regions of the dusty medium with different dust densities. The external magnetic field is assumed to be oriented along the interface dividing the two medium. It is shown that the collisional momentum exchange that is responsible for the relative drift between the plasma particles affects the propagation of the surface waves in the complex plasma via the Hall drift of the magnetic fluctuations. The propagation properties of the sausage and kink waves depend not only on the grain charge and size distribution but also on the ambient plasma thermal conditions.

  7. Collisional damping rates for plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigik, S. F.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-01

    The distinction between the plasma dynamics dominated by collisional transport versus collective processes has never been rigorously addressed until recently. A recent paper [P. H. Yoon et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 033203 (2016)] formulates for the first time, a unified kinetic theory in which collective processes and collisional dynamics are systematically incorporated from first principles. One of the outcomes of such a formalism is the rigorous derivation of collisional damping rates for Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves, which can be contrasted to the heuristic customary approach. However, the results are given only in formal mathematical expressions. The present brief communication numerically evaluates the rigorous collisional damping rates by considering the case of plasma particles with Maxwellian velocity distribution function so as to assess the consequence of the rigorous formalism in a quantitative manner. Comparison with the heuristic ("Spitzer") formula shows that the accurate damping rates are much lower in magnitude than the conventional expression, which implies that the traditional approach over-estimates the importance of attenuation of plasma waves by collisional relaxation process. Such a finding may have a wide applicability ranging from laboratory to space and astrophysical plasmas.

  8. Collisional Cross-Sections with T-Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry without Experimental Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Daniel N.; Susa, Anna C.; Williams, Evan R.

    2017-07-01

    A method for relating traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) drift times with collisional cross-sections using computational simulations is presented. This method is developed using SIMION modeling of the TWIMS potential wave and equations that describe the velocity of ions in gases induced by electric fields. The accuracy of this method is assessed by comparing the collisional cross-sections of 70 different reference ions obtained using this method with those obtained from static drift tube ion mobility measurements. The cross-sections obtained here with low wave velocities are very similar to those obtained using static drift (average difference = 0.3%) for ions formed from both denaturing and buffered aqueous solutions. In contrast, the cross-sections obtained with high wave velocities are significantly greater, especially for ions formed from buffered aqueous solutions. These higher cross-sections at high wave velocities may result from high-order factors not accounted for in the model presented here or from the protein ions unfolding during TWIMS. Results from this study demonstrate that collisional cross-sections can be obtained from single TWIMS drift time measurements, but that low wave velocities and gentle instrument conditions should be used in order to minimize any uncertainties resulting from high-order effects not accounted for in the present model and from any protein unfolding that might occur. Thus, the method presented here eliminates the need to calibrate TWIMS drift times with collisional cross-sections measured using other ion mobility devices.

  9. Coupled dust drift acoustic shock and soliton in collisional four component magnetized dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, M.; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Jan, Qasim

    2017-09-01

    Low frequency electrostatic coupled dust drift dust acoustic waves are studied in an inhomogeneous, collisional four component dust magnetoplasma composed of dust components of opposite polarity, along with Boltzmannian ions and electrons. The nonlinear evolution equation in the form of an ordinary differential equation and its limiting cases are derived and solved using the Tanh-method. The numerical analysis of the obtained solutions is studied for both laboratory and cosmic plasma systems. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion and electron temperatures, and charge number, both rarefactive and compressive shock and solitary waves may exist. It is shown that the concepts of a critical ion and electron temperatures/density in the nonlinear equations treatment, and of a changeover from compressive to rarefactive shock and soliton characters, correspond to the formation of rarefactive regimes, at which the electric stresses maximize and density minimizes.

  10. Drift Wave versus Interchange Turbulence in Tokamak Geometry Linear versus Nonlinear Mode Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, B D

    2002-01-01

    The competition between drift wave and interchange physics in general E-cross-B drift turbulence is studied with computations in three dimensional tokamak flux tube geometry. For a given set of background scales, the parameter space can be covered by the plasma beta and drift wave collisionality. At large enough plasma beta the turbulence breaks out into ideal ballooning modes and saturates only by depleting the free energy in the background pressure gradient. At high collisionality it finds a more gradual transition to resistive ballooning. At moderate beta and collisionality it retains drift wave character, qualitatively identical to simple two dimensional slab models. The underlying cause is the nonlinear vorticity advection through which the self sustained drift wave turbulence supersedes the linear instabilities, scattering them apart before they can grow, imposing its own physical character on the dynamics. This vorticity advection catalyses the gradient drive, while saturation occurs solely through tur...

  11. Stability of current-driven electrostatic waves in a magnetized and collisional negative ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, Chandu; Varghese, Anu; S, Jyothi [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Issac, Molly [Department of Physics, All Saints' College, Thiruvananthapuram 695 007, Kerala (India); Renuka, G [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India)], E-mail: cvgmgphys@yahoo.co.in

    2008-10-15

    The stability of electrostatic waves, propagating nearly parallel to a uniform external magnetic field, is studied in a fully ionized, collisional plasma of positive and negative ions and a field-aligned current of drifting electrons. Expressions have been derived for the dispersion relation and growth rate using fluid theory and retaining the collisional and conductivity terms for the electrons. The plasma can, in general, support two modes, which have frequencies that are a composite of the ion acoustic and ion gyro frequencies. The growth rate of the modes increases with increasing drift velocities of the electrons and decreases with increasing negative ion densities.

  12. Observation of Up-gradient Particle Flux in Collisional Drift-ITG Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lang

    2015-11-01

    We report the observation of a net inward, up-gradient turbulent particle flux from two independent diagnostics in collisional drift-ITG plasma turbulence. At low magnetic fields (B = 1.2 kG) the drift-waves persist, an up-gradient inward particle flux develops, fluctuations propagating in the ion diamagnetic drift direction develop and a pronounced steepening of the ion temperature and mean density gradients occurs. The two different types of fluctuation features modulate and compete with each other and dominate in different radial location and magnetic field region. Linear stability analyses show that a robust ITG instability is excited for these conditions. The onset of net inward flux also coincides with the development of a strong intrinsic parallel flow shear that can drive an inward pinch when it is coupled with grad-Ti. However, we find that the ITG-driven inward pinch is more dominant in our experiments. This basic experiment provides for a detailed examination of turbulent-driven particle pinches and up-gradient fluxes in the presence of multiple free-energy sources. Moreover, the coexistence and competition of DWs and ITG have been observed to influence tokamak transport and remains a topic of interest for both magnetically confined fusion plasmas and space plasma systems. A detailed experimental study complemented by theory and linear and nonlinear simulations of these experiments is used to elucidate the physics of up-gradient particle transport. Supported by DOE (DE- SC0001961).

  13. Collisional transport across the magnetic field in drift-fluid models

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Rasmussen, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    Drift ordered fluid models are widely applied in studies of low-frequency turbulence in the edge and scrape-off layer regions of magnetically confined plasmas. Here, we show how collisional transport across the magnetic field is self-consistently incorporated into drift-fluid models without altering the drift-fluid energy integral. We demonstrate that the inclusion of collisional transport in drift-fluid models gives rise to diffusion of particle density, momentum and pressures in drift-fluid turbulence models and thereby obviate the customary use of artificial diffusion in turbulence simulations. We further derive a computationally efficient, two-dimensional model which can be time integrated for several turbulence de-correlation times using only limited computational resources. The model describes interchange turbulence in a two-dimensional plane perpendicular to the magnetic field located at the outboard midplane of a tokamak. The model domain has two regions modeling open and closed field lines. The model...

  14. Collisional transport across the magnetic field in drift-fluid models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    Drift ordered fluid models are widely applied in studies of low-frequency turbulence in the edge and scrape-off layer regions of magnetically confined plasmas. Here, we show how collisional transport across the magnetic field is self-consistently incorporated into drift-fluid models without...... altering the drift-fluid energy integral. We demonstrate that the inclusion of collisional transport in drift-fluid models gives rise to diffusion of particle density, momentum, and pressures in drift-fluid turbulence models and, thereby, obviates the customary use of artificial diffusion in turbulence...... simulations. We further derive a computationally efficient, two-dimensional model, which can be time integrated for several turbulence de-correlation times using only limited computational resources. The model describes interchange turbulence in a two-dimensional plane perpendicular to the magnetic field...

  15. Drift-wave stability in the field-reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. K.; Fulton, D. P.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.; Schmitz, L.

    2017-08-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations of C-2-like field-reversed configuration (FRC) find that electrostatic drift-waves are locally stable in the core. The stabilization mechanisms include finite Larmor radius effects, magnetic well (negative grad-B), and fast electron short circuit effects. In the scrape-off layer (SOL), collisionless electrostatic drift-waves in the ion-to-electron-scale are destabilized by electron temperature gradients due to the resonance with locally barely trapped electrons. Collisions can suppress this instability, but a collisional drift-wave instability still exists at realistic pressure gradients. Simulation results are in qualitative agreement with C-2 FRC experiments. In particular, the lack of ion-scale instability in the core is not inconsistent with experimental measurements of a fluctuation spectrum showing a depression at ion-scales. The pressure gradient thresholds for the SOL instability from simulations are also consistent with the critical gradient behavior observed in experiments.

  16. Autoresonant control of drift waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagalov, A. G.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Naulin, V.

    2017-03-01

    The control of nonlinear drift waves in a magnetized plasmas column has been investigated. The studies are based on the Hasegawa–Mima model, which is solved on a disk domain with radial inhomogeneity of the plasma density. The system is forced by a rotating potential with varying frequency defined on the boundary. To excite and control the waves we apply the autoresonant effect, taking place when the amplitude of the forcing exceeds a threshold value and the waves are phase-locked with the forcing. We demonstrate that the autoresonant approach is applicable for excitation of a range of steady nonlinear waves of the lowest azimuthal mode numbers and for controlling their amplitudes and phases. We also demonstrate the excitation of zonal flows (m = 0 modes), which are controlled via the forced modes.

  17. Autoresonant control of drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shagalov, A.G.; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker

    2017-01-01

    The control of nonlinear drift waves in a magnetized plasmas column has been investigated. The studies are based on the Hasegawa–Mima model, which is solved on a disk domain with radial inhomogeneity of the plasma density. The system is forced by a rotating potential with varying frequency defined...... on the boundary. To excite and control the waves we apply the autoresonant effect, taking place when the amplitude of the forcing exceeds a threshold value and the waves are phase-locked with the forcing. We demonstrate that the autoresonant approach is applicable for excitation of a range of steady nonlinear...... waves of the lowest azimuthal mode numbers and for controlling their amplitudes and phases. We also demonstrate the excitation of zonal flows (m = 0 modes), which are controlled via the forced modes....

  18. Collisional transport across the magnetic field in drift-fluid models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry;

    2016-01-01

    Drift ordered fluid models are widely applied in studies of low-frequency turbulence in the edge and scrape-off layer regions of magnetically confined plasmas. Here, we show how collisional transport across the magnetic field is self-consistently incorporated into drift-fluid models without...... simulations. We further derive a computationally efficient, two-dimensional model, which can be time integrated for several turbulence de-correlation times using only limited computational resources. The model describes interchange turbulence in a two-dimensional plane perpendicular to the magnetic field...... located at the outboard midplane of a tokamak. The model domain has two regions modeling open and closed field lines. The model employs a computational expedient model for collisional transport. Numerical simulations show good agreement between the full and the simplified model for collisional transport....

  19. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samiran Ghosh; Nikhil Chakrabarti; Manoranjan Khan; M R Gupta

    2013-02-01

    The conditions for the existence of low-frequency electrostatic drift wave in pair-ion plasma are discussed. It is shown that the temperature and/or mass difference of both species could produce drift wave in a pair-ion plasma. The results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  20. Resistive Drift Waves in a Bumpy Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2004-01-12

    A computational study of resistive drift waves in the edge plasma of a bumpy torus is presented. The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is obtained from a three-dimensional local equilibrium model. The use of a local magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium model allows for a computationally efficient systematic study of the impact of the magnetic field structure on drift wave stability.

  1. Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzi, Oreste; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attach, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view, and which requires in general to approximate the original collisional Landau integral by simplified differential operators in reduced dimensionality. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear form. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator...

  2. Numerical study of drift-kinetic evolution of collisional plasmas in tori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, Jr., C. O.; Meier, H. K.; van Rij, W. I.; McCune, J. E.

    1976-03-01

    Preliminary numerical results for the dynamics of toroidally confined plasmas in the drift-kinetic, Fokker--Planck description are discussed. These solutions were obtained by using the techniques inherent to the collisional plasma model (CPM) described in detail elsewhere. An initial value problem is solved in the local approximation in which collisions and particle dynamics compete in a given magnetic field to set up a quasi-equilibrium. Both the plasma (guiding center) distribution function and many macroscopic quantities of interest are monitored. Good agreement with corresponding but more approximate theories is obtained over a wide range of collisionality, particularly with regard to the neoclassical particle flux. Encouraging confirmation of earlier results for the distribution function is achieved when due account is taken of the differing collisionality of particles with differing energies. These initial results indicate the potential importance of certain non-local effects as well as inclusion of self-consistency between fields and plasma currents and densities.

  3. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  4. Drift wave launching in a linear quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessema, G.Y.; Elliott, J.A.; Rusbridge, M.G. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Inst. of Science and Technology)

    1989-12-01

    Drift waves have been successfully launched from flag probes in a steady-state magnetized plasma, and the launching mechanism has been identified. Non-linear interactions are observed between launched and intrinsic waves. A wide range of further experimental studies is thus made possible, of fundamental relevance to plasma confinement. (author).

  5. Collisional effects in weakly collisional plasmas: nonlinear electrostatic waves and recurrence phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, E.; Pezzi, O.; Valentini, F.

    2015-12-01

    The longstanding problem of collisions in plasmas is a very fascinating and huge topic in plasma physics. The 'natural' operator that describes the Coulombian interactions between charged particles is the Landau (LAN) integral operator. The LAN operator is a nonlinear, integro-differential and Fokker-Planck type operator which satisfies the H theorem for the entropy growth. Due to its nonlinear nature and multi-dimensionality, any approach to the solution of the Landau integral is almost prohibitive. Therefore collisions are usually modeled by simplified collisional operators. Here collisional effects are modeled by i) the one-dimensional Lenard-Bernstein (LB) operator and ii) the three-dimensional Dougherty (DG) operator. In the first case i), by focusing on a 1D-1V phase space, we study recurrence effects in a weakly collisional plasma, being collisions modeled by the LB operator. By decomposing the linear Vlasov-Poisson system in the Fourier-Hermite space, the recurrence problem is investigated in the linear regime of the damping of a Langmuir wave and of the onset of the bump-on-tail instability. The analysis is then confirmed and extended to the nonlinear regime through a Eulerian collisional Vlasov-Poisson code. Despite being routinely used, an artificial collisionality is not in general a viable way of preventing recurrence in numerical simulations. Moreover, recursive phenomena affect both the linear exponential growth and the nonlinear saturation of a linear instability by producing a fake growth in the electric field, thus showing that, although the filamentation is usually associated with low amplitude fluctuations contexts, it can occur also in nonlinear phenomena. On the other hand ii), the effects of electron-electron collisions on the propagation of nonlinear electrostatic waves are shown by means of Eulerian simulations in a 1D-3V (one dimension in physical space, three dimensions in velocity space) phase space. The nonlinear regime of the symmetric

  6. Nonlinear mechanisms for drift wave saturation and induced particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimits, A.M. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (USA). Lab. for Plasma Research); Lee, W.W. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the nonlinear dynamics of gyrokinetic particle simulations of electrostatic collisionless and weakly collisional drift waves is presented. In previous studies it was shown that, in the nonlinearly saturated phase of the evolution, the saturation levels and especially the particle fluxes have an unexpected dependence on collisionality. In this paper, the explanations for these collisionality dependences are found to be as follows: The saturation level is determined by a balance between the electron and ion fluxes. The ion flux is small for levels of the potential below an E {times} B-trapping threshold and increases sharply once this threshold is crossed. Due to the presence of resonant electrons, the electron flux has a much smoother dependence on the potential. In the 2-1/2-dimensional ( pseudo-3D'') geometry, the electrons are accelerated away from the resonance as they diffuse spatially, resulting in an inhibition of their diffusion. Collisions and three-dimensional effects can repopulate the resonance thereby increasing the value of the particle flux. 30 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Modulational instability of electromagnetic waves in a collisional quantum magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastbood, E.; Bafandeh, F.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir [Physics Department of Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The modulational instability of right-hand circularly polarized electromagnetic electron cyclotron (CPEM-EC) wave in a magnetized quantum plasma is studied taking into account the collisional effects. Employing quantum hydrodynamic and nonlinear Schrödinger equations, the dispersion relation of modulated CPEM-EC wave in a collisional plasma has been derived. It is found that this wave is unstable in such a plasma system and the growth rate of the associated instability depends on various parameters such as electron Fermi temperature, plasma number density, collision frequency, and modulation wavenumber. It is shown that while the increase of collision frequency leads to increase of the growth rate of instability, especially at large wavenumber limit, the increase of plasma number density results in more stable modulated CPEM-EC wave. It is also found that in contrast to collisionless plasma in which modulational instability is restricted to small wavenumbers, in collisional plasma, the interval of instability occurrence can be extended to a large domain.

  8. Weakly nonlinear electron plasma waves in collisional plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecseli, H. L.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Tagare, S. G.

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of a high frequency plasma wave in a weakly magnetized, collisional plasma is considered. In addition to the ponderomotive-force-nonlinearity the nonlinearity due to the heating of the electrons is taken into account. A set of nonlinear equations including the effect...... of a constantly maintained pump wave is derived and a general dispersion relation describing the modulation of the high frequency wave due to different low frequency responses is obtained. Particular attention is devoted to a purely growing modulation. The relative importance of the ponderomotive force...

  9. Mode selective control of drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, C.; Klinger, T.; Block, D.;

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on spatiotemporal open-loop synchronization of drift wave turbulence in a magnetized cylindrical plasma are reported. The synchronization effect is modeled by a rotating current profile with prescribed mode structure. Numerical simulations of an extended Hasegawa-Wakatani model show g...

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of resistive electrostatic drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which is pertur......The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which...... is perturbed by a small amplitude incoherent wave-field. The initial evolution is exponential, following the growth of perturbations predicted by linear stability theory. The fluctuations saturate at relatively high amplitudes, by forming a pair of magnetic field aligned vortex-like structures of opposite...

  11. The Absence of Stokes Drift in Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chafin, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Stokes drift has been as central to the history of wave theory as it has been distressingly absent from experiment. Neither wave tanks nor experiments in open bodies detect this without nearly canceling "eulerian flows." Acoustic waves have an analogous problem that is particularly problematic in the vorticity production at the edges of beams. Here we demonstrate that the explanation for this arises from subtle end-of-packet and wavetrain gradient effects such as microbreaking events and wave-flow decomposition subtleties required to conserve mass and momentum and avoid fictitious external forces. These losses occur at both ends of packets and can produce a significant nonviscous energy loss for translating and spreading surface wave packets and wavetrains. In contrast, monochromatic sound wave packets will be shown to asymmetrically distort to conserve momentum. This provides an interesting analogy to how such internal forces arise for gradients of electromagnetic wavetrains in media. Such examples show that...

  12. A note on the drift waves in the presence of electrons added by meteors by ablation phenomena or by thermionic emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V H Kulkarni; Shobha Kadam

    2012-07-01

    The role of added electrons on the drift dissipative instability in a nonuniform collisional plasma is analysed. We observe the presence of a drift wave that depends entirely on the added electrons through the collision frequency coupling and there is an additional damping. The present study is applied to the density irregularities caused by meteor ionization in the ionosphere.

  13. Wave propelled ratchets and drifting rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddi, A.; Terwagne, D.; Fort, E.; Couder, Y.

    2008-05-01

    Several droplets, bouncing on a vertically vibrated liquid bath, can form various types of bound states, their interaction being due to the waves emitted by their bouncing. Though they associate droplets which are individually motionless, we show that these bound states are self-propelled when the droplets are of uneven size. The driving force is linked to the assymetry of the emitted surface waves. The direction of this ratchet-like displacement can be reversed, by varying the amplitude of forcing. This direction reversal occurs when the bouncing of one of the drops becomes sub-harmonic. As a generalization, a larger number of bouncing droplets form crystalline rafts which are also shown to drift or rotate when assymetrical.

  14. Terahertz generation by beating two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Qiao, Xin; Cheng, Li-Hong; Tang, Rong-An; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui, E-mail: xuejk@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Atomic & Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronics Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma is discussed theoretically. The critical angle between the two Langmuir waves and the critical wave-length (wave vector) of Langmuir waves for generating THz radiation are obtained analytically. Furthermore, the maximum radiation energy is obtained. We find that the critical angle, the critical wave-length, and the generated radiation energy strongly depend on plasma temperature and wave-length of the Langmuir waves. That is, the THz radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma can be controlled by adjusting the plasma temperature and the Langmuir wave-length.

  15. Coherent Vortex Evolution in Drift Wave Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, R.; Terry, P. W.

    1998-11-01

    Localized structures in turbulence are subject to loss of coherence by mixing. Phase space structures, such as drift-hole, (P. W. Terry, P. H. Diamond, T. S. Hahm, Phys. Fluids B) 2 9 2048 (1990) possess a self-electric field, which if sufficiently large maintains particle trapping against the tidal deformations of ambient turbulence. We show here that intense vortices in fluid drift wave turbulence avoid mixing by suppressing ambient turbulence with the strong flow shear of the vortex edge. Analysis of turbulence evolution in the vortex edge recovers Rapid Distortion Theory (G. K. Batchelor and I. Proudman, Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math.) 7 83 (1954) as the short time limit and the shear suppression scaling theory (H. Biglari, P. H. Diamond and P. W. Terry, Phys. Fluids B) 2 1 (1990) as the long time limit. Shear suppression leads to an amplitude condition for coherence and delineates the Gaussian core from the non Gaussian tail of the probability distribution function. The amplitude condition of shear suppression is compared with the trapping condition for phase space holes. The possibility of nonlinear vortex growth will be examined by considering electron dynamics in the vortex evolution.

  16. Anomalous drift of spiral waves in heterogeneous excitable media

    CERN Document Server

    Sridhar, S; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2009-01-01

    We study the drift of spiral waves in a simple model of heterogeneous excitable medium, having gradients in local excitability or cellular coupling. For the first time, we report the anomalous drift of spiral waves towards regions having higher excitability, in contrast to all earlier observations in reaction-diffusion models of excitable media. Such anomalous drift can promote the onset of complex spatio-temporal patterns, e.g., those responsible for life-threatening arrhythmias in the heart.

  17. Resistive drift wave turbulence in a three-dimensional geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Naulin, V.

    1999-01-01

    The Hasegawa-Wakatani model describing resistive drift waves is investigated analytically and numerically in a three-dimensional periodic geometry. After an initial growth of the energy the drift waves couple nonlinearly to convective cells, which eventually dominate the system completely...

  18. Nonlinear propagation of short wavelength drift-Alfven waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    Making use of a kinetic ion and a hydrodynamic electron description together with the Maxwell equation, the authors derive a set of nonlinear equations which governs the dynamics of short wavelength ion drift-Alfven waves. It is shown that the nonlinear drift-Alfven waves can propagate as two...

  19. Nonlinear acoustic waves in a collisional self-gravitating dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Zhi-Rong; Yang Zeng-Qiang; Yin Bao-Xiang; Sun Mao-Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Using the reductive perturbation method,we investigate the small amplitude nonlinear acoustic wave in a collisional self-gravitating dusty plasma.The result shows that the small amplitude dust acoustic wave can be expressed by a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation,and the nonlinear wave is instable because of the collisions between the neutral gas molecules and the charged particles.

  20. Drift waves in a high-density cylindrical helicon discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, C.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.

    2005-01-01

    of the background plasma parameters. All experimentally observed features of the instability are found to be consistent with drift waves. A linear nonlocal numerical model for drift modes, based on the two-fluid description of a plasma, is used for comparison between the experimental observations and theory....... Comparing numerical and experimental frequencies, it is found that the experimentally observed frequencies are consistent with drift waves. The numerical results show that the high electron collision frequencies provide the strongest destabilization mechanism in the helicon plasma. (c) 2005 American...

  1. Two-fluid MHD Regime of Drift Wave Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shang-Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Xie, Jin-Lin; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Drift wave instabilities contribute to the formation of edge turbulence and zonal flows, and thus are believed to play essential roles in the anomalous transport processes in tokamaks. Whereas drift waves are generally assumed to be local and electrostatic, experiments have often found regimes where the spatial scales and the magnetic components of drift waves approach those of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes. In this work we study such a drift wave regime in a cylindrical magnetized plasma using a full two-fluid MHD model implemented in the NIMROD code. The linear dependency of growth rates on resistivity and the dispersion relation found in the NIMROD calculations qualitatively agree with theoretical analysis. As the azimuthal mode number increases, the drift modes become highly localized radially; however, unlike the conventional local approximation, the radial profile of the drift mode tends to shift toward the edge away from the center of the density gradient slope, suggesting the inhomogeneity of two-fluid effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11275200 and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant 2014GB124002.

  2. Littoral drift computations on mutual wave and current influence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, E.W.

    1971-01-01

    11th Conference on Coastal Engineering in London 1968, the author presented a method for computing the littoral drift starting from the longshore current velocity as this is generated by the waves and with the assumption that the material is stirred up by the waves. In this paper measurements in a m

  3. Transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, P.H.; McDevitt, C.J.; Gurcan, O.E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, unified approach to the theory of turbulent transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift waves. The physics of resonant and non‐resonant off‐diagonal contributions to the momentum flux is emphasized, and collisionless momentum exchange between waves and parti...

  4. Transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, P.H.; McDevitt, C.J.; Gürcan, O.D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, unified approach to the theory of turbulent transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift waves. The physics of resonant and nonresonant off-diagonal contributions to the momentum flux is emphasized, and collisionless momentum exchange between waves and partic...

  5. Drift of Spiral Waves in Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The spontaneous drift of the spiral wave in a finite domain in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is investigated numerically. By using the interactions between the spiral wave and its images, we propose a phenomenological theory to explain the observations.

  6. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  7. Drift and ion acoustic wave driven vortices with superthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Shan, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, QAU Campus, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); Haque, Q. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, QAU Campus, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-08-15

    Linear and nonlinear analysis of coupled drift and acoustic mode is presented in an inhomogeneous electron-ion plasma with {kappa}-distributed electrons. A linear dispersion relation is found which shows that the phase speed of both the drift wave and the ion acoustic wave decreases in the presence of superthermal electrons. Several limiting cases are also discussed. In the nonlinear regime, stationary solutions in the form of dipolar and monopolar vortices are obtained. It is shown that the condition for the boundedness of the solution implies that the speed of drift wave driven vortices reduces with increase in superthermality effect. Ignoring density inhomogeniety, it is investigated that the lower and upper limits on the speed of the ion acoustic driven vortices spread with the inclusion of high energy electrons. The importance of results with reference to space plasmas is also pointed out.

  8. Drift Wave Test Particle Transport in Reversed Shear Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W.; Park, H.B.; Kwon, J.M.; Stronzzi, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Choi, D.I.

    1998-06-01

    Drift wave maps, area preserving maps that describe the motion of charged particles in drift waves, are derived. The maps allow the integration of particle orbits on the long time scale needed to describe transport. Calculations using the drift wave maps show that dramatic improvement in the particle confinement, in the presence of a given level and spectrum of E x B turbulence, can occur for q(r)-profiles with reversed shear. A similar reduction in the transport, i.e. one that is independent of the turbulence, is observed in the presence of an equilibrium radial electric field with shear. The transport reduction, caused by the combined effects of radial electric field shear and both monotonic and reversed shear magnetic q-profiles, is also investigated.

  9. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Martines, E; Cavazzana, R; Adámek, J; Antoni, V; Serianni, G; Spolaore, M; Vianello, N

    2014-01-01

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

  10. Wave propelled ratchets and drifting rafts

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Several droplets, bouncing on a vertically vibrated liquid bath, can form various types of bound states, their interaction being due to the waves emitted by their bouncing. Though they associate droplets which are individually motionless, we show that these bound states are self- propelled when the droplets are of uneven size. The driving force is linked to the assymetry of the emitted surface waves. The direction of this ratchet-like displacement can be reversed, by varying the amplitude of ...

  11. On advanced fluid modelling of drift wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Weiland, J; Zasenko, V

    2007-01-01

    The Dupree-Weinstock renormalization is used to prove that a reactive closure exists for drift wave turbulence in magnetized plasmas. The result is used to explain recent results in gyrokinetic simulations and is also related to the Mattor-Parker closure. The level of closure is found in terms of applied external sources.

  12. Lyapunov exponents and particle dispersion in drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, T.S.; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Hasegawa-Wakatani model equations for resistive drift waves are solved numerically for a range of values of the coupling due to the parallel electron motion. The largest Lyapunov exponent, lambda(1), is calculated to quantify the unpredictability of the turbulent flow and compared to other...

  13. Propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum magnetized collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taheri Boroujeni, S.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum plasma in the presence of the external magnetic field and collisional effects is investigated by using quantum magnetohydrodynamics model. A general analytical expression for the dispersion relation of surface waves is obtained by considering the boundary conditions. It is shown that, in some special cases, the obtained dispersion relation reduces to the results reported in previous works. It is also indicated that the quantum, external magnetic field and collisional effects can facilitate the propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded plasma. In addition, it is found that the growth rate of the surface wave instability is enhanced by increasing the collision frequency and plasmonic parameter.

  14. Eigenvalue solution to the electron-collisional effect on ion-acoustic and entropy waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Jian

    2001-01-01

    [1]Braginskii,S.I.,Transport processes in a plasma,in Reviews of Plasma Physics,Vol.1,New York:Consultants Bureau,1965,205-311.[2]Ono,M.,Kulsrud,R.M.,Frequency and damping of ion acoustic waves,Phys.Fluids,1975,18(10):1287-1293.[3]Randall,C.J.,Effect of ion collisionality on ion-acoustic waves,Phys.Fluids,1982,25(12):2231-2233.[4]Tracy,M.D.,Williams,E.A.,Estabrook,K.G.et al.,Eigenvalue solution for the ion-collisional effects on ion-acoustic and entropy waves,Phys.Fluids,1993,B5(5):1430.[5]Bell,A.R.,Electron energy transport in ion waves and its relevance to laser produced plasmas,Phys.Fluids,1983,26(1):279-284.[6]Epperlein,E.M.,Short,R.W.,Simon,A.,Damping of ion-acoustic waves in the presence of electron-ion collisions,Phys.Rev.Lett.,1992,69(12):1765-1768.[7]Epperlein,E.M.,Effect of electron collisions on ion-acoustic waves and heat flow,Phys.Plasmas,1994,1(1):109-115.[8]Bychenkov,V.Y.,Myatt,J.,Rozmus,W.et al.,Quasihydrodynamic description of ion acoustic waves in a collisional plasmas,Phys.Plasmas,1994,1(8):2419-2429.[9]Bychenkov,V.Y.,Myatt,J.,Rozmus,W.et al.,Ion acoustic waves in plasmas with collisional electrons,Phys.Rev.E,1994,50(6):5134-5137.[10]Bychenkov,V.Y.,Rozmus,W.,Tikhonchuk,V.T.et al.,Nonlocal electron transport in a plasma,Phys.Rev.Lett.,1995,75(24):4405-4408.[11]Zhang,Y.Q.et al.,Density fluctuation spectra of a collision-dominated plasma measured by light scattering,Phys.Rev.Lett.,1989,62(16):1848-1851.[12]Hinton,F.L.,Collisional transport in plasma,in Handbook of Plasma Physics,Vol.1,Amsterdam:North-Holland,1983,147-199.[13]Zheng Jian,Yu Changxuan,A numerical approach to the frequencies and damping rates of ion-acoustic waves in ion-collisional plasmas,Chin.Phys.Lett.,1999,16(12):905-907.[14]Hammett,G.W.,Perkins,F.,Fluid moment models for Landau damping with application to the ion-temperature-gradient instability,Phys.Rev.Lett.,1990,64(25):3019-3022.

  15. Applications of the wave kinetic approach: from laser wakefields to drift wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trines, R. M. G. M.; Bingham, R.; Silva, L. O.; Mendonça, J. T.; Shukla, P. K.; Murphy, C. D.; Dunlop, M. W.; Davies, J. A.; Bamford, R.; Vaivads, A.; Norreys, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Nonlinear wave-driven processes in plasmas are normally described by either a monochromatic pump wave that couples to other monochromatic waves, or as a random phase wave coupling to other random phase waves. An alternative approach involves a random or broadband pump coupling to monochromatic and/or coherent structures in the plasma. This approach can be implemented through the wave-kinetic model. In this model, the incoming pump wave is described by either a bunch (for coherent waves) or a sea (for random phase waves) of quasi-particles. This approach has been applied to both photon acceleration in laser wakefields and drift wave turbulence in magnetized plasma edge configurations. Numerical simulations have been compared to experiments, varying from photon acceleration to drift mode-zonal flow turbulence, and good qualitative correspondences have been found in all cases.

  16. Global Theory to Understand Toroidal Drift Waves in Steep Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hua-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf., Xie and Xiao, Phys. Plasmas, 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters `quantum number' $l$ and ballooning angle $\\vartheta_k$, (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, $>50\\%$, and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structu...

  17. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang

    for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa- Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa......-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron......Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important...

  18. Drift waves and chaos in a LAPTAG plasma physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Birge-Lee, Henry; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Wolman, Ben; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Patankar, Vedang; Bridges, Gabriel; Buckley-Bonanno, Samuel; Buckley, Susan; Ge, Andrew; Thomas, Sam

    2016-02-01

    In a project involving an alliance between universities and high schools, a magnetized plasma column with a steep pressure gradient was established in an experimental device. A two-dimensional probe measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data were used to generate the Bandt-Pompe entropy and Jensen-Shannon complexity for the data. These quantities, when plotted against one another, revealed that a combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations were a deterministically chaotic system. Our analysis can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos and random noise, making it a potentially useful technique in nonlinear dynamics.

  19. Electron drift waves in an advanced tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, M.A.; Persson, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Signals and Systems and Euratom/VR Association; Rafiq, T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics

    2006-06-15

    The influence of details of an international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER)-like geometry on drift wave stability is studied. The eigenvalue problem for electrostatic electron drift waves is solved numerically by following the ballooning mode formalism and using a standard shooting technique. The real frequencies and growth rates of the most unstable modes and their eigenfunctions are calculated for two specific magnetic flux surfaces. For the equilibrium under investigation, the modes are found to be unstable for peak density profiles and their stability is found to be strongly affected by the local magnetic shear (LMS). The presence of positive LMS is found to be destabilizing on the magnetic surface where global magnetic shear is reverse. The stability behaviour is however different for a positive magnetic shear surface where the effect of large positive LMS is found to be stabilizing. The eigenfunctions are more localized in the regions where normal curvature is bad and magnetic field is weak.

  20. Eigenvalue solution to the electron-collisional effect on ion-acoustic and entropy waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The linearized electron Fokker-Planck and cold-ion fluid equations are solved as an eigenvalue problem in the quasineutral limit for ionization state,Z=1,8,and 64 for ion-acoustic and entropy waves.The perturbed electron distribution function is written as a moment expansion of eigenvectors,and is used to compute collisionality-dependence macroscopic quantities in the plasma such as the generalized specific heat ratio,and the electron thermal conductivity.

  1. Collisional damping of helicon waves in a high density hydrogen linear plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneses, Juan F.; Blackwell, Boyd D.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation and damping of helicon waves along the length (50 cm) of a helicon-produced 20 kW hydrogen plasma ({{n}\\text{e}}∼ 1–2 × 1019 m‑3, {{T}\\text{e}}∼ 1–6 eV, H2 8 mTorr) operated in a magnetic mirror configuration (antenna region: 50–200 G and mirror region: 800 G). Experimental results show the presence of traveling helicon waves (4–8 G and {λz}∼ 10–15 cm) propagating away from the antenna region which become collisionally absorbed within 40–50 cm. We describe the use of the WKB method to calculate wave damping and provide an expression to assess its validity based on experimental measurements. Theoretical calculations are consistent with experiment and indicate that for conditions where Coulomb collisions are dominant classical collisionality is sufficient to explain the observed wave damping along the length of the plasma column. Based on these results, we provide an expression for the scaling of helicon wave damping relevant to high density discharges and discuss the location of surfaces for plasma-material interaction studies in helicon based linear plasma devices.

  2. Light-Gradient-Induced Spiral Wave Drifts in a Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui-Jie; WANG Peng-Ye; ZHAO Ying-Ying

    2005-01-01

    @@ The dynamic behaviour of spiral tip in the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction under the influence of an externally applied light gradient was experimentally studied. The gradient causes different drifts for different spiral patterns. The centre of the spiral wave moved toward the region of lower light intensity. The direction of an additional perpendicular drift depended on the chirality of the spiral wave. The dependences of the drifting angle and the drifting velocity on light gradient have been measured.

  3. Stokes drift for inertial particles transported by water waves

    CERN Document Server

    Boffetta, G; Mazzino, A; Onorato, M; Santamaria, F

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect of surface gravity waves on the motion of inertial particles in an incompressible fluid. Using the multiple-scale technique, we perform an analytical calculation which allows us to predict the dynamics of such particles; results are shown for both the infinite- and finite-depth regimes. Numerical simulations based on the velocity field resulting from the second-order Stokes theory for the surface elevation have been performed, and an excellent agreement with the analytical predictions is observed. Such an agreement seems to hold even beyond the formal applicability of the theory. We find that the presence of inertia leads to a non-negligible correction to the well-known horizontal Stokes drift; moreover, we find that the vertical velocity is also affected by a drift. The latter result may have some relevant consequences on the rate of sedimentation of particles of finite size. We underline that such a drift would also be observed in the (hypothetical) absence of the gravitational force.

  4. Faraday and resonant waves in binary collisionally-inhomogeneous Bose-Einstein condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Sudharsan, J B; Raportaru, Mihaela Carina; Nicolin, Alexandru I; Balaz, Antun

    2016-01-01

    We study Faraday and resonant waves in two-component quasi-one-dimensional (cigar-shaped) collisionally inhomogeneous Bose-Einstein condensates subject to periodic modulation of the radial confinement. We show by means of extensive numerical simulations that, as the system exhibits stronger spatially-localised binary collisions (whose scattering length is taken for convenience to be of Gaussian form), the system becomes effectively a linear one. In other words, as the scattering length approaches a delta-function, we observe that the two nonlinear configurations typical for binary cigar-shaped condensates, namely the segregated and the symbiotic one, turn into two overlapping Gaussian wave functions typical for linear systems, and that the instability onset times of the Faraday and resonant waves become longer. Moreover, our numerical simulations show that the spatial period of the excited waves (either resonant or Faraday ones) decreases as the inhomogeneity becomes stronger. Our results also demonstrate tha...

  5. Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by Drift Vortex in Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong; CHEN Yinhua; WANG Ge

    2008-01-01

    In a quasi-two-dimensional model, the scattering of incident ordinary electromag-netic waves by a dipole-electrostatic drift vortex is studied with first-order Born approximation. The distribution of the scattering cross-section and total cross-section are evaluated analytically in different approximate conditions, and the physical interpretations are discussed. When the wavelength of incident wave is much longer than the vortex radius (kia << 1), it is found that the angle at which the scattering cross-section reaches its maxim depends significantly on the approxi-mation of the parameters of the vortex used. It is also found that the total scattering cross-section has an affinitive relation with the parameters of the plasma, while it is irrelevant to the frequency of the incident wave in a wide range of parameters of the vortex. In a totally different range of parameters when incident wave is in the radar-frequency range (then ki<< 1, the wavelength of incident wave is much shorter than the vortex radius), the numerical procedure is conducted with computer in order to obtain the distribution and the total expression of the scattering cross-section. Then it is found that the total scattering cross-section in the low frequency range is much larger than that in high frequency range, so the scattering is more effective in the low frequency range than in high frequency range.

  6. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-15

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  7. Global theory to understand toroidal drift waves in steep gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua-sheng; Li, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from a typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf. H. S. Xie and Y. Xiao, Phys. Plasmas 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters "quantum number" l and ballooning angle ϑk , (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, >50 % , and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structures. With velocity space integral, semi-local theory predicts that the critical jump gradient of the most unstable ion temperature gradient mode from ground state l = 0 to non-ground state l = 1 is LT-1R ˜50 . These features can have important consequences to turbulent transport.

  8. Directional change of particles in dissipative drift-wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoch, Benjamin; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the statistical properties of Lagrangian particle transport in dissipative drift-wave turbulence modeled by the Hasegawa-Wakatani system. The angle between subsequent particle displacement increments is evaluated as a function of the timelag and thus multi-scale geometric statistics can be performed. The evolution of the mean angle with the time lag is studied and the probability density function of the directional change are analyzed for the different flow regimes. By varying the adiabaticity parameter the flow regime can be modified from the hydrodynamic limit to a geostrophic limit, including the quasi adiabatic regime which has some relevance for edge turbulence of fusion plasmas in tokamaks. Support by the French Research Federation for Fusion Studies within the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) is thankfully acknowledged.

  9. Dissipative electron drift modes in the H1-NF stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeem, M.; Rafiq, T.; Persson, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Electromagnetics

    2001-09-01

    A resistive drift wave model is developed from the two fluids theory, and the associated eigenvalue problem is solved using the ballooning mode formalism for the 3D equilibrium magnetic field configuration of the H-1NF stellarator. The frequency spectrum and the localization of electron drift modes are driven unstable by collisional dissipation of electrons along the magnetic field lines. (orig.)

  10. Validity of the Taylor hypothesis for linear kinetic waves in the weakly collisional solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howes, G. G.; Klein, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); TenBarge, J. M. [IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    The interpretation of single-point spacecraft measurements of solar wind turbulence is complicated by the fact that the measurements are made in a frame of reference in relative motion with respect to the turbulent plasma. The Taylor hypothesis—that temporal fluctuations measured by a stationary probe in a rapidly flowing fluid are dominated by the advection of spatial structures in the fluid rest frame—is often assumed to simplify the analysis. But measurements of turbulence in upcoming missions, such as Solar Probe Plus, threaten to violate the Taylor hypothesis, either due to slow flow of the plasma with respect to the spacecraft or to the dispersive nature of the plasma fluctuations at small scales. Assuming that the frequency of the turbulent fluctuations is characterized by the frequency of the linear waves supported by the plasma, we evaluate the validity of the Taylor hypothesis for the linear kinetic wave modes in the weakly collisional solar wind. The analysis predicts that a dissipation range of solar wind turbulence supported by whistler waves is likely to violate the Taylor hypothesis, while one supported by kinetic Alfvén waves is not.

  11. The frequency and damping of ion acoustic waves in collisional and collisionless two-species plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, R L; Valeo, E J

    2004-07-15

    The dispersion properties of ion acoustic waves (IAW) are sensitive to the strength of ion-ion collisions in multi-species plasma in which the different species usually have differing charge-to-mass ratios. The modification of the frequency and damping of the fast and slow acoustic modes in a plasma composed of light (low Z) and heavy (high Z) ions is considered. In the fluid limit where the light ion scattering mean free path, {lambda}{sub th} is smaller than the acoustic wavelength, {lambda} = 2{pi}/k, the interspecies friction and heat flow carried by the light ions scattering from the heavy ions causes the damping. In the collisionless limit, k{lambda}{sub lh} >> 1, Landau damping by the light ions provides the dissipation. In the intermediate regime when k{lambda}{sub lh} {approx} 1, the damping is at least as large as the sum of the collisional and Landau damping.

  12. The Frequency and Damping of Ion Acoustic Waves in Collisional and Collisionless Two-species Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Berger; E.J. Valeo

    2004-08-18

    The dispersion properties of ion acoustic waves (IAW) are sensitive to the strength of ion-ion collisions in multi-species plasma in which the different species usually have differing charge-to-mass ratios. The modification of the frequency and damping of the fast and slow acoustic modes in a plasma composed of light (low Z) and heavy (high Z) ions is considered. In the fluid limit where the light ion scattering mean free path, {lambda}{sub th} is smaller than the acoustic wavelength, {lambda} = 2{pi}/k, the interspecies friction and heat flow carried by the light ions scattering from the heavy ions causes the damping. In the collisionless limit, k{lambda}{sub th} >> 1, Landau damping by the light ions provides the dissipation. In the intermediate regime when k{lambda}{sub th} {approx} 1, the damping is at least as large as the sum of the collisional and Landau damping.

  13. Effect of a Dissipative Term in the Drift Waves Hamiltonian System

    CERN Document Server

    Oyarzabal, Ricardo S; Batista, Antonio M; Caldas, Iberê L; Viana, Ricardo L; Iarosz, Kelly C

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the Hamiltonian model of drift waves which describes the chaotic transport of particles in the plasma confinement. With one drift wave the system is integrable and it presents stable orbits. When one wave is added the system may or may not be integrable depending on the phase of each wave velocity. If the two waves have the same phase velocity, the system is integrable. When the phase velocities between the two waves are different, the system shows chaotic behaviour. In this model we add a small dissipation. In the presence of a weak dissipation, for different initial conditions, we observe transient orbits which converge to periodic attractors.

  14. Drift of scroll waves in thin layers caused by thickness features: asymptotic theory and numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biktasheva, I V; Dierckx, H; Biktashev, V N

    2015-02-13

    A scroll wave in a very thin layer of excitable medium is similar to a spiral wave, but its behavior is affected by the layer geometry. We identify the effect of sharp variations of the layer thickness, which is separate from filament tension and curvature-induced drifts described earlier. We outline a two-step asymptotic theory describing this effect, including asymptotics in the layer thickness and calculation of the drift of so-perturbed spiral waves using response functions. As specific examples, we consider drift of scrolls along thickness steps, ridges, ditches, and disk-shaped thickness variations. Asymptotic predictions agree with numerical simulations.

  15. Amplitude limits and nonlinear damping of shear-Alfvén waves in high-beta low-collisionality plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Quataert, E.

    2017-05-01

    This work, which extends Squire et al (Astrophys. J. Lett. 2016 830 L25), explores the effect of self-generated pressure anisotropy on linearly polarized shear-Alfvén fluctuations in low-collisionality plasmas. Such anisotropies lead to stringent limits on the amplitude of magnetic perturbations in high-β plasmas, above which a fluctuation can destabilize itself through the parallel firehose instability. This causes the wave frequency to approach zero, ‘interrupting’ the wave and stopping its oscillation. These effects are explored in detail in the collisionless and weakly collisional ‘Braginskii’ regime, for both standing and traveling waves. The focus is on simplified models in one dimension, on scales much larger than the ion gyroradius. The effect has interesting implications for the physics of magnetized turbulence in the high-β conditions that are prevalent in many astrophysical plasmas.

  16. Validity of the Taylor Hypothesis for Linear Kinetic Waves in the Weakly Collisional Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, G G; TenBarge, J M

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of single-point spacecraft measurements of solar wind turbulence is complicated by the fact that the measurements are made in a frame of reference in relative motion with respect to the turbulent plasma. The Taylor hypothesis---that temporal fluctuations measured by a stationary probe in a rapidly flowing fluid are dominated by the advection of spatial structures in the fluid rest frame---is often assumed to simplify the analysis. But measurements of turbulence in upcoming missions, such as Solar Probe Plus, threaten to violate the Taylor hypothesis, either due to slow flow of the plasma with respect to the spacecraft or to the dispersive nature of the plasma fluctuations at small scales. Assuming that the frequency of the turbulent fluctuations is characterized by the frequency of the linear waves supported by the plasma, we evaluate the validity of the Taylor hypothesis for the linear kinetic wave modes in the weakly collisional solar wind. The analysis predicts that a dissipation range o...

  17. Effects of Periodic Forcing Amplitude on the Spiral Wave Resonance Drift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ning-Jie; LI Bing-Wei; YING He-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study dynamics of spiral waves under a uniform periodic temporal forcing in an excitable medium. With a specific combination of frequency and amplitude of the external periodic forcing, a resonance drift of a spiral wave occurs along a straight line, and it is accompanied by a complicated ‘flower-like’ motion on each side of this bifurcate boundary line. It is confirmed that the straight-line drift frequency of spiral waves is not locked to the nature rotation frequency as the forcing amplitude expends the range of the spiral wave frequency. These results are further verified numerically for a simplified kinematical model.

  18. Nonlinear wave structures in collisional plasma of auroral E-region ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Volosevich

    Full Text Available Studies of the auroral plasma with small-scale inhomogenieties producing the VHF-radar reflections (radar aurora when observed in conditions of the saturated Farley-Buneman instability within the auroral E region, show strong nonlinear interactions and density fluctuations of 5–15%. Such nonlinearity and high fluctation amplitudes are inconsistent with the limitations of the weak turbulence theory, and thus a theory for arbitrary amplitudes is needed. To this end, a nonlinear theory is described for electrostatic MHD moving plasma structures of arbitrary amplitude for conditions throughout the altitude range of the collisional auroral E region. The equations are derived, from electron and ion motion self-consistent with the electric field, for the general case of the one-dimensional problem. They take into account nonlinearity, electron and ion inertia, diffusion, deviation from quasi-neutrality, and dynamical ion viscosity. The importance of the ion viscosity for dispersion is stressed, while deviation from the quasi-neutrality can be important only at rather low plasma densities, not typical for the auroral E region. In a small amplitude limit these equations have classical nonlinear solutions of the type of "electrostatic shock wave" or of knoidal waves. In a particular case these knoidal waves degrade to a dissipative soliton. A two-dimensional case of a quasi-neutral plasma is considered in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field by way of the Poisson brackets, but neglecting the nonlinearity and ion inertia. It is shown that in these conditions an effective saturation can be achieved at the stationary turbulence level of order of 10%.

  19. Comment on "Propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum magnetized collisional plasma" [Phys. Plasmas 20, 122106 (2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2016-04-01

    In a recent article [Niknam et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122106 (2013)], Niknam et al. investigated the propagation of TM surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum magnetized collisional plasma in the Faraday configuration (in this case, the magnetic field is parallel to the both of the plasma surface and direction of propagation). Here, we present a fresh look at the problem and show that TM surface waves cannot propagate on surface of the present system. We find in the Faraday configuration the surface waves acquire both TM and TE components due to the cyclotron motion of electrons. Therefore, the main result of the work by Niknam et al. is incorrect.

  20. Dissipative drift instability in dusty plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilakshi Das

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation has been done on the very low-frequency electrostatic drift waves in a collisional dusty plasma. The dust density gradient is taken perpendicular to the magnetic field B0⃗, which causes the drift wave. In this case, low-frequency drift instabilities can be driven by E1⃗×B0⃗ and diamagnetic drifts, where E1⃗ is the perturbed electric field. Dust charge fluctuation is also taken into consideration for our study. The dust- neutral and ion-neutral collision terms have been included in equations of motion. It is seen that the low-frequency drift instability gets damped in such a system. Both dust charging and collision of plasma particles with the neutrals may be responsible for the damping of the wave. Both analytical and numerical techniques have been used while developing the theory.

  1. Experimental investigation of the nonlinear evolution of an impurity-driven drift wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, G.R.; Yamada, M.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1982-04-01

    An impurity-driven drift wave is observed to be destabilized by the reversed density gradient of a singly-ionized heavy-impurity-ion population in a Q-machine plasma. The evolution of the instability is investigated as it progresses from the initial linear exponential growth phase, into a nonlinear saturated state, whereupon strong radially outward anomalous diffusion is observed. The relationship between the anomalous diffusion coefficient and the wave amplitude is in agreement with estimates obtained from the nonlinear drift-wave turbulence theory of Dupree.

  2. A Computer Simulation Study of Anatomy Induced Drift of Spiral Waves in the Human Atrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay R. Kharche

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of spiral waves of excitation with atrial anatomy remains unclear. This simulation study isolates the role of atrial anatomical structures on spiral wave spontaneous drift in the human atrium. We implemented realistic and idealised 3D human atria models to investigate the functional impact of anatomical structures on the long-term (∼40 s behaviour of spiral waves. The drift of a spiral wave was quantified by tracing its tip trajectory, which was correlated to atrial anatomical features. The interaction of spiral waves with the following idealised geometries was investigated: (a a wedge-like structure with a continuously varying atrial wall thickness; (b a ridge-like structure with a sudden change in atrial wall thickness; (c multiple bridge-like structures consisting of a bridge connected to the atrial wall. Spiral waves drifted from thicker to thinner regions and along ridge-like structures. Breakthrough patterns caused by pectinate muscles (PM bridges were also observed, albeit infrequently. Apparent anchoring close to PM-atrial wall junctions was observed. These observations were similar in both the realistic and the idealised models. We conclude that spatially altering atrial wall thickness is a significant cause of drift of spiral waves. PM bridges cause breakthrough patterns and induce transient anchoring of spiral waves.

  3. A Laboratory Experiment on EM Backscatter from Farley-Buneman and Gradient Drift Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alport, M. J.; D'Angelo, N.; Pécseli, Hans

    1981-01-01

    Results are reported of a laboratory experiment on Bragg backscatter of 3-cm microwaves by turbulent waves driven by the Farley-Buneman and gradient drift instabilities. The present work is the third in a series of laboratory experiments performed to test, under controlled conditions, prevalent...... ideas on EM scattering by equatorial and high-latitude ionospheric waves and irregularities....

  4. Eddy, drift wave and zonal flow dynamics in a linear magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, H.; Inagaki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Kosuga, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Kasuya, N.; Nagashima, Y.; Yamada, T.; Lesur, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-09-01

    Turbulence and its structure formation are universal in neutral fluids and in plasmas. Turbulence annihilates global structures but can organize flows and eddies. The mutual-interactions between flow and the eddy give basic insights into the understanding of non-equilibrium and nonlinear interaction by turbulence. In fusion plasma, clarifying structure formation by Drift-wave turbulence, driven by density gradients in magnetized plasma, is an important issue. Here, a new mutual-interaction among eddy, drift wave and flow in magnetized plasma is discovered. A two-dimensional solitary eddy, which is a perturbation with circumnavigating motion localized radially and azimuthally, is transiently organized in a drift wave - zonal flow (azimuthally symmetric band-like shear flows) system. The excitation of the eddy is synchronized with zonal perturbation. The organization of the eddy has substantial impact on the acceleration of zonal flow.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann model for collisionless electrostatic drift wave turbulence obeying Charney-Hasegawa-Mima dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Held, M

    2015-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) approach to the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima (CHM) model for adiabatic drift wave turbulence in magnetised plasmas, is implemented. The CHM-LBM model contains a barotropic equation of state for the potential, a force term including a cross-product analogous to the Coriolis force in quasigeostrophic models, and a density gradient source term. Expansion of the resulting lattice Boltzmann model equations leads to cold-ion fluid continuity and momentum equations, which resemble CHM dynamics under drift ordering. The resulting numerical solutions of standard test cases (monopole propagation, stable drift modes and decaying turbulence) are compared to results obtained by a conventional finite difference scheme that directly discretizes the CHM equation. The LB scheme resembles characteristic CHM dynamics apart from an additional shear in the density gradient direction. The occuring shear reduces with the drift ratio and is ascribed to the compressible limit of the underlying LBM.

  6. Wave Drift Forces on Two Floating Bodies Arranged Side by Side

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenyang Duan; Binbin Zhao

    2011-01-01

    An innovative hydrodynamic theory and numerical model were developed to help improve the efficiency,accuracy,and convergence of the numerical prediction of wave drift forces on two side-by-side deepwater floating bodies.The wave drift forces were expressed by the double integration of source strength and the corresponding Green function on the body surface,which is consistent with the far field formula based on momentum conservation and sharing the advantage of near field calculations providing the drift force on each body.Numerical results were validated through comparing the general far field model and pressure integral model,as well as the middle field model developed using the software HydroStar.

  7. Regulating drift-wave plasma turbulence into spatiotemporal patterns by pinning coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Panpan; Yang, Lei; Deng, Zhigang; Wang, Xingang

    2011-07-01

    Using the technique of pinning coupling in chaos control, we investigate how the two-dimensional drift-wave plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Mima equation can be regulated into different spatiotemporal patterns. It is shown both analytically and numerically that, depending on the pattern structure of the target, the pinning strength necessary for regulating the turbulence could have a large variation. More specifically, with the increase of the wave number of the target, the critical pinning strength is found to be increased by a power-law scaling. Moreover, in both the transition and transient process of the pinning regulation, the modes of the turbulence are found to be suppressed in a hierarchical fashion, that is, by the sequence of mode wave number. The findings give insight into the dynamics of drift-wave turbulence, as well as indicative to the design of new control techniques for real-world turbulence.

  8. Dynamics of Zonal FLow Instability and Saturation in Drift Wave Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katt, S. T.; Kim, E.; Diamond, P. H.

    2001-10-01

    We study generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz (GKH) instability as a saturation mechanism for a collisionless zonal flow in the background of drift waves. By treating drift waves as adiabatically modified by GKH, we investigate the modulation instability of drift waves due to GKH modes as well as the linear inflection-type instability of zonal flow. In the case where zonal flows evolve on the time scale much larger than GKH mode, GKH mode is shown to become destabilized not only by the linear instability of zonal flow but also by coupling to drift waves, with a growth rate which is enhanced over the linear value. Furthermore, the nonlinear (modulational) generation of a zonal flow is estimated to dominate over that of GKH. Our results indicate that GKH may not play an important role in a collisionless saturation of zonal flow, in contrast to [1] and [2]. The effect of temperature fluctuation will be discussed. [1] B.N. Rogers, W. Dorland, and M. Kotschenreuther, PRL, 85, 5336, (2000). [2] Y. Idomura, M. Wakatani, and S. Tokuda, PoP, 7, 3551, (2000).

  9. Geometrical effects on drift wave stability in low shear stellarator plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasim, M H; Rafiq, T; Persson, M [Department of Electromagnetics and Euratom/VR Association, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    Modern stellarators are designed with neoclassical transport in mind, potentially leading to anomalous transport originating from drift wave turbulence as the primary cause of energy and particle losses. It is therefore of interest to consider the influence of details of geometry on drift wave stability. In this paper the eigenvalue drift wave equation is therefore solved numerically in fully three-dimensional stellarator geometries using the ballooning mode formalism. The correlation between the details of the configurations such as local magnetic shear (LMS), normal curvature, geodesic curvature and magnetic field strength and the drift wave spectrum is discussed for two different stellarator configurations. A detailed discussion of the localization of the most unstable modes is presented and analysed. It is found that the most unstable modes are localized where the stabilizing effect of integrated LMS is minimum or where the coupling between the integrated LMS and geodesic curvature is strong. Since the more the modes are localized the stronger they will be influenced by the local geometrical effects, the most unstable modes are also highly localized.

  10. The role of coherent vorticity in turbulent transport in resistive drift-wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Wouter J T; Benkadda, Sadruddin; Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai; 10.1063/1.2956640

    2011-01-01

    The coherent vortex extraction method, a wavelet technique for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows, is applied to simulations of resistive drift-wave turbulence in magnetized plasma (Hasegawa-Wakatani system). The aim is to retain only the essential degrees of freedom, responsible for the transport. It is shown that the radial density flux is carried by these coherent modes. In the quasi-hydrodynamic regime, coherent vortices exhibit depletion of the polarization-drift nonlinearity and vorticity strongly dominates strain, in contrast to the quasiadiabatic regime.

  11. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface I: Wave-current coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; William, Perrie; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-06-01

    To study the electromagnetic backscattering from a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface, a fractal sea surface wave-current model is derived, based on the mechanism of wave-current interactions. The numerical results show the effect of the ocean current on the wave. Wave amplitude decreases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height increase, spectrum intensity decreases and shifts towards lower frequencies when the current occurs parallel to the direction of the ocean wave. By comparison, wave amplitude increases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height decrease, spectrum intensity increases and shifts towards higher frequencies if the current is in the opposite direction to the direction of ocean wave. The wave-current interaction effect of the ocean current is much stronger than that of the nonlinear wave-wave interaction. The kurtosis of the nonlinear fractal ocean surface is larger than that of linear fractal ocean surface. The effect of the current on skewness of the probability distribution function is negligible. Therefore, the ocean wave spectrum is notably changed by the surface current and the change should be detectable in the electromagnetic backscattering signal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Development Program of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service.

  12. Zonal flow generation and its feedback on turbulence production in drift wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pushkarev, Andrey V; Nazarenko, Sergey V

    2012-01-01

    Plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations has been simulated numerically for different models and values of the adiabaticity parameter C. It is found that for low values of C turbulence remains isotropic, zonal flows are not generated and there is no suppression of the meridional drift waves and of the particle transport. For high values of C, turbulence evolves toward highly anisotropic states with a dominant contribution of the zonal sector to the kinetic energy. This anisotropic flow leads to a decrease of a turbulence production in the meridional sector and limits the particle transport across the mean isopycnal surfaces. This behavior allows to consider the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations a minimal PDE model which contains the drift-wave/zonal-flow feedback loop prototypical of the LH transition in plasma devices.

  13. Transition from avalanche dominated transport to drift-wave dominated transport in a basic laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Compernolle, Bart; Morales, George; Maggs, James; Sydora, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Results of a basic heat transport experiment involving an off-axis heat source are presented. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. A ring-shaped electron beam source injects low energy electrons (below ionization energy) along a strong magnetic field into a preexisting, large and cold plasma. The injected electrons are thermalized by Coulomb collisions within a short distance and provide an off-axis heat source that results in a long, hollow, cylindrical region of elevated plasma pressure embedded in a colder plasma, and far from the machine walls. The off-axis source is active for a period long compared to the density decay time, i.e. as time progresses the power per particle increases. Two distinct regimes are observed to take place, an initial regime dominated by avalanches, identified as sudden intermittent rearrangements of the pressure profile, and a second regime dominated by sustained drift-Alfvén wave activity. The transition between the two regimes is sudden, affects the full radial profile and is preceded by the growth of drift Alfvén waves. Langmuir probe data will be shown on the evolution of the density, temperature and flow profiles during the transition. The character of the sustained drift wave activity will also be presented. Work supported by NSF/DOE Grant 1619505, and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, sponsored jointly by DOE and NSF.

  14. Comparison of electron drift waves in numerical and analytical tokamak equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiq, T; Anderson, J; Persson, M [Department of Electromagnetics and Euratom/VR Association, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the importance of the details of the equilibria on the stability of electron drift waves. A comparison of electrostatic electron drift waves in numerical and analytical tokamak equilibria is presented in fully three-dimensional circular and non-circular tokamaks. The numerical equilibria are obtained using the variational moments equilibrium code and the analytical equilibria used is the generalized s-alpha model. An eigenvalue equation for the model is derived using the ballooning mode formalism and solved numerically using a standard shooting technique. The stability and the localization of the electron drift wave is found to be strongly dependent on the local shear of the magnetic field. Large values of the local shear are found to be stabilizing. A disagreement in the results is found between analytical and numerical equilibria at aspect ratios of typical tokamaks, suggesting that the latter approach should be used in the transport calculations. The effects of the local shaping of the magnetic surfaces are complicated and can be both stabilizing and destabilizing, depending on the details of the equilibria.

  15. Anchoring of drifting spiral and scroll waves to impermeable inclusions in excitable media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlin, Christian W; Pertsov, Arkady M

    2012-07-20

    Anchoring of spiral and scroll waves in excitable media has attracted considerable interest in the context of cardiac arrhythmias. Here, by bombarding inclusions with drifting spiral and scroll waves, we explore the forces exerted by inclusions onto an approaching spiral and derive the equations of motion governing spiral dynamics in the vicinity of inclusion. We demonstrate that these forces nonmonotonically depend on distance and can lead to complex behavior: (a) anchoring to small but circumnavigating larger inclusions; (b) chirality-dependent anchoring.

  16. Complete classification of discrete resonant Rossby/drift wave triads on periodic domains

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, Miguel D

    2013-01-01

    We consider the set of Diophantine equations that arise in the context of the barotropic vorticity equation on periodic domains, when nonlinear wave interactions are studied to leading order in the amplitudes. The solutions to this set of Diophantine equations are of interest in atmosphere (Rossby waves) and Tokamak plasmas (drift waves), because they provide the values of the spectral wavevectors that interact resonantly via three-wave interactions. These come in "triads", i.e., groups of three wavevectors. We provide the full solution to the Diophantine equations in the case of infinite Rossby deformation radius. The method is completely new, and relies on mapping the unknown variables to rational points on quadratic forms of "Minkowski" type. Classical methods invented centuries ago by Fermat, Euler, Lagrange and Minkowski, are used to classify all solutions to our original Diophantine equations, thus providing a computational method to generate numerically all the resonant triads in the system. Our method...

  17. On the onset of surface wind drift at short fetches as observed in a wind wave flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Robles, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Ocean surface drift is of great relevance to properly model wind waves and specially the early stages of surface waves development and ocean-atmosphere fluxes during incipient wind events and storms. In particular, wave models are not so accurate predicting wave behaviour at short fetches, where wind drift onset might be very important. The onset of surface drift induced by wind and waves is being studied through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Wind stress over the water surface, waves and surface drift are measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. While momentum fluxes are estimated directly through the eddy correlation method in a station about the middle of the tank, they provide reference information to the corresponding surface drift onset recorded at rather short non-dimensional fetches. At each experimental run very low wind was on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0. Surface drift values were up to 0.5 cm/s for the highest wind while very distinctive shear was detected in the upper 1.5 cm. Rather linear variation of surface drift was observed with depth. Evolution of the surface drift velocity is analysed and onset behaviour is addressed with particular emphasis in accelerated winds. This work represents a RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793) contribution. The support from ANUIES-ECOS M09-U01 project, CONACYT-187112 Estancia Sabática, and Institute Carnot, is greatly acknowledged.

  18. Atomic physics effects on tokamak edge drift-tearing modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, T.S.

    1993-03-01

    The effects of ionization and charge exchange on the linear stability of drift-tearing modes are analytically investigated. In particular, the linear instability threshold {Delta}{sup Th}, produced by ion sound wave coupling is modified. In the strongly collisional regime, the ionization breaks up the near cancellation of the perturbed electric field and the pressure gradient along the magnetic field, and increases the threshold. In the semi-collisional regime, both ionization and charge exchange act as drag on the ion parallel velocity, and consequently decrease the threshold by reducing the effectiveness of ion sound wave propagation.

  19. Atomic physics effects on tokamak edge drift-tearing modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, T.S.

    1993-03-01

    The effects of ionization and charge exchange on the linear stability of drift-tearing modes are analytically investigated. In particular, the linear instability threshold [Delta][sup Th], produced by ion sound wave coupling is modified. In the strongly collisional regime, the ionization breaks up the near cancellation of the perturbed electric field and the pressure gradient along the magnetic field, and increases the threshold. In the semi-collisional regime, both ionization and charge exchange act as drag on the ion parallel velocity, and consequently decrease the threshold by reducing the effectiveness of ion sound wave propagation.

  20. Simulation of laser-driven plasma beat-wave propagation in collisional weakly relativistic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2016-11-01

    The process of interaction of lasers beating in a plasma has been explored by virtue of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in the presence of electron-ion collisions. A plasma beat wave is resonantly excited by ponderomotive force by two relatively long laser pulses of different frequencies. The amplitude of the plasma wave become maximum, when the difference in the frequencies is equal to the plasma frequency. We propose to demonstrate the energy transfer between the laser beat wave and the plasma wave in the presence of electron-ion collision in nearly relativistic regime with 2D-PIC simulations. The relativistic effect and electron-ion collision both affect the energy transfer between the interacting waves. The finding of simulation results shows that there is a considerable decay in the plasma wave and the field energy over time in the presence of electron-ion collisions.

  1. Modulational Instability of Dust Ion Acoustic Waves in a Collisional Dusty Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUEJu-Kui

    2003-01-01

    The modulational instability of dust ion accoustic waves in a dust plasma with ion-dust collision effects is studied.Using the perturbation method,a modified nonlinear Schroedinger equation contains a damping term that comes from the effect of the ion-dust collision is derived.It is found that the inclusion of the ion-dust collision would modify the modulational instability of the wave packet and could not admit any stationary envelope solitary waves.

  2. Wave Grouping of a Drifting Spiral Wave in the Presence of an External Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hu-Jiang; YANG Jun-Zhong; HU Gang

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenon of wave grouping, in which the dense waves and the sparse waves can form groups in front of the spiral tip when the spiral wave is meandering, has been reported in a chemical reaction system recently. We present a method to realize the phenomenon of wave grouping by applying an external field to the system. The numerical simulations are carried out on the basis of the FitzHugh-Nagumo equations.

  3. Effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth on Stokes drift estimation based on short-term variation of wave conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrhaug, Dag; Wang, Hong; Holmedal, Lars Erik

    2016-04-01

    The Stokes drift represents an important transport component of ocean circulation models. Locally it is responsible for transport of e.g. contaminated ballast water from ships, oil spills, plankton and larvae. It also plays an important role in mixing processes across the interphase between the atmosphere and the ocean. The Stokes drift is the mean Lagrangian velocity obtained from the water particle trajectory in the wave propagation direction; it is maximum at the surface, decreasing rapidly with the depth below the surface. The total mean mass transport is obtained by integrating the Stokes drift over the water depth; this is also referred to as the volume Stokes transport. The paper provides a simple analytical method which can be used to give estimates of the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth based on short-term variation of wave conditions. This is achieved by using a joint distribution of individual wave heights and wave periods together with an explicit solution of the wave dispersion equation. The mean values of the surface Stokes drift and the volume Stokes transport for individual random waves within a sea state are presented, and the effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth parameter are discussed. Furthermore, example of results corresponding to typical field conditions are presented to demonstrate the application of the method, including the Stokes drift profile in the water column beneath the surface. Thus, the present analytical method can be used to estimate the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth for random waves within a sea state based on available wave statistics.

  4. Impact of the Collisional Plasma on the Propagation of Millimeter Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁忠才; 时家明; 汪家春; 许波

    2004-01-01

    The plasma generated in the low-altitude atmosphere is of high collision frequencies.In this paper, the transmission coefficients of millimeter(MM) waves normally incident upon the plasma with high collision frequencies are calculated and analyzed. The experimental results of reflection and attenuation are presented for the eight-millimeter waves propagating through the plasma. Both the calculated experimental results indicate that the MM-waves concerned are attenuated significantly and reflected weakly, when propagating through the plasma of high collision frequencies.

  5. Predator prey oscillations in a simple cascade model of drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berionni, V.; Guercan, Oe. D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    A reduced three shell limit of a simple cascade model of drift wave turbulence, which emphasizes nonlocal interactions with a large scale mode, is considered. It is shown to describe both the well known predator prey dynamics between the drift waves and zonal flows and to reduce to the standard three wave interaction equations. Here, this model is considered as a dynamical system whose characteristics are investigated. The analytical solutions for the purely nonlinear limit are given in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions. An approximate analytical solution involving Jacobi elliptic functions and exponential growth is computed using scale separation for the case of unstable solutions that are observed when the energy injection rate is high. The fixed points of the system are determined, and the behavior around these fixed points is studied. The system is shown to display periodic solutions corresponding to limit cycle oscillations, apparently chaotic phase space orbits, as well as unstable solutions that grow slowly while oscillating rapidly. The period doubling route to transition to chaos is examined.

  6. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M F; Vranjes, J

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vph-vf0)exp[-(vph-vf0)2], where vf0 is the flow speed and vph is the phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf0vph.

  7. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population

    CERN Document Server

    Bashir, M F

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vph-vf0) exp[-(vph-vf0)^2], where vf0 is the flow speed and vph phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf0 < vph.

  8. Drift and breakup of spiral waves in reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfilov, A V; Keldermann, R H; Nash, M P

    2007-05-08

    Rotating spiral waves organize excitation in various biological, physical, and chemical systems. They underpin a variety of important phenomena, such as cardiac arrhythmias, morphogenesis processes, and spatial patterns in chemical reactions. Important insights into spiral wave dynamics have been obtained from theoretical studies of the reaction-diffusion (RD) partial differential equations. However, most of these studies have ignored the fact that spiral wave rotation is often accompanied by substantial deformations of the medium. Here, we show that joint consideration of the RD equations with the equations of continuum mechanics for tissue deformations (RD-mechanics systems), yield important effects on spiral wave dynamics. We show that deformation can induce the breakup of spiral waves into complex spatiotemporal patterns. We also show that mechanics leads to spiral wave drift throughout the medium approaching dynamical attractors, which are determined by the parameters of the model and the size of the medium. We study mechanisms of these effects and discuss their applicability to the theory of cardiac arrhythmias. Overall, we demonstrate the importance of RD-mechanics systems for mathematics applied to life sciences.

  9. Three-Dimensional Dust-Acoustic Waves in a Collisional Dusty Plasma with Opposite Polarity Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Mai-Mai; DUAN Wen-Shan

    2005-01-01

    The dispersion relation is derived for three-dimensional dust-acoustic waves in a current-driven dusty plasmas with both positively and negatively charged dust particles. The dependencies of the frequency and the growth rate on the wave number K, the intensity of magnetic field B, and the inclination angle θ have been numerically shown in this paper. The growth rate is negative for the laboratory dusty plasma, but it is positive for the cosmic dusty plasma.It is found that when the inclination angle θ = π/2, there is no instability. The effect of the electrostatic field E0 has also been studied in this paper.

  10. Lower hybrid frequency range waves generated by ion polarization drift due to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves: Analysis of an event observed by the Van Allen Probe B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Boardsen, S.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Engebretson, M. J.; Sibeck, D.; Chen, S.; Breneman, A.

    2017-01-01

    We analyze a wave event that occurred near noon between 07:03 and 07:08 UT on 23 February 2014 detected by the Van Allen Probes B spacecraft, where waves in the lower hybrid frequency range (LHFR) and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are observed to be highly correlated, with Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86. We assume that the correlation is the result of LHFR wave generation by the ions' polarization drift in the electric field of the EMIC waves. To check this assumption the drift velocities of electrons and H+, He+, and O+ ions in the measured EMIC wave electric field were modeled. Then the LHFR wave linear instantaneous growth rates for plasma with these changing drift velocities and different plasma compositions were calculated. The time distribution of these growth rates, their frequency distribution, and the frequency dependence of the ratio of the LHFR wave power spectral density (PSD) parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field to the total PSD were found. These characteristics of the growth rates were compared with the corresponding characteristics of the observed LHFR activity. Reasonable agreement between these features and the strong correlation between EMIC and LHFR energy densities support the assumption that the LHFR wave generation can be caused by the ions' polarization drift in the electric field of an EMIC wave.

  11. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on secondary structures in drift-wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leconte, M. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, California 92093 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Recent experiments showed a decrease of long range correlations during the application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) [Y. Xu et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 063020 (2011)]. This finding suggests that RMPs damp zonal flows. To elucidate the effect of the RMPs on zonal structures in drift wave turbulence, we construct a generalized Hasegawa-Wakatani model including RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large RMP amplitude. A predator-prey model coupling the primary drift wave dynamics to the zonal modes evolution is derived. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. The novel regime has a power threshold which increases with RMP amplitude as {gamma}{sub c}{approx}[({delta}B{sub r}/B)]{sup 2}.

  12. Plasma-Maser Instability of the Electromagnetic Radiation In The Presence Of Electrostatic Drift Wave Turbulence in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahinder Singh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The generation mechanism of the electromagnetic radiation in case of inhomogeneous plasma on the basis of plasma-maser interaction in presence of drift wave turbulence is studied. The drift wave turbulence is taken as the low-frequency mode field and is found to be strongly in phase relation with thermal particles and may transfer its wave energy nonlinearly through a modulated field of high-frequency extraordinary mode (X-mode wave. It has been found that amplification of X-mode wave is possible at the expense of drift wave turbulent energy. This type of high-frequency instability can leads to auroral kilometric radiation (AKR. The growth rate of the X-mode wave, in the form of AKR, has been calculated with the involvement of spatial density gradient parameter. This result may be particularly important for stability of various drift modes in magnetically confined plasma as well as for transport of momentum and energy in such inhomogeneous plasma

  13. Collisional-inhomogeneity-induced generation of matter-wave dark solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-4515 (United States); Kevrekidis, P.G., E-mail: kevrekid@gmail.co [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-4515 (United States); Horikis, T.P. [Department of Mathematics, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Frantzeskakis, D.J. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 15784 (Greece)

    2010-08-16

    We propose an experimentally relevant protocol for the controlled generation of matter-wave dark solitons in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). In particular, using direct numerical simulations, we show that by switching-on a spatially inhomogeneous (step-like) change of the s-wave scattering length, it is possible to generate a controllable number of dark solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional BEC. A similar phenomenology is also found in the two-dimensional setting of 'disk-shaped' BECs but, as the solitons are subject to the snaking instability, they decay into vortex structures. A detailed investigation of how the parameters involved affect the emergence and evolution of solitons and vortices is provided.

  14. Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

  15. Attenuation characteristics of electromagnetic waves in a weak collisional and fully ionized dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Li; Guo, Li-Xin; Li, Jiang-Ting; Chen, Wei; Yan, Xu; Huang, Qing-Qing

    2017-09-01

    The expression of complex dielectric permittivity for non-magnetized fully ionized dusty plasma is obtained based on the kinetic equation in the Fokker-Planck-Landau collision model and the charging equation of the statistical theory. The influences of density, average size of dust grains, and balanced charging of the charge number of dust particles on the attenuation properties of electromagnetic waves in fully ionized dusty plasma are investigated by calculating the attenuation constant. In addition, the attenuation characteristics of weakly ionized and fully ionized dusty plasmas are compared. Results enriched the physical mechanisms of microwave attenuation for fully ionized dusty plasma and provide a theoretical basis for future studies.

  16. Effects of electron drift on the collisionless damping of kinetic Alfv\\'en waves in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Yuguang; Chen, Christopher H K; Salem, Chadi S; Verscharen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The collisionless dissipation of anisotropic Alfv\\'enic turbulence is a promising candidate to solve the solar wind heating problem. Extensive studies examined the kinetic properties of Alfv\\'en waves in simple Maxwellian or bi-Maxwellian plasmas. However, the observed electron velocity distribution functions in the solar wind are more complex. In this study, we analyze the properties of kinetic Alfv\\'en waves in a plasma with two drifting electron populations. We numerically solve the linearized Maxwell-Vlasov equations and find that the damping rate and the proton-electron energy partition for kinetic Alfv\\'en waves are significantly modified in such plasmas, compared to plasmas without electron drifts. We suggest that electron drift is an important factor to take into account when considering the dissipation of Alfv\\'enic turbulence in the solar wind or other $\\beta \\sim 1$ astrophysical plasmas.

  17. Seismic architecture and morphology of Neogenic sediment waves and drifts, offshore West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglioni, Luca; Bonamini, Enrico

    2013-04-01

    The three dimension visualisation softwares of seismic data and the recent development of semi-automatic interpretation tools allow to define the 3D morphology of ancient depositional systems at a resolution never achieved before. This study analyses a Neogenic stratigraphic interval in the deep water of the West African margin. The purpose of the work is the understanding of the sedimentary architectures and the link with the genetic depositional processes. The study is mainly based on the interpretation of seismic geometries and amplitude/isochron maps derived from newly-interpreted seismic horizons. The seismic stratigraphy reveals abrupt changes in depositional styles and sedimentary processes. Transitions between Sediment Drifts (SD), Sediment Waves (SWs) and Mass Transport Complexes (MTCs) are here frequently observed, suggesting that cyclically either bottom-current intensity decreased or gravity-flow input overwhelmed the bottom-current signal. The lower studied interval corresponds to a SD sequence, made up of stacked individual packages and having a maximum thickness of 300 ms. The landward drift morphology is characterized by convex-upward, mounded seismic reflections. Each drift onlaps on a seaward-dipping reflection interpreted as paleo-slope. These contouritic deposits are concentrated near the base of slope, and fade out downdip. The drift appears to be grown from the deeper part of the basin and backstepped up the slope. It is inferred that the deposition of the drifts took place under the influence of a marine current, subparallel to the southern margin of West African coast. The backstepping of the onlapping architecture may have resulted from bottom current acceleration across the ramp. The intermediate studied interval represents a transitional sequence in which SW are alternated with MTDs of minor size (up to 60 ms thick). In this transition interval, onlap relationships and thickness variations suggest that gravity flow deposits preferentially

  18. Excitation of kinetic geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves in nonuniform plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Z. [Inst. Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chen, L. [Inst. Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou 310027 (China); Dept. Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of California, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States); Zonca, F. [Inst. Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou 310027 (China); Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.P. 65 - I-00044 - Frascati (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Effects of system nonuniformities and kinetic dispersiveness on the spontaneous excitation of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) by Drift Wave (DW) turbulence are investigated based on nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. The coupled nonlinear equations describing parametric decay of DW into GAM and DW lower sideband are derived and then solved both analytically and numerically to investigate the effects on the parametric decay process due to system nonuniformities, such as nonuniform diamagnetic frequency, finite radial envelope of DW pump, and kinetic dispersiveness. It is found that the parametric decay process is a convective instability for typical tokamak parameters when finite group velocities of DW and GAM associated with kinetic dispersiveness and finite radial envelope are taken into account. When, however, nonuniformity of diamagnetic frequency is taken into account, the parametric decay process becomes, time asymptotically, a quasi-exponentially growing absolute instability.

  19. Precursor wave structure, prereversal vertical drift, and their relative roles in the development of post sunset equatorial spread-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil; Sobral, José; alam Kherani, Esfhan; Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of large-scale wave structure in the equatorial bottomside F region that are present during daytime as precursor to post sunset development of the spread F/plasma bubble irregularities are investigated in this paper. Digisonde data from three equatorial sites in Brazil (Fortaleza, Sao Luis and Cachimbo) for a period of few months at low to medium/high solar activity phases are analyzed. Small amplitude oscillations in the F layer true heights, representing wave structure in polarization electric field, are identified as upward propagating gravity waves having zonal scale of a few hundred kilometers. Their amplitudes undergo amplification towards sunset, and depending on the amplitude of the prereversal vertical drift (PRE) they may lead to post sunset generation of ESF/plasma bubble irregularities. On days of their larger amplitudes they appear to occur in phase coherence on all days, and correspondingly the PRE vertical drift velocities are larger than on days of the smaller amplitudes of the wave structure that appear at random phase on the different days. The sustenance of these precursor waves structures is supported by the relatively large ratio (approaching unity) of the F region-to- total field line integrated Pedersen conductivities as calculated using the SUPIM simulation of the low latitude ionosphere. This study examines the role of the wave structure relative to that of the prereversal vertical drift in the post sunset spread F irregularity development.

  20. The acoustic instabilities in magnetized collisional dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B. P., E-mail: birendra.pandey@mq.edu.au [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Vladimirov, S. V., E-mail: s.vladimirov@physics.usyd.edu.au [Metamaterials Laboratory, National Research University of Information Technology, Mechanics, and Optics, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Dwivedi, C. B., E-mail: jagatpurdwivedi@gmail.com [Ved–Vijnanam Pravartanam Samitihi, Pratapgarh (Awadh), Jagatpur, Bharat (India)

    2014-09-15

    The present work investigates the wave propagation in collisional dusty plasmas in the presence of electric and magnetic field. It is shown that the dust ion-acoustic waves may become unstable to the reactive instability whereas dust-acoustic waves may suffer from both reactive and dissipative instabilities. If the wave phase speed is smaller than the plasma drift speed, the instability is of reactive type whereas in the opposite case, the instability becomes dissipative in nature. Plasma in the vicinity of dust may also become unstable to reactive instability with the instability sensitive to the dust material: dielectric dust may considerably quench this instability. This has implications for the dust charging and the use of dust as a probe in the plasma sheath.

  1. Rossby and Drift Wave Turbulence and Zonal Flows: the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, Colm; Quinn, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    A detailed study of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions is presented. These simple nonlinear partial differential equations suggested for both Rossby waves in the atmosphere and also drift waves in a magnetically-confined plasma exhibit some remarkable and nontrivial properties, which in their qualitative form survive in more realistic and complicated models, and as such form a conceptual basis for understanding the turbulence and zonal flow dynamics in real plasma and geophysical systems. Two idealised scenarios of generation of zonal flows by small-scale turbulence are explored: a modulational instability and turbulent cascades. A detailed study of the generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability reveals that the dynamics of this zonal flow generation mechanism differ widely depending on the initial degree of nonlinearity. A numerical proof is provided for the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence -zonostrophy and the invariant cascades are shown to be characterised...

  2. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  3. Drift waves in the corona: heating and acceleration of ions at frequencies far below the gyro frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Vranjes, J

    2010-01-01

    In the solar corona, several mechanisms of the drift wave instability can make the mode growing up to amplitudes at which particle acceleration and stochastic heating by the drift wave take place. The stochastic heating, well known from laboratory plasma physics where it has been confirmed in numerous experiments, has been completely ignored in past studies of coronal heating. However, in the present study and in our very recent works it has been shown that the inhomogeneous coronal plasma is, in fact, a perfect environment for fast growing drift waves. As a matter of fact, the large growth rates are typically of the same order as the plasma frequency. The consequent heating rates may exceed the required values for a sustained coronal heating by several orders of magnitude. Some aspects of these phenomena are investigated here. In particular the analysis of the particle dynamics within the growing wave is compared with the corresponding fluid analysis. While both of them predict the stochastic heating, the th...

  4. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state.

  5. Observational evidence for Hall drift and Hall waves in the crusts of isolated young neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The observed long-term spin-down evolution of isolated radio pulsars cannot be explained by the standard magnetic dipole radiation with a constant braking torque. However how and why the torque varies still remains controversial, which is an outstanding problem in our understanding of neutron stars. Many pulsars have been observed with significant long-term changes of their spin-down rates modulated by quasi-periodic oscillations. Applying the phenomenological model of pulsar timing noise we developed recently to the observed precise pulsar timing data, here we show that, the Hall drift and Hall waves in their crusts are responsible for the observed long-term evolution of the spin-down rates and their quasi-periodic modulations, respectively. Consequently the majority of dipolar magnetic field lines are restricted to their outer crusts, rather than penetrating the cores of the neutron stars. Understanding of the nature of pulsar timing noise not only reveals the interior physics of neutron stars, but also all...

  6. Dynamics of zonal flow saturation in strong collisionless drift wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-jin; Diamond, P. H.

    2002-11-01

    Generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz (GKH) instability is examined as a mechanism for the saturation of zonal flows in the collisionless regime. By focusing on strong turbulence regimes, GKH instability is analyzed in the presence of a background of finite-amplitude drift waves. A detailed study of a simple model with cold ions shows that nonlinear excitation of GKH modes via modulational instability can be comparable to their linear generation. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that zonal flows are likely to grow faster than GKH mode near marginality, with insignificant turbulent viscous damping by linear GKH. The effect of finite ion temperature fluctuations is incorporated in a simple toroidal ion temperature gradient model, within which both zonal flow and temperature are generated by modulational instability. The phase between the two is calculated self-consistently and shown to be positive. Furthermore, the correction to nonlinear generation of GKH modes appears to be small, being of order O(ρi2k2). Thus, the role of linear GKH instability in the saturation of collisionless zonal flows, in general, seems dubious.

  7. Impact of resonant magnetic perturbations on nonlinearly driven modes in drift-wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leconte, M. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI (Korea, Republic of); CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we study the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows, and confinement in the framework of resistive drift wave turbulence. We extend the Hasegawa-Wakatani model to include RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large ({delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}). Both the vorticity flux (Reynolds stress) and particle flux are modulated. We derive an extended predator prey model which couples zonal potential and density dynamics to the evolution of turbulence intensity. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. We find states that are similar to the ZF-dominated state of the standard predator-prey model, but for which the power threshold is now a function of the RMP strength. For small RMP amplitude, the energy of zonal flows decreases and the turbulence energy increases with ({delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}), corresponding to a damping of zonal flows.

  8. Acute amiodarone promotes drift and early termination of spiral wave re-entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Harumichi; Honjo, Haruo; Ishiguro, Yuko S; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Okuno, Yusuke; Harada, Masahide; Takanari, Hiroki; Sakuma, Ichiro; Kamiya, Kaichiro; Kodama, Itsuo

    2010-07-01

    Intravenous application of amiodarone is commonly used in the treatment of life-threatening arrhythmias, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the acute effects of amiodarone on spiral wave (SW) re-entry, the primary organization machinery of ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF), in comparison with lidocaine. A two-dimensional ventricular myocardial layer was obtained from 24 Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts, and epicardial excitations were analyzed by high-resolution optical mapping. During basic stimulation, amiodarone (5 microM) caused prolongation of action potential duration (APD) by 5.6%-9.1%, whereas lidocaine (15 microM) caused APD shortening by 5.0%-6.4%. Amiodarone and lidocaine reduced conduction velocity similarly. Ventricular tachycardias induced by DC stimulation in the presence of amiodarone were of shorter duration (sustained-VTs >30 s/total VTs: 2/58, amiodarone vs 13/52, control), whereas those with lidocaine were of longer duration (22/73, lidocaine vs 14/58, control). Amiodarone caused prolongation of VT cycle length and destabilization of SW re-entry, which is characterized by marked prolongation of functional block lines, frequent wavefront-tail interactions near the rotation center, and considerable drift, leading to its early annihilation via collision with anatomical boundaries. Spiral wave re-entry in the presence of lidocaine was more stabilized than in control. In the anisotropic ventricular myocardium, amiodarone destabilizes SW re-entry facilitating its early termination. Lidocaine, in contrast, stabilizes SW re-entry resulting in its persistence.

  9. Spatial structure and dispersion of drift mirror waves coupled with Alfvén waves in a 1-D inhomogeneous plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Klimushkin

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper employs the frame of a 1-D inhomogeneous model of space plasma,to examine the spatial structure and growth rate of drift mirror modes, often suggested for interpreting some oscillation types in space plasma. Owing to its coupling with the Alfvén mode, the drift mirror mode attains dispersion across magnetic shells (dependence of the frequency on the wave-vector's radial component, kr. The spatial structure of a mode confined across magnetic shells is studied. The scale of spatial localization of the wave is shown to be determined by the plasma inhomogeneity scale and by the azimuthal component of the wave vector. The wave propagates across magnetic shells, its amplitude modulated along the radial coordinate by the Gauss function. Coupling with the Alfvén mode strongly influences the growth rate of the drift mirror instability. The mirror mode can only exist in a narrow range of parameters. In the general case, the mode represents an Alfvén wave modified by plasma inhomogeneity.

  10. A statistical study of gyro-averaging effects in a reduced model of drift-wave transport

    CERN Document Server

    da Fonseca, J D; Sokolov, M; Caldas, I L

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on transport driven by electrostatic drift-waves is presented. The study is based on a reduced discrete Hamiltonian dynamical system known as the gyro-averaged standard map (GSM). In this system, FLR effects are incorporated through the gyro-averaging of a simplified weak-turbulence model of electrostatic fluctuations. Formally, the GSM is a modified version of the standard map in which the perturbation amplitude, $K_0$, becomes $K_0 J_0(\\hat{\\rho})$, where $J_0$ is the zeroth-order Bessel function and $\\hat{\\rho}$ is the Larmor radius. Assuming a Maxwellian probability density function (pdf) for $\\hat{\\rho}$, we compute analytically and numerically the pdf and the cumulative distribution function of the effective drift-wave perturbation amplitude $K_0 J_0(\\hat{\\rho})$. Using these results we compute the probability of loss of confinement (i.e., global chaos), $P_{c}$, and the probability of trapping in the main drift-wave resonance, $P_{t}$. It is sho...

  11. A statistical study of gyro-averaging effects in a reduced model of drift-wave transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, J. D.; del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Sokolov, I. M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-08-01

    A statistical study of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on transport driven by electrostatic drift-waves is presented. The study is based on a reduced discrete Hamiltonian dynamical system known as the gyro-averaged standard map (GSM). In this system, FLR effects are incorporated through the gyro-averaging of a simplified weak-turbulence model of electrostatic fluctuations. Formally, the GSM is a modified version of the standard map in which the perturbation amplitude, K0, becomes K0J0(ρ ̂ ) , where J0 is the zeroth-order Bessel function and ρ ̂ is the Larmor radius. Assuming a Maxwellian probability density function (pdf) for ρ ̂ , we compute analytically and numerically the pdf and the cumulative distribution function of the effective drift-wave perturbation amplitude K0J0(ρ ̂ ) . Using these results, we compute the probability of loss of confinement (i.e., global chaos), Pc, and the probability of trapping in the main drift-wave resonance, Pt. It is shown that Pc provides an upper bound for the escape rate, and that Pt provides a good estimate of the particle trapping rate. The analytical results are compared with direct numerical Monte-Carlo simulations of particle transport.

  12. Validation study of a drift-wave turbulence model for CSDX linear plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, P.; Holland, C.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2017-09-01

    A validation study of self-regulating drift-wave turbulence/zonal flow dynamics in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment linear plasma device using Langmuir probe synthetic diagnostics is presented in this paper. We use a set of nonlocal 3D equations, which evolve density, vorticity, and electron temperature fluctuations, and include proper sheath boundary conditions. Nonlinear simulations of these equations are carried out using BOUndary Turbulence (BOUT++) framework. To identify the dominant parametric dependencies of the model, a linear growth rate sensitivity analysis is performed using input parameter uncertainties, which are taken from the experimental measurements. For the direct comparison of nonlinear simulation results to experiment, we use synthetic Langmuir probe diagnostics to generate a set of synthetic ion saturation current and floating potential fluctuations. In addition, comparisons of azimuthal velocities determined via time-delay estimation, and nonlinear energy transfer are shown. We observe a significant improvement of model-experiment agreement relative to the previous 2D simulations. An essential component of this improved agreement is found to be the effect of electron temperature fluctuations on floating potential measurements, which introduces clear amplitude and phase shifts relative to the plasma potential fluctuations in synthetically measured quantities, where the simulations capture the experimental measurements in the core of plasma. However, the simulations overpredict the fluctuation levels at larger radii. Moreover, systematic simulation scans show that the self-generated E × B zonal flows profile is very sensitive to the steepening of density equilibrium profile. This suggests that evolving both fluctuations and equilibrium profiles, along with the inclusion of modest axial variation of radial profiles in the model are needed for further improvement of simulation results against the experimental measurements.

  13. Simulating the effects of stellarator geometry on gyrokinetic drift-wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgaertel, Jessica Ann

    Nuclear fusion is a clean, safe form of energy with abundant fuel. In magnetic fusion energy (MFE) experiments, the plasma fuel is confined by magnetic fields at very high temperatures and densities. One fusion reactor design is the non-axisymmetric, torus-shaped stellarator. Its fully-3D fields have advantages over the simpler, better-understood axisymmetric tokamak, including the ability to optimize magnetic configurations for desired properties, such as lower transport (longer confinement time). Turbulence in the plasma can break MFE confinement. While turbulent transport is known to cause a significant amount of heat loss in tokamaks, it is a new area of research in stellarators. Gyrokinetics is a good mathematical model of the drift-wave instabilities that cause turbulence. Multiple gyrokinetic turbulence codes that had great success comparing to tokamak experiments are being converted for use with stellarator geometry. This thesis describes such adaptations of the gyrokinetic turbulence code, GS2. Herein a new computational grid generator and upgrades to GS2 itself are described, tested, and benchmarked against three other gyrokinetic codes. Using GS2, detailed linear studies using the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) geometry were conducted. The first compares stability in two equilibria with different β=(plasma pressure)/(magnetic pressure). Overall, the higher β case was more stable than the lower β case. As high β is important for MFE experiments, this is encouraging. The second compares NCSX linear stability to a tokamak case. NCSX was more stable with a 20% higher critical temperature gradient normalized by the minor radius, suggesting that the fusion power might be enhanced by ˜ 50%. In addition, the first nonlinear, non-axisymmetric GS2 simulations are presented. Finally, linear stability of two locations in a W7-AS plasma were compared. The experimentally-measured parameters used were from a W7-AS shot in which measured heat fluxes

  14. Second coordinate readout in drift chambers by timing of the electromagnetic wave propagating along the anode wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boie, R.A.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Xi, D.M.

    1980-11-01

    The feasibility of using an anode wire and surrounding electrodes in drift chambers as a transmission line for second coordinate readout has been studied. The method is based on propagation of the electromagnetic wave along the anode wire is determined by measurement, in an optimized electronic readout system, of the time difference between the arrivals of the signal to the ends of the wire. The resolution obtained on long wires (approx. 2 meters) is about 2 cm FWHM for minimum ionizing particles at a gas gain of approx. = 10/sup 5/.

  15. Morning sector drift-bounce resonance driven ULF waves observed in artificially-induced HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Baddeley

    Full Text Available HF radar backscatter, which has been artificially-induced by a high power RF facility such as the EISCAT heater at Tromsø, has provided coherent radar ionospheric electric field data of unprecedented temporal resolution and accuracy. Here such data are used to investigate ULF wave processes observed by both the CUTLASS HF radars and the EISCAT UHF radar. Data from the SP-UK-OUCH experiment have revealed small-scale (high azimuthal wave number, m -45 waves, predominantly in the morning sector, thought to be brought about by the drift-bounce resonance processes. Conjugate observations from the Polar CAM-MICE instrument indicate the presence of a non-Maxwellian ion distribution function. Further statistical analysis has been undertaken, using the Polar TIMAS instrument, to reveal the prevalence and magnitude of the non-Maxwellian energetic particle populations thought to be responsible for generating these wave types.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; wave-particle interactions Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities

  16. Spatial localization and azimuthal wave numbers of Alfvén waves generated by drift-bounce resonance in the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Mager

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial localization and azimuthal wave numbers m of poloidal Alfvén waves generated by energetic particles in the magnetosphere are studied in the paper. There are two factors that cause the wave localization across magnetic shells. First, the instability growth rate is proportional to the distribution function of the energetic particles, hence waves must be predominantly generated on magnetic shells where the particles are located. Second, the frequency of the generated poloidal wave must coincide with the poloidal eigenfrequency, which is a function of the radial coordinate. The combined impact of these two factors also determines the azimuthal wave number of the generated oscillations. The beams with energies about 10 keV and 150 keV are considered. As a result, the waves are shown to be strongly localized across magnetic shells; for the most often observed second longitudinal harmonic of poloidal Alfvén wave (N=2, the localization region is about one Earth radius across the magnetic shells. It is shown that the drift-bounce resonance condition does not select the m value for this harmonic. For 10 keV particles (most often involved in the explanation of poloidal pulsations, the azimuthal wave number was shown to be determined with a rather low accuracy, -100<m<0. The 150 keV particles provide a little better but still a poor determination of this value, -90<m<-70. For the fundamental harmonic (N=1, the azimuthal wave number is determined with a better accuracy, but both of these numbers are too small (if the waves are generated by 150 keV particles, or the waves are generated on magnetic shells (in 10 keV case which are too far away. The calculated values of γ/ω are not large enough to overcome the damping on the ionosphere. All these have cast some suspicion on the possibility of the drift-bounce instability to generate poloidal pulsations in the magnetosphere.

  17. Two corrections to the drift-wave kinetic equation in the context of zonal-flow physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, D E; Shi, E L; Dodin, I Y

    2016-01-01

    The drift-wave (DW) kinetic equation, that is commonly used in studies of zonal flows (ZF), excludes the exchange of enstrophy between DW and ZF and also effects beyond the geometrical-optics limit. Using the quasilinear approximation of the generalized Hasegawa--Mima model, we propose a modified theory that accounts for these effects within a wave kinetic equation (WKE) of the Wigner--Moyal type, which is commonly known in quantum mechanics. In the geometrical-optics limit, this theory features additional terms beyond the traditional WKE that ensure exact conservation of the \\textit{total} enstrophy and energy in the DW-ZF system. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the importance of these additional terms. The proposed theory can be viewed as a reformulation of the second-order cumulant expansion (also known as the CE2) in a more intuitive manner, namely, in terms of canonical phase-space variables.

  18. Impact of resonant magnetic perturbations on zonal modes, drift-wave turbulence and the L-H transition threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, M.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows and confinement in the framework of resistive drift-wave turbulence. This work was motivated, in parts, by experiments reported at the IAEA 2010 conference (Xu et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 062030) which showed a decrease of long-range correlations during the application of RMPs. We derive and apply a zero-dimensional predator-prey model coupling the drift-wave-zonal-mode system (Leconte and Diamond 2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 055903) to the evolution of mean quantities. This model has both density-gradient drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. This model allows a description of the full L-H transition evolution with RMPs, including the mean sheared flow evolution. The key results are the following: (i) the L-I and I-H power thresholds both increase with RMP amplitude |\\tilde b_x| , the relative increase of the L-I threshold scales as \\Delta P_LI \\propto |\\tilde b_x|^2 \

  19. Impact of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations on Zonal Modes, Drift-Wave Turbulence and the L-H Transition Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Leconte, M; Xu, Y

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows and confinement in the framework of resistive drift-wave turbulence. This work was motivated, in parts, by experiments reported at the IAEA 2010 conference [Y. Xu {\\it et al}, Nucl. Fusion \\textbf{51}, 062030] which showed a decrease of long-range correlations during the application of RMPs. We derive and apply a zero-dimensional predator-prey model coupling the Drift-Wave Zonal Mode system [M. Leconte and P.H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas \\textbf{19}, 055903] to the evolution of mean quantities. This model has both density gradient drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. This model allows a description of the full L-H transition evolution with RMPs, including the mean sheared flow evolution. The key results are: i) The L-I and I-H power thresholds \\emph{both} increase with RMP amplitude $|\\bx|$, the relative increase of the L-I threshold scales as $\\D...

  20. Collisional Effects on Nonlinear Ion Drag Force for Small Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, I H

    2013-01-01

    The ion drag force arising from plasma flow past an embedded spherical grain is calculated self-consistently and non-linearly using particle in cell codes, accounting for ion-neutral collisions. Using ion velocity distribution appropriate for ion drift driven by a force field gives wake potential and force greatly different from a shifted Maxwellian distribution, regardless of collisionality. The low-collisionality forces are shown to be consistent with estimates based upon cross-sections for scattering in a Yukawa (shielded) grain field, but only if non-linear shielding length is used. Finite collisionality initially enhances the drag force, but only by up to a factor of 2. Larger collisionality eventually reduces the drag force. In the collisional regime, the drift distribution gives larger drag than the shift distribution even at velocities where their collisionless drags are equal. Comprehensive practical analytic formulas for force that fit the calculations are provided.

  1. Effect of nonplanar geometry on ion acoustic solitary waves in presence of ionization in collisional dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Samiran [College of Textile Technology, Berhampore 742101, Murshidabad, West Bengal (India)]. E-mail: sran_g@yahoo.com

    2005-04-11

    It has been found that the dust ion acoustic solitary wave (DIASW) is governed by a modified form of Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation modified by the effects of ionization, particle collisions and bounded nonplanar geometry. Approximate analytical time evolution solution and also the numerical solution of modified form of KdV equation reveal that the wave amplitude grows exponentially with time due to ionization, whereas the bounded nonplanar geometry and collision reduce the instability growth rate.

  2. Drift and breakup of spiral waves in reaction–diffusion–mechanics systems

    OpenAIRE

    Panfilov, A. V.; Keldermann, R.H.; Nash, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Rotating spiral waves organize excitation in various biological, physical, and chemical systems. They underpin a variety of important phenomena, such as cardiac arrhythmias, morphogenesis processes, and spatial patterns in chemical reactions. Important insights into spiral wave dynamics have been obtained from theoretical studies of the reaction–diffusion (RD) partial differential equations. However, most of these studies have ignored the fact that spiral wave rotation is often accompanied by...

  3. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyarzabal, R.S. [Pós-Graduação em Ciências/Física, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Szezech, J.D. [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Batista, A.M., E-mail: antoniomarcosbatista@gmail.com [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, S.L.T. de [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, 36420-000, Ouro Branco, MG (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05315-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Viana, R.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sanjuán, M.A.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipán s/n, 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-22

    Highlights: • We consider a situation for which a chaotic transient is present in the dynamics of the two-wave model with damping. • The damping in plasma models can be a way for study a realistic behavior of confinement due the collisional effect. • The escape time as a function of the damping obey a power-law scaling. • We have made a qualitative transport analysis with a simple model that can be useful for more complete models. • We have shown that the pattern of the basin of attraction depends on the damping parameter. - Abstract: We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  4. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Centre for Magnetic Fusion Theory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Weiland, J.; Zang, Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2013-10-15

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport.

  5. Spiral wave drift and complex-oscillatory spiral waves caused by heterogeneities in two-dimensional in vitro cardiac tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sung-Jae; Hong, Jin Hee; Kim, Tae Yun; Bae, Byung Wook; Lee, Kyoung J [CRI Center for Neurodynamics and Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kyoung@nld.korea.ac.kr

    2008-01-15

    Understanding spiral reentry wave dynamics in cardiac systems is important since it underlies various cardiac arrhythmia including cardiac fibrillation. Primary cultures of dissociated cardiac cells have been a convenient and useful system for studying cardiac wave dynamics, since one can carry out systematic and quantitative studies with them under well-controlled environments. One key drawback of the dissociated cell culture is that, inevitably, some spatial inhomogeneities in terms of cell types and density, and/or the degree of gap junction connectivity, are introduced to the system during the preparation. These unintentional spatial inhomogeneities can cause some non-trivial wave dynamics, for example, the entrainment dynamics among different spiral waves and the generation of complex-oscillatory spiral waves. The aim of this paper is to quantify these general phenomena in an in vitro cardiac system and provide explanations for them with a simple physiological model having some realistic spatial inhomogeneities incorporated.

  6. Projected Changes on the Global Surface Wave Drift Climate towards the END of the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Ana; Semedo, Alvaro; Behrens, Arno; Weisse, Ralf; Breivik, Øyvind; Saetra, Øyvind; Håkon Christensen, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The global wave-induced current (the Stokes Drift - SD) is an important feature of the ocean surface, with mean values close to 10 cm/s along the extra-tropical storm tracks in both hemispheres. Besides the horizontal displacement of large volumes of water the SD also plays an important role in the ocean mix-layer turbulence structure, particularly in stormy or high wind speed areas. The role of the wave-induced currents in the ocean mix-layer and in the sea surface temperature (SST) is currently a hot topic of air-sea interaction research, from forecast to climate ranges. The SD is mostly driven by wind sea waves and highly sensitive to changes in the overlaying wind speed and direction. The impact of climate change in the global wave-induced current climate will be presented. The wave model WAM has been forced by the global climate model (GCM) ECHAM5 wind speed (at 10 m height) and ice, for present-day and potential future climate conditions towards the end of the end of the twenty-first century, represented by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) CMIP3 (Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 3) A1B greenhouse gas emission scenario (usually referred to as a ''medium-high emissions'' scenario). Several wave parameters were stored as output in the WAM model simulations, including the wave spectra. The 6 hourly and 0.5°×0.5°, temporal and space resolution, wave spectra were used to compute the SD global climate of two 32-yr periods, representative of the end of the twentieth (1959-1990) and twenty-first (1969-2100) centuries. Comparisons of the present climate run with the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) ERA-40 reanalysis are used to assess the capability of the WAM-ECHAM5 runs to produce realistic SD results. This study is part of the WRCP-JCOMM COWCLIP (Coordinated Ocean Wave Climate Project) effort.

  7. Modulation instability and dissipative ion-acoustic structures in collisional nonthermal electron-positron-ion plasma: solitary and shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan; He, Ya-Ling; Ma, Chenchen; Sun, Youfa

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear behavior of an ion-acoustic wave packet is investigated in a three-component plasma consisting of warm ions, nonthermal electrons and positrons. The nonthermal components are assumed to be inertialess and hot where they are modeled by the kappa distribution. The relevant processes, including the kinematic viscosity amongst the plasma constituents and the collision between ions and neutrals, are taken into consideration. It is shown that the dynamics of the modulated ion-acoustic wave is governed by the generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a linear dissipative term. The dispersion relation and modulation instability criterion for the generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation are investigated numerically. In the general dissipation regime, the effect of the plasma parameters on the dissipative solitary (dissipative soliton) and shock waves is also discussed in detail. The project is supported by NSF of China (11501441, 11371289, 11371288), National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1261112), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2014M560756), and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (xjj2015067).

  8. Fractal structures in the chaotic motion of charged particles in a magnetized plasma under the influence of drift waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, A. C.; Viana, R. L.; Kroetz, T.; Caldas, I. L.

    2017-03-01

    Chaotic dynamics in open Hamiltonian dynamical systems typically presents a number of fractal structures in phase space derived from the interwoven structure of invariant manifolds and the corresponding chaotic saddle. These structures are thought to play an important role in the transport properties related to the chaotic motion. Such properties can explain some aspects of the non-uniform nature of the anomalous transport observed in magnetically confined plasmas. Accordingly we consider a theoretical model for the interaction of charged test particles with drift waves. We describe the exit basin structure of the corresponding chaotic orbit in phase space and interpret it in terms of the invariant manifold structure underlying chaotic dynamics. As a result, the exit basin boundary is shown to be a fractal curve, by direct calculation of its box-counting dimension. Moreover, when there are more than two basins, we verify the existence of the Wada property, an extreme form of fractality.

  9. Existence of a directional Stokes drift in asymmetrical three-dimensional travelling gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iooss, Gérard; Plotnikov, Pavel

    2009-09-01

    We consider periodic travelling gravity waves at the surface of an infinitely deep perfect fluid. The pattern is non-symmetric with respect to the propagation direction of the waves and we consider a general non-resonant situation. Defining a couple of amplitudes ɛ,ɛ along the basis of wave vectors which satisfy the dispersion relation, following Iooss and Plotnikov (2009), travelling waves exist with an asymptotic expansion in powers of ɛ,ɛ, for nearly all pair of angles made by the basic wave vectors with the critical propagation direction, and for values of the couple (ɛ12,ɛ22) in a subset of the plane, with asymptotic full measure at the origin. We prove the remarkable property that on the free surface, observed in the moving frame, the propagation direction of the waves differs from the asymptotic direction taken by fluid particles, by a small angle which is computed. To cite this article: G. Iooss, P. Plotnikov, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  10. Second order kinetic theory of parallel momentum transport in collisionless drift wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Gao, Zhe; Chen, Jiale

    2016-08-01

    A second order kinetic model for turbulent ion parallel momentum transport is presented. A new nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux term is calculated. The resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the momentum source, while the nonresonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force compensates for that of the nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux. The resonant component of the kinetic momentum flux can be divided into three parts, including the pinch term, the diffusive term, and the residual stress. By reassembling the pinch term and the residual stress, the residual stress can be considered as a pinch term of parallel wave-particle resonant velocity, and, therefore, may be called as "resonant velocity pinch" term. Considering the resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the transfer rate between resonant ions and waves (or, equivalently, nonresonant ions), a conservation equation of the parallel momentum of resonant ions and waves is obtained.

  11. Dust acoustic and drift waves in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma with dust charge fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir, U.; Haque, Q.; Imtiaz, N.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    > ) on the wave dispersion and instability are presented. It is found that the presence of the non-thermal electron and ion populations reduce the growth rate of the instability which arises due to the dust charging effect. In addition, the nonlinear vortex solutions are also obtained. For illustration, the results are analysed by using the dusty plasma parameters of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  12. A flowing plasma model to describe drift waves in a cylindrical helicon discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, L; Cormac, C S

    2011-01-01

    A two-fluid model developed originally to describe wave oscillations in the vacuum arc centrifuge, a cylindrical, rapidly rotating, low temperature and confined plasma column, is applied to interpret plasma oscillations in a RF generated linear magnetised plasma (WOMBAT), with similar density and field strength. Compared to typical centrifuge plasmas, WOMBAT plasmas have slower normalised rotation frequency, lower temperature and lower axial velocity. Despite these differences, the two-fluid model provides a consistent description of the WOMBAT plasma configuration and yields qualitative agreement between measured and predicted wave oscillation frequencies with axial field strength. In addition, the radial profile of the density perturbation predicted by this model is consistent with the data. Parameter scans show that the dispersion curve is sensitive to the axial field strength and the electron temperature, and the dependence of oscillation frequency with electron temperature matches the experiment. These r...

  13. The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on ion-temperature-gradient driven drift-wave instabilities in electron-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batool, Nazia [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); National Center of Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); Masood, W. [National Center of Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2012-08-15

    The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven drift-wave instabilities in the presence of equilibrium density, temperature, and magnetic field gradients are investigated here. By using Braginskii's transport equations for ions and Cairns as well as Kappa distribution for electrons, the coupled mode equations are derived. The modified ITG driven modes are derived, and it is found both analytically as well as numerically that the nonthermal distribution of electrons significantly modify the real frequencies as well as the growth rate of the ITG driven drift wave instability. The growth rate of ion-temperature-gradient driven instability is found to be maximum for Cairns, intermediate for Kappa, and minimum for the Maxwellian distributed electron case. The results of present investigation might be helpful to understand several wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas in the presence of nonthermal electrons.

  14. Phase dependent advection-diffusion in drift wave - zonal flow turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Moradi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    In plasma turbulence theory, due to the complexity of the system with many non-linearly interacting waves, the dynamics of the phases is often disregarded and the so-called random-phase approximation (RPA) is used assuming the existence of a Chirikov-like criterion for the onset of wave stochasticity. The dynamical amplitudes are represented as complex numbers, $\\psi = \\psi_r + i\\psi_i = ae^{i\\theta}$, with the amplitudes slowly varying whereas the phases are rapidly varying and, in particular, distributed uniformly over the interval $[0;2\\pi)$. However, one could expect that the phase dynamics can play a role in the self-organisation and the formation of coherent structures. In the same manner it is also expected that the RPA falls short to take coherent interaction between phases into account. In this work therefore, we studied the role of phase dynamics and the coupling of phases between different modes on the characteristic time evolution of the turbulent. We assume a simple turbulent system where the so-...

  15. Stability of the lower hybrid instability excited by longitudinal currents in a collisional, multi-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, Chandu [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam-686 560, Kerala (India); Kurian, M J [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam-686 560, Kerala (India); Antony, S [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam-686 560, Kerala (India); Anilkumar, C P [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Tirunelveli-627 011, Tamil Nadu (India); Renuka, G [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Thiruvananthapuram-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2007-05-15

    We have investigated the stability of the lower hybrid wave in a collisional plasma containing hydrogen and positively and negatively charged oxygen ions. The collisions of all the species in the plasma have been considered. The electrons, streaming parallel to the magnetic field, can excite the instability if their drift velocity exceeds the parallel phase velocity of the wave. This is true for both the weakly as well as the strongly collisional cases. If the ion collisions are neglected, the growth/damping rate depends on the electron collision frequency and is modified by a factor dependent directly on the number densities and square of the charges on the oxygen ions and inversely on the masses of these ions. Ion collisions, however only damp the wave; this damping being dependent also on the ion collision frequencies, in addition to the above dependencies. We find that the dispersion relation in the low collisional limit can account for lower hybrid waves in the observed frequency range.

  16. Jeans stability in collisional quantum dusty magnetoplasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, M.; Asif, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Mir, Zahid [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Superior University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2014-09-15

    Jeans instability is examined in detail in uniform dusty magnetoplasmas taking care of collisional and non-zero finite thermal effects in addition to the quantum characteristics arising through the Bohm potential and the Fermi degenerate pressure using the quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas. It is found that the presence of the dust-lower-hybrid wave, collisional effects of plasma species, thermal effects of electrons, and the quantum mechanical effects of electrons have significance over the Jeans instability. Here, we have pointed out a new class of dissipative instability in quantum plasma regime.

  17. Initial Results of DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, Magnetic Fields, and Plasma Waves Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Maynard, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF oscillations corresponding to a variety of plasma waves, in particular banded ELF hiss, whistlers, and lower hybrid wave turbulence triggered by lightning-induced sferics. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics and irregularities inherent to the Earth's low latitude ionosphere.

  18. Influence of Ion Nonlinear Polarization Drift and Warm Ions on Solitary Kinetic Alfvén Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Su-Ping; LI Zhong-Yuan

    2003-01-01

    Considering the effects of ion nonlinear polarization drift and warm ions, we adopt two-fluid model to results derived in this paper indicate that dip SKAW and hump SKAW both exist in a wide range in magnetosphere(for the pressure parameter β ~ 10-5 ~ 0.01, where βis the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure, i.e.region 1 > β > me/mi. These results are different from previous ones. That indicates that the effects of ion nonlinear polarization drift and warm ions are important and they cannot be neglected. The SKAW has an electric field parallel to the ambient magnetic field, which makes the SKAW take an important role in the acceleration and energization of field-aligned charged particles in magnetic plasmas. And the SKAW is also important for the heating of a local plasma.So it makes a novel physical mechanism of energy transmission possible.

  19. Phase mixing vs. nonlinear advection in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Schekochihin, A A; Highcock, E G; Dellar, P J; Dorland, W; Hammett, G W

    2015-01-01

    A scaling theory of long-wavelength electrostatic turbulence in a magnetised, weakly collisional plasma (e.g., drift-wave turbulence driven by temperature gradients) is proposed, with account taken both of the nonlinear advection of the perturbed particle distribution by fluctuating ExB flows and of its phase mixing, which is caused by the streaming of the particles along the mean magnetic field and, in a linear problem, would lead to Landau damping. A consistent theory is constructed in which very little free energy leaks into high velocity moments of the distribution, rendering the turbulent cascade in the energetically relevant part of the wave-number space essentially fluid-like. The velocity-space spectra of free energy expressed in terms of Hermite-moment orders are steep power laws and so the free-energy content of the phase space does not diverge at infinitesimal collisionality (while it does for a linear problem); collisional heating due to long-wavelength perturbations vanishes in this limit (also i...

  20. The interaction of a circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave with an electron having a constant time independent drift velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashid, M.

    2011-01-01

    A circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave may appear when a 1S electron encounters a decelerating stopping positively charged hole inside a semiconductor. The circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave can have an interaction with a conducting electron which has a constant time inde

  1. The interaction of a circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave with an electron having a constant time independent drift velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashid, M.

    2011-01-01

    A circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave may appear when a 1S electron encounters a decelerating stopping positively charged hole inside a semiconductor. The circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave can have an interaction with a conducting electron which has a constant time

  2. Effects of ring current ions on the ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere based on a 5-D drift kinetic ring current model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K.; Amano, T.; Saito, S.; Kamiya, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Keika, K.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial inner magnetosphere is the region where different plasma regimes over a wide range of energy such as the plasmasphere, ring current, and radiation belt coexist. Among them, the ring current carries most of plasma pressure and is thus responsible for deformation of the magnetic field. Since the deformation changes drift paths of charged particles including the ring current ions, it is important to describe this coupling between the ring current and electric/magnetic fields self-consistently. It is known that short-timescale phenomena such as ULF waves and substorm related ion injections from the plasma sheet play important roles in the inner magnetospheric dynamics during magnetic storms. While ULF waves contribute to the radial transport of relativistic electrons to form the radiation belt, the ion injections contribute to excitation of storm-time Pc5 ULF waves as well as to plasma supply to the ring current from the magnetotail. Aiming at a self-consistent description of the coupling between ring current ions and electric/magnetic fields, we have developed a global ring current model (GEMSIS-RC model). The model is a self-consistent and kinetic numerical simulation code solving the five-dimensional collisionless drift-kinetic equation for the ring-current ions coupled with Maxwell equations. Without assuming a force-balanced equilibrium, the GEMSIS-RC model allows the force-imbalance to exist, which generates induced electric field through the polarization current. In this study, we applied the GEMSIS-RC model for simulation of ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere with a focus on the short-timescale phenomena described above. Comparison between runs with/without ring current ions show that the existence of hot ring current ions can deform and amplify the original sinusoidal waveforms. The deformation causes the energy cascade to higher frequency range (Pc4 and Pc3 ranges). The cascade is more pronounced in high plasma beta cases. It is also shown that

  3. Transport dynamics of self-consistent, near-marginal drift-wave turbulence. I. Investigation of the ability of external flows to tune the non-diffusive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, D.; Newman, D. E.; Sánchez, R.

    2017-07-01

    The reduction of turbulent transport across sheared flow regions has been known for a long time in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas. However, details of the dynamics are still unclear, in particular, in what refers to the changes caused by the flow on the nature of radial transport itself. In Paper II, we have shown in a simplified model of drift wave turbulence that, when the background profile is allowed to evolve self-consistently with fluctuations, a variety of transport regimes ranging from superdiffusive to subdiffusive open up depending on the properties of the underlying turbulence [D. Ogata et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 052307 (2017)]. In this paper, we show that externally applied sheared flows can, under the proper conditions, cause the transport dynamics to be diffusive or subdiffusive.

  4. Collisional and collisionless expansion of Yukawa balls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Goree, John A

    2013-12-01

    The expansion of Yukawa balls is studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations of collisionless and collisional situations. High computation speed was achieved by using the parallel computing power of graphics processing units. When the radius of the Yukawa ball is large compared to the shielding length, the expansion process starts with the blow-off of the outermost layer. A rarefactive wave subsequently propagates radially inward at the speed of longitudinal phonons. This mechanism is fundamentally different from Coulomb explosions, which employ a self-similar expansion of the entire system. In the collisionless limit, the outer layers carry away most of the available energy. The simulations are compared with analytical estimates. In the collisional case, the expansion process can be described by a nonlinear diffusion equation that is a special case of the porous medium equation.

  5. Doppler effect in a solid medium: Spin wave emission by a precessing domain wall drifting in spin current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hong; Chen, Jie; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The Doppler effect is a fundamental physical phenomenon observed for waves propagating in vacuum or various media, commonly gaseous or liquid. Here, we report on the occurrence of a Doppler effect in a solid medium. Instead of a real object, a topological soliton, i.e., a magnetic domain wall (DW) traveling in a current-carrying ferromagnetic nanowire, plays the role of the moving wave source. The Larmor precession of the DW in an external field stimulates emission of monochromatic spin waves (SWs) during its motion, which show a significant Doppler effect, comparable to the acoustic one of a train whistle. This process involves two prominent spin-transfer-torque effects simultaneously, the current-driven DW motion and the current-induced SW Doppler shift. The latter gives rise to an interesting feature, i.e., the observed SW Doppler effect appears resulting from a stationary source and a moving observer, contrary to the laboratory frame.

  6. Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities in the presence of collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, J.F.; Lee, W.W.; Tang, W.M.

    1986-07-01

    Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities in the presence of electron-ion collisions in a shear-free slab has been studied by using gyrokinetic particle simulation techniques as well as by solving, both numerically and analytically, model mode-coupling equations. The purpose of the investigation is to determine the mechanisms responsible for the nonlinear saturation of the instability and for the ensuing steady-state transport. Such an insight is very valuable for understanding drift wave problems in more complicated geometries. The results indicate that the electron E x B convection is the dominant mechanism for saturation. It is also found that the saturation amplitude and the associated quasilinear diffusion are greatly enhanced over their collisionless values as a result of weak collisions. In the highly collisional (fluid) limit, there is an upper bound for saturation with ephi/T/sub e/ approx. = (..omega../sub l//..cap omega../sub i/)/(k/sub perpendicular/rho/sub s/)/sup 2/. The associated quasilinear diffusion, which increases with collisionality, takes the form of D/sub ql/ approx. = ..gamma../sub l//k/sub perpendicular//sup 2/, where ..omega../sub l/ and ..gamma../sub l/ are the linear frequency and growth rate, respectively. In the steady state, the diffusion process becomes stochastic in nature. The relevant mechanisms here are related to the velocity-space nonlinearities and background fluctuations. The magnitude of the diffusion at this stage can be comparable to that of quasilinear diffusion in the presence of collisions, and it remains finite even in the collisionless limit.

  7. Study of Linear and Nonlinear Wave Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Feng; Berumen, Jorge; Hood, Ryan; Mattingly, Sean; Skiff, Frederick

    2013-10-01

    We report an experimental study of externally excited low-frequency waves in a cylindrical, magnetized, singly-ionized Argon inductively-coupled gas discharge plasma that is weakly collisional. Wave excitation in the drift wave frequency range is accomplished by low-percentage amplitude modulation of the RF plasma source. Laser-induced fluorescence is adopted to study ion-density fluctuations in phase space. The laser is chopped to separate LIF from collisional fluorescence. A single negatively-biased Langmuir probe is used to detect ion-density fluctuations in the plasma. A ring array of Langmuir probes is also used to analyze the spatial and spectral structure of the excited waves. We apply coherent detection with respect to the wave frequency to obtain the ion distribution function associated with externally generated waves. Higher-order spectra are computed to evaluate the nonlinear coupling between fluctuations at various frequencies produced by the externally generated waves. Parametric decay of the waves is observed. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  8. 3-dimensional Oil Drift Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettre, C.; Reistad, M.; Hjøllo, B.Å.

    Simulation of oil drift has been an ongoing activity at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute since the 1970's. The Marine Forecasting Centre provides a 24-hour service for the Norwegian Pollution Control Authority and the oil companies operating in the Norwegian sector. The response time is 30 minutes. From 2002 the service is extended to simulation of oil drift from oil spills in deep water, using the DeepBlow model developed by SINTEF Applied Chemistry. The oil drift model can be applied both for instantaneous and continuous releases. The changes in the mass of oil and emulsion as a result of evaporation and emulsion are computed. For oil spill at deep water, hydrate formation and gas dissolution are taken into account. The properties of the oil depend on the oil type, and in the present version 64 different types of oil can be simulated. For accurate oil drift simulations it is important to have the best possible data on the atmospheric and oceanic conditions. The oil drift simulations at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute are always based on the most updated data from numerical models of the atmosphere and the ocean. The drift of the surface oil is computed from the vectorial sum of the surface current from the ocean model and the wave induced Stokes drift computed from wave energy spectra from the wave prediction model. In the new model the current distribution with depth is taken into account when calculating the drift of the dispersed oil droplets. Salinity and temperature profiles from the ocean model are needed in the DeepBlow model. The result of the oil drift simulations can be plotted on sea charts used for navigation, either as trajectory plots or particle plots showing the situation at a given time. The results can also be sent as data files to be included in the user's own GIS system.

  9. Comment to the note "Counting of discrete Rossby/drift wave resonant triads", arXiv:1309.0405

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, A

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this note is clarify the following misunderstanding apparent in the note arXiv:1309.0405 by M. Bustamante, U. Hayat, P. Lynch, B. Quinn; [1]: the authors erroneously assume that in the manuscript arXiv:1307.8272 by A. Kartashov and E. Kartashova, [2], resonant triads with real amplitudes are counted whereas it can be seen explicitly from the form of dynamical system that wave amplitudes are complex.

  10. A new multi-domain method based on an analytical control surface for linear and second-order mean drift wave loads on floating bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; Chen, Xiaobo

    2017-10-01

    A novel multi-domain method based on an analytical control surface is proposed by combining the use of free-surface Green function and Rankine source function. A cylindrical control surface is introduced to subdivide the fluid domain into external and internal domains. Unlike the traditional domain decomposition strategy or multi-block method, the control surface here is not panelized, on which the velocity potential and normal velocity components are analytically expressed as a series of base functions composed of Laguerre function in vertical coordinate and Fourier series in the circumference. Free-surface Green function is applied in the external domain, and the boundary integral equation is constructed on the control surface in the sense of Galerkin collocation via integrating test functions orthogonal to base functions over the control surface. The external solution gives rise to the so-called Dirichlet-to-Neumann [DN2] and Neumann-to-Dirichlet [ND2] relations on the control surface. Irregular frequencies, which are only dependent on the radius of the control surface, are present in the external solution, and they are removed by extending the boundary integral equation to the interior free surface (circular disc) on which the null normal derivative of potential is imposed, and the dipole distribution is expressed as Fourier-Bessel expansion on the disc. In the internal domain, where the Rankine source function is adopted, new boundary integral equations are formulated. The point collocation is imposed over the body surface and free surface, while the collocation of the Galerkin type is applied on the control surface. The present method is valid in the computation of both linear and second-order mean drift wave loads. Furthermore, the second-order mean drift force based on the middle-field formulation can be calculated analytically by using the coefficients of the Fourier-Laguerre expansion.

  11. Transition from Collisionless to Collisional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prateek Sharma; Gregory W. Hammett; Eliot Quataert

    2003-07-24

    Recent calculations by Quataert et al. (2002) found that the growth rates of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless plasma can differ significantly from those calculated using MHD. This can be important in hot accretion flows around compact objects. In this paper, we study the transition from the collisionless kinetic regime to the collisional MHD regime, mapping out the dependence of the MRI growth rate on collisionality. A kinetic closure scheme for a magnetized plasma is used that includes the effect of collisions via a BGK operator. The transition to MHD occurs as the mean free path becomes short compared to the parallel wavelength 2*/k(sub)||. In the weak magnetic field regime where the Alfven and MRI frequencies w are small compared to the sound wave frequency k(sub)||c(sub)0, the dynamics are still effectively collisionless even if omega << v, so long as the collision frequency v << k(sub)||c(sub)0; for an accretion flow this requires n less than or approximately equal to *(square root of b). The low collisionality regime not only modifies the MRI growth rate, but also introduces collisionless Landau or Barnes damping of long wavelength modes, which may be important for the nonlinear saturation of the MRI.

  12. Drifting and meandering of Olive Ridley Sea turtles in the Bay of Bengal: Role of oceanic Rossby waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ram, P.S.; Rao, S.A.; Sadhuram, Y.

    in the direction of geostrophic currents. It is found that the locations of these thermal fronts in the Bay of Bengal are primarily determined by the Oceanic Rossby waves and local Ekman pumping. Key Words: Bay of Bengal, Circulation, Cyclonic and Anti... drawn with black dots shows the meandering path of the rest of the three turtles. Locations of the turtles at different times are also shown as white stars. A strong anti-cyclonic gyre (warm core eddy) centered at 17º N with SSHD above 30 cm...

  13. 一种基于漂移和波动思想的遗传算法%A New Genetic Algorithm Based on Drift and Wave Thought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李松芳; 刘伟; 徐怀祥

    2014-01-01

    In order to make full use of the optimal individual information , referring to thought of drift and wave to design the new crossover and mutation operator , it proposes a new genetic algorithm;The new al-gorithm uses the chaotic strategy for processing infeasible individuals , with the new operator combined with optimal individual information , so it has the capability of global search and local search .Simulation experiments show that the new algorithm can improve the algorithm convergence speed and accuracy , and that the proposed method is effective and feasible .%为充分利用最优个体的信息,借鉴于漂移和波动思想设计出新的交叉与变异算子,提出一种新的遗传算法。新算法采用混沌策略处理不可行个体,新算子结合最优个体信息,兼具全局搜索与局部搜索性能。仿真实验表明,新算法不但加快了算法的收敛速度,而且提高了求解精度,是一种有效性算法。

  14. FLYCHK Collisional-Radiative Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 160 FLYCHK Collisional-Radiative Code (Web, free access)   FLYCHK provides a capability to generate atomic level populations and charge state distributions for low-Z to mid-Z elements under NLTE conditions.

  15. Collisional effects on the current-filamentation instability in a dense plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Biao; SHENG Zheng-Ming; ZHANG Jie

    2009-01-01

    The collisional current-filamentation instability (CFI) is studied for a nonrelativistic electron beampenetrating an infinite uniform plasma.It is analytically shown that the CFI is driven by the drift-anisotropyrather than the classical anisotropy of the beam and the background plasma.Therefore,collisional effects can either attenuate or enhance the CFI depending on the drift-anisotropy of the beam-plasma system.Numerical results are given for some typical parameters,which show that collisional effects cannot stabilize but enhance the CFI in a dense plasma.Thus,the CFI may play a dominant role in the fast electron transport and deposition relevant to the fast ignition scenario(FIS).

  16. Current-driven electron drift solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ali, E-mail: aliahmad79@hotmail.com [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT) Islamabad (Pakistan); Saleem, H. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT) Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-12-09

    The soliton formation by the current-driven drift-like wave is investigated for heavier ion (such as barium) plasma experiments planned to be performed in future. It is pointed out that the sheared flow of electrons can give rise to short scale solitary structures in the presence of stationary heavier ions. The nonlinearity appears due to convective term in the parallel equation of motion and not because of temperature gradient unlike the case of low frequency usual drift wave soliton. This higher frequency drift-like wave requires sheared flow of electrons and not the density gradient to exist.

  17. Diffusion and transport phenomena in a collisional magnetoplasma having both streaming and temperature anisotropy: Collisional kinetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J N Mohanty; K C Baral; G Nath

    2007-03-01

    Boltzmann-transport equation is analytically solved for two-component magnetoplasma using Chapman-Enskog analysis to include collisional diffusion transport having anisotropies in both streaming velocity and temperature components. The modified collisional integrals are analytically solved with flux integrals and perturbed kinetic equation to arrive at drift diffusion velocity and resulting transport coefficients which are markedly affected by both streaming and temperature anisotropy. The early isotropic results are recovered in the limit $V_{0} = 0$ and $T_{\\|} = T_{\\bot}$ which reduce to eqs (11.30) and (11.31) of [1] and eqs (2.7) and (2.13) of [2]. The electrical resistivity (n_{\\bot}) diminishes sharply in fusion temperature limit $kT_{\\bot} = 1$ keV. The shape of the curves for both electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity is rectangular hyperbolic. However, for low thermal ratio $(T_{\\|}/T_{\\bot} < 1)$, the curves are raised up and for high thermal ratio $(T_{\\|}/T_{\\bot} > 1)$, they are lowered down the isotropic case $(T_{\\|}/T_{\\bot} > 1)$, showing comparatively diminished magnitudes of the quantities.

  18. Nonlinear electrostatic drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Avadhesh C.; Srivastava, Krishna M.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear analysis of electrostatic drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is performed. It is shown that the analysis leads to the propagation of the weakly nonlinear dispersive waves, and the nonlinear behavior is governed by the nonlinear Burger's equation.

  19. Protoplanetary Accretion by Collisional Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Wettlaufer, J S

    2009-01-01

    The formation of a solar system is believed to have followed a multi-stage process around a protostar. Whipple first noted that planetesimal growth by particle agglomeration is strongly influenced by gas drag; there is a ``bottleneck'' at the meter scale with such bodies rapidly spiraling into the central star, whereas much smaller or larger particles do not. Thus, successful planetary accretion requires rapid planetesimal growth to km scale. A commonly accepted picture is that for collisional velocities $V_c$ above a certain threshold collisional velocity, ${V_{th}} \\sim$ 0.1-10 cm s$^{-1}$, particle agglomeration is not possible; elastic rebound overcomes attractive surface and intermolecular forces. However, if perfect sticking is assumed for all collisions the bottleneck can be overcome by rapid planetesimal growth. While previous work has dealt explicitly with the influences of collisional pressures and the possibility of particle fracture or penetration, the basic role of the phase behavior of matter--p...

  20. Features of 3–7-day planetary-wave-type oscillations in F-layer vertical drift and equatorial spread F observed over two low-latitude stations in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the equatorial atmosphere–ionosphere coupling system have shown that planetary-wave-type oscillations, as an important seeding mechanism for equatorial spread F (ESF, play an important role in ESF irregularity development and its day-to-day variability in the equatorial latitudes. In this study, ionosonde virtual height and ESF measurements over Sanya (18.4° N, 109.6° E; 12.8° N dip latitude and meteor radar neutral-wind measurements over Fuke (19.5° N, 109.1° E; 14° N dip latitude during 2013 are used to investigate the features of planetary-wave-type oscillations in both the lower atmosphere and the ionosphere and their possible influences on ESF occurrence under the weak solar maximum year. The ∼ 3-day and ∼ 7-day planetary-wave-type oscillations have been observed in the neutral zonal winds and the time rate of change in F-layer virtual heights. According to the propagation characteristics, the 3-day and 7-day planetary-wave-type oscillations are basically recognized as ultrafast and fast Kelvin waves, respectively. With increasing heights, the 3-day wave oscillations are gradually amplified, while the 7-day wave oscillations are generally constant. By performing a cross-wavelet transform on the onsets of ESF and the vertical drifts of the F layer, we found that there are simultaneously occurring 7-day and 3-day common wave oscillations between them. The 7-day waves are mainly in the inversion phase, while the 3-day waves are mostly in an in-phase state, indicating that the 7-day waves may play a main role in ESF initiation. Approximate delays of 6 days for the 7-day waves and 5 days for the 3-day waves in their propagation upward from the lower atmosphere to the ionosphere are evaluated with wavelet power spectrum analysis. The estimated upward velocities from these time delays provide consistent evidence that the 7-day and 3-day waves propagate vertically upward with typical Kelvin wave

  1. On the study of ion-acoustic solitary waves and double-layers in a drift multicomponent plasma with electron-inertia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S N Paul; S Chattopadhyaya; S K Bhattacharya; B Bera

    2003-06-01

    Using the pseudopotential method, theoretical investigation has been made on the first-order Korteweg-deVries ion-acoustic solitons in a multicomponent plasma consisting of warm positive ions, negative ions and isothermal electrons. The effects of electron-inertia and drift motion of the ions on the amplitudes and widths of the solitons have been studied in a plasma having (H+, Cl-), (H+, O-), (He+, H-) and (He+, O-) ions. Ion-acoustic double-layers have also been investigated for such plasmas. It has been found that drift velocity and electron-inertia have significant contribution on the formation of double-layers in multicomponent plasma.

  2. Phase mixing versus nonlinear advection in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Parker, J. T.; Highcock, E. G.; Dellar, P. J.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.

    2016-04-01

    > A scaling theory of long-wavelength electrostatic turbulence in a magnetised, weakly collisional plasma (e.g. drift-wave turbulence driven by ion temperature gradients) is proposed, with account taken both of the nonlinear advection of the perturbed particle distribution by fluctuating flows and of its phase mixing, which is caused by the streaming of the particles along the mean magnetic field and, in a linear problem, would lead to Landau damping. It is found that it is possible to construct a consistent theory in which very little free energy leaks into high velocity moments of the distribution function, rendering the turbulent cascade in the energetically relevant part of the wavenumber space essentially fluid-like. The velocity-space spectra of free energy expressed in terms of Hermite-moment orders are steep power laws and so the free-energy content of the phase space does not diverge at infinitesimal collisionality (while it does for a linear problem); collisional heating due to long-wavelength perturbations vanishes in this limit (also in contrast with the linear problem, in which it occurs at the finite rate equal to the Landau damping rate). The ability of the free energy to stay in the low velocity moments of the distribution function is facilitated by the `anti-phase-mixing' effect, whose presence in the nonlinear system is due to the stochastic version of the plasma echo (the advecting velocity couples the phase-mixing and anti-phase-mixing perturbations). The partitioning of the wavenumber space between the (energetically dominant) region where this is the case and the region where linear phase mixing wins its competition with nonlinear advection is governed by the `critical balance' between linear and nonlinear time scales (which for high Hermite moments splits into two thresholds, one demarcating the wavenumber region where phase mixing predominates, the other where plasma echo does).

  3. The use of ultraviolet Thomson scattering as a versatile diagnostic for detailed measurements of a collisional laser produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracy, M.D.

    1993-01-08

    Collective Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic waves at 266nm is used to obtain spatially resolved, two-dimensional electron density, sound speed, and radial drift profiles of a collisional laser plasma. An ultraviolet diagnostic wavelength minimizes the complicating effects of inverse bremsstrahlung and refractive turning in the coronal region of interest, where the electron densities approach n{sub c}/10. Laser plasmas of this type are important because they model some of the aspects of the plasmas found in high-gain laser-fusion pellets irradiated by long pulse widths where the laser light is absorbed mostly in the corona. The experimental results and LASNEX simulations agree within a percent standard deviation of 40% for the electron density and 50% for the sound speed and radial drift velocity. Thus it is shown that the hydrodynamics equations with classical coefficients and the numerical approximations in LASNEX are valid models of laser-heated, highly collisional plasmas. The versatility of Thomson scattering is expanded upon by extending existing theory with a Fokker-Planck based model to include plasmas that are characterized by (0 {le} k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ii} {le} {infinity}) and ZT{sub e}/T{sub i}, where k{sub ia} is the ion- acoustic wave number, {lambda}{sub ii} is the ion-ion mean free path, Z is the ionization state of the plasma, and T{sub e}, T{sub i} are the electron and ion temperatures in electron volts respectively. The model is valid for plasmas in which the electrons are approximately collisionless, (k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ei}, k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ee} {ge} 1), and quasineutrality holds, ({alpha} {much_gt}1), where {alpha} = 1/k{lambda}{sub DE} and {lambda}{sub DE} is the electron Debye length. This newly developed model predicts the lineshape of the ion-acoustic Thomson spectra and when fit to experimental data provides a direct measurement of the relative thermal flow velocity between the electrons and ions.

  4. The drift of ab-type domain walls in the weak ferromagnetic

    CERN Document Server

    Gerasimchuk, V S

    2002-01-01

    The drift motion of a ab-type 180-degree domain wall in a weak ferromagnetic is studied in elastic stress fields, generated by a sound wave. Parallel or perpendicularly to the domain wall plane. The dependences of the drift velocity on direction, polarization and amplitude of the acoustic wave are obtained. The drift conditions of the band domain structure are defined.

  5. Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.W.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.R.; Smith, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless drift instabilities in a shear-free magnetic field has been studied by means of gyrokinetic particle simulation as well as numerical integration of model mode-coupling equations. The purpose of the investigation is to identify relevant nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the steady-state drift wave fluctuations. It is found that the saturation of the instability is mainly caused by the nonlinear E x B convection of the resonant electrons and their associated velocity space nonlinearity. The latter also induces energy exchange between the competing modes, which, in turn, gives rise to enhanced diffusion. The nonlinear E x B convection of the ions, which contributes to the nonlinear frequency shift, is also an important ingredient for the saturation.

  6. Drift solitons and their two-dimensional stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, Y.

    1977-07-01

    The nonlinear equation governing low-frequency drift waves is considered. Utilizing the linear dispersion relation for such waves, it is shown that there exists a parameter range for which the drift waves are governed by a modified Korteweg--de Vries equation having a solitary solution in one and two dimensions. The one-dimensional solitons are unstable with respect to perturbations in the direction perpendicular to their motion.

  7. Collisional properties of weakly bound heteronuclear dimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, B.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.; Petrov, D.S.

    2008-01-01

    We consider collisional properties of weakly bound heteronuclear molecules (dimers) formed in a two-species mixture of atoms with a large mass difference. We focus on dimers containing light fermionic atoms as they manifest collisional stability due to an effective dimer-dimer repulsion originating

  8. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  9. Effect of Stokes drift on upper ocean mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuang; SONG Jinbao; SUN Qun

    2008-01-01

    Stokes drift is the main source of vertical vorticity in the ocean mixed layer.In the ways of Coriolis - Stokes forcing and Langmuir circulations,Stokes drift can substantially affect the whole mixed layer.A modified Mellor-Yamada 2.5 level turbulence closure model is used to parameterize its effect on upper ocean mixing conventionally.Results show that comparing surface heating with wave breaking,Stokes drift plays the most important role in the entire ocean mixed layer,especially in the subsurface layer.As expected,Stokes drift elevates both the dissipation rate and the turbulence energy in the upper ocean mixing.Also,influence of the surface heating,wave breaking and wind speed on Stokes drift is investigated respectively.Research shows that it is significant and important to assessing the Stokes drift into ocean mixed layer studying.The laboratory observations are supporting numerical experiments quantitatively.

  10. Study of electric and magnetic field fluctuations from lower hybrid drift instability waves in the terrestrial magnetotail with the fully kinetic, semi-implicit, adaptive multi level multi domain method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Norgren, C.; Newman, D.; Goldman, M.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-05-01

    The newly developed fully kinetic, semi-implicit, adaptive multi-level multi-domain (MLMD) method is used to simulate, at realistic mass ratio, the development of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) in the terrestrial magnetotail over a large wavenumber range and at a low computational cost. The power spectra of the perpendicular electric field and of the fluctuations of the parallel magnetic field are studied at wavenumbers and times that allow to appreciate the onset of the electrostatic and electromagnetic LHDI branches and of the kink instability. The coupling between electric and magnetic field fluctuations observed by Norgren et al. ["Lower hybrid drift waves: Space observations," Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 055001 (2012)] for high wavenumber LHDI waves in the terrestrial magnetotail is verified. In the MLMD simulations presented, a domain ("coarse grid") is simulated with low resolution. A small fraction of the entire domain is then simulated with higher resolution also ("refined grid") to capture smaller scale, higher frequency processes. Initially, the MLMD method is validated for LHDI simulations. MLMD simulations with different levels of grid refinement are validated against the standard semi-implicit particle in cell simulations of domains corresponding to both the coarse and the refined grid. Precious information regarding the applicability of the MLMD method to turbulence simulations is derived. The power spectra of MLMD simulations done with different levels of refinements are then compared. They consistently show a break in the magnetic field spectra at k⊥di˜30 , with di the ion skin depth and k⊥ the perpendicular wavenumber. The break is observed at early simulated times, Ωcit <6 , with Ωci the ion cyclotron frequency. It is due to the initial decoupling of electric and magnetic field fluctuations at intermediate and low wavenumbers, before the development of the electromagnetic LHDI branch. Evidence of coupling between electric and magnetic

  11. Collisional Aggregation due to Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pumir, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Collisions between particles suspended in a fluid play an important role in many physical processes. As an example, collisions of microscopic water droplets in clouds are a necessary step in the production of macroscopic raindrops. Collisions of dust grains are also conjectured to be important for planet formation in the gas surrounding young stars, and also to play a role in the dynamics of sand storms. In these processes, collisions are favoured by fast turbulent motions. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of collisional aggregation due to turbulence. We discuss the role of fractal clustering of particles, and caustic singularities of their velocities. We also discuss limitations of the Smoluchowski equation for modelling these processes. These advances lead to a semi-quantitative understanding on the influence of turbulence on collision rates, and point to deficiencies in the current understanding of rainfall and planet formation.

  12. Effects of parallel sound wave damping and drift kinetic damping on the resistive wall mode stability with various plasma rotation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Liu, Yue

    2015-10-01

    > The effect of a parallel viscous force induced damping and the magnetic precessional drift resonance induced damping on the stability of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is numerically investigated for one of the advanced steady-state scenarios in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). The key element of the investigation is to study how different plasma rotation profiles affect the stability prediction. The single-fluid, toroidal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code MARS-F (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 7, 2000, p. 3681) and the MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 112503) are used for this purpose. Three extreme rotation profiles are considered: (a) a uniform profile with no shear, (b) a profile with negative flow shear at the rational surface ( is the equilibrium safety factor), and (c) a profile with positive shear at . The parallel viscous force is found to be effective for the mode stabilization at high plasma flow speed (about a few percent of the Alfven speed) for the no shear flow profile and the negative shear flow profile, but the stable domain does not appear with the positive shear flow profile. The predicted eigenmode structure is different with different rotation profiles. With a self-consistent inclusion of the magnetic precession drift resonance of thermal particles in MARS-K computations, a lower critical flow speed, i.e. the minimum speed needed for full suppression of the mode, is obtained. Likewise the eigenmode structure is also modified by different rotation profiles in the kinetic results.

  13. Modeling concept drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchani, Hanen; Martinez, Ana Maria; Masegosa, Andrés R.

    2015-01-01

    An often used approach for detecting and adapting to concept drift when doing classification is to treat the data as i.i.d. and use changes in classification accuracy as an indication of concept drift. In this paper, we take a different perspective and propose a framework, based on probabilistic ...

  14. Influence of collisional dephasing processes on superfluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Jeffery J.; Malcuit, Michelle S.; Raymer, Michael G.; Boyd, Robert W.; Drummond, Peter D.

    1989-11-01

    We present a quantum-mechanical treatment of the influence of collisional dephasing processes on the statistical properties of superfluorescence (SF). The theory, which treats nonlinear propagation effects as well as quantum noise, shows how the nature of the cooperative emission process changes from that of SF to that of amplified spontaneous emission as the collisional dephasing rate is varied. The predictions of how the SF delay time varies with the collisional dephasing rate are in good agreement with the results of a recent experiment [M. S. Malcuit, J. J. Maki, D. J. Simkin, and R. W. Boyd, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 1189 (1987)].

  15. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package

  16. Mass Hierarchy of Collisional Energy Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Kolevatov, Rodion

    2008-01-01

    Collisional parton energy loss is revisited within a simple model assuming incoherent elastic scattering of on-shell projectile partons on partonic constituents of the QGP with HTL screening. The thermal motion of plasma particles is carefully taken into account. Results on $dE/dx$ are found to be consistent with other authors. There is a significant discrepancy in the energy loss pattern for the cases with thermal motion on and off, which illustrates the importance of taking the kinematics into account exactly. The dependence on the mass of the partons forming the plasma is included in the calculations and its influence on the collisional energy loss is studied. The mass hierarchy of collisional energy loss is found to have a strong dependence on the mass introduced for plasma particles. Due to difference in the mass hierarchy with radiative energy loss, the collisional one when included increases the relative suppression of heavy quarks compared to light quarks.

  17. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  18. Drift in Diffusion Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Marchesoni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The longstanding problem of Brownian transport in a heterogeneous quasi one-dimensional medium with space-dependent self-diffusion coefficient is addressed in the overdamped (zero mass limit. A satisfactory mesoscopic description is obtained in the Langevin equation formalism by introducing an appropriate drift term, which depends on the system macroscopic observables, namely the diffuser concentration and current. The drift term is related to the microscopic properties of the medium. The paradoxical existence of a finite drift at zero current suggests the possibility of designing a Maxwell demon operating between two equilibrium reservoirs at the same temperature.

  19. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. II. CMEs, Shock Waves, and Drifting Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Slemzin, V. A.; Filippov, B. P.; Egorov, Y. I.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Prestage, N. P.; Temmer, M.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our study (Grechnev et al., 2013, doi:10.1007/s11207-013-0316-6; Paper I) on the 18 November 2003 geoffective event. To understand possible impact on geospace of coronal transients observed on that day, we investigated their properties from solar near-surface manifestations in extreme ultraviolet, LASCO white-light images, and dynamic radio spectra. We reconcile near-surface activity with the expansion of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and determine their orientation relative to the earthward direction. The kinematic measurements, dynamic radio spectra, and microwave and X-ray light curves all contribute to the overall picture of the complex event and confirm an additional eruption at 08:07 - 08:20 UT close to the solar disk center presumed in Paper I. Unusual characteristics of the ejection appear to match those expected for a source of the 20 November superstorm but make its detection in LASCO images hopeless. On the other hand, none of the CMEs observed by LASCO seem to be a promising candidate for a source of the superstorm being able to produce, at most, a glancing blow on the Earth's magnetosphere. Our analysis confirms free propagation of shock waves revealed in the event and reconciles their kinematics with "EUV waves" and dynamic radio spectra up to decameters.

  20. Drift Scale THM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because

  1. The Drifting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  2. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  3. SAA drift: Experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  4. Suppression of phase mixing in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, J T; Schekochihin, A A; Dellar, P J

    2016-01-01

    Transfer of free energy from large to small velocity-space scales by phase mixing leads to Landau damping in a linear plasma. In a turbulent drift-kinetic plasma, this transfer is statistically nearly canceled by an inverse transfer from small to large velocity-space scales due to "anti-phase-mixing" modes excited by a stochastic form of plasma echo. Fluid moments (density, velocity, temperature) are thus approximately energetically isolated from the higher moments of the distribution function, so phase mixing is ineffective as a dissipation mechanism when the plasma collisionality is small.

  5. Collisional quenching of highly rotationally excited HF

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Benhui; Forrey, R C; Stancil, P C; Balakrishnan, N

    2015-01-01

    Collisional excitation rate coefficients play an important role in the dynamics of energy transfer in the interstellar medium. In particular, accurate rotational excitation rates are needed to interpret microwave and infrared observations of the interstellar gas for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line formation. Theoretical cross sections and rate coefficients for collisional deexcitation of rotationally excited HF in the vibrational ground state are reported. The quantum-mechanical close-coupling approach implemented in the nonreactive scattering code MOLSCAT was applied in the cross section and rate coefficient calculations on an accurate 2D HF-He potential energy surface. Estimates of rate coefficients for H and H$_2$ colliders were obtained from the HF-He collisional data with a reduced-potential scaling approach. The calculation of state-to-state rotational quenching cross sections for HF due to He with initial rotational levels up to $j=20$ were performed for kinetic energies from 10$^{-5}$ to 15000...

  6. Collisional excitation of water by hydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Daniel, F; Dagdigian, P J; Dubernet, M -L; lique, F; forêts, G Pineau des

    2014-01-01

    We present quantum dynamical calculations that describe the rotational excitation of H$_2$O due to collisions with H atoms. We used a recent, high accuracy potential energy surface, and solved the collisional dynamics with the close-coupling formalism, for total energies up to 12 000 cm$^{-1}$. From these calculations, we obtained collisional rate coefficients for the first 45 energy levels of both ortho- and para-H$_2$O and for temperatures in the range T = 5-1500 K. These rate coefficients are subsequently compared to the values previously published for the H$_2$O / He and H$_2$O / H$_2$ collisional systems. It is shown that no simple relation exists between the three systems and that specific calculations are thus mandatory.

  7. Negative Drift in Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian

    2011-01-01

    An important step in gaining a better understanding of the stochastic dynamics of evolving populations, is the development of appropriate analytical tools. We present a new drift theorem for populations that allows properties of their long-term behaviour, e.g. the runtime of evolutionary algorithms...

  8. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  9. Development of drifting buoys

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.; Peshwe, V.B.; Tengali, S.

    . Considerable potential exists for the use of drifting buoys if the cost of data acquisition and processing systems is held at a reasonable level. As yet it is in infancy and further development is required before system reliability and longevity are considered...

  10. Collisional evolution of eccentric planetesimal swarms

    CERN Document Server

    Wyatt, M C; Payne, M J; Churcher, L J

    2009-01-01

    Models for the steady state collisional evolution of low eccentricity planetesimal belts identify debris disks with hot dust at 1AU, like eta Corvi and HD69830, as anomalous since collisional processing should have removed most of the planetesimal mass over their >1 Gyr lifetimes. This paper looks at the effect of large planetesimal eccentricities (e>>0.3) on their collisional lifetime and the amount of mass that can remain at late times M_{late}. For an axisymmetric planetesimal disk with common pericentres and eccentricities e, we find that M_{late} \\propto e^{-5/3}(1+e)^{4/3}(1-e)^{-3}. For a scattered disk-like population (i.e., common pericentres), in the absence of dynamical evolution, the mass evolution at late times would be as if only planetesimals with the largest eccentricity were present. Despite the increased remaining mass, higher eccentricities do not increase the hot emission from the collisional cascade until e>0.99, partly because most collisions occur near pericentre thus increasing the dus...

  11. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  12. Collisional effects in the dynamics of a dipolar gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    In this talk, we discuss the role of collisions in dipolar gases which are far from equilibrium. We compare and contrast collisional mechanisms with mean-field effects. We consider several cases of dynamical behaviour. We begin with cross-dimensional relaxation, where the time-scale of equilibration is studied following a quench in the trap parameters. We also discuss the damping of monopole and quadrupole excitations. Finally we discuss time-of-flight expansion dynamics. Our results demonstrate that collisions can play a significant role. We use these results to extract an estimate of the deca-heptuplet s-partial-wave scattering length of bosonic dysprosium, and to improve the accuracy of experimental time-of-flight expansion imaging. Financial support from the Marie Sklodowska-Curie H2020 framework program.

  13. Longitudinal dielectric permettivity of quantum Maxwell collisional plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2010-01-01

    The kinetic equation of Wigner -- Vlasov -- Boltzmann with collision integral in relaxation BGK (Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook) form in coordinate space for quantum non--degenerate (Maxwellian) collisional plasma is used. Exact expression (within the limits of considered model) is found. The analysis of longitudinal dielectric permeability is done. It is shown that in the limit when Planck's constant tends to zero of expression for dielectric permettivity transforms into the classical case of dielectric permettivity. At small values of wave number it has been received the solution of the dispersion equation. Damping of plasma oscillations has been analized. The analytical comparison with the dielectric Mermin' function received with the use of the kinetic equation in momentum space is done. Graphic comparison of the real and imaginary parts of dielectric permettivity of quantum and classical plasma is done also.

  14. Generation of longitudinal electric current by the transversal electromagnetic field in collisional plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2015-01-01

    From kinetic Vlasov equation for collisional plasmas distribution function is received in square-law approximation on size of electromagnetic field. The formula for calculation electric current is deduced at any temperature (any degree of degeneration electronic gas). This formula contains one-dimension quadrature. It is shown, that the nonlinearity account leads to occurrence the longitudinal electric current directed along a wave vector. This longitudinal current is perpendicular to the known transversal classical current, received at the linear analysis. When frequency of collisions tends to zero, all received results for collisional plasma pass in known corresponding formulas for collisionless plasma. The case of small values of wave number is considered. It is shown, that the received quantity of longitudinal current at tendency of frequency of collisions to zero also passes in known corresponding expression of current for collisionless plasmas. Graphic comparison of dimensionless size of current is spen...

  15. Style drift in private equity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Cumming; G. Fleming; A. Schwienbacher

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the concept of style drift to private equity investment. We present theory and evidence pertaining to style drifts in terms of a fund manager's stated focus on particular stages of entrepreneurial development. We develop a model that derives conditions under which style drifts are less

  16. Drift-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Banoo

    1998-01-01

    equation in the discrete momentum space. This is shown to be similar to the conventional drift-diffusion equation except that it is a more rigorous solution to the Boltzmann equation because the current and carrier densities are resolved into M×1 vectors, where M is the number of modes in the discrete momentum space. The mobility and diffusion coefficient become M×M matrices which connect the M momentum space modes. This approach is demonstrated by simulating electron transport in bulk silicon.

  17. Optimization of CFETR baseline performance by controlling rotation shear and pedestal collisionality through integrated modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Xiang; Chen, Jiale; Chan, Vincent S.; Zhuang, Ge; Li, Guoqiang; Deng, Zhao; Shi, Nan; Xu, Guoliang; Staebler, Gary M.; Guo, Wenfeng

    2017-04-01

    The optimization of a CFETR baseline scenario (Chan et al 2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 023017) with an electron cyclotron (EC) wave and neutral beam (NB) is performed using a multi-dimensional code suite. TGLF and NEO are used to calculate turbulent and neoclassical transport. The evaluation of sources and sinks, as well as the current evolution, are performed using ONETWO, and the equilibrium is updated using EFIT. The pedestal is consistent with the EPED model. Rotation shear is controlled using NB. It has been found that both fusion gain Q and NB power deposited in the edge increase with decreasing NB energy, with NB providing current drive, torque, energy and particle source simultaneously. By using an optimized combination of two NBs, Q can be kept at a high level while the NB edge power is reduced. Pedestal collisionality is controlled to find an optimization path for Q by trading off between the pedestal density and temperature with the pedestal pressure fixed. It has been found that Q increases with pedestal collisionality, while the density peaking factor (DPF) remains almost unchanged. The invariance of DPF can be explained by the change of the dominant type of turbulence from the core to the edge (i.e. trapped electron mode in the core and ion temperature gradient mode at the edge), and collisionality has the opposite effect on particle transport for these two modes. A weaker dependence of DPF on collisionality makes a higher density operation more favorable for fusion gain.

  18. Physical Mechanism of the Lower-Hybrid-Drift Instability in a Collisional Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-30

    ATTN R. CR.AwFORO DEFENSE TECHNICAL INFORMATION CENTER CAMERON STA’ION COmtiAVNDER/DIRECTOR ALEXANDRIA, VA. 22314 ATMOSP’-ERIC SCIENCES .ABOR.ATORY (12...S’REE 6565 ARE~ ~ OFLVER FHALS CHURl VRP AO TOY 22346 NEEZMAM MAl 02134 ,15(N.ONY 555 TECNOLOGY QUAREODCY A,’’N NEASAL ROSSCN’-O Y 01Cr A’-N D..N SP

  19. Ambient tremors in a collisional orogenic belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Lindsay Yuling; Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Wech, Aaron G.; Byrne, Timothy; Peng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Deep-seated tectonic tremors have been regarded as an observation tied to interconnected fluids at depth, which have been well documented in worldwide subduction zones and transform faults but not in a collisional mountain belt. In this study we explore the general features of collisional tremors in Taiwan and discuss the possible generation mechanism. In the 4 year data, we find 231 ambient tremor episodes with durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. In addition to a coseismic slip-induced stress change from nearby major earthquake, increased tremor rate is also highly correlated with the active, normal faulting earthquake swarms at the shallower depth. Both the tremor and earthquake swarm activities are confined in a small, area where the high attenuation, high thermal anomaly, the boundary between high and low resistivity, and localized veins on the surfaces distributed, suggesting the involvement of fluids from metamorphic dehydration within the orogen.

  20. Collisional Simulations of Neptune's Ring Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänninen, J.; Porco, C.

    1997-03-01

    The currently accepted model for Neptune arc confinement relies on the radial and azimuthal confining perturbations due to the nearby satellite, Galatea. This model calls for arc particle orbits exhibiting a negative eccentricity gradient and crossing at quadrature, a configuration that paradoxically leads to collisions energetic enough to disrupt arc confinement. We confirm with numerical collisional N-body simulations that the confinement mechanism relying on a 42:43 corotation-inclination resonance and a 42:43 outer Lindblad resonance with Galatea is indeed capable of confining a large population of 10-m-size and bigger particles over short time scales. Moreover, we find that an 84:86 outer vertical resonance, also due to Galatea, falling within 20 m of the arcs' radial position, effectively reduces the collision frequency and relative collisional velocities and consequently stabilizes the arcs over long time scales against the disruptive effects of collisions.

  1. Fine velocity structures collisional dissipation in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    In a weakly collisional plasma, such as the solar wind, collisions are usually considered far too weak to produce any significant effect on the plasma dynamics [1]. However, the estimation of collisionality is often based on the restrictive assumption that the particle velocity distribution function (VDF) shape is close to Maxwellian [2]. On the other hand, in situ spacecraft measurements in the solar wind [3], as well as kinetic numerical experiments [4], indicate that marked non-Maxwellian features develop in the three-dimensional VDFs, (temperature anisotropies, generation of particle beams, ring-like modulations etc.) as a result of the kinetic turbulent cascade of energy towards short spatial scales. Therefore, since collisional effects are proportional to the velocity gradients of the VDF, the collisionless hypothesis may fail locally in velocity space. Here, the existence of several characteristic times during the collisional relaxation of fine velocity structures is investigated by means of Eulerian numerical simulations of a spatially homogeneous force-free weakly collisional plasma. The effect of smoothing out velocity gradients on the evolution of global quantities, such as temperature and entropy, is discussed, suggesting that plasma collisionality can increase locally due to the velocity space deformation of the particle velocity distribution. In particular, by means of Eulerian simulations of collisional relaxation of a spatially homogeneous force-free plasma, in which collisions among particles of the same species are modeled through the complete Landau operator, we show that the system entropy growth occurs over several time scales, inversely proportional to the steepness of the velocity gradients in the VDF. We report clear evidences that fine velocity structures are dissipated by collisions in a time much shorter than global non-Maxwellian features, like, for example, temperature anisotropies. Moreover we indicate that, if small-scale structures

  2. Molecular spectroscopy and collisional excitation. [in astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, S.

    1975-01-01

    The paper examines the basic principles underlying the molecular transitions responsible for interstellar molecular spectra. The energy levels of molecules are discussed in detail with special attention given to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the electronic Hamiltonian, and the parameters of vibrational and rotational energy. The probabilities for radiative and collisional transitions are calculated. A brief review of techniques for molecular spectroscopy is presented along with methods used to determine collision cross sections on both an experimental and a theoretical basis.

  3. Collisionally induced atomic clock shifts and correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, Y. B.; Osherov, I. [Departments of Chemistry and Electro-Optics and the Ilse Katz Center for Nano-Science, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts for atomic clocks using a density-matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Numerical results for a finite-temperature {sup 87}Sr {sup 1}S{sub 0} (F=9/2) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

  4. Fe XVII Emission from Hot, Collisional Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Bitter, M; von Goeler, S; Hill, K W

    2004-12-03

    The ratios of the Fe XVII 3s {yields} 2p transitions to that of the dominant 3d {yields} 2p transition measured in high-temperature tokamak plasmas are compared to solar and astrophysical observations. Good agreement is found, indicating that the collisional line formation processes active in opacity-free, low-density, high-temperature laboratory plasmas are a good description of those found in astrophysical plasmas.

  5. Parametric excitation of axisymmetric toroidal electrostatic mo de by drift wave turbulences%轴对称环状静电模的漂移波湍流参量激发理论研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章扬忠; 谢涛

    2014-01-01

    The axisymmetric toroidal electrostatic mode discussed in this paper refers collectively to the nearly ideal electro-static fluid mode with zero toroidal mode number in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas like tokamak, including geodesic acoustic mode, sound waves and the so-called nearly zero-frequency zonal flow. Use is made of cold ion fluid model in the toroidal coordinate system with a circular cross section to develop the theory of parametric excitation for the three above mentioned modes systematically to the first order of inverse large aspect ratio, which ends up with the four following observations: (1) The density zonal flow is only associated with the excitation of the first harmonic cosine sound wave and is independent of the potential zonal flow. (2) The geodesic acoustic mode is the high frequency branch of the dispersion in the form of coupling between the first harmonic sine sound wave and the nearly zero-frequency zonal flow due to geodesic curvature, while the low frequency branch of the same dispersion is identified to be the ‘toroidally modified nearly zero-frequency zonal flow’. (3) Only a weak coupling exists between the second harmonic sine sound wave and the nearly zero-frequency zonal flow. (4) All cosine sound waves and sine sound waves beyond the second harmonic are decoupled to the nearly zero-frequency zonal flow. A Gaussian type of drift wave energy spectrum with only a few parameters is introduced for calculation. Emphasis is laid on the effects resulting from the finite radial spectrum width such as double Landau-singularity, which reveal a significant modification to the δ-spectrum, thus resulting in serious restriction to the parametric excitation of geodesic acoustic mode and nearly zero-frequency zonal flow. Also discussed is the possibility of excitation of density zonal flow in the high q region. Numerical results are presented graphically and discussed in the reasonable physical regime. It is indicated that the

  6. Exact collisional moments for plasma fluid theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Hirvijoki, E.; Lingam, M.

    2017-04-01

    The velocity-space moments of the often troublesome nonlinear Landau collision operator are expressed exactly in terms of multi-index Hermite-polynomial moments of distribution functions. The collisional moments are shown to be generated by derivatives of two well-known functions, namely, the Rosenbluth-MacDonald-Judd-Trubnikov potentials for a Gaussian distribution. The resulting formula has a nonlinear dependency on the relative mean flow of the colliding species normalised to the root-mean-square of the corresponding thermal velocities and a bilinear dependency on densities and higher-order velocity moments of the distribution functions, with no restriction on temperature, flow, or mass ratio of the species. The result can be applied to both the classic transport theory of plasmas that relies on the Chapman-Enskog method, as well as to derive collisional fluid equations that follow Grad's moment approach. As an illustrative example, we provide the collisional ten-moment equations with exact conservation laws for momentum- and energy-transfer rates.

  7. Polymers for Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duez, Quentin; Chirot, Fabien; Liénard, Romain; Josse, Thomas; Choi, ChangMin; Coulembier, Olivier; Dugourd, Philippe; Cornil, Jérôme; Gerbaux, Pascal; De Winter, Julien

    2017-07-01

    One of the main issues when using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) for the determination of collisional cross-section (CCS) concerns the need for a robust calibration procedure built from referent ions of known CCS. Here, we implement synthetic polymer ions as CCS calibrants in positive ion mode. Based on their intrinsic polydispersities, polymers offer in a single sample the opportunity to generate, upon electrospray ionization, numerous ions covering a broad mass range and a large CCS window for different charge states at a time. In addition, the key advantage of polymer ions as CCS calibrants lies in the robustness of their gas-phase structure with respect to the instrumental conditions, making them less prone to collisional-induced unfolding (CIU) than protein ions. In this paper, we present a CCS calibration procedure using sodium cationized polylactide and polyethylene glycol, PLA and PEG, as calibrants with reference CCS determined on a home-made drift tube. Our calibration procedure is further validated by testing the polymer calibration to determine CCS of numerous different ions for which CCS are reported in the literature. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Benchmark of the local drift-kinetic models for neoclassical transport simulation in helical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B.; Satake, S.; Kanno, R.; Sugama, H.; Matsuoka, S.

    2017-02-01

    The benchmarks of the neoclassical transport codes based on the several local drift-kinetic models are reported here. Here, the drift-kinetic models are zero orbit width (ZOW), zero magnetic drift, DKES-like, and global, as classified in Matsuoka et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 072511 (2015)]. The magnetic geometries of Helically Symmetric Experiment, Large Helical Device (LHD), and Wendelstein 7-X are employed in the benchmarks. It is found that the assumption of E ×B incompressibility causes discrepancy of neoclassical radial flux and parallel flow among the models when E ×B is sufficiently large compared to the magnetic drift velocities. For example, Mp≤0.4 where Mp is the poloidal Mach number. On the other hand, when E ×B and the magnetic drift velocities are comparable, the tangential magnetic drift, which is included in both the global and ZOW models, fills the role of suppressing unphysical peaking of neoclassical radial-fluxes found in the other local models at Er≃0 . In low collisionality plasmas, in particular, the tangential drift effect works well to suppress such unphysical behavior of the radial transport caused in the simulations. It is demonstrated that the ZOW model has the advantage of mitigating the unphysical behavior in the several magnetic geometries, and that it also implements the evaluation of bootstrap current in LHD with the low computation cost compared to the global model.

  9. Longshore transport based on directional waves along north Tamilnadu Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jena, B.K.; Chandramohan, P.; SanilKumar, V.

    the coastline tends to be a nodal drift regime. The temporary rise in wave activities during the cyclonic days often increases the southerly drift, which partly gets deposited in the Palk Bay and causes deficit for the northerly drift...

  10. Fingermark ridge drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification.

  11. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  12. Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles and their use in Ocean Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Oyvind; Bidlot, Jea-Raymond; Janssen, Peter A. E. M.; Mogensen, Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deep-water approximations to the Stokes drift velocity profile are explored as alternatives to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profiles investigated rely on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, viz the Stokes transport and the surface Stokes drift velocity. Comparisons against parametric spectra and profiles under wave spectra from the ERA-Interim reanalysis and buoy observations reveal much better agreement than the monochromatic profile even for complex sea states. That the profiles give a closer match and a more correct shear has implications for ocean circulation models since the Coriolis-Stokes force depends on the magnitude and direction of the Stokes drift profile and Langmuir turbulence parameterizations depend sensitively on the shear of the profile. Of the two Stokes drift profiles explored here, the profile based on the Phillips spectrum is by far the best. In particular, the shear near the surface is almost identical to that influenced by the f-5 tail of spectral wave models. The NEMO general circulation ocean model was recently extended to incorporate the Stokes-Coriolis force along with two other wave-related effects. The ECWMF coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean ensemble forecast system now includes these wave effects in the ocean model component (NEMO).

  13. The DRIFT Dark Matter Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Daw, E; Fox, J R; Gauvreau, J -L; Ghag, C; Harmon, L J; Harton, J L; Gold, M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Miller, E H; Murphy, A St J; Paling, S M; Landers, J M; Phan, N; Pipe, M; Pushkin, K; Robinson, M; Sadler, S W; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Walker, D; Warner, D

    2011-01-01

    The current status of the DRIFT (Directional Recoil Identification From Tracks) experiment at Boulby Mine is presented, including the latest limits on the WIMP spin-dependent cross-section from 1.5 kg days of running with a mixture of CS2 and CF4. Planned upgrades to DRIFT IId are detailed, along with ongoing work towards DRIFT III, which aims to be the world's first 10 m3-scale directional Dark Matter detector.

  14. Detecting the Drift of Quantum Sources: Not the de Finetti Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Lucia; van Enk, S. J.

    2011-05-01

    We propose and analyze a method to detect and characterize the drift of a nonstationary quantum source. It generalizes a standard measurement for detecting phase diffusion of laser fields to quantum systems of arbitrary Hilbert space dimension, qubits in particular. We distinguish diffusive and systematic drifts, and examine how quickly one can determine that a source is drifting. We show that for single-photon wave packets our measurement is implemented by the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect.

  15. Collisional blockade in microscopic optical dipole traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, N; Reymond, G; Grangier, P

    2002-07-08

    We analyze the operating regimes of a very small optical dipole trap, loaded from a magneto-optical trap, as a function of the atom loading rate, i.e., the number of atoms per second entering the dipole trap. We show that, when the dipole trap volume is small enough, a "collisional blockade" mechanism locks the average number of trapped atoms on the value 0.5 over a large range of loading rates. We also discuss the "weak loading" and "strong loading" regimes outside the blockade range, and we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these three regimes.

  16. Collisional evolution of the early asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Hutton, Ricardo; Brunini, Adrián

    1999-04-01

    We present numerical results obtained by a simulation of the collisional process between asteroids and scattered comets from the Uranus-Neptune zone. This mechanism allows the use of single exponent incremental size distributions for the initial belt reaching a final distribution that matches the observed population very well. Since the cometary bombardment was extremely efficient removing mass from the primordial asteroid belt in a very short time, we always obtained belts with total masses less than 0.001 M ⊕ after ≈ 2×10 7 yrs. This result allows processes with an important initial mass preserving Vestas basaltic crust.

  17. Missing Mass in Collisional Debris from Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, F; Brinks, E; Boquien, M; Amram, P; Lisenfeld, U; Koribalski, B S; Walter, F; Charmandaris, V

    2007-01-01

    Recycled dwarf galaxies can form in the collisional debris of massive galaxies. Theoretical models predict that, contrary to classical galaxies, they should be free of non-baryonic Dark Matter. Analyzing the observed gas kinematics of such recycled galaxies with the help of a numerical model, we demonstrate that they do contain a massive dark component amounting to about twice the visible matter. Staying within the standard cosmological framework, this result most likely indicates the presence of large amounts of unseen, presumably cold, molecular gas. This additional mass should be present in the disks of their progenitor spiral galaxies, accounting for a significant part of the so-called missing baryons.

  18. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  19. The KLOE drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; Lucia, E. De; Robertis, G. De; Sangro, R. De; Simone, P. De; Zorzi, G. De; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Domenico, A. Di; Donato, C. Di; Falco, S. Di; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U.V.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P. E-mail: paolo.valente@lnf.infn.it; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y

    2001-04-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K{sub L} produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm{sup 2} in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm{sup 2} in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  20. High rate drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, D.C. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Berisso, M.C. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Gutierrez, G. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Holmes, S.D. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Wehmann, A. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Avilez, C. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Felix, J. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Moreno, G. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Romero, M. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Sosa, M. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Forbush, M. (Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)); Huson, F.R. (Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)); Wightman, J.A. (Department of Physi

    1994-06-01

    Fermilab experiment 690, a study of target dissociation reactions pp[yields]pX using an 800 GeV/c proton beam and a liquid hydrogen target, collected data in late 1991. The incident beam and 600-800 GeV/c scattered protons were measured using a system of six 6 in.x4 in. and two 15 in.x8 in. pressurized drift chambers spaced over 260 m. These chambers provided precise measurements at rates above 10 MHz (2 MHz per cm of sense wire). The measurement resolution of the smaller chambers was 90 [mu]m, and the resolution of the larger chambers was 125 [mu]m. Construction details and performance results, including radiation damage, are presented. ((orig.))

  1. The KLOE drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervelli, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; Lucia, E D; Robertis, G D; Sangro, R D; Simone, P D; Zorzi, G D; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Domenico, A D; Donato, C D; Falco, S D; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Von Hagel, U; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Panareo, M; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2001-01-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K sub L produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm sup 2 in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm sup 2 in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  2. Intense sediment transport: Collisional to turbulent suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzi, Diego; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    A recent simple analytical approach to the problem of steady, uniform transport of sediment by a turbulent shearing fluid dominated by interparticle collisions is extended to the case in which the mean turbulent lift may partially or totally support the weight of the sediment. We treat the granular-fluid mixture as a continuum and make use of constitutive relations of kinetic theory of granular gases to model the particle phase and a simple mixing-length approach for the fluid. We focus on pressure-driven flows over horizontal, erodible beds and divide the flow itself into layers, each dominated by different physical mechanisms. This permits a crude analytical integration of the governing equations and to obtain analytical expressions for the distribution of particle concentration and velocity. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing laboratory measurements on the flow of glass spheres and sand particles in water. We also show how to build a regime map to distinguish between collisional, turbulent-collisional, and fully turbulent suspensions.

  3. The Creation of Haumea's Collisional Family

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichting, Hilke E

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the first collisional family was discovered in the Kuiper belt. The parent body of this family, Haumea, is one of the largest objects in the Kuiper belt and is orbited by two satellites. It has been proposed that the Haumea family was created from dispersed fragments that resulted from a giant impact. This proposed origin of the Haumea family is however in conflict with the observed velocity dispersion between the family members (\\sim 140 m/s) which is significantly less than the escape velocity from Haumea's surface (\\sim 900 m/s). In this paper we propose a different formation scenario for Haumea's collisional family. In our scenario the family members are ejected while in orbit around Haumea. This scenario, therefore, gives naturally rise to a lower velocity dispersion among the family members than expected from direct ejection from Haumea's surface. In our scenario Haumea's giant impact forms a single moon that tidally evolves outward until it suffers a destructive collision from which the famil...

  4. Collisional deactivation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie A.; Barker, John R.

    1996-07-01

    The collisional deactivation of vibrationally excited pyrazine (C4N2H4) in the electronic ground state by 19 collider gases was studied using the time-resolved infrared fluorescence (IRF) technique. The pyrazine was photoexcited with a 308 nm laser and its vibrational deactivation was monitored following rapid radiationless transitions to produce vibrationally excited molecules in the electronic ground state. The IRF data were analyzed by a simple approximate inversion method, as well as with full collisional master equation simulations. The average energies transferred in deactivating collisions (d) exhibit a near-linear dependence on vibrational energy at lower energies and less dependence at higher energies. The deactivation of ground state pyrazine was found to be similar to that of ground state benzene [J. R. Barker and B. M. Toselli, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 12, 305 (1990)], but it is strikingly different from the deactivation of triplet state pyrazine [T. J. Bevilacqua and R. B. Weisman, J. Chem. Phys. 98, 6316 (1993)].

  5. Collisional Features in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attree, Nicholas Oliver; Murray, Carl; Cooper, Nicholas; Williams, Gareth

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's highly dynamic F ring contains a population of small (radius ~ 1 km) moonlets embedded within its core or on nearby orbits. These objects interact, both gravitationally and collisionally, with the ring producing a range of features, some of which are unique to it. Here we present a brief overview of F ring collisional processes, investigated using a combination of Cassini imaging, simulations and orbital dynamics. Collisions produce linear debris clouds, known as 'jets' and 'mini-jets', which evolve, due to differential orbital motion, over periods ranging from hours to months. Mini-jet-forming collisions occur daily in the F ring whilst larger, more dramatic, events are rarer but produce jets that persist for many months, 'wrapping around' the ring to form almost parallel strands. Measuring jet properties, such as formation rates and relative orbits, allows us to infer a local population of order hundreds of objects colliding at relative velocities of a few metres per second. N-body modelling of the collisions shows good agreement with observations when two aggregates are allowed to impact and partially fragment (as opposed to a solid moonlet encountering dust), implying massive objects both in the core and nearby. Multiple, repeated collisions by the same, or fragments of the same, object are also important in explaining some jet morphology, showing that many objects survive the collisions. The F ring represents a natural laboratory for observing low-velocity collisions between icy objects as well as the ongoing aggregation and accretion that most-likely forms them.

  6. DRIFT EFFECTS IN HGCDTE DETECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. PAVAN KUMAR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of temporal drift in spectral responsivity of HgCdTe photodetectors is investigated and found to have an origin different from what has been reported in literature. Traditionally, the literature attributes the cause of drift due to the deposition of thin film of ice water on the active area of the cold detector. The source of drift as proposed in this paper is more critical owing to the difficulties in acquisition of infrared temperature measurements. A model explaining the drift phenomenon in HgCdTe detectors is described by considering the deep trapping of charge carriers and generation of radiation induced deep trap centers which are meta-stable in nature. A theoretical model is fitted to the experimental data. A comparison of the model with the experimental data shows that the radiation induced deep trap centers and charge trapping effects are mainly responsible for the drift phenomenon observed in HgCdTe detectors.

  7. Bouchaud walks with variable drift

    CERN Document Server

    Parra, Manuel Cabezas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a sequence of Bouchaud trap models on $\\mathbb{Z}$ with drift. We analyze the possible scaling limits for a sequence of walks, where we make the drift decay to 0 as we rescale the walks. Depending on the speed of the decay of the drift we obtain three different scaling limits. If the drift decays slowly as we rescale the walks we obtain the inverse of an \\alpha$-stable subordinator as scaling limit. If the drift decays quickly as we rescale the walks, we obtain the F.I.N. diffusion as scaling limit. There is a critical speed of decay separating these two main regimes, where a new process appears as scaling limit. This critical speed is related to the index $\\alpha$ of the inhomogeneity of the environment.

  8. CTF Void Drift Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gosdin, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gergar, Marcus [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This milestone report is a summary of work performed in support of expansion of the validation and verification (V&V) matrix for the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code, CTF. The focus of this study is on validating the void drift modeling capabilities of CTF and verifying the supporting models that impact the void drift phenomenon. CTF uses a simple turbulent-diffusion approximation to model lateral cross-flow due to turbulent mixing and void drift. The void drift component of the model is based on the Lahey and Moody model. The models are a function of two-phase mass, momentum, and energy distribution in the system; therefore, it is necessary to correctly model the ow distribution in rod bundle geometry as a first step to correctly calculating the void distribution due to void drift.

  9. Wave-Ice interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈奚海莉

    2001-01-01

    The growth and movement of sea ice cover are influenced by the presence of wave field. Inturn, the wave field is influenced by the presence of ice cover. Their interaction is not fully understood.In this paper, we discuss some current understanding on wave attenuation when it propagates through frag-mented ice cover, ice drift due to the wave motion, and the growth characteristics of ice cover in wave field.

  10. Benchmark of the Local Drift-kinetic Models for Neoclassical Transport Simulation in Helical Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, B; Kanno, R; Sugama, H; Matsuoka, S

    2016-01-01

    The benchmarks of the neoclassical transport codes based on the several local drift-kinetic models are reported here. Here, the drift-kinetic models are ZOW, ZMD, DKES-like, and global, as classified in [Matsuoka et al., Physics of Plasmas 22, 072511 (2015)]. The magnetic geometries of HSX, LHD, and W7-X are employed in the benchmarks. It is found that the assumption of $\\boldsymbol E \\times \\boldsymbol B$ incompressibility causes discrepancy of neoclassical radial flux and parallel flow among the models, when $\\boldsymbol E \\times \\boldsymbol B$ is sufficiently large compared to the magnetic drift velocities. On the other hand, when $\\boldsymbol E \\times \\boldsymbol B$ and the magnetic drift velocities are comparable, the tangential magnetic drift, which is included in both the global and ZOW models, fills the role of suppressing unphysical peaking of neoclassical radial-fluxes found in the other local models at $E_r \\simeq 0$. In low collisionality plasmas, in particular, the tangential drift effect works w...

  11. Theory of sheath in a collisional multi-component plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Mahanta; K S Goswami

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this brief report is to study the behaviour of sheath structure in a multicomponent plasma with dust-neutral collisions. The plasma consists of electrons, ions, micron size negatively charged dust particles and neutrals. The sheath-edge potential and sheath width are calculated for collisionally dominated sheath. Comparison of collisionless and collisionally dominated sheath are made.

  12. Coulomb collisional effects on high energy particles in the presence of driftwave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, B; Cheng, C Z

    2013-01-01

    High energy particles' behavior including fusion born alpha particles in an ITER like tokamak in the presence of background driftwave turbulence is investigated by an orbit following calculation. The background turbulence is given by the toroidal driftwave eigenmode combined with a random number generator. The transport level is reduced as the particle energy increase; the widths of the guiding center islands produced by the passing particles are inverse proportional to the square root of parallel velocities. On the other hand, the trapped particles are sensitive to $E \\times B$ drift at the banana tips whose radial displacement is larger for lower energy particles. Coulomb collisional effects are incorporated which modifies the transport process of the trapped high energy particles whose radial excursion resides in limited radial domains without collisions.

  13. On the two weighting scheme for {delta}f collisional transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Wang, W. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    The validity is given to the newly proposed two weighting {delta}f scheme (Wang et al., Research Report of National Institute for Fusion Science NIFS-588, 1999) for collisional or neoclassical transport calculations, which can solve the drift kinetic equation taking account of effects of steep plasma gradients, large radial electric field, finite banana width, and the non-standard orbit topology near the axis. The marker density functions in weight equations are successively solved by using the idea of {delta}f method and a hierarchy of equations for weight and marker density functions is obtained. These hierarchy equations are solved by choosing an appropriate source function for each marker density. Thus the validity of the two weighting {delta}f scheme is mathematically proved. (author)

  14. Effects of drift angle on model ship flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, J.; Stern, F.

    The effects of drift angle on model ship flow are investigated through towing tank tests for the Series 60 CB=0.6 cargo/container model ship. Resistance, side force, drift moment, sinkage, trim, and heel data are procured for a range of drift angles β and Froude numbers (Fr) and the model free condition. Detailed free-surface and mean velocity and pressure flow maps are procured for high and low Fr=0.316 and 0.16 and β=5° and 10° (free surface) and β=10° (mean velocity and pressure) for the model fixed condition (i.e. fixed with zero sinkage, trim, and heel). Comparison of results at high and low Fr and previous data for β=0° enables identification of important free-surface and drift effects. Geometry, conditions, data, and uncertainty analysis are documented in sufficient detail so as to be useful as a benchmark for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation. The resistance increases linearly with β with same slope for all Fr, whereas the increases in the side force, drift moment, sinkage, trim, and heel with β are quadratic. The wave profile is only affected near the bow, i.e. the bow wave amplitude increases/decreases on the windward/leeward sides, whereas the wave elevations are affected throughout the entire wave field. However, the wave envelope angle on both sides is nearly the same as β=0°, i.e. the near-field wave pattern rotates with the hull and remains within a similar wave envelope as β=0°. The wave amplitudes are significantly increased/decreased on the windward/leeward sides. The wake region is also asymmetric with larger wedge angle on the leeward side. The boundary layer and wake are dominated by the hull vortex system consisting of fore body keel, bilge, and wave-breaking vortices and after body bilge and counter-rotating vortices. The occurrence of a wave-breaking vortex for breaking bow waves has not been previously documented in the literature. The trends for the maximum vorticity, circulation, minimum axial velocity, and

  15. Hemoglobin Drift after Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Timothy J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Kilic, Arman; Haggerty, Kara A.; Frank, Steven M.; Savage, William J.; Whitman, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent literature suggests that a restrictive approach to red blood cell transfusions is associated with improved outcomes in cardiac surgery (CS) patients. Even in the absence of bleeding, intravascular fluid shifts cause hemoglobin levels to drift postoperatively, possibly confounding the decision to transfuse. We undertook this study to define the natural progression of hemoglobin levels in postoperative CS patients. Methods We included all CS patients from 10/10-03/11 who did not receive a postoperative transfusion. Primary stratification was by intraoperative transfusion status. Change in hemoglobin was evaluated relative to the initial postoperative hemoglobin. Maximal drift was defined as the maximum minus the minimum hemoglobin for a given hospitalization. Final drift was defined as the difference between initial and discharge hemoglobin. Results Our final cohort included 199 patients, 71(36%) received an intraoperative transfusion while 128(64%) did not. The average initial and final hemoglobin for all patients were 11.0±1.4g/dL and 9.9±1.3g/dL, respectively, an final drift of 1.1±1.4g/dL. The maximal drift was 1.8±1.1g/dL and was similar regardless of intraoperative transfusion status(p=0.9). Although all patients’ hemoglobin initially dropped, 79% of patients reached a nadir and experienced a mean recovery of 0.7±0.7g/dL by discharge. On multivariable analysis, increasing CPB time was significantly associated with total hemoglobin drift(Coefficient/hour: 0.3[0.1–0.5]g/dL, p=0.02). Conclusions In this first report of hemoglobin drift following CS, although all postoperative patients experienced downward hemoglobin drift, 79% of patients exhibited hemoglobin recovery prior to discharge. Physicians should consider the eventual upward hemoglobin drift prior to administering red cell transfusions. PMID:22609121

  16. Nonlinear magnetic reconnection in low collisionality plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottaviani, M. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Porcelli, F. [Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy)

    1994-07-01

    The magnetic reconnection in collisionless regimes, where electron inertia is responsible for the decoupling of the plasma motion from that of the field lines, is discussed. Since the linear theory of m=1 modes breaks down for very small magnetic island widths, a non linear analysis is called for. Thus, the behaviour of a collisionless, 2-D fluid slab model in the limit {rho}/d -> 0, is analyzed. The main result is that, when the island size is larger than the linear layer but smaller than the equilibrium scale length, the reconnection rate exhibits a quasi-explosive time behaviour, during which a current density sub-layer narrower than the skin depth is formed. It is believed that the inclusion of the electron initial term in Ohm`s law opens the possibility to understand the rapidity of relaxation process observed in low collisionality plasmas. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Formation and evolution of vortices in a collisional strongly coupled dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, Sayanee [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, a/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Banerjee, Debabrata, E-mail: debu@ustc.edu.cn [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, a/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2016-07-29

    Formation and evolution of vortices are studied in a collisional strongly coupled dusty plasma in the framework of a Generalized Hydrodynamic model (GH). Here we mainly present the nonlinear dynamical response of this strongly coupled system in presence of dust-neutral collisional drag. It is shown that the interplay between the nonlinear elastic stress and the dust-neutral collisional drag results in the generation of non-propagating monopole vortex for some duration before it starts to propagate like transverse shear wave. It is also found that the interaction between two unshielded monopole vortices having both same (co-rotating) and opposite (counter rotating) rotations result in the formation of two propagating dipole vortices of equal and unequal strength respectively. These results will provide some new understanding on the transport properties in such a strongly coupled system. The numerical simulation is carried out using a de-aliased doubly periodic pseudo-spectral code with Runge–Kutta–Gill time integrator. - Highlights: • A numerical study of vortex evolution in strongly coupled dusty plasma is presented. • Dust-neutral drag is first time considered with the Generalized Hydrodynamic model (GH). • Dust-neutral drag force balances the nonlinear effect of elastic stress. • Localized non-propagating monopole structure is generated for some duration. • Dipole vortices are produced after interaction between two monopole vortices.

  18. Drift modes of a quasi-two-dimensional current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Malova, Kh. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Zelenyi, L. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15

    Stability of a plasma configuration consisting of a thin one-dimensional current sheet embedded into a two-dimensional background current sheet is studied. Drift modes developing in plasma as unstable waves along the current direction are considered. Dispersion relations for kink and sausage perturbation modes are obtained depending on the ratio of parameters of thin and background current sheets. It is shown that the existence of the background sheet results in a decrease in the instability growth rates and a significant increase in the perturbation wavelengths. The role of drift modes in the excitation of oscillations observed in the current sheet of the Earth's magnetotail is discussed.

  19. Silicon Drift Detectors for ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Navach, F; CERN. Geneva

    1992-01-01

    The Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) is a semiconductor, not yet extensively used in HEP experiment, which has an excellent spatial resolution and granularity about comparable to a pixel device requiring a number of readout channels two order of magnitude less.

  20. SOLAR WIND COLLISIONAL AGE FROM A GLOBAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhiber, R; Usmanov, AV; Matthaeus, WH [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Goldstein, ML [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    Simple estimates of the number of Coulomb collisions experienced by the interplanetary plasma to the point of observation, i.e., the “collisional age”, can be usefully employed in the study of non-thermal features of the solar wind. Usually these estimates are based on local plasma properties at the point of observation. Here we improve the method of estimation of the collisional age by employing solutions obtained from global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations. This enables evaluation of the complete analytical expression for the collisional age without using approximations. The improved estimation of the collisional timescale is compared with turbulence and expansion timescales to assess the relative importance of collisions. The collisional age computed using the approximate formula employed in previous work is compared with the improved simulation-based calculations to examine the validity of the simplified formula. We also develop an analytical expression for the evaluation of the collisional age and we find good agreement between the numerical and analytical results. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications for an improved estimation of collisionality along spacecraft trajectories, including Solar Probe Plus.

  1. Diffusive shock acceleration with magnetic field amplification and Alfvenic drift

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2012-01-01

    We explore how wave-particle interactions affect diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at astrophysical shocks by performing time-dependent kinetic simulations, in which phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA), Alfvenic drift, thermal leakage injection, Bohm-like diffusion, and a free escape boundary are implemented. If the injection fraction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles is greater than 2x10^{-4}, for the shock parameters relevant for young supernova remnants, DSA is efficient enough to develop a significant shock precursor due to CR feedback, and magnetic field can be amplified up to a factor of 20 via CR streaming instability in the upstream region. If scattering centers drift with Alfven speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum can be steepened significantly and the acceleration efficiency is reduced. Nonlinear DSA with self-consistent MFA and Alfvenic drift predicts that the postshock CR pressure saturates roughly at 10 % of the shock ram pressure for strong shocks...

  2. THE COLLISIONAL EVOLUTION OF DEBRIS DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, Andras; Rieke, George H. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Balog, Zoltan, E-mail: agaspar@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: grieke@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: balog@mpia.de [Max-Plank Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-05-01

    We explore the collisional decay of disk mass and infrared emission in debris disks. With models, we show that the rate of the decay varies throughout the evolution of the disks, increasing its rate up to a certain point, which is followed by a leveling off to a slower value. The total disk mass falls off {proportional_to}t {sup -0.35} at its fastest point (where t is time) for our reference model, while the dust mass and its proxy-the infrared excess emission-fades significantly faster ({proportional_to}t {sup -0.8}). These later level off to a decay rate of M{sub tot}(t){proportional_to}t {sup -0.08} and M{sub dust}(t) or L{sub ir}(t){proportional_to}t {sup -0.6}. This is slower than the {proportional_to}t {sup -1} decay given for all three system parameters by traditional analytic models. We also compile an extensive catalog of Spitzer and Herschel 24, 70, and 100 {mu}m observations. Assuming a log-normal distribution of initial disk masses, we generate model population decay curves for the fraction of stars harboring debris disks detected at 24 {mu}m. We also model the distribution of measured excesses at the far-IR wavelengths (70-100 {mu}m) at certain age regimes. We show general agreement at 24 {mu}m between the decay of our numerical collisional population synthesis model and observations up to a Gyr. We associate offsets above a Gyr to stochastic events in a few select systems. We cannot fit the decay in the far-infrared convincingly with grain strength properties appropriate for silicates, but those of water ice give fits more consistent with the observations (other relatively weak grain materials would presumably also be successful). The oldest disks have a higher incidence of large excesses than predicted by the model; again, a plausible explanation is very late phases of high dynamical activity around a small number of stars. Finally, we constrain the variables of our numerical model by comparing the evolutionary trends generated from the exploration

  3. Deterministic single-file dynamics in collisional representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesoni, F; Taloni, A

    2007-12-01

    We re-examine numerically the diffusion of a deterministic, or ballistic single file with preassigned velocity distribution (Jepsen's gas) from a collisional viewpoint. For a two-modal velocity distribution, where half the particles have velocity +/-c, the collisional statistics is analytically proven to reproduce the continuous time representation. For a three-modal velocity distribution with equal fractions, where less than 12 of the particles have velocity +/-c, with the remaining particles at rest, the collisional process is shown to be inhomogeneous; its stationary properties are discussed here by combining exact and phenomenological arguments. Collisional memory effects are then related to the negative power-law tails in the velocity autocorrelation functions, predicted earlier in the continuous time formalism. Numerical and analytical results for Gaussian and four-modal Jepsen's gases are also reported for the sake of a comparison.

  4. Modelling substorm chorus events in terms of dispersive azimuthal drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Collier

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Substorm Chorus Event (SCE is a radio phenomenon observed on the ground after the onset of the substorm expansion phase. It consists of a band of VLF chorus with rising upper and lower cutoff frequencies. These emissions are thought to result from Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons which drift into a ground station's field of view from an injection site around midnight. The increasing frequency of the emission envelope has been attributed to the combined effects of energy dispersion due to gradient and curvature drifts, and the modification of resonance conditions and variation of the half-gyrofrequency cutoff resulting from the radial component of the ExB drift.

    A model is presented which accounts for the observed features of the SCE in terms of the growth rate of whistler mode waves due to anisotropy in the electron distribution. This model provides an explanation for the increasing frequency of the SCE lower cutoff, as well as reproducing the general frequency-time signature of the event. In addition, the results place some restrictions on the injected particle source distribution which might lead to a SCE.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (Wave-particle interaction – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Storms and substorms

  5. Evolution of Collisionally Merged Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T K; Baumgardt, H; Ibukiyama, A; Makino, J; Ebisuzaki, & T; Suzuki, Takeru K; Nakasato, Naohito; Baumgardt, Holger; Ibukiyama, Akihiro; Makino, Junichiro

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of collisionally merged stars with mass of ~100 Msun which might be formed in dense star clusters. We assumed that massive stars with several tens Msun collide typically after ~1Myr of the formation of the cluster and performed hydrodynamical simulations of several collision events. Our simulations show that after the collisions, merged stars have extended envelopes and their radii are larger than those in the thermal equilibrium states and that their interiors are He-rich because of the stellar evolution of the progenitor stars. We also found that if the mass-ratio of merging stars is far from unity, the interior of the merger product is not well mixed and the elemental abundance is not homogeneous. We then followed the evolution of these collision products by a one dimensional stellar evolution code. After an initial contraction on the Kelvin-Helmholtz (thermal adjustment) timescale (~10^{3-4} yr), the evolution of the merged stars traces that of single homogeneous stars with co...

  6. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  7. Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.

    2009-04-23

    become the slow and entropy modes of the conventional MHD). In the "dissipation range" below ion gyroscale, there are again two cascades: the kinetic-Alfven-wave (KAW) cascade governed by two fluid-like Electron Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (ERMHD) equations and a passive cascade of ion entropy fluctuations both in space and velocity. The latter cascade brings the energy of the inertial-range fluctuations that was Landau-damped at the ion gyroscale to collisional scales in the phase space and leads to ion heating. The KAWenergy is similarly damped at the electron gyroscale and converted into electron heat. Kolmogorov-style scaling relations are derived for all of these cascades. The relationship between the theoretical models proposed in this paper and astrophysical applications and observations is discussed in detail.

  8. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV PS Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows Linac 2 drift-tubes, suspended on stems coming from the top, in contrast to Linac 1, where the drift-tubes stood on stems coming from the bottom.

  9. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  10. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgalla, R. J. F., E-mail: reneesgalla@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil)

    2015-02-15

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ∼ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is λ{sub r} ∼ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs)

  11. ELECTRON HEAT FLUX IN THE SOLAR WIND: ARE WE OBSERVING THE COLLISIONAL LIMIT IN THE 1 AU DATA?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Università degli Studi di Firenze Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Matteini, L. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Pantellini, F. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot 5, place J. Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2014-07-20

    Using statistically significant data at 1 AU, it has recently been shown (Bale et al.) that in the solar wind, when the Knudsen number K {sub T} (the ratio between the electron mean free path and the electron temperature scale height) drops below about 0.3, the electron heat flux q intensity rapidly approaches the classical collisional Spitzer-Härm limit. Using a fully kinetic model including the effect of Coulomb collisions and the expansion of the solar wind with heliocentric distance, we observe that the heat flux strength does indeed approach the collisional value for Knudsen numbers smaller than about 0.3 in very good agreement with the observations. However, closer inspection of the heat flux properties, such as its variation with the heliocentric distance and its dependence on the plasma parameters, shows that for Knudsen numbers between 0.02 and 0.3 the heat flux is not conveniently described by the Spitzer-Härm formula. We conclude that even though observations at 1 AU seem to indicate that the electron heat flux intensity approaches the collisional limit when the Knudsen drops below ∼0.3, the collisional limit is not a generally valid closure for a Knudsen larger than 0.01. Moreover, the good agreement between the heat flux from our model and the heat flux from solar wind measurements in the high-Knudsen number regime seems to indicate that the heat flux at 1 AU is not constrained by electromagnetic instabilities as both wave-particle and wave-wave interactions are neglected in our calculations.

  12. Collisional Disruption of Ice by High-Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Masahiko

    1999-11-01

    High-velocity impact among icy planetesimals is a physical phenomenon important to the planetary evolution process in the outer Solar System. In order to study this phenomenon, impact experiments on water ice were made by using a two-stage light gas gun installed in a cold room (-10°C) to clarify the elementary processes of collisional disruption and to study the reaccumulation and the escape conditions of the impact fragments. Cubic ice targets ranging in size from 15 to 100 mm were impacted by a nylon projectile of 7 mg with an impact velocity ( vi) from 2.3 to 4.7 km/s. The corresponding mass ratio of the projectile to the target ( mp/ Mt) ranged from 10 -3 to 10 -6, which is two orders of magnitude lower than that used in previous studies (Arakawa et al. 1995, Icarus118, 341-354). As a result, we obtained data on elementary processes such as attenuation of the shock wave and fragmentation dynamics. We found that the shock pressure attenuates in the ice target according to the relation of P∝( Lp/ r2, irrespective of the mass ratio between 10 -3 and 10 -5, where Lp is the projectile size and r is a propagation distance. The largest fragment mass ( ml) normalized by the original target mass has a good relationship to a nondimensional impact stress ( PI, NDIS) defined as the ratio of the antipodal pressure to the material strength. This relationship is described as ml/ Mt ∝ PI-1.7 for a wide range of impact conditions (50 m/s20 km) reaccumulated. On the other hand, when smaller icy bodies (radius<2 km) disrupted catastrophically, all fragments escaped and a rubble pile was never formed.

  13. Transverse electric conductivity and dielectric permeability in quantum non-degenerate and maxwellian collisional plasma with variable collision frequency in Mermin's approach

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2013-01-01

    Formulas for transverse conductance and dielectric permeability in quantum non-degenerate and Maxwellian collisional plasma with arbitrary variable collision frequency in Mermin's approach are deduced. Frequency of collisions of particles depends arbitrarily on a wave vector. The special case of frequency of collisions proportional to the module of a wave vector is considered. The graphic analysis of the real and imaginary parts of dielectric function is made.

  14. Onset of stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in a plasma in the presence of hot drifting electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D. N.; Yadav, Pinki; Jang, D. G.; Hur, M. S.; Suk, H.; Avinash, K.

    2015-05-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in plasmas with energetic drifting electrons was investigated by analyzing the growth of interacting waves during the Raman scattering process. The Langmuir wave and scattered electromagnetic sideband wave grow initially and are dampened after attaining a maximum level that indicates a periodic exchange of energy between the pump wave and the daughter waves. The presence of energetic drifting electrons in the laser-produced plasma influences the stimulated Raman scattering process. The plasma wave generated by Raman scattering may be influenced by the energetic electrons, which enhance the growth rate of the instability. Our results show that the presence of energetic (hot) drifting electrons in a plasma has an important effect on the evolution of the interacting waves. This phenomenon is modeled via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the propagation and interaction of the laser under Raman instability.

  15. Does the geoid drift west?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, G. E.; Parker, R. L.; Zumberge, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    In 1970 Hide and Malin noted a correlation of about 0.8 between the geoid and the geomagnetic potential at the Earth's surface when the latter is rotated eastward in longitude by about 160 degrees and the spherical harmonic expansions of both functions are truncated at degree 4. From a century of magnetic observatory data, Hide and Malin inferred an average magnetic westward drift rate of about 0.27 degrees/year. They attributed the magnetic-gravitational correlation to a core event at about 1350 A.D. which impressed the mantle's gravity pattern at long wavelengths onto the core motion and the resulting magnetic field. The impressed pattern was then carried westward 160 degrees by the nsuing magnetic westward drift. An alternative possibility is some sort of steady physical coupling between the magnetic and gravitational fields (perhaps migration of Hide's bumps on the core-mantle interface). This model predicts that the geoid will drift west at the magnetic rate. On a rigid earth, the resulting changes in sea level would be easily observed, but they could be masked by adjustment of the mantle if it has a shell with viscosity considerably less than 10 to the 21 poise. However, steady westward drift of the geoid also predicts secular changes in g, the local acceleration of gravity, at land stations. These changes are now ruled out by recent independent high-accuracy absolute measurements of g made by several workers at various locations in the Northern Hemisphere.

  16. Theory of Collisional Two-Stream Plasma Instabilities in the Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Chad Allen; Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers; Fontenla, Juan

    2014-06-01

    The solar chromosphere experiences intense heating just above its temperature minimum. The heating increases the electron temperature in this region by over 2000 K. Furthermore, it exhibits little time variation and appears widespread across the solar disk. Although semi-empirical models, UV continuum observations, and line emission measurements confirm the existence of the heating, its source remains unexplained. Potential heating sources such as acoustic shocks, resistive dissipation, and magnetic reconnection via nanoflares fail to account for the intensity, persistence, and ubiquity of the heating. Fontenla (2005) suggested turbulence from a collisional two-stream plasma instability known as the Farley-Buneman instability (FBI) could contribute significantly to the heating. This instability is known to heat the plasma of the E-region ionosphere which bears many similarities to the chromospheric plasma. However, the ionospheric theory of the FBI does not account for the diverse ion species found in the solar chromosphere. This work develops a new collisional, two-stream instability theory appropriate for the chromospheric plasma environment using a linear fluid analysis to derive a new dispersion relationship and critical E x B drift velocity required to trigger the instability. Using a 1D, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, radiative transfer model and careful estimates of collision rates and magnetic field strengths, we calculate the trigger velocities necessary to induce the instability throughout the chromosphere. Trigger velocities as low as 4 km s^-1 are found near the temperature minimum, well below the local neutral acoustic speed in that region. From this, we expect the instability to occur frequently, converting kinetic energy contained in neutral convective flows from the photosphere into thermal energy via turbulence. This could contribute significantly to chromospheric heating and explain its persistent and ubiquitous nature.

  17. Studies of electron drift velocity in nitrogen and isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC/SP), SP (Brazil); Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The electron drift velocity is one of the most important transport parameters used to describe the physical behaviour of gas discharges and the development of avalanches in gaseous detectors, mainly when temporal information is significant, as in drift chambers and in the recent Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Although many filling gases, isobutane is frequently used in RPCs, due to its excellent timing properties, but at high electric fields conditions there are insufficient data available in literature. In the present work we report the preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for isobutane as function of the reduced electric field E/N, in the range of 100 Td up to 216 Td. There are different methods to determine electron drift velocity in a gas, and our measurements were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which consists of extracting electrons from a metallic cathode and accelerates them toward the anode by a uniform electric field. Once the drift distance and the transit time are known, the drift velocities can be determined. In our system, the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (LTB MNL200-LD) liberates electron from the cathode made of aluminium (40mm diameter). By means of a high voltage supply (Bertan, 225-30), these electrons are accelerated toward the anode (made of a high resistivity glass - 2:10{sup 12}{omega} cm) and this movement produces a fast electric signal in the anode, which is digitalized in an oscilloscope (LeCroy WavePro 7000) with 1 GHz bandwidth and 10 GS/s. The values obtained were compared to that ones of a Bolsig+ simulation code. In order to validate the technique and to analyze non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented. (author)

  18. Collisional interaction between metastable neon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drunen, Wouter Johannes van

    2008-07-07

    In this thesis, the study of cold gases of neon atoms in different metastable states is described. It contains measurements of the collisional parameters for both the 3s[3/2]{sub 2} and the 3s'[1/2]{sub 0} metastable state and the dependence of the inelastic loss on external fields. Furthermore, the investigation of frequency dependent laser-induced collisions, and the possibility to excite photoassociation resonances is presented. For the measurements described here, neon atoms have been confined in a magnetooptical trap, in a magnetostatic trap, or in an optical dipole trap, respectively. By laser cooling inside the magnetic trap, atomic samples with more than 95 percent occupation of the magnetic substate m{sub J} = +2 could be prepared. They have a typical temperature of 0.5 mK, central densities up to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, and a central phase-space density of up to 2.2.10{sup -7}. After loading the optical dipole trap from the magnetic trap, 2.5.10{sup 6} atoms with typical temperatures of 0.1 mK, and central densities up to 5.10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} were trapped. By evaporative cooling of the atoms in the magnetic trap we could increase the phase-space density by a factor of 200 to 5.10{sup -5}. Investigating the frequency dependence of laser-induced collisions did not reveal an experimental signature for the excitation of photoassociation resonances. For the {sup 3}D{sub 3} line a frequency dependence of laser enhanced Penning ionization was observed. Measurement of the two-body loss coefficient as function of the magnetic field showed a field dependence of the inelastic loss. These losses increase towards both small and large offset fields. The implementation of an optical dipole trap allowed us to trap the {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable state. From the trap loss measurements we determined the two-body loss coefficient of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable state for both bosonic isotopes {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne. For {sup 20}Ne we obtained {beta}=6{sup +5}{sub

  19. Steady-state benchmarks of DK4D: A time-dependent, axisymmetric drift-kinetic equation solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, B. C. [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Ramos, J. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The DK4D code has been written to solve a set of time-dependent, axisymmetric, finite-Larmor-radius drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) for the non-Maxwellian part of the electron and ion distribution functions using the full, linearized Fokker–Planck–Landau collision operator. The plasma is assumed to be in the low- to finite-collisionality regime, as is found in the cores of modern and future magnetic confinement fusion experiments. Each DKE is formulated such that the perturbed distribution function carries no net density, parallel momentum, or kinetic energy. Rather, these quantities are contained within the background Maxwellians and would be evolved by an appropriate set of extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. This formulation allows for straight-forward coupling of DK4D to existing extended MHD time evolution codes. DK4D uses a mix of implicit and explicit temporal representations and finite element and spectral spatial representations. These, along with other computational methods used, are discussed extensively. Steady-state benchmarks are then presented comparing the results of DK4D to expected analytic results at low collisionality, qualitatively, and to the Sauter analytic fits for the neoclassical conductivity and bootstrap current, quantitatively. These benchmarks confirm that DK4D is capable of solving for the correct, gyroaveraged distribution function in stationary magnetic equilibria. Furthermore, the results presented demonstrate how the exact drift-kinetic solution varies with collisionality as a function of the magnetic moment and the poloidal angle.

  20. An Obliquely Propagating Electromagnetic Lower-Hybrid-Drift Instability in Plasmas with Negative Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feihu; ZHANG Zhou; CHEN Yinhua; HUANG Feng

    2007-01-01

    In this study,by employing a local fluid theory for warm plasma containing negative ions,an obliquely propagating electromagnetic instability in the lower hybrid frequency range driven by cross-field currents or relative drifts between electrons and ions Was investigated.It is found that the growth rate of the lower-hybrid-drift instability(LHDI)can be controlled by appropriate selection of the propagation direction,the wave number and the relative population of the negative ions.

  1. Dispersal of invasive species by drifting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riel, van M.C.; Velde, van der G.; Vaate, bij de A.

    2011-01-01

    Drifting can be an effective way for aquatic organisms to disperse and colonise new areas. Increasing connectivity between European large rivers facilitates invasion by drifting aquatic macroinvertebrates. The present study shows that high abundances of invasive species drift in the headstream of

  2. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  3. Isotropic inelastic and superelastic collisional rates in a multiterm atom

    CERN Document Server

    Belluzzi, L; Bueno, J Trujillo

    2013-01-01

    The spectral line polarization of the radiation emerging from a magnetized astrophysical plasma depends on the state of the atoms within the medium, whose determination requires considering the interactions between the atoms and the magnetic field, between the atoms and photons (radiative transitions), and between the atoms and other material particles (collisional transitions). In applications within the framework of the multiterm model atom (which accounts for quantum interference between magnetic sublevels pertaining either to the same J-level or to different J-levels within the same term) collisional processes are generally neglected when solving the master equation for the atomic density matrix. This is partly due to the lack of experimental data and/or of approximate theoretical expressions for calculating the collisional transfer and relaxation rates (in particular the rates for interference between sublevels pertaining to different J-levels, and the depolarizing rates due to elastic collisions). In th...

  4. A numerical estimation of the impact of Stokes drift on upper ocean temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaoshuang; WANG Zhifeng; WANG Bin; WU Kejian; HAN Guijun; LI Wei

    2014-01-01

    The impact of Stokes drift on the mixed layer temperature variation was estimated by taking into account an advective heat transport term induced by the Stokes drift in the equation of mixed layer temperature and using the oceanic and wave parameters from a global ocean circulation model (HYCOM) and a wave model ( Wave Watch III). The dimensional analysis and quantitative estimation method were conducted to assess the importance of the effect induced by the Stokes drift and to analyze its spatial distribution and seasonal variation characteristics. Results show that the contribution of the Stokes drift to the mixed layer tempera-ture variation at mid-to-high latitudes is comparable with that of the mean current, and a substantial part of mixed layer temperature change is induced by taking the Stokes drift effect into account. Although the advection heat transport induced by the Stokes drift is not the leading term for the mixed layer temperature equation, it cannot be neglected and even becomes critical in some regions for the simulation of the upper-ocean temperature.

  5. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H., E-mail: hendrik.jansen@desy.de

    2016-09-21

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  6. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  7. MPS II drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  8. Eigenmode stability analysis of drift-mirror modes in nonuniform plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Klimushkin

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Drift-mirror modes in a one-dimensional inhomogeneous model of the magnetosphere are studied by employing gyrokinetics, taking into account finite Larmor radius effects. A wave equation is derived which describes both the spatial structure of the modes, and its eigenvalue yields a growth rate of the mode. The finite Larmor radius effects are shown to raise the instability threshold especially for high-m waves, and lead to wave propagation across field lines.

  9. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, T.A. [Duffy, (T.A.) Tijeras, NM (United States); Goldman, A. [Goldman, (A.), Sandia, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  10. Collisional effects on the numerical recurrence in Vlasov-Poisson simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The initial state recurrence in numerical simulations of the Vlasov-Poisson system is a well-known phenomenon. Here we study the effect on recurrence of artificial collisions modeled through the Lenard-Bernstein operator [A. Lenard and I. B. Bernstein, Phys. Rev. 112, 1456-1459 (1958)]. By decomposing the linear Vlasov-Poisson system in the Fourier-Hermite space, the recurrence problem is investigated in the linear regime of the damping of a Langmuir wave and of the onset of the bump-on-tail instability. The analysis is then confirmed and extended to the nonlinear regime through a Eulerian collisional Vlasov-Poisson code. It is found that, despite being routinely used, an artificial collisionality is not a viable way of preventing recurrence in numerical simulations without compromising the kinetic nature of the solution. Moreover, it is shown how numerical effects associated to the generation of fine velocity scales, can modify the physical features of the system evolution even in nonlinear regime. This mean...

  11. Collisional effects on the numerical recurrence in Vlasov-Poisson simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università della Calabria, 87036 Rende (CS) (Italy); Camporeale, Enrico [Center for Mathematics and Computer Science (CWI), 1090 GB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    The initial state recurrence in numerical simulations of the Vlasov-Poisson system is a well-known phenomenon. Here, we study the effect on recurrence of artificial collisions modeled through the Lenard-Bernstein operator [A. Lenard and I. B. Bernstein, Phys. Rev. 112, 1456–1459 (1958)]. By decomposing the linear Vlasov-Poisson system in the Fourier-Hermite space, the recurrence problem is investigated in the linear regime of the damping of a Langmuir wave and of the onset of the bump-on-tail instability. The analysis is then confirmed and extended to the nonlinear regime through an Eulerian collisional Vlasov-Poisson code. It is found that, despite being routinely used, an artificial collisionality is not a viable way of preventing recurrence in numerical simulations without compromising the kinetic nature of the solution. Moreover, it is shown how numerical effects associated to the generation of fine velocity scales can modify the physical features of the system evolution even in nonlinear regime. This means that filamentation-like phenomena, usually associated with low amplitude fluctuations contexts, can play a role even in nonlinear regime.

  12. Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model for internal energy excitation and dissociation in hypersonic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munafò, A; Panesi, M; Magin, T E

    2014-02-01

    A Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model is proposed to reduce a detailed kinetic mechanism database developed at NASA Ames Research Center for internal energy transfer and dissociation in N(2)-N interactions. The coarse-grained model is constructed by lumping the rovibrational energy levels of the N(2) molecule into energy bins. The population of the levels within each bin is assumed to follow a Boltzmann distribution at the local translational temperature. Excitation and dissociation rate coefficients for the energy bins are obtained by averaging the elementary rate coefficients. The energy bins are treated as separate species, thus allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. The proposed coarse-grained model is applied to the study of nonequilibrium flows behind normal shock waves and within converging-diverging nozzles. In both cases, the flow is assumed inviscid and steady. Computational results are compared with those obtained by direct solution of the master equation for the rovibrational collisional model and a more conventional multitemperature model. It is found that the proposed coarse-grained model is able to accurately resolve the nonequilibrium dynamics of internal energy excitation and dissociation-recombination processes with only 20 energy bins. Furthermore, the proposed coarse-grained model provides a superior description of the nonequilibrium phenomena occurring in shock heated and nozzle flows when compared with the conventional multitemperature models.

  13. Dispersal of invasive species by drifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. VAN RIEL, G. VAN DER VELDE, A. BIJ DE VAATE

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Drifting can be an effective way for aquatic organisms to disperse and colonise new areas. Increasing connectivity between European large rivers facilitates invasion by drifting aquatic macroinvertebrates. The present study shows that high abundances of invasive species drift in the headstream of the river Rhine. Dikerogammarus villosus and Chelicorophium curvispinum represented up to 90% of the total of drifting macroinvertebrates. Drift activity shows seasonal and diel patterns. Most species started drifting in spring and were most abundant in the water column during the summer period. Drift activity was very low during the winter period. Diel patterns were apparent; most species, including D. villosus, drifted during the night. Drifting macroinvertebrates colonised stony substrate directly from the water column. D. villosus generally colonised the substrate at night, while higher numbers of C. curvispinum colonised the substrate during the day. It is very likely that drifting functions as a dispersal mechanism for crustacean invaders. Once waterways are connected, these species are no longer necessarily dependent on dispersal vectors other than drift for extending their distribution range [Current Zoology 57 (6: 818–827, 2011].

  14. Sheared Flow Driven Drift Instability and Vortices in Dusty Plasmas with Opposite Polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, A.; Shah, AttaUllah; Ikram, M.; Clark, R. E. H.

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency electrostatic drift waves are studied in an inhomogeneous dust magnetoplasma containing dust with components of opposite polarity. The drift waves are driven by the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) sheared flows in the presence of electrons and ions. Due to sheared flow in the linear regime, the electrostatic dust drift waves become unstable. The conditions of mode instability, with the effects of dust streaming and opposite polarity, are studied. These are excited modes which gain large amplitudes and exhibit interactions among themselves. The interaction is governed by the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) nonlinear equation with vector nonlinearity. The stationary solutions of the HM equation in the form of a vortex chain and a dipolar vortex, including effects of dust polarity and electron (ion) temperatures, are studied. The relevance of the present work to space and laboratory four component dusty plasmas is noted.

  15. Longitudinal dielectric permeability in quantum non-degenerate and maxwellian collisional plasma with constant collision frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Latyshev, A. V.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The formula for dielectric function of non-degenerate and maxwellian collisional plasmas is transformed to the form, convenient for research. Graphic comparison of longitudinal dielectric functions of quantum and classical non-degenerate collisional plasmas is made.

  16. Longitudinal dielectric permeability in quantum non-degenegate and maxwellian collisional plasma with constant collision frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2013-01-01

    The formula for dielectric function of non-degenerate and maxwellian collisional plasmas is transformed to the form, convenient for research. Graphic comparison of longitudinal dielectric functions of quantum and classical non-degenerate collisional plasmas is made.

  17. From Dust to Planetesimals: An Improved Model for Collisional Growth in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaud, Pascale; Meru, Farzana; Galvagni, Marina; Olczak, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Planet formation occurs within the gas- and dust-rich environments of protoplanetary disks. Observations of these objects show that the growth of primordial submicron-sized particles into larger aggregates occurs at the earliest evolutionary stages of the disks. However, theoretical models of particle growth that use the Smoluchowski equation to describe collisional coagulation and fragmentation have so far failed to produce large particles while maintaining a significant population of small grains. This has generally been attributed to the existence of two barriers impeding growth due to bouncing and fragmentation of colliding particles. In this paper, we demonstrate that the importance of these barriers has been artificially inflated through the use of simplified models that do not take into account the stochastic nature of the particle motions within the gas disk. We present a new approach in which the relative velocities between two particles are described by a probability distribution function that models both deterministic motion (from the vertical settling, radial drift, and azimuthal drift) and stochastic motion (from Brownian motion and turbulence). Taking both into account can give quite different results to what has been considered recently in other studies. We demonstrate the vital effect of two "ingredients" for particle growth: the proper implementation of a velocity distribution function that overcomes the bouncing barrier and, in combination with mass transfer in high-mass-ratio collisions, boosts the growth of larger particles beyond the fragmentation barrier. A robust result of our simulations is the emergence of two particle populations (small and large), potentially explaining simultaneously a number of longstanding problems in protoplanetary disks, including planetesimal formation close to the central star, the presence of millimeter- to centimeter-sized particles far out in the disk, and the persistence of μm-sized grains for millions of

  18. Limitations of Hall MHD as a model for turbulence in weakly collisional plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Howes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The limitations of Hall MHD as a model for turbulence in weakly collisional plasmas are explored using quantitative comparisons to Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory over a wide range of parameter space. The validity of Hall MHD in the cold ion limit is shown, but spurious undamped wave modes exist in Hall MHD when the ion temperature is finite. It is argued that turbulence in the dissipation range of the solar wind must be one, or a mixture, of three electromagnetic wave modes: the parallel whistler, oblique whistler, or kinetic Alfvén waves. These modes are generally well described by Hall MHD. Determining the applicability of linear kinetic damping rates in turbulent plasmas requires a suite of fluid and kinetic nonlinear numerical simulations. Contrasting fluid and kinetic simulations will also shed light on whether the presence of spurious wave modes alters the nonlinear couplings inherent in turbulence and will illuminate the turbulent dynamics and energy transfer in the regime of the characteristic ion kinetic scales.

  19. Laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, R

    1995-01-15

    An experiment that involves laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms is proposed and the spectral line shape of the cross section is calculated on the basis of data available in the literature. The feasibility of the experiment both in oven cells and in a crossed-atomic-beam geometry is discussed.

  20. A Stokes drift approximation based on the Phillips spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Breivik, Øyvind; Janssen, Peter A E M

    2016-01-01

    A new approximation to the Stokes drift velocity pro?le based on the exact solution for the Phillips spectrum is explored. The pro?file is compared with the monochromatic pro?file and the recently proposed exponential integral profi?le. ERA-Interim spectra and spectra from a wave buoy in the central North Sea are used to investigate the behaviour of the profi?le. It is found that the new profi?le has a much stronger gradient near the surface and lower normalized deviation from the pro?le computed from the spectra. Based on estimates from two open-ocean locations, an average value has been estimated for a key parameter of the profi?le. Given this parameter, the profi?le can be computed from the same two parameters as the monochromatic profi?le, namely the transport and the surface Stokes drift velocity.

  1. Proton temperature-anisotropy-driven instabilities in weakly collisional plasmas: Hybrid simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hellinger, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic instabilities in weakly collisional, high beta plasmas are investigated using two-dimensional hybrid expanding box simulations with Coulomb collisions modeled through the Langevin equation (corresponding to the Fokker-Planck one). The expansion drives a parallel or perpendicular temperature anisotropy (depending on the orientation of the ambient magnetic field). For the chosen parameters the Coulomb collisions are important with respect to the driver but are not strong enough to keep the system stable with respect to instabilities driven by the proton temperature anisotropy. In the case of the parallel temperature anisotropy the dominant oblique fire hose instability efficiently reduces the anisotropy in a quasilinear manner. In the case of the perpendicular temperature anisotropy the dominant mirror instability generates coherent compressive structures which scatter protons and reduce the temperature anisotropy. For both the cases the instabilities generate temporarily enough wave energy so that the ...

  2. A study of the propagation of ulf electromagnetic fields in collisional, inhomogeneous, magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, J.E.

    1987-02-01

    The propagation of ultralow-frequency (ulf) electromagnetic signals (Alfven and magnetosonic waves) in collisional, inhomogeneous, magnetized plasmas is analyzed by numerical simulation. The problem is formulated from a Maxwell-equation orbit-theory approach rather than from a magnetohydrodynamic point of view, and the problem is numerically treated in a fully time-dependent manner. Boundary-value-problem behavior is distinguished from initial-value-problem behavior. The propagation of two-dimensional small-amplitude electromagnetic disturbances in plasmas with spatially dependent densities and in plasmas with spatially dependent conductivities is numerically simulated, and when possible, the simulations are compared with theory. Changes in the plasma density lead to changes in the signal speed and to reflections; collisions lead to changes in the signal speed, to reflections, and to attenuations. Theoretical descriptions based upon discontinuities in the media are generally incorrect in predicting the amplitudes of signals reflected from plasma inhomogeneities. 19 refs., 16 figs.

  3. Collisional cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Sourav; Rangwala, S A

    2015-01-01

    The most generic cooling and thermalization pathway at the lowest temperatures is via elastic collisions. In hybrid ion-atom traps, ion cooling to temperatures where low partial wave collisions dominate require the collisional cooling mechanism to be well understood and controlled. There exists great uncertainty on whether cooling of light ions by heavier neutral atoms is possible. Here we experimentally demonstrate the cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms for the first time. We show that trapped 39K+ ions are cooled by localized ultracold neutral 85Rb atoms for an ion-atom mass ratio where most theoretical models predict ion heating. We demonstrate, based on detailed numerical simulation of our ion-cooling model, which is in excellent agreement with experiments, that cooling of ions by localized cold atoms is possible for any mass ratio. Our result opens up the possibility of studying quantum collisions and chemistry in trapped atom-ion systems.

  4. Nonlinear interaction between surface plasmons and ion oscillations in a semi-bounded collisional quantum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir; Taheri Boroujeni, S. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the nonlinear interaction between high-frequency surface plasmons and low-frequency ion oscillations in a semi-bounded collisional quantum plasma. By coupling the nonlinear Schrodinger equation and quantum hydrodynamic model, and taking into account the ponderomotive force, the dispersion equation is obtained. By solving this equation, it is shown that there is a modulational instability in the system, and collisions and quantum forces play significant roles on this instability. The quantum tunneling increases the phase and group velocities of the modulated waves and collisions increase the growth rate of the modulational instability. It is also shown that the effect of quantum forces and collisions is more significant in high modulated wavenumber regions.

  5. Second harmonic generation of Cosh-Gaussian laser beam in collisional plasma with nonlinear absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navpreet; Gupta, Naveen; Singh, Arvinder

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates second harmonic generation (SHG) of an intense Cosh-Gaussian (ChG) laser beam propagating through a preformed underdense collisional plasma with nonlinear absorption. Nonuniform heating of plasma electrons takes place due to the nonuniform irradiance of intensity along the wavefront of laser beam. This nonuniform heating of plasma leads to the self-focusing of the laser beam and thus produces strong density gradients in the transverse direction. The density gradients so generated excite an electron plasma wave (EPW) at pump frequency that interacts with the pump beam to produce its second harmonics. To envision the propagation dynamics of the ChG laser beam, moment theory in Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (W.K.B) approximation has been invoked. The effects of nonlinear absorption on self-focusing of the laser beam as well as on the conversion efficiency of its second harmonics have been theoretically investigated.

  6. Collisional effect on the Weibel instability with the bi-Maxwellian distribution function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdavi, M.; Khanzadeh, H. [Physics Department, Mazandaran University, P. O. Box 47415-416, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In this paper, the Coulomb collision effect of electron-ion is investigated based on the equilibrium bi-Maxwellian anisotropic distribution function in dense and unmagnetized plasma. An analytical expression is derived for the real frequency and the growth rate of the Weibel instability for two limiting cases |ξ=(ω{sup ′}/k{sub ||}θ{sub ||})|≫1 and |ξ|≪1. In the limit |ξ|≪1, the quantity η that is due to a collisional term will appear in the growth and condition of the rate of the Weibel instability, which leads to a constraining condition of the growth rate. When η increases, the growth rate will increase and the wave instability will be distant from its own damping mode.

  7. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  8. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  9. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  10. Snow Drift Management: Summit Station Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 6- 6 Engineering for Polar Operations, Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) Snow Drift Management Summit Station...Drift Management Summit Station Greenland Robert B. Haehnel and Matthew F. Bigl U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Cold...Engineering for Polar Operations, Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) EP-ARC-15-33, “Monitoring and Managing Snow Drifting at Summit Station, Greenland” ERDC

  11. Drift-Alfven instabilities of a finite beta plasma shear flow along a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-02-01

    It was derived that the drift-Alfven instabilities with the shear flow parallel to the magnetic field have significant difference from the drift-Alfven instabilities of a shearless plasma when the ion temperature is comparable with electron temperature for a finite plasma beta. The velocity shear not only modifies the frequency and the growth rate of the known drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping, but also triggers a combined effect of the velocity shear and the inverse ion Landau damping, which manifests the development of the ion kinetic shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability. The excited unstable waves have the phase velocities along the magnetic field comparable with the ion thermal velocity, and the growth rate is comparable with the frequency. The development of this instability may be the efficient mechanism of the ion energization in shear flows.

  12. Impact of groyne fields on the littoral drift: A hybrid morphological modelling study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, S. E.; Drønen, N.; Deigaard, R.

    2016-01-01

    of this mechanism is presented including effects of scales, e.g. the effect of the relative length of the groynes (compared to the width of the surf zone).The model results indicate a strong dependency of the reduction in littoral drift on the initial geometric bypass ratio (Qgeo*), which is defined from the groyne......This paper concerns numerical modelling of the impact on the littoral drift and the shoreline from groynes forming a field of equidistant and identical groynes. The most important effect of a groyne on the shoreline morphology is that the littoral drift is blocked completely or partially. A local...... reduction in the littoral drift around the groyne introduces alongshore gradients in the alongshore sediment transport and sedimentation and erosion around the groyne which will cause re-orientation of the bed contours towards the prevailing wave direction until an equilibrium is reached. A discussion...

  13. Decameter type III bursts with positive and negative frequency drift rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Briand, C.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Zarka, P.; Frantzusenko, A. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Panchenko, M.; Zaqarashvili, T.; Shergelashvili, B.

    2013-09-01

    We report about observations of decameter type III bursts whose frequency drift rates vary their signs from negative to positive. Moreover drift rates of some bursts vary the sign some times. Positive drift rates for some bursts are changed from 0.44 MHz/s to 12 MHz/s. At the same time the negative drift rates of these bursts are standard values for decameter type III bursts. A possible interpretation of such phenomenon on the base of plasma mechanism of type III burst generation is discussed. The sense of this interpretation is that group velocity of type III electromagnetic waves generated by fast electrons at some conditions can be smaller than velocity of these electrons.

  14. Very high energy emission of Crab-like pulsars driven by the Cherenkov drift radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Osmanov, Z

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the generation of very high energy (VHE) emission in Crab-like pulsars driven by means of the feedback of Cherenkov drift waves on distribution of magnetospheric electrons. We have found that the unstable Cherenkov drift modes lead to the quasi-linear diffusion (QLD), keeping the pitch angles from vanishing, which in turn, maintains the synchrotron mechanism. Considering the Crab-like pulsars it has been shown that the growth rate of the Cherenkov drift instability (ChDI) is quite high, indicating high efficiency of the process. Analyzing the mechanism for the typical parameters we have found that the Cherenkov drift emission from the extreme UV to hard $X$-rays is strongly correlated with the VHE synchrotron emission in the GeV band.

  15. Redshift drift in a pressure gradient cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Balcerzak, Adam

    2012-01-01

    We derive the redshift drift formula for the inhomogeneous pressure spherically symmetric Stephani universes which are complementary to inhomogeneous density Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models. We show that there is a clear difference between the redshift drift predictions for these two models. The Stephani models have positive drift values at small redshift and behave qualitatively as the $\\Lambda$CDM models while the drift for LTB models is always negative. This prediction can be tested in future space experiments such as E-ELT, TMT, GMT or CODEX.

  16. THERMAL EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT DRIFT DIAMETER SIZES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.M. Wade

    1999-01-04

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the thermal response of a repository-emplaced waste package and its corresponding drift wall surface temperature with different drift diameters. The case examined is that of a 21 pressurized water reactor (PWR) uncanistered fuel (UCF) waste package loaded with design basis spent nuclear fuel assemblies. This calculation evaluates a 3.5 meter to 6.5 meter drift diameter range in increments of 1.0 meters. The time-dependent temperatures of interest, as determined by this calculation, are the spent nuclear fuel cladding temperature, the waste package surface temperature, and the drift wall surface temperature.

  17. RF Breakdown in Drift Tube Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Stovall, J; Lown, R

    2009-01-01

    The highest RF electric field in drift-tube linacs (DTLs) often occurs on the face of the first drift tube. Typically this drift tube contains a quadrupole focusing magnet whose fringing fields penetrate the face of the drift tube parallel to the RF electric fields in the accelerating gap. It has been shown that the threshold for RF breakdown in RF cavities may be reduced in the presence of a static magnetic field. This note offers a “rule of thumb” for picking the maximum “safe” surface electric field in DTLs based on these measurements.

  18. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Geppert, U.

    2016-07-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within ˜104-105 yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths ˜1014 G maintained over ≳106 yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity ɛ ˜ 10-6, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after ˜105 yr. A pulsar rotating at ˜102 Hz with such ɛ is a promising gravitational wave source candidate. Since such large deformations can be caused only by a particular magnetic field configuration that penetrates the whole star and whose maximum magnetic energy is concentrated in the outer core region, gravitational wave emission observed from radio pulsars can thus inform us about the internal field structures of young neutron stars.

  19. Fermilab drift tube Linac revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milorad Popovic

    2004-05-12

    Using the PARMILA code running under PC-WINDOWS, the present performance of the Fermilab Drift Tube Linac has been analyzed in the light of new demands on the Linac/Booster complex (the Proton Source). The Fermilab Drift Tube Linac (DTL) was designed in the sixties as a proton linac with a final energy of 200 MeV and a peak current of 100mA. In the seventies, in order to enable multi-turn charge exchange injection into the Booster, the ion source was replaced by an H- source with a peak beam current of 25mA. Since then the peak beam current was steadily increased up to 55mA. In the early nineties, part of the drift tube structure was replaced with a side-coupled cavity structure in order to increase the final energy to 400 MeV. The original and still primary purpose of the linac is to serve as the injector for the Booster. As an added benefit, the Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) was built in the middle seventies. It uses 66MeV protons from the Linac to produce neutrons for medical purposes. The Linac/Booster complex was designed to run at a fundamental cycling rate of 15Hz, but beam is accelerated on every cycle only when NTF is running. Until recently the demand from the High Energy Physics program resulted in an average linac beam repetition rate of order 1 Hz. With the MiniBoone experiment and the NuMI program, the demands on the Proton Source have changed, with emphasis on higher beam repetition rates up to 7.5Hz. Historically the beam losses in the linac were small, localized at one spot, so activation was not an important issue. With higher beam rate, this has the potential to become the dominant issue. Until today all tuning in the linac and Proton Source was governed by two goals: to maximize the peak beam current out of the linac and to minimize the beam losses in the linac. If maximal peak current from the linac is no longer a primary goal, then the linac quadrupoles can be adjusted differently to achieve different goals.

  20. Experimental observation of strong coupling effects on the dispersion of dust acoustic waves in a plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, P; Sen, A; Kaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion properties of low frequency dust acoustic waves in the strong coupling regime are investigated experimentally in an argon plasma embedded with a mixture of kaolin and $MnO_2$ dust particles. The neutral pressure is varied over a wide range to change the collisional properties of the dusty plasma. In the low collisional regime the turnover of the dispersion curve at higher wave numbers and the resultant region of $\\partial\\omega/\\partial k < 0$ are identified as signatures of dust-dust correlations. In the high collisional regime dust neutral collisions produce a similar effect and prevent an unambiguous identification of strong coupling effects.

  1. Physics of Collisional Plasmas Introduction to High-Frequency Discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Moisan, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of Collisional Plasmas deals with the plasma physics of interest to laboratory research and industrial applications, such as lighting, fabrication of microelectronics, destruction of greenhouse gases. Its emphasis is on explaining the physical mechanisms, rather than the detailed mathematical description and theoretical analysis. At the introductory level, it is important to convey the characteristic physical phenomena of plasmas, before addressing the ultimate formalism of kinetic theory, with its microscopic, statistical mechanics approach. To this aim, this text translates the physical phenomena into more tractable equations, using the hydrodynamic model; this considers the plasma as a fluid, in which the macroscopic physical parameters are the statistical averages of the microscopic (individual) parameters. This book is an introduction to the physics of collisional plasmas, as opposed to plasmas in space. It is intended for graduate students in physics and engineering . The first chapter intr...

  2. Collective instabilities and collisional effects for space charge dominated beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy)]. E-mail: benedetti@bo.infn.it; Turchetti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2007-07-01

    This paper is organized into two parts. In the first one we analyze the equipartitioning process in the presence of collisions for a Gaussian anisotropic beam. Far from instabilities the equipartition process can be described correctly by using Landau's collisional theory, whereas when the dynamics of the system is strongly nonlinear (e.g. in the vicinity of a resonance) a hybrid dynamical-collisional equipartition mechanism occurs. In the second part of the paper we discuss shortly a systematic study of the collective instabilities in a symmetric periodic focusing channel for a KV beam by using the moments method. We emphasize differences occurring when the periodic focusing lattice is replaced by the corresponding constant focusing one.

  3. Acceleration of weakly collisional solar-type winds

    CERN Document Server

    Zouganelis, I; Landi, S; Maksimovic, M; Pantellini, F

    2005-01-01

    One of the basic properties of the solar wind, that is the high speed of the fast wind, is still not satisfactorily explained. This is mainly due to the theoretical difficulty of treating weakly collisional plasmas. The fluid approach implies that the medium is collision dominated and that the particle velocity distributions are close to Maxwellians. However the electron velocity distributions observed in the solar wind depart significantly from Maxwellians. Recent kinetic collisionless models (called exospheric) using velocity distributions with a suprathermal tail have been able to reproduce the high speeds of the fast solar wind. In this letter we present new developments of these models by generalizing them over a large range of corona conditions. We also present new results obtained by numerical simulations that include collisions. Both approaches calculate the heat flux self-consistently without any assumption on the energy transport. We show that both approaches - the exospheric and the collisional one...

  4. Double layers in a modestly collisional electronegative discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Sheridan, T E

    1999-01-01

    The effect of ion-neutral collisions on the structure and ion flux emanating from a steady-state, planar discharge with two negative components is investigated. The positive ion component is modelled as a cold fluid subject to constant-mobility collisions, while the electrons and negative ions obey Boltzmann relations. The model includes the collisionless limit. When the negative ions are sufficiently cold three types of discharge structures are found. For small negative ion concentrations or high collisionality, the discharge is 'stratified', with an electronegative core and an electropositive edge. For the opposite conditions, the discharge is 'uniform' with the negative ion density remaining significant at the edge of the plasma. Between these cases lies the special case of a double-layer-stratified discharge, where quasi-neutrality is violated at the edge of the electronegative core. Double-layer-stratified solutions are robust in that they persist for moderate collisionality. Numerical solutions for fini...

  5. Simulation of transient collisional x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Akira; Utsumi, Takayuki; Moribayashi, Kengo; Zhidkov, A.; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kado, Masataka; Hasegawa, Noboru [Advanced Photon Research Center, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a collisional radiative model of electron collisional excited x-ray lasers. We calculate the ion abundance and soft x-ray gain for the Ne-like 3s-3p transition and Ni-like 4d-4p transition, in short pulse laser irradiated plasmas. We combine a detailed model using the atomic data calculated by the HULLAC code and the averaged model based on the screened hydrogenic approximation to develop a compact model. Effects of dielectronic recombination channels and radiation trapping of the lower laser level are investigated. The calculation of the transient gain is carried out using the plasma temperature and density obtained from a 1D hydrodynamics code. (author)

  6. Optimal electric potential profile in a collisional magnetized thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtman, Amnon; Makrinich, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    A major figure of merit in propulsion in general and in electric propulsion in particular is the thrust per unit of deposited power, the ratio of thrust over power. We have recently demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that for a fixed deposited power in the ions, the momentum delivered by the electric force is larger if the accelerated ions collide with neutrals during the acceleration. As expected, the higher thrust for given power is achieved for a collisional plasma at the expense of a lower thrust per unit mass flow rate. Operation in the collisional regime can be advantageous for certain space missions. We analyze a Hall thruster configuration in which the flow is only weakly ionized but there are frequent ion-neutral collisions. With a variational method we seek an electric potential profile that maximizes thrust over power. We then examine what radial magnetic field profile should determine such a potential profile. Supported by the Israel Science Foundation Grant 765/11.

  7. Collisional Energy Loss of Non Asymptotic Jets in a QGP

    CERN Document Server

    Adil, A; Horowitz, W A; Wicks, S

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the collisional energy loss suffered by a heavy (charm) quark created at a finite time within a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) in the classical linear response formalism. We pay close attention to the problem of formulating a conserved current and accounting for binding and radiative energy loss effects. We find that the finite time correction is on the order of a Debye length as expected and the overall energy loss is similar in magnitude to the energy loss suffered by a charge created in the asymptotic past. This result has significant implications for the relative contribution to energy loss from collisional and radiative sources and will have ramifications for the ``single electron puzzle'' at RHIC as well as other experimental observables.

  8. Collisional current drive in two interpenetrating plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Kugland, N. L.; Park, H.-S.; Pollaine, S. M.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    The magnetic field generation in two interpenetrating, weakly collisional plasma streams produced by intense lasers is considered. The generation mechanism is very similar to the neutral beam injection current drive in toroidal fusion devices, with the differences related to the absence of the initial magnetic field, short interaction time, and different geometry. Spatial and temporal characteristics of the magnetic field produced in two counterstreaming jets are evaluated; it is shown that the magnetic field of order of 1 T can be generated for modest jet parameters. Conditions under which this mechanism dominates that of the ''Biermann battery'' are discussed. Other settings where the mechanism of the collisional current drive can be important for the generation of seed magnetic fields include astrophysics and interiors of hohlraums.

  9. On the maximal efficiency of the collisional Penrose process

    CERN Document Server

    Leiderschneider, Elly

    2015-01-01

    The center of mass (CM) energy in a collisional Penrose process - a collision taking place within the ergosphere of a Kerr black hole - can diverge under suitable extreme conditions (maximal Kerr, near horizon collision and suitable impact parameters). We present an analytic expression for the CM energy, refining expressions given in the literature. Even though the CM energy diverges, we show that the maximal energy attained by a particle that escapes the black hole's gravitational pull and reaches infinity is modest. We obtain an analytic expression for the energy of an escaping particle resulting from a collisional Penrose process, and apply it to derive the maximal energy and the maximal efficiency for several physical scenarios: pair annihilation, Compton scattering, and the elastic scattering of two massive particles. In all physically reasonable cases (in which the incident particles initially fall from infinity towards the black hole) the maximal energy (and the corresponding efficiency) are only one o...

  10. Collisional broadening of angular correlations in a multiphase transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Edmonds, Terrence; Wang, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Systematic comparisons of jetlike correlation data to radiative and collisional energy loss model calculations are essential to extract transport properties of the quark-gluon medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. This paper presents a transport study of collisional broadening of jetlike correlations, by following parton-parton collision history in a multiphase transport (AMPT) model. The correlation shape is studied as a function of the number of parton-parton collisions suffered by a high transverse momentum probe parton ($N_{\\rm coll}$) and the azimuth of the probe relative to the reaction plane ($\\phi_{\\rm fin.}^{\\rm probe}$). Correlation is found to broaden with increasing $N_{\\rm coll}$ and $\\phi_{\\rm fin.}^{\\rm probe}$ from in- to out-of-plane direction. This study provides a transport model benchmark for future jet-medium interaction studies.

  11. Collisional effects on Rayleigh-Taylor-induced magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuel, M. J.-E. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Flaig, M.; Plewa, T. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hu, S. X.; Betti, R.; Hager, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Magnetic-field generation from the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability was predicted more than 30 years ago, though experimental measurements of this phenomenon have only occurred in the past few years. These pioneering observations demonstrated that collisional effects are important to B-field evolution. To produce fields of a measurable strength, high-intensity lasers irradiate solid targets to generate the nonaligned temperature and density gradients required for B-field generation. The ablation process naturally generates an unstable system where RT-induced magnetic fields form. Field strengths inferred from monoenergetic-proton radiographs indicate that in the ablation region diffusive effects caused by finite plasma resistivity are not negligible. Results from the first proof-of-existence experiments are reviewed and the role of collisional effects on B-field evolution is discussed in detail.

  12. Silicon drift detectors with the drift field induced by pureB-coated trenches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanver, Lis Karen; Kneževi´c, Tihomir; Suligoj, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Junction formation in deep trenches is proposed as a new means of creating a built-in drift field in silicon drift detectors (SDDs). The potential performance of this trenched drift detector (TDD) was investigated analytically and through simulations, and compared to simulations of conventional

  13. The Genetic Drift Inventory: A Tool for Measuring What Advanced Undergraduates Have Mastered about Genetic Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rebecca M.; Andrews, Tessa C.; McElhinny, Teresa L.; Mead, Louise S.; Abraham, Joel K.; Thanukos, Anna; Perez, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding genetic drift is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of biology, yet it is difficult to learn because it combines the conceptual challenges of both evolution and randomness. To help assess strategies for teaching genetic drift, we have developed and evaluated the Genetic Drift Inventory (GeDI), a concept inventory that measures…

  14. The ARGUS microvertex drift chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, E.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Appuhn, R. D.; Buchmüller, J.; Kolanoski, H.; Kreimeier, B.; Lange, A.; Siegmund, T.; Walther, A.; Edwards, K. W.; Fernholz, R. C.; Kapitza, H.; MacFarlane, D. B.; O'Neill, M.; Parsons, J. A.; Prentice, J. D.; Seidel, S. C.; Tsipolitis, G.; Ball, S.; Babaev, A.; Danilov, M.; Tichomirov, I.

    1989-11-01

    The ARGUS collaboration is currently building a new microvertex drift chamber (μVDC) as an upgrade of their detector. The μVDC is optimized for B-meson physics at DORIS energies. Important design features are minimal multiple scattering for low-momentum particles and three-dimensional reconstruction of decay vertices with equal resolutions in r- φ and r- z. Vertex resolutions of 15-25 μm are expected. Prototypes of the μVDC have been tested with different gas mixtures at various pressures. Spatial resolutions as small as 20 μm were obtained using CO 2/propane at 4 bar and DME at 1 bar. New readout electronics have been developed for the μVDC aiming at low thresholds for the TDC measurements. Employing a novel idea for noise and cross-talk suppression, which is based on a discrimination against short pulses, very low threshold settings are possible.

  15. Complexity Reduction of Collisional-Radiative Kinetics for Atomic Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    tioned (e.g., for non - Maxwellian kinetics), one must be able to correctly apportion the changes in energy, e.g., to Ee and Eh (for heavy particles) and (b...or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT Thermal non -equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional...prohibitively large, making multidimensional and unsteady simulations of non -equilibrium radiating plasma particularly challenging. In this paper, we

  16. Collisional Sheath in the Electronegative Radio-Frequency Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Baoxia; DENG Wenjuan; CHEN Yinhua

    2007-01-01

    A model of collisional RF sheath with negative ions is discussed in this paper.The influences of collision and negative ions on the parameters of the sheath are studied through numerical simulation.It is found that when the collision coefficient increases and the RF power is fixed,the electrode potential and sheath electric field potential increase,the electrode current and thickness of the sheath decrease.When the negative ion content changes,the same phenomenon occurs.

  17. Longitudinal dielectric permettivity of quantum Maxwell collisional plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Latyshev, A. V.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    The kinetic equation of Wigner -- Vlasov -- Boltzmann with collision integral in relaxation BGK (Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook) form in coordinate space for quantum non--degenerate (Maxwellian) collisional plasma is used. Exact expression (within the limits of considered model) is found. The analysis of longitudinal dielectric permeability is done. It is shown that in the limit when Planck's constant tends to zero of expression for dielectric permettivity transforms into the classical case of di...

  18. Kinetic simulation study of one dimensional collisional bounded plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic simulation study ofone dimensional collisional bounded plasma is presented.The formation of stable sheath potential is investigated.It is found that mass ratio of electron and ion not onlyaffects the level of sheath potential, but also affectsthe ion temperature of system. It is clarified that the effects of secondaryemission electron on both the total potential dropand the temperature are not important.

  19. Comets as collisional fragments of a primordial planetesimal disk

    CERN Document Server

    Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The Rosetta mission and its exquisite measurements have revived the debate on whether comets are pristine planetesimals or collisionally evolved objects. We investigate the collisional evolution experienced by the precursors of current comet nuclei during the early stages of the Solar System, in the context of the so-called "Nice Model". We consider two environments for the collisional evolution: (1) the trans-planetary planetesimal disk, from the time of gas removal until the disk was dispersed by the migration of the ice giants, and (2) the dispersing disk during the time that the scattered disk was formed. Simulations have been performed, using different methods in the two cases, to find the number of destructive collisions typically experienced by a comet nucleus of 2km radius. In the widely accepted scenario, where the dispersal of the planetesimal disk occurred at the time of the Late Heavy Bombardment about 4Gy ago, comet-sized planetesimals have a very small chance to survive against destructive colli...

  20. Collisional Processing of Olivine and Pyroxene in Cometary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Cintala, M. J.; Olney, R. D.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Zolensky, M.

    2008-01-01

    According to the nebular theory of solar-system formation, collisions between bodies occurred frequently early in the solar system s history and continue at a lower rate even today. Collisions have reworked the surface compositions and structures of cometary nuclei, though to an unknown degree. The majority of the collisional history of a typical Jupiter-family comet takes place while it resides in the Kuiper Belt. Impacts occur on the surfaces of small bodies over a large range of velocities by impactors of all sizes, but typical encounter speeds within the Kuiper Belt are 1.5 to 2.0 km/s[1]. Durda and Stern suggest that the interiors of most cometary nuclei with diameters 8 m would rework up to one-third of that TNO s surface. In fact, it has been proposed that most short-period comets from the Kuiper Belt (90%) are collisional fragments from larger TNOs - not primordial objects themselves [3] - and that most short-period comets from the Kuiper Belt will be collisionally processed both on their surfaces as well as in their interiors.

  1. A collisional extension of time-dependent Hartree-Fock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, L.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Dinh, P. M.; Suraud, E.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a collisional extension of time-dependent mean-field theories on the basis of a recently proposed stochastic extension of mean-field dynamics (stochastic time-dependent Hartree-Fock, STDHF). The latter theory is unfortunately too involved to envision practical applications in realistic systems in the near future and is thus bound to model systems. It is also hard to explore moderate to low energies with STDHF, because of vanishing transition probabilities that are impossible to sample properly. For such moderately excited situations covering small fluctuations, we compactify sampling by employing the same average mean field for all STDHF trajectories. The new approach, coined average STDHF (ASTDHF), ignores the fluctuations of the mean field but still accounts correctly for the collisional correlations responsible for dissipative features on top of mean-field dynamics. We detail the main features of the new approach in relation to existing equations, in particular quantum kinetic theories. The new theory is directly connected to STDHF, both formally and practically. We thus discuss in detail how the two approaches are related to each other. We apply the new scheme to illustrative examples taking as benchmark STDHF dynamics in 1D. ASTDHF provides results that are in remarkable agreement with the more elaborate STDHF. It makes it a promising approach to deal with dissipative dynamics in finite quantum systems, because of its moderate cost allowing applications in realistic systems and the possibility of exploring any excitation energy range where collisional correlations are expected to play a role.

  2. Collisional processes and size distribution in spatially extended debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Thebault, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    We present a new multi-annulus code for the study of collisionally evolving extended debris discs. We first aim to confirm results obtained for a single-annulus system, namely that the size distribution in "real" debris discs always departs from the theoretical collisional equilibrium $dN\\proptoR^{-3.5}dR$ power law, especially in the crucial size range of observable particles (<1cm), where it displays a characteristic wavy pattern. We also aim at studying how debris discs density distributions, scattered light luminosity profiles, and SEDs are affected by the coupled effect of collisions and radial mixing due to radiation pressure affected small grains. The size distribution evolution is modeled from micron-sized grains to 50km-sized bodies. The model takes into account the crucial influence of radiation pressure-affected small grains. We consider the collisional evolution of a fiducial a=120AU radius disc with an initial surface density in $\\Sigma(a)\\propto a^{\\alpha}$. We show that the system's radial e...

  3. Biology Undergraduates' Misconceptions about Genetic Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T. M.; Price, R. M.; Mead, L. S.; McElhinny, T. L.; Thanukos, A.; Perez, K. E.; Herreid, C. F.; Terry, D. R.; Lemons, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores biology undergraduates' misconceptions about genetic drift. We use qualitative and quantitative methods to describe students' definitions, identify common misconceptions, and examine differences before and after instruction on genetic drift. We identify and describe five overarching categories that include 16 distinct…

  4. Do Arctic waders use adaptive wind drift?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, M; Alerstam, T; Gudmundsson, GA; Hedenstrom, A; Piersma, T; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur A.; Hedenström, Anders

    2004-01-01

    We analysed five data sets of night directions of migrating arctic waders ill relation to,winds, recorded by tracking radar and optical range finder, in order to find out if these birds compensate for wind drift, or allow themselves to be drifted by winds. Our purpose was to investigate whether arct

  5. Learning under Concept Drift: an Overview

    CERN Document Server

    e, Indr\\ e Žliobait\\

    2010-01-01

    Concept drift refers to a non stationary learning problem over time. The training and the application data often mismatch in real life problems. In this report we present a context of concept drift problem 1. We focus on the issues relevant to adaptive training set formation. We present the framework and terminology, and formulate a global picture of concept drift learners design. We start with formalizing the framework for the concept drifting data in Section 1. In Section 2 we discuss the adaptivity mechanisms of the concept drift learners. In Section 3 we overview the principle mechanisms of concept drift learners. In this chapter we give a general picture of the available algorithms and categorize them based on their properties. Section 5 discusses the related research fields and Section 5 groups and presents major concept drift applications. This report is intended to give a bird's view of concept drift research field, provide a context of the research and position it within broad spectrum of research fi...

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic Slow Mode with Drifting He$^{++}$: Implications for Coronal Seismology and the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Hollweg, Joseph V; Chandran, Benjamin D G

    2014-01-01

    The MHD slow mode wave has application to coronal seismology, MHD turbulence, and the solar wind where it can be produced by parametric instabilities. We consider analytically how a drifting ion species (e.g. He$^{++}$) affects the linear slow mode wave in a mainly electron-proton plasma, with potential consequences for the aforementioned applications. Our main conclusions are: 1. For wavevectors highly oblique to the magnetic field, we find solutions that are characterized by very small perturbations of total pressure. Thus, our results may help to distinguish the MHD slow mode from kinetic Alfv\\'en waves and non-propagating pressure-balanced structures, which can also have very small total pressure perturbations. 2. For small ion concentrations, there are solutions that are similar to the usual slow mode in an electron-proton plasma, and solutions that are dominated by the drifting ions, but for small drifts the wave modes cannot be simply characterized. 3. Even with zero ion drift, the standard dispersion ...

  7. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Sun

    2004-07-09

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c).

  8. New insights into main belt asteroid collisional lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henych, Tomas; Holsapple, Keith

    2016-10-01

    We are developing a new Monte Carlo code to study the collisional and spin evolution of main belt asteroids. A byproduct is information on asteroid lifetimes. We find new interpretations and values of those lifetimes.In the conventional approach, the "collisional lifetime" is measured by the time when an asteroid is struck by an impactor large enough to remove one-half of the target's mass. That event is called a catastrophic disruption (CD). From an assumed population of impactors and Poisson statistics, one can estimate the largest expected impactor to impact in a given time interval to get its expected collisional lifetime. However, our Monte Carlo simulations give lifetimes that are distinctly shorter. That raises questions about the basic definition of catastrophic disruption.During its presence in the main belt, many other asteroids of all sizes continually strike a target asteroid. Before the CD one happens, there are many small impacts, and a few less than but not equal to the CD one. Each impact erodes the target asteroid. Very commonly, it is eroded to a much smaller mass before some CD event. We will present examples.So what shall we define as its collisional lifetime? Should it be the time for which its mass is reduced to one-half of its original mass, irrespective of how that happened, perhaps from many impacts? Or when any single impact reduces its mass to one-half of its original mass? Or when a single impact reduces it to one-half of its current mass?We propose that collisional lifetime is defined as the time at which it reaches 50% of its original mass, from any combination of small and/or large events. We use cratering and ejecta scaling formulas (e.g. Holsapple, 1993, Housen and Holsapple, 2011) to calculate the eroded mass history of the target for a history of impactors and calculate the outcome of any impact using the current size. In the gravity regime, the eroded body is easier to disrupt. We will present our lifetime estimates and those of

  9. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Grace W.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Cook, Paul J.

    2005-09-08

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an undergroundvoidthat, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rockmass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturatedrock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirmingits existence have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of driftshadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristicscould provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in thesubsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposednuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the fieldprogram that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadowand the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sandmine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch,California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it anexcellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. Themine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine Formation, anapproximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales,coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the minerequired the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other,driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. Thisconfiguration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rockmass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around theunderlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performedare described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radialpattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situwater content and chemical constituents. With the active hydrologic test,water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel driftsand the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottomdrift. Tensiometers, electrical resistance probes, neutron probes, andground penetrating radar may be

  10. The Dependence of H-mode Energy Confinement and Transport on Collisionality in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S. M.; Gerhardt, S.; Guttenfelder, W.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.

    2012-11-27

    Understanding the dependence of confi nement on collisionality in tokamaks is important for the design of next-step devices, which will operate at collisionalities at least one order of magnitude lower than in present generation. A wide range of collisionality has been obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by employing two different wall conditioning techniques, one with boronization and between-shot helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC+B), and one using lithium evaporation (Li EVAP). Previous studies of HeGDC+B plasmas indicated a strong and favorable dependence of normalized con nement on collisionality. Discharges with lithium conditioning discussed in the present study gen- erally achieved lower collisionality, extending the accessible range of collisionality by almost an order of unity. While the confinement dependences on dimensional, engineering variables of the HeGDC+B and Li EVAP datasets differed, collisionality was found to unify the trends, with the lower collisionality lithium conditioned discharges extending the trend of increasing normalized confi nement time with decreasing collisionality when other dimension less variables were held as fi xed as possible. This increase of confi nement with decreasing collisionality was driven by a large reduction in electron transport in the outer region of the plasma. This result is consistent with gyrokinetic calculations that show microtearing and Electron Temperature Gradient modes to be more stable for the lower collisionality discharges. Ion transport, near neoclassical at high collisionality, became more anomalous at lower collisionality, possibly due to the growth of hybrid TEM/KBM modes in the outer regions of the plasma.

  11. The Dependence of H-mode Energy Confinement and Transport on Collisionality in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S. M.; Gerhardt, S.; Guttenfelder, W.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.

    2012-11-28

    Understanding the dependence of confi nement on collisionality in tokamaks is important for the design of next-step devices, which will operate at collisionalities at least one order of magnitude lower than in present generation. A wide range of collisionality has been obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by employing two different wall conditioning techniques, one with boronization and between-shot helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC+B), and one using lithium evaporation (Li EVAP). Previous studies of HeGDC+B plasmas indicated a strong and favorable dependence of normalized con nement on collisionality. Discharges with lithium conditioning discussed in the present study gen- erally achieved lower collisionality, extending the accessible range of collisionality by almost an order of unity. While the confinement dependences on dimensional, engineering variables of the HeGDC+B and Li EVAP datasets differed, collisionality was found to unify the trends, with the lower collisionality lithium conditioned discharges extending the trend of increasing normalized confi nement time with decreasing collisionality when other dimension less variables were held as fi xed as possible. This increase of confi nement with decreasing collisionality was driven by a large reduction in electron transport in the outer region of the plasma. This result is consistent with gyrokinetic calculations that show microtearing and Electron Temperature Gradient modes to be more stable for the lower collisionality discharges. Ion transport, near neoclassical at high collisionality, became more anomalous at lower collisionality, possibly due to the growth of hybrid TEM/KBM modes in the outer regions of the plasma

  12. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers. The differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest drift velocity monitoring results are discussed.

  13. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers because the drift velocity depends on it. Furthermore the differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest pressure monitoring results are discussed.

  14. Global Modeling of Nebulae with Particle Growth, Drift and Evaporation Fronts. I: Methodology and Typical Results

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Paul R; Morgan, Demitri A

    2015-01-01

    We model particle growth in a turbulent, viscously evolving protoplanetary nebula, incorporating sticking, bouncing, fragmentation, and mass transfer at high speeds. We treat small particles using a moments method and large particles using a traditional histogram binning, including a probability distribution function of collisional velocities. The fragmentation strength of the particles depends on their composition (icy aggregates are stronger than silicate aggregates). The particle opacity, which controls the nebula thermal structure, evolves as particles grow and mass redistributes. While growing, particles drift radially due to nebula headwind drag. Particles of different compositions evaporate at "evaporation fronts" (EFs) where the midplane temperature exceeds their respective evaporation temperatures. We track the vapor and solid phases of each component, accounting for advection and radial and vertical diffusion. We present characteristic results in evolutions lasting $2 \\times 10^5$ years. In general,...

  15. Wind-induced drift of objects at sea: the leeway field method

    CERN Document Server

    Breivik, Øyvind; Maisondieu, Christophe; Roth, Jens Christian; 10.1016/j.apor.2011.01.005

    2011-01-01

    A method for conducting leeway field experiments to establish the drift properties of small objects (0.1-25 m) is described. The objective is to define a standardized and unambiguous procedure for condensing the drift properties down to a set of coefficients that may be incorporated into existing stochastic trajectory forecast models for drifting objects of concern to search and rescue operations and other activities involving vessels lost at sea such as containers with hazardous material. An operational definition of the slip or wind and wave-induced motion of a drifting object relative to the ambient current is proposed. This definition taken together with a strict adherence to 10 m wind speed allows us to refer unambiguously to the leeway of a drifting object. We recommend that all objects if possible be studied using what we term the direct method, where the object's leeway is studied directly using an attached current meter. We divide drifting objects into four categories, depending on their size. For th...

  16. Solving the drift control problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Ormeci Matoglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We model the problem of managing capacity in a build-to-order environment as a Brownian drift control problem. We formulate a structured linear program that models a practical discretization of the problem and exploit a strong relationship between relative value functions and dual solutions to develop a functional lower bound for the continuous problem from a dual solution to the discrete problem. Refining the discretization proves a functional strong duality for the continuous problem. The linear programming formulation is so badly scaled, however, that solving it is beyond the capabilities of standard solvers. By demonstrating the equivalence between strongly feasible bases and deterministic unichain policies, we combinatorialize the pivoting process and by exploiting the relationship between dual solutions and relative value functions, develop a mechanism for solving the LP without ever computing its coefficients. Finally, we exploit the relationship between relative value functions and dual solutions to develop a scheme analogous to column generation for refining the discretization so as to drive the gap between the discrete approximation and the continuous problem to zero quickly while keeping the LP small. Computational studies show our scheme is much faster than simply solving a regular discretization of the problem both in terms of finding a policy with a low average cost and in terms of providing a lower bound on the optimal average cost.

  17. Genetic drift of HIV populations in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yegor Voronin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Populations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 undergo a surprisingly large amount of genetic drift in infected patients despite very large population sizes, which are predicted to be mostly deterministic. Several models have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, but all of them implicitly assume that the process of virus replication itself does not contribute to genetic drift. We developed an assay to measure the amount of genetic drift for HIV populations replicating in cell culture. The assay relies on creation of HIV populations of known size and measurements of variation in frequency of a neutral allele. Using this assay, we show that HIV undergoes approximately ten times more genetic drift than would be expected from its population size, which we defined as the number of infected cells in the culture. We showed that a large portion of the increase in genetic drift is due to non-synchronous infection of target cells. When infections are synchronized, genetic drift for the virus is only 3-fold higher than expected from its population size. Thus, the stochastic nature of biological processes involved in viral replication contributes to increased genetic drift in HIV populations. We propose that appreciation of these effects will allow better understanding of the evolutionary forces acting on HIV in infected patients.

  18. Collisional and collision-less surface heating in intense laser matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Andreas; Divol, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    We explore the interaction of high-contrast intense sub-100 fs laser pulses with solid density tar- gets, using numerically converged collisional particle-in-cell simulations in one two and three dimen- sions. We observe a competition between two mechanisms that can lead to plasma heating. Inverse bremsstrahlung at solid density on one hand, and electrons scattering off plasma waves on the other, can both heat the skin layer to keV temperatures on a femtosecond time scale, facilitating a heat wave and a source of MeV electrons that penetrate and heat the bulk target. Collision-less effects heat the surface effectively starting at the relativistic intensity threshold, independent of plasma density. Our numerical results show that a high-contrast 1J/100fs laser can drive a solid target into the warm dense matter regime. This system is suitable to ab-initio modeling and experimental probing. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. A unified numerical model of collisional depolarization and broadening rates due to hydrogen atom collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Derouich, M; Barklem, P S

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of solar polarization spectra accounting for partial or complete frequency redistribution requires data on various collisional processes. Data for depolarization and polarization transfer are needed but often missing, while data for collisional broadening are usually more readily available. Recent work by Sahal-Br\\'echot and Bommier concluded that despite underlying similarities in the physics of collisional broadening and depolarization processes, relationships between them are not possible to derive purely analytically. We aim to derive accurate numerical relationships between the collisional broadening rates and the collisional depolarization and polarization transfer rates due to hydrogen atom collisions. Such relationships would enable accurate and efficient estimation of collisional data for solar applications. Using earlier results for broadening and depolarization processes based on general (i.e. not specific to a given atom), semi-classical calculations employing interaction potentials...

  20. Influence of electron-neutral collisions on the Compton scattering cross section and the Salpeter structure factor in warm collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Osikdo-Dong, Gunsan-City, Jeollabuk-Do 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States); Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The electron-neutral collision effects on the Compton scattering process are investigated in warm collisional plasmas. The Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas is obtained by the Salpeter structure factor with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the plasma dielectric function as a function of the electron-neutral collision frequency, Debye length, and wave number. It is shown that the influence of electron-neutral collision strongly suppresses the Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas. It is also found that the electron-neutral collision effect on the differential Compton scattering cross section is more significant in forward scattering directions. We show that the differential Compton scattering cross section has a maximum at the scattering angle φ=π/2. In addition, we find that the electron-neutral collision effect on the total Compton scattering cross section increases with increasing Debye length and wave number. The variation of the Compton scattering cross section due to the change of collision frequency and plasma parameters is also discussed.

  1. Pixelated CdZnTe drift detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A technique, the so-called Drift Strip Method (DSM), for improving the CdZnTe detector energy response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays was applied as a pixel geometry. First tests have confirmed that this detector type provides excellent energy resolution and imaging performance. We specifically...... report on the performance of 3 mm thick prototype CZT drift pixel detectors fabricated using material from eV-products. We discuss issues associated with detector module performance. Characterization results obtained from several prototype drift pixel detectors are presented. Results of position...

  2. Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Theory With Polarization Drift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Wang and T.S. Hahm

    2010-03-25

    A set of the electrostatic toroidal gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and the Poisson equation, which explicitly includes the polarization drift, is derived systematically by using Lie-transform method. The polarization drift is introduced in the gyrocenter equations of motion, and the corresponding polarization density is derived. Contrary to the wide-spread expectation, the inclusion of the polarization drift in the gyrocenter equations of motion does not affect the expression for the polarization density significantly. This is due to modification of the gyrocenter phase-space volume caused by the electrostatic potential [T. S. Hahm, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4658 (1996)] .

  3. A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma Simulations with Detailed Collisional Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-23

    account for all processes of the collisional cascade during the relaxation of a hot plasma. To this end, the focus was in the development of (a) a...Collisional Radiative operator was necessary to accurately account for all processes of the collisional cascade during the relaxation of a hot plasma. To this...important to note that this is a code-to- code comparison and the validation of these simulations is an area of active research in the non-local

  4. Sources of low-latitude ionospheric E × B drifts and their variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maute, A.; Richmond, A. D.; Roble, R. G.

    2012-06-01

    The complete mechanism of how upward propagating tropospheric tides connect to the upper atmosphere is not yet fully understood. One proposed mechanism is via ionospheric wind dynamo. However, other sources can potentially alter the vertical E × B drift: gravity and plasma pressure gradient driven current, the geomagnetic main field, and longitudinal variation in the conductivities. In this study we examine the contribution to the vertical drift from these sources, and compare them. We use March equinox results from the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. We found that the gravity and plasma pressure gradient driven current and the longitudinal variation of the conductivities excluding the variation due to the geomagnetic main field do not change the longitudinal variation of the vertical drift significantly. Modifying the geomagnetic main field will change the vertical drift at 5-6 LT, 18-19 LT and 23-24 LT at almost all longitudes. In general the influence of the geomagnetic main field on the vertical drift is larger, with respect to the maximum difference, at 18-19 LT and 23-24 LT, equal at 5-6 LT, and smaller at 14-15 LT than the influence due to nonmigrating tidal components in the neutral winds. Examination of the contribution from E- and F-region neutral winds to the vertical drift shows that their importance depends on the local time and the solar activity. This implies that the vertical drift has to be analyzed at specific local times to examine the relation between the wave number in the vertical drift and in the neutral winds.

  5. The collisional history of dwarf planet Ceres revealed by Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, S.; Williams, D. A.; Mest, S. C.; Schenk, P.; O'Brien, D. P.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ermakov, A.; Castillo, J. C.; Jaumann, R.; Neesemann, A.; Hiesinger, H.; Park, R. S.; Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Impact craters are a ubiquitous feature of solid surfaces of celestial objects. Craters are oftentimes used to constrain the past evolution of their host objects, as well as to assess their crustal structures. The Dawn spacecraft, currently in orbit around the dwarf planet Ceres, has revealed a surface peppered with impact craters. Two important facts emerge from their global spatial distribution: i) significant longitudinal and latitudinal asymmetries in the crater areal density, ii) and the lack of well-preserved craters larger than 400 km in imaging data. Interestingly, most of the low crater density terrains are found in the vicinity of the three largest, well-preserved impact craters ranging from ~160 to ~290 km in diameter. These low crater areal density terrains expand over a greater distance than observed for large craters on rocky bodies and icy satellites, which typically are confined within one crater radius from the rim. To assess the collisional history of Ceres we developed a Monte Carlo model that tracks the timing, size and number of collisions throughout the history of the solar system. The model shows that Ceres' collisional evolution should have resulted typically in a factor of 10 more craters than observed, with some ~10 craters larger than 400 km expected to have formed over the last 4.5 Gyr ago. While small craters may have reached an equilibrium level, which does not allow then to further increase in number, the lack of evident large craters is a puzzle. A possibility is that the scars of large craters have been obliterated by topography relaxation due to an ice-rich crust. Here we will present an overview of the Ceres' crater spatial distribution and compare it to other siblings (such as the asteroid Vesta), and collisional evolution models. We will also discuss how these results pose important constraints on the internal structure of the dwarf planet in conjunction with surface composition and gravity data acquired by Dawn.

  6. Hybrid accretionary/collisional mechanism of Paleozoic Asian continental growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulmann, Karel; Lexa, Ondrej; Janousek, Vojtech; Pavla, Stipska; Yingde, Jiang; Alexandra, Guy; Min, Sun

    2016-04-01

    Continental crust is formed above subduction zones by well-known process of "juvenile crust growth". This new crust is in modern Earth assembled into continents by two ways: (i) short-lived collisions of continental blocks with the Eurasian continent along the "Alpine-Himalayan collisional/interior orogens" in the heart of the Pangean continental plates realm; and (ii) long lived lateral accretion of ocean-floor fragments along "circum-Pacific accretionary/peripheral orogens" at the border of the Pacific oceanic plate. This configuration has existed since the late Proterozoic, when the giant accretionary Terra Australis Orogen developed at periphery of an old Palaeo-Pacific ocean together with collisional Caledonian and Variscan orogens. At the same time, the large (ca. 9 millions km2) Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) developed in the NE part of the Pangea. This orogen reveals features of both peripheral and interior orogens, which implies that the generally accepted "peripheral-accretionary" and "interior- collisional" paradigm is not applicable here. To solve this conundrum a new model of unprecedented Phanerozoic continental growth is proposed. In this model, the CAOB precursor evolved at the interface of old exterior and young interior oceans. Subsequently, the new lithospheric domain was transferred by advancing subduction into the interior of the Pangean mostly continental realm. During this process the oceanic crust was transformed into continental crust and it was only later when this specific lithosphere was incorporated into the Asian continent. If true, this concept represents revolutionary insight into processes of crustal growth explaining the enigma of anchoring hybrid lithosphere inside a continent without its subduction or Tibetan-type thickening.

  7. Free electron degeneracy effects on collisional excitation, ionization, de-excitation and three-body recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallents, G. J.

    2016-09-01

    Collisional-radiative models enable average ionization and ionization populations, plus the rates of absorption and emission of radiation to be calculated for plasmas not in thermal equilbrium. At high densities and low temperatures, electrons may have a high occupancy of the free electron quantum states and evaluations of rate coefficients need to take into account the free electron degeneracy. We demonstrate that electron degeneracy can reduce collisional rate coefficients by orders-of-magnitude from values calculated neglecting degeneracy. We show that assumptions regarding the collisional differential cross-section can alter collisional ionization and recombination rate coefficients by a further factor two under conditions relevant to inertial fusion.

  8. Progress and records in the study of endogenetic mineralization during collisional orogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To develop and perfect the theory of plate tectonics and regional metallogeny,metallogenesis during collisional orogenesis should be thoroughly studied and will attract increasing attention of more and more scientists.This paper presents the main aspects of research and discussions on metallogenesis during collisional orogenesis after the development of plate tectonics,and accordingly divides the study history into two stages,i.e.the junior stage during 1971-1990 and the senior stage after 1990.Beginning with the negation of mineralization in the collision regime by Guild (1971),the focus of study was put on whether there occurred any mineralization during collisional orogenesis at the junior stage.At the senior stage,which is initiated by the advance of metallogenic and petrogenic model for collisional orogenesis,scientists begin to pay their attention to the geodynamic mechanism of metallogenesis,spatial and temporal distribution of ore deposits,ore-forming fluidization,relationship between petrogenesis and mineralization in collisional orogenesis,etc.Abundance of typical collisional orogens such as Himalayan,China has best natural conditions to study collisional metallogenesis.Great progress in the study of metallogenesis during collisional orogenesis has been made by Chinese geologists.Therefore,we hope that the Chinese geologists and Chinese governments at various levels to pay more attention to the study of collisional metallogenesis.Some urgent problems are suggested to be solved so as to bring about breakthroughs in the aspects concerned.

  9. Drift wave turbulence in low-β plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Pécseli, Hans

    1983-01-01

    Experimental investigations of strong turbulence associated with the radial density gradient of a rotating magnetized plasma column are reported. The experiment is designed to make Taylor's hypothesis effective, in order to allow a simple interpretation of measured frequency spectra in terms...

  10. Comparison of secondary islands in collisional reconnection to Hall reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, L S; Cassak, P A

    2010-07-02

    Large-scale resistive Hall-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the transition from Sweet-Parker (collisional) to Hall (collisionless) magnetic reconnection are presented; the first to separate secondary islands from collisionless effects. Three main results are described. There exists a regime with secondary islands but without collisionless effects, and the reconnection rate is faster than Sweet-Parker, but significantly slower than Hall reconnection. This implies that secondary islands do not cause the fastest reconnection rates. The onset of Hall reconnection ejects secondary islands from the vicinity of the X line, implying that energy is released more rapidly during Hall reconnection. Coronal applications are discussed.

  11. Collisional transfer of population and orientation in sodium potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Christopher Matthew

    Collisional spectral satellite lines have been identified in recent optical-optical double resonance (OODR) excitation spectra of the NaK molecule. These satellite lines represent both a transfer of population, and a partial preservation of angular momentum orientation, to a rotational level adjacent to the one directly excited by the pump laser beam. A rate equation model was used to study the intensities of these satellite lines as a function of argon pressure and heat pipe oven temperature, in order to separate the collisional effects of argon and potassium atoms (being the most populous species in the vapor by an order of magnitude over the third most populous). Using a fit of this rate equation model to the data, it was found that collisions between NaK and potassium are more likely to transfer population and destroy orientation than argon collisions, and also more likely to transfer population to rotational levels higher in energy than the one being pumped (i.e. a propensity for positive Delta J collisions). Also, collisions between NaK and argon atoms show a propensity toward even-numbered changes in J. In addition to the above study, an analysis of collisional line broadening and velocity-changes in J-changing collisions was performed, showing potassium has a higher line broadening rate coefficient, as well as a smaller velocity change in J-changing collisions, than argon. A program was also written in Fortran 90/95 which solves the density matrix equations of motion in steady state for a coupled system of 3 (or 4) energy levels with their constituent degenerate magnetic sublevels. The solution to these equations yields the populations of each sublevel in steady state, as well as the laser-induced coherences between each sublevel (which are needed to model the polarization spectroscopy lineshape precisely). Development of an appropriate theoretical model for collisional transfer will yield a more rigorous study of the problem than the empirical rate

  12. Analysis of the transient collisional x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Akira; Utsumi, Takayuki; Moribayashi, Kengo; Zhidkov, Alexei; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kado, Masataka; Tanaka, Momoko; Hasegawa, Noboru; Daido, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the gain of a transient collisional x-ray lasers had been investigated using a plasma hydrodynamics code coupled with a detailed atomic kinetics code. The calculated gain of a Ni-like Ag laser pumped by two 100ps laser pulses agrees qualitatively with the experiment. Calculations for a thin foil target irradiated by two 2ps laser pulses shows that a high gain (>50/cm) can be obtained by adjusting the temporal interval between the two pump pulses. (author)

  13. Collisional Excitation of Automotive Fuel Components (ethanol and Isooctane)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Rachelle H.; White, Allen R.; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2009-06-01

    It is possible to excite fuel components indirectly via a 10.6 um CO2 laser. A 9% solution of isopropanol in ethanol was used, as it has a strong absorption cross section at 10.6 um. CO2 laser excitation of pure ethanol caused little or no change in absorption in the C-H stretch region. However, the ethanol/isopropanol mixture did show a response proportional to laser excitation. Further studies indicate that excitation of isooctane/isopropanol mixture is also possible via collisional energy transfer between the laser excited isopropanol and isooctane.

  14. Line-of-Sight Path Following for Dubins Paths with Adaptive Sideslip Compensation of Drift Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fossen, Thor Inge; Pettersen, Kristin Ytterstad; Galeazzi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    guidance law is intended for maneuvering in the horizontal-plane at given speeds and typical applications are marine craft, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as well as other vehicles and craft where the goal is to follow a predefined parametrized curve without time......We present a nonlinear adaptive path-following controller that compensates for drift forces through vehicle sideslip. Vehicle sideslip arises during path following when the vehicle is subject to drift forces caused by ocean currents, wind and waves. The proposed algorithm is motivated by a lineof...... constraints. Two vehicle cases studies are included to verify the theoretical results....

  15. Vacuum condensates and `ether-drift' experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Consoli, M.; Pagano, A.; Pappalardo, L.

    2003-01-01

    The idea of a `condensed' vacuum state is generally accepted in modern elementary particle physics. We argue that this should motivate a new generation of precise `ether-drift' experiments with present-day technology.

  16. An analytical model of iceberg drift

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Till J W; Eisenman, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Iceberg drift and decay and the associated freshwater release are increasingly seen as important processes in Earth's climate system, yet a detailed understanding of their dynamics has remained elusive. Here, an idealized model of iceberg drift is presented. The model is designed to include the most salient physical processes that determine iceberg motion while remaining sufficiently simple to facilitate physical insight into iceberg drift dynamics. We derive an analytical solution of the model, which helps build understanding and also enables the rapid computation of large numbers of iceberg trajectories. The long-standing empirical rule of thumb that icebergs drift at 2% of the wind velocity, relative to the ocean current, is derived here from physical first principles, and it is shown that this relation only holds in the limit of strong winds or small icebergs, which approximately applies for typical icebergs in the Arctic. It is demonstrated that the opposite limit of weak winds or large icebergs approxim...

  17. Stabilization Strategies for Drift Tube Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085420; Lamehi Rashti, Mohammad

    The average axial electric fields in drift tube linac cavities are known to be sensitive with respect to the perturbation errors. Postcoupler is a powerful stabilizer devices that is used to reduce this sensitivity of average axial field. Postcouplers are the cylindrical rod which is extended from cavity wall toward the drift tube without touching the drift tube surface. Postcouplers need to be adjusted to the right length to stabilize the average axial field. Although postcouplers are used successfully in many projects, there is no straightforward procedure for postcouplers adjustment and it has been done almost based on trial and errors. In this thesis, the physics and characteristics of postcouplers has been studied by using an equivalent circuit model and 3D finite element method calculations. Finally, a straightforward and accurate method to adjust postcouplers has been concluded. The method has been verified by using experimental measurements on CERN Linac4 drift tube linac cavities.

  18. CROSS DRIFT ALCOVE/NICHE UTILITIES ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Goodin

    1999-07-08

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide the design basis and general arrangement requirements of the non-potable water, waste water, compressed air and ventilation (post excavation) utilities required in support of the Cross Drift alcoves and niches.

  19. The Electron Drift Instrument for MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Granoff, M.; Widholm, M.; Gaidos, J. A.; Briggs, B. H.; Dors, I. G.; Chutter, M. W.; Macri, J.; Argall, M.; Bodet, D.; Needell, J.; Steller, M. B.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Ottacher, H.; Hasiba, J.; Hofmann, K.; Kletzing, C. A.; Bounds, S. R.; Dvorsky, R. T.; Sigsbee, K.; Kooi, V.

    2016-03-01

    The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission measures the in-situ electric and magnetic fields using the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one or more gyrations. This drift is related to the electric field and, to a lesser extent, the gradient in the magnetic field. Although these two quantities can be determined separately by use of different electron energies, for MMS regions of interest the magnetic field gradient contribution is negligible. As a by-product of the drift determination, the magnetic field strength and constraints on its direction are also determined. The present paper describes the scientific objectives, the experimental method, and the technical realization of the various elements of the instrument on MMS.

  20. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  1. The Bipolar Quantum Drift-diffusion Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu Qing CHEN; Li CHEN

    2009-01-01

    A fourth order parabolic system, the bipolar quantum drift-diffusion model in semiconductor simulation, with physically motivated Dirichlet-Neumann boundary condition is studied in this paper. By semidiscretization in time and compactness argument, the global existence and semiclassical limit are obtained, in which semiclassical limit describes the relation between quantum and classical drift-diffusion models. Furthermore, in the case of constant doping, we prove the weak solution exponentially approaches its constant steady state as time increases to infinity.

  2. Thermodynamics Insights for the Redshift Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2015-01-01

    The secular redshift drift is a potential measurement to directly probe the cosmic expansion. Previous study on the redshift drift mainly focused on the model-dependent simulation. Apparently, the physical insights on the redshift drift are very necessary. So in this paper, it is investigated using thermodynamics on the apparent, Hubble and event horizons. Thermodynamics could analytically present the model-independent upper bounds of redshift drift. For specific assumption on the cosmological parameters, we find that the thermodynamics bounds are nearly one order of magnitude larger than the expectation in standard ΛCDM model. We then examine ten observed redshift drift from Green Bank Telescope at redshift 0.09 < z < 0.69, and find that these observational results are inconsistent with the thermodynamics. The size of the errorbars on these measurements is about three orders of magnitude larger than the effect of thermodynamical bounds for the redshift drift. Obviously, we have not yet hit any instrumental systematics at the shift level of 1m s-1 yr-1.

  3. Suppressing drift chamber diffusion without magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Martoff, C J; Ohnuki, T; Spooner, N J C; Lehner, M

    2000-01-01

    The spatial resolution in drift chamber detectors for ionizing radiation is limited by diffusion of the primary electrons. A strong magnetic field along the drift direction is often applied (Fancher et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 161 (1979) 383) because it suppresses the transverse diffusion, improving the resolution but at considerable increase in cost and complexity. Here we show that transverse track diffusion can be strongly suppressed without any magnetic field. This is achieved by using a gas additive which reversibly captures primary ionization electrons, forming negative ions. The ions drift with thermal energies even at very high drift fields and low pressures (E/P=28.5 V/cm torr), and the diffusion decreases with increasing drift field. Upon arrival at the avalanche region of the chamber the negative ions are efficiently stripped and ordinary avalanche gain is obtained. Using this technique, r.m.s. transverse diffusion less than 200 mu m has been achieved over a 15 cm drift path at 40 torr with ze...

  4. Nonintrusive microwave diagnostics of collisional plasmas in Hall thrusters and dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stults, Joshua

    This research presents a numerical framework for diagnosing electron properties in collisional plasmas. Microwave diagnostics achieved a significant level of development during the middle part of the last century due to work in nuclear weapons and fusion plasma research. With the growing use of plasma-based devices in fields as diverse as space propulsion, materials processing and fluid flow control, there is a need for improved, flexible diagnostic techniques suitable for use under the practical constraints imposed by plasma fields generated in a wide variety of aerospace devices. Much of the current diagnostic methodology in the engineering literature is based on analytical diagnostic, or forward, models. The Appleton-Hartree formula is an oft-used analytical relation for the refractive index of a cold, collisional plasma. Most of the assumptions underlying the model are applicable to diagnostics for plasma fields such as those found in Hall Thrusters and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators. Among the assumptions is uniform material properties, this assumption is relaxed in the present research by introducing a flexible, numerical model of diagnostic wave propagation that can capture the effects of spatial gradients in the plasma state. The numerical approach is chosen for its flexibility in handling future extensions such as multiple spatial dimensions to account for scattering effects when the spatial extent of the plasma is small relative to the probing beam's width, and velocity dependent collision frequency for situations where the constant collision frequency assumption is not justified. The numerical wave propagation model (forward model) is incorporated into a general tomographic reconstruction framework that enables the combination of multiple interferometry measurements. The combined measurements provide a quantitative picture of the spatial variation in the plasma properties. The benefit of combining multiple measurements in a coherent

  5. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00165402; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; 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Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; 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    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  6. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

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Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; 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Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  7. Varying and inverting the mass hierarchy in collisional energy loss

    CERN Document Server

    Kolevatov, Rodion

    2008-01-01

    Heavy ion collisions at RHIC and at the LHC give access to the medium-induced suppression patterns of heavy-flavored single inclusive hadron spectra at high transverse momentum. This opens novel opportunities for a detailed characterization of the medium produced in the collision. In this note, we point out that the capacity of a QCD medium to absorb the recoil of a partonic projectile is an independent signature, which may differ for different media at the same density. In particular, while the mass hierarchy (i.e., the projectile mass dependence) of radiative energy loss depends solely on a property of the projectile, the mass hierarchy of collisional energy loss depends significantly on properties of the medium. By varying these properties in a class of models, we find that the mass hierarchy of collisional parton energy loss can be modified considerably and can even be inverted, compared to that of radiative parton energy loss. This may help to disentangle the relative strengths of radiative and collision...

  8. Collisional-radiative model: a plasma spectroscopy theory for experimentalists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Takashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Sawada, Keiji

    1997-01-01

    The rate equation describing the population n(p) of an excited (and the ground state) level p of ions immersed in plasma is shown. In 1962, the method of quasi-steady state solution (collisional-radiative model) was proposed. Its idea is explained. The coupled differential equations reduce to a set of coupled linear equations for excited levels. The solution of these coupled equations is presented. The equations giving the ionization and recombination of this system of ions under consideration are described in terms of the effective rate coefficients. The collisional-radiative ionization and recombination rate coefficients are expressed in terms of the population coefficients for p > 1. As for ionizing plasma, the excited level populations, the populations, the population distribution among the excited levels, two regimes of the excited levels, the dominant flows of electrons among the levels and so on are shown. As for recombining plasma, the excited level populations, the population distribution among the excited levels, the dominant flows of electrons and so on are shown. Ionization balance plasma may be considered. (K.I.)

  9. Experimental study of collisional granular flows down an inclined plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanza, Emmanuel; Chevoir, François; Moucheront, Pascal

    1999-12-01

    The collisional flow of a slightly inelastic granular material down a rough inclined plane is usually described by kinetic theories. We present an experimental study aimed at analysing the assumptions and the quantitative predictions of such theories. A two-dimensional channel coupled to a model granular material and image analysis allow detailed and complete measurement of the kinematics and structure of the flows. We determine the range of inclination and particle flux for which the flow is stationary and uniform. The characteristic profiles of solid fraction, mean velocity and granular temperature are systematically measured. Both the true collisional and the dilute kinetic regimes are examined. We show that a quasi-hydrodynamic description of these regimes seems relevant, and that the pressure and the viscosity terms are in good qualitative agreement with the prediction of the kinetic theory. The profiles are well described by the kinetic theory near the top of the flow, at low solid fraction. Conversely there are large discrepancies near the rough plane, where the material is structured in layers.

  10. The Collisional Divot in the Kuiper belt Size Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Wesley C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of collisional evolution calculations for the Kuiper belt starting from an initial size distribution similar to that produced by accretion simulations of that region - a steep power-law large object size distribution that breaks to a shallower slope at r ~1-2 km, with collisional equilibrium achieved for objects r ~0.5 km. We find that the break from the steep large object power-law causes a divot, or depletion of objects at r ~10-20 km, which in-turn greatly reduces the disruption rate of objects with r> 25-50 km, preserving the steep power-law behavior for objects at this size. Our calculations demonstrate that the roll-over observed in the Kuiper belt size distribution is naturally explained as an edge of a divot in the size distribution; the radius at which the size distribution transitions away from the power-law, and the shape of the divot from our simulations are consistent with the size of the observed roll-over, and size distribution for smaller bodies. Both the kink r...

  11. GAP CLEARING BY PLANETS IN A COLLISIONAL DEBRIS DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvold, Erika R. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland Baltimore County 1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Kuchner, Marc J., E-mail: Erika.Nesvold@umbc.edu, E-mail: Marc.Kuchner@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667 Greenbelt, MD 21230 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    We apply our 3D debris disk model, SMACK, to simulate a planet on a circular orbit near a ring of planetesimals that are experiencing destructive collisions. Previous simulations of a planet opening a gap in a collisionless debris disk have found that the width of the gap scales as the planet mass to the 2/7th power (α = 2/7). We find that gap sizes in a collisional disk still obey a power law scaling with planet mass, but that the index α of the power law depends on the age of the system t relative to the collisional timescale t {sub coll} of the disk by α = 0.32(t/t {sub coll}){sup –0.04}, with inferred planet masses up to five times smaller than those predicted by the classical gap law. The increased gap sizes likely stem from the interaction between collisions and the mean motion resonances near the chaotic zone. We investigate the effects of the initial eccentricity distribution of the disk particles and find a negligible effect on the gap size at Jovian planet masses, since collisions tend to erase memory of the initial particle eccentricity distributions. Finally, we find that the presence of Trojan analogs is a potentially powerful diagnostic of planets in the mass range ∼1-10 M {sub Jup}. We apply our model to place new upper limits on planets around Fomalhaut, HR 4796 A, HD 202628, HD 181327, and β Pictoris.

  12. Concentrated Hitting Times of Randomized Search Heuristics with Variable Drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian; Witt, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    these results handle a position-dependent (variable) drift that was not covered by previous drift theorems with tail bounds. Moreover, our theorem can be specialized into virtually all existing drift theorems with drift towards the target from the literature. Finally, user-friendly specializations...

  13. Analytical and numerical treatment of resistive drift instability in a plasma slab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirnov, V. V., E-mail: vvmirnov@wisc.edu; Sauppe, J. P.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas (United States)

    2016-05-15

    An analytic approach combining the effect of equilibrium diamagnetic flows and the finite ionsound gyroradius associated with electron−ion decoupling and kinetic Alfvén wave dispersion is derived to study resistive drift instabilities in a plasma slab. Linear numerical computations using the NIMROD code are performed with cold ions and hot electrons in a plasma slab with a doubly periodic box bounded by two perfectly conducting walls. A linearly unstable resistive drift mode is observed in computations with a growth rate that is consistent with the analytic dispersion relation. The resistive drift mode is expected to be suppressed by magnetic shear in unbounded domains, but the mode is observed in numerical computations with and without magnetic shear. In the slab model, the finite slab thickness and the perfectly conducting boundary conditions are likely to account for the lack of suppression.

  14. Plasma-statistical models of the atom in the theory of some collisional and radiative processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astapenko, VA

    2002-01-01

    A plasma-statistical model was used to describe collisional and radiative processes involving target ionization, namely, collisional ionization of atoms and incoherent polarization bremsstrahlung. The cross sections of these processes were expressed through the Compton profile of X-ray scattering, f

  15. Dark Energy and Equation of State Oscillations with Collisional Matter Fluid in Exponential Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oikonomou, V K; Park, Miok

    2014-01-01

    We study some aspects of cosmological evolution in a universe described by a viable curvature corrected exponential $F(R)$ gravity model, in the presence of matter fluids consisting of collisional matter and radiation. Particularly, we express the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker equations of motion in terms of parameters that are appropriate for describing the dark energy oscillations and compare the dark energy density and the dark energy equation of state parameter corresponding to collisional and non-collisional matter. In addition to these, and owing to the fact that the cosmological evolution of collisional and non-collisional matter universes, when quantified in terms of the Hubble parameter and the effective equation of states parameters, is very much alike, we further scrutinize the cosmological evolution study by extending the analysis to the study of matter perturbations in the matter domination era. We quantify this analysis in terms of the growth factor of matter perturbations, in which case the result...

  16. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorov, Arthur George; Geppert, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within $\\sim 10^4$ -- $10^5$ yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths $\\sim 10^{14}$ G maintained over $\\gtrsim 10^6$ yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity $\\epsilon\\sim 10^{-6}$, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after $\\sim 10^5$ ...

  17. Electron drift velocities in fast Argon and CF4 based drift gases

    CERN Document Server

    van Apeldoorn, G

    1998-01-01

    98-063 Electron drift velocities in gas mixtures were measured in a tabletop experiment using a nitrogen laser to create the primary electrons. The maximum drift times for electrons in a 5 mm (10 mm) honeycomb drift cell at 2200 V anode voltage were 28 ns (53 ns) and 21 ns (61 ns) for Ar-Cf4-CH4 (75/18/6) and Ar-CF4-CO2 (68/27/5), respectively. Changing the ratio of the latter mix did not change the drift velocity very much. The gains of the gases are ~10^4 for a single primary electron. CF4 causes electron attachment. The measured drift times agree well with GARFIELD simulations.

  18. Kinetic theory of the filamentation instability in a collisional current-driven plasma with nonextensive distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir; Rastbood, E. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    The evolution of filamentation instability in a weakly ionized current-carrying plasma with nonextensive distribution was studied in the diffusion frequency region, taking into account the effects of electron-neutral collisions. Using the kinetic theory, Lorentz transformation formulas, and Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model, the generalized dielectric permittivity functions of this plasma system were achieved. By obtaining the dispersion relation of low-frequency waves, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate were investigated. It was shown that collisions can increase the maximum growth rate of instability. The analysis of temporal evolution of filamentation instability revealed that the growth rate of instability increased by increasing the q-parameter and electron drift velocity. Finally, the results of Maxwellian and q-nonextensive velocity distributions were compared and discussed.

  19. LAD Dissertation Prize Talk: Molecular Collisional Excitation in Astrophysical Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kyle M.

    2017-06-01

    While molecular excitation calculations are vital in determining particle velocity distributions, internal state distributions, abundances, and ionization balance in gaseous environments, both theoretical calculations and experimental data for these processes are lacking. Reliable molecular collisional data with the most abundant species - H2, H, He, and electrons - are needed to probe material in astrophysical environments such as nebulae, molecular clouds, comets, and planetary atmospheres. However, excitation calculations with the main collider, H2, are computationally expensive and therefore various approximations are used to obtain unknown rate coefficients. The widely-accepted collider-mass scaling approach is flawed, and alternate scaling techniques based on physical and mathematical principles are presented here. The most up-to-date excitation data are used to model the chemical evolution of primordial species in the Recombination Era and produce accurate non-thermal spectra of the molecules H2+, HD, and H2 in a primordial cloud as it collapses into a first generation star.

  20. Collisional Processing of Comet Surfaces: Impact Experiments into Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Jensen, E. A.; Cintala, M. J.; Smith, D. C.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Wooden, D. H.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    A new paradigm has emerged where 3.9 Ga ago, a violent reshuffling reshaped the placement of small bodies in the solar system (the Nice model). Surface properties of these objects may have been affected by collisions caused by this event, and by collisions with other small bodies since their emplacement. In addition, objects in the Kuiper Belt are believed to undergo extensive collisional processing while in the Kuiper Belt. Physical manifestations of shock effects (e.g., planar dislocations) in minerals typically found in comets will be correlated with spectral changes (e.g. reddening, loss and shift of peaks, new signatures) to allow astronomers to better understand geophysical impact processing that has occurred on small bodies. Targets will include solid and granular olivine (forsterite), impacted over a range of impact speeds with the Experimental Impact Laboratory at NASA JSC. Analyses include quantification of the dependence of the spectral changes with respect to impact speed, texture of the target, and temperature.

  1. Buoyancy Instabilities in a Weakly Collisional Intracluster Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Matthew W; Reynolds, Christopher S; Stone, James M

    2012-01-01

    The intracluster medium of galaxy clusters is a weakly collisional, high-beta plasma in which the transport of heat and momentum occurs primarily along magnetic-field lines. Anisotropic heat conduction allows convective instabilities to be driven by temperature gradients of either sign, the magnetothermal instability (MTI) in the outskirts of non-isothermal clusters and the heat-flux buoyancy-driven instability (HBI) in their cooling cores. We employ the Athena MHD code to investigate the nonlinear evolution of these instabilities, self-consistently including the effects of anisotropic viscosity (i.e. Braginskii pressure anisotropy), anisotropic conduction, and radiative cooling. We highlight the importance of the microscale instabilities that inevitably accompany and regulate the pressure anisotropies generated by the HBI and MTI. We find that, in all but the innermost regions of cool-core clusters, anisotropic viscosity significantly impairs the ability of the HBI to reorient magnetic-field lines orthogonal...

  2. Spatial structure of a collisionally inhomogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fei, E-mail: wiself@gmail.com [Hunan First Normal University, Department of Education Science (China); Zhang, Dongxia; Rong, Shiguang; Xu, Ying [Hunan University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics (China)

    2013-11-15

    The spatial structure of a collisionally inhomogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in an optical lattice is studied. A spatially dependent current with an explicit analytic expression is found in the case with a spatially dependent BEC phase. The oscillating amplitude of the current can be adjusted by a Feshbach resonance, and the intensity of the current depends heavily on the initial and boundary conditions. Increasing the oscillating amplitude of the current can force the system to pass from a single-periodic spatial structure into a very complex state. But in the case with a constant phase, the spatially dependent current disappears and the Melnikov chaotic criterion is obtained via a perturbative analysis in the presence of a weak optical lattice potential. Numerical simulations show that a strong optical lattice potential can lead BEC atoms to a state with a chaotic spatial distribution via a quasiperiodic route.

  3. Modeling Collisional Cascades In Debris Disks: The Numerical Method

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspar, Andras; Ozel, Feryal; Rieke, George H; Cooney, Alan

    2011-01-01

    We develop a new numerical algorithm to model collisional cascades in debris disks. Because of the large dynamical range in particle masses, we solve the integro-differential equations describing erosive and catastrophic collisions in a particle-in-a-box approach, while treating the orbital dynamics of the particles in an approximate fashion. We employ a new scheme for describing erosive (cratering) collisions that yields a continuous set of outcomes as a function of colliding masses. We demonstrate the stability and convergence characteristics of our algorithm and compare it with other treatments. We show that incorporating the effects of erosive collisions results in a decay of the particle distribution that is significantly faster than with purely catastrophic collisions.

  4. MODELING COLLISIONAL CASCADES IN DEBRIS DISKS: THE NUMERICAL METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, Andras; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Oezel, Feryal; Rieke, George H.; Cooney, Alan, E-mail: agaspar@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: dpsaltis@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: fozel@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: grieke@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: acooney@physics.arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    We develop a new numerical algorithm to model collisional cascades in debris disks. Because of the large dynamical range in particle masses, we solve the integro-differential equations describing erosive and catastrophic collisions in a particle-in-a-box approach, while treating the orbital dynamics of the particles in an approximate fashion. We employ a new scheme for describing erosive (cratering) collisions that yields a continuous set of outcomes as a function of colliding masses. We demonstrate the stability and convergence characteristics of our algorithm and compare it with other treatments. We show that incorporating the effects of erosive collisions results in a decay of the particle distribution that is significantly faster than with purely catastrophic collisions.

  5. Modern methods in collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a compact yet comprehensive overview of recent developments in collisional-radiative (CR) modeling of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. It describes advances across the entire field, from basic considerations of model completeness to validation and verification of CR models to calculation of plasma kinetic characteristics and spectra in diverse plasmas. Various approaches to CR modeling are presented, together with numerous examples of applications. A number of important topics, such as atomic models for CR modeling, atomic data and its availability and quality, radiation transport, non-Maxwellian effects on plasma emission, ionization potential lowering, and verification and validation of CR models, are thoroughly addressed. Strong emphasis is placed on the most recent developments in the field, such as XFEL spectroscopy. Written by leading international research scientists from a number of key laboratories, the book offers a timely summary of the most recent progress in this area. It ...

  6. The violent collisional history of asteroid 4 Vesta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, S; McSween, H Y; O'Brien, D P; Schenk, P; De Sanctis, M C; Gaskell, R; Jaumann, R; Mottola, S; Preusker, F; Raymond, C A; Roatsch, T; Russell, C T

    2012-05-11

    Vesta is a large differentiated rocky body in the main asteroid belt that accreted within the first few million years after the formation of the earliest solar system solids. The Dawn spacecraft extensively imaged Vesta's surface, revealing a collision-dominated history. Results show that Vesta's cratering record has a strong north-south dichotomy. Vesta's northern heavily cratered terrains retain much of their earliest history. The southern hemisphere was reset, however, by two major collisions in more recent times. We estimate that the youngest of these impact structures, about 500 kilometers across, formed about 1 billion years ago, in agreement with estimates of Vesta asteroid family age based on dynamical and collisional constraints, supporting the notion that the Vesta asteroid family was formed during this event.

  7. Collisionally-activated dissociation in hyperthermal surface ionization of cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Shai; Danon, Albert; Amirav, Aviv

    1992-03-01

    Cholesterol in a hydrogen-seeded supersonic molecular beam was scattered from a continuously oxidized rhenium foil. The hyperthermal surface scattering exhibited efficient molecular ionization with a controlled amount of molecular ion dissociation. At 5.3 eV incident molecular kinetic energy the hyperthermal surface ionization mass spectrum was dominated by the parent molecular ion. Upon the increase of the molecular kinetic energy, a gradual increase in the degree of ion dissociation was observed. At 22eV incident kinetic energy the parent ion was completely dissociated and the mass spectrum was dominated by an extensive consecutive fragmentation. An efficient kinetic-vibrational energy transfer was observed, and it is extimated to be over 18% of the available incident kinetic energy. The implication for surface collisionally-activated dissociation of polyatomic ions is discussed. Rhenium oxide is suggested as an optimal surface for this purpose, as well as for the hyperthermal surface ionization of neutral species.

  8. Collisional Cascade Caclulations for Irregular Satellite Swarms in Fomalhaut b

    CERN Document Server

    Kenyon, Scott J

    2015-01-01

    We describe an extensive suite of numerical calculations for the collisional evolution of irregular satellite swarms around 1--300 M-earth planets orbiting at 120 AU in the Fomalhaut system. For 10--100 M-earth planets, swarms with initial masses of roughly 1% of the planet mass have cross-sectional areas comparable to the observed cross-sectional area of Fomalhaut b. Among 30--300 M-earth planets, our calculations yield optically thick swarms of satellites for ages of 1-10 Myr. Observations with HST and ground-based AO instruments can constrain the frequency of these systems around stars in the beta Pic moving group and possibly other nearby associations of young stars.

  9. Analysis of drift effects on the tokamak power scrape-off width using SOLPS-ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, E. T.; Goldston, R. J.; Kaveeva, E. G.; Makowski, M. A.; Mordijck, S.; Rozhansky, V. A.; Senichenkov, I. Yu; Voskoboynikov, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    SOLPS-ITER, a comprehensive 2D scrape-off layer modeling package, is used to examine the physical mechanisms that set the scrape-off width ({λq} ) for inter-ELM power exhaust. Guided by Goldston’s heuristic drift (HD) model, which shows remarkable quantitative agreement with experimental data, this research examines drift effects on {λq} in a DIII-D H-mode magnetic equilibrium. As a numerical expedient, a low target recycling coefficient of 0.9 is used in the simulations, resulting in outer target plasma that is sheath limited instead of conduction limited as in the experiment. Scrape-off layer (SOL) particle diffusivity (D SOL) is scanned from 1 to 0.1 m2 s-1. Across this diffusivity range, outer divertor heat flux is dominated by a narrow (˜3-4 mm when mapped to the outer midplane) electron convection channel associated with thermoelectric current through the SOL from outer to inner divertor. An order-unity up-down ion pressure asymmetry allows net ion drift flux across the separatrix, facilitated by an artificial mechanism that mimics the anomalous electron transport required for overall ambipolarity in the HD model. At {{D}\\text{SOL}}=0.1 m2 s-1, the density fall-off length is similar to the electron temperature fall-off length, as predicted by the HD model and as seen experimentally. This research represents a step toward a deeper understanding of the power scrape-off width, and serves as a basis for extending fluid modeling to more experimentally relevant, high-collisionality regimes.

  10. The KLOE drift chamber VCI 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervell, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; De Lucia, E. E-mail: erika.delucia@roma1.infn.it; De Robertis, G.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; De Zorzi, G.; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Falco, S.; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U. von.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y

    2002-02-01

    The main goal of the KLOE experiment at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory is the study CP violation in kaon decays. The tracking device of the experiment is a drift chamber whose dimensions, 4 m of diameter and 3.3 m length, provide a large acceptance volume for the decay products of low momentum K{sub L} ({lambda}{sub L}=3.4 m). A complete stereo geometry with 12.582 cells arranged in 58 layers guarantees a high and uniform efficiency in the reconstruction of the charged K{sub L} decays. Very light materials have been chosen both for the drift medium, a helium-based gas mixture, and for the mechanical structure, made of carbon fiber, to minimize multiple scattering and conversion of low-energy photons. The design requirements, the adopted solutions together with the calibration procedure and the tracking performances of the drift chamber are discussed.

  11. Epigenetic drift, epigenetic clocks and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shijie C; Widschwendter, Martin; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    It is well-established that the DNA methylation landscape of normal cells undergoes a gradual modification with age, termed as 'epigenetic drift'. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of epigenetic drift and its potential role in cancer etiology. We propose a new terminology to help distinguish the different components of epigenetic drift, with the aim of clarifying the role of the epigenetic clock, mitotic clocks and active changes, which accumulate in response to environmental disease risk factors. We further highlight the growing evidence that epigenetic changes associated with cancer risk factors may play an important causal role in cancer development, and that monitoring these molecular changes in normal cells may offer novel risk prediction and disease prevention strategies.

  12. The KLOE drift chamber VCI 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervell, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; De Sangro, R; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Murtas, F; Müller, S; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Panareo, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Von Hagel, U; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2002-01-01

    The main goal of the KLOE experiment at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory is the study CP violation in kaon decays. The tracking device of the experiment is a drift chamber whose dimensions, 4 m of diameter and 3.3 m length, provide a large acceptance volume for the decay products of low momentum K sub L (lambda sub L =3.4 m). A complete stereo geometry with 12.582 cells arranged in 58 layers guarantees a high and uniform efficiency in the reconstruction of the charged K sub L decays. Very light materials have been chosen both for the drift medium, a helium-based gas mixture, and for the mechanical structure, made of carbon fiber, to minimize multiple scattering and conversion of low-energy photons. The design requirements, the adopted solutions together with the calibration procedure and the tracking performances of the drift chamber are discussed.

  13. Collisional modelling of the debris disc around HIP 17439

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüppler, Ch.; Löhne, T.; Krivov, A. V.; Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Eiroa, C.

    2014-07-01

    We present an analysis of the debris disc around the nearby K2 V star HIP 17439. In the context of the Herschel DUNES key programme, the disc was observed and spatially resolved in the far-IR with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. In a previous study, we assumed that the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust are independent power laws. There, several scenarios capable of explaining the observations were suggested after exploring a very broad range of possible model parameters. In this paper, we perform a follow-up in-depth collisional modelling of these scenarios to further distinguish between them. In our models we consider collisions, direct radiation pressure, and drag forces, which are the actual physical processes operating in debris discs. We find that all scenarios discussed in the first paper are physically reasonable and can reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution along with the PACS surface brightness profiles reasonably well. In one model, the dust is produced beyond 120 au in a narrow planetesimal belt and is transported inwards by Poynting-Robertson and stellar wind drag. Good agreement with the observed radial profiles would require stellar winds by about an order of magnitude stronger than the solar value, which is not confirmed - although not ruled out - by observations. Another model consists of two spatially separated planetesimal belts, a warm inner and a cold outer one. This scenario would probably imply the presence of planets clearing the gap between the two components. Finally, we show qualitatively that the observations can be explained by assuming the dust is produced in a single, but broad planetesimal disc with a surface density of solids rising outwards, as expected for an extended disc that experiences a natural inside-out collisional depletion. Prospects of distinguishing between the competing scenarios by future observations are discussed.

  14. Learning in the context of distribution drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0039 Learning in the context of distribution drift Geoff Webb MONASH UNIVERSITY Final Report 05/09/2017 DISTRIBUTION A...Department of Defense, Executive Services, Directorate (0704-0188).   Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person ...23 Apr 2015 to 22 Apr 2017 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Learning in the context of distribution drift 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-15-1

  15. Shock drift mechanism for Forbush decreases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Andrew F.; Sarris, E. T.; Dodopoulos, C.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the way in which Forbush decreases can arise from variable drifts in nonuniform shocks, where the variation in shock strength along the shock front causes both the shock drift distance and the energy gain to become variable. More particles can then be transported out of a given region of space and energy interval than were transported in, so a spacecraft passing through this region can observe a Forbush decrease in this energy interval despite shock energization and compression. A simple example of how this can occur is presented.

  16. Ultra-low mass drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assiro, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Cappelli, L. [Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale (Italy); Cascella, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento Matematica e Fisica, Università del Salento (Italy); De Lorenzis, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Ignatov, F. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); L' Erario, A.; Maffezzoli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Miccoli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Onorato, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); Perillo, M. [EnginSoft S.p.a., Trento (Italy); Piacentino, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); Rella, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Rossetti, F. [EnginSoft S.p.a., Trento (Italy); Spedicato, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Tassielli, G., E-mail: giovanni.tassielli@le.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); and others

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel low mass drift chamber concept, developed in order to fulfill the stringent requirements imposed by the experiments for extremely rare processes, which require high resolutions (order of 100–200 keV/c) for particle momenta in a range (50–100 MeV/c) totally dominated by the multiple scattering contribution. We describe a geometry optimization procedure and a new wiring strategy with a feed-through-less wire anchoring system developed and tested on a drift chamber prototype under completion at INFN-Lecce.

  17. Relativistic Electron Shock Drift Acceleration in Low Mach Number Galaxy Cluster Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Umeda, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    An extreme case of electron shock drift acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks is investigated as a plausible mechanism of initial acceleration of relativistic electrons in large-scale shocks in galaxy clusters where upstream plasma temperature is of the order of 10 keV and a degree of magnetization is not too small. One-dimensional electromagnetic full particle simulations reveal that, even though a shock is rather moderate, a part of thermal incoming electrons are accelerated and reflected through relativistic shock drift acceleration and form a local nonthermal population just upstream of the shock. The accelerated electrons can self-generate local coherent waves and further be back-scattered toward the shock by those waves. This may be a scenario for the first stage of the electron shock acceleration occurring at the large-scale shocks in galaxy clusters such as CIZA J2242.8+5301 which has well defined radio relics.

  18. Non-resonant instability of coupled Alfvén and drift compressional modes in magnetospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Pavel N.; Klimushkin, Dmitri Yu

    2017-09-01

    A new mechanism of generation of the high-m compressional ULF waves in the magnetosphere is considered. It is suggested that the wave can be generated by the non-resonant instability of coupled Alfvén and drift compressional modes in the energetic component of the magnetospheric plasma. A stability analysis of the of the coupled modes in the inhomogeneous finite-β plasma in the dipole-like field in gyrokinetics is performed. A quadratic equation was obtained that determines mode frequency and the growth rate. The frequencies of both modes depend on the azimuthal wave number, m. The branches are merged at some critical m value, forming a mode with both real and imaginary parts of the wave frequency. This mode is amplified due to the instability called the drift coupling instability. The instability criterion was found. Its growth rate is determined by the mode coupling.

  19. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  20. Low-drift micro flow sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The emerging fields of micro total-analysis systems (micro-TAS), micro-reactors and bio-MEMS drives the need for further miniaturisation of sensors measuring quantities such as pressure, temperature and flow. The research described in this thesis concerns the development of low-drift micro flow sens

  1. Experimental design for drifting buoy Lagrangian test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, P. M.

    1975-01-01

    A test of instrumentation fabricated to measure the performance of a free drifting buoy as a (Lagrangian) current meter is described. Specifically it is proposed to distinguish between the trajectory of a drogued buoy and the trajectory of the water at the level of the drogue by measuring the flow relative to the drogue.

  2. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  3. Ion Landau Damping on Drift Tearing Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Connor, J W; Zocco, A

    2012-01-01

    The equations governing the ion Landau damping (ILD) layers for a drift tearing mode are derived and solved to provide a matching to ideal MHD solutions at large $x$ and to the drift tearing solution emerging from the ion kinetic region, $k\\rho_{i}\\sim1$, at small $x,$ the distance from the rational surface. The ILD layers lie on either side of the mode rational surface at locations defined by $k_{y}xV_{Ti}/L_{s}=\\omega_{*e}(1+0.73\\eta_{e})$ and have been ignored in many previous analyses of linear drift tearing stability. The effect of the ILD layer on the drift tearing mode is to introduce an additional stabilizing contribution, requiring even larger values of the stability index, $\\Delta^{\\prime}$ for instability, than predicted by Connor Hastie and Zocco [PPCF,54, 035003, (2012)] and Cowley, Kulsrud and Hahm [Phys. Fluids,29, 3230, (1986)]. The magnitude and scaling of the new stabilizing effect in slab geometry is discussed.

  4. Stable discrete representation of relativistically drifting plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchen, Manuel; Godfrey, Brendan B; Dornmair, Irene; Jalas, Soeren; Peters, Kevin; Vay, Jean-Luc; Maier, Andreas R

    2016-01-01

    Representing the electrodynamics of relativistically drifting particle ensembles in discrete, co-propagating Galilean coordinates enables the derivation of a Particle-in-Cell algorithm that is intrinsically free of the Numerical Cherenkov Instability, for plasmas flowing at a uniform velocity. Application of the method is shown by modeling plasma accelerators in a Lorentz-transformed optimal frame of reference.

  5. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  6. Learning drifting concepts with neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biehl, Michael; Schwarze, Holm

    1993-01-01

    The learning of time-dependent concepts with a neural network is studied analytically and numerically. The linearly separable target rule is represented by an N-vector, whose time dependence is modelled by a random or deterministic drift process. A single-layer network is trained online using differ

  7. Visualizing CMS muon drift tubes’ currents

    CERN Document Server

    Hamarik, Lauri

    2015-01-01

    This report documents my work as a summer student in the CMS DT group at CERN in July and August of 2015. During that time, I have participated in relocating DT monitoring experiment to GIF++ site and creating software to analyze drift tubes’ wires current dependence on luminosity and radioactivity.

  8. A large acceptance cylindrical drift chamber detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrose, D.A. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Bachman, M.G. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Coffey, W.P. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Glass, G. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); McNaughton, K.H. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Riley, P.J. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Adams, D.L. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Gaussiran, T.L. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Hungerford, E.V. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Lan, K.A. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Johnston, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); McNaughton, M.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Penttila, S.I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Supek, I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a large acceptance cylindrical drift chamber detector designed and built for the study of the np{yields}pp{pi}{sup -} reaction at neutron beam energies in the range 500-800 MeV. Details of construction, electronics, testing, and detection efficiencies and resolutions are presented. (orig.).

  9. Stochastic Evolution Equations with Adapted Drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we study stochastic evolution equations in Banach spaces. We restrict ourselves to the two following cases. First, we consider equations in which the drift is a closed linear operator that depends on time and is random. Such equations occur as mathematical models in for instance

  10. Effects of Drifting Macroalgae in Eelgrass Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canal Vergés, Paula; Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun; Kristensen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    and physical damage on eelgrass can occur when macroalgae are drifting as bedload. The ballistic effect of moving macroalgae on surface sediment was tested in the field as well as in a series of annular flume experiments, where simultaneous measurements of macroalgae transport and turbidity were measured...

  11. Effects of Drifting Macroalgae in Eelgrass Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canal Vergés, Paula; Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun; Kristensen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that current-driven macroalge transport in shallow lagoons and estuaries may negatively impact eelgrass through increased turbidity and physical stress. Increased turbidity and lower light availability for eelgrass may result when drifting macroalgae erode surface sediment a...

  12. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  13. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II:Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢涛; William Perrie; 赵尚卓; 方贺; 于文金; 何宜军

    2016-01-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface.

  14. Generalization of the one dimensional modeling and design considerations of spiral Si drift detectors: Flat (straight) drift channels and constant drift fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Manwen, E-mail: mwliu1993@163.com; Li, Zheng, E-mail: zhengli58@gmail.com

    2016-07-11

    The one-dimensional design consideration for the spiral (cylindrical geometry) Si drift detector (SDD) has been modified and generalized for small drift distance (R) compatible to the detector thickness (d), i.e. for R–d, and for non uniform backside biasing situations. By applying a non uniform biasing voltage with a gradient similar (proportional) to the front side, one can increase the reach-through voltage, resulting in a large drift field for carriers. This can be important for large R (>3 mm). With a careful design of electric field profiles on both sides, one can obtain the optimum case of a spiral SDD with a straight (flat) drift channel and constant drift field throughout the carrier drift channel. The previous solution in the literature is an approximation of this work for R»d and with a curved drift channel.

  15. Generalization of the one dimensional modeling and design considerations of spiral Si drift detectors: Flat (straight) drift channels and constant drift fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Manwen; Li, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional design consideration for the spiral (cylindrical geometry) Si drift detector (SDD) has been modified and generalized for small drift distance (R) compatible to the detector thickness (d), i.e. for R-d, and for non uniform backside biasing situations. By applying a non uniform biasing voltage with a gradient similar (proportional) to the front side, one can increase the reach-through voltage, resulting in a large drift field for carriers. This can be important for large R (>3 mm). With a careful design of electric field profiles on both sides, one can obtain the optimum case of a spiral SDD with a straight (flat) drift channel and constant drift field throughout the carrier drift channel. The previous solution in the literature is an approximation of this work for R»d and with a curved drift channel.

  16. Collisional transport in a plasma with steep gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Murakami, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    The validity is given to the newly proposed two {delta}f method for neoclassical transport calculation, which can be solve the drift kinetic equation considering effects of steep plasma gradients, large radial electric field, finite banana width, and an orbit topology near the axis. The new method is applied to the study of ion transport with steep plasma gradients. It is found that the ion thermal diffusivity decreases as the scale length of density gradient decreases, while the ion particle flux due to ion-ion self collisions increases with increasing gradient. (author)

  17. Variational transport coefficients for low aspect ratio, low collisionality stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshman, S. P.; Spong, D. A.; D'Azevedo, E.; Peyton, B.; Lawkins, W.

    2001-10-01

    Stellarators with low aspect ratios (A converged results for these bounds. The convergence of DKES as the number of basis functions is varied is examined for several low aspect ratio configurations corresponding to the proposed NCSX and QPS experiments. It is shown that even on fairly coarse meshes, the minimax extremum yields a good approximation to the final (very fine mesh) values of the transport coefficients. Methods for optimally selecting the basis harmonic components, and hence greatly reducing the computational effort, are described. Iterative solution techniques have been developed which are scaleable to higher dimensional problems that include radial drift orbit effects. These methods are compared with the presently used Thomas algorithm.

  18. Coronal Shock Waves, EUV waves, and Their Relation to CMEs. I. Reconciliation of "EIT waves", Type II Radio Bursts, and Leading Edges of CMEs

    CERN Document Server

    Grechnev, V V; Chertok, I M; Kuzmenko, I V; Afanasyev, A N; Meshalkina, N S; Kalashnikov, S S; Kubo, Y

    2011-01-01

    We show examples of excitation of coronal waves by flare-related abrupt eruptions of magnetic rope structures. The waves presumably rapidly steepened into shocks and freely propagated afterwards like decelerating blast waves that showed up as Moreton waves and EUV waves. We propose a simple quantitative description for such shock waves to reconcile their observed propagation with drift rates of metric type II bursts and kinematics of leading edges of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Taking account of different plasma density falloffs for propagation of a wave up and along the solar surface, we demonstrate a close correspondence between drift rates of type II bursts and speeds of EUV waves, Moreton waves, and CMEs observed in a few known events.

  19. Particle acceleration in tangential discontinuities by lower hybrid waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Spicer

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the role that the lower-hybrid wave turbulence plays in providing the necessary resistivity at collisionless reconnection sights. The mechanism for generating the waves is considered to be the lower-hybrid drift instability. We find that the level of the wave amplitude is sufficient enough to heat and accelerate both electrons and ions.

  20. Shear Flow Dispersion Under Wave and Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The longitudinal dispersion of solute in open channel flow with short period progressive waves is investigated. The waves induce second order drift velocity in the direction of propagation and enhance the mixing process in concurrent direction. The 1-D wave-period-averaged dispersion equation is derived and an expression for the wave-current induced longitudinal dispersion coefficient (WCLDC) is proposed based on Fischer's expression (1979) for dispersion in unidirectional flow. The result shows that the effect of waves on dispersion is mainly due to the cross-sectional variation of the drift velocity. Furthermore, to obtain a more practical expression of the WCLDC, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient due to Seo and Cheong (1998) is modified to incluee the effect of drift velocity. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to verify the proposed expression. The experimental results, together with dimensional analysis, show that the wave effect can be reflected by the ratio between the wave amplitude and wave period. A comparative study between the cases with and without waves demonstrates that the magnitude of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient is increased under the presence of waves.

  1. Collisional transfer of population and orientation in NaK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, C. M.; Ashman, S.; Bai, J.; Beser, B.; Ahmed, E. H.; Lyyra, A. M.; Huennekens, J.

    2011-05-01

    Collisional satellite lines with |ΔJ| ≤ 58 have been identified in recent polarization spectroscopy V-type optical-optical double resonance (OODR) excitation spectra of the Rb2 molecule [H. Salami et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 022515 (2009)]. Observation of these satellite lines clearly requires a transfer of population from the rotational level directly excited by the pump laser to a neighboring level in a collision of the molecule with an atomic perturber. However to be observed in polarization spectroscopy, the collision must also partially preserve the angular momentum orientation, which is at least somewhat surprising given the extremely large values of ΔJ that were observed. In the present work, we used the two-step OODR fluorescence and polarization spectroscopy techniques to obtain quantitative information on the transfer of population and orientation in rotationally inelastic collisions of the NaK molecules prepared in the 2(A)1Σ+(v' = 16, J' = 30) rovibrational level with argon and potassium perturbers. A rate equation model was used to study the intensities of these satellite lines as a function of argon pressure and heat pipe oven temperature, in order to separate the collisional effects of argon and potassium atoms. Using a fit of this rate equation model to the data, we found that collisions of NaK molecules with potassium atoms are more likely to transfer population and destroy orientation than collisions with argon atoms. Collisions with argon atoms show a strong propensity for population transfer with ΔJ = even. Conversely, collisions with potassium atoms do not show this ΔJ = even propensity, but do show a propensity for ΔJ = positive compared to ΔJ = negative, for this particular initial state. The density matrix equations of motion have also been solved numerically in order to test the approximations used in the rate equation model and to calculate fluorescence and polarization spectroscopy line shapes. In addition, we have measured rate

  2. Kinetic Theory of Instability-Enhanced Collisional Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott D.

    2009-11-01

    A generalization of the Lenard-Balescu collision operator is derived which accounts for the scattering of particles by instability amplified fluctuations that originate from the thermal motion of discrete particles (in contrast to evoking a fluctuation level externally, as is done in quasilinear kinetic theory) [1]. Emphasis is placed on plasmas with convective instabilities. It is shown that an instability-enhanced collective response results which can be the primary mechanism for scattering particles, being orders of magnitude more frequent than conventional Coulomb collisions, even though the fluctuations are in a linear growth phase. The resulting collision operator is shown to obey conservation laws (energy, momentum, and density), Galilean invariance, and the Boltzmann H-theorem. It has the property that Maxwellian is the unique equilibrium distribution function; again in contrast to weak turbulence or quasilinear theories. Instability-enhanced collisional effects can dominate particle scattering and cause strong frictional forces. For example, this theory has been applied to two outstanding problems: Langmuir's paradox [2] and determining Bohm's criterion for plasmas with multiple ion species [3]. Langmuir's paradox is a measurement of anomalous electron scattering rapidly establishing a Maxwellian distribution in gas discharges with low temperature and pressure. This may be explained by instability-enhanced scattering in the plasma-boundary transition region (presheath) where convective ion-acoustic instabilities are excited. Bohm's criterion for multiple ion species is a single condition that the ion fluid speeds must obey at the sheath edge; but it is insufficient to determine the speed of individual species. It is shown that an instability-enhanced collisional friction, due to streaming instabilities in the presheath, determines this criterion.[4pt] [1] S.D. Baalrud, J.D. Callen, and C.C. Hegna, Phys. Plasmas 15, 092111 (2008).[0pt] [2] S.D. Baalrud, J

  3. Barber's Point, Oahu, Hawaii Drift Card Study 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drift cards were be released from Barber's Point, Oahu, approximately once a month during the two year span to get an idea of the distribution of card drift under...

  4. Exploring Genetic Drift and Natural Selection through a Simulation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Timothy J.; Rissing, Steven W.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on the development of a laboratory exercise that would allow students to explore the concept of genetic drift. Discusses the concept of genetic drift that is coincident with natural selection and that closely models the real world. (DDR)

  5. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral

  6. A new code to study structures in collisionally active, perturbed debris discs. Application to binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Thebault, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Debris discs are traditionally studied using two distinct types of numerical models: statistical particle-in-a-box codes to study their collisional and size distribution evolution, and dynamical N-body models to study their spatial structure. The absence of collisions from N-body codes is in particular a major shortcoming, as collisional processes are expected to significantly alter the results obtained from pure N-body runs. We present a new numerical model, to study the spatial structure of perturbed debris discs at dynamical and collisional steady-state. We focus on the competing effects between gravitational perturbations by a massive body (planet or star), collisional production of small grains, and radiation pressure placing these grains in possibly dynamically unstable regions. We consider a disc of parent bodies at dynamical steady-state, from which small radiation-pressure-affected grains are released in a series of runs, each corresponding to a different orbital position of the perturber, where part...

  7. Electromagnetic drift modes in an inhomogeneous electron gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    A pair of nonlinear equations is derived which describes the dynamics of the electromagnetic drift oscillations in a nonuniform magnetized electron gas. It is shown that the nonlinear electromagnetic drift modes can propagate in the form of dipole vortices......A pair of nonlinear equations is derived which describes the dynamics of the electromagnetic drift oscillations in a nonuniform magnetized electron gas. It is shown that the nonlinear electromagnetic drift modes can propagate in the form of dipole vortices...

  8. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, David H.

    2001-05-30

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4) Evaluate factors

  9. Accommodation of collisional shortening along the Alpine plate boundary : plate kinematics vs rheological controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Claudio; Bellahsen, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The style of collision in the Alps varies along strike, reflecting different amounts and different modes of accommodation of collisional shortening. These differences control the patterns of exhumation during collision. Whereas the western Alps largely consist of a metamorphic complex formed during subduction and largely exhumed before the initiation of collision, the subduction nappe-stack of the Central and the Eastern Alps is strongly overprinted by collisional shortening and by Barrovian metamorphism. Based on compiled and new data we estimate amounts of collisional shortening along the strike of the chain and set it in relationship to the geometry of the collisional prism. The western Alpine collisional structures form a very large (in map view), but moderately shortened wedge, terminating in front of a poorly developed Molasse basin. Shortening of this wedge was mainly localized along its external parts, resulting in accretion of basement and cover units thrusted towards the foreland. Back-folding and back-thrusting are barely developed and no shortening takes place in the upper, Adriatic plate. In the Central Alps, the amount of collisional shortening is larger and it is distributed both in the lower and in the upper plate. The collisional prism is bivergent and partitioning of the amount of shortening between the upper and lower plates varies along strike, being most probably controlled by rheological, heterogeneities. The thickened accreted lower plate is strongly affected by Barrovian metamorphism where shortening is largest and localized within a confined area. A deep Molasse basin developed in front of the prism. In the Eastern Alps collisional kinematics vary from east to west, with orogen-parallel displacements dominating in the east and orogen-perpendicular ones in the West, where they culminate in the structural and metamorphic dome of the Tauern Window. Nowhere else in the Alps collisional shortening is so strongly localized in one and the same

  10. A Collisional Origin to Earth's Non-chondritic Composition?

    CERN Document Server

    Bonsor, Amy; Carter, Philip J; Elliott, Tim; Walter, Michael J; Stewart, Sarah T

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate a non-chondritic composition for Bulk Earth. If Earth formed from the accretion of chondritic material, its non-chondritic composition, in particular the super-chondritic 142Nd/144Nd and low Mg/Fe ratios, might be explained by the collisional erosion of differentiated planetesimals during its formation. In this work we use an N-body code, that includes a state-of-the-art collision model, to follow the formation of protoplanets, similar to proto-Earth, from differentiated planetesimals (> 100 km) up to isolation mass (> 0.16 M_Earth). Collisions between differentiated bodies have the potential to change the core-mantle ratio of the accreted protoplanets. We show that sufficient mantle material can be stripped from the colliding bodies during runaway and oligarchic growth, such that the final protoplanets could have Mg/Fe and Si/Fe ratios similar to that of bulk Earth, but only if Earth is an extreme case and the core is assumed to contain 10% silicon by mass. This may indicat...

  11. Consistent analytic approach to the efficiency of collisional Penrose process

    CERN Document Server

    Harada, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a consistent analytic approach to the efficiency of collisional Penrose process in the vicinity of a maximally rotating Kerr black hole. We focus on a collision with arbitrarily high centre-of-mass energy, which occurs if either of the colliding particles has its angular momentum finetuned to the critical value to enter the horizon. We show that if the finetuned particle is ingoing on the collision, the upper limit of the efficiency is $(2+\\sqrt{3})(2-\\sqrt{2})\\simeq 2.186$, while if the finetuned particle is bounced back before the collision, the upper limit is $(2+\\sqrt{3})^{2}\\simeq 13.93$. Despite earlier claims, the former can be attained for inverse Compton scattering if the finetuned particle is massive and starts at rest at infinity, while the latter for various particle reactions, such as inverse Compton scattering and pair annihilation, if the finetuned particle is either massless or highly relativistic at infinity. We discuss difference between the present and earlier analyses.

  12. Collisional Grooming Models of the Kuiper Belt Dust Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchner, Marc J

    2010-01-01

    We modeled the 3-D structure of the Kuiper Belt dust cloud at four different dust production rates, incorporating both planet-dust interactions and grain-grain collisions using the collisional grooming algorithm. Simulated images of a model with a face-on optical depth of ~10^-4 primarily show an azimuthally-symmetric ring at 40-47 AU in submillimeter and infrared wavelengths; this ring is associated with the cold classical Kuiper Belt. For models with lower optical depths (10^-6 and 10^-7), synthetic infrared images show that the ring widens and a gap opens in the ring at the location of of Neptune; this feature is caused by trapping of dust grains in Neptune's mean motion resonances. At low optical depths, a secondary ring also appears associated with the hole cleared in the center of the disk by Saturn. Our simulations, which incorporate 25 different grain sizes, illustrate that grain-grain collisions are important in sculpting today's Kuiper Belt dust, and probably other aspects of the Solar System dust c...

  13. Collisional modelling of the AU Microscopii debris disc

    CERN Document Server

    Schüppler, Ch; Krivov, A V; Ertel, S; Marshall, J P; Wolf, S; Wyatt, M C; Augereau, J -C; Metchev, S A

    2015-01-01

    The spatially resolved AU Mic debris disc is among the most famous and best-studied debris discs. We aim at a comprehensive understanding of the dust production and the dynamics of the disc objects with in depth collisional modelling including stellar radiative and corpuscular forces. Our models are compared to a suite of observational data for thermal and scattered light emission, ranging from the ALMA radial surface brightness profile at 1.3mm to polarisation measurements in the visible. Most of the data can be reproduced with a planetesimal belt having an outer edge at around 40au and subsequent inward transport of dust by stellar winds. A low dynamical excitation of the planetesimals with eccentricities up to 0.03 is preferred. The radial width of the planetesimal belt cannot be constrained tightly. Belts that are 5au and 17au wide, as well as a broad 44au-wide belt are consistent with observations. All models show surface density profiles increasing with distance from the star as inferred from observatio...

  14. Collisional modelling of the debris disc around HIP 17439

    CERN Document Server

    Schüppler, Ch; Krivov, A V; Ertel, S; Marshall, J P; Eiroa, C

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the debris disc around the nearby K2 V star HIP 17439. In the context of the Herschel DUNES key programme the disc was observed and spatially resolved in the far-IR with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. In a first model, Ertel et al. (2014) assumed the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust to be independent power laws. There, by exploring a very broad range of possible model parameters several scenarios capable of explaining the observations were suggested. In this paper, we perform a follow-up in-depth collisional modelling of these scenarios trying to further distinguish between them. In our models we consider collisions, direct radiation pressure, and drag forces, i.e. the actual physical processes operating in debris discs. We find that all scenarios discussed in Ertel et al. are physically sensible and can reproduce the observed SED along with the PACS surface brightness profiles reasonably well. In one model, the dust is produced beyond 120au in a narro...

  15. Collisional disruption of gravitational aggregates in the tidal environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-05-20

    The degree of disruption in collisions in free space is determined by specific impact energy, and the mass fraction of the largest remnant is a monotonically decreasing function of impact energy. However, it has not been shown whether such a relationship is applicable to collisions under the influence of a planet's tidal force, which is important in ring dynamics and satellite accretion. Here we examine the collisional disruption of gravitational aggregates in the tidal environment by using local N-body simulations. We find that outcomes of such a collision largely depend on the impact velocity, the direction of impact, and the radial distance from the planet. In the case of a strong tidal field corresponding to Saturn's F ring, collisions in the azimuthal direction are much more destructive than those in the radial direction. Numerical results of collisions sensitively depend on the impact velocity, and a complete disruption of aggregates can occur even in impacts with velocity much lower than their escape velocity. In such low-velocity collisions, the deformation of colliding aggregates plays an essential role in determining collision outcomes, because the physical size of the aggregate is comparable to its Hill radius. On the other hand, the dependence of collision outcomes on impact velocity becomes similar to the case in free space when the distance from the planet is sufficiently large. Our results are consistent with Cassini observations of the F ring, which suggest ongoing creation and disruption of aggregates within the ring.

  16. 3D multispecies collisional model of Ganymede's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Francois; Leclercq, Ludivine; Oza, Apurva; Schmidt, Carl; Modolo, Ronan; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Johnson, Robert E.

    2016-10-01

    Ganymede's atmosphere is produced by the interaction of the Sun and of the Jovian magnetosphere with its surface. It is a reflection of Ganymede's surface properties, but also of the complex interaction between the Ganymede and Jupiter magnetospheres. The Exospheric Global Model (EGM) has been developed in order to be able to integrate surface and magnetosphere processes with those in Ganymede's atmosphere. It is a 3D parallelized multi-species collisional model, coupled with LatHys, a hybrid multi-grid 3D multi-species model of Ganymede's magnetosphere (Leclercq et al., Geophys. Res. Let., Submitted, 2016). EGM's description of the species-dependent spatial distribution of Ganymede's atmosphere, its temporal variability during rotation around Jupiter, its connection to the surface, the role of collisions, and respective roles of sublimation and sputtering in producing Ganymede's exosphere, illustrates how modeling combined with in situ and remote sensing of Ganymede's atmosphere can contribute to our understanding of this unique surface-atmosphere-magnetosphere integrated system.

  17. Hiding in the Shadows II: Collisional Dust as Exoplanet Markers

    CERN Document Server

    Dobinson, Jack; Lines, Stefan; Carter, Philip J; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E; Teanby, Nick A

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the youngest planets ($\\sim$1-10 Myr for a transitional disk) will increase the accuracy of our planet formation models. Unfortunately, observations of such planets are challenging and time-consuming to undertake even in ideal circumstances. Therefore, we propose the determination of a set of markers that can pre-select promising exoplanet-hosting candidate disks. To this end, N-body simulations were conducted to investigate the effect of an embedded Jupiter mass planet on the dynamics of the surrounding planetesimal disk and the resulting creation of second generation collisional dust. We use a new collision model that allows fragmentation and erosion of planetesimals, and dust-sized fragments are simulated in a post process step including non-gravitational forces due to stellar radiation and a gaseous protoplanetary disk. Synthetic images from our numerical simulations show a bright double ring at 850 $\\mu$m for a low eccentricity planet, whereas a high eccentricity planet would produce a ch...

  18. Direct and Collisional Excitation of Automotive Fuel Components)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Allen R.; Wilson, Kyle; Sakai, Stephen; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2010-06-01

    Adding energy directly into the vibrational modes of automotive fuel may reduce the threshold energy required for combustion, without raising the combustion charge temperature. This energy can be supplied either directly via incident laser radiation or indirectly through collision with directly excited molecules. The most common chemical in commercial gasoline, isooctane, does not absorb infrared radiation sufficiently at any wavelength for which an infrared laser is readily available. However, CO2 lasers are relatively cheap, and are available at wavelengths which are absorbed by isopropanol as well as ethanol, which is also a component of commercial gasoline. In this study, the infrared absorption of isopropanol and ethanol in balance isooctane were measured at three wavelengths (10.6 m, 10.2 m, and 9.3 m) of incident CO2 laser radiation. Additional time-resolved emission measurements were performed for these mixtures. The data support the existence of the proposed collisional pathway for energy transfer from ethanol and isopropanol to isooctane.

  19. Microgravity experiments on the collisional behavior of Saturnian ring particles

    CERN Document Server

    Heißelmann, Daniel; Fraser, Helen J; Wolling, Kristin; 10.1016/j.icarus.2009.08.009

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present results of two novel experimental methods to investigate the collisional behavior of individual macroscopic icy bodies. The experiments reported here were conducted in the microgravity environments of parabolic flights and the Bremen drop tower facility. Using a cryogenic parabolic-flight setup, we were able to capture 41 near-central collisions of 1.5-cm-sized ice spheres at relative velocities between 6 and $22 \\mathrm{cm s^{-1}}$. The analysis of the image sequences provides a uniform distribution of coefficients of restitution with a mean value of $\\overline{\\varepsilon} = 0.45$ and values ranging from $\\varepsilon = 0.06$ to 0.84. Additionally, we designed a prototype drop tower experiment for collisions within an ensemble of up to one hundred cm-sized projectiles and performed the first experiments with solid glass beads. We were able to statistically analyze the development of the kinetic energy of the entire system, which can be well explained by assuming a granular `fluid' fo...

  20. Collisional debris as laboratories to study star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Boquien, M; Wu, Y; Charmandaris, V; Lisenfeld, U; Braine, J; Brinks, E; Iglesias-Páramo, J; Xu, C K

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we address the question whether star formation is driven by local processes or the large scale environment. To do so, we investigate star formation in collisional debris where the gravitational potential well and velocity gradients are shallower and compare our results with previous work on star formation in non-interacting spiral and dwarf galaxies. We have performed multiwavelength spectroscopic and imaging observations (from the far-ultraviolet to the mid-infrared) of 6 interacting systems, identifying a total of 60 star-forming regions in their collision debris. Our analysis indicates that in these regions a) the emission of the dust is at the expected level for their luminosity and metallicity, b) the usual tracers of star formation rate display the typical trend and scatter found in classical star forming regions, and c) the extinction and metallicity are not the main parameters governing the scatter in the properties of intergalactic star forming regions; age effects and variations in the...

  1. Consistent analytic approach to the efficiency of collisional Penrose process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tomohiro; Ogasawara, Kota; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2016-07-01

    We propose a consistent analytic approach to the efficiency of collisional Penrose process in the vicinity of a maximally rotating Kerr black hole. We focus on a collision with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy, which occurs if either of the colliding particles has its angular momentum fine-tuned to the critical value to enter the horizon. We show that if the fine-tuned particle is ingoing on the collision, the upper limit of the efficiency is (2 +√{3 })(2 -√{2 })≃2.186 , while if the fine-tuned particle is bounced back before the collision, the upper limit is (2 +√{3 })2≃13.93 . Despite earlier claims, the former can be attained for inverse Compton scattering if the fine-tuned particle is massive and starts at rest at infinity, while the latter can be attained for various particle reactions, such as inverse Compton scattering and pair annihilation, if the fine-tuned particle is either massless or highly relativistic at infinity. We discuss the difference between the present and earlier analyses.

  2. Expansion of Collisional Radiative Model for Helium line ratio spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquegrani, David; Cooper, Chris; Forest, Cary; Milhone, Jason; Munoz-Borges, Jorge; Schmitz, Oliver; Unterberg, Ezekial

    2015-11-01

    Helium line ratio spectroscopy is a powerful technique of active plasma edge spectroscopy. It enables reconstruction of plasma edge parameters like electron density and temperature by use of suitable Collisional Radiative Models (CRM). An established approach is successful at moderate plasma densities (~1018m-3 range) and temperature (30-300eV), taking recombination and charge exchange to be negligible. The goal of this work is to experimentally explore limitations of this approach to CRM. For basic validation the Madison Plasma Dynamo eXperiment (MPDX) will be used. MPDX offers a very uniform plasma and spherical symmetry at low temperature (5-20 eV) and low density (1016 -1017m-3) . Initial data from MPDX shows a deviation in CRM results when compared to Langmuir probe data. This discrepancy points to the importance of recombination effects. The validated model is applied to first time measurement of electron density and temperature in front of an ICRH antenna at the TEXTOR tokamak. These measurements are important to understand RF coupling and PMI physics at the antenna limiters. Work supported in part by start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the UW - Madison, USA and NSF CAREER award PHY-1455210.

  3. Evolution of a Gaussian laser beam in warm collisional magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, M. J.; Jafari Milani, M. R.; Niknam, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the spatial evolution of an intense circularly polarized Gaussian laser beam propagated through a warm plasma is investigated, taking into account the ponderomotive force, Ohmic heating, external magnetic field, and collisional effects. Using the momentum transfer and energy equations, both modified electron temperature and electron density in plasma are obtained. By introducing the complex dielectric permittivity of warm magnetized plasma and using the complex eikonal function, coupled differential equations for beam width parameter are established and solved numerically. The effects of polarization state of laser and magnetic field on the laser spot size evolution are studied. It is observed that in case of the right-handed polarization, an increase in the value of external magnetic field causes an increase in the strength of the self-focusing, especially in the higher values, and consequently, the self-focusing occurs in shorter distance of propagation. Moreover, the results demonstrate the existence of laser intensity and electron temperature ranges where self-focusing can occur, while the beam diverges outside of these regions; meanwhile, in these intervals, there exists a turning point for each of intensity and temperature in which the self-focusing process has its strongest strength. Finally, it is found that the self-focusing effect can be enhanced by increasing the plasma frequency (plasma density).

  4. Langmuir probe in collisionless and collisional plasma including dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sayak; Kaur, Manjit; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Saxena, Y. C.; Pal, R.

    2017-04-01

    Measurements of local plasma parameters in dusty plasma are crucial for understanding the physics issues related to such systems. The Langmuir probe, a small electrode immersed in the plasma, provides such measurements. However, designing of a Langmuir probe system in a dusty plasma environment demands special consideration. First, the probe has to be miniaturized enough so that its perturbation on the ambient dust structure is minimal. At the same time, the probe dimensions must be such that a well-defined theory exists for interpretation of its characteristics. The associated instrumentation must also support the measurement of current collected by the probe with high signal to noise ratio. The most important consideration, of course, comes from the fact that the probes are prone to dust contamination, as the dust particles tend to stick to the probe surface and alter the current collecting area in unpredictable ways. This article describes the design and operation of a Langmuir probe system that resolves these challenging issues in dusty plasma. In doing so, first, different theories that are used to interpret the probe characteristics in collisionless as well as in collisional regimes are discussed, with special emphasis on application. The critical issues associated with the current-voltage characteristics of Langmuir probe obtained in different operating regimes are discussed. Then, an algorithm for processing these characteristics efficiently in presence of ion-neutral collisions in the probe sheath is presented.

  5. HIDING IN THE SHADOWS. II. COLLISIONAL DUST AS EXOPLANET MARKERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobinson, Jack; Leinhardt, Zoë M.; Lines, Stefan; Carter, Philip J. [University of Bristol, School of Physics, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E. [University of Delaware, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 217 Sharp Lab, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Teanby, Nick A. [University of Bristol, School of Earth Sciences, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-20

    Observations of the youngest planets (∼1–10 Myr for a transitional disk) will increase the accuracy of our planet formation models. Unfortunately, observations of such planets are challenging and time-consuming to undertake, even in ideal circumstances. Therefore, we propose the determination of a set of markers that can preselect promising exoplanet-hosting candidate disks. To this end, N-body simulations were conducted to investigate the effect of an embedded Jupiter-mass planet on the dynamics of the surrounding planetesimal disk and the resulting creation of second-generation collisional dust. We use a new collision model that allows fragmentation and erosion of planetesimals, and dust-sized fragments are simulated in a post-process step including non-gravitational forces due to stellar radiation and a gaseous protoplanetary disk. Synthetic images from our numerical simulations show a bright double ring at 850 μm for a low-eccentricity planet, whereas a high-eccentricity planet would produce a characteristic inner ring with asymmetries in the disk. In the presence of first-generation primordial dust these markers would be difficult to detect far from the orbit of the embedded planet, but would be detectable inside a gap of planetary origin in a transitional disk.

  6. Ion mobility mass spectrometry of peptide, protein, and protein complex ions using a radio-frequency confining drift cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Samuel J; Giles, Kevin; Gilbert, Tony; Bush, Matthew F

    2016-02-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments enable the characterization of mass, assembly, and shape of biological molecules and assemblies. Here, a new radio-frequency confining drift cell is characterized and used to measure the mobilities of peptide, protein, and protein complex ions. The new drift cell replaced the traveling-wave ion mobility cell in a Waters Synapt G2 HDMS. Methods for operating the drift cell and determining collision cross section values using this experimental set up are presented within the context of the original instrument control software. Collision cross sections for 349 cations and anions are reported, 155 of which are for ions that have not been characterized previously using ion mobility. The values for the remaining ions are similar to those determined using a previous radio-frequency confining drift cell and drift tubes without radial confinement. Using this device under 2 Torr of helium gas and an optimized drift voltage, denatured and native-like ions exhibited average apparent resolving powers of 14.2 and 16.5, respectively. For ions with high mobility, which are also low in mass, the apparent resolving power is limited by contributions from ion gating. In contrast, the arrival-time distributions of low-mobility, native-like ions are not well explained using only contributions from ion gating and diffusion. For those species, the widths of arrival-time distributions are most consistent with the presence of multiple structures in the gas phase.

  7. Modeling of collisional excited x-ray lasers using short pulse laser pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Akira; Moribayashi, Kengo; Utsumi, Takayuki; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    A simple atomic kinetics model of electron collisional excited x-ray lasers has been developed. The model consists of a collisional radiative model using the average ion model (AIM) and a detailed term accounting (DTA) model of Ni-like Ta. An estimate of plasma condition to produce gain in Ni-like Ta ({lambda}=44A) is given. Use of the plasma confined in a cylinder is proposed to preform a uniform high density plasma from 1-D hydrodynamics calculations. (author)

  8. Drifting snow climate of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the drifting snow climate of the Earth's ice sheets, Antarctica and Greenland. For that purpose we use a regional atmospheric climate model, RACMO2. We included a routine that is able to calculate the drifting snow fluxes and accounts for the interaction between drifting snow on

  9. Drifting snow climate of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314850163

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the drifting snow climate of the Earth's ice sheets, Antarctica and Greenland. For that purpose we use a regional atmospheric climate model, RACMO2. We included a routine that is able to calculate the drifting snow fluxes and accounts for the interaction between drifting snow on

  10. Travelling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry and negative ion fragmentation of hybrid and complex N-glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, David J; Scarff, Charlotte A; Edgeworth, Matthew; Pagel, Kevin; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Struwe, Weston B; Crispin, Max; Scrivens, James H

    2016-11-01

    Nitrogen collisional cross sections (CCSs) of hybrid and complex glycans released from the glycoproteins IgG, gp120 (from human immunodeficiency virus), ovalbumin, α1-acid glycoprotein and thyroglobulin were measured with a travelling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer using dextran as the calibrant. The utility of this instrument for isomer separation was also investigated. Some isomers, such as Man3 GlcNAc3 from chicken ovalbumin and Man3 GlcNAc3 Fuc1 from thyroglobulin could be partially resolved and identified by their negative ion fragmentation spectra obtained by collision-induced decomposition (CID). Several other larger glycans, however, although existing as isomers, produced only asymmetric rather than separated arrival time distributions (ATDs). Nevertheless, in these cases, isomers could often be detected by plotting extracted fragment ATDs of diagnostic fragment ions from the negative ion CID spectra obtained in the transfer cell of the Waters Synapt mass spectrometer. Coincidence in the drift times of all fragment ions with an asymmetric ATD profile in this work, and in the related earlier paper on high-mannose glycans, usually suggested that separations were because of conformers or anomers, whereas symmetrical ATDs of fragments showing differences in drift times indicated isomer separation. Although some significant differences in CCSs were found for the smaller isomeric glycans, the differences found for the larger compounds were usually too small to be analytically useful. Possible correlations between CCSs and structural types were also investigated, and it was found that complex glycans tended to have slightly smaller CCSs than high-mannose glycans of comparable molecular weight. In addition, biantennary glycans containing a core fucose and/or a bisecting GlcNAc residue fell on different mobility-m/z trend lines to those glycans not so substituted with both of these substituents contributing to larger CCSs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons

  11. Rough differential equations with unbounded drift term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, S.; Scheutzow, M.

    2017-01-01

    We study controlled differential equations driven by a rough path (in the sense of T. Lyons) with an additional, possibly unbounded drift term. We show that the equation induces a solution flow if the drift grows at most linearly. Furthermore, we show that the semiflow exists assuming only appropriate one-sided growth conditions. We provide bounds for both the flow and the semiflow. Applied to stochastic analysis, our results imply strong completeness and the existence of a stochastic (semi)flow for a large class of stochastic differential equations. If the driving process is Gaussian, we can further deduce (essentially) sharp tail estimates for the (semi)flow and a Freidlin-Wentzell-type large deviation result.

  12. Clean Industrial Room for Drift Tube Assembling

    CERN Document Server

    Glonti, GL; Evtoukhovitch, P G; Kroa, G; Manz, A; Potrap, I N; Rihter, P; Stoletov, G D; Tskhadadze, E G; Chepurnov, V F; Chirkov, A V; Shelkov, G A

    2001-01-01

    Description of a clean industrial room for assembly of drift tubes for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment is presented. High quality specifications on the detectors to be produced demanded creation of a workplace with stable temperature and humidity, as well as minimum quantity of dust in the room. Checking of parameters of intra-room air during long period of continuous work has been confirmed correctness of the designed characteristics of the climatic system installed in the clean room. The room large volum (\\sim 190 m^3), the powerful and flexible climatic system, and simplicity of service allow assembling of detectors with length up to 5 m. Subsequent checking of functionality of the assembled detectors has shown high quality of assembling (the amount of rejected tubes does not exceed 2 %). It demonstrates conformity to the assembling quality requirements for mass production of drift chambers for the muon spectrometer.

  13. Gas sensor with attenuated drift characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Shin [Danbury, CT; Chen, Philip S. H. [Bethel, CT; Neuner, Jeffrey W [Bethel, CT; Welch, James [Fairfield, CT; Hendrix, Bryan [Danbury, CT; Dimeo, Jr., Frank [Danbury, CT

    2008-05-13

    A sensor with an attenuated drift characteristic, including a layer structure in which a sensing layer has a layer of diffusional barrier material on at least one of its faces. The sensor may for example be constituted as a hydrogen gas sensor including a palladium/yttrium layer structure formed on a micro-hotplate base, with a chromium barrier layer between the yttrium layer and the micro-hotplate, and with a tantalum barrier layer between the yttrium layer and an overlying palladium protective layer. The gas sensor is useful for detection of a target gas in environments susceptible to generation or incursion of such gas, and achieves substantial (e.g., >90%) reduction of signal drift from the gas sensor in extended operation, relative to a corresponding gas sensor lacking the diffusional barrier structure of the invention

  14. Numerical Wave Flume Study on Wave Motion Around Submerged Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐鹏; 侯一筠

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear interaction between surface waves and a submerged horizontal plate is investigated in the absorbed numerical wave flume developed based on the volume of fluid (VOF) method. The governing equations of the numerical model are the continuity equation and the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the k-ε turbulence equations. Incident waves are generated by an absorbing wave-maker that eliminates the waves reflected from structures. Results are obtained for a range of parameters, with consideration of the condition under which the reflection coefficient becomes maximal and the transmission coefficient minimal. Wave breaking over the plate, vortex shedding downwave, and pulsating flow below the plate are observed. Time-averaged hydrodynamic force reveals a negative drift force. All these characteristics provide a reference for construction of submerged plate breakwaters.

  15. OpenDrift - an open source framework for ocean trajectory modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Breivik, Øyvind; Ådlandsvik, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    We will present a new, open source tool for modeling the trajectories and fate of particles or substances (Lagrangian Elements) drifting in the ocean, or even in the atmosphere. The software is named OpenDrift, and has been developed at Norwegian Meteorological Institute in cooperation with Institute of Marine Research. OpenDrift is a generic framework written in Python, and is openly available at https://github.com/knutfrode/opendrift/. The framework is modular with respect to three aspects: (1) obtaining input data, (2) the transport/morphological processes, and (3) exporting of results to file. Modularity is achieved through well defined interfaces between components, and use of a consistent vocabulary (CF conventions) for naming of variables. Modular input implies that it is not necessary to preprocess input data (e.g. currents, wind and waves from Eulerian models) to a particular file format. Instead "reader modules" can be written/used to obtain data directly from any original source, including files or through web based protocols (e.g. OPeNDAP/Thredds). Modularity of processes implies that a model developer may focus on the geophysical processes relevant for the application of interest, without needing to consider technical tasks such as reading, reprojecting, and colocating input data, rotation and scaling of vectors and model output. We will show a few example applications of using OpenDrift for predicting drifters, oil spills, and search and rescue objects.

  16. A Standard Law for the Equatorward Drift of the Sunspot Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2012-01-01

    The latitudinal location of the sunspot zones in each hemisphere is determined by calculating the centroid position of sunspot areas for each solar rotation from May 1874 to June 2012. When these centroid positions are plotted and analyzed as functions of time from each sunspot cycle maximum there appears to be systematic differences in the positions and equatorward drift rates as a function of sunspot cycle amplitude. If, instead, these centroid positions are plotted and analyzed as functions of time from each sunspot cycle minimum then most of the differences in the positions and equatorward drift rates disappear. The differences that remain disappear entirely if curve fitting is used to determine the starting times (which vary by as much as 8 months from the times of minima). The sunspot zone latitudes and equatorward drift measured relative to this starting time follow a standard path for all cycles with no dependence upon cycle strength or hemispheric dominance. Although Cycle 23 was peculiar in its length and the strength of the polar fields it produced, it too shows no significant variation from this standard. This standard law, and the lack of variation with sunspot cycle characteristics, is consistent with Dynamo Wave mechanisms but not consistent with current Flux Transport Dynamo models for the equatorward drift of the sunspot zones.

  17. Some remarks on electronics for drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Verweij, H

    1973-01-01

    A brief outline of the required functions is given. Analogue and digital time measuring methods are compared. Amplifiers and current division circuits are discussed. A method for storage of analogue information, and the analogue shift register, is proposed. Functional block diagrams and more detailed information is given on complete systems, which are at present being developed at CERN. They allow the measurement of two orthogonal coordinates, one by the drift time, the other by the current division. (6 refs).

  18. Silicon drift detectors in the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvicini, V; Crescio, E; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Kolojvari, A A; Mazza, G; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nissinen, J; Nouais, D; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A

    2000-01-01

    Silicon drift detectors (SDDs) are well suited to high-energy physics experiments with relatively low event rates. In particular SDDs will be used for the two intermediate layers of the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment. Beam test results of linear SDD prototypes have shown a resolution of 40*30 mu m/sup 2/ and a cluster finding efficiency of essentially 100% with E=600 V/cm. (6 refs).

  19. The drift chambers of the NOMAD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anfreville, M.; Astier, P.; Authier, M.; Baldisseri, A.; Banner, M.; Besson, N.; Bouchez, J.; Castera, A.; Cloue, O.; Dumarchez, J. E-mail: jacques.dumarchez@cern.ch; Dumps, L.; Gangler, E.; Gosset, J.; Hagner, C.; Jollec, C.; Lachaud, C.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Meyer, J.-P.; Ouriet, J.-P.; Passerieux, J.-P.; Margaley, T.P.T. Pedrol; Placci, A.; Pluquet, A.; Poinsignon, J.; Popov, B.A.; Rathouit, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Stolarczyk, T.; Uros, V.; Vannucci, F.; Vo, M.K.; Zaccone, H

    2002-04-01

    We present a detailed description of the drift chambers used as an active target and a tracking device in the NOMAD experiment at CERN. The main characteristics of these chambers are a large area (3{center_dot}3 m{sup 2}), a self-supporting structure made of light composite materials and a low cost. A spatial resolution of 150 {mu}m has been achieved with a single hit efficiency of 97%.

  20. Unintended Positional Drift and Its Potential Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Walking-In-Place interaction techniques seem particularly useful in relation to immersive virtual environments where the user's movement is greatly constrained by a limited physical space. However, current techniques may not be particularly useful in combination with head-mounted displays since...... many users unintentionally move forward while walking in place. We refer to this phenomenon accidental movement as Unintended Positional Drift. The poster presents evidence of the phenomenon's existence and subsequently discusses different design solutions which potentially could circumvent the problem....

  1. The drift table: designing for ludic engagement

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The Drift Table is an electronic coffee table that displays slowly moving aerial photography controlled by the distribution of weight on its surface. It was designed to investigate our ideas about how technologies for the home could support ludic activities-that is, activities motivated by curiosity, exploration, and reflection rather than externally-defined tasks. The many design choices we made, for example to block or disguise utilitarian functionality, helped to articulate our emerging un...

  2. THERMAL DRIFT CHARACTERISTICS OF CAPACITIVE PRESSURE SENSORS

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The capacitive pressure sensors based on silicon are characterized by their very high sensitivities and their low power consumption. Nevertheless, their thermal behavior remains more or less unpredictable because they can indicate very high thermal coefficients. The study of the thermal behavior of these sensors is essential to define the parameters that cause the output characteristics drift. In this study, we modeled the thermal behavior of this sensors, using Finite Element Analysis (FE...

  3. Cenozoic Circulation History of the North Atlantic Ocean From Seismic Stratigraphy of the Newfoundland Ridge Drift Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, P. R.; Romans, B.; Norris, R. D.; Tucholke, B. E.; Swift, S. A.; Sexton, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    In the North Atlantic Ocean, contour-following bottom currents have eroded regional unconformities and deposited contourite drifts that exceed two km in thickness and extend for 100s of km. The character of deep-water masses that are conveyed through ocean basins by such currents influence global heat transfer and ocean-atmosphere partitioning of CO2. The Newfoundland Ridge Drift Complex lies directly under the modern Deep Western Boundary Current southeast of Newfoundland, close to the site of overturning in the northwest Atlantic Ocean and at the intersection of the warm Gulf Stream and cool Labrador surface currents. To the south are regions of the western North Atlantic basin that are influenced by southern- as well as northern-sourced bottom waters. Here, we document the evolution of North Atlantic deep-water circulation by seismic-stratigraphic analysis of the long-lived and areally extensive Newfoundland Ridge Drift Complex. IODP Expedition 342 boreholes provide age control on seismic units, allowing sedimentation patterns to be placed in a temporal framework. We find three major phases of sedimentation: pre-contourite drift (~115-50 Ma), active contourite drift (~50-2.6 Ma), and late-contourite drift (~2.6-0 Ma). Bottom-current-controlled deposition of terrigenous-rich sediment began at ~50 Ma, which correlates to the onset of a long-term global cooling trend. A further change in deep circulation near the Eocene-Oligocene transition (~30 Ma) is indicated by more focused drift sedimentation with greatly increased accumulation rates and stratal architecture dominated by mud waves. At ~2.6 Ma to present the axis of drift accumulation shifted markedly towards shallower water depths, corresponding with the onset of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. We discuss how these reorganizations of deep circulation correlate with results of other North Atlantic seismic stratigraphic studies to the north and south.

  4. Correlated Energy Exchange in Drifting Sea Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chmel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ice floe speed variations were monitored at the research camp North Pole 35 established on the Arctic ice pack in 2008. A three-month time series of measured speed values was used for determining changes in the kinetic energy of the drifting ice floe. The constructed energy distributions were analyzed by methods of nonextensive statistical mechanics based on the Tsallis statistics for open nonequilibrium systems, such as tectonic formations and drifting sea ice. The nonextensivity means the nonadditivity of externally induced energy changes in multicomponent systems due to dynamic interrelation of components having no structural links. The Tsallis formalism gives one an opportunity to assess the correlation between ice floe motions through a specific parameter, the so-called parameter of nonextensivity. This formalistic assessment of the actual state of drifting pack allows one to forecast some important trends in sea ice behavior, because the level of correlated dynamics determines conditions for extended mechanical perturbations in ice pack. In this work, we revealed temporal fluctuations of the parameter of nonextensivity and observed its maximum value before a large-scale sea ice fragmentation (faulting of consolidated sea ice. The correlation was not detected in fragmented sea ice where long-range interactions are weakened.

  5. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  6. Ambipolar Drift Heating in Turbulent Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Padoan, P; Nordlund, A A; Padoan, Paolo

    1999-01-01

    Although thermal pressure is unimportant dynamically in most molecular gas, the temperature is an important diagnostic of dynamical processes and physical conditions. This is the first of two papers on thermal equilibrium in molecular clouds. We present calculations of frictional heating by ion-neutral (or ambipolar) drift in three-dimensional simulations of turbulent, magnetized molecular clouds. We show that ambipolar drift heating is a strong function of position in a turbulent cloud, and its average value can be significantly larger than the average cosmic ray heating rate. The volume averaged heating rate per unit volume due to ambipolar drift, H_AD ~ |JxB|^2 ~ B^4/L_B^2, is found to depend on the rms Alfvenic Mach number, M_A, and on the average field strength, as H_AD ~ M_A^2^4. This implies that the typical scale of variation of the magnetic field, L_B, is inversely proportional to M_A, which we also demonstrate.

  7. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Tang

    2000-01-07

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M&O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used.

  8. Social diffusion and global drift on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayama, Hiroki; Sinatra, Roberta

    2015-03-01

    We study a mathematical model of social diffusion on a symmetric weighted network where individual nodes' states gradually assimilate to local social norms made by their neighbors' average states. Unlike physical diffusion, this process is not state conservational and thus the global state of the network (i.e., sum of node states) will drift. The asymptotic average node state will be the average of initial node states weighted by their strengths. Here we show that, while the global state is not conserved in this process, the inner product of strength and state vectors is conserved instead, and perfect positive correlation between node states and local averages of their self-neighbor strength ratios always results in upward (or at least neutral) global drift. We also show that the strength assortativity negatively affects the speed of homogenization. Based on these findings, we propose an adaptive link weight adjustment method to achieve the highest upward global drift by increasing the strength-state correlation. The effectiveness of the method was confirmed through numerical simulations and implications for real-world social applications are discussed.

  9. Wind tunnel observations of drifting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Enrico; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drifting snow has a significant impact on snow redistribution in mountains, prairies as well as on glaciers, ice shelves, and sea ice. In all these environments, the local mass balance is highly influenced by drifting snow. Understanding the dynamic of snow saltation is crucial to the accurate description of the process. We applied digital shadowgraphy in a cold wind tunnel to measure drifting snow over natural snow covers. The acquisition and evaluation of time-resolved shadowgraphy images allowed us to resolve a large part of the saltation layer. The technique has been successfully compared to the measurements obtained from a Snow Particle Counter, considered the most robust technique for snow mass-flux measurements so far. The streamwise snow transport is dominated by large-scale events. The vertical snow transport has a more equal distribution of energy across the scales, similarly to what is observed for the flow turbulence velocities. It is hypothesized that the vertical snow transport is a quantity that reflects the local entrainment of the snow crystals into the saltation layer while the streamwise snow transport results from the streamwise development of the trajectories of the snow particles once entrained, and therefore is rather a non-local quantity.

  10. Chemotaxis when bacteria remember: drift versus diffusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakuntala Chatterjee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli bacteria govern their trajectories by switching between running and tumbling modes as a function of the nutrient concentration they experienced in the past. At short time one observes a drift of the bacterial population, while at long time one observes accumulation in high-nutrient regions. Recent work has viewed chemotaxis as a compromise between drift toward favorable regions and accumulation in favorable regions. A number of earlier studies assume that a bacterium resets its memory at tumbles - a fact not borne out by experiment - and make use of approximate coarse-grained descriptions. Here, we revisit the problem of chemotaxis without resorting to any memory resets. We find that when bacteria respond to the environment in a non-adaptive manner, chemotaxis is generally dominated by diffusion, whereas when bacteria respond in an adaptive manner, chemotaxis is dominated by a bias in the motion. In the adaptive case, favorable drift occurs together with favorable accumulation. We derive our results from detailed simulations and a variety of analytical arguments. In particular, we introduce a new coarse-grained description of chemotaxis as biased diffusion, and we discuss the way it departs from older coarse-grained descriptions.

  11. Internal Clock Drift Estimation in Computer Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Marouani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most computers have several high-resolution timing sources, from the programmable interrupt timer to the cycle counter. Yet, even at a precision of one cycle in ten millions, clocks may drift significantly in a single second at a clock frequency of several GHz. When tracing the low-level system events in computer clusters, such as packet sending or reception, each computer system records its own events using an internal clock. In order to properly understand the global system behavior and performance, as reported by the events recorded on each computer, it is important to estimate precisely the clock differences and drift between the different computers in the system. This article studies the clock precision and stability of several computer systems, with different architectures. It also studies the typical network delay characteristics, since time synchronization algorithms rely on the exchange of network packets and are dependent on the symmetry of the delays. A very precise clock, based on the atomic time provided by the GPS satellite network, was used as a reference to measure clock drifts and network delays. The results obtained are of immediate use to all applications which depend on computer clocks or network time synchronization accuracy.

  12. Giving cosmic redshift drift a whirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Alex G.; Linder, Eric V.; Edelstein, Jerry; Erskine, David

    2015-03-01

    Redshift drift provides a direct kinematic measurement of cosmic acceleration but it occurs with a characteristic time scale of a Hubble time. Thus redshift observations with a challenging precision of 10-9 require a 10 year time span to obtain a signal-to-noise of 1. We discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to address this challenge, potentially requiring less observer time and having greater immunity to common systematics. On the theoretical side we explore allowing the universe, rather than the observer, to provide long time spans; speculative methods include radial baryon acoustic oscillations, cosmic pulsars, and strongly lensed quasars. On the experimental side, we explore beating down the redshift precision using differential interferometric techniques, including externally dispersed interferometers and spatial heterodyne spectroscopy. Low-redshift emission line galaxies are identified as having high cosmology leverage and systematics control, with an 8 h exposure on a 10-m telescope (1000 h of exposure on a 40-m telescope) potentially capable of measuring the redshift of a galaxy to a precision of 10-8 (few ×10-10). Low-redshift redshift drift also has very strong complementarity with cosmic microwave background measurements, with the combination achieving a dark energy figure of merit of nearly 300 (1400) for 5% (1%) precision on drift.

  13. THERMAL DRIFT CHARACTERISTICS OF CAPACITIVE PRESSURE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDELAZIZ BEDDIAF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The capacitive pressure sensors based on silicon are characterized by their very high sensitivities and their low power consumption. Nevertheless, their thermal behavior remains more or less unpredictable because they can indicate very high thermal coefficients. The study of the thermal behavior of these sensors is essential to define the parameters that cause the output characteristics drift. In this study, we modeled the thermal behavior of this sensors, using Finite Element Analysis (FEA made in COMSOL. The model solved by COMSOL environment takes into account the entire sensor and thermal effects due to the temperature considering the materials’ properties, the geometric shape and also the heat transfer mechanisms. By COMSOL we determine how the temperature affects the sensor during the manufacturing process. For that end, we calculated the thermal drift of capacitance at rest, the thermal coefficients and we compared them with experimental results to validate our model. Further, we studied the thermal drift of sensor characteristics both at rest and under constant and uniform pressure. Further, our study put emphasis on the geometric influence parameters on these characteristics to optimize the sensor performance. Finally, this study allows us to predict the sensor behavior against temperature and to minimize this effect by optimizing the geometrical parameters.

  14. Hydroelastic responses of pontoon type very large floating offshore structures. 2nd Report. Effect of the water depth and the drift forces; Pontoon gata choogata futaishiki kaiyo kozobutsu no harochu chosei oto ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Senkai eikyo to hyoryuryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, H.; Miyajima, S. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science; Masuda, K.; Ikoma, T. [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). College of Science and Technology

    1996-12-31

    Steady-state drift force in regular waves is theoretically analyzed. It is also studied under combined external force experimentally using a two-dimensional water tank. The fluid forces are analyzed by the pressure distribution method based on the potential theory, in which the effects of water depth are taken into account to discuss the effects of elastic deformation of the floating structure on the drift characteristics of steady-state waves. The tests were carried out using a wave-making circulating water tank equipped with a wind duct to create wind, waves and tidal flow. Drift force under a combined external force by wind, wave and/or tidal flow cannot be accurately predicted by arithmetically adding these components. For predicting drift force by tidal flow, it is necessary to take into account drag force in current at the floating structure bottom as well as that in wind at the front face. Drift force by tidal flow is affected by shallowness of water, which should be taken into account for drag forces. The floating structure will be deformed along the wave face as its stiffness decreases, basically decreasing steady-state drift force. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  15. Hydroelastic responses of pontoon type very large floating offshore structures. 2nd Report. Effect of the water depth and the drift forces; Pontoon gata choogata futaishiki kaiyo kozobutsu no harochu chosei oto ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Senkai eikyo to hyoryuryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, H.; Miyajima, S. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science; Masuda, K.; Ikoma, T. [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). College of Science and Technology

    1996-12-31

    Steady-state drift force in regular waves is theoretically analyzed. It is also studied under combined external force experimentally using a two-dimensional water tank. The fluid forces are analyzed by the pressure distribution method based on the potential theory, in which the effects of water depth are taken into account to discuss the effects of elastic deformation of the floating structure on the drift characteristics of steady-state waves. The tests were carried out using a wave-making circulating water tank equipped with a wind duct to create wind, waves and tidal flow. Drift force under a combined external force by wind, wave and/or tidal flow cannot be accurately predicted by arithmetically adding these components. For predicting drift force by tidal flow, it is necessary to take into account drag force in current at the floating structure bottom as well as that in wind at the front face. Drift force by tidal flow is affected by shallowness of water, which should be taken into account for drag forces. The floating structure will be deformed along the wave face as its stiffness decreases, basically decreasing steady-state drift force. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  16. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2001-01-10

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), an analysis of the effects of salts and precipitates on the repository chemical environment is to be developed and documented in an Analyses/Model Report (AMR). The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The purpose of this ICN is to qualify and document qualification of the AMR's technical products. The scope of this document is to develop a model of the processes that govern salt precipitation and dissolution and resulting water composition in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS). This model is developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical modeling work performed by PAO and is to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. However, the concepts may also apply to some near and far field geochemical processes and can have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone and saturated zone transport modeling efforts. The intended use of the model developed in this report is to estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the pH, chloride concentration, and ionic strength of water on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the post-closure period. These estimates are based on evaporative processes that are subject to a broad range of potential environmental conditions and are independent of the presence or absence of backfill. An additional intended use is to estimate the environmental conditions required for complete vaporization of water. The presence and composition of liquid water

  17. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Sun

    2000-04-07

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k_0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  18. Reconnection and Spire Drift in Coronal Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David

    2015-04-01

    It is observed that there are two morphologically-different kinds of X-ray/EUV jets in coronal holes: standard jets and blowout jets. In both kinds: (1) in the base of the jet there is closed magnetic field that has one foot in flux of polarity opposite that of the ambient open field of the coronal hole, and (2) in coronal X-ray/EUV images of the jet there is typically a bright nodule at the edge of the base. In the conventional scenario for jets of either kind, the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade, the downward product of interchange reconnection of closed field in the base with impacted ambient open field, and the upper product of this reconnection is the jet-outflow spire. It is also observed that in most jets of either kind the spire drifts sideways away from the bright nodule. We present the observed bright nodule and spire drift in an example standard jet and in two example blowout jets. With cartoons of the magnetic field and its reconnection in jets, we point out: (1) if the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade made by interchange reconnection, then the spire should drift toward the bright nodule, and (2) if the bright nodule is instead a compact flare arcade made, as in a filament-eruption flare, by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting sheared-field core of a lobe of the closed field in the base, then the spire, made by the interchange reconnection that is driven on the outside of that lobe by the lobe’s internal convulsion, should drift away from the bright nodule. Therefore, from the observation that the spire usually drifts away from the bright nodule, we infer: (1) in X-ray/EUV jets of either kind in coronal holes the interchange reconnection that generates the jet-outflow spire usually does not make the bright nodule; instead, the bright nodule is made by reconnection inside erupting closed field in the base, as in a filament eruption, the eruption being either a confined eruption for a standard jet or a blowout eruption (as

  19. Airborne organophosphate pesticides drift in Mediterranean climate: The importance of secondary drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivan, Ohad; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-02-01

    Pesticide application is a short-term air-pollution episode with near and far field effects due to atmospheric drift. In order to better evaluate resulting air concentrations in nearby communities following pesticide application, measurements of airborne pesticides were conducted at ∼70 m from field edge. This was done following three different application events of the organophosphate pesticide Chlorpyrifos in a persimmon orchard. Complementary information on larger spatial scale was obtained using CALPUFF modeling in which application and meteorological data was used to better evaluate dispersion patterns. Measurements indicated high airborne concentrations during application hours (few μg m-3 for 8 h average), which dropped to tens of ng m-3 in the following days. Measured atmospheric concentrations show that secondary drift (i.e., post-application drift) involves significant loads of pesticides and hence should not be ignored in exposure considerations. Furthermore, CALPUFF modeling revealed the complex dispersion pattern when weak winds prevailed, and showed that during the 24 h after application air concentrations reached levels above the hourly Texas effect screening level (0.1 μg m-3). Interestingly, weak winds on the night after application resulted in a secondary peak in measured and modeled air concentrations. Long exposure time (when secondary drift is considered) and concentrations measured following such common air-assisted orchard application, suggest pesticide drift may have health repercussions that are currently unknown, and emphasize the need for further epidemiological studies.

  20. Simplified Drift Analysis for Proving Lower Bounds in Evolutionary Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Drift analysis is a powerful tool used to bound the optimization time of evolutionary algorithms (EAs). Various previous works apply a drift theorem going back to Hajek in order to show exponential lower bounds on the optimization time of EAs. However, this drift theorem is tedious to read...... and to apply since it requires two bounds on the moment-generating (exponential) function of the drift. A recent work identifies a specialization of this drift theorem that is much easier to apply. Nevertheless, it is not as simple and not as general as possible. The present paper picks up Hajek’s line...... of thought to prove a drift theorem that is very easy to use in evolutionary computation. Only two conditions have to be verified, one of which holds for virtually all EAs with standard mutation. The other condition is a bound on what is really relevant, the drift. Applications show how previous analyses...