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Sample records for collision-induced dissociative chemical

  1. Development of a collision induced dissociation ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.N.

    1982-01-01

    A transient analysis ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer is developed to investigate the phenomena of collision induced dissociation. The Fourier transform method and the modified maximum entropy spectral analysis or covariance least square method are implemented in measuring the mass spectrum of the ion ensemble. The Fourier transform method can be used in quantitative analysis while the maximum entropy method as developed here is useful for qualitative analysis only. The cyclotron resonance frequency, relaxation time constant, and the relative ion population are observable from the Fourier transform spectrum. These parameters are very important in investigating collision induced dissociation process and other topics in gas phase chemistry. The ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer is not only developed to study fragments and their abundance from a parent ion, but also to determine the threshold energy and reaction cross section in the collision induced dissociation process. When hard sphere model is used in the ion-molecule collision, the radius of acetone ion measured from the reactive cross section is 2.2 angstrom which is very close to the physical dimension of acetone. The threshold energy for acetone ion in collision induced dissociation process is 1.8 eV which is similar to the result obtained by the angle-resolved mass spectrometer

  2. Collision-induced dissociation of diatomic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los, J.; Govers, T.R.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt is made to illustrate how mass spectrometric studies of dissociation in diatomic molecular ions can provide information on the dynamics of these collisions and on the predissociative states involved. Restriction is made to primary beam energies of the order of at least keV. The review covers the dynamics of dissociation, experimental techniques, direct dissociation in heavy-particle collisions, and translational spectroscopy. 120 references

  3. Collision-induced dissociation of aflatoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Katalin; Nagy, Lajos; Mándi, Attila; Kuki, Ákos; Mézes, Miklós; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2013-02-28

    The aflatoxin mycotoxins are particularly hazardous to health when present in food. Therefore, from an analytical point of view, knowledge of their mass spectrometric properties is essential. The aim of the present study was to describe the collision-induced dissociation behavior of the four most common aflatoxins: B1, B2, G1 and G2. Protonated aflatoxins were produced using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments nitrogen was used as the collision gas and the collision energies were varied in the range of 9-44 eV (in the laboratory frame). The major APCI-MS/MS fragmentations of protonated aflatoxins occurred at 30 eV collision energy. The main fragmentation channels were found to be the losses of a series of carbon monoxide molecules and loss of a methyl radical, leading to the formation of radical-type product ions. In addition, if the aflatoxin molecule contained an ether- or lactone-oxygen atom linked to a saturated carbon atom, loss of a water molecule was observed from the [M + H](+) ion, especially in the case of aflatoxins G1 and G2. A relatively small modification in the structure of aflatoxins dramatically altered the fragmentation pathways and this was particularly true for aflatoxins B1 and B2. Due to the presence of a C = C double bond connected to the ether group in aflatoxin B1 no elimination of water was observed but, instead, formation of radical-type product ions occurred. Fragmentation of protonated aflatoxin B1 yielded the most abundant radical-type cations. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Semiclassical calculation for collision induced dissociation. II. Morse oscillator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusinek, I.; Roberts, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A recently developed semiclassical procedure for calculating collision induced dissociation probabilities P/sup diss/ is applied to the collinear collision between a particle and a Morse oscillator diatomic. The particle--diatom interaction is described with a repulsive exponential potential function. P/sup diss/ is reported for a system of three identical particles, as a function of collision energy E/sub t/ and initial vibrational state of the diatomic n 1 . The results are compared with the previously reported values for the collision between a particle and a truncated harmonic oscillator. The two studies show similar features, namely: (a) there is an oscillatory structure in the P/sup diss/ energy profiles, which is directly related to n 1 ; (b) P/sup diss/ becomes noticeable (> or approx. =10 -3 ) for E/sub t/ values appreciably higher than the energetic threshold; (c) vibrational enhancement (inhibition) of collision induced dissociation persists at low (high) energies; and (d) good agreement between the classical and semiclassical results is found above the classical dynamic threshold. Finally, the convergence of P/sup diss/ for increasing box length is shown to be rapid and satisfactory

  5. Statistical modeling of competitive threshold collision-induced dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M. T.; Armentrout, P. B.

    1998-08-01

    Collision-induced dissociation of (R1OH)Li+(R2OH) with xenon is studied using guided ion beam mass spectrometry. R1OH and R2OH include the following molecules: water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and 1-butanol. In all cases, the primary products formed correspond to endothermic loss of one of the neutral alcohols, with minor products that include those formed by ligand exchange and loss of both ligands. The cross-section thresholds are interpreted to yield 0 and 298 K bond energies for (R1OH)Li+-R2OH and relative Li+ binding affinities of the R1OH and R2OH ligands after accounting for the effects of multiple ion-molecule collisions, internal energy of the reactant ions, and dissociation lifetimes. We introduce a means to simultaneously analyze the cross sections for these competitive dissociations using statistical theories to predict the energy dependent branching ratio. Thermochemistry in good agreement with previous work is obtained in all cases. In essence, this statistical approach provides a detailed means of correcting for the "competitive shift" inherent in multichannel processes.

  6. Threshold collision-induced dissociation of diatomic molecules: a case study of the energetics and dynamics of O2- collisions with Ar and Xe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahu Akin, F; Ree, Jongbaik; Ervin, Kent M; Kyu Shin, Hyung

    2005-08-08

    The energetics and dynamics of collision-induced dissociation of O2- with Ar and Xe targets are studied experimentally using guided ion-beam tandem mass spectrometry. The cross sections and the collision dynamics are modeled theoretically by classical trajectory calculations. Experimental apparent threshold energies are 2.1 and 1.1 eV in excess of the thermochemical O2- bond dissociation energy for argon and xenon, respectively. Classical trajectory calculations confirm the observed threshold behavior and the dependence of cross sections on the relative kinetic energy. Representative trajectories reveal that the bond dissociation takes place on a short time scale of about 50 fs in strong direct collisions. Collision-induced dissociation is found to be remarkably restricted to the perpendicular approach of ArXe to the molecular axis of O2-, while collinear collisions do not result in dissociation. The higher collisional energy-transfer efficiency of xenon compared with argon is attributed to both mass and polarizability effects.

  7. Threshold collision-induced dissociation of diatomic molecules: A case study of the energetics and dynamics of O2- collisions with Ar and Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahu Akin, F.; Ree, Jongbaik; Ervin, Kent M.; Hyung, Kyu Shin

    2005-01-01

    The energetics and dynamics of collision-induced dissociation of O 2 - with Ar and Xe targets are studied experimentally using guided ion-beam tandem mass spectrometry. The cross sections and the collision dynamics are modeled theoretically by classical trajectory calculations. Experimental apparent threshold energies are 2.1 and 1.1 eV in excess of the thermochemical O 2 - bond dissociation energy for argon and xenon, respectively. Classical trajectory calculations confirm the observed threshold behavior and the dependence of cross sections on the relative kinetic energy. Representative trajectories reveal that the bond dissociation takes place on a short time scale of about 50 fs in strong direct collisions. Collision-induced dissociation is found to be remarkably restricted to the perpendicular approach of Ar/Xe to the molecular axis of O 2 - , while collinear collisions do not result in dissociation. The higher collisional energy-transfer efficiency of xenon compared with argon is attributed to both mass and polarizability effects

  8. Simple quantal model for collision-induced dissociation: An Airy basis calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, P.M.; Sridharan, S.

    1982-01-01

    New matrix elements for the Airy continuum basis are employed to find quantum mechanical dissociation probabilities for the the forced Morse oscillator. The calculations performed illustrate the ease with which the continuously infinite Airy basis can be manipulated, and they illustrate the transition from vibrational enhancement to vibrational inhibition of diatomic breakup. The forced Morse oscillator model thus reproduces the behavior of more complicated collinear collision-induced dissociation systems

  9. Electron Transfer and Collision Induced Dissociation of Non-Derivatized and Derivatized Desmosine and Isodesmosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongay, Sara; Hermans, Jos; Bruins, Andries P.; Nieuwendijk, Adrianus M. C. H.; Overkleeft, Hermen; Bischoff, Rainer

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has attracted increasing interest due to its complementarity to collision-induced dissociation (CID). ETD allows the direct localization of labile post-translational modifications, which is of main interest in proteomics where differences and similarities between

  10. In-source collision induced dissociation of inorganic explosives for mass spectrometric signature detection and chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, Thomas P., E-mail: thomas.forbes@nist.gov; Sisco, Edward

    2015-09-10

    The trace detection, bulk quantification, and chemical imaging of inorganic explosives and components was demonstrated utilizing in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) coupled with laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). The incorporation of in-source CID provided direct control over the extent of adduct and cluster fragmentation as well as organic noise reduction for the enhanced detection of both the elemental and molecular ion signatures of fuel-oxidizer mixtures and other inorganic components of explosive devices. Investigation of oxidizer molecular anions, specifically, nitrates, chlorates, and perchlorates, identified that the optimal in-source CID existed at the transition between fragmentation of the ionic salt bonds and molecular anion bonds. The chemical imaging of oxidizer particles from latent fingerprints was demonstrated, including both cation and anion components in positive and negative mode mass spectrometry, respectively. This investigation demonstrated LDI-MS with in-source CID as a versatile tool for security fields, as well as environmental monitoring and nuclear safeguards, facilitating the detection of elemental and molecular inorganic compounds at nanogram levels. - Highlights: • In-source CID enhanced detection of elemental inorganics up to 1000-fold. • In-source CID optimization of polyatomic oxidizers enhanced detection up to 100-fold. • Optimal CID identified at transition from breaking ionic salt to molecular anion bonds. • Trace detection of inorganic explosives at nanogram levels was demonstrated. • Oxidizer particles were chemically imaged directly from latent fingerprints.

  11. Collision-induced dissociation with Fourier transform mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cody, R.B.; Burnier, R.C.; Freiser, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociations (CID) is demonstrated on a number of primary and secondary ions using a Nicolet prototype Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FT-MS). Like the triple quadrupole technique, CID using FT-MS is a relatively low energy and efficient process. The ability to study a wide range of ion-molecule reaction products is exemplified by results on proton-bound dimers and transition metal containing ionic species. Variation of collision energy by varying the RF irradiation level can provide information about product distributions as a function of energy as well as yield ion structural information. Like the triple quadrupole technique, no slits are employed and virtually all of the fragment ions formed by the CID process may be detected. Unlike all previous mass spectrometric techniques for studying CID, a tandem instrument is not required, and different experiments are performed by making software modifications rather than hardware modifications

  12. Three-Body Collision Contributions to Recombination and Collision-Induced Dissociation. II. Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendrick, Brian; Pack, Russell T.; Walker, Robert B.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed rate constants for the reaction Ne + Ne + H r e quilibrium Ne 2 + H are generated, and the master equations governing collision-induced dissociation (CID) and recombination are accurately solved numerically. The temperature and pressure dependence are explored. At all pressures, three-body (3B) collisions dominate. The sequential two-body energy-transfer (ET) mechanism gives a rate that is more than a factor of two too small at low pressures and orders of magnitude too small at high pressures. Simpler models are explored; to describe the kinetics they must include direct 3B rates connecting the continuum to the bound states and to the quasibound states. The relevance of the present reaction to more general CID/recombination reactions is discussed. For atomic fragments, the 3B mechanism usually dominates. For diatomic fragments,the 3B and ET mechanism are competitive, and for polyatomic fragments the ET mechanism usually dominates

  13. MALDI-TOF MS coupled with collision-induced dissociation (CID) measurements of poly(methyl methacrylate)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgaertel, A.; Becer, C.R.; Gottschaldt, M.; Schubert, U.S.

    2008-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was chosen for an in-detail analysis of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in order to determine the possible fragmentation mechanism with the help of collision-induced dissociation (CID). All experiments were

  14. Fully-converged three-dimensional collision-induced dissociation calculations with Faddeev-AGS theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haftel, M.I.; Lim, T.K.

    1981-09-01

    The first fully-converged quantum-mechanical calculation of the collision-induced dissociation cross section in a three-dimensional-model system of three helium-like atoms is reported. Faddeev-AGS theory is used. It yields as a bonus the elastic atom-diatom cross section. The obtained results resemble those from some collinear models but indicate clearly the futility of multiple-scattering approximations except at hyperthermal energies. (orig.)

  15. Electron Transfer Dissociation and Collision-Induced Dissociation of Underivatized Metallated Oligosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller-Duke, Ranelle M.; Bogala, Mallikharjuna R.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2018-05-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were used to investigate underivatized, metal-cationized oligosaccharides formed via electrospray ionization (ESI). Reducing and non-reducing sugars were studied including the tetrasaccharides maltotetraose, 3α,4β,3α-galactotetraose, stachyose, nystose, and a heptasaccharide, maltoheptaose. Univalent alkali, divalent alkaline earth, divalent and trivalent transition metal ions, and a boron group trivalent metal ion were adducted to the non-permethylated oligosaccharides. ESI generated [M + Met]+, [M + 2Met]2+, [M + Met]2+, [M + Met - H]+, and [M + Met - 2H]+ most intensely along with low intensity nitrate adducts, depending on the metal and sugar ionized. The ability of these metal ions to produce oligosaccharide adduct ions by ESI had the general trend: Ca(II) > Mg(II) > Ni(II) > Co(II) > Zn(II) > Cu(II) > Na(I) > K(I) > Al(III) ≈ Fe(III) ≈ Cr(III). Although trivalent metals were utilized, no triply charged ions were formed. Metal cations allowed for high ESI signal intensity without permethylation. ETD and CID on [M + Met]2+ produced various glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages, with ETD producing more cross-ring and internal ions, which are useful for structural analysis. Product ion intensities varied based on glycosidic-bond linkage and identity of monosaccharide sub-unit, and metal adducts. ETD and CID showed high fragmentation efficiency, often with complete precursor dissociation, depending on the identity of the adducted metal ion. Loss of water was occasionally observed, but elimination of small neutral molecules was not prevalent. For both ETD and CID, [M + Co]2+ produced the most uniform structurally informative dissociation with all oligosaccharides studied. The ETD and CID spectra were complementary. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Electron Transfer Dissociation and Collision-Induced Dissociation of Underivatized Metallated Oligosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller-Duke, Ranelle M.; Bogala, Mallikharjuna R.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2018-02-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were used to investigate underivatized, metal-cationized oligosaccharides formed via electrospray ionization (ESI). Reducing and non-reducing sugars were studied including the tetrasaccharides maltotetraose, 3α,4β,3α-galactotetraose, stachyose, nystose, and a heptasaccharide, maltoheptaose. Univalent alkali, divalent alkaline earth, divalent and trivalent transition metal ions, and a boron group trivalent metal ion were adducted to the non-permethylated oligosaccharides. ESI generated [M + Met]+, [M + 2Met]2+, [M + Met]2+, [M + Met - H]+, and [M + Met - 2H]+ most intensely along with low intensity nitrate adducts, depending on the metal and sugar ionized. The ability of these metal ions to produce oligosaccharide adduct ions by ESI had the general trend: Ca(II) > Mg(II) > Ni(II) > Co(II) > Zn(II) > Cu(II) > Na(I) > K(I) > Al(III) ≈ Fe(III) ≈ Cr(III). Although trivalent metals were utilized, no triply charged ions were formed. Metal cations allowed for high ESI signal intensity without permethylation. ETD and CID on [M + Met]2+ produced various glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages, with ETD producing more cross-ring and internal ions, which are useful for structural analysis. Product ion intensities varied based on glycosidic-bond linkage and identity of monosaccharide sub-unit, and metal adducts. ETD and CID showed high fragmentation efficiency, often with complete precursor dissociation, depending on the identity of the adducted metal ion. Loss of water was occasionally observed, but elimination of small neutral molecules was not prevalent. For both ETD and CID, [M + Co]2+ produced the most uniform structurally informative dissociation with all oligosaccharides studied. The ETD and CID spectra were complementary. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Collision-Induced Dissociation Mass Spectrometry: A Powerful Tool for Natural Product Structure Elucidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew R; Carlson, Erin E

    2015-11-03

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool in natural product structure elucidation, but our ability to directly correlate fragmentation spectra to these structures lags far behind similar efforts in peptide sequencing and proteomics. Often, manual data interpretation is required and our knowledge of the expected fragmentation patterns for many scaffolds is limited, further complicating analysis. Here, we summarize advances in natural product structure elucidation based upon the application of collision induced dissociation fragmentation mechanisms.

  18. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H., E-mail: shmushrif@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore)

    2015-05-14

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cu{sub n} where n = 2–12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C–H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH{sub 3} and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CH{sub x} (x = 1–3) species and recombination of H with CH{sub x} have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters.

  19. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H.

    2015-01-01

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cu n where n = 2–12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C–H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH 3 and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CH x (x = 1–3) species and recombination of H with CH x have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters

  20. A high-resolution tandem mass spectrometer for the collision-induced dissociation of large molecule ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouwerkerk, C.E.D.

    1988-01-01

    Instrumental development in the field of tandem mass spectrometry is described in order to use the technique for the analysis of large organic molecules. Experiments are also described in which the process of collision-induced dissociation (CID) is investigated. The fragmentation pattern of CH 4 + has been measured for three different target gases He, Ar and Xe. From these measurements fragmentation cross sections are calculated. 192 refs.; 47 figs.; 6 tabs

  1. Implementation of dipolar direct current (DDC) collision-induced dissociation in storage and transmission modes on a quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Ian K; Londry, Frank A; McLuckey, Scott A

    2011-09-15

    Means for effecting dipolar direct current collision-induced dissociation (DDC CID) on a quadrupole/time-of-flight in a mass spectrometer have been implemented for the broadband dissociation of a wide range of analyte ions. The DDC fragmentation method in electrodynamic storage and transmission devices provides a means for inducing fragmentation of ions over a large mass-to-charge range simultaneously. It can be effected within an ion storage step in a quadrupole collision cell that is operated as a linear ion trap or as ions are continuously transmitted through the collision cell. A DDC potential is applied across one pair of rods in the quadrupole collision cell of a QqTOF hybrid mass spectrometer to effect fragmentation. In this study, ions derived from a small drug molecule, a model peptide, a small protein, and an oligonucleotide were subjected to the DDC CID method in either an ion trapping or an ion transmission mode (or both). Several key experimental parameters that affect DDC CID results, such as time, voltage, low mass cutoff, and bath gas pressure, are illustrated with protonated leucine enkephalin. The DDC CID dissociation method gives a readily tunable, broadband tool for probing the primary structures of a wide range of analyte ions. The method provides an alternative to the narrow resonance conditions of conventional ion trap CID and it can access more extensive sequential fragmentation, depending upon conditions. The DDC CID approach constitutes a collision analog to infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD). Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Aggregation-induced chemical reactions: acid dissociation in growing water clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbert, Harald; Masia, Marco; Kaczmarek-Kedziera, Anna; Nair, Nisanth N; Marx, Dominik

    2011-03-23

    Understanding chemical reactivity at ultracold conditions, thus enabling molecular syntheses via interstellar and atmospheric processes, is a key issue in cryochemistry. In particular, acid dissociation and proton transfer reactions are ubiquitous in aqueous microsolvation environments. Here, the full dissociation of a HCl molecule upon stepwise solvation by a small number of water molecules at low temperatures, as relevant to helium nanodroplet isolation (HENDI) spectroscopy, is analyzed in mechanistic detail. It is found that upon successive aggregation of HCl with H(2)O molecules, a series of cyclic heteromolecular structures, up to and including HCl(H(2)O)(3), are initially obtained before a precursor state for dissociation, HCl(H(2)O)(3)···H(2)O, is observed upon addition of a fourth water molecule. The latter partially aggregated structure can be viewed as an "activated species", which readily leads to dissociation of HCl and to the formation of a solvent-shared ion pair, H(3)O(+)(H(2)O)(3)Cl(-). Overall, the process is mostly downhill in potential energy, and, in addition, small remaining barriers are overcome by using kinetic energy released as a result of forming hydrogen bonds due to aggregation. The associated barrier is not ruled by thermal equilibrium but is generated by athermal non-equilibrium dynamics. These "aggregation-induced chemical reactions" are expected to be of broad relevance to chemistry at ultralow temperature much beyond HENDI spectroscopy.

  3. Collision induced dissociation of protonated N-nitrosodimethylamine by ion trap mass spectrometry: Ultimate carcinogens in gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Natalia; Baker, Michael; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2009-12-01

    Collision induced dissociation of protonated N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and isotopically labeled N-nitrosodimethyl-d6-amine (NDMA-d6) was investigated by sequential ion trap mass spectrometry to establish mechanisms of gas phase reactions leading to intriguing products of this potent carcinogen. The fragmentation of (NDMA + H+) occurs via two dissociation pathways. In the alkylation pathway, homolytic cleavage of the N-O bond of N-dimethyl, N'-hydroxydiazenium ion generates N-dimethyldiazenium distonic ion which reacts further by a CH3 radical loss to form methanediazonium ion. Both methanediazonium ion and its precursor are involved in ion/molecule reactions. Methanediazonium ion showed to be capable of methylating water and methanol molecules in the gas phase of the ion trap and N-dimethyldiazenium distonic ion showed to abstract a hydrogen atom from a solvent molecule. In the denitrosation pathway, a tautomerization of N-dimethyl, N'-hydroxydiazenium ion to N-nitrosodimethylammonium intermediate ion results in radical cleavage of the N-N bond of the intermediate ion to form N-dimethylaminium radical cation which reacts further through [alpha]-cleavage to generate N-methylmethylenimmonium ion. Although the reactions of NDMA in the gas phase are different to those for enzymatic conversion of NDMA in biological systems, each activation method generates the same products. We will show that collision induced dissociation of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) and N-nitrosodipropylamine (NDPA) is also a feasible approach to gain information on formation, stability, and reactivity of alkylating agents originating from NDEA and NDPA. Investigating such biologically relevant, but highly reactive intermediates in the condensed phase is hampered by the short life-times of these transient species.

  4. Gas chromatography/chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis of anabolic steroids: ionization and collision-induced dissociation behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polet, Michael; Van Gansbeke, Wim; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen

    2016-02-28

    The detection of new anabolic steroid metabolites and new designer steroids is a challenging task in doping analysis. Switching from electron ionization gas chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS/MS) to chemical ionization (CI) has proven to be an efficient way to increase the sensitivity of GC/MS/MS analyses and facilitate the detection of anabolic steroids. CI also extends the possibilities of GC/MS/MS analyses as the molecular ion is retained in its protonated form due to the softer ionization. In EI it can be difficult to find previously unknown but expected metabolites due to the low abundance or absence of the molecular ion and the extensive (and to a large extent unpredictable) fragmentation. The main aim of this work was to study the CI and collision-induced dissociation (CID) behavior of a large number of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) as their trimethylsilyl derivatives in order to determine correlations between structures and CID fragmentation. Clarification of these correlations is needed for the elucidation of structures of unknown steroids and new metabolites. The ionization and CID behavior of 65 AAS have been studied using GC/CI-MS/MS with ammonia as the reagent gas. Glucuronidated AAS reference standards were first hydrolyzed to obtain their free forms. Afterwards, all the standards were derivatized to their trimethylsilyl forms. Full scan and product ion scan analyses were used to examine the ionization and CID behavior. Full scan and product ion scan analyses revealed clear correlations between AAS structure and the obtained mass spectra. These correlations were confirmed by analysis of multiple hydroxylated, methylated, chlorinated and deuterated analogs. AAS have been divided into three groups according to their ionization behavior and into seven groups according to their CID behavior. Correlations between fragmentation and structure were revealed and fragmentation pathways were postulated. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley

  5. Collision induced fragmentation dynamics of small metallic clusters; Dynamique de fragmentation induite par collision de petits agregats metalliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, Y

    1999-04-15

    The goal of this work is the complete analysis of the fragmentation of alkali clusters (Na{sub n}{sup +} (n < 10), NaK{sup +} and K{sub 2}{sup +}) induced by collision with light atomic (He) or molecular (H{sub 2}) targets. The main point is to study how the energy is transmitted to the cluster during the collision and how this energy is shared among the various degrees of freedom of the system and leads to its fragmentation. Two types of interactions govern the collision induced dissociation processes: on one hand, the electronic mechanisms where the target perturbs the electronic cloud and brings the molecule into a dissociative state, and on the other hand, the impulsive mechanisms where the momentum transferred to the atomic cores leads to the rotational-vibrational dissociation of the molecule. The experimental procedure is based on the measurement of the velocity vectors of the outgoing fragments detected in coincidence. This allows to reconstruct the full kinematics of the fragmentation and to separate and characterize for the first time the two types of interactions. The two basic mechanisms of collision induced dissociation are then clearly resolved for the diatomic molecule Na{sub 2}{sup +}. For the heteronuclear molecular ion NaK{sup +}, it is shown that the dissociation process is due to a combination of electronic and impulsive mechanisms in some of the dissociation pathways. The extension to the study of metallic clusters Na{sub n}{sup +} (n < 10) fragmentation shows the role and the relative importance of the electronic and impulsive mechanisms and their evolution with the cluster size. The complete analysis of Na{sub 3}{sup +} multi-fragmentation is also presented. (author)

  6. How Hot are Your Ions Really? A Threshold Collision-Induced Dissociation Study of Substituted Benzylpyridinium "Thermometer" Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, John E.; McNary, Christopher P.; Furin, April; Sweeney, Andrew F.; Armentrout, P. B.

    2017-09-01

    The first absolute experimental bond dissociation energies (BDEs) for the main heterolytic bond cleavages of four benzylpyridinium "thermometer" ions are measured using threshold collision-induced dissociation in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. In this experiment, substituted benzylpyridinium ions are introduced into the apparatus using an electrospray ionization source, thermalized, and collided with Xe at varied kinetic energies to determine absolute cross-sections for these reactions. Various effects are accounted for, including kinetic shifts, multiple collisions, and internal and kinetic energy distributions. These experimentally measured 0 K BDEs are compared with computationally predicted values at the B3LYP-GD3BJ, M06-GD3, and MP2(full) levels of theory with a 6-311+G(2d,2p) basis set using vibrational frequencies and geometries determined at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level. Additional dissociation pathways are observed for nitrobenzylpyridinium experimentally and investigated using these same levels of theory. Experimental BDEs are also compared against values in the literature at the AM1, HF, B3LYP, B3P86, and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Of the calculated values obtained in this work, the MP2(full) level of theory with counterpoise corrections best reproduces the experimental results, as do the similar literature CCSD(T) values. Lastly, the survival yield method is used to determine the characteristic temperature (Tchar) of the electrospray source prior to the thermalization region and to confirm efficient thermalization. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Surface-induced dissociation and chemical reactions of C2D4(+) on stainless steel, carbon (HOPG), and two different diamond surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feketeová, Linda; Zabka, Jan; Zappa, Fabio; Grill, Verena; Scheier, Paul; Märk, Tilmann D; Herman, Zdenek

    2009-06-01

    Surface-induced interactions of the projectile ion C(2)D(4)(+) with room-temperature (hydrocarbon covered) stainless steel, carbon highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and two different types of diamond surfaces (O-terminated and H-terminated) were investigated over the range of incident energies from a few eV up to 50 eV. The relative abundance of the product ions in dependence on the incident energy of the projectile ion [collision-energy resolved mass spectra, (CERMS) curves] was determined. The product ion mass spectra contained ions resulting from direct dissociation of the projectile ions, from chemical reactions with the hydrocarbons on the surface, and (to a small extent) from sputtering of the surface material. Sputtering of the surface layer by low-energy Ar(+) ions (5-400 eV) indicated the presence of hydrocarbons on all studied surfaces. The CERMS curves of the product ions were analyzed to obtain both CERMS curves for the products of direct surface-induced dissociation of the projectile ion and CERMS curves of products of surface reactions. From the former, the fraction of energy converted in the surface collision into the internal excitation of the projectile ion was estimated as 10% of the incident energy. The internal energy of the surface-excited projectile ions was very similar for all studied surfaces. The H-terminated room-temperature diamond surface differed from the other surfaces only in the fraction of product ions formed in H-atom transfer surface reactions (45% of all product ions formed versus 70% on the other surfaces).

  8. Vibrational and cascade dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} ions by collision with gas molecules; Dissociation vibrationnelle et dissociation en cascade d'ions H{sub 2}{sup +} par collisions avec les molecules d'un gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verveer, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    Protons produced by collisional dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} ions have an energy spectrum with a narrow central peak. For a part the protons in this peak are produced by vibrational dissociation and for another part by a cascade of two collisions. For H{sub 2}{sup +} ions of 50 to 150 keV the cross section for vibrational dissociation is about 4.1 10{sup -19} cm{sup 2}/molecule in hydrogen and 1.1 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}/molecule in argon. (author) [French] Les protons resultant de la dissociation par collisions d'ions H{sub 2}{sup +} dans un gaz ont un spectre d'energie qui presente un pic central tres etroit. Les protons dans ce pic proviennent, pour une part de la dissociation vibrationnelle et pour l'autre part d'une suite de deux collisions. Dans le domaine d'energie des ions H{sub 2}{sup +} de 50 a 150 keV la section efficace de dissociation vibrationnel vaut 4.1 10{sup -19} cm{sup 2}/molecule pour l'hydrogene et 1,1 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}/molecule pour l'argon.

  9. Dissociation mechanism of HNIW ions investigated by chemical ionization and electron impact mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rongjie; Xiao, Hemiao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2006-04-15

    Chemical Ionization (CI) with Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID) spectroscopy and Electron Impacting (EI) with metastable Mass analyzed Ion Kinetic Energy (MIKE) spectroscopy have been applied to study ionic dissociations of Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW). Similarities and differences between EI/MIKE and CI/CID mass spectra of HNIW were analyzed. In EI mass spectra, the ions [HNIW-n NO{sub 2}]{sup +} (n=2-5), such as the ion at m/z 347, were less frequent (1-2% relative abundance), but in CI mass spectra, these ions were very abundant. For some ions of large molar mass from HNIW, their dissociations pathways from parent ions to daughter ions were built according to CID and MIKE spectra. Molecular ions of HNIW with a protonated nitro group at five-member ring seem more stable than at six-member ring. The HNIW ions losing five of six nitro groups are very stable based on CID spectra, which agrees with some research results for thermal decomposition of HNIW in literature. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Semiclassical calculation for collision induced dissociation. III. Restricted two dimensional Morse oscillator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusinek, I.

    1980-01-01

    A semiclassical procedure previously used for collinear CID calculations is applied to the perpendicular collisions (2D, no rotation, zero impact parameter) of a Morse homonuclear diatomic molecule and an atom, interacting via an exponential repulsive potential. Values of the dissociation probability (P/sup diss/) are given as a function of total energy (E/sub t/) and initial vibrational state (n 1 =0,1,3,5) for a system with three identical masses. The results are compared with the P/sup diss/ previously reported for an identical one dimensional system. We find: (a) quasiclassical P/sup diss/ that are a good approximation to the semiclassical ones, if CID is classically allowed, (b) vibrational enhancement of CID, and (c) energetic thresholds for dissociation similar to the ones found in the collinear case

  11. Quantitative correlations between collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry coupled with electrospray ionization or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry - Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2018-04-01

    The problematic that we consider in this paper treats the quantitative correlation model equations between experimental kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of coupled electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry with collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry, accounting for the fact that the physical phenomena and mechanisms of ESI- and APCI-ion formation are completely different. There are described forty two fragment reactions of three analytes under independent ESI- and APCI-measurements. The developed new quantitative models allow us to study correlatively the reaction kinetics and thermodynamics using the methods of mass spectrometry, which complementary application with the methods of the quantum chemistry provide 3D structural information of the analytes. Both static and dynamic quantum chemical computations are carried out. The object of analyses are [2,3-dimethyl-4-(4-methyl-benzoyl)-2,3-di-p-tolyl-cyclobutyl]-p-tolyl-methanone (1) and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons derivatives of dibenzoperylen (2) and tetrabenzo [a,c,fg,op]naphthacene (3), respectively. As far as (1) is known to be a product of [2π+2π] cycloaddition reactions of chalcone (1,3-di-p-tolyl-propenone), however producing cyclic derivatives with different stereo selectivity, so that the study provide crucial data about the capability of mass spectrometry to provide determine the stereo selectivity of the analytes. This work also first provides quantitative treatment of the relations '3D molecular/electronic structures'-'quantum chemical diffusion coefficient'-'mass spectrometric diffusion coefficient', thus extending the capability of the mass spectrometry for determination of the exact 3D structure of the analytes using independent measurements and computations of the diffusion coefficients. The determination of the experimental diffusion parameters is carried out within the 'current monitoring method

  12. Influence of Background H2O on the Collision-Induced Dissociation Products Generated from [UO2NO3]+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Iacovino, Anna; Tatosian, Irena

    2018-04-01

    Developing a comprehensive understanding of the reactivity of uranium-containing species remains an important goal in areas ranging from the development of nuclear fuel processing methods to studies of the migration and fate of the element in the environment. Electrospray ionization (ESI) is an effective way to generate gas-phase complexes containing uranium for subsequent studies of intrinsic structure and reactivity. Recent experiments by our group have demonstrated that the relatively low levels of residual H2O in a 2-D, linear ion trap (LIT) make it possible to examine fragmentation pathways and reactions not observed in earlier studies conducted with 3-D ion traps (Van Stipdonk et al. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 14, 1205-1214, 2003). In the present study, we revisited the dissociation of complexes composed of uranyl nitrate cation [UVIO2(NO3)]+ coordinated by alcohol ligands (methanol and ethanol) using the 2-D LIT. With relatively low levels of background H2O, collision-induced dissociation (CID) of [UVIO2(NO3)]+ primarily creates [UO2(O2)]+ by the ejection of NO. However, CID (using He as collision gas) of [UVIO2(NO3)]+ creates [UO2(H2O)]+ and UO2 + when the 2-D LIT is used with higher levels of background H2O. Based on the results presented here, we propose that product ion spectrum in the previous experiments was the result of a two-step process: initial formation of [UVIO2(O2)]+ followed by rapid exchange of O2 for H2O by ion-molecule reaction. Our experiments illustrate the impact of residual H2O in ion trap instruments on the product ions generated by CID and provide a more accurate description of the intrinsic dissociation pathway for [UVIO2(NO3)]+. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Separation and identification of structural isomers by quadrupole collision-induced dissociation-hydrogen/deuterium exchange-infrared multiphoton dissociation (QCID-HDX-IRMPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucinski, Ashley C; Somogyi, Arpád; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2010-08-01

    A new approach that uses a hybrid Q-FTICR instrument and combines quadrupole collision-induced dissociation, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and infrared multiphoton dissociation (QCID-HDX-IRMPD) has been shown to effectively separate and differentiate isomeric fragment ion structures present at the same m/z. This method was used to study protonated YAGFL-OH (free acid), YAGFL-NH(2) (amide), cyclic YAGFL, and YAGFL-OCH(3) (methyl ester). QCID-HDX of m/z 552.28 (C(29)H(38)N(5)O(6)) from YAGFL-OH reveals at least two distributions of ions corresponding to the b(5) ion and a non-C-terminal water loss ion structure. Subsequent IRMPD fragmentation of each population shows distinct fragmentation patterns, reflecting the different structures from which they arise. This contrasts with data for YAGFL-NH(2) and YAGFL-OCH(3), which do not show two distinct H/D exchange populations for the C(29)H(38)N(5)O(6) structure formed by NH(3) and HOCH(3) loss, respectively. Relative extents of exchange for C(29)H(38)N(5)O(6) ions from six sequence isomers (YAGFL, AGFLY, GFLYA, FLYAG, LYAGF, and LFGAY) show a sequence dependence of relative isomer abundance. Supporting action IRMPD spectroscopy data are also presented herein and also show that multiple structures are present for the C(29)H(38)N(5)O(6) species from YAGFL-OH. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Enantioselective Collision-Activated Dissociation of Gas-Phase Tryptophan Induced by Chiral Recognition of Protonated l-Alanine Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Tajiri, Michiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2017-06-01

    Enantioselective dissociation in the gas phase is important for enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes in molecular clouds regarding the origin of homochirality in biomolecules. Enantioselective collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptophan (Trp) and the chiral recognition ability of l-alanine peptides ( l-Ala n ; n = 2-4) were examined using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. CAD spectra of gas-phase heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala n ) and homochiral H+( l-Trp)( l-Ala n ) noncovalent complexes were obtained as a function of the peptide size n. The H2O-elimination product was observed in CAD spectra of both heterochiral and homochiral complexes for n = 2 and 4, and in homochiral H+( l-Trp)( l-Ala3), indicating that the proton is attached to the l-alanine peptide, and H2O loss occurs from H+( l-Ala n ) in the noncovalent complexes. H2O loss did not occur in heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala3), where NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss were the primary dissociation pathways. In heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala3), the protonation site is the amino group of d-Trp, and NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss occur from H+( d-Trp). l-Ala peptides recognize d-Trp through protonation of the amino group for peptide size n = 3. NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss from H+( d-Trp) proceeds via enantioselective CAD in gas-phase heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala3) at room temperature, whereas l-Trp dissociation was not observed in homochiral H+( l-Trp)( l-Ala3). These results suggest that enantioselective dissociation induced by chiral recognition of l-Ala peptides through protonation could play an important role in enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes of amino acids.

  15. Dissociation dynamics of CH3I in electric spark induced breakdown revealed by time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Wei-long; Song, Yun-fei; Duo, Li-ping; Liu, Yu-qiang; Yang, Yan-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Emission of electric spark dissociation of CH 3 I is similar to its fs LIBS. • We use fs laser induced breakdown as a simulation for electric spark dissociation. • The I 2 molecule formation is directly observed in the time-resolved LIBS. • Bimolecular collision of I ∗ and CH 3 I is responsible for the formation of I 2 . - Abstract: The electric discharge spark dissociation of gas CH 3 I is found to be similar to its femtosecond laser photodissociation. The almost identical spectra of the two processes show that their initial ionization conditions are very similar. The initial ionization followed by molecular fragmentation is proposed as the dissociation mechanism, in which the characteristic emissions of I + , CH 3 , CH 2 , CH, H, and I 2 are identified as the dissociation products. The emission band of 505 nm I 2 is clearly observed in the time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The dynamic curve indicates that I 2 ∗ molecules are formed after the delay time of ∼4.7 ns. The formation of I 2 ∗ molecule results from the bimolecular collision of the highly excited iodine atom I ∗ ( 4 P) and CH 3 I molecule. This dynamical information can help understand the process of electric discharge spark dissociation of CH 3 I

  16. Strategy to improve the quantitative LC-MS analysis of molecular ions resistant to gas-phase collision induced dissociation: application to disulfide-rich cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccimaro, Eugene; Ranasinghe, Asoka; D'Arienzo, Celia; Xu, Carrie; Onorato, Joelle; Drexler, Dieter M; Josephs, Jonathan L; Poss, Michael; Olah, Timothy

    2014-12-02

    Due to observed collision induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation inefficiency, developing sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assays for CID resistant compounds is especially challenging. As an alternative to traditional LC-MS/MS, we present here a methodology that preserves the intact analyte ion for quantification by selectively filtering ions while reducing chemical noise. Utilizing a quadrupole-Orbitrap MS, the target ion is selectively isolated while interfering matrix components undergo MS/MS fragmentation by CID, allowing noise-free detection of the analyte's surviving molecular ion. In this manner, CID affords additional selectivity during high resolution accurate mass analysis by elimination of isobaric interferences, a fundamentally different concept than the traditional approach of monitoring a target analyte's unique fragment following CID. This survivor-selected ion monitoring (survivor-SIM) approach has allowed sensitive and specific detection of disulfide-rich cyclic peptides extracted from plasma.

  17. Collision-induced dissociation of noncovalent complexes between vancomycin antibiotics and peptide ligand stereoisomers: evidence for molecular recognition in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Delforge, D; Remacle, J

    1999-01-01

    In solution, the antibiotics of the vancomycin group bind stereospecifically to peptides with the C-terminal sequence: -L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, Substitution by a L-Ala at either of the two C-terminal residues causes a dramatic decrease in the binding affinity to the antibiotics. This solution behavior...... is clearly reflected in electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectra obtained from equimolar mixtures of an antibiotic, an isotopically labelled peptide ligand and an unlabelled peptide stereoisomer. Using collision-induced dissociation (CID) we have probed the gas phase stability of isomeric (1:1) noncovalent...

  18. Wavepacket theory of collisional dissociation in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulander, K.

    1980-01-01

    An explicit integration scheme is used to solve the time dependent Schroedinger equation for wavepackets which model collisions in the collinear H + H 2 system. A realistic LEPS-type potential energy surface is used. Collision energies considered are above the dissociation threshold and probabilities for collision induced dissociation are reported. Also quantum mechanical state-to-state transition probabilities are generated. These results are compared to extensive classical trajectory calculations performed on this same system. The time evolution of the wavepacket densities is studied to understand the dynamics of the collinear collisional dissociation process

  19. Dissociative excitation of lithium atom in electron collisions with LiBr molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.M.

    1998-01-01

    Effective cross sections of the lithium atom dissociative excitation in electron collisions with the LiBr molecules are measured. The measurement error equals 5-12%. The optical functions of the lithium atom dissociative excitation are calculated on the basis of the data obtained

  20. Automated and high confidence protein phosphorylation site localization using complementary collision-activated dissociation and electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas A; Sylvester, Marc; Jensen, Ole N

    2012-01-01

    -site localization and the number of assigned phospho-sites at a fixed false-localization rate. The average calculated Cscore from a large data set (>7000 phosphopeptide MS/MS spectra) was ∼32 compared to ∼23 and ∼17 for the Ascore using collision-activated dissociation (CAD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD...... peptide fragmentation and the loss of labile phosphate groups complicate identification of the site of the phosphate motif. Here, we have implemented and evaluated a novel approach for phospho-site localization by the combined use of peptide tandem mass spectrometry data obtained using both collision......-activated dissociation and electron transfer dissociation, an approach termed the Cscore. The scoring algorithm used in the Cscore was adapted from the widely used Ascore method. The analytical benefit of integrating the product ion information of both ETD and CAD data are evident by increased confidence in phospho...

  1. Collisions of polyatomic ions with surfaces: incident energy partitioning and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabka, J.; Roithova, J.; Dolejsek, Z.; Herman, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Collision of polyatomic ions with surfaces were investigated in ion-surface scattering experiments to obtain more information on energy partitioning in ion-surface collision and on chemical reactions at surfaces. Mass spectra, translation energy and angular distributions of product ions were measured in dependence on the incident energy and the incident angle of polyatomic projectiles. From these data distributions of energy fractions resulting in internal excitation of the projectile, translation energy of the product ions, and energy absorbed by the surface were determined. The surface investigated were a standard stainless steel surface, covered by hydrocarbons, carbon surfaces at room and elevated temperatures, and several surfaces covered by a self-assembled monolayers (C 12 -hydrocarbon SAM, C 11 -perfluorohydrocarbon SAM, and C 11 hydrocarbon with terminal -COOH group SAM). The main processes observed at collision energies of 10 - 50 eV were: neutralization of the ions at surfaces, inelastic scattering and dissociations of the projectile ions, quasi elastic scattering of the projectile ions, and chemical reactions with the surface material (usually hydrogen-atom transfer reactions). The ion survival factor was estimated to be a few percent for even-electron ions (like protonated ethanol ion, C 2 H 5 O + , CD 5 + ) and about 10 - 10 2 times lower for radical ions (like ethanol and benzene molecular ions, CD 4 + ). In the polyatomic ion -surface energy transfer experiments, the ethanol molecular ion was used as a well-characterized projectile ion. The results with most of the surfaces studied showed in the collision energy range of 13 - 32 eV that most collisions were strongly inelastic with about 6 - 8 % of the incident projectile energy transformed into internal excitation of the projectile (independent of the incident angle) and led partially to its further dissociation in a unimolecular way after the interaction with the surface. The incident energy

  2. Fragmentation study of iridoid glucosides through positive and negative electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es-Safi, Nour-Eddine; Kerhoas, Lucien; Ducrot, Paul-Henri

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methodology based on the combined use of positive and negative electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation (CID) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been applied to the mass spectral study of a series of six naturally occurring iridoids through in-source fragmentation of the protonated [M+H]+, deprotonated [M--H]- and sodiated [M+Na]+ ions. This led to the unambiguous determination of the molecular masses of the studied compounds and allowed CID spectra of the molecular ions to be obtained. Valuable structural information regarding the nature of both the glycoside and the aglycone moiety was thus obtained. Glycosidic cleavage and ring cleavages of both aglycone and sugar moieties were the major fragmentation pathways observed during CID, where the losses of small molecules, the cinnamoyl and the cinnamate parts were also observed. The formation of the ionized aglycones, sugars and their product ions was thus obtained giving information on their basic skeleton. The protonated, i.e. [M+H]+ and deprotonated [M--H]-, ions were found to fragment mainly by glycosidic cleavages. MS/MS spectra of the [M+Na]+ ions gave complementary information for the structural characterization of the studied compounds. Unlike the dissociation of protonated molecular ions, that of sodiated molecules also provided sodiated sugar fragments where the C0+ fragment corresponding to the glucose ion was obtained as base peak for all the studied compounds. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Matter-wave entanglement and teleportation by molecular dissociation and collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Opatrny, T.; Kurizki, G.

    2000-01-01

    We propose dissociation of cold diatomic molecules as a source of atom pairs with highly correlated (entangled) positions and momenta, approximating the original quantum state introduced by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)]. Wavepacket teleportation is shown to be achievable by its collision with one of the EPR correlated atoms and manipulation of the other atom in the pair.

  4. Experimentally-induced dissociation impairs visual memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Chris R; Mersaditabari, Niloufar

    2013-12-01

    Dissociation is a phenomenon common in a number of psychological disorders and has been frequently suggested to impair memory for traumatic events. In this study we explored the effects of dissociation on visual memory. A dissociative state was induced experimentally using a mirror-gazing task and its short-term effects on memory performance were investigated. Sixty healthy individuals took part in the experiment. Induced dissociation impaired visual memory performance relative to a control condition; however, the degree of dissociation was not associated with lower memory scores in the experimental group. The results have theoretical and practical implications for individuals who experience frequent dissociative states such as patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Collisions of benzene and buckminsterfullerene at fluorinated and non-fluorinated self-assembled monolayer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysocki, V.H.; Ding, H.M.; Kane, T.E.; Somogyi, A.; Callahan, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    It has been illustrated that a variety of analytically-useful processes occur upon low-energy (eV) collisions of mass-selected polyatomic ions with a surface. These include surface induced dissociation, reactive collisions of projectile ions with surface adsorbates, and chemical sputtering. The goal of the research described here is to investigate the ion-surface chemistry that is detected when C 6 H 6 + , C 6 D 6 + , C 6 H 5 F + , C 60 + , and C 60 ++ collide with a well-characterized surface at collision energies of 10-100 eV

  6. Study of dissociative collisions of hydrogen-line ions by mean of angular and energy distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, H.; Urquijo, J. de; Cisneros, C.; Alvarez, J.

    1988-01-01

    Angular and energy distribution of fragments produced in a collision, employed in conjunction with the 'step-model' that means excitation and binary dissociation, are used to determine the binding energy of H 3 (D 3 ) and HD + 2 and also to identify the principal channels in the dissociation processes. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  7. Bibliography of molecular dissociation in heavy particle collisions, 1950--75

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniel, E.W.; Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Thomas, E.W.

    1979-02-01

    This annotated bibliography lists published work on molecular dissociation in heavy particle collisions for the period 1950 to 1975. Sources include scientific journals, abstract compilations, conference proceedings, books, and reports. The bibliography is arranged alphabetically by author. Each entry indicates whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, and what reactants were investigated. Following the bibliographical listing are indexes of reactants and authors.

  8. Bibliography of molecular dissociation in heavy particle collisions, 1950--75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, E.W.; Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Thomas, E.W.

    1979-02-01

    This annotated bibliography lists published work on molecular dissociation in heavy particle collisions for the period 1950 to 1975. Sources include scientific journals, abstract compilations, conference proceedings, books, and reports. The bibliography is arranged alphabetically by author. Each entry indicates whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, and what reactants were investigated. Following the bibliographical listing are indexes of reactants and authors

  9. Matter-Wave Entanglement and Teleportation by Molecular Dissociation and Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatrný, T.; Kurizki, G.

    2001-04-01

    We propose dissociation of cold diatomic molecules as a source of atom pairs with highly correlated (entangled) positions and momenta, approximating the original quantum state introduced by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)]. Wave packet teleportation is shown to be achievable by its collision with one of the EPR correlated atoms and manipulation of the other atom in the pair.

  10. Matter-wave entanglement and teleportation by molecular dissociation and collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatrný, T; Kurizki, G

    2001-04-02

    We propose dissociation of cold diatomic molecules as a source of atom pairs with highly correlated (entangled) positions and momenta, approximating the original quantum state introduced by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)]. Wave packet teleportation is shown to be achievable by its collision with one of the EPR correlated atoms and manipulation of the other atom in the pair.

  11. Dissociation of Methanol and Acetylene by slow Highly Charged Ion Collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, Sankar; Rajput, Jyoti; Roy, A; Ahuja, R; Ghosh, P N; Safvan, C P

    2007-01-01

    We report here the results of dissociation of multiple charged methanol and acetylene molecules in collision with 1.2 MeV Ar 8+ projectiles. We observed a wide range of dissociation products from the TOF spectrum starting from undissociated molecular ions, fragments losing an hydrogen atom due to breakage of C-H and/or O-H bonds, to complete rupture of C-C and C-O skeletons for the respective molecules. From the coincidence map of the fragments, we could separate out the different dissociation channels between carbon and oxygen ionic fragments as well as complete two-body dissociation events. The most striking feature in the breakup of CH 3 OH is the formation of H 2 + and H 3 + due to intramolecular rearrangement of the C-H bonds within the methyl group. In dissociative ionization studies of C 2 H 2 , we observed a diatom-like behaviour of the C-C charged complex as evidenced from the measured slopes of the coincidence islands for carbon atomic charged fragments and theoretical values determined from the charge and momentum distribution of the correlated particles. The shape and orientation of the islands give further information about the momentum balance in the fragmentation process in two-body dissociation

  12. Aspects of Coulomb dissociation and interference in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystrand, Joakim; Baltz, Anthony; Klein, Spencer R.

    2001-01-01

    Coherent vector meson production in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. These interactions may occur for impact parameters much larger than the sum of the nuclear radii. Since the vector meson production is always localized to one of the nuclei, the system acts as a two-source interferometer in the transverse plane. By tagging the outgoing nuclei for Coulomb dissociation it is possible to obtain a measure of the impact parameter and thus the source separation in the interferometer. This is of particular interest since the life-time of the vector mesons are generally much shorter than the impact parameters of the collisions

  13. Identification of monohydroxy progesterones produced by CYP106A2 using comparative HPLC and electrospray ionisation collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisurek, Michael; Kang, M.-J.; Hartmann, Rolf W.; Bernhardt, Rita

    2004-01-01

    Two previously uncharacterised products, produced by recombinant CYP106A2 of Bacillus megaterium ATCC 13368 using progesterone as substrate, were identified. For this purpose a combination of comparative HPLC and electrospray ionisation collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry (ESI CID MS) was established and applied for rapid identification of the steroids, which were identified as 11α-hydroxyprogesterone and 9α-hydroxyprogesterone. The pharmaceutical relevance of these steroids is discussed. Furthermore, the hydroxylation activity was quantified for all monohydroxylation products (15β-hydroxyprogesterone, 6β-hydroxyprogesterone, 11α-hydroxyprogesterone, and 9α-hydroxyprogesterone). The V max values for 15β-hydroxyprogesterone, 6β-hydroxyprogesterone, 11α-hydroxyprogesterone, and 9α-hydroxyprogesterone were determined as 337.3 ± 43.7, 22.3 ± 0.9, 17.5 ± 0.9, and 6.5 ± 0.3 nmol product/min/nmol CYP106A2, respectively

  14. Predictors of trait dissociation and peritraumatic dissociation induced via cold pressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pérez, Lydia; López-Martínez, Alicia Eva; Asmundson, Gordon John Glenn

    2013-11-30

    Understanding which factors predict individual dissociative response during stressful situations is important to clarify the nature of dissociation and the mechanisms associated to its use as a coping strategy. The present study examined (1) whether experiential avoidance (EA), anxiety sensitivity (AS), depressive symptoms, and state anxiety concurrently predicted trait dissociation (TD)-absorption, amnesia, depersonalization, and total TD scores-and laboratory induced dissociation (LID); and (2) whether TD and catastrophizing predicted LID. We also examined whether catastrophizing mediated the relationships between both AS and depressive symptoms and LID. A total of 101 female undergraduate students participated in a cold pressor task, which significantly induced dissociation. Results of hierarchical regression analyses showed that AS at Time 1 (9 months before the experimental session), as well as depressive symptoms and catastrophizing at the time of the experiment (Time 2), predicted LID at Time 2. Depressive symptoms at Time 2 predicted total TD, absorption, and amnesia scores. AS at Time 1 and depressive symptoms at Time 2 predicted depersonalization. AS, depressive symptoms, and catastrophizing seem to facilitate the use of dissociative strategies by healthy individuals, even in response to non-traumatic but discomforting stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cross-sections for dissociative excitation of lead atom in collisions of slow electrons with PbI2 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.M.

    2006-01-01

    The dissociative excitation of the lead atom in e-PbI 2 collisions has been studied experimentally. 27 excitation cross-sections are measured at an exciting-electron energy of 100 eV. Nine optical excitation functions are recorded at the electron energy varying in the 0-100 eV range. The most possible reaction channels at low electron energies along with the relation of the dissociative-excitation cross-sections of the lead atom both in e-PbI 2 and e-PbCl 2 collisions are discussed. (authors)

  16. Electromagnetic field effects on Υ-meson dissociation in PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelck, J.; Wolschin, G. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    We investigate the effect of the electromagnetic field generated in relativistic heavy-ion collisions on the dissociation of Υ mesons. The electromagnetic field is calculated using a simple model which characterizes the emerging quark-gluon plasma (QGP) by its conductivity only. A numerical estimate of the field strength experienced by Υ mesons embedded in the expanding QGP and its consequences on the Υ dissociation is made. The electromagnetic field effects prove to be negligible compared to the established strong-interaction suppression mechanisms. (orig.)

  17. Differentiating chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans using collision-induced dissociation; uronic acid cross-ring diagnostic fragments in a single stage of tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailemia, Muchena J; Patel, Anish B; Johnson, Dane T; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J; Amster, I Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The stereochemistry of the hexuronic acid residues of the structure of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is a key feature that affects their interactions with proteins and other biological functions. Electron based tandem mass spectrometry methods, in particular electron detachment dissociation (EDD), have been able to distinguish glucuronic acid (GlcA) from iduronic acid (IdoA) residues in some heparan sulfate tetrasaccharides by producing epimer-specific fragments. Similarly, the relative abundance of glycosidic fragment ions produced by collision-induced dissociation (CID) or EDD has been shown to correlate with the type of hexuronic acid present in chondroitin sulfate GAGs. The present work examines the effect of charge state and degree of sodium cationization on the CID fragmentation products that can be used to distinguish GlcA and IdoA containing chondroitin sulfate A and dermatan sulfate chains. The cross-ring fragments (2,4)A(n) and (0,2)X(n) formed within the hexuronic acid residues are highly preferential for chains containing GlcA, distinguishing it from IdoA. The diagnostic capability of the fragments requires the selection of a molecular ion and fragment ions with specific ionization characteristics, namely charge state and number of ionizable protons. The ions with the appropriate characteristics display diagnostic properties for all the chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate chains (degree of polymerization of 4-10) studied.

  18. Adatom Bond Dissociation in the Collision Between an Adsorbed Atom and Incident Diatomic Molecule: A Classical Trajectory Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayhan, U.

    2004-01-01

    The collisional dissociation of the Atom-Surface bond in the diatomic molecule (gas) / atom (ads) collision taking place on a bcc-structure surface have been studied by classical trajectory methods over the collision energy ranges and the attractive well depth of the diatomic molecule (gas) / atom (ads) interactions

  19. Collision induced fragmentation of fast molecular ions in solids and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review is given of recent high resolution measurements on fragments arising from the collision-induced dissociation of fast (MeV) molecular ions. For solid targets, strong wake effects are observed. For gaseous targets, excited electronic states of the projectile ions play an important role. Measurements of this type provide useful information on the charge states of fast ions traversing matter. The experimental techniques show promise as a unique method for determining the geometrical structures of the molecular-ion projectiles. 41 references

  20. Axial spatial distribution focusing: improving MALDI-TOF/RTOF mass spectrometric performance for high-energy collision-induced dissociation of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgacem, O; Pittenauer, E; Openshaw, M E; Hart, P J; Bowdler, A; Allmaier, G

    2016-02-15

    For the last two decades, curved field reflectron technology has been used in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometers, assisting in the generation of post-source-decay (PSD) or collision-induced dissociation (CID) without decelerating precursor ions, producing true high-energy CID spectra. The result was the generation of product ion mass spectra with product ions typical of high-energy (10 keV and beyond) collision processes. The disadvantage of this approach was the lack of resolution in CID spectra resulting from the excess laser energy deposition used to generate those MS/MS spectra. The work presented in this study overcomes this limitation and includes comprehensive examples of high-energy and high-resolution CID MALDI-MS/MS spectra of biomolecules. The devices used in this study are TOF/RTOF instruments equipped with a high-vacuum MALDI ion source. High-resolution and high-energy CID spectra result from the use of axial spatial distribution focusing (ASDF) in combination with curved field reflectron technology. A CID spectrum of the P14 R1 peptide exhibits product ion resolution in excess of 10,000 (FWHM) but at the same time yields typical high-energy product ions such as w- and [y-2]-type ion series. High-energy CID spectra of lipids, exemplified by a glycerophospholipid and triglyceride, demonstrate C-C backbone fragmentation elucidating the presence of a hydroxyl group in addition to double-bond positioning. A complex high mannose carbohydrate (Man)8 (GlcNAc)2 was also studied at 20 keV collision energy and revealed further high-energy product ions with very high resolution, allowing unambiguous detection and characterization of cross-ring cleavage-related ions. This is the first comprehensive study using a MALDI-TOF/RTOF instrument equipped with a curved field reflectron and an ASDF device prior to the reflectron. © 2015 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley

  1. Collision-induced destructive quantum interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xihua; Sun Zhenrong; Zhang Shi'an; Ding Liang'en; Wang Zugeng

    2005-01-01

    We conduct theoretical studies on the collision-induced destructive quantum interference of two-colour two-photon transitions in an open rhomb-type five-level system with a widely separated doublet by the density matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced decay rates, the ratio of the transition dipole moments and the energy separation of the doublet on the interference are analysed. It is shown that a narrow dip appears in the excitation spectrum due to the collision-induced destructive interference, and that the narrow interference dip still exists even when the collision broadening is comparable to the energy separation of the doublet. The physical origin of the collision-induced destructive quantum interference is analysed in the dressed-atom picture

  2. Different dynamic behaviors of the dissociation and recombination reactions in a model calculation of polyethylene by first-principles steered molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Yuji; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Ozawa, Nobuki; Chazeau, Laurent; Cavaillé, Jean-Yves; Kubo, Momoji

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the different dynamics of dissociation and recombination processes. • Hydrogen at the chain ends collides each other in the recombination process. • Dissociation and recombination processes take different pathway. - Abstract: We investigate the different dynamics of the stress-induced dissociation and recombination reactions in a model of polyethylene by a first-principles molecular dynamics simulation at the B3LYP/6-31g(d) level. The dissociation under external forces acting on the chemical reaction site at 300 K follows the same pathway as the one calculated by the static first-principles method because it has a similar activation barrier to that of the static first-principles calculation. On the other hand, in the recombination process, thermal fluctuations causes collisions between hydrogen atoms at the chain ends. Furthermore, when external forces do not directly act on the chemical reaction site, two different dissociation processes are observed. On the other hand, recombination process is not observed due to rarely contact of the radical carbon. These results indicate that dissociation and recombination dynamics are very different, showing the importance of the dynamic calculation.

  3. Probing peptide fragment ion structures by combining sustained off-resonance collision-induced dissociation and gas-phase H/D exchange (SORI-HDX) in Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Arpád

    2008-12-01

    The usefulness of gas-phase H/D exchange is demonstrated to probe heterogeneous fragment and parent ion populations. Singly and multiply protonated peptides/proteins were fragmented by using sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID). The fragments and the surviving precursor ions then all undergo H/D exchange in the gas-phase with either D(2)O or CD(3)OD under the same experimental conditions. Usually, 10 to 60 s of reaction time is adequate to monitor characteristic differences in the H/D exchange kinetic rates. These differences are then correlated to isomeric ion structures. The SORI-HDX method can be used to rapidly test fragment ion structures and provides useful insights into peptide fragmentation mechanisms.

  4. Electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, I.; Takayanagi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The study of collision processes plays an important research role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made by means of collision experiments. Based on theoretical, experimental, and computational studies, this volume presents an overview detailing the basic processes of electron-molecule collisions. The editors have collected papers-written by a group of international experts-that consider a diverse range of phenomena occurring in electronmolecule collisions. The volume discusses first the basic formulation for scattering problems and then gives an outline of the physics of electron-molecule collisions. The main topics covered are rotational transitions, vibrational transitions, dissociation of molecules in slow collisions, the electron-molecule collision as a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular electronic structures, and experimental and computational techniques for determining the cross sections. These well-referenced chapters are self-contained and can be read independently or consecutively. Authoritative and up-to-date, Electron-Molecule Collisions is a useful addition to the libraries of students and researchers in the fields of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics, and physical chemistry

  5. A classical trajectory study of the adatom -surface bond dissociation in the collision reaction between an adsorbed H atom and an N2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayhan, U.

    2005-01-01

    The collisionnal dissociation of the Adatom-Surface bond in the diatomic molecule N2(gas)/H(ads) collision taking place on a W(100) bcc-structure surface have been studied by classical trajectory method over the collision energy ranges (0.1-2.0 eV ) and the attractive well depth (0.19-4.0 eV). of the N2 molecule (gas)/H(ads) interactions. When the energy accumulate into the adatom bond, thus leading to a a large dissociation probability

  6. Electron beam induced deposition of silacyclohexane and dichlorosilacyclohexane: the role of dissociative ionization and dissociative electron attachment in the deposition process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragesh Kumar T P

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present first experiments on electron beam induced deposition of silacyclohexane (SCH and dichlorosilacyclohexane (DCSCH under a focused high-energy electron beam (FEBID. We compare the deposition dynamics observed when growing pillars of high aspect ratio from these compounds and we compare the proximity effect observed for these compounds. The two precursors show similar behaviour with regards to fragmentation through dissociative ionization in the gas phase under single-collision conditions. However, while DCSCH shows appreciable cross sections with regards to dissociative electron attachment, SCH is inert with respect to this process. We discuss our deposition experiments in context of the efficiency of these different electron-induced fragmentation processes. With regards to the deposition dynamics, we observe a substantially faster growth from DCSCH and a higher saturation diameter when growing pillars with high aspect ratio. However, both compounds show similar behaviour with regards to the proximity effect. With regards to the composition of the deposits, we observe that the C/Si ratio is similar for both compounds and in both cases close to the initial molecular stoichiometry. The oxygen content in the DCSCH deposits is about double that of the SCH deposits. Only marginal chlorine is observed in the deposits of from DCSCH. We discuss these observations in context of potential approaches for Si deposition.

  7. An ultra-sensitive instrument for collision activated dissociation mass spectrometry with high mass resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louter, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    During the last decade Collision Activated Dissociation Mass Spectrometry (CAD-MS) has developed into an important and sometimes unique technique for the structure elucidation of ions. An extensive description of the double stage MS is given, which has been especially devloped for CAD-MS. A high mass resolution and a very high sensitivity are obtained by application of special techniques like post-acceleration of fragment ions, quadrupole (Q-pole) lenses and an electro-optical, simultaneous ion detection system. The operation of the rather complex ion-optics is demonstrated by application of a computer simulation of the tandem MS. Special attention is given to the action of the four Q-pole lenses and the second sector magnet upon curvature and position of the mass focal plane. Two mass calibration methods are described for the fragment spectra. The so-called polynomial-method applies a fifth-order polynomial approximation of the functional relation between position on the detector and corresponding relative momentum of fragment ions. The second method uses the matrix model of the instrument. The detector consists of two channelplates (CEMA), a fibre optics slab, coated with a phosphor layer, a camera objective and a 1024-channels photodiode-array. A bio-chemical and an organic-chemical application of the instrument are given. As bio-chemical application the peak m/z 59 in the pyrolysis mass spectrum of complete mycobacteria is identified. As an example of organic-chemical application the fragmentation process of 2,3-butadienoic acid has been investigated. (Auth.)

  8. Second European study conference on molecular low energy collisions (MOLEC II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The conference contained 52 papers on molecular low energy collisions including nonadiabatic transitions and excited states, vibrational and rotational energy transfer, chemical reactions, dissociation and ionization, general methods, potential surfaces, electronic excitation and excited states, inelastic scattering and anisotropic potentials, chemical reactions, and Van der Waals molecules. (JFP)

  9. Translational Entanglement and Teleportation of Matter Wavepackets by Collisions and Half-Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, L.; Tal, A.; Kurizki, G.

    To date, the translationally-entangled state originally proposed by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) in 1935 has not been experimentally realized for massive particles. Opatrný and Kurizki [Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3180 (2000)] have suggested the creation of a position- and momentum-correlated, i.e., translationally-entangled, pair of particles approximating the EPR state by dissociation of cold diatomic molecules, and further manipulation of the EPR pair effecting matter-wave teleportation. Here we aim at setting the principles of and quantifying translational entanglement by collisions and half-collisions. In collisions, the resonance width s and the initial phase-space distributions are shown to determine the degree of post-collisional momentum entanglement. Half-collisions (dissociation) are shown to yield different types of approximate EPR states. We analyse a feasible realization of translational EPR entanglement and teleportation via cold-molecule Raman dissociation and subsequent collisions, resolving both practical and conceptual difficulties it has faced so far: How to avoid entanglement loss due to the wavepacket spreading of the dissociation fragments? How to measure both position and momentum correlations of the dissociation fragments with sufficient accuracy to verify their EPR correlations? How to reliably perform two-particle (Bell) position and momentum measurements on one of the fragments and the wavepacket to be teleported?

  10. Increasing the productivity of glycopeptides analysis by using higher-energy collision dissociation-accurate mass-product-dependent electron transfer dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Julian; Dutta, Sucharita; Hemenway, Eric; Viner, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Currently, glycans are attracting attention from the scientific community as potential biomarkers or as posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of therapeutic proteins. However, structural characterization of glycoproteins and glycopeptides remains analytically challenging. Here, we report on the implementation of a novel acquisition strategy termed higher-energy collision dissociation-accurate mass-product-dependent electron transfer dissociation (HCD-PD-ETD) on a hybrid linear ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. This acquisition strategy uses the complementary fragmentations of ETD and HCD for glycopeptides analysis in an intelligent fashion. Furthermore, the approach minimizes user input for optimizing instrumental parameters and enables straightforward detection of glycopeptides. ETD spectra are only acquired when glycan oxonium ions from MS/MS HCD are detected. The advantage of this approach is that it streamlines data analysis and improves dynamic range and duty cycle. Here, we present the benefits of HCD-PD-ETD relative to the traditional alternating HCD/ETD for a trainer set containing twelve-protein mixture with two glycoproteins: human serotransferrin, ovalbumin and contaminations of two other: bovine alpha 1 acid glycoprotein (bAGP) and bovine fetuin.

  11. Structural Analysis of Unsaturated Glycosphingolipids Using Shotgun Ozone-Induced Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Rodell C.; Vu, Ngoc; Zhang, Qibin

    2017-08-01

    Glycosphingolipids are essential biomolecules widely distributed across biological kingdoms yet remain relatively underexplored owing to both compositional and structural complexity. While the glycan head group has been the subject of most studies, there is paucity of reports on the lipid moiety, particularly the location of unsaturation. In this paper, ozone-induced dissociation mass spectrometry (OzID-MS) implemented in a traveling wave-based quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-ToF) mass spectrometer was applied to study unsaturated glycosphingolipids using shotgun approach. Resulting high resolution mass spectra facilitated the unambiguous identification of diagnostic OzID product ions. Using [M+Na]+ adducts of authentic standards, we observed that the long chain base and fatty acyl unsaturation had distinct reactivity with ozone. The reactivity of unsaturation in the fatty acyl chain was about 8-fold higher than that in the long chain base, which enables their straightforward differentiation. Influence of the head group, fatty acyl hydroxylation, and length of fatty acyl chain on the oxidative cleavage of double bonds was also observed. Application of this technique to bovine brain galactocerebrosides revealed co-isolated isobaric and regioisomeric species, which otherwise would be incompletely identified using contemporary collision-induced dissociation (CID) alone. These results highlight the potential of OzID-MS in glycosphingolipids research, which not only provides complementary structural information to existing CID technique but also facilitates de novo structural determination of these complex biomolecules. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Modeling of molecular nitrogen collisions and dissociation processes for direct simulation Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Neal; Levin, Deborah A; van Duin, Adri C T; Zhu, Tong

    2014-12-21

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used for simulating hypersonic Earth re-entry flows requires accurate total collision cross sections and reaction probabilities. However, total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, so their reliability is unknown for the high temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. Existing DSMC reaction models accurately reproduce experimental equilibrium reaction rates, but the applicability of these rates to the strong thermal nonequilibrium observed in hypersonic shocks is unknown. For hypersonic flows, these modeling issues are particularly relevant for nitrogen, the dominant species of air. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method is used to accurately compute collision and reaction cross sections for the N2(Σg+1)-N2(Σg+1) collision pair for conditions expected in hypersonic shocks using a new potential energy surface developed using a ReaxFF fit to recent advanced ab initio calculations. The MD/QCT-computed reaction probabilities were found to exhibit better physical behavior and predict less dissociation than the baseline total collision energy reaction model for strong nonequilibrium conditions expected in a shock. The MD/QCT reaction model compared well with computed equilibrium reaction rates and shock-tube data. In addition, the MD/QCT-computed total cross sections were found to agree well with established variable hard sphere total cross sections.

  13. Modeling of molecular nitrogen collisions and dissociation processes for direct simulation Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, Neal; Levin, Deborah A.; Duin, Adri C. T. van; Zhu, Tong

    2014-01-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used for simulating hypersonic Earth re-entry flows requires accurate total collision cross sections and reaction probabilities. However, total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, so their reliability is unknown for the high temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. Existing DSMC reaction models accurately reproduce experimental equilibrium reaction rates, but the applicability of these rates to the strong thermal nonequilibrium observed in hypersonic shocks is unknown. For hypersonic flows, these modeling issues are particularly relevant for nitrogen, the dominant species of air. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method is used to accurately compute collision and reaction cross sections for the N 2 ( 1 Σ g + )-N 2 ( 1 Σ g + ) collision pair for conditions expected in hypersonic shocks using a new potential energy surface developed using a ReaxFF fit to recent advanced ab initio calculations. The MD/QCT-computed reaction probabilities were found to exhibit better physical behavior and predict less dissociation than the baseline total collision energy reaction model for strong nonequilibrium conditions expected in a shock. The MD/QCT reaction model compared well with computed equilibrium reaction rates and shock-tube data. In addition, the MD/QCT-computed total cross sections were found to agree well with established variable hard sphere total cross sections

  14. Simultaneous Quantification of Free Cholesterol, Cholesteryl Esters, and Triglycerides without Ester Hydrolysis by UHPLC Separation and In-Source Collision Induced Dissociation Coupled MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Michael S.; McWilliams, Lisa G.; Jones, Jeffrey I.; Kuklenyik, Zsuzsanna; Pirkle, James L.; Barr, John R.

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate the application of in-source nitrogen collision-induced dissociation (CID) that eliminates the need for ester hydrolysis before simultaneous analysis of esterified cholesterol (EC) and triglycerides (TG) along with free cholesterol (FC) from human serum, using normal phase liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The analysis requires only 50 μL of 1:100 dilute serum with a high-throughput, precipitation/evaporation/extraction protocol in one pot. Known representative mixtures of EC and TG species were used as calibrators with stable isotope labeled analogs as internal standards. The APCI MS source was operated with nitrogen source gas. Reproducible in-source CID was achieved with the use of optimal cone voltage (declustering potential), generating FC, EC, and TG lipid class-specific precursor fragment ions for multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Using a representative mixture of purified FC, CE, and TG species as calibrators, the method accuracy was assessed with analysis of five inter-laboratory standardization materials, showing -10% bias for Total-C and -3% for Total-TG. Repeated duplicate analysis of a quality control pool showed intra-day and inter-day variation of 5% and 5.8% for FC, 5.2% and 8.5% for Total-C, and 4.1% and 7.7% for Total-TG. The applicability of the method was demonstrated on 32 serum samples and corresponding lipoprotein sub-fractions collected from normolipidemic, hypercholesterolemic, hypertriglyceridemic, and hyperlipidemic donors. The results show that in-source CID coupled with isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS is a viable high precision approach for translational research studies where samples are substantially diluted or the amounts of archived samples are limited. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Electrosprayed Protein Complexes: An All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Model with Mobile Protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Vlad; Trecroce, Danielle A; McAllister, Robert G; Konermann, Lars

    2016-06-16

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has become an indispensable technique for examining noncovalent protein complexes. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of these multiply protonated gaseous ions usually culminates in ejection of a single subunit with a disproportionately large amount of charge. Experiments suggest that this process involves subunit unfolding prior to separation from the residual complex, as well as H(+) migration onto the unravelling chain. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are a promising avenue for gaining detailed insights into these CID events. Unfortunately, typical MD algorithms do not allow for mobile protons. Here we address this limitation by implementing a strategy that combines atomistic force fields (such as OPLS/AA and CHARMM36) with a proton hopping algorithm, focusing on the tetrameric complexes transthyretin and streptavidin. Protons are redistributed over all acidic and basic sites in 20 ps intervals, subject to an energy function that reflects electrostatic interactions and proton affinities. Our simulations predict that nativelike conformers at the onset of collisional heating contain multiple salt bridges. Collisional heating initially causes subtle structural changes that lead to a gradual decline of these zwitterionic patterns. Many of the MD runs show gradual unfolding of a single subunit in conjunction with H(+) migration, culminating in subunit separation from the complex. However, there are also instances where two or more chains start to unfold simultaneously, giving rise to charge competition. The scission point where the "winning" subunit separates from the complex can be attained for different degrees of unfolding, giving rise to product ions in various charge states. The simulated product ion distributions are in close agreement with experimental CID data. Proton enrichment in the departing subunit is driven by charge-charge repulsion, but the combination of salt bridge depletion, charge migration

  16. Multi-property isotropic intermolecular potentials and predicted spectral lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA), collision-induced light scattering (CILS) and collision-induced hyper-Rayleigh scattering (CIHR) for H2sbnd Ne, -Kr and -Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kader, M. S. A.; Godet, J.-L.; Gustafsson, M.; Maroulis, G.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA), collision-induced light scattering (CILS) and collision-induced hyper-Rayleigh scattering (CIHR) at room temperature (295 K) are computed for gaseous mixtures of molecular hydrogen with neon, krypton and xenon. The induced spectra are detected using theoretical values for induced dipole moment, pair-polarizability trace and anisotropy, hyper-polarizability and updated intermolecular potentials. Good agreement is observed for all spectra when the literature and the present potentials which are constructed from the transport and thermo-physical properties are used.

  17. Novel 2-Alkyl-1-Ethylpyridinium ionic liquids : synthesis, dissociation energies and volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilas, M.; Alves da Rocha, M.A.; Fernandes, A.M.; Tojo, E.; Santos, L.M.N.B.F.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the synthesis, volatility study and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with energy-variable collision induced dissociation of the isolated [(cation)2(anion)]+ of a novel series of 2-alkyl-1-ethyl pyridinium based ionic liquids, [2CN-21C2Py][NTf2]. Compared to the

  18. Towards understanding the tandem mass spectra of protonated oligopeptides. 2: The proline effect in collision-induced dissociation of protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx = Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiholder, Christian; Suhai, Sándor; Harrison, Alex G; Paizs, Béla

    2011-06-01

    The product ion spectra of proline-containing peptides are commonly dominated by y(n) ions generated by cleavage at the N-terminal side of proline residues. This proline effect is investigated in the current work by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx includes Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp) in an electrospray/quadrupole/time-of-flight (QqTOF) mass spectrometer and by quantum chemical calculations on protonated Ala-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala. The CID spectra of all investigated peptides show a dominant y(2) ion (Pro-Ala sequence). Our computational results show that the proline effect mainly arises from the particularly low threshold energy for the amide bond cleavage N-terminal to the proline residue, and from the high proton affinity of the proline-containing C-terminal fragment produced by this cleavage. These theoretical results are qualitatively supported by the experimentally observed y(2)/b(3) abundance ratios for protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx = Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp). In the post-cleavage phase of fragmentation the N-terminal oxazolone fragment with the Ala-Ala-Xxx sequence and Pro-Ala compete for the ionizing proton for these peptides. As the proton affinity of the oxazolone fragment increases, the y(2)/b(3) abundance ratio decreases.

  19. Scattering Length Scaling Laws for Ultracold Three-Body Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Incao, J.P.; Esry, B.D.

    2005-01-01

    We present a simple and unifying picture that provides the energy and scattering length dependence for all inelastic three-body collision rates in the ultracold regime for three-body systems with short-range two-body interactions. Here, we present the scaling laws for vibrational relaxation, three-body recombination, and collision-induced dissociation for systems that support s-wave two-body collisions. These systems include three identical bosons, two identical bosons, and two identical fermions. Our approach reproduces all previous results, predicts several others, and gives the general form of the scaling laws in all cases

  20. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-01-01

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  1. Measurement of diffractive dissociation cross sections in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ =7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heister, Arno; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Novgorodova, Olga; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Triossi, Andrea; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Korenkov, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Mitsyn, Valeri Valentinovitch; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Tikhonenko, Elena; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Khein, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Lukina, Olga; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; 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Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Verwilligen, Piet; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-07-06

    Measurements of diffractive dissociation cross sections in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV are presented in kinematic regions defined by the masses $M_X$ and $M_Y$ of the two final-state hadronic systems separated by the largest rapidity gap in the event. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of $\\xi_X= M^2_X/s$ in the region $\\log_{10}\\xi_X$ between $-5.5$ and $-2.5$, for $\\log_{10}M_Y$ lower than $0.5$, dominated by single dissociation (SD), and $\\log_{10}M_Y$ between $0.5$ and $1.1$, dominated by double dissociation (DD), where $M_X$ and $M_Y$ are given in GeV. The inclusive pp cross section is also measured as a function of the width of the central pseudorapidity gap $\\Delta\\eta$ for $\\Delta\\eta$ larger than $3$, $\\log_{10}M_X$ larger than $1.1$, and $\\log_{10}M_Y$ larger than $1.1$, a region dominated by DD. The cross sections integrated over these regions are used to extract the total SD and DD cross sections. In addition, the inclusive differential cross section, $\\mathrm{d}\\sigma ...

  2. Chemical potentials of π- and π+ in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenstejn, M.I.; Shin Nan Yang.

    1991-01-01

    We consider a chemical nonequilibrium model to describe the pion production in Ar+KCl and La+La collisions at initial energies E lab /A=(0.5-1.8) GeV/nucl. The excess of low energy π - is interpreted as the manifestation of positive chemical potential of π - at the thermal freeze out. We find that in collisions between nuclei with large atomic numbers the chemical potential of π + is smaller than that of π - . This leads to the prediction of a much less excess of low-energy π + , than as measured in the π - case, in heavy-ion collisions at bombarding energies in the region of 1 GeV/nucl. 17 refs.; 2 figs. (author)

  3. Multiphoton dissociation and thermal unimolecular reactions induced by infrared lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, H.L.

    1981-04-01

    Multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of ethyl chloride was studied using a tunable 3.3 μm laser to excite CH stretches. The absorbed energy increases almost linearly with fluence, while for 10 μm excitation there is substantial saturation. Much higher dissociation yields were observed for 3.3 μm excitation than for 10 μm excitation, reflecting bottlenecking in the discrete region of 10 μm excitation. The resonant nature of the excitation allows the rate equations description for transitions in the quasicontinuum and continuum to be extended to the discrete levels. Absorption cross sections are estimated from ordinary ir spectra. A set of cross sections which is constant or slowly decreasing with increasing vibrational excitation gives good fits to both absorption and dissociation yield data. The rate equations model was also used to quantitatively calculate the pressure dependence of the MPD yield of SF 6 caused by vibrational self-quenching. Between 1000-3000 cm -1 of energy is removed from SF 6 excited to approx. > 60 kcal/mole by collision with a cold SF 6 molecule at gas kinetic rate. Calculation showed the fluence dependence of dissociation varies strongly with the gas pressure. Infrared multiphoton excitation was applied to study thermal unimolecular reactions. With SiF 4 as absorbing gas for the CO 2 laser pulse, transient high temperature pulses were generated in a gas mixture. IR fluorescence from the medium reflected the decay of the temperature. The activation energy and the preexponential factor of the reactant dissociation were obtained from a phenomenological model calculation. Results are presented in detail

  4. Correlations between channel probabilities in collisional dissociation of D3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, S.; Nir, D.; Rosner, B.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of the dissociation of D 3 + ions at 300--600 keV under single- and multiple-collision conditions in Ar- and H 2 -gas targets have been performed. A complete separation of all dissociation channels was achieved, including the neutral channels, which were resolved using a fine-mesh technique. Data analysis in the multiple-collision regime confirms the validity of the rate equations governing the charge exchange processes. In the single-collision region the analysis yields constant relations between channel probabilities. Data rearrangement shows probability factorization and suggests that collisional dissociation is a two-stage process, a fast electron exchange followed by rearrangement and branching to the exit channels

  5. Dynamics of the water dimer + nitric oxide collision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ree, Jong Baik [Dept. of Chemistry Education, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoo Hang [Dept. of Chemistry, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyung Kyu [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Nevada (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Collision-induced intermolecular energy transfer and intramolecular vibrational redistribution in the collision of a water dimer and nitric oxide are studied by use of quasiclassical procedures. Intermolecular energy flow is shown to occur mainly through a direct-mode mechanism transferring relatively large amounts in strong collisions. About a quarter of the energy initially deposited in the dimer transfers to the ground state NO, while the rest redistributes among internal motions of the collision system. The main portion of initial energy deposited in the dimer redistributes in the stretches of the donor monomer through the 1:1 resonance followed by in the bend through the 1:2 resonance. Energy transfer from the excited NO to the ground-state dimer is equally efficient, transferring more than half the initial excitation to the donor monomer, the efficiency that is attributed to the internal modes operating as energy reservoirs. The hydrogen bond shares about 15% of the initial excitation stored in both dimer-to-NO and NO-to-dimer processes as a result of strong coupling of the hydrogen bond with the proton-donor OH bond of the monomer. A small fraction of collisions proceeds through a complex-mode mechanism and lead to NO dissociation, the dissociated O atom showing a propensity to form a new hydrogen bond.

  6. Quantum chemical molecular dynamical investigation of alkyl nitrite photo-dissociated on copper surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaojing; Wang Wei; Han Peilin; Kubo, Momoji; Miyamoto, Akira

    2008-01-01

    An accelerated quantum chemical molecular dynamical code 'Colors-Excite' was used to investigate the photolysis of alkyl nitrites series, RONO (R=CH 3 and C(CH 3 ) 3 ) on copper surfaces. Our calculations showed that the photo-dissociated processes are associated with the alkyl substituents of RONO when adsorbed on copper surfaces. For R=CH 3 , a two-step photolysis reaction occurred, yielding diverse intermediate products including RO radical, NO, and HNO, consistent with those reported in gas phase. While for R=C(CH 3 ) 3 , only one-step photolysis reaction occurred and gave intermediate products of RO radical and NO. Consequently, pure RO species were achieved to adsorb on metal surfaces by removing the NO species in photolysis reaction. The detailed photo-dissociated behaviors of RONO on copper surfaces with different alkyl substituents which are uncovered by the present simulation can be extended to explain the diverse dissociative mechanism experimentally observed. The quantum chemical molecular dynamical code 'Colors-Excite' is proved to be highly applicable to the photo-dissociations on metal surfaces

  7. MDMA-Induced Dissociative State not Mediated by the 5-HT2A Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew J. Puxty

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that a single dose of MDMA induce a dissociative state, by elevating feelings of depersonalization and derealization. Typically, it is assumed that action on the 5-HT2A receptor is the mechanism underlying these psychedelic experiences. In addition, other studies have shown associations between dissociative states and biological parameters (heart rate, cortisol, which are elevated by MDMA. In order to investigate the role of the 5-HT2 receptor in the MDMA-induced dissociative state and the association with biological parameters, a placebo-controlled within-subject study was conducted including a single oral dose of MDMA (75 mg, combined with placebo or a single oral dose of the 5-HT2 receptor blocker ketanserin (40 mg. Twenty healthy recreational MDMA users filled out a dissociative states scale (CADSS 90 min after treatments, which was preceded and followed by assessment of a number of biological parameters (cortisol levels, heart rate, MDMA blood concentrations. Findings showed that MDMA induced a dissociative state but this effect was not counteracted by pre-treatment with ketanserin. Heart rate was the only biological parameter that correlated with the MDMA-induced dissociative state, but an absence of correlation between these measures when participants were pretreated with ketanserin suggests an absence of directional effects of heart rate on dissociative state. It is suggested that the 5-HT2 receptor does not mediate the dissociative effects caused by a single dose of MDMA. Further research is needed to determine the exact neurobiology underlying this effect and whether these effects contribute to the therapeutic potential of MDMA.

  8. Combined photoelectron, collision-induced dissociation, and computational studies of parent and fragment anions of N-paranitrophenylsulfonylalanine and N-paranitrophenylalanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Jason; Chen, Jing; Buonaugurio, Angela; Bowen, Kit H.; Do-Thanh, Chi-Linh; Wang, Yilin; Best, Michael D.; Compton, R. N.; Sommerfeld, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    After synthesizing the compounds N-paranitrophenylsulfonylalanine (NPNPSA) and N-paranitrophenylalanine (NPNPA), the photoelectron spectrum of the valence anion of N-paranitrophenylsulfonylalanine (NPNPSA)-, was measured and the collision-induced dissociation (CID) pathways of deprotonated N-paranitrophenylsulfonylalanine (NPNPSA-H)- and deprotonated N-paranitrophenylalanine (NPNPA-H)- were determined. Pertinent calculations were conducted to analyze both sets of experimental data. From the valence anion photoelectron spectrum of (NPNPSA)-, the adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of NPNPSA was determined to be 1.7 ± 0.1 eV, while the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of (NPNPSA)- was found to be 2.3 ± 0.1 eV. Calculations for four low lying conformers of (NPNPSA)- gave AEA values in the range of 1.6-2.1 eV and VDE values in the range of 2.0-2.4 eV. These calculations are in very good agreement with the experimental values. While the NPNPA anion (NPNPSA)- was not observed experimentally it was studied computationally. The six low lying (NPNPSA)- conformers were identified and calculated to have AEA values in the range of 0.7-1.2 eV and VDE values in the range of 0.9-1.6 eV. CID was used to study the fragmentation patterns of deprotonated NPNPA and deprotonated NPNPSA. Based on the CID data and calculations, the excess charge was located on the delocalized π-orbitals of the nitrobenzene moiety. This is made evident by the fact that the dominant fragments all contained the nitrobenzene moiety even though the parent anions used for the CID study were formed via deprotonation of the carboxylic acid. The dipole-bound anions of both molecules are studied theoretically using the results of previous studies on nitrobenzene as a reference.

  9. Excited-State N2 Dissociation Pathway on Fe-Functionalized Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirez, John Mark P; Carter, Emily A

    2017-03-29

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) offer the possibility of light-activated chemical catalysis on surfaces of strongly plasmonic metal nanoparticles. This technology relies on lower-barrier bond formation and/or dissociation routes made available through energy transfer following the eventual decay of LSPRs. The coupling between these decay processes and a chemical trajectory (nuclear motion, charge-transfer, intersystem crossing, etc.) dictates the availability of these alternative (possibly lower barrier) excited-state channels. The Haber-Bosch method of NH 3 synthesis from N 2 and H 2 is notoriously energy intensive. This is due to the difficulty of N 2 dissociation despite the overall reaction being thermodynamically favorable at ambient temperatures and pressures. LSPRs may provide means to improve the kinetics of N 2 dissociation via induced resonance electronic excitation. In this work, we calculate, via embedded n-electron valence second-order perturbation theory within the density functional embedding theory, the excited-state potential energy surfaces for dissociation of N 2 on an Fe-doped Au(111) surface. This metal alloy may take advantage simultaneously of the strong LSPR of Au and the catalytic activity of Fe toward N 2 dissociation. We find the ground-state dissociation activation energy to be 4.74 eV/N 2 , with Fe as the active site on the surface. Consecutive resonance energy transfers (RETs) may be accessed due to the availability of many electronically excited states with intermediate energies arising from the metal surface that may couple to states induced by the Fe-dopant and the adsorbate molecule, and crossing between excited states may effectively lower the dissociation barrier to 1.33 eV. Our work illustrates that large energetic barriers, prohibitive toward chemical reaction, may be overcome through multiple RETs facilitating an otherwise difficult chemical process.

  10. Dissociation of VE-PTP from VE-cadherin is required for leukocyte extravasation and for VEGF-induced vascular permeability in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broermann, Andre; Winderlich, Mark; Block, Helena; Frye, Maike; Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander; Cagna, Giuseppe; Linnepe, Ruth; Schulte, Dörte; Nottebaum, Astrid Fee

    2011-01-01

    We have recently shown that vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP), an endothelial membrane protein, associates with VE-cadherin and is required for optimal VE-cadherin function and endothelial cell contact integrity. The dissociation of VE-PTP from VE-cadherin is triggered by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and by the binding of leukocytes to endothelial cells in vitro, suggesting that this dissociation is a prerequisite for the destabilization of endothelial cell contacts. Here, we show that VE-cadherin/VE-PTP dissociation also occurs in vivo in response to LPS stimulation of the lung or systemic VEGF stimulation. To show that this dissociation is indeed necessary in vivo for leukocyte extravasation and VEGF-induced vascular permeability, we generated knock-in mice expressing the fusion proteins VE-cadherin-FK 506 binding protein and VE-PTP-FRB* under the control of the endogenous VE-cadherin promoter, thus replacing endogenous VE-cadherin. The additional domains in both fusion proteins allow the heterodimeric complex to be stabilized by a chemical compound (rapalog). We found that intravenous application of the rapalog strongly inhibited VEGF-induced (skin) and LPS-induced (lung) vascular permeability and inhibited neutrophil extravasation in the IL-1β inflamed cremaster and the LPS-inflamed lung. We conclude that the dissociation of VE-PTP from VE-cadherin is indeed required in vivo for the opening of endothelial cell contacts during induction of vascular permeability and leukocyte extravasation. PMID:22025303

  11. Collision-induced coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1985-01-01

    Collision-induced coherence is based on the elimination of phase correlations between coherent Feynman-type pathways which happen to interfere destructively in the absence of damping for certain nonlinear processes. One consequence is the appearance of the extra resonances in four-wave light mixing experiments, for which the intensity increases with increasing buffer gas pressure. These resonances may occur between a pair of initially unpopulated excited states, or between a pair of initially equally populated ground states. The pair of levels may be Zeeman substrates which became degenerate in zero magnetic field. The resulting collision-enhanced Hanle resonances can lead to very sharp variations in the four-wave light mixing signal as the external magnetic field passes through zero. The theoretical description in terms of a coherence grating between Zeeman substrates is equivalent to a description in terms of a spin polarization grating obtained by collision-enhanced transverse optical pumping. The axis of quantization in the former case is taken perpendicular to the direction of the light beams; in the latter case is taken parallel to this direction

  12. Theoretical resonant electron-impact vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation cross sections of ro-vibrationally excited BeH"+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laporta, V.; Chakrabarti, K.; Celiberto, R.; Janev, R. K.; Mezei, J. Zs.; Niyonzima, S.; Tennyson, J.; Schneider, I.F.

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical study of resonant vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation processes of the beryllium monohydride cation, BeH"+ , induced by electron impact, is reported. Full sets of ro-vibrationally-resolved cross sections and of the corresponding Maxwellian rate coefficients are presented for the three processes. Particular emphasis is given to the high-energy behaviour. Potential curves of "2σ"+, "2σ and "2δ symmetries and the corresponding resonance widths, obtained from R-matrix calculations, provide the input for calculations which use a local complex-potential model for resonant collisions in each of the three symmetries. Rotational motion of nuclei and isotopic effects are also discussed. The relevant results are compared with those obtained using a multichannel quantum defect theory method. Full results are available from the Phys4Entry database.

  13. Mobility of point defects induced by subthreshold collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, A.; Nguyen Van Doan

    1976-01-01

    The effect of thermal vibrations on atomic collision focusing was studied with the view to demonstrate that such collisions may induce point defect migration through the crystal. The persistence of the phenomenon of focused atomic collisions in a crystal at thermal equilibrium was studied, using a computer simulation by the Molecular Dynamics Technique. In the temperature range (0 to 500K) matter and momentum transfers in c.f.c. crystals proceed mainly by focused collisions along and directions. Their contribution to the induced migration of radiation defects was determined from the threshold energy of every primary able to be involved in the process. As an example, the quantitative model is applied to electron irradiation along the crystallographic directions [fr

  14. Photogenerated Exciton Dissociation in Highly Coupled Lead Salt Nanocrystal Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.; Luria, Justin; Hyun, Byung-Ryool; Bartnik, Adam C.; Sun, Liangfeng; Lim, Yee-Fun; Marohn, John A.; Wise, Frank W.; Hanrath, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Internanocrystal coupling induced excitons dissociation in lead salt nanocrystal assemblies is investigated. By combining transient photoluminescence spectroscopy, grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, and time-resolved electric force microscopy, we show that excitons can dissociate, without the aid of an external bias or chemical potential gradient, via tunneling through a potential barrier when the coupling energy is comparable to the exciton binding energy. Our results have important implications for the design of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. Photogenerated Exciton Dissociation in Highly Coupled Lead Salt Nanocrystal Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2010-05-12

    Internanocrystal coupling induced excitons dissociation in lead salt nanocrystal assemblies is investigated. By combining transient photoluminescence spectroscopy, grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, and time-resolved electric force microscopy, we show that excitons can dissociate, without the aid of an external bias or chemical potential gradient, via tunneling through a potential barrier when the coupling energy is comparable to the exciton binding energy. Our results have important implications for the design of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  16. Cross section measurements of the processes occurring in the fragmentation of Hn+ (3 ≤ n ≤ 35) hydrogen clusters induced by high speed (60 keV/u) collisions on helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louc, Sandrine

    1997-01-01

    Different processes involved in the fragmentation of ionised hydrogen clusters H 3 + (H 2 ) (n-3)/2 (n = 5-35) have been studied in the same experiment: the fragmentation of the cluster is induced by the collision with an helium atom at high velocity (≅ c/100). The collision is realised in reversed kinematic - clusters are accelerated - which allows the detection of neutral and charged fragments. The different channels of fragmentation are identified by using coincidence techniques. For all the cluster sizes studied the capture cross sections of one electron of the target by the cluster is equal to the capture cross section of the H 3 + ion. In the same way, the dissociation cross section of the H 3 + core of the cluster does not depend on cluster size. These fragmentation processes are due to the interaction of H 3 + core of the cluster and the helium atom without ionization of another component of the cluster. On the contrary, the cross sections of loss of one, two and three molecules by the cluster and the dissociation cross section of the cluster in all its molecular components depends strongly on the cluster size. This dependence is different from the one measured for the metastable decay of the cluster. Thus, the process of loss of molecules induced by a collision should correspond to a different dissociation mechanism. In regard of the singularities observed for the size dependence, the H 9 + , H 15 + , H 19 + and H 29 + clusters could be the 'core' of the biggest clusters. These observation are in agreement with the size effects of smaller magnitude observed for the dissociation cross section (all the processes). The values of the cross section for the process of at least one ionization of the cluster indicate that about 80% of the fragmentation events result from this process. (author)

  17. Semiexclusive production of J/ψ mesons in proton–proton collisions with electromagnetic and diffractive dissociation of one of the protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Cisek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the cross sections for both electromagnetic and diffractive dissociation of protons for the semiexclusive production of J/ψ mesons in proton–proton collisions at the LHC. Several differential distributions in missing mass (MX, or single-particle variables related exclusively to the J/ψ meson are calculated for s=7and13 TeV. The cross sections and distributions are compared to the cross section of the purely exclusive reaction pp→ppJ/ψ. We show the corresponding ratio as a function of J/ψ meson rapidity. We compare the distributions for purely electromagnetic and purely diffractive proton excitations/dissociation. We predict cross sections for electromagnetic and diffractive excitations of similar order of magnitude.

  18. Diffractive dissociation and eikonalization in high energy pp and p bar p collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotsman, E.; Levin, E.M.; Maor, U.

    1994-01-01

    We show that eikonal corrections imposed on diffraction dissociation processes calculated in the triple Regge limit produce a radical change in the energy dependence of the predicted cross section. The induced correction is shown to be in general agreement with the recent Fermilab Tevatron experimental data

  19. Post-foil interaction in foil-induced molecular dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faibis, A.; Kanter, E.P.; Koenig, W.; Plesser, I.; Vager, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have investigated the foil-induced dissociation of 175- 250- keV/amu CH + , NH + , and OH + , FH + and NeH + ions by coincident detection of the fragment atoms. The dissociation energies corresponding to in-foil and post-foil interactions were deduced from the measured relative flight times of the fragment pairs to a set of detectors downstream from the target. The authors considered final states consisting of a) a proton and a heavy-ion and, b) a hydrogen atom and a heavy-ion. Surprisingly, in both cases the energy released in the post-target interaction shows a similar linear increase with the charge state of the heavy partner

  20. Systematic trends in photonic reagent induced reactions in a homologous chemical family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbetts, Katharine Moore; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2013-08-29

    The growing use of ultrafast laser pulses to induce chemical reactions prompts consideration of these pulses as "photonic reagents" in analogy to chemical reagents. This work explores the prospect that photonic reagents may affect systematic trends in dissociative ionization reactions of a homologous family of halomethanes, much as systematic outcomes are often observed for reactions between homologous families of chemical reagents and chemical substrates. The experiments in this work with photonic reagents of varying pulse energy and linear spectral chirp reveal systematic correlations between observable ion yields and the following set of natural variables describing the substrate molecules: the ionization energy of the parent molecule, the appearance energy of each fragment ion, and the relative strength of carbon-halogen bonds in molecules containing two different halogens. The results suggest that reactions induced by photonic reagents exhibit systematic behavior analogous to that observed in reactions driven by chemical reagents, which provides a basis to consider empirical "rules" for predicting the outcomes of photonic reagent induced reactions.

  1. Atomic collisions by neutrons-induced charged particles in water, protein and nucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.

    1976-01-01

    The action of slow charged particles is peculiar in that atomic collisions are commonly invlolved. In atomic collisions, which are rare events when fast particles interact with matter, displacement of atoms and chemical bond-breakage is possible. Sufficiently energetic neutrons generate charged recoil particles in matter. Some of these are slow as compared to orbital electrons, but the energy transferred to such slow particles is generally relatively small. Yet, it contributes significantly to the dose absorbed from 0.1-30 keV neutrons. In tissue all recoils induced by neutrons of less than 30 keV are slow, and above 0.1 keV the absorbed dose due to collisiondominates over that due to capture reactions. The aim of the present paper is to identify those intervals of neutron energy in which atomic collision damage is most probable in living matter. The results of calculations presented here indicate that atomic collisions should be most significant for 0.5-3 keV neutrons. (author)

  2. Fragmentation pathways of O-alkyl methylphosphonothionocyanidates in the gas phase: toward unambiguous structural characterization of chemicals in the Chemical Weapons Convention framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidian, Hamid; Babri, Mehran; Ashrafi, Davood; Sarabadani, Mansour; Naseri, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-08-01

    The electron-impact (EI) mass spectra of a series of O-alkyl methylphosphonothionocyanidates were studied for Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) purposes. General EI fragmentation pathways were constructed and discussed, and collision-induced dissociation studies of the major EI ions were performed to confirm proposed fragment structures by analyzing fragment ions of deuterated analogs and by use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Thiono-thiolo rearrangement, McLafferty-type rearrangement, and a previously unknown intramolecular electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction were observed and confirmed. The study also focused on differentiation of isomeric compounds. Retention indices for all compounds, and an electrophilicity index for several compounds, are reported and interpreted.

  3. Comparative study between hadron and heavy ion dissociation at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bakry, Y.M.N.; Abd-Elhalim, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    The present work deals with the dissociation of hadrons and heavy ions at high energies. In investigating hadron nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions, it is important to classify the experimental data, into two main classes; the coherent. and incoherent reactions. The coherent production is the main of our study. This process called electromagnetic dissociation (ED) and can be differentiate into coulomb dissociation (CD) and diffraction dissociation (DD). This work explains the experimental data of collisions of hadrons K± (70 GeV/c) and π(340 Gc V/c) and heavy ions 6 L i, 7 L i, 1 2C and1 6O at Dubna energies (3-4.5 A GeV/c)with emulsion target, in the frame of some models and theories which describe the mechanism of ED dissociation

  4. Controlling Chemical Reactions in Confined Environments: Water Dissociation in MOF-74

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika M. A. Fuentes-Fernandez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The confined porous environment of metal organic frameworks (MOFs is an attractive system for studying reaction mechanisms. Compared to flat oxide surfaces, MOFs have the key advantage that they exhibit a well-defined structure and present significantly fewer challenges in experimental characterization. As an example of an important reaction, we study here the dissociation of water—which plays a critical role in biology, chemistry, and materials science—in MOFs and show how the knowledge of the structure in this confined environment allows for an unprecedented level of understanding and control. In particular, combining in-situ infrared spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that the water dissociation reaction can be selectively controlled inside Zn-MOF-74 by alcohol, through both chemical and physical interactions. Methanol is observed to speed up water dissociation by 25% to 100%, depending on the alcohol partial pressure. On the other hand, co-adsorption of isopropanol reduces the speed of the water reaction, due mostly to steric interactions. In addition, we also investigate the stability of the product state after the water dissociation has occurred and find that the presence of additional water significantly stabilizes the dissociated state. Our results show that precise control of reactions within nano-porous materials is possible, opening the way for advances in fields ranging from catalysis to electrochemistry and sensors.

  5. Reactive collisions of electrons with H2+ , HD+, BeH+, BeD+ and SH+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Nicolina; Iacob, Felix; Mezei, János Zsolt; Motapon, Ousmanou; Niyonzima, Sebastien; Kashinski, David O.; Talbi, Dahbia; Hickman, Albert Peet; Schneider, Ioan F.

    2017-12-01

    In numerous cold ionized gases the dissociative recombination (DR), the elastic collisions (EC), the vibrational excitation (VE) (inelastic collisions) and the vibrational de-excitation (VdE) (super-elastic collisions) of molecular cations with electrons are major elementary processes. Using a stepwise method based on the Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory (MQDT), cross sections and rate coefficients have been obtained for reactions induced on HD+, H2+, BeH+, BeD+ and SH+. Moreover, the relative importance of the different reaction mechanisms, direct vs. indirect and rotational vs. non-rotational, have been studied for these molecular systems.

  6. Study of the fragmentation of astrophysical interest molecules (CnHm) induced by high velocity collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuna, Th.

    2008-07-01

    This work shows the study of atom-molecule collision processes in the high velocity domain (v=4,5 a.u). The molecules concerned by this work are small unsaturated hydrocarbons C 1-4 H and C 3 H 2 . Molecules are accelerated with the Tandem accelerator in Orsay and their fragmentation is analyzed by the 4π, 100% efficient detector, AGAT. Thanks to a shape analysis of the current signal from the silicon detectors in association with the well known grid method, we are able to measure all the fragmentation channels of the incident molecule. These dissociation measurements have been introduced in the modelization of two objects of the interstellar medium in which a lot of hydrocarbon molecules have been observed (TMC1, horse-head nebula). We have extended our branching ratios obtained by high velocity collision to other electronic processes included in the chemical database like photodissociation and dissociative recombination. This procedure is feasible under an assumption of the statistical point of view of the molecular fragmentation. The deviations following our modification are very small in the modelization of TMC1 but significant in the photodissociation region. The first part is dedicated to the description of the experimental setting that has enabled us to study the fragmentation of C n H m molecules: the Orsay's Tandem accelerator and the Agat detector. The second part deals with negative ion sources and particularly with the Sahat source that is based on electronic impact and has shown good features for the production of anions and correct stability for its use with accelerators. The third part is dedicated to the experimental results in terms of cross-sections, number of fragments and branching ratios, associated to the various collisional processes. The last part presents an application of our measurement of fragmentation data to astro-chemistry. In this field, the simulation codes of the inter-stellar medium require databases of chemical reactions that

  7. Universal imaging: Dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules, chemical dynamics beamline 9.0.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M.; Chen, D.; Suits, A.G. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A third endstation was recently added to the Chemical Dynamics beamline, designed to exploit the high flux broadband undulator light for a range of studies of reactive scattering, photochemistry and photoionization processes using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy coupled with position-sensitive detection. Two molecular beam sources are fixed at right angles, with the undulator light, or laser beams, intersecting the molecular beams at 45{degrees}. To date, beamline experiments have included a study of dissociative photoionization of a variety of molecules including N{sub 2}O and SF{sub 6}. In this mode, a single molecular beam source is used, with the tunable undulator light inducing, in SF{sub 6} for example, the process SF{sub 6} {r_arrow} SF{sub 6}{sup +} + e{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} SF{sub 5}{sup +} + F + e{sup {minus}}. The SF{sub 5}{sup +} ions are accelerated up the flight tube, mass selected and detected as a function of position on a phosphor screen viewed by a CCD camera. The position directly reveals the recoil speed (or translational energy release) and angular distribution for the dissociative ionization process. Furthermore, this measurement is obtained for all recoil speeds and angles simultaneously. Such detailed angular information has not previously been obtained for dissociative ionization processes; typically ion time-of-flight profiles are deconvoluted to yield rough insight into the angular distributions. The recorded image is actually a 2-dimensional projection of the nascent 3-dimensional velocity distribution, but established tomographic techniques enable the authors to reconstruct the 3-D distribution.

  8. Selective bond cleavage in potassium collisions with pyrimidine bases of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Diogo; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; García, Gustavo; Limão-Vieira, Paulo

    2013-01-11

    Electron transfer in alkali-molecule collisions to gas phase thymine and uracil yielding H- formation is selectively controlled in the energy range between 5.3 and 66.1 eV. By tuning the collision energy, electron transfer from the alkali to partly deuterated thymine, methylated thymine at the N1 and methylated uracil at the N3 positions, H- loss proceeds not only through the breaking of the (C-H) against (N-H) bonds but also through N1 against N3 sites. Such selectivity, as far as bond and site are concerned, is here reported for the first time by electron transfer induced dissociation experiments in alkali-molecule collisions.

  9. Dissociative charge exchange of H2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruijn, D. de.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to molecular dissociation, in particular the dissociation of the hydrogen molecule H 2 arising from electron capture of its ion H 2 + in a collision. Thereby the important practical question how a chemical bond can be broken is implicitly addressed. This thesis opens (chapter I) with an overview of the available experimental approaches in molecular physics. Further the simple Demkov model for NRCE is described. In chapter II a novel experimental technique for measurements on dissociative processes is introduced which combines a high efficiency with a high energy resolution. A detailed description of the techniques applied in the detector, which has a high spatial and timing resolution with 30 μm and 350 psec FWHM respectively for the detection of one particle, is given in chapter III. A semi-classical theory for NRCE in the medium energy range between a diatomic molecular ion and an atom is developed in chapter IV. The experiments on dissociative charge exchange of H 2 + with Ar, Mg, Na and Cs targets at keV energies are described in Chapter V. The predissociation of the c 3 PIsub(u)-state of H 2 populated after charge exchange of H 2 with several targets at keV energies; is the subject of chapter VI. In chapter VII, orientational oscillations in the cross section for charge exchange of H 2 + with alkali targets are discussed. The last chapter deals with predissociation of highly excited states in H 2 . (Auth.)

  10. J/ψ dissociation in parity-odd bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuchin, Kirill

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the quarkonium dissociation rate in the P and CP-odd domains (bubbles) that were possibly created in heavy-ion collisions. In the presence of the magnetic field produced by the valence quarks of colliding ions, parity-odd domains generate electric field. Quarkonium dissociation is the result of quantum tunneling of quark or antiquark through the potential barrier in this electric field. The strength of the electric field in the quarkonium comoving frame depends on the quarkonium velocity with respect to the background magnetic field. We investigate momentum, electric field strength and azimuthal dependence of the dissociation rate. Azimuthal distribution of quarkonia surviving in the electromagnetic field is strongly anisotropic; the form of anisotropy depends on the relation between the electric and magnetic fields and quarkonium momentum P ⊥ . These features can be used to explore the properties of the electromagnetic field created in heavy ion collisions.

  11. Direct glycan structure determination of intact N-linked glycopeptides by low-energy collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry and predicted spectral library searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Pei-Jing; Hu, Yingwei; Lam, Henry

    2016-08-31

    Intact glycopeptide MS analysis to reveal site-specific protein glycosylation is an important frontier of proteomics. However, computational tools for analyzing MS/MS spectra of intact glycopeptides are still limited and not well-integrated into existing workflows. In this work, a new computational tool which combines the spectral library building/searching tool, SpectraST (Lam et al. Nat. Methods2008, 5, 873-875), and the glycopeptide fragmentation prediction tool, MassAnalyzer (Zhang et al. Anal. Chem.2010, 82, 10194-10202) for intact glycopeptide analysis has been developed. Specifically, this tool enables the determination of the glycan structure directly from low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of intact glycopeptides. Given a list of possible glycopeptide sequences as input, a sample-specific spectral library of MassAnalyzer-predicted spectra is built using SpectraST. Glycan identification from CID spectra is achieved by spectral library searching against this library, in which both m/z and intensity information of the possible fragmentation ions are taken into consideration for improved accuracy. We validated our method using a standard glycoprotein, human transferrin, and evaluated its potential to be used in site-specific glycosylation profiling of glycoprotein datasets from LC-MS/MS. In addition, we further applied our method to reveal, for the first time, the site-specific N-glycosylation profile of recombinant human acetylcholinesterase expressed in HEK293 cells. For maximum usability, SpectraST is developed as part of the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP), a freely available and open-source software suite for MS data analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chemical freeze-out study in proton-proton collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sabita; Mishra, Debadeepti; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Chatterjee, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Particle multiplicities measured at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facilities can be used to understand the chemical freeze-out dynamics. At chemical freeze-out (CFO), inelastic collisions cease and the freeze-out parameters can be determined using measured particle multiplicities within the framework of a statistical model. The statistical model has proven to be quite successful in describing the particle production from elementary p-p and e"+e"- collisions up to heavy-ion collisions. It helps to do a systematic study of the centrality and energy dependence of freeze-out parameters in heavy-ion collisions from lower SPS to higher LHC energies. The new data at LHC along with the RHIC data can be used to do such a systematic study in proton-proton collisions

  13. An ab initio chemical reaction model for the direct simulation Monte Carlo study of non-equilibrium nitrogen flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, T K; Bhandarkar, U V; Puranik, B P

    2017-08-28

    A new ab initio based chemical model for a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) study suitable for simulating rarefied flows with a high degree of non-equilibrium is presented. To this end, Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) cross sections for N 2 +N 2 →N 2 +2N are calculated and published using a global complete active space self-consistent field-complete active space second order perturbation theory N 4 potential energy surface and quasi-classical trajectory algorithm for high energy collisions (up to 30 eV). CID cross sections are calculated for only a selected set of ro-vibrational combinations of the two nitrogen molecules, and a fitting scheme based on spectroscopic weights is presented to interpolate the CID cross section for all possible ro-vibrational combinations. The new chemical model is validated by calculating equilibrium reaction rate coefficients that can be compared well with existing shock tube and computational results. High-enthalpy hypersonic nitrogen flows around a cylinder in the transition flow regime are simulated using DSMC to compare the predictions of the current ab initio based chemical model with the prevailing phenomenological model (the total collision energy model). The differences in the predictions are discussed.

  14. Method for separating the isotopes of a chemical element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devienne, F.M.

    1977-01-01

    A beam of positive or negative primary ions of at least one compound of a chemical element is accelerated in order to pass through collision boxes placed in series. As a result of inelastic collisions of the ions with the molecules of a neutral target gas within each collision box, a given percentage of primary ions is dissociated into at least two fragments, one of which is a secondary ion in the form of at least two isotopic species. The collision boxes are brought to a potential V 2 so as to trap preferentially one isotopic species which is condensed within each box. 15 claims, 4 figures

  15. Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Hydrogen-Helium gas mixtures at Thousands of Kelvin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2010-10-01

    The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H2 molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of the outer planets and cool stars ^[1]. The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H2--H2, H2--He, and H2--H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin ^[2]. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H2 pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely ^[2], so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures ^[2]. [1] L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Absorption in Gases, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, New York, 1993 and 2006 [2] Xiaoping Li, Katharine L. C. Hunt, Fei Wang, Martin Abel, and Lothar Frommhold, ``Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Molecular Hydrogen Pairs at Thousands of Kelvin'', International Journal of Spectroscopy, vol. 2010, Article ID 371201, 11 pages, 2010. doi: 10.1155/2010/371201

  16. Chemistry at molecular junctions: Rotation and dissociation of O2 on the Ag(110) surface induced by a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sharani; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A

    2013-08-21

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is a fascinating tool used to perform chemical processes at the single-molecule level, including bond formation, bond breaking, and even chemical reactions. Hahn and Ho [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 214702 (2005)] performed controlled rotations and dissociations of single O2 molecules chemisorbed on the Ag(110) surface at precise bias voltages using STM. These threshold voltages were dependent on the direction of the bias voltage and the initial orientation of the chemisorbed molecule. They also observed an interesting voltage-direction-dependent and orientation-dependent pathway selectivity suggestive of mode-selective chemistry at molecular junctions, such that in one case the molecule underwent direct dissociation, whereas in the other case it underwent rotation-mediated dissociation. We present a detailed, first-principles-based theoretical study to investigate the mechanism of the tunneling-induced O2 dynamics, including the origin of the observed threshold voltages, the pathway dependence, and the rate of O2 dissociation. Results show a direct correspondence between the observed threshold voltage for a process and the activation energy for that process. The pathway selectivity arises from a competition between the voltage-modified barrier heights for rotation and dissociation, and the coupling strength of the tunneling electrons to the rotational and vibrational modes of the adsorbed molecule. Finally, we explore the "dipole" and "resonance" mechanisms of inelastic electron tunneling to elucidate the energy transfer between the tunneling electrons and chemisorbed O2.

  17. Unique pentafluorobenzylation and collision-induced dissociation for specific and accurate GC-MS/MS quantification of the catecholamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerner, Alexander A; Heusser, Karsten; Gutzki, Frank M; Mitschke, Anja; Tank, Jens; Stichtenoth, Dirk O; Jordan, Jens; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2011-05-15

    In the human body, the catecholamine norepinephrine is mainly metabolized to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) which therefore serves as an important biomarker for norepinephrine's metabolism. Most data on DHPG concentrations in human plasma and urine has been generated by using HPLC-ECD or GC-MS technologies. Here, we describe a stable-isotope dilution GC-MS/MS method for the quantitative determination of DHPG in human urine using trideutero-DHPG (d(3)-DHPG) as internal standard and a two-step derivatization process with pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFB-Br) and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). Two pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives were obtained and identified, i.e., two isomeric DHPG-PFB-(TMS)(3) derivatives and the later eluting DHPG-tetrafluorobenzyl-(TMS)(2) derivative, i.e., DHPG-TFB-(TMS)(2). To our knowledge the DHPG-TFB-(TMS)(2) derivative and the underlying reaction have not been reported previously. In this reaction both vicinal aromatic hydroxyl groups of DHPG react with PFB-Br to form a heterocyclic seven-membered [1,4]dioxepin compound. The DHPG-TFB-(TMS)(2) derivative was used for quantitative GC-MS/MS analysis in the electron-capturing negative-ion chemical ionization mode by selected-reaction monitoring of m/z 351 from m/z 401 for DHPG and of m/z 352 from m/z 404 for d(3)-DHPG. Validation experiments on human urine samples spiked with DHPG in a narrow (0-33 nM) and a wide range (0-901 nM) revealed high recovery (86-104%) and low imprecision (RSD; 0.01-2.8%). LOD and relative LLOQ (rLLOQ) values of the method for DHPG were determined to be 76 amol and 9.4%, respectively. In urine of 28 patients suffering from chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, DHPG was measured at a mean concentration of 238 nM (38.3 μg/g creatinine). The DHPG concentration in the respective control group of 40 healthy subjects was measured to be 328 nM (39.2 μg/g creatinine). Given the unique derivatization reaction and collision-induced

  18. Point defects migration induced by subthreshold focused collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, A.; Doan, N.V.

    1976-01-01

    The persistence of the phenomenon of focused atomic collisions in a large range of temperature up to 0.3 Tf in copper have been shown using computer simulation by the Molecular Dynamics Technique. On the other hand, different processes by which the subthreshold collisions can induce a vacancy migration have been investigated. A quantitative model relating the induced vacancy migration to the flux density, direction and energy of incident particles has been developed. For example in an electron irradiation, it is found that the induced vacancy jump frequency depends notably on the incident direction and exhibits a maximum value in the range of electron energy between 60 and 100keV

  19. Development and Optimization of an UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS Method Based on an In-Source Collision Induced Dissociation Approach for Comprehensive Discrimination of Chlorogenic Acids Isomers from Momordica Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Madala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorogenic acids (CGA have been profiled in the leaves of Momordica balsamina, Momordica charantia, and Momordica foetida. All three species were found to contain the trans and cis isomers of 4-acyl para-coumaroylquinic acid (pCoQA, caffeoylquinic acid (CQA, and feruloylquinic acid (FQA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of pCoQA and FQA and their cis isomers in these Momordica species. These profiles were obtained by a newly developed UPLC-qTOF-MS method based on the in-source collision induced dissociation (ISCID method optimized to mimic the MS2 and MS3 fragmentation of an ion trap-based MS. The presence of the cis isomers is believed to be due to high UV exposure of these plants. Furthermore, the absence of the 3-acyl and 5-acyl CGA molecules points to a metabolic mark that is unusual and represents a very interesting biochemical phenotype of these species. Our optimized ISCID method was also shown to be able to distinguish between the geometrical isomers of all three forms of CGA, a phenomenon previously deemed impossible with other common mass spectrometry systems used for CGA analyses.

  20. Influence of Electron Molecule Resonant Vibrational Collisions over the Symmetric Mode and Direct Excitation-Dissociation Cross Sections of CO2 on the Electron Energy Distribution Function and Dissociation Mechanisms in Cold Pure CO2 Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietanza, L D; Colonna, G; Laporta, V; Celiberto, R; D'Ammando, G; Laricchiuta, A; Capitelli, M

    2016-05-05

    A new set of electron-vibrational (e-V) processes linking the first 10 vibrational levels of the symmetric mode of CO2 is derived by using a decoupled vibrational model and inserted in the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function (eedf). The new eedf and dissociation rates are in satisfactory agreement with the corresponding ones obtained by using the e-V cross sections reported in the database of Hake and Phelps (H-P). Large differences are, on the contrary, found when the experimental dissociation cross sections of Cosby and Helm are inserted in the Boltzman equation. Comparison of the corresponding rates with those obtained by using the low-energy threshold energy, reported in the H-P database, shows differences up to orders of magnitude, which decrease with the increasing of the reduced electric field. In all cases, we show the importance of superelastic vibrational collisions in affecting eedf and dissociation rates either in the direct electron impact mechanism or in the pure vibrational mechanism.

  1. Quasi continuum vibrational of molecules and isotopic selectivity properties induced by collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelie, Christian

    1990-01-01

    This research thesis proposes an overview of knowledge on vibrationally highly excited states of molecules. The author shows that the statistic quasi-continuum formed by these states is preceded by a quasi continuum of weak transitions with a lower energy, and that these transitions remain structured and very narrow up to the dissociation energy and beyond. Collisions between molecules excited in their quasi continuum are then studied. The author particularly analyses a new phenomenon of isotopic selectivity which is important for the dissociation of a molecule colliding another molecule. It appears that this selectivity regarding selectivity is due to a selectivity of transferred energy which paradoxically increases with the molecule vibrational content because of a resonance phenomenon of energies transferred by dipole-dipole interaction [fr

  2. New chemical-DSMC method in numerical simulation of axisymmetric rarefied reactive flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Ramin; Kamali Moghadam, Ramin; Mani, Mahmoud

    2017-04-01

    The modified quantum kinetic (MQK) chemical reaction model introduced by Zakeri et al. is developed for applicable cases in axisymmetric reactive rarefied gas flows using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Although, the MQK chemical model uses some modifications in the quantum kinetic (QK) method, it also employs the general soft sphere collision model and Stockmayer potential function to properly select the collision pairs in the DSMC algorithm and capture both the attraction and repulsion intermolecular forces in rarefied gas flows. For assessment of the presented model in the simulation of more complex and applicable reacting flows, first, the air dissociation is studied in a single cell for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The MQK results agree well with the analytical and experimental data and they accurately predict the characteristics of the rarefied flowfield with chemical reaction. To investigate accuracy of the MQK chemical model in the simulation of the axisymmetric flow, air dissociation is also assessed in an axial hypersonic flow around two geometries, the sphere as a benchmark case and the blunt body (STS-2) as an applicable test case. The computed results including the transient, rotational and vibrational temperatures, species concentration in the stagnation line, and also the heat flux and pressure coefficient on the surface are compared with those of the other chemical methods like the QK and total collision energy (TCE) models and available analytical and experimental data. Generally, the MQK chemical model properly simulates the chemical reactions and predicts flowfield characteristics more accurate rather than the typical QK model. Although in some cases, results of the MQK approaches match with those of the TCE method, the main point is that the MQK does not need any experimental data or unrealistic assumption of specular boundary condition as used in the TCE method. Another advantage of the MQK model is the

  3. Energy and mass-number dependence of the dissociation temperature in hydrodynamical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Y.; Navarra, F.S.

    1990-10-01

    Transverse-momentum distributions of π and K have been analysed to obtain the √s dependence of the collective transverse and the dissociation temperature in pp- and p-barp induced multiparticle production reactions. A good fit of both the pion and kaon data has been obtained in terms of a previously proposed simple parametrization of the collective transverse rapidity distribution. The main outcomes are the logarithmically increasing average transverse rapidity squared and a slowly decreasing dissociation temperature T sub(d) as the incident energy √s increases. This last behaviour is in excellent agreement with early Landau's estimate. An extension of the same estimate to nucleus-nucleus collisions gives the correct low temperature component which has been observed in heavy-ion experiments. (author)

  4. Dissociative Tendencies and Traffic Incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the relationship between dissociative experiences and road traffic incidents (crashes and traffic tickets in drivers (n=295 from Mar del Plata (Argentina city. A self-report questionnaire was applied to assess traffic crash involvement and sociodemographic variables. Dissociative tendencies were assessed by a modified version of the DES scale. To examine differences in DES scores tests of the difference of means were applied. Drivers who reported to be previously involved in traffic incidents obtained higher puntuations in the dissociative experiences scale than drivers who did not report such events. This result is observed for the total scale and for the three sub-scales (absorption, amnesia and depersonalization. However, differences appeared mainly for minor damage collisions. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of dissociative tendencies as a risk factor in road traffic safety.

  5. Thermal, chemical and spectral equilibration in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almási, Gábor András, E-mail: g.almasi@gsi.de [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Wolf, György, E-mail: wolf.gyorgy@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-11-15

    We have considered the equilibration in relativistic heavy ion collisions at energies 1–7 A GeV using our transport model. We applied periodic boundary conditions to close the system in a box. We found that the thermal equilibration takes place in the first 20–40 fm/c whose time is comparable to the duration of a heavy ion collision. The chemical equilibration is a much slower process and the system does not equilibrate in a heavy ion collision. We have shown that in the testparticle simulation of the Boltzmann equation the mass spectra of broad resonances follow instantaneously their in-medium spectral functions as expected from the Markovian approximation to the Kadanoff–Baym equations employed via the (local) gradient expansion.

  6. Data on ionization, excitation, dissociation and dissociative ionization of targets by helium ion bombardments, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Nobuo; Urakawa, Junji

    1984-03-01

    This report presents a compilation of the experimental data on cross sections for the ionization, excitation, dissociation and dissociative ionization processes of targets in helium ion impacts on atoms and molecules under a single collision condition. These measurements were carried out in the energy range from several keV to 3.5 MeV. A systematic survey has been made on the literatures from 1975 to the end of 1982. A list of references is also given, including relevant papers published before 1975. (author)

  7. Molecular treatment of single (dissociative and nondissociative) and double electron capture in He2+ + H2 collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L F; Macias, A; Mendez, L; Pons, B; Riera, A

    2003-01-01

    We present close-coupling calculations of total cross sections for single and double electron capture in He 2+ + H 2 collisions in the range 0.5- 25 keV amu -1 , and compare them with experimental data. We confirm the experimental finding that the dominant process for E ∼> 3 keV amu -1 is the nondissociative capture He 2+ + H 2 → He + (2l) + H 2 + (1σ g ), while at lower energies it is dissociative capture leading to He + (1s) + H + + H. Our calculations also show that He(1s2l) is the main output of the two electron capture process. (letter to the editor)

  8. The I2 dissociation mechanisms in the chemical oxygen-iodine laser revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waichman, K; Barmashenko, B D; Rosenwaks, S

    2012-06-28

    The recently suggested mechanism of I(2) dissociation in the chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) [K. Waichman, B. D. Barmashenko, and S. Rosenwaks, J. Appl. Phys. 106, 063108 (2009); and J. Chem. Phys. 133, 084301 (2010)] was largely based on the suggestion of V. N. Azyazov, S. Yu. Pichugin, and M. C. Heaven [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 104306 (2009)] that the vibrational population of O(2)(a) produced in the chemical generator is high enough to play an essential role in the dissociation. The results of model calculations based on this mechanism agreed very well with measurements of the small signal gain g, I(2) dissociation fraction F, and temperature T in the COIL. This mechanism is here revisited, following the recent experiments of M. V. Zagidullin [Quantum Electron. 40, 794 (2010)] where the observed low population of O(2)(b, v = 1) led to the conclusion that the vibrational population of O(2)(a) at the outlet of the generator is close to thermal equilibrium value. This value corresponds to a very small probability, ∼0.05, of O(2)(a) energy pooling to the states O(2)(X,a,b, v > 0). We show that the dissociation mechanism can reproduce the experimentally observed values of g, F, and T in the COIL only if most of the energy released in the processes of O(2)(a) energy pooling and O(2)(b) quenching by H(2)O ends up as vibrational energy of the products, O(2)(X,a,b), where the vibrational states v = 2 and 3 are significantly populated. We discuss possible reasons for the differences in the suggested vibrational population and explain how these differences can be reconciled.

  9. Dissociation of NF3 in shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breshears, W.D.; Bird, P.F.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal dissociation rate of NF 3 in mixtures of 5% and 10%NF 3 in Ar has been measured behind incident shock waves over the temperature range 1330-2000 K. Dissociation rates were determined from postshock density gradients measured by laser beam deflection. The second order rate coefficient determined for NF 3 -Ar collisions is k/sub d/=2.31 x 10 15 exp(-20500/T) cm 3 mole sec

  10. Collision induced light-scattering from gaseous sulphurhexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleich, R.

    1983-10-01

    Modern laser technology permits the measurement of collision induced light-scattering spectra from molecular gases at low densities. Measurements of this type provide a test for the separation dependent pair polarizabilities and pair potentials. For this work the octahedral molecule sulphurhexafluoride (SF 6 , point group symmetry 0sub(h)) has been chosen for which the permanent polarizability anisotropy vanishes. For the experiment an argon ion laser in combination with a double grating monochromator and standard photon counting techniques were used. Both the polarized and depolarized scattering cross sections were obtained. The point dipole-induced-dipole (DID) effect is shown to account for the most of the total scattered intensity. At low frequency shifts the line shape of the SF 6 spectrum is dominated by bound dimers, whereas the intermediate frequency range up to 50 cm -1 is well described by a DID free trajectory binary collision model. The high frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision induced rotational Raman (CIRR) effect and estimates for the dipole-octopole polarizability E are obtained both from the spectral distribution and from the depolarization ratio. It is demonstrated that the hierarchy of effects constituting the CIRR-model converges slowly for large frequency shifts. (Author)

  11. Dissociation and decay of ultracold sodium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, T.; Abo-Shaeer, J.R.; Xu, K.; Chin, J.K.; Ketterle, W.

    2004-01-01

    The dissociation of ultracold molecules was studied by ramping an external magnetic field through a Feshbach resonance. The observed dissociation energies directly yielded the strength of the atom-molecule coupling. They showed nonlinear dependence on the ramp speed. This was explained by a Wigner threshold law which predicts that the decay rate of the molecules above threshold increases with the density of states. In addition, inelastic molecule-molecule and molecule-atom collisions were characterized

  12. Gas hydrate dissociation off Svalbard induced by isostatic rebound rather than global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmann, Klaus; Riedel, M; Hong, W L; Patton, H; Hubbard, A; Pape, T; Hsu, C W; Schmidt, C; Johnson, J E; Torres, M E; Andreassen, K; Berndt, C; Bohrmann, G

    2018-01-08

    Methane seepage from the upper continental slopes of Western Svalbard has previously been attributed to gas hydrate dissociation induced by anthropogenic warming of ambient bottom waters. Here we show that sediment cores drilled off Prins Karls Foreland contain freshwater from dissociating hydrates. However, our modeling indicates that the observed pore water freshening began around 8 ka BP when the rate of isostatic uplift outpaced eustatic sea-level rise. The resultant local shallowing and lowering of hydrostatic pressure forced gas hydrate dissociation and dissolved chloride depletions consistent with our geochemical analysis. Hence, we propose that hydrate dissociation was triggered by postglacial isostatic rebound rather than anthropogenic warming. Furthermore, we show that methane fluxes from dissociating hydrates were considerably smaller than present methane seepage rates implying that gas hydrates were not a major source of methane to the oceans, but rather acted as a dynamic seal, regulating methane release from deep geological reservoirs.

  13. Fragmentation of C2H4 by charge-changing collisions of O2+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.; Mizuno, T.; Yamada, T.; Imai, M.; Shibata, H.; Itoh, A.; Tsuchida, H.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated molecular fragmentation of C 2 H 4 in charge-changing collisions of 1.14MeV O 2+ ions. Branching ratios associated with decaying from temporary produced (C 2 H 4 ) r+ ions into various fragment channels were obtained. Dissociation via a C-C bond breaking is preferential in 1-electron loss collisions in comparison with 1-electron capture collisions. We confirmed that multiple ionization and dissociation rarely occur in electron capture collisions, while they occur rather strongly in electron loss collisions. (author)

  14. Computation of Collision-Induced Absorption by Simple Molecular Complexes, for Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2012-06-01

    The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H{_2} molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of various types of planets and cool stars, such as late stars, low-mass stars, brown dwarfs, cool white dwarf stars, the ambers of the smaller, burnt out main sequence stars, exoplanets, etc., and therefore of special astronomical interest The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H{_2}-H{_2}, H{_2}-He, and H{_2}-H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H{_2} pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely, so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures. First results for H_2-He complexes have already been applied to astrophysical models have shown great improvements in these models. L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Absorption in Gases, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, New York, 1993 and 2006 X. Li, K. L. C. Hunt, F. Wang, M. Abel, and L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Molecular Hydrogen Pairs at Thousands of Kelvin, Int. J. of Spect., vol. 2010, Article ID 371201, 11 pages, 2010. doi: 10.1155/2010/371201 M. Abel, L. Frommhold, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, Collision-induced absorption by H{_2} pairs: From hundreds to thousands of Kelvin, J. Phys. Chem. A, 115, 6805-6812, 2011} L. Frommhold, M. Abel, F. Wang, M. Gustafsson, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Infrared atmospheric emission and absorption by simple molecular complexes, from first principles", Mol. Phys. 108, 2265, 2010 M. Abel, L. Frommhold, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, Infrared absorption by collisional H_2-He complexes

  15. Global proteomic profiling of phosphopeptides using electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Henrik; Horn, David M; Tang, Ning

    2007-01-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is a recently introduced mass spectrometric technique that provides a more comprehensive coverage of peptide sequences and posttranslational modifications. Here, we evaluated the use of ETD for a global phosphoproteome analysis. In all, we identified a total...... of 1,435 phosphorylation sites from human embryonic kidney 293T cells, of which 1,141 ( approximately 80%) were not previously described. A detailed comparison of ETD and collision-induced dissociation (CID) modes showed that ETD identified 60% more phosphopeptides than CID, with an average of 40% more...... fragment ions that facilitated localization of phosphorylation sites. Although our data indicate that ETD is superior to CID for phosphorylation analysis, the two methods can be effectively combined in alternating ETD and CID modes for a more comprehensive analysis. Combining ETD and CID, from this single...

  16. Multiphoton dissociation of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, P.A.

    1979-10-01

    The dynamics of infrared multiphoton excitation and dissociation of SF 6 was investigated under collision free conditions by a crossed laser-molecular beam method. In order to understand the excitation mechanism and to elucidate the requirements of laser intensity and energy fluence, a series of experiments were carried out to measure the dissociation yield dependences on energy fluence, vibrational temperature of SF 6 , the pulse duration of the CO 2 laser and the frequency in both one and two laser experiments. Translational energy distributions of the SF 5 dissociation product measured by time of flight and angular distributions and the dissociation lifetime of excited SF 6 as inferred from the observation of secondary dissociation of SF 5 into SF 4 and F during the laser pulse suggest that the dynamics of dissociation of excited molecules is dominated by complete energy randomization and rapid intramolecular energy transfer on a nanosecond timescale, and can be adequately described by RRKM theory. An improved phenomenological model including the initial intensity dependent excitation, a rate equation describing the absorption and stimulated emission of single photons, and the unimolecular dissociation of excited molecules is constructed based on available experimental results. The model shows that the energy fluence of the laser determines the excitation of molecules in the quasi-continuum and the excess energy with which molecules dissociate after the laser pulse. The role played by the laser intensity in multiphoton dissociation is more significant than just that of overcoming the intensity dependent absorption in the lowest levels. 63 references

  17. Electron and molecular ion collisions relevant to divertor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, H.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the concept of the multi-channel quantum defect theory (MQDT) and show the outline of the MQDT newly extended to include the dissociative states. We investigate some molecular processes relevant to the divertor plasma by using the MQDT: the dissociative recombination, dissociative excitation, and rotation-vibrational transition in the hydrogen molecular ion and electron collisions. (author)

  18. Dissociating emotion-induced blindness and hypervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra, Bruno R; Zeelenberg, René

    2009-12-01

    Previous findings suggest that emotional stimuli sometimes improve (emotion-induced hypervision) and sometimes impair (emotion-induced blindness) the visual perception of subsequent neutral stimuli. We hypothesized that these differential carryover effects might be due to 2 distinct emotional influences in visual processing. On the one hand, emotional stimuli trigger a general enhancement in the efficiency of visual processing that can carry over onto other stimuli. On the other hand, emotional stimuli benefit from a stimulus-specific enhancement in later attentional processing at the expense of competing visual stimuli. We investigated whether detrimental (blindness) and beneficial (hypervision) carryover effects of emotion in perception can be dissociated within a single experimental paradigm. In 2 experiments, we manipulated the temporal competition for attention between an emotional cue word and a subsequent neutral target word by varying cue-target interstimulus interval (ISI) and cue visibility. Interestingly, emotional cues impaired target identification at short ISIs but improved target identification when competition was diminished by either increasing ISI or reducing cue visibility, suggesting that emotional significance of stimuli can improve and impair visual performance through distinct perceptual mechanisms.

  19. Probing the lowest coordination number of dianionic platinum-cyanide complexes in the gas phase: Dynamics of the charge dissociation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, G; Hvelplund, P; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Low-energy and high-energy collision induced dissociation techniques are used to study the dissociation behavior of the gaseous Pt(CN)(6)(2-) and Pt(CN)(4)(2-) dianion complexes in order to probe the smallest stable dianion complex. Loss of neutral molecules from Pt(CN)(6)(2-) occurs resulting...... in Pt(CN)(5)(2-) and Pt(CN)(4)(2-), but no indication of the existence of Pt(CN)(3)(2-) was found. This indicates that the lifetime of Pt(CN)(3)(2-) is less than 4 mus (the flight time from the collision region to the detector). In contrast, all monoanion platinum-cyanide complexes were observed, i.......e., Pt(CN)(n)(-) (n=1-6). The kinetic energy released in processes where monoanions are formed is much lower than the barrier height for the reverse reaction (>1.5 eV), which indicates that electron detachment is involved, e.g., Pt(CN)(3)(-) and CN- are not formed in the same dynamical process from Pt(CN...

  20. Half collision resonance phenomena in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximo Garcia-Sucre; Raseev, G.; Ross, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Escuela Latinoamericana de Fisica (ELAF) is a series of meeting s that for 28 years has played an important role in research-level teaching of physics in Latin America. This book contains the proceedings of ELAF 90 which was held at the Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC) in Caracas, Venezuela from July 23 to August 3, 1990, as part of the commemoration of the 30th anniversary of IVIC. In contrast to previous ELAF's that were of general scope, ELAF 90 centered on a particular subject matter: '' Half Collisional Resonance Phenomena in Molecules, Experimental and Theoretical Approaches. ''The term ''Half Collision'' refers to the fragmentation of a molecular system following is excitation by light. The lack of an incident fragmentation of a molecular system following is excitation by light. The lack of an incident particle (other than the photon) in the fragmentation process is what leads to the term. The purpose of this volume is to present current results in the experimental and theoretical study of half collisions and also to include pedagogical papers at an introductory or intermediate level. The contributions are grouped into several sections; light sources; ionization; dissociation-experimental; dissociation-theory; competition between ionization and dissociation; and particle-molecule collisions

  1. Electron emission following collisions between multi-charged ions and D2 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, G.

    2004-05-01

    Dissociative ionisation mechanisms induced in collisions involving a highly charged ion (S 15+ , 13.6 MeV/u) and a molecular deuterium target, have been studied through momentum vector correlations of both the D + fragments and the electrons produced. An experimental apparatus has been developed in order to detect in coincidence all the charged particles produced during the collision. The measurement of their momentum vectors, which allows one to determine both their kinetic energy and direction of emission with respect to the projectile one, combines Time of Flight, Position Sensitive Detection, and multi-coincidence techniques. The correlation of the fragment and electron kinetic energies enables not only to determine branching ratios between the dissociative ionisation pathways, but also to separate unambiguously kinetic energy distributions of fragments associated to each process. Finally, the angular distributions of ejected electrons, as a function of the orientation of the molecular axis with respect to the projectile direction, are deduced from the spatial correlation. Measurements are compared to theoretical angular distributions obtained using the CDW-EIS (Continuum Distorted Wave-Eikonal Initial State) method. (author)

  2. Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Collisional Complexes in Dense Hydrogen-Helium Gas Mixtures at Thousands of Kelvin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2011-06-01

    The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H{_2} molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of the outer planets and cool stars. The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H{_2}-H{_2}, H{_2}-He, and H{_2}-H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H{_2} pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely, so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures. L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Absorption in Gases, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, New York, 1993 and 2006 Xiaoping Li, Katharine L. C. Hunt, Fei Wang, Martin Abel, and Lothar Frommhold, "Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Molecular Hydrogen Pairs at Thousands of Kelvin", International Journal of Spectroscopy, vol. 2010, Article ID 371201, 11 pages, 2010. doi: 10.1155/2010/371201 M. Abel, L. Frommhold, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Collision-induced absorption by H{_2} pairs: From hundreds to thousands of Kelvin," J. Phys. Chem. A, published online, DOI: 10.1021/jp109441f L. Frommhold, M. Abel, F. Wang, M. Gustafsson, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Infrared atmospheric emission and absorption by simple molecular complexes, from first principles", Mol. Phys. 108, 2265, 2010

  3. Collision-induced absorption intensity redistribution and the atomic pair polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanin, M. O.

    1997-01-01

    A modified relation between the trace polarizability of a diatom and the S(-2) dipole sum is proposed that accounts for the effect of atomic collisions on the dipole oscillator strength distribution. Contribution to the collision-induced trace due to redistribution in the ionization continuum of Ar is evaluated and is found to be significant

  4. Chemical-induced Vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Chemical-induced depigmentation of the skin has been recognized for over 75 years, first as an occupational hazard but then extending to those using household commercial products as common as hair dyes. Since their discovery, these chemicals have been used therapeutically in patients with severe vitiligo to depigment their remaining skin and improve their appearance. The importance of recognizing this phenomenon was highlighted during an outbreak of vitiligo in Japan during the summer of 2013, when over 16,000 users of a new skin lightening cosmetic cream developed skin depigmentation at the site of contact with the cream and many in remote areas as well. Depigmenting chemicals appear to be analogs of the amino acid tyrosine that disrupt melanogenesis and result in autoimmunity and melanocyte destruction. Because chemical-induced depigmentation is clinically and histologically indistinguishable from non-chemically induced vitiligo, and because these chemicals appear to induce melanocyte autoimmunity, this phenomenon should be known as “chemical-induced vitiligo”, rather than less accurate terms that have been previously used. PMID:28317525

  5. Kinetics of electrically and chemically induced swelling in polyelectrolyte gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, P. E.; Nussbaum, J. H.; Grodzinsky, A. J.; Yarmush, M. L.

    1990-09-01

    Controlled swelling and shrinking of polyelectrolyte gels is useful for regulating the transport of solutes into, out of, and through these materials. A macroscopic continuum model is presented to predict the kinetics of swelling in polyelectrolyte gel membranes induced by augmentation of electrostatic swelling forces arising from membrane fixed charge groups. The model accounts for ionic transport within the membrane, electrodiffusion phenomena, dissociation of membrane charge groups, intramembrane fluid flow, and mechanical deformation of the membrane matrix. Model predictions are compared with measurements of chemically and electrically induced swelling and shrinking in crosslinked polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) membranes. Large, reversible changes in PMAA membrane hydration were observed after changing the bath pH or by applying an electric field to modify the intramembrane ionic environment and fixed charge density. A relatively slow swelling process and more rapid shrinking for both chemical and electrical modulation of the intramembrane pH are observed. The model indicates that retardation of membrane swelling is dominated by diffusion-limited reaction of H+ ions with membrane charge groups, and that the more rapid shrinking is limited primarily by mechanical processes.

  6. Fragmentation study of isolated and nano-solvated biomolecules induced by collision with multiply charged ions and neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernigaud, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns a gas phase study of the fragmentation of bio-molecular systems induced by slow collisions with multiply charged ions (in the keV-region), alkali atoms and rare gases. The main objective was to study the physical processes involved in the dissociation of highly electronically excited systems. In order to elucidate the intrinsic properties of certain biomolecules (porphyrins and amino acids) we have performed experiments in the gas phase with isolated systems. The obtained results demonstrate the high stability of porphyrins after electron removal and attachment. Furthermore, a dependence of the fragmentation pattern produced by multiply charged ions on the isomeric structure of the alanine molecule has been shown. In a second part of the thesis, a strong influence of the environment of the biomolecule on the fragmentation channels, their modification and their new opening, has been clearly proven. This phenomenon occurs in the presence of other surrounding biomolecules (clusters of nucleobases) as well as for molecules of a solvent (molecules of water, methanol and acetonitrile) in which the biomolecule is embedded. In order to extend these studies to larger systems, a new experimental set-up, based on an electro-spray ion source combined with a quadrupole mass filter has been developed. Due to the successful tests and proposed improvements of the device future experiments will become available concerning the fragmentation of large charged and solvated bio-molecular systems induced by collision processes. (author) [fr

  7. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with hexapole collision cell: figures of merit and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen]|[Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk (Belarus); Becker, J.S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen

    2000-11-01

    The use of gas-filled multipole collision cells represents important progress in ICP-MS instrumentation. It enables an increase in element sensitivity based on the improvement of ion transmission efficiency from near thermalization and collisional focusing of ions. In addition, gas-phase ion-molecule chemistry can be applied in order to reduce mass spectral interferences via charge transfer reaction of interfering ions with reaction gas or via fragmentation of interfering molecular ions by collision-induced dissociation. The application of a hexapole collision cell in quadrupole based ICP-MS (HEX-ICP-QMS) was studied systematically in order to characterize the analytical figures of merit of this approach. Additionally, the performance of different solution introduction systems as well as an inductively coupled plasma shielded torch was studied for use with HEX-ICP-QMS. (orig.)

  8. Cross section measurements of the processes occurring in the fragmentation of H{sub n}{sup +} (3 {<=} n {<=} 35) hydrogen clusters induced by high speed (60 keV/u) collisions on helium atoms; Mesure des sections efficaces des differents processus intervenant dans la fragmentation d`agregats d`hydrogene H{sub n}{sup +} (3 {<=} n {<=} 35) induite par collision a haute vitesse (60 keV/u) sur un atome d`helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louc, Sandrine [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-09-15

    Different processes involved in the fragmentation of ionised hydrogen clusters H{sub 3} + (H{sub 2}){sub (n-3)/2} (n = 5-35) have been studied in the same experiment: the fragmentation of the cluster is induced by the collision with an helium atom at high velocity ({approx_equal} c/100). The collision is realised in reversed kinematic - clusters are accelerated - which allows the detection of neutral and charged fragments. The different channels of fragmentation are identified by using coincidence techniques. For all the cluster sizes studied the capture cross sections of one electron of the target by the cluster is equal to the capture cross section of the H{sub 3}{sup +} ion. In the same way, the dissociation cross section of the H{sub 3}{sup +} core of the cluster does not depend on cluster size. These fragmentation processes are due to the interaction of H{sub 3}{sup +} core of the cluster and the helium atom without ionization of another component of the cluster. On the contrary, the cross sections of loss of one, two and three molecules by the cluster and the dissociation cross section of the cluster in all its molecular components depends strongly on the cluster size. This dependence is different from the one measured for the metastable decay of the cluster. Thus, the process of loss of molecules induced by a collision should correspond to a different dissociation mechanism. In regard of the singularities observed for the size dependence, the H{sub 9}{sup +}, H{sub 15}{sup +}, H{sub 19}{sup +} and H{sub 29}{sup +} clusters could be the `core` of the biggest clusters. These observation are in agreement with the size effects of smaller magnitude observed for the dissociation cross section (all the processes). The values of the cross section for the process of at least one ionization of the cluster indicate that about 80% of the fragmentation events result from this process. (author) 114 refs., 74 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Particle Production in Strong Electromagnetic Fields in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Tuchin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available I review the origin and properties of electromagnetic fields produced in heavy-ion collisions. The field strength immediately after a collision is proportional to the collision energy and reaches ~mπ2 at RHIC and ~10mπ2 at LHC. I demonstrate by explicit analytical calculation that after dropping by about one-two orders of magnitude during the first fm/c of plasma expansion, it freezes out and lasts for as long as quark-gluon plasma lives as a consequence of finite electrical conductivity of the plasma. Magnetic field breaks spherical symmetry in the direction perpendicular to the reaction plane, and therefore all kinetic coefficients are anisotropic. I examine viscosity of QGP and show that magnetic field induces azimuthal anisotropy on plasma flow even in spherically symmetric geometry. Very strong electromagnetic field has an important impact on particle production. I discuss the problem of energy loss and polarization of fast fermions due to synchrotron radiation, consider photon decay induced by magnetic field, elucidate J/ψ dissociation via Lorentz ionization mechanism, and examine electromagnetic radiation by plasma. I conclude that all processes in QGP are affected by strong electromagnetic field and call for experimental investigation.

  10. Laser-induced-fluorescence studies of fragment ions: CH+ and CD+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Keefe, A.

    1981-08-01

    The dynamics of ion-molecule interactions within a mass selective rf quadrupole ion trap are studied for several ion-molecule systems. Laser induced fluorescence is used as a probe of the internal energy distributions of molecular ions under collision free conditions and under controlled collision conditions. The effects of collisions at near thermal energies (0.3 to 0.5 eV) are easily understood in terms of processes such as charge transfer and other energy transfer mechanisms. The A 1 PI - X 1 Σ + system of CH + and CD + has been examined under collision free conditions. The ions were produced from methane through electron impact ionization/dissociation. The observed energy distributions reflect the dynamical partitioning of dissociation exothermicity, excepting short lived electronic states. Many new transitions belonging to this electronic system have been observed and a reliable vibrational frequency for the X 1 Σ + state has been obtained. The radiative lifetimes of CH + and CD + A 1 PI(v = 0) states have been measured and a revised oscillator strength for the A-X transition has been derived from this data

  11. Electron-molecular cation reactive collisions: from channel mixing to competitive processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motapon, O; Tamo, F O Waffeu; Backodissa, D; Chakrabarti, K; Mezei, J. Zs; Lique, F; Schneider, I F; Tudorache, D; Bultel, A; Tchang-Brillet, L; Dulieu, O; Tennyson, J; Wolf, A; Urbain, X

    2011-01-01

    The competition between dissociative recombination, vibrational excitation, and dissociative excitation of molecular cations in electron-impact collisions is discussed within the formalism of the Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory. Illustrative results are given for the HD + /HD and CO + /CO systems.

  12. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  13. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  14. Ion induced fragmentation of biomolecular systems at low collision energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernigaud, V; Adoui, L; Chesnel, J Y; Rangama, J; Huber, B A; Manil, B; Alvarado, F; Bari, S; Hoekstra, R; Postma, J; Schlathoelter, T

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present results of different collision experiments between multiply charged ions at low collision energies (in the keV-region) and biomolecular systems. This kind of interaction allows to remove electrons form the biomolecule without transferring a large amount of vibrational excitation energy. Nevertheless, following the ionization of the target, fragmentation of biomolecular species may occur. It is the main objective of this work to study the physical processes involved in the dissociation of highly electronically excited systems. In order to elucidate the intrinsic properties of certain biomolecules (porphyrins and amino acids) we have performed experiments in the gas phase with isolated systems. The obtained results demonstrate the high stability of porphyrins after electron removal. Furthermore, a dependence of the fragmentation pattern produced by multiply charged ions on the isomeric structure of the alanine molecule has been shown. By considering the presence of other surrounding biomolecules (clusters of nucleobases), a strong influence of the environment of the biomolecule on the fragmentation channels and their modification, has been clearly proven. This result is explained, in the thymine and uracil case, by the formation of hydrogen bonds between O and H atoms, which is known to favor planar cluster geometries.

  15. Atomic collisions research with excited atomic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogerland, M.D.; Gulley, R.J.; Colla, M.; Lu, W.; Milic, D.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Buckman, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of fundamental atomic collision and spectroscopic properties such as collision cross sections, reaction rates, transition probabilities etc. underpin the understanding and operation of many plasma and gas-discharge-based devices and phenomena, for example plasma processing and deposition. In almost all cases the complex series of reactions which sustains the discharge or plasma, or produces the reactive species of interest, has a precursor electron impact excitation, attachment, dissociation or ionisation event. These processes have been extensively studied in a wide range of atomic and molecular species and an impressive data base of collision cross sections and reaction rates now exists. However, most of these measurements are for collisions with stable atomic or molecular species which are initially in their ground electronic state. Relatively little information is available for scattering from excited states or for scattering from unstable molecular radicals. Examples of such species would be metastable excited rare gases, which are often used as buffer gases, or CF 2 radicals formed by electron impact dissociation in a CF 4 plasma processing discharge. We are interested in developing experimental techniques which will enable the quantitative study of such exotic atomic and molecular species. In this talk I would like to outline one such facility which is being used for studies of collisions with metastable He(2 3 S) atoms

  16. Single-collision studies of hot atom energy transfer and chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research in the collision dynamics of translationally hot atoms, with funding with DOE for the project ''Single-Collision Studies of Hot Atom Energy Transfer and Chemical Reaction,'' Grant Number DE-FG03-85ER13453. The work reported here was done during the period September 9, 1988 through October 31, 1991. During this period this DOE-funded work has been focused on several different efforts: (1) experimental studies of the state-to-state dynamics of the H + RH → H 2 R reactions where RH is CH 4 , C 2 H 6 , or C 3 H 8 , (2) theoretical (quasiclassical trajectory) studies of hot hydrogen atom collision dynamics, (3) the development of photochemical sources of translationally hot molecular free radicals and characterization of the high resolution CARS spectroscopy of molecular free radicals, (4) the implementation of stimulated Raman excitation (SRE) techniques for the preparation of vibrationally state-selected molecular reactants

  17. Characterization of Isomeric Glycans by Reversed Phase Liquid Chromatography-Electronic Excitation Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yang; Wei, Juan; Costello, Catherine E.; Lin, Cheng

    2018-04-01

    The occurrence of numerous structural isomers in glycans from biological sources presents a severe challenge for structural glycomics. The subtle differences among isomeric structures demand analytical methods that can provide structural details while working efficiently with on-line glycan separation methods. Although liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a powerful tool for mixture analysis, the commonly utilized collision-induced dissociation (CID) method often does not generate a sufficient number of fragments at the MS2 level for comprehensive structural characterization. Here, we studied the electronic excitation dissociation (EED) behaviors of metal-adducted, permethylated glycans, and identified key spectral features that could facilitate both topology and linkage determinations. We developed an EED-based, nanoscale, reversed phase (RP)LC-MS/MS platform, and demonstrated its ability to achieve complete structural elucidation of up to five structural isomers in a single LC-MS/MS analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Kinetics of the urea-induced dissociation of human plasma alpha-2-macroglobulin as measured by small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöberg, B.; Pap, S.; Järnberg, S.-E.

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of the urea-induced dissociation of human plasma alpha-2-macroglobulin into two half-molecular fragments was investigated at 21.0-degrees-C by using small-angle neutron scattering. The relative change in molecular mass that occurs upon dissociation was monitored by recording the forw...

  19. Studies of neutron dissociation at Fermilab energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferbel, T.

    1975-01-01

    The latest results obtained in a continuing investigation of neutron dissociation in (pπ - ) systems in neutron--nucleus collisions between 50 and 300 GeV/c are summarized. The nuclear coherent dissociation data are discussed first; then new measurements of total cross sections of neutrons on nuclei in the Fermilab momentum range are presented; finally, neutron dissociation using a hydrogen target is considered, and the hydrogen data are compared with expectations from simple Deck models. A substantial correlation was observed between the mass and the t of the system produced. The spin structure of the pπ - amplitudes at low mass was described surprisingly well by the simple Deck mechanism. The t-channel helicity amplitudes contained comparable contributions from flip and nonflip terms, and the states produced were not restricted to those expected on the basis of the Morrison rule. (19 figures, 2 tables) (U.S.)

  20. Electron collision cross sections and radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the cross section data needs in radiation chemistry, and of the recent progress in electron impact studies on dissociative excitation of molecules. In the former some of the important target species, processes, and collision energies are presented, while in the latter it is demonstrated that radiation chemistry is a source of new ideas and information in atomic collision research. 37 references, 4 figures

  1. Laser-induced charge exchange in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riera, A.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of laser-induced charge transfer (LICT) in ion-atom collisions is presented for the range of impact energies in which a quasimolecular description is appropriate. For each relative orientation of the AC field, LICT cross sections can be obtained with trivial modifications of standard programs. Simpler, perturbative expressions for the orientation-averaged cross sections are accurate for I v -1 6 W s cm -3 , and the analytical Landau-Zener perturbative expression often provides good estimates for these cross sections. The practical advantages of the dressed state formalism as an alternative approach are critically examined, and the general characteristics of LICT cross sections in multicharged ion-atom collisions are shown with the help of an example. (Auth.)

  2. Increased precision for analysis of protein-ligand dissociation constants determined from chemical shift titrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markin, Craig J.; Spyracopoulos, Leo, E-mail: leo.spyracopoulos@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    NMR is ideally suited for the analysis of protein-protein and protein ligand interactions with dissociation constants ranging from {approx}2 {mu}M to {approx}1 mM, and with kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. For the determination of dissociation constants (K{sub D}) of 1:1 protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions using NMR, the protein and ligand concentrations must necessarily be similar in magnitude to the K{sub D}, and nonlinear least squares analysis of chemical shift changes as a function of ligand concentration is employed to determine estimates for the parameters K{sub D} and the maximum chemical shift change ({Delta}{delta}{sub max}). During a typical NMR titration, the initial protein concentration, [P{sub 0}], is held nearly constant. For this condition, to determine the most accurate parameters for K{sub D} and {Delta}{delta}{sub max} from nonlinear least squares analyses requires initial protein concentrations that are {approx}0.5 Multiplication-Sign K{sub D}, and a maximum concentration for the ligand, or titrant, of {approx}10 Multiplication-Sign [P{sub 0}]. From a practical standpoint, these requirements are often difficult to achieve. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that co-variation of the ligand and protein concentrations during a titration leads to an increase in the precision of the fitted K{sub D} and {Delta}{delta}{sub max} values when [P{sub 0}] > K{sub D}. Importantly, judicious choice of protein and ligand concentrations for a given NMR titration, combined with nonlinear least squares analyses using two independent variables (ligand and protein concentrations) and two parameters (K{sub D} and {Delta}{delta}{sub max}) is a straightforward approach to increasing the accuracy of measured dissociation constants for 1:1 protein-ligand interactions.

  3. Simulant molecules with trivalent or pentavalent phosphorus atoms: bond dissociation energies and other thermodynamic and structural properties from quantum chemical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, David K; RaghuVeer, Krishans S; Ortiz, J V

    2011-08-04

    The CBS-QB3 and G4 thermochemical models have been used to generate energetic, structural, and spectroscopic data on a set of molecules with trivalent or pentavalent phosphorus atoms that can serve as simulants of chemical warfare agents. Based on structural data, the conformational stabilities of these molecules are explained in terms of the anomeric interaction within the OPOC and OPSC fragments. For those cases where experimental data are available, comparisons have been made between calculated and previously reported vibrational frequencies. All varieties of bond dissociation energies have been examined except those for C-H and P═O bonds. In trivalent phosphorus molecules, the O-C and S-C bonds have the lowest dissociation energies. In the pentavalent phosphorus set, the S-C bonds, followed by P-S bonds, have the lowest dissociation energies. In the fluorinated simulant molecules, the P-F bond is strongest, and the P-C or O-C bonds are weakest. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. The role of the environment in the ion induced fragmentation of uracil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Markush, P.; Bolognesi, P.; Cartoni, A.; Rousseau, P.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Domaracka, A.; Kočišek, Jaroslav; Castrovilli, M. C.; Huber, B. A.; Avaldi, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 25 (2016), s. 16721-16729 ISSN 1463-9076 Grant - others:COST(XE) CM1024; COST(XE) MP1002 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : COLLISION-INDUCED DISSOCIATION * PHOTOION MASS-SPECTROMETRY * MULTIPLY-CHARGED IONS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  5. Dissociative scattering of low-energy SiF{sub 3}{sup +} and SiF{sup +} ions (5-200 eV) on Cu(100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Yuji; Sasaki, T A [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Dissociative scattering of molecular SiF{sub 3}{sup +} and SiF{sup +} ions from a Cu(100) single crystal surface has been investigated in the incident energy range from 5 eV to 200 eV with a scattering angle of 77deg. The scattered ion intensity of dissociative ions and parent molecular ions were measured as a function of incident ion energy. The observed data show that onset energies of dissociation for SiF{sub 3}{sup +} and SiF{sup +} ions are 30 eV and 40 eV, respectively. The obtained threshold energies are consistent with a impulsive collision model where the dissociation of incident ion is caused by vibrational excitation during collision. (author)

  6. Using vibrational Cooper minima to determine strong-field molecular-dissociation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severt, T.; Zohrabi, M.; Armstrong, G. S. J.; McKenna, J.; Gaire, B.; Kling, Nora G.; Ablikim, U.; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the possibility of using vibrational ``Cooper minima'' (VCM) locations as a method to determine dissociation pathways of molecules in a strong laser field. As a test case, we study the laser-induced dissociation of an O2+ion beam by several wavelengths (λ = 800 , 400, and 266 nm) using a coincidence three-dimensional momentum imaging technique. Vibrational structure is observed in the kinetic energy release spectra, revealing a suppression of the dissociation of certain vibrational levels, which is a manifestation of the VCM effect. Previously, it has been shown in H2+that first-order time-dependent perturbation theory can be used to predict the locations of the VCM. We explore if the VCM locations predicted by perturbation theory can help uniquely identify dissociation pathways in O2+and consider its utility for other systems. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy. TS was partially supported by NSF-REU under Grant No. PHY-0851599.

  7. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Protein Complexes in a Hybrid Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jing; Zhou, Mowei; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Wolff, Jeremy J.; Somogyi, Árpád; Pedder, Randall E.; Quintyn, Royston S.; Morrison, Lindsay J.; Easterling, Michael L.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2017-01-03

    Mass spectrometry continues to develop as a valuable tool in the analysis of proteins and protein complexes. In protein complex mass spectrometry studies, surface-induced dissociation (SID) has been successfully applied in quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instruments. SID provides structural information on non-covalent protein complexes that is complementary to other techniques. However, the mass resolution of Q-TOF instruments can limit the information that can be obtained for protein complexes by SID. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) provides ultrahigh resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy measurements. In this study, an SID device was designed and successfully installed in a hybrid FT-ICR instrument in place of the standard gas collision cell. The SID-FT-ICR platform has been tested with several protein complex systems (homooligomers, a heterooligomer, and a protein-ligand complex, ranging from 53 kDa to 85 kDa), and the results are consistent with data previously acquired on Q-TOF platforms, matching predictions from known protein interface information. SID fragments with the same m/z but different charge states are well-resolved based on distinct spacing between adjacent isotope peaks, and the addition of metal cations and ligands can also be isotopically resolved with the ultrahigh mass resolution available in FT-ICR.

  8. Spectroscopic studies of hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kielkopf, J.

    1991-01-01

    Low energy collisions involving neutral excited states of hydrogen are being studied with vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy. Atomic hydrogen is generated by focusing an energetic pulse of ArF, KrF, or YAG laser light into a cell of molecular hydrogen, where a plasma is created near the focal point. The H 2 molecules in and near this region are dissociated, and the cooling atomic hydrogen gas is examined with laser and dispersive optical spectroscopy. In related experiments, we are also investigating neutral H + O and H + metal - atom collisions in these laser-generated plasmas

  9. Risk Analysis Of Collision Between Passenger Ferry And Chemical Tanker In The Western Zone Of The Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przywarty Marcin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents assumptions and process of the forming of a risk assessment model for collision between a passenger ferry departing from or approaching port of Świnoujście and a chemical tanker carrying a dangerous cargo. In order to assess navigational safety on the basis of data obtained from AIS system, were prepared probabilistic domains of ships, which made it possible to estimate number of navigational incidents as well as their spatial distribution, that consequently allowed to determine potentially dangerous areas. The next phase was formulation of a simulative model intended for the calculating of probability of collision between the ferry and chemical tanker as well as the determining of characteristic scenarios for such collision. This paper presents also an analysis of consequences of the collision with taking into consideration a damage of cargo tanks.

  10. Non-equilibrium reaction rates in chemical kinetic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy

    2018-05-01

    Within the recently proposed asymptotic method for solving the Boltzmann equation for chemically reacting gas mixture, the chemical kinetic equations has been derived. Corresponding one-temperature non-equilibrium reaction rates are expressed in terms of specific heat capacities of the species participate in the chemical reactions, bracket integrals connected with the internal energy transfer in inelastic non-reactive collisions and energy transfer coefficients. Reactions of dissociation/recombination of homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules are considered. It is shown that all reaction rates are the complex functions of the species densities, similarly to the unimolecular reaction rates. For determining the rate coefficients it is recommended to tabulate corresponding bracket integrals, additionally to the equilibrium rate constants. Correlation of the obtained results with the irreversible thermodynamics is established.

  11. Energy transfer in diatom/diatom molecular collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohlberg, K.W.

    1992-01-01

    In a collision of two molecules, the translational energy of the collision may be redistributed into internal energy of rotation, vibration, or electron motion, in one or both of the colliding partners. In addition, internal energy in one or more of these modes may be open-quotes quenchedclose quotes into translation, leading to a superelastic collision. Such energy transfer may take place by a number of mechanisms. This energy transfer is of fundamental importance in understanding chemical reaction dynamics. Nearly all chemical reactions take place through a bimolecular collision process (or multiple bimolecular collisions) and the quantum state specificity of the reaction can have a major role in determining the kinetics of the reaction, In particular, the author has investigated vibrational energy transfer in collisions between two diatomic molecules. In addition to serving as models for all molecular collision process, gas phase collisions of these species are ubiquitous in atmospheric phenomena which are of critical importance in answering the current questions about the human induced degradation of the earth's atmospheric. Classical trajectory methods have been used to explore the excitation of vibrations in gas-phase collisions of the nitrogen molecular ion with its parent molecule. The near symmetry of the reactants is shown to result in a high probability that the two molecules are excited by an equal amount of energy. This provides a possible explanation of the molecular beam measurements which show that the total number of vibrational energy quanta excited in the collision is, with a high probability that the two molecules are excited by an equal amount of energy. This provides a possible explanation of the molecular beam measurements which show that the total number of vibrational energy quanta excited in the collision is, with a high probability, even

  12. Total dissociation cross section of halo nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Formanek, J. [Karlova Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Fakulta Matematicko-Fyzikalni; Lombard, R.J. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1996-10-01

    Calculations of the total dissociation cross section is performed in the impact parameter representation. The case of {sup 11}Be and {sup 11}Li loosing one and two neutron(s), respectively, by collision on a {sup 12}C target, which remains in its ground state are discussed. The results are found to depend essentially on the rms radius of the halo wave function. (author). 12 refs.

  13. PREFACE: Sixth International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andreas; Lammich, Lutz; Schmelcher, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Dissociative recombination between electrons and molecular ions is an elementary reaction in electron-induced chemistry attracting strong attention across discipline boundaries, from fundamental questions of intramolecular dynamics to astrophysics, plasma science, as well as atmospheric and planetary physics. The process is explored on the level of atomic quantum dynamics both experimentally and theoretically, employing cold collisions at temperatures down to 10 Kelvin involving small molecules or also very large systems ranging up to biomolecules. Dissociative recombination (DR) and related processes, such as dissociative excitation, collisional cooling of vibrations and rotations, photodissociation via high-lying electronic states, resonant electron attachment, and electron-induced processes in large molecules and clusters, are studied by a variety of experimental methods, including stored and trapped molecular ions, plasma techniques such as stationary and flowing afterglow, and laser spectroscopic diagnostic of molecular excitations. The Sixth International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications (DR2004) was organized by the Research Group on Atomic and Molecular Physics with Stored Ions at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany, and held near Heidelberg in the town of Mosbach in July 2004. It was attended by about 90 scientists working in atomic and molecular physics, astrophysics, plasma- and biophysics. International Conferences on Dissociative Recombination and related processes were held before at Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada (1988), Saint Jacut, Brittany, France (1992), Ein Gedi, Israel (1995), Nässlingen, Stockholm Archipelago, Sweden (1999), and last within a symposium at the American Chemical Society meeting in Chicago, USA (2001). The presentations of this conference document a strong development of theoretical ideas towards the understanding of DR in particular in polyatomic

  14. Resonant inelastic collisions of electrons with diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houfek, Karel

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we give a review of applications of the nonlocal resonance theory which has been successfully used for treating the nuclear dynamics of low-energy electron collisions with diatomic molecules over several decades. We give examples and brief explanations of various structures observed in the cross sections of vibrational excitation and dissociative electron attachment to diatomic molecules such as threshold peaks, boomerang oscillations below the dissociative attachment threshold, or outer-well resonances.

  15. Resonant inelastic collisions of electrons with diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houfek, Karel, E-mail: karel.houfek@gmail.com [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2012-05-15

    In this contribution we give a review of applications of the nonlocal resonance theory which has been successfully used for treating the nuclear dynamics of low-energy electron collisions with diatomic molecules over several decades. We give examples and brief explanations of various structures observed in the cross sections of vibrational excitation and dissociative electron attachment to diatomic molecules such as threshold peaks, boomerang oscillations below the dissociative attachment threshold, or outer-well resonances.

  16. Nuclear suppression in p-A collisions from induced radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arleo, F.; Kolevatov, R.; Peigne, S.; Sami, T.

    2016-01-01

    The current status of coherent energy loss is reviewed, both in theory and in its phenomenological applications to p-A collisions. The induced energy loss is not bounded in general, but only in the specific situation where the energetic parton is suddenly accelerated (as in deep inelastic scattering) in the nuclear medium. In the situation where the parton is asymptotic, i.e. 'prepared' at t = -∞ and 'tagged' at t = +∞ after crossing a nuclear medium of thickness L (a situation relevant to forward hadron production in p-A collisions), ΔE appears to be proportional to E. Both situations are detailed in the article

  17. Study of the fragmentation of astrophysical interest molecules (C{sub n}H{sub m}) induced by high velocity collision; Etude de la fragmentation de molecules d'interet astrophysique de type C{sub n}H{sub m} par collision atomique de haute vitesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuna, Th

    2008-07-15

    This work shows the study of atom-molecule collision processes in the high velocity domain (v=4,5 a.u). The molecules concerned by this work are small unsaturated hydrocarbons C{sub 1-4}H and C{sub 3}H{sub 2}. Molecules are accelerated with the Tandem accelerator in Orsay and their fragmentation is analyzed by the 4{pi}, 100% efficient detector, AGAT. Thanks to a shape analysis of the current signal from the silicon detectors in association with the well known grid method, we are able to measure all the fragmentation channels of the incident molecule. These dissociation measurements have been introduced in the modelization of two objects of the interstellar medium in which a lot of hydrocarbon molecules have been observed (TMC1, horse-head nebula). We have extended our branching ratios obtained by high velocity collision to other electronic processes included in the chemical database like photodissociation and dissociative recombination. This procedure is feasible under an assumption of the statistical point of view of the molecular fragmentation. The deviations following our modification are very small in the modelization of TMC1 but significant in the photodissociation region. The first part is dedicated to the description of the experimental setting that has enabled us to study the fragmentation of C{sub n}H{sub m} molecules: the Orsay's Tandem accelerator and the Agat detector. The second part deals with negative ion sources and particularly with the Sahat source that is based on electronic impact and has shown good features for the production of anions and correct stability for its use with accelerators. The third part is dedicated to the experimental results in terms of cross-sections, number of fragments and branching ratios, associated to the various collisional processes. The last part presents an application of our measurement of fragmentation data to astro-chemistry. In this field, the simulation codes of the inter-stellar medium require databases

  18. Electron-neutral scattering cross sections for CO2: a complete and consistent set and an assessment of dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grofulović, Marija; Alves, Luís L; Guerra, Vasco

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a complete and consistent set of cross sections for electron collisions with carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) molecules to be published in the IST-Lisbon database with LXCat. The set is validated from the comparison between swarm parameters calculated using a two-term Boltzmann solver and the available experimental data. The importance of superelastic collisions with CO 2 (0 1 0) molecules at low values of the reduced electric field is discussed. Due to significant uncertainties, there are ongoing debates regarding the deconvolution of cross sections that describe generic energy losses at specific energy thresholds into cross sections that describe individual processes. An important example of these uncertainties is with the dissociation of CO 2 , for which the total electron impact dissociation cross section has not yet been unambiguously identified. The available dissociation cross sections are evaluated and discussed, and a strategy to obtain electron-impact dissociation rate coefficients is suggested. (paper)

  19. Collision-induced stimulated photon echoes in ‘strong’ magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetov, V. A.

    2018-05-01

    Collision-induced stimulated photon echoes formed in a gaseous medium on the transition with the angular momentum change Ja=0 → Jb=1 under the action of ‘strong’ longitudinal magnetic field, when the echo pulse becomes unpolarized, are considered with an account of elastic depolarizing collisions. In the case of narrow spectral line the explicit expressions for the echo polarization density matrix and the degree of polarization are obtained. In the case of broad spectral line the results of the numeric calculations reproduce qualitatively the curve obtained in the experiments with ytterbium vapor.

  20. On the determination of double diffraction dissociation cross section at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtmann, H.; Nikolaev, N.N.; Speth, J.; Zakharov, B.G.

    1996-01-01

    The excitation of the proton into undetected multiparticle states (double diffraction dissociation) is an important background to single diffractive deep-inelastic processes ep→e'p'ρ 0 , e'p'J/Ψ, e'p'X at HERA. We present estimates of the admixture of the double diffraction dissociation events in all diffractive events. We find that in the J/Ψ photoproduction, electroproduction of the ρ 0 at large Q 2 and diffraction dissociation of real and virtual photons into high mass states X the contamination of the double diffraction dissociation can be as large as ∼30%, thus affecting substantially the experimental tests of the pomeron exchange in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. We discuss a possibility of tagging the double diffraction dissociation by neutrons observed in the forward neutron calorimeter. We present evaluations of the spectra of neutrons and efficiency of neutron tagging based on the experimental data for diffractive processes in the proton-proton collisions. (orig.)

  1. Multiphoton ionization as a probe of molecular photofragmentation: statistical and dynamical energy partitioning in the multiphoton dissociation of nitromethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockney, B.H.

    1982-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) appears in its first use as a probe of laser-induced photofragmentation. Specifically, MPI here reveals the internal and translational energy content of the nascent fragments from the infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of nitromethane (CH 3 NO 2 ). The apparatus for this work consists of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam crossed by two pulsed and focused lasers - a CO 2 laser to induce collision-free unimolecular dissociation of CH 3 NO 2 , and a tunable dye laser following immediately to ionize selectively one of the pair of dissociation fragments for detection by a mass spectrometer and particle multiplier. A computer simulation of each fragment's MPI spectrum, a series of four photon resonances to members of the npsigma/sub u/ Rydberg state of NO 2 and three photon resonances to two vibrational members of the #betta# 1 Rydberg state of CH 3 , aids in determining the fragment's internal energy content. The dye laser is delayed and its focus is traced through a small quarter circle centered at the focus of the CO 2 laser. The flight times of the fragments from the point of dissociation and their laboratory scattering angular distributions at fixed ionizing laser wavelength provide their center of mass recoil velocity distributions. The energy deposited in the fragments evidences a striking mixture of statistical and dynamical energy partitioning. The statistical RRKM theory of unimolecular decomposition accurately predicts the amount of internal energy found in the fragments

  2. An exploration of the influence of diagonal dissociation and moderate changes in speed on locomotor parameters in trotting horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jane Hobbs

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the trot is described as a diagonal gait, contacts of the diagonal pairs of hooves are not usually perfectly synchronized. Although subtle, the timing dissociation between contacts of each diagonal pair could have consequences on gait dynamics and provide insight into the functional strategies employed. This study explores the mechanical effects of different diagonal dissociation patterns when speed was matched between individuals and how these effects link to moderate, natural changes in trotting speed. We anticipate that hind-first diagonal dissociation at contact increases with speed, diagonal dissociation at contact can reduce collision-based energy losses and predominant dissociation patterns will be evident within individuals. Methods. The study was performed in two parts: in the first 17 horses performed speed-matched trotting trials and in the second, five horses each performed 10 trotting trials that represented a range of individually preferred speeds. Standard motion capture provided kinematic data that were synchronized with ground reaction force (GRF data from a series of force plates. The data were analyzed further to determine temporal, speed, GRF, postural, mass distribution, moment, and collision dynamics parameters. Results. Fore-first, synchronous, and hind-first dissociations were found in horses trotting at (3.3 m/s ± 10%. In these speed-matched trials, mean centre of pressure (COP cranio-caudal location differed significantly between the three dissociation categories. The COP moved systematically and significantly (P = .001 from being more caudally located in hind-first dissociation (mean location = 0.41 ± 0.04 through synchronous (0.36 ± 0.02 to a more cranial location in fore-first dissociation (0.32 ± 0.02. Dissociation patterns were found to influence function, posture, and balance parameters. Over a moderate speed range, peak vertical forelimb GRF had a strong relationship with dissociation

  3. Ridge formation induced by jets in pp collisions at 7 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwa, Rudolph C.; Yang, C. B.

    2011-01-01

    An interpretation of the ridge phenomenon found in pp collisions at 7 TeV is given in terms of enhancement of soft partons due to energy loss of semihard jets. A description of ridge formation in nuclear collisions can directly be extended to pp collisions since hydrodynamics is not used and azimuthal anisotropy is generated by semihard scattering. The observed ridge structure is then understood as a manifestation of soft-soft transverse correlation induced by semihard partons without long-range longitudinal correlation. Both the p T and multiplicity dependencies are well reproduced. Some predictions are made about other observables.

  4. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine [Institute of Nuclear Theory, University of Washington,Seattle, WA 98195-1550 (United States); Tywoniuk, Konrad [Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2017-04-21

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the “soft drop declustering” procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  5. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine

    2017-04-21

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the "soft drop declustering" procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  6. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2017-04-01

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the "soft drop declustering" procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  7. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the “soft drop declustering” procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  8. Collision-induced spectroscopy with long-range intermolecular interactions: A diagrammatic representation and the invariant form of the induced properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzov, A. P.; Chrysos, M.; Rachet, F.; Egorova, N. I.

    2006-01-01

    Collision-induced properties of two interacting molecules a and b are derived by means of a general diagrammatic method involving M molecule-molecule and N photon-molecule couplings. The method is an extension of previous graphical treatments of nonlinear optics because it exhaustively determines interaction-induced polarization mechanisms in a trustworthy and handy fashion. Here we focus on long-range intermolecular interactions. Retardation effects are neglected. A fully quantum-mechanical treatment of the molecules is made whereas second quantization for the electromagnetic field, in the nonrelativistic approximation, is implicitly applied. The collision-induced absorption, Raman, and hyper-Raman processes are viewed and studied, through guiding examples, as specific cases N=1, 2, and 3, respectively. In Raman (N=2), the standard first-order (M=1) dipole-induced dipole term of the incremental polarizability, Δα, is the result of a coupling of the two photons with distinct molecules, a and b, which perturb each other via a dipole-dipole mechanism. Rather, when the two photons interact with the same molecule, a or b, the (N=2, M=1) graphs predict the occurrence of a nonlinear polarization mechanism. The latter is expected to contribute substantially to the collision-induced Raman bands by certain molecular gases

  9. Perseveration induces dissociative uncertainty in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giele, Catharina L; van den Hout, Marcel A; Engelhard, Iris M; Dek, Eliane C P; Toffolo, Marieke B J; Cath, Danielle C

    2016-09-01

    Obsessive compulsive (OC)-like perseveration paradoxically increases feelings of uncertainty. We studied whether the underlying mechanism between perseveration and uncertainty is a reduced accessibility of meaning ('semantic satiation'). OCD patients (n = 24) and matched non-clinical controls (n = 24) repeated words 2 (non-perseveration) or 20 times (perseveration). They decided whether this word was related to another target word. Speed of relatedness judgments and feelings of dissociative uncertainty were measured. The effects of real-life perseveration on dissociative uncertainty were tested in a smaller subsample of the OCD group (n = 9). Speed of relatedness judgments was not affected by perseveration. However, both groups reported more dissociative uncertainty after perseveration compared to non-perseveration, which was higher in OCD patients. Patients reported more dissociative uncertainty after 'clinical' perseveration compared to non-perseveration.. Both parts of this study are limited by some methodological issues and a small sample size. Although the mechanism behind 'perseveration → uncertainty' is still unclear, results suggest that the effects of perseveration are counterproductive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Collision-Induced Dissociation Study of Strong Hydrogen-Bonded Cluster Ions Y-(HF) n (Y=F, O2) Using Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with a HF Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kenya; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) was produced by a homemade HF generator in order to investigate the properties of strong hydrogen-bonded clusters such as (HF) n . The HF molecules were ionized in the form of complex ions associated with the negative core ions Y - produced by atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI). The use of APCDI in combination with the homemade HF generator led to the formation of negative-ion HF clusters Y - (HF) n (Y=F, O 2 ), where larger clusters with n ≥4 were not detected. The mechanisms for the formation of the HF, F - (HF) n , and O 2 - (HF) n species were discussed from the standpoints of the HF generator and APCDI MS. By performing energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments on the cluster ions F - (HF) n ( n =1-3), the energies for the loss of HF from F - (HF) 3 , F - (HF) 2 , and F - (HF) were evaluated to be 1 eV or lower, 1 eV or higher, and 2 eV, respectively, on the basis of their center-of-mass energy ( E CM ). These E CM values were consistent with the values of 0.995, 1.308, and 2.048 eV, respectively, obtained by ab initio calculations. The stability of [O 2 (HF) n ] - ( n =1-4) was discussed on the basis of the bond lengths of O 2 H-F - (HF) n and O 2 - H-F(HF) n obtained by ab initio calculations. The calculations indicated that [O 2 (HF) 4 ] - separated into O 2 H and F - (HF) 3 .

  11. GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. II. 3D Turbulent, Magnetized Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Nakamura, Fumitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Loo, Sven Van [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds (United Kingdom); Christie, Duncan [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Collins, David [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We investigate giant molecular cloud collisions and their ability to induce gravitational instability and thus star formation. This mechanism may be a major driver of star formation activity in galactic disks. We carry out a series of 3D, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), adaptive mesh refinement simulations to study how cloud collisions trigger formation of dense filaments and clumps. Heating and cooling functions are implemented based on photo-dissociation region models that span the atomic-to-molecular transition and can return detailed diagnostic information. The clouds are initialized with supersonic turbulence and a range of magnetic field strengths and orientations. Collisions at various velocities and impact parameters are investigated. Comparing and contrasting colliding and non-colliding cases, we characterize morphologies of dense gas, magnetic field structure, cloud kinematic signatures, and cloud dynamics. We present key observational diagnostics of cloud collisions, especially: relative orientations between magnetic fields and density structures, like filaments; {sup 13}CO( J = 2-1), {sup 13}CO( J = 3-2), and {sup 12}CO( J = 8-7) integrated intensity maps and spectra; and cloud virial parameters. We compare these results to observed Galactic clouds.

  12. Spin conversion induced by spin-orbit interaction in positronium collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, H; Nakayama, T; Hyodo, T

    2009-01-01

    The positronium spin conversion reaction induced by spin-orbit interaction is investigated. We obtain the reaction rates during positronium-Xe and positronium-Kr collisions by using the Zeeman mixing of positronium states. At thermal energies corresponding to room temperature, the reaction rate for spin conversion due to spin-orbit interaction is found to be almost twice that for the positronium pick-off reaction. We also study the energy dependence of the reaction rate. The mean energy of positronium is controlled by changing the gas temperature and using positronium in thermal equilibrium. We found that the reaction rate increases with the collision energy.

  13. Electron beam induced fluorescence measurements of the degree of hydrogen dissociation in hydrogen plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C.; Brussaard, G.J.H.; de Beer, E.C.M.; Schram, D.C.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The degree of dissociation of hydrogen in a hydrogen plasma has been measured using electron beam induced fluorescence. A 20 kV, 1 mA electron beam excites both the ground state H atom and H2 molecule into atomic hydrogen in an excited state. From the resulting fluorescence the degree of

  14. A review of electron-capture and electron-transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry in polymer chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart-Smith, Gene

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •ECD and ETD can produce unique and diagnostically useful polymer ion fragmentation data. •The operating principles of ECD and ETD are discussed in relation to other dissociation techniques. •Key characteristics of ECD and ETD spectra, as observed from biological analytes, are discussed. •ECD and ETD analyses are compared to CID analyses for different classes of synthetic polymer. -- Abstract: Mass spectrometry (MS)-based studies of synthetic polymers often characterise detected polymer components using mass data alone. However when mass-based characterisations are ambiguous, tandem MS (MS/MS) offers a means by which additional analytical information may be collected. This review provides a synopsis of two particularly promising methods of dissociating polymer ions during MS/MS: electron-capture and electron-transfer dissociation (ECD and ETD, respectively). The article opens with a summary of the basic characteristics and operating principles of ECD and ETD, and relates these techniques to other methods of dissociating gas-phase ions, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID). Insights into ECD- and ETD-based MS/MS, gained from studies into proteins and peptides, are then discussed in relation to polymer chemistry. Finally, ECD- and ETD-based studies into various classes of polymer are summarised; for each polymer class, ECD- and ETD-derived data are compared to CID-derived data. These discussions identify ECD and ETD as powerful means by which unique and diagnostically useful polymer ion fragmentation data may be generated, and techniques worthy of increased utilisation by the polymer chemistry community

  15. Angular-momentum-assisted dissociation of CO in strong optical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Amy; Ogden, Hannah; Murray, Matthew; Liu, Qingnan; Toro, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Filaments are produced in CO gas by intense, chirped laser pulses. Visible emission from C2 is observed as a result of chemical reactions of highly excited CO. At laser intensities greater than 1014 W cm-2, the C2 emission shows a strong dependence on laser polarization. Oppositely chirped pulses of light with ω0 = 800 nm are recombined spatially and temporally to generate angularly accelerating electric fields (up to 30 THz) that either have an instantaneous linear polarization or act as a dynamic polarization grating that oscillates among linear and circular polarizations. The angularly accelerating linear polarization corresponds to an optical centrifuge that concurrently drives molecules into high rotational states (with J 50) and induces strong-field dissociation. Higher order excitation is observed for the time-varying laser polarization configuration that does not induce rotational excitation. The results indicate that the presence of rotational angular momentum lowers the threshold for CO dissociation in strong optical fields by coupling nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom. Support from NSF CHE-1058721 and the University of Maryland.

  16. Effect of pH and dissociation on the fate and exposure of ionizable chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Ionizable organic chemicals comprise an important fraction of pharmaceuticals, pesticides as well as industrial chemicals. It has been estimated that 33% of the preregistered REACH substances is mostly ionized at pH 7. To extend the appliccability of existing exposure models, a Multimedia Activity...... parameters. The sensitivity analysis showed that the parameters describing ionization, pH and the dissociation constant (pKa), are among the most sensitive model parameters. The uncertainty analysis, however, indicated that these parameters are not the major source of uncertainty, which statistically...... and sediments. In most cases, the uncertainty of PECs and of persistance is largely explained by the uncertainty of (bio)degradation rates, which may be caused by model assumptions, experimental or estimation errors or by the environmental variability, including the effect of pH....

  17. Three-body dissociations: The photodissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide at 193 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, D.A.; North, S.W.; Stranges, D.

    1997-01-01

    When a molecule with two equivalent chemical bonds is excited above the threshold for dissociation of both bonds, how the rupture of the two bonds is temporally coupled becomes a salient question. Following absorption at 193 nm dimethyl sulfoxide (CH 3 SOCH 3 ) contains enough energy to rupture both C-S bonds. This can happen in a stepwise (reaction 1) or concerted (reaction 2) fashion where the authors use rotation of the SOCH 3 intermediate prior to dissociation to define a stepwise dissociation: (1) CH 3 SOCH 3 → 2CH 3 + SO; (2a) CH 3 SOCH 3 → CH 3 + SOCH 3 ; and (2b) SOCH 3 → SO + CH 3 . Recently, the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide following absorption at 193 nm was suggested to involve simultaneous cleavage of both C-S bonds on an excited electronic surface. This conclusion was inferred from laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and resonant multiphoton ionization (2+1 REMPI) measurements of the internal energy content in the CH 3 and SO photoproducts and a near unity quantum yield measured for SO. Since this type of concerted three body dissociation is very interesting and a rather rare event in photodissociation dynamics, the authors chose to investigate this system using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy at beamline 9.0.2.1. The soft photoionization provided by the VUV undulator radiation allowed the authors to probe the SOCH 3 intermediate which had not been previously observed and provided good evidence that the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide primarily proceeds via a two step dissociation, reaction 2

  18. Quantum dynamics of fast chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, J.C. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The aims of this research are to explore, develop, and apply theoretical methods for the evaluation of the dynamics of gas phase collision processes, primarily chemical reactions. The primary theoretical tools developed for this work have been quantum scattering theory, both in time dependent and time independent forms. Over the past several years, the authors have developed and applied methods for the direct quantum evaluation of thermal rate constants, applying these to the evaluation of the hydrogen isotopic exchange reactions, applied wave packet propagation techniques to the dissociation of Rydberg H{sub 3}, incorporated optical potentials into the evaluation of thermal rate constants, evaluated the use of optical potentials for state-to-state reaction probability evaluations, and, most recently, have developed quantum approaches for electronically non-adiabatic reactions which may be applied to simplify calculations of reactive, but electronically adiabatic systems. Evaluation of the thermal rate constants and the dissociation of H{sub 3} were reported last year, and have now been published.

  19. Coulomb dissociation of N-20,N-21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeder, Marko; Adachi, Tatsuya; Aksyutina, Yulia; Alcantara, Juan; Altstadt, Sebastian; Alvarez-Pol, Hector; Ashwood, Nicholas; Atar, Leyla; Aumann, Thomas; Avdeichikov, Vladimir; Barr, M.; Beceiro, Saul; Bemmerer, Daniel; Benlliure, Jose; Bertulani, Carlos; Boretzky, Konstanze; Borge, Maria J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Caamano, Manuel; Caesar, Christoph; Casarejos, Enrique; Catford, Wilton; Cederkall, Joakim; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, Marielle; Chulkov, Leonid; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Crespo, Raquel; Pramanik, Ushasi Datta; Diaz-Fernandez, Paloma; Dillmann, Iris; Elekes, Zoltan; Enders, Joachim; Ershova, Olga; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, Luis M.; Freer, Martin; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, Hans; Galaviz, Daniel; Geissel, Hans; Gernhaeuser, Roman; Goebel, Kathrin; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, Nasser; Najafi, Mohammad Ali; Rigollet, Catherine; Stoica, V.; Streicher, Branislav; Van de Walle, J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron-rich light nuclei and their reactions play an important role in the creation of chemical elements. Here, data from a Coulomb dissociation experiment on N-20,N-21 are reported. Relativistic N-20,N-21 ions impinged on a lead target and the Coulomb dissociation cross section was determined in a

  20. Metal cation dependence of interactions with amino acids: bond dissociation energies of Rb(+) and Cs(+) to the acidic amino acids and their amide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentrout, P B; Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-04-24

    Metal cation-amino acid interactions are key components controlling the secondary structure and biological function of proteins, enzymes, and macromolecular complexes comprising these species. Determination of pairwise interactions of alkali metal cations with amino acids provides a thermodynamic vocabulary that begins to quantify these fundamental processes. In the present work, we expand a systematic study of such interactions by examining rubidium and cesium cations binding with the acidic amino acids (AA), aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu), and their amide derivatives, asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln). These eight complexes are formed using electrospray ionization and their bond dissociation energies (BDEs) are determined experimentally using threshold collision-induced dissociation with xenon in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Analyses of the energy-dependent cross sections include consideration of unimolecular decay rates, internal energy of the reactant ions, and multiple ion-neutral collisions. Quantum chemical calculations are conducted at the B3LYP, MP2(full), and M06 levels of theory using def2-TZVPPD basis sets, with results showing reasonable agreement with experiment. At 0 and 298 K, most levels of theory predict that the ground-state conformers for M(+)(Asp) and M(+)(Asn) involve tridentate binding of the metal cation to the backbone carbonyl, amino, and side-chain carbonyl groups, although tridentate binding to the carboxylic acid group and side-chain carbonyl is competitive for M(+)(Asn). For the two longer side-chain amino acids, Glu and Gln, multiple structures are competitive. A comparison of these results to those for the smaller alkali cations, Na(+) and K(+), provides insight into the trends in binding energies associated with the molecular polarizability and dipole moment of the side chain. For all four metal cations, the BDEs are inversely correlated with the size of the metal cation and follow the order Asp < Glu

  1. Excitation of atoms and molecules in collisions with highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research of multicharged nitrogen, oxygen and carbon monoxide molecular ions produced with collision with multicharged argon ions. Properties like ionization, dissociation, and excitation are investigated

  2. The mechanisms of the hadron-nucleus collision processes and of the hadron-nucleus collision induced nuclear reactions - in the light of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.; Strugalska-Gola, E.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of the hadron-nucleus collision processes and of the hadron-nucleus collision induced nuclear reactions are described - as experimentally based. The target nuclei are damaged definitely and locally in the collisions and the configurations of the nucleons in them became instable. The configuration must transit into stable stages of the nuclear transition reaction products. The difference between the initial internal energy of the unstable residual nucleus and the total final energy of the stable products of the nuclear transition reaction may be released in some cases

  3. Out-of-equilibrium catalysis of chemical reactions by electronic tunnel currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhioev, Alan A; Kosov, Daniel S; von Oppen, Felix

    2013-04-07

    We present an escape rate theory for current-induced chemical reactions. We use Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's functions to derive a Langevin equation for the reaction coordinate. Due to the out of equilibrium electronic degrees of freedom, the friction, noise, and effective temperature in the Langevin equation depend locally on the reaction coordinate. As an example, we consider the dissociation of diatomic molecules induced by the electronic current from a scanning tunnelling microscope tip. In the resonant tunnelling regime, the molecular dissociation involves two processes which are intricately interconnected: a modification of the potential energy barrier and heating of the molecule. The decrease of the molecular barrier (i.e., the current induced catalytic reduction of the barrier) accompanied by the appearance of the effective, reaction-coordinate-dependent temperature is an alternative mechanism for current-induced chemical reactions, which is distinctly different from the usual paradigm of pumping vibrational degrees of freedom.

  4. Association/dissociation in dense gases and adsorption/desorption on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flannery, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new comprehensive theory is described for the time evolution towards equilibrium of association and dissociation in a dense gas. Expressions are formulated and are illustrated for the net probabilities of association to stable vibrational levels and dissociation to the continuum from an arbitrary bound vibrational level via collision with the thermal gas bath. A general variational principle emerges: The rate which corresponds to the overall direction of the process always adjusts itself to a minimum and the time evolution towards equilibrium is hindered. Analogy is established with Kirchhoff's Laws and Tellegen's Theorem for electrical networks, and with the Principle of Least Dissipation basic to thermodynamics, heat conduction, and fluid mechanics. The theory can also be modified to provide the first basic microscopic account of Associative Desorption of atoms from and Dissociative Chemisorption of molecules to surfaces

  5. Dissociative recombination of rare gas hydride ions: II. ArH+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J B A; Novotny, O; LeGarrec, J L; Florescu-Mitchell, A; Rebrion-Rowe, C; Stolyarov, A V; Child, M S; Svendsen, A; Ghazaly, M A El; Andersen, L H

    2005-01-01

    A storage ring measurement of the rate coefficient for the production of neutral Ar in e + ArH + collisions is described. It is found that the recombination rate is too small to measure at low centre-of-mass energies but the combined rate coefficient for dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation increases above 2.5 eV displaying peaks centred at 7.5 eV, 16 and 26 eV. Calculated potential energy curves for the ground and excited states of ArH + are presented and these aid in the elucidation of the recombination and excitation processes observed at higher energies. The implications for plasma modelling are discussed. (letter to the editor)

  6. Photodissociation of gaseous CH3COSH at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Observation of three dissociation channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, En-Lan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Upon one-photon excitation at 248 nm, gaseous CH 3 C(O)SH is dissociated following three pathways with the products of (1) OCS + CH 4 , (2) CH 3 SH + CO, and (3) CH 2 CO + H 2 S that are detected using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The excited state 1 (n O , π * CO ) has a radiative lifetime of 249 ± 11 ns long enough to allow for Ar collisions that induce internal conversion and enhance the fragment yields. The rate constant of collision-induced internal conversion is estimated to be 1.1 × 10 −10 cm 3 molecule −1 s −1 . Among the primary dissociation products, a fraction of the CH 2 CO moiety may undergo further decomposition to CH 2 + CO, of which CH 2 is confirmed by reaction with O 2 producing CO 2 , CO, OH, and H 2 CO. Such a secondary decomposition was not observed previously in the Ar matrix-isolated experiments. The high-resolution spectra of CO are analyzed to determine the ro-vibrational energy deposition of 8.7 ± 0.7 kcal/mol, while the remaining primary products with smaller rotational constants are recognized but cannot be spectrally resolved. The CO fragment detected is mainly ascribed to the primary production. A prior distribution method is applied to predict the vibrational distribution of CO that is consistent with the experimental findings.

  7. Ultra-peripheral collisions of relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, S.; STAR Collaboration

    2001-01-01

    We report the first observation of exclusive ρ production in ultra-peripheral collisions at RHIC. The ρ are produced electromagnetically at large impact parameters where no hadronic interactions occur. The produced ρ have a small perpendicular momentum, consistent with production that is coherent on both the photon emitting and scattering nuclei. We observe both exclusive ρ production, and ρ production accompanied by electromagnetic dissociation of both nuclei. We discuss models of vector meson production and the correlation with nuclear breakup. We also observe e + e - pair production in these ultra-peripheral collisions

  8. Dissociative Recombination and Excitation of CH+5 : Absolute Cross Sections and Branching Fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semaniak, J.; Larson, A.; Le Padellec, A.; Stroemholm, C.; Larsson, M.; Rosen, S.; Peverall, R.; Danared, H.; Djuric, N.; Dunn, G.H.; Datz, S.

    1998-01-01

    The heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING was used to measure the absolute dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation cross sections for collision energies below 50 eV. Deduced thermal rates coefficients are consistent with previous beams data but are lower by a factor of 3 than the rates measured by means of the flowing afterglow Langmuir probe technique. A resonant structure in dissociative recombination cross section was found at 9 eV. We have determined the branching fractions in DR of CH + 5 below 0.2 eV. The branching is dominated by three-body CH 3 + H + H and CH 2 + H 2 + H dissociation channels, which occur with branching ratios of ∼0.7 and ∼0.2, respectively; thus methane is a minor species among dissociation products. Both the measured absolute cross sections and branching in dissociative recombination of CH + 5 can have important implications for the models of dense interstellar clouds and abundance of CH 2 , CH 3 and CH 4 in these media. copyright copyright 1998. The American Astronomical Society

  9. Mode Specific Electronic Friction in Dissociative Chemisorption on Metal Surfaces: H2 on Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Reinhard J.; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua; Tully, John C.

    2017-06-01

    Electronic friction and the ensuing nonadiabatic energy loss play an important role in chemical reaction dynamics at metal surfaces. Using molecular dynamics with electronic friction evaluated on the fly from density functional theory, we find strong mode dependence and a dominance of nonadiabatic energy loss along the bond stretch coordinate for scattering and dissociative chemisorption of H2 on the Ag(111) surface. Exemplary trajectories with varying initial conditions indicate that this mode specificity translates into modulated energy loss during a dissociative chemisorption event. Despite minor nonadiabatic energy loss of about 5%, the directionality of friction forces induces dynamical steering that affects individual reaction outcomes, specifically for low-incidence energies and vibrationally excited molecules. Mode-specific friction induces enhanced loss of rovibrational rather than translational energy and will be most visible in its effect on final energy distributions in molecular scattering experiments.

  10. Infrared laser-induced chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Mikio

    1978-01-01

    The experimental means which clearly distinguishes between infrared ray-induced reactions and thermal reactions has been furnished for the first time when an intense monochromatic light source has been obtained by the development of infrared laser. Consequently, infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have started to develop as one field of chemical reaction researches. Researches of laser-induced chemical reactions have become new means for the researches of chemical reactions since they were highlighted as a new promising technique for isotope separation. Specifically, since the success has been reported in 235 U separation using laser in 1974, comparison of this method with conventional separation techniques from the economic point of view has been conducted, and it was estimated by some people that the laser isotope separation is cheaper. This report briefly describes on the excitation of oscillation and reaction rate, and introduces the chemical reactions induced by CW laser and TEA CO 2 laser. Dependence of reaction yield on laser power, measurement of the absorbed quantity of infrared ray and excitation mechanism are explained. Next, isomerizing reactions are reported, and finally, isotope separation is explained. It was found that infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have the selectivity for isotopes. Since it is evident that there are many examples different from thermal and photo-chemical reactions, future collection of the data is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  11. Three-body dissociations: The photodissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide at 193 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, D.A.; North, S.W.; Stranges, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule with two equivalent chemical bonds is excited above the threshold for dissociation of both bonds, how the rupture of the two bonds is temporally coupled becomes a salient question. Following absorption at 193 nm dimethyl sulfoxide (CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3}) contains enough energy to rupture both C-S bonds. This can happen in a stepwise (reaction 1) or concerted (reaction 2) fashion where the authors use rotation of the SOCH{sub 3} intermediate prior to dissociation to define a stepwise dissociation: (1) CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} 2CH{sub 3} + SO; (2a) CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} CH{sub 3} + SOCH{sub 3}; and (2b) SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} SO + CH{sub 3}. Recently, the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide following absorption at 193 nm was suggested to involve simultaneous cleavage of both C-S bonds on an excited electronic surface. This conclusion was inferred from laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and resonant multiphoton ionization (2+1 REMPI) measurements of the internal energy content in the CH{sub 3} and SO photoproducts and a near unity quantum yield measured for SO. Since this type of concerted three body dissociation is very interesting and a rather rare event in photodissociation dynamics, the authors chose to investigate this system using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy at beamline 9.0.2.1. The soft photoionization provided by the VUV undulator radiation allowed the authors to probe the SOCH{sub 3} intermediate which had not been previously observed and provided good evidence that the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide primarily proceeds via a two step dissociation, reaction 2.

  12. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (i) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (ii) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (iii) the e + e - annihilation. The geometrical description of high-energy elastic scattering developed earlier is still in general agreement with experiments at the CERN-S bar ppS energies. A simple one-parameter expression for the blackness of bar pp system has been proposed recently which describes very well all existing data from ISR to S bar ppS energies. The geometrical description has also been extended to include processes of fragmentation and diffraction dissociation and other phenomena. In the past five years, a unified physical picture for multiparticle emission in hadron-hadron and e + e - collisions was developed. It focuses on the idea of the wide range of values for the total angular momentum in hadron-hadron collisions. An extension of this consideration yields a theory for the momentum distribution of the outgoing particles which agrees with bar pp and e + e - collision experiments. The results and conclusions of this theory have been extrapolated to higher energies and yielded many predictions which can be experimentally tested. 37 refs

  13. Coloring Rate of Phenolphthalein by Reaction with Alkaline Solution Observed by Liquid-Droplet Collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yuuka; Kikkawa, Shigenori; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kohno, Jun-ya

    2015-06-11

    Many important chemical reactions are induced by mixing two solutions. This paper presents a new way to measure rates of rapid chemical reactions induced by mixing two reactant solutions using a liquid-droplet collision. The coloring reaction of phenolphthalein (H2PP) by a reaction with NaOH is investigated kinetically. Liquid droplets of H2PP/ethanol and NaOH/H2O solutions are made to collide, which induces a reaction that transforms H2PP into a deprotonated form (PP(2-)). The concentration of PP(2-) is evaluated from the RGB values of pixels in the colored droplet images, and is measured as a function of the elapsed time from the collision. The obtained rate constant is (2.2 ± 0.7) × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), which is the rate constant for the rate-determining step of the coloring reaction of H2PP. This method was shown to be applicable to determine rate constants of rapid chemical reactions between two solutions.

  14. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ1(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt-lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ωR, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ vr/ωT, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  15. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ 1 (r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω R , is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v r /ω T , so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles

  16. Photoionization and cold collision studies using trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have used laser cooling and trapping techniques to investigate photoionization and cold collisions. With laser-trapped Rb, they have measured the photoionization cross section from the first excited (5P) level by observing the photoionization-induced loss rate of neutral atoms from the trap. This technique has the advantage that it directly measures the photoionization rate per atom. Knowing the ionizing laser intensity and the excited-state fraction, the measured loss rate gives the absolute cross section. Using this technique, the Rb 5P photoionization cross section at ∼400 nm has been determined with an uncertainty of 9%. The authors are currently attempting to extend this method to the 5D level. Using time-ordered pulses of diode-laser light (similar to the STIRAP technique), they have performed very efficient two-photon excitation of trapped Rb atoms to 5D. Finally, they will present results from a recent collaboration which combines measurements form conventional molecular spectroscopy (single photon and double resonance) with photoassociation collisions of ultracold Na atoms to yield a precise (≤1 ppm) value for the dissociation energy of the X Σ g+ ground state of the Na 2 molecule

  17. Collision processes of hydrocarbon species in hydrogen plasmas. Pt. 3. The Silane-family

    CERN Document Server

    Janev, R K

    2003-01-01

    Cross sections are provided for most important collision processes of the Silicon-Hydrides from the ''Silane-family'': SiH sub y (y = 1 - 4) molecules and their ions SiH sub y sup + , with (plasma) electrons and protons. The processes include: electron impact ionization and dissociation of SiH sub y , dissociative excitation, ionization and recombination of SiH sub y sup + ions with electrons, and charge - and atom - exchange in proton collisions with SiH sub y. All important channels of dissociative processes are considered. Information is also provided on the energetics (reactants/products energy loss / gain) of each individual reaction channel. Total and partial cross sections are presented in compact analytic forms. The critical assessment of data, derivation of new data and presentation of results follow closely the concepts of the recently published related databases for Carbon-Hydrides, namely for the Methane family, and for the Ethane- and the Propane families, respectively.

  18. Low energy heavy particle collisions relevant to gas divertor physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onda, Kunizo [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-01

    Cross sections for rotational and vibrational excitations of H{sub 2} molecules caused by impact of electron, proton, H atom, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, or H{sup -} are compared with one another and reviewed for rotational excitations by examining an interaction potential between collision partners. It is pointed out what are difficulties in theoretical approaches to collision of atoms with H{sub 2} molecules initially in vibrationally and rotationally excited states. A theoretical approach developed by our group, which aims quantum mechanically to investigate vibrationally inelastic scattering, exchange reaction, or dissociation of molecule in vibrationally excited states collided with an atom or its ion, is presented. Newly obtained dissociation cross sections of H{sub 2} in vibrationally excited states by He impact are presented and compared in magnitude with those of H{sub 2} caused by electron impact. (author)

  19. Ionisation and dissociation of water induced by swift multicharged ions; Etude de l'ionisation et de la dissociation d'H{sub 2}O induites par collision avec des ions multicharges rapides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, S

    2006-02-15

    Ionization and dissociation of water molecules and water clusters induced by 11.7 MeV/A Ni{sup 25+} ions were carried out by imaging techniques. Branching ratios, ionisation cross sections and Kinetic Energy Released distributions have been measured together with fragmentation dynamics studies. Multiple ionization represents approximately 30% of the ionizing events. Double ionization produces in significant way atomic oxygen, considered as a possible precursor of the large production of HO{sub 2} radical in liquid water radiolysis by ions of high Linear Energy Transfer. We evidence a strong selectivity of bond breakage in the case of ion-induced HOD fragmentation. Once the molecule doubly ionized, the breakage of the O-H bond is found 6.5 times more probable than that of the O-D bond. A semi-classical calculation simulating the fragmentation dynamics on the potential energy surface of the ground-state of di-cation H{sub 2}O{sup 2+} makes possible to as well reproduce the preferential nature of the breakage of the O-H bond as the position and the shift of the kinetic energy distributions. First results concerning interaction with water clusters are also reported. Measurements in coincidence are carried out giving access to correlation, with the distributions in energy and angle of the emitted fragments. Mass spectrum points fast intra-cluster proton transfer, leading to the emission of protonated clusters. (author)

  20. Photon diffractive dissociation in deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryskin, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    The new ep-collider HERA gives us the possibility to study the diffractive dissociation of virtual photon in deep inelastic ep-collision. The process of photon dissociation in deep inelastic scattering is the most direct way to measure the value of triple-pomeron vertex G 3P . It was shown that the value of the correct bare vertex G 3P may more than 4 times exceeds its effective value measuring in the triple-reggeon region and reaches the value of about 40-50% of the elastic pp-pomeron vertex. On the contrary in deep inelastic processes the perpendicular momenta q t of the secondary particles are large enough. Thus in deep inelastic reactions one can measure the absolute value of G 3P vertex in the most direct way and compare its value and q t dependence with the leading log QCD predictions

  1. Analyzing relationships between surface perturbations and local chemical reactivity of metal sites: Alkali promotion of O2 dissociation on Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hongliang; Linic, Suljo

    2016-06-01

    Many commercial heterogeneous catalysts are complex structures that contain metal active sites promoted by multiple additives. Developing fundamental understanding about the impact of these perturbations on the local surface reactivity is crucial for catalyst development and optimization. In this contribution, we develop a general framework for identifying underlying mechanisms that control the changes in the surface reactivity of a metal site (more specifically the adsorbate-surface interactions) upon a perturbation in the local environment. This framework allows us to interpret fairly complex interactions on metal surfaces in terms of specific, physically transparent contributions that can be evaluated independently of each other. We use Cs-promoted dissociation of O2 as an example to illustrate our approach. We concluded that the Cs adsorbate affects the outcome of the chemical reaction through a strong alkali-induced electric field interacting with the static dipole moment of the O2/Ag(111) system.

  2. Top Down Tandem Mass Spectrometric Analysis of a Chemically Modified Rough-Type Lipopolysaccharide Vaccine Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler, Benjamin L.; Khan, Mohd M.; Smith, Donald F.; Harberts, Erin M.; Kilgour, David P. A.; Ernst, Robert K.; Cross, Alan S.; Goodlett, David R.

    2018-02-01

    Recent advances in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biology have led to its use in drug discovery pipelines, including vaccine and vaccine adjuvant discovery. Desirable characteristics for LPS vaccine candidates include both the ability to produce a specific antibody titer in patients and a minimal host inflammatory response directed by the innate immune system. However, in-depth chemical characterization of most LPS extracts has not been performed; hence, biological activities of these extracts are unpredictable. Additionally, the most widely adopted workflow for LPS structure elucidation includes nonspecific chemical decomposition steps before analyses, making structures inferred and not necessarily biologically relevant. In this work, several different mass spectrometry workflows that have not been previously explored were employed to show proof-of-principle for top down LPS primary structure elucidation, specifically for a rough-type mutant (J5) E. coli-derived LPS component of a vaccine candidate. First, ion mobility filtered precursor ions were subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID) to define differences in native J5 LPS v. chemically detoxified J5 LPS (dLPS). Next, ultra-high mass resolving power, accurate mass spectrometry was employed for unequivocal precursor and product ion empirical formulae generation. Finally, MS3 analyses in an ion trap instrument showed that previous knowledge about dissociation of LPS components can be used to reconstruct and sequence LPS in a top down fashion. A structural rationale is also explained for differential inflammatory dose-response curves, in vitro, when HEK-Blue hTLR4 cells were administered increasing concentrations of native J5 LPS v. dLPS, which will be useful in future drug discovery efforts. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Collision processes of hydrocarbon species in hydrogen plasmas. II The ethane and propane families

    CERN Document Server

    Janev, R K

    2002-01-01

    Cross sections and rate coefficients are provided for collision processes of electrons and protons with C sub x H sub y and C sub x H sub y sup + (x = 2, 3; 1 <= y <= 2x + 2) hydrocarbon species in a wide range of collision energies and plasma (gas) temperatures. The considered processes include: electron-impact ionization and dissociation of C sub x H sub y , dissociative excitation, ionization and recombination of C sub x H sub y sup + with electrons, and both charge transfer and atom exchange in proton channels are considered separately. Information is also provided for the energies of each individual reaction channel. The cross sections and rate coefficients are presented in compact analytic forms.

  4. Modeling and Analysis of Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, William; Pratt, Scott

    2014-09-01

    High-energy collisions of heavy ions, such as gold, copper, or uranium serve as an important means of studying quantum chromodynamic matter. When relativistic nuclei collide, a hot, energetic fireball of dissociated partonic matter is created; this super-hadronic matter is believed to be the quark gluon plasma (QGP), which is theorized to have comprised the universe immediately following the big bang. As the fireball expands and cools, it reaches freeze-out temperatures, and quarks hadronize into baryons and mesons. To characterize this super-hadronic matter, one can use balance functions, a means of studying correlations due to local charge conservation. In particular, the simple model used in this research assumed two waves of localized charge-anticharge production, with an abrupt transition from the QGP stage to hadronization. Balance functions were constructed as the sum of these two charge production components, and four parameters were manipulated to match the model's output with experimental data taken from the STAR Collaboration at RHIC. Results show that the chemical composition of the super-hadronic matter are consistent with that of a thermally equilibrated QGP. High-energy collisions of heavy ions, such as gold, copper, or uranium serve as an important means of studying quantum chromodynamic matter. When relativistic nuclei collide, a hot, energetic fireball of dissociated partonic matter is created; this super-hadronic matter is believed to be the quark gluon plasma (QGP), which is theorized to have comprised the universe immediately following the big bang. As the fireball expands and cools, it reaches freeze-out temperatures, and quarks hadronize into baryons and mesons. To characterize this super-hadronic matter, one can use balance functions, a means of studying correlations due to local charge conservation. In particular, the simple model used in this research assumed two waves of localized charge-anticharge production, with an abrupt transition

  5. Heavy flavour production at CMS in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We review recent results relating to beauty production in heavy-ion collisions, in both the closed and open heavy flavor sectors, from the CMS experiment at the LHC. The sequential suppression of the ° states in PbPb collisions is thought to be evidence of the dissociation of quarkonia bound states in deconfined matter. Data from pPb collisions demonstrate that while cold nuclear effects appear to be subdominant in minimum bias collisions, there exists a non-trivial dependence on collision multiplicity that remains to be understood. The suppression of high p T particles in heavy-ion collisions, relative to the expectation from pp collisions, is typically interpreted in terms of energy loss of hard scattered parton in the dense nuclear medium. The flavor dependence of the energy loss may be accessed via measurements of b hadrons and b-tagged jets. Measurement of B mesons, via non-prompt J = y , at relatively low p T indicate a smaller suppression factor than D meson or inclusive charged hadrons. Data on b jet...

  6. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrienko, Daniil A., E-mail: daniila@umich.edu; Boyd, Iain D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, 1320 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    Investigation of O{sub 2}–N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound–bound and bound–free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO{sub 2} complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N{sub 2}–O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system.

  7. A panorama of phase transition signals and influence of collision-induced correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bougault, R. [LPC Caen IN2P3-CNRS/ENSICAEN et Univ., 14 - Caen (France)

    2003-07-01

    The presented results will show the richness of nuclear heavy-ion physics where data are accumulated as a succession of independent events. The different reaction mechanisms can provide for 39 A.MeV Ta+Au, 40 and 80 A.MeV Au+Au peripheral collisions a set of data almost free of entrance channel effects as well as a set of events where collision-induced correlations can be evidenced. The event selection method will be presented and it will be shown how the entrance channel dynamical effects affect determination of heat capacity through partial energy fluctuation measurements. (author)

  8. A panorama of phase transition signals and influence of collision-induced correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougault, R.

    2003-01-01

    The presented results will show the richness of nuclear heavy-ion physics where data are accumulated as a succession of independent events. The different reaction mechanisms can provide for 39 A.MeV Ta+Au, 40 and 80 A.MeV Au+Au peripheral collisions a set of data almost free of entrance channel effects as well as a set of events where collision-induced correlations can be evidenced. The event selection method will be presented and it will be shown how the entrance channel dynamical effects affect determination of heat capacity through partial energy fluctuation measurements. (author)

  9. Chemical Potentials of Quarks Extracted from Particle Transverse Momentum Distributions in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Hong; Liu, Fu-Hu

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of a multisource thermal model, the transverse momentum distributions of charged particles produced in nucleus-nucleus (A-A) and deuteron-nucleus (d-A) collisions at relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) energies are investigated by a two-component revised Boltzmann distribution. The calculated results are in agreement with the PHENIX experimental data. It is found that the source temperature increases obviously with increase of the particle mass and incident energy, but it does not show an obvious change with the collision centrality. Then, the values of chemical potentials for up, down, and strange quarks can be obtained from the antiparticle to particle yield ratios in a wide transverse momentum range. The relationship between the chemical potentials of quarks and the transverse momentum with different centralities is investigated, too

  10. ϒ production measurements in pp, p–Pb and Pb–Pb collisions with ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Indranil [Science and Engineering Research Board, Vasant Square, New Delhi-110070 (India); Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)

    2016-12-15

    The ϒ production measurement provide an important tool to study the color dissociation properties of matter at extreme energy densities, which is measured using the nuclear modification factor in heavy-ion collisions. In the present paper, the measurement of the nuclear modification factor of ϒ is discussed using the data collected in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at LHC energies.

  11. Far-wing light absorption induced by resonant or near-resonant collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalieri, S.; Celli, M.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have studied the absorption of light induced by a resonant or near-resonant collision between two atoms. The calculations have been performed by taking into account also the magnetic sublevels, which makes their theoretical predictions more applicable to realistic cases. Analytical expressions for the far-wing absorption cross-section have been obtained

  12. Correlation diagram approach to the dissociative ionization mechanisms of methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momigny, J.; Wankenne, H.; Krier, C.

    1980-01-01

    A systematic survey is made of the dissociation processes from the ground state and from the electronically excited states of CH 3 OH + . Most metastable processes occurring in the mass spectrum of CD 3 OH are studied also, including measurement of the kinetic energy release and appearance potentials. It is shown that if ionic species such as CH 2 OH + , CH 2 O + and HCO + are present in the mass spectrum of CH 3 OH, the isomers CH 3 O + , HCOH + and COH + are also present. The precursors of these ions having been identified by the metastable processes, correlation diagrams are used to show that, from the first ionization potential of CH 3 OH to 14 eV, the only exception being CH 3 O + which results from an electronically spin-forbidden predissociation, the fragment ions can be considered to result from adiabatic decay of the ground state of CH 3 OH + . The potential barriers involved in these adiabatic processes result either from conical intersection or from avoided-crossing between the ground state of CH 3 OH + and the electronically excited states occurring up to 14 eV. At higher energies, many non-adiabatic processes occur; for example, the appearance of CD 2 O + and the electronically excited states of HCO + and COH + ions. It is shown additionally that kinetic energy releases observed in the collision-induced processes CH 3 OH + → CH 2 OH + + H and CH 2 OH + → HCO + + H 2 are in good agreement with the mechanistic approach via the correlation diagram for the appearance of the non-collision-induced ion processes. (orig.)

  13. Hydrogen dissociation on metal surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijzenbroek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Dissociative chemisorption is an important reaction step in many catalytic reactions. An example of such a reaction is the Haber-Bosch process, which is used commercially to produce ammonia, an important starting material in the production of fertilisers. In theoretical descriptions of such chemical

  14. CO2 Dissociation by Low Current Gliding Discharge in the Reverse Vortex Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsol, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    If performed with high energy efficiency, plasma-chemical dissociation of carbon dioxide can be a way of converting and storing energy when there is an excess of electric energy, for example generated by solar elements of wind turbines. CO2 dissociation with efficiency of up to 90% was reported earlier for low pressure microwave discharge in supersonic flow. A new plasma-chemical system uses a low current gliding discharge in the reverse vortex flow of plasma gas. The system is a development of the Gliding Arc in Tornado reactor. The system was used to study dissociation of CO2 in wide ranges of the following experimental parameters: reactor pressure (15-150 kPa), discharge current (50-500 mA), gas flow rate (3-30 liters per minute), and electrode gap length (1-10 cm). Additionally, the effect of thermal energy recuperation on CO2 dissociation efficiency was tested. Plasma chemical efficiency of CO2 dissociation is very low (about 3%) in a short discharge at low pressures (about 15 kPa) when it is defined by electronic excitation. The highest efficiency (above 40%) was reached at pressures 50-70 kPa in a long discharge with thermal energy recuperation. It means that the process is controlled by thermal dissociation with subsequent effective quenching. Plasma chemical efficiency was determined from the data of chromatographic analysis and oscilloscope electric power integration, and also was checked calorimetrically by the thermal balance of the system.

  15. Photo-dissociation of hydrogen passivated dopants in gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, L.; Larsson, J.A.; Nolan, M.; Murtagh, M.; Greer, J.C.; Barbe, M.; Bailly, F.; Chevallier, J.; Silvestre, F.S.; Loridant-Bernard, D.; Constant, E.; Constant, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the photo-dissociation mechanisms of hydrogen passivated n- and p-type dopants in gallium arsenide is presented. The photo-induced dissociation of the Si Ga -H complex has been observed for relatively low photon energies (3.48 eV), whereas the photo-dissociation of C As -H is not observed for photon energies up to 5.58 eV. This fundamental difference in the photo-dissociation behavior between the two dopants is explained in terms of the localized excitation energies about the Si-H and C-H bonds

  16. Collision-induced absorption with exchange effects and anisotropic interactions: theory and application to H2 - H2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karman, Tijs; van der Avoird, Ad; Groenenboom, Gerrit C

    2015-02-28

    We discuss three quantum mechanical formalisms for calculating collision-induced absorption spectra. First, we revisit the established theory of collision-induced absorption, assuming distinguishable molecules which interact isotropically. Then, the theory is rederived incorporating exchange effects between indistinguishable molecules. It is shown that the spectrum can no longer be written as an incoherent sum of the contributions of the different spherical components of the dipole moment. Finally, we derive an efficient method to include the effects of anisotropic interactions in the computation of the absorption spectrum. This method calculates the dipole coupling on-the-fly, which allows for the uncoupled treatment of the initial and final states without the explicit reconstruction of the many-component wave functions. The three formalisms are applied to the collision-induced rotation-translation spectra of hydrogen molecules in the far-infrared. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained. Significant effects of anisotropic interactions are observed in the far wing.

  17. High-energy limit of collision-induced false vacuum decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidov, Sergei; Levkov, Dmitry [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences,60-th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow, 117312 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-17

    We develop a consistent semiclassical description of field-theoretic collision-induced tunneling at arbitrary high collision energies. As a playground we consider a (1+1)-dimensional false vacuum decay initiated by a collision of N particles at energy E, paying special attention to the realistic case of N=2 particles. We demonstrate that the cross section of this process is exponentially suppressed at all energies. Moreover, the respective suppressesion exponent F{sub N}(E) exhibits a specific behavior which is significant for our semiclassical method and assumed to be general: it decreases with energy, reaches absolute minimum F=F{sub min}(N) at a certain threshold energy E=E{sub rt}(N), and stays constant at higher energies. We show that the minimal suppression F{sub min}(N) and threshold energy can be evaluated using a special class of semiclassical solutions which describe exponentially suppressed transitions but nevertheless evolve in real time. Importantly, we argue that the cross section at energies above E{sub rt}(N) is computed perturbatively in the background of the latter solutions, and the terms of this perturbative expansion stay bounded in the infinite-energy limit. Transitions in the high-energy regime proceed via emission of many soft quanta with total energy E{sub rt}; the energy excess E−E{sub rt} remains in the colliding particles till the end of the process.

  18. Electromagnetic dissociation of 238U in heavy-ion collisions at 120 MeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justice, M.L.

    1991-04-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the heavy-ion induced electromagnetic dissociation of a 120 MeV/A 238 U beam incident on five targets: 9 Be, 27 Al, nat Cu, nat Ag, and nat U. Electromagnetic dissociation at this beam energy is essentially a two step process involving the excitation of a giant resonance followed by particle decay. At 120 MeV/A there is predicted to be a significant contribution of the giant quadrupole resonance to the EMD cross sections. The specific exit channel which was looked at was projectile fission. The two fission fragments were detected in coincidence by an array of solid-state ΔE-E detectors, allowing the changes of the fragments to be determined to within ± .5 units. The events were sorted on the basis of the sums of the fragments' charges, acceptance corrections were applied, and total cross sections for the most peripheral events were determined. Electromagnetic fission at the beam energy of this experiment always leads to a true charge sum of 92. Due to the imperfect resolution of the detectors, charge sums of 91 and 93 were included in order to account for all of the electromagnetic fission events. The experimentally observed cross sections are due to nuclear interaction processes as well as electromagnetic processes. Under the conditions of this experiment, the cross sections for the beryllium target are almost entirely due to nuclear processes. The nuclear cross sections for the other four targets were determined by extrapolation from the beryllium data using a geometrical scaling model. After subtraction of the nuclear cross sections, the resulting electromagnetic cross sections are compared to theoretical calculations based on the equivalent photon approximation. Systematic uncertainties are discussed and suggestions for improving the experiment are given

  19. The cAMP-induced G protein subunits dissociation monitored in live Dictyostelium cells by BRET reveals two activation rates, a positive effect of caffeine and potential role of microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariqul Islam, A F M; Yue, Haicen; Scavello, Margarethakay; Haldeman, Pearce; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Charest, Pascale G

    2018-08-01

    To study the dynamics and mechanisms controlling activation of the heterotrimeric G protein Gα2βγ in Dictyostelium in response to stimulation by the chemoattractant cyclic AMP (cAMP), we monitored the G protein subunit interaction in live cells using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). We found that cAMP induces the cAR1-mediated dissociation of the G protein subunits to a similar extent in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells, suggesting that only a small number of cAR1 (as expressed in undifferentiated cells) is necessary to induce the full activation of Gα2βγ. In addition, we found that treating cells with caffeine increases the potency of cAMP-induced Gα2βγ activation; and that disrupting the microtubule network but not F-actin inhibits the cAMP-induced dissociation of Gα2βγ. Thus, microtubules are necessary for efficient cAR1-mediated activation of the heterotrimeric G protein. Finally, kinetics analyses of Gα2βγ subunit dissociation induced by different cAMP concentrations indicate that there are two distinct rates at which the heterotrimeric G protein subunits dissociate when cells are stimulated with cAMP concentrations above 500 nM versus only one rate at lower cAMP concentrations. Quantitative modeling suggests that the kinetics profile of Gα2βγ subunit dissociation results from the presence of both uncoupled and G protein pre-coupled cAR1 that have differential affinities for cAMP and, consequently, induce G protein subunit dissociation through different rates. We suggest that these different signaling kinetic profiles may play an important role in initial chemoattractant gradient sensing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Coulomb dissociation of N 20,21

    OpenAIRE

    Röder, Marko; Adachi, Tatsuya; Aksyutina, Yulia; Alcantara, Juan; Altstadt, Sebastian; Alvarez-Pol, Hector; Ashwood, Nicholas; Atar, Leyla; Aumann, Thomas; Avdeichikov, Vladimir; Barr, M.; Beceiro, Saul; Bemmerer, Daniel; Benlliure, Jose; Bertulani, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutron-rich light nuclei and their reactions play an important role in the creation of chemical elements. Here, data from a Coulomb dissociation experiment on N20,21 are reported. Relativistic N20,21 ions impinged on a lead target and the Coulomb dissociation cross section was determined in a kinematically complete experiment. Using the detailed balance theorem, the N19(n,γ)N20 and N20(n,γ)N21 excitation functions and thermonuclear reaction rates have been determined. The N19(n,γ)N20 rate is...

  1. Radical Reactions in the Gas Phase: Recent Development and Application in Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent literature describing the use of gas phase radical reactions for structural characterization of complex biomolecules other than peptides. Specifically, chemical derivatization, in-source chemical reaction, and gas phase ion/ion reactions have been demonstrated as effective ways to generate radical precursor ions that yield structural informative fragments complementary to those from conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID. Radical driven dissociation has been applied to a variety of biomolecules including peptides, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and phospholipids. The majority of the molecules discussed in this review see limited fragmentation from conventional CID, and the gas phase radical reactions open up completely new dissociation channels for these molecules and therefore yield high fidelity confirmation of the structures of the target molecules. Due to the extensively studied peptide fragmentation, this review focuses only on nonpeptide biomolecules such as nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and phospholipids.

  2. Mass spectral analysis of N-oxides of Chemical Weapons Convention related aminoethanols under electrospray ionization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, L; Karthikraj, R; Murty, M R V S; Raju, N Prasada; Vairamani, M; Prabhakar, S

    2011-02-28

    N,N'-Dialkylaminoethanols are the hydrolyzed products or precursors of chemical warfare agents such as V-agents and nitrogen mustards, and they are prone to undergo oxidation in environmental matrices or during decontamination processes. Consequently, screening of the oxidized products of aminoethanols in aqueous samples is an important task in the verification of chemical weapons convention-related chemicals. Here we report the successful characterization of the N-oxides of N,N'-dialkylaminoethanols, alkyl diethanolamines, and triethanolamine using positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of the [M+H](+) and [M+Na](+) ions show diagnostic product ions that enable the unambiguous identification of the studied N-oxides, including those of isomeric compounds. The proposed fragmentation pathways are supported by high-resolution mass spectrometry data and product/precursor ion spectra. The CID spectra of [M+H](+) ions included [MH-CH(4)O(2)](+) as the key product ion, in addition to a distinctive alkene loss that allowed us to recognize the alkyl group attached to the nitrogen. The [M+Na](+) ions show characteristic product ions due to the loss of groups (R) attached to nitrogen either as a radical (R) or as a molecule [R+H or (R-H)] after hydrogen migration. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Inelastic scattering and endohedral complex formation in high-energy collisions of fullerenes with He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, J.H.; Mowrey, R.C.; Ross, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since the original postulation of its icosahedral structure by Smalley and Kroto in 1985, C 60 (also known as buckminsterfullerene) has fascinated investigators in a variety of fields. With the publication of a synthetic method for the bulk production of C 60 , there has been an explosion of research interest in this molecule. A number of intriguing experimental results have been published, including work in the area of mass spectrometry. For example, at a workshop at the 1991 ASMS meeting, Schwartz and coworkers reported a remarkable result. They showed that high energy collisions of C 60 + with He resulted not only in the expected formation of collision-induced dissociation (CID) products such as C 56 + and C 58 + (C 2 loss is the main fragmentation pathway for C 60 ), but also in the formation of products such as C 56 + + 4 and C 58 + + 4. Careful experiments with He showed that the products were C 56 He + and C 58 He + , most likely formed by the uptake of He by C 60 + during the collision. Subsequent experiments in this laboratory were able to directly observe the C 60 He + product, the product ion shifts in kinetic energy by an amount equal to the center-of-mass collision energy, consistent with kinematic arguments. C 60 He + was also observed by the Gross group and the Schwarz group. Gross and coworkers also showed that inelastic scattering processes can be observed in the collision spectrum. More recently, the Anderson group has studied reverse processes, in which ions such as He + , Li + , and C + undergo collisions with C 60 and are taken up in the collision

  4. Accounting for the dissociating properties of organic chemicals in LCIA: An uncertainty analysis applied to micropollutants in the assessment of freshwater ecotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Sérgio Alberto; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Gabarrell, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fate parameters of dissociating chemicals were estimated and applied to an LCIA model. ► Results were compared to the default model using non-polar partitioning regressions. ► Negligible differences were estimated for direct emissions to freshwater. ► Results were overestimated in the default model for indirect emissions. ► Sorption of the cationic fraction of organic bases was the most influential parameter. -- Abstract: In life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) models, the sorption of the ionic fraction of dissociating organic chemicals is not adequately modeled because conventional non-polar partitioning models are applied. Therefore, high uncertainties are expected when modeling the mobility, as well as the bioavailability for uptake by exposed biota and degradation, of dissociating organic chemicals. Alternative regressions that account for the ionized fraction of a molecule to estimate fate parameters were applied to the USEtox model. The most sensitive model parameters in the estimation of ecotoxicological characterization factors (CFs) of micropollutants were evaluated by Monte Carlo analysis in both the default USEtox model and the alternative approach. Negligible differences of CFs values and 95% confidence limits between the two approaches were estimated for direct emissions to the freshwater compartment; however the default USEtox model overestimates CFs and the 95% confidence limits of basic compounds up to three orders and four orders of magnitude, respectively, relatively to the alternative approach for emissions to the agricultural soil compartment. For three emission scenarios, LCIA results show that the default USEtox model overestimates freshwater ecotoxicity impacts for the emission scenarios to agricultural soil by one order of magnitude, and larger confidence limits were estimated, relatively to the alternative approach

  5. Recent work with fast molecular-ion beams at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooney, P.J.; Gemmell, D.S.; Groeneveld, K.O.; Kanter, E.P.; Pietsch, W.J.; Vager, Z.; Zabransky, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    Research in these areas during 1979 is summarized: (a) studies of molecular-ion dissociation in gaseous targets, (b) developing an understanding of the origins of central peaks and of the two phenomena of the transmission of fast molecular ions through thin foil targets and of the production of neutral fragments from collision-induced dissociation of fast molecular projectiles, (c) studies exploring the extent to which high-resolution measurements on dissociation fragments can be used to determine the stereochemical structures of the molecular ions in the incident beam, (d) extensive modifications to the beam-line and apparatus at the 4-MV Dynamitron so as to permit a wide variety of coincidence measurements on fragments from collision-induced molecular-ion dissociation

  6. Chemical freeze out condition for central heavy-ion collisions at AGS, SPS, RHIC and LHC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Sandeep; Mishra, Debadeepti; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Das, Sabita; Sharma, Natasha; Kumar, Lokesh; Sahoo, Raghunath

    2014-01-01

    As a result of ultrarelativistic collision between two heavy ions, a fireball is expected to form that rapidly thermalized as it expands and hence cools. As the interparticle separation increases the particles cease to interact. The surface of last scattering is the freeze-out surface. It can be of two types: chemical freeze-out (CFO) where inelastic collisions cease and kinetic freeze-out where elastic collisions cease. But in general freeze-out can be a more complicated process in which different types of particles and reactions switch-off at different times giving rise to a series of freeze-out surfaces. Here we will discuss two CFO schemes: 1CFO, in which all hadrons freeze-out together and 2CFO, in which all strange and those with hidden strangeness freeze-out at the same surface and the other non strange hadrons freeze-out at a separate surface

  7. Zero-Point Energy Constraint for Unimolecular Dissociation Reactions. Giving Trajectories Multiple Chances To Dissociate Correctly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Amit K; Hase, William L

    2016-01-28

    A zero-point energy (ZPE) constraint model is proposed for classical trajectory simulations of unimolecular decomposition and applied to CH4* → H + CH3 decomposition. With this model trajectories are not allowed to dissociate unless they have ZPE in the CH3 product. If not, they are returned to the CH4* region of phase space and, if necessary, given additional opportunities to dissociate with ZPE. The lifetime for dissociation of an individual trajectory is the time it takes to dissociate with ZPE in CH3, including multiple possible returns to CH4*. With this ZPE constraint the dissociation of CH4* is exponential in time as expected for intrinsic RRKM dynamics and the resulting rate constant is in good agreement with the harmonic quantum value of RRKM theory. In contrast, a model that discards trajectories without ZPE in the reaction products gives a CH4* → H + CH3 rate constant that agrees with the classical and not quantum RRKM value. The rate constant for the purely classical simulation indicates that anharmonicity may be important and the rate constant from the ZPE constrained classical trajectory simulation may not represent the complete anharmonicity of the RRKM quantum dynamics. The ZPE constraint model proposed here is compared with previous models for restricting ZPE flow in intramolecular dynamics, and connecting product and reactant/product quantum energy levels in chemical dynamics simulations.

  8. Nuclear energy release in hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.; Strugalska-Gola, E.

    1998-01-01

    Energy release process in nuclear reactions induced by fast hadrons in hadron-nucleus collisions is discussed. Some portion of the internal nuclear energy is released when the locally damaged in a collision, and instable therefore, residual target nucleus transits itself into light nuclear fragments (nucleons, D, T) and a stable lighter final nucleus or some number of stable lighter nuclei. It is not excluded that in some of the collisions the induced intranuclear nuclear reactions may be energy overcompensating. Corresponding reconnaissance should be made - in analysing the nuclear reactions induced in hadron-nucleus collisions

  9. Elastic and proton-dissociative photoproduction of J/ψ mesons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexa, C.; Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H.; Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Kleinwort, C.; Kraemer, M.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Boudry, V.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Buniatyan, A.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Lubimov, V.; Rostovtsev, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Ceccopieri, F.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Staykova, Z.; Mechelen, P. van; Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R.; Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Cvach, J.; Hladky, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Ferencei, J.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Joensson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Kogler, R.; Nowak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Soloviev, Y.; Stella, B.; Sykora, T.; Tsakov, I.; Wegener, D.

    2013-01-01

    Cross sections for elastic and proton-dissociative photoproduction of J/ψ mesons are measured with the H1 detector in positron-proton collisions at HERA. The data were collected at ep centre-of-mass energies √(s) ∼ 318 GeV and √(s) ∼ 225 GeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of L = 130 pb -1 and L = 10.8 pb -1 , respectively. The cross sections are measured as a function of the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy in the range 25 γp 2 for the elastic process and vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 for proton dissociation. The results are compared to other measurements. The W γp and t-dependences are parametrised using phenomenological fits. (orig.)

  10. Quantum dot-induced viral capsid assembling in dissociation buffer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao D

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ding Gao,1,2 Zhi-Ping Zhang,1 Feng Li,3 Dong Men,1 Jiao-Yu Deng,1 Hong-Ping Wei,1 Xian-En Zhang,1 Zong-Qiang Cui1 1State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 2Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 3Division of Nanobiomedicine and i-Lab, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: Viruses encapsulating inorganic nanoparticles are a novel type of nanostructure with applications in biomedicine and biosensors. However, the encapsulation and assembly mechanisms of these hybridized virus-based nanoparticles (VNPs are still unknown. In this article, it was found that quantum dots (QDs can induce simian virus 40 (SV40 capsid assembly in dissociation buffer, where viral capsids should be disassembled. The analysis of the transmission electron microscope, dynamic light scattering, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstruction experimental results showed that the SV40 major capsid protein 1 (VP1 can be assembled into ≈25 nm capsids in the dissociation buffer when QDs are present and that the QDs are encapsulated in the SV40 capsids. Moreover, it was determined that there is a strong affinity between QDs and the SV40 VP1 proteins (KD = 2.19E-10 M, which should play an important role in QD encapsulation in the SV40 viral capsids. This study provides a new understanding of the assembly mechanism of SV40 virus-based nanoparticles with QDs, which may help in the design and construction of other similar virus-based nanoparticles. Keywords: quantum dots, simian virus 40, self-assembly, encapsulation, virus-based nanoparticles

  11. Shock wave structure in an ideal dissociating gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    Composition changes within the shock layer due to chemical reactions are considered. The Lighthill ideal dissociating gas model was used in an effort to describe the oxygen type molecule. First, the two limiting cases, when the chemical reaction rates are very slow and very fast in comparison to local convective rates, are investigated. Then, the problem is solved for arbitrary chemical reaction rates.

  12. Coherent control of D2/H2 dissociative ionization by a mid-infrared two-color laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanie, Vincent; Ibrahim, Heide; Beaulieu, Samuel; Thiré, Nicolas; Schmidt, Bruno E; Légaré, François; Deng, Yunpei; Alnaser, Ali S; Litvinyuk, Igor V; Tong, Xiao-Min

    2016-01-01

    Steering the electrons during an ultrafast photo-induced process in a molecule influences the chemical behavior of the system, opening the door to the control of photochemical reactions and photobiological processes. Electrons can be efficiently localized using a strong laser field with a well-designed temporal shape of the electric component. Consequently, many experiments have been performed with laser sources in the near-infrared region (800 nm) in the interest of studying and enhancing the electron localization. However, due to its limited accessibility, the mid-infrared (MIR) range has barely been investigated, although it allows to efficiently control small molecules and even more complex systems. To push further the manipulation of basic chemical mechanisms, we used a MIR two-color (1800 and 900 nm) laser field to ionize H 2 and D 2 molecules and to steer the remaining electron during the photo-induced dissociation. The study of this prototype reaction led to the simultaneous control of four fragmentation channels. The results are well reproduced by a theoretical model solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the molecular ion, identifying the involved dissociation mechanisms. By varying the relative phase between the two colors, asymmetries (i.e., electron localization selectivity) of up to 65% were obtained, corresponding to enhanced or equivalent levels of control compared to previous experiments. Experimentally easier to implement, the use of a two-color laser field leads to a better electron localization than carrier-envelope phase stabilized pulses and applying the technique in the MIR range reveals more dissociation channels than at 800 nm. (paper)

  13. $J/\\psi$ Absorption in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Maiani, Luciano; Polosa, Antonio; Riquer, V

    2004-01-01

    We present a new calculation of the pi-J/psi dissociation cross sections within the Constituent Quark-Meson Model recently introduced. To discuss the absorption of J/psi in heavy-ion collisions, we assume the J/psi to be produced inside a thermalized pion gas, as discussed by Bjorken, and introduce the corrections due to absorption by nuclear matter as well. We fit the absorption length of the J/psi to the data obtained at the CERN SPS by the NA50 Collaboration for Pb-Pb collisions. Collisions of lower centrality allow us to determine the temperature and the energy density of the pion gas. For both these quantities we find values close to those indicated by lattice gauge calculations for the transition to a quark-gluon plasma. A simple extrapolation to more central collisions, which takes into account the increase of the energy deposited due to the increased nucleon flux, fails to reproduce the break in J/psi absorption indicated by NA50, thus lending support to the idea that an unconfined quark-gluon phase m...

  14. MOLECULAR BEAM STUDIES OF IR LASER INDUCED MULTIPHOTON DISSOCIATION AND VIBRATIONAL PREDISSOCIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yuan T.; Shen, Y. Ron

    1980-06-01

    The advancement of crossed molecular beam methods, modern spectroscopy and laser technology allows us to observe chemical reactions on atomic and molecular levels in great detail. After a brief history of crossed molecular beams studies, the author describes and discusses the universal molecular beam apparatus and gives examples of crossed molecular beam studies. The crossed beam technique is compared to other techniques used to provide microscopic information on reaction dynamics. Application of crossed laser and molecular beam studies to the problem of IR multiphoton dissociation of polyatomic molecules is discussed. Study of vibrational predissociation of hydrogen-bonded and van der Waals molecular clusters are discussed. Future cases that the author considers worth pursuing that could benefit from the collisionless environment of molecular beams are enumerated.

  15. Elucidating Direct Photolysis Mechanisms of Different Dissociation Species of Norfloxacin in Water and Mg2+ Effects by Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Se; Wang, Zhuang

    2017-11-11

    The study of pollution due to combined antibiotics and metals is urgently needed. Photochemical processes are an important transformation pathway for antibiotics in the environment. The mechanisms underlying the effects of metal-ion complexation on the aquatic photochemical transformation of antibiotics in different dissociation forms are crucial problems in science, and beg solutions. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms of direct photolysis of norfloxacin (NOR) in different dissociation forms in water and metal ion Mg 2+ effects using quantum chemical calculations. Results show that different dissociation forms of NOR had different maximum electronic absorbance wavelengths (NOR 2+ direct photolysis pathways were de-ethylation (N7-C8 bond cleavage) and decarboxylation (C2-C5 bond cleavage). Furthermore, the presence of Mg 2+ changed the order of the wavelength at maximum electronic absorbance (NOR⁺-Mg 2+ direct photolysis of NOR⁰, NOR⁺, and NOR 2+ . The calculated TS results indicated that the presence of Mg 2+ increased E a for most direct photolysis pathways of NOR, while it decreased E a for some direct photolysis pathways such as the loss of the piperazine ring and the damage of the piperazine ring of NOR⁰ and the defluorination of NOR⁺.

  16. Site selective dissociation of ozone upon core excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocellin, A.; Mundim, M.S.P.; Coutinho, L.H.; Homem, M.G.P.; Naves de Brito, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present new measurements applied to core excitation of ozone molecule using to analyze the dissociation channels the photo-electron-photo-ion coincidence (PEPICO) and the photo-electron-photo-ion-photo-ion coincidence (PEPIPICO) technique. The new experimental set-up allows measuring O + /O + ion pair coincidences without discrimination. The dissociation channels of several core-excited states have been investigated. The relative yields of dissociation channels were determined from coincidence data. The core excitation from O terminal (O T ) or O central (O C ) induce different fragmentation; preferentially one bond is broken at the O terminal excitation and two bonds when O central is excited, showing site selectivity fragmentation of ozone upon core excitation. The ultra-fast dissociation of the O T 1s -1 7a 1 1 core-excited state is confirmed by the relative yield of dissociation

  17. Collision-induced polarizabilities of inert gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, K.L.; Madden, P.A.; Buckingham, A.D.

    1978-01-01

    The use of polarizability densities to calculate collision-induced polarizabilities is investigated. One method for computing polarizabilities of inert gas diatoms employs atomic polarizability densities from finite-field Hartree-Fock calculations, together with classical equations for the polarization of dielectrics. It is shown that this model gives inaccurate values for both the local fields and the local response to non-uniform fields. An alternative method incorporating the same physical effects is used to compute the pair polarizabilities to first order in the interatomic interaction. To first order the pair contribution to the trace of the polarizability is negative at short range. The calculated anisotropy does not differ significantly from the DID value, whereas the polarizability density calculation gives a substantial reduction in the anisotropy. (author)

  18. Chemical Detection Based on Adsorption-Induced and Photo-Induced Stresses in MEMS Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datskos, P.G.

    1999-04-05

    Recently there has been an increasing demand to perform real-time in-situ chemical detection of hazardous materials, contraband chemicals, and explosive chemicals. Currently, real-time chemical detection requires rather large analytical instrumentation that are expensive and complicated to use. The advent of inexpensive mass produced MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) devices opened-up new possibilities for chemical detection. For example, microcantilevers were found to respond to chemical stimuli by undergoing changes in their bending and resonance frequency even when a small number of molecules adsorb on their surface. In our present studies, we extended this concept by studying changes in both the adsorption-induced stress and photo-induced stress as target chemicals adsorb on the surface of microcantilevers. For example, microcantilevers that have adsorbed molecules will undergo photo-induced bending that depends on the number of absorbed molecules on the surface. However, microcantilevers that have undergone photo-induced bending will adsorb molecules on their surfaces in a distinctly different way. Depending on the photon wavelength and microcantilever material, the microcantilever can be made to bend by expanding or contracting the irradiated surface. This is important in cases where the photo-induced stresses can be used to counter any adsorption-induced stresses and increase the dynamic range. Coating the surface of the microstructure with a different material can provide chemical specificity for the target chemicals. However, by selecting appropriate photon wavelengths we can change the chemical selectivity due to the introduction of new surface states in the MEMS device. We will present and discuss our results on the use of adsorption-induced and photo-induced bending of microcantilevers for chemical detection.

  19. Turbulence-induced bubble collision force modeling and validation in adiabatic two-phase flow using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Subash L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Brooks, Caleb S. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Schlegel, Joshua P. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Liu, Yang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Buchanan, John R. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Bettis Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Void distribution in narrow rectangular channel with various non-uniform inlet conditions. • Modeling of void diffusion due to bubble collision force. • Validation of new modeling in adiabatic air–water two-phase flow in a narrow channel. - Abstract: The prediction capability of the two-fluid model for gas–liquid dispersed two-phase flow depends on the accuracy of the closure relations for the interfacial forces. In previous studies of two-phase flow Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), interfacial force models for a single isolated bubble has been extended to disperse two-phase flow assuming the effect in a swarm of bubbles is similar. Limited studies have been performed investigating the effect of the bubble concentration on the lateral phase distribution. Bubbles, while moving through the liquid phase, may undergo turbulence-driven random collision with neighboring bubbles without significant coalescence. The rate of these collisions depends upon the bubble approach velocity and bubble spacing. The bubble collision frequency is expected to be higher in locations with higher bubble concentrations, i.e., volume fraction. This turbulence-driven random collision causes the diffusion of the bubbles from high concentration to low concentration. Based on experimental observations, a phenomenological model has been developed for a “turbulence-induced bubble collision force” for use in the two-fluid model. For testing the validity of the model, two-phase flow data measured at Purdue University are utilized. The geometry is a 10 mm × 200 mm cross section channel. Experimentally, non-uniform inlet boundary conditions are applied with different sparger combinations to vary the volume fraction distribution across the wider dimension. Examining uniform and non-uniform inlet data allows for the influence of the volume fraction to be studied as a separate effect. The turbulence-induced bubble collision force has been implemented in ANSYS CFX. The

  20. Wave-packet approach to Rydberg resonances in dissociative recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisset, Sabine; Pichl, Lukas; Orel, Ann E.; Schneider, Ioan F.

    2007-01-01

    We report the time-dependent approach to resonant electron capture into Rydberg states in collisions with molecular cations at low impact energy, as an alternative to the method based on multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT), and present the results for the HD + ion. The propagation of the initial wave function on 13 Rydberg states (besides one valence state) correctly describes the indirect dissociative recombination mechanism in the time domain. Notably, the nonlocal coupling operator between the ionization and dissociation channels is accounted for in the indirect process, extending previous work on the case of direct coupling. The present approach compares to the MQDT framework with remarkable precision: resonant structures in the cross section correctly emerge from the wave-packet propagation; the time-dependent result also forms a cross section envelope for the dense series of ultrafine MQDT resonances corresponding to the quasicontinuous part of the Rydberg state manifold

  1. Dissociation dynamics of anionic and excited neutral fragments of gaseous SiCl4 following Cl 2p and Si 2p core-level excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J M; Lu, K T; Lee, J M; Chou, T L; Chen, H C; Chen, S A; Haw, S C; Chen, T H

    2008-01-01

    The state-selective dissociation dynamics for anionic and excited neutral fragments of gaseous SiCl 4 following Cl 2p and Si 2p core-level excitations were characterized by combining measurements of the photon-induced anionic dissociation, x-ray absorption and UV/visible dispersed fluorescence. The transitions of core electrons to high Rydberg states/doubly excited states in the vicinity of both Si 2p and Cl 2p ionization thresholds of gaseous SiCl 4 lead to a remarkably enhanced production of anionic, Si - and Cl - , fragments and excited neutral atomic, Si*, fragments. This enhancement via core-level excitation near the ionization threshold of gaseous SiCl 4 is explained in terms of the contributions from the Auger decay of doubly excited states, shake-modified resonant Auger decay, or/and post-collision interaction. These complementary results provide insight into the state-selective anionic and excited neutral fragmentation of gaseous molecules via core-level excitation.

  2. Site selective dissociation of ozone upon core excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocellin, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia-UnB, Box 04455, CEP 70919-970, Brasilia-DF (Brazil)], E-mail: mocellin@fis.unb.br; Mundim, M.S.P. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia-UnB, Box 04455, CEP 70919-970, Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Coutinho, L.H. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro-UFRJ, Box 68563, CEP 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Homem, M.G.P. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-LNLS, Box 6192, CEP 13084-971, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Naves de Brito, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-LNLS, Box 6192, CEP 13084-971, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia-UnB, Box 04455, CEP 70919-970, Brasilia-DF (Brazil)

    2007-05-15

    We present new measurements applied to core excitation of ozone molecule using to analyze the dissociation channels the photo-electron-photo-ion coincidence (PEPICO) and the photo-electron-photo-ion-photo-ion coincidence (PEPIPICO) technique. The new experimental set-up allows measuring O{sup +}/O{sup +} ion pair coincidences without discrimination. The dissociation channels of several core-excited states have been investigated. The relative yields of dissociation channels were determined from coincidence data. The core excitation from O terminal (O{sub T}) or O central (O{sub C}) induce different fragmentation; preferentially one bond is broken at the O terminal excitation and two bonds when O central is excited, showing site selectivity fragmentation of ozone upon core excitation. The ultra-fast dissociation of the O{sub T} 1s{sup -1}7a{sub 1}{sup 1} core-excited state is confirmed by the relative yield of dissociation.

  3. Dissociation and psychosis in dissociative identity disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laddis, Andreas; Dell, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Dissociative symptoms, first-rank symptoms of schizophrenia, and delusions were assessed in 40 schizophrenia patients and 40 dissociative identity disorder (DID) patients with the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID). Schizophrenia patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I Disorders; DID patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised. DID patients obtained significantly (a) higher dissociation scores; (b) higher passive-influence scores (first-rank symptoms); and (c) higher scores on scales that measure child voices, angry voices, persecutory voices, voices arguing, and voices commenting. Schizophrenia patients obtained significantly higher delusion scores than did DID patients. What is odd is that the dissociation scores of schizophrenia patients were unrelated to their reports of childhood maltreatment. Multiple regression analyses indicated that 81% of the variance in DID patients' dissociation scores was predicted by the MID's Ego-Alien Experiences Scale, whereas 92% of the variance in schizophrenia patients' dissociation scores was predicted by the MID's Voices Scale. We propose that schizophrenia patients' responses to the MID do not index the same pathology as do the responses of DID patients. We argue that neither phenomenological definitions of dissociation nor the current generation of dissociation instruments (which are uniformly phenomenological in nature) can distinguish between the dissociative phenomena of DID and what we suspect are just the dissociation-like phenomena of schizophrenia.

  4. Energy distribution in dissociations of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koernig, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis studies are reported of fragmentation processes in polyatomic molecules. In order to find out which dessocaciation reactions take place, how they are brought about by the internal energy of the reactant, and to investigate the structure of the dissociating 'transition state', the fragment mass and the corresponding kinetic energy release (KER) are determined by differential translational spectroscopy using a position and time sensitive two-particle coincidence detector. The results are interpreted using the statistical theory of unimolecular dissociation. It turns out that the standard assumptions of the theory, especially in calculating KER-distributions, are not realistic in all molecules considered. Dissociation is induced by the neutralization with alkali metal vapour. In ch. 2 the experimental method and the analysis of the data (dissociation pathways, branching ratios and ε-d-distributions) are introduced and exemplified by measurements of cyclohexane, which represents the upper limit in precursor and fragment mass accessible in the apparatus. In ch. 3 a study is reported of the molecules methylchloride (CH 3 Cl) and the acetylradical (CH 3 CO). In spite of their similar geometric structures, completely different dissociation mechanisms have been found. Methylchloride dissociates via a repulsive state; acetyl radicals show energy scrambling. The energy distribution from dissociating acetyl exemplifies dynamical effects in the dissociation. In ch. 4 an investigation of a number of prototype hydrocarbons is presented. The dissociation pathways of several small linear alkanes indicate that neutralization takes place to unknown repulsive potentials, of which the position and steepness are determined from the kinetic energy release. (author). 118 refs.; 40 figs.; 5 tabs

  5. Quantum analysis in the transition process to excited state of an oxygen molecule induced by electron collisions; Denshi shototsu ni tomonau sanso bunshi ni okeru reiki jotai sen`i no ryoshironteki kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimaru, K. [Gifu National College of Technology, Gifu (Japan); Okazaki, K. [Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-06-25

    For understanding of fundamental chemical reactions under a highly non equilibrium condition which is quite often used in plasma processing, the relevant atomic and molecular processes must be clarified. In this study, an analysis of the transition process to the excited state of an oxygen molecule induced by electron collisions in the oxygen plasma has been carried out. First, the electron density distribution in an oxygen molecule has been calculated using the extended Huckel molecular orbital method. Then, the electron potential energy distribution in the transition process to the excited state has been estimated. The electron behavior has been calculated using the estimated unidimensional electron potential energy distribution and unsteady quantum mechanics. As a result, the transition process to the excited state of an oxygen molecule induced by electron collisions and its conditions have been clarified qualitatively. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Calculation of laser induced impulse based on the laser supported detonation wave model with dissociation, ionization and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, Li; Mousen, Cheng; Xiaokang, Li

    2014-01-01

    In the laser intensity range that the laser supported detonation (LSD) wave can be maintained, dissociation, ionization and radiation take a substantial part of the incidence laser energy. There is little treatment on the phenomenon in the existing models, which brings obvious discrepancies between their predictions and the experiment results. Taking into account the impact of dissociation, ionization and radiation in the conservations of mass, momentum and energy, a modified LSD wave model is developed which fits the experimental data more effectively rather than the existing models. Taking into consideration the pressure decay of the normal and the radial rarefaction, the laser induced impulse that is delivered to the target surface is calculated in the air; and the dependencies of impulse performance on laser intensity, pulse width, ambient pressure and spot size are indicated. The results confirm that the dissociation is the pivotal factor of the appearance of the momentum coupling coefficient extremum. This study focuses on a more thorough understanding of LSD and the interaction between laser and matter

  7. Calculation of laser induced impulse based on the laser supported detonation wave model with dissociation, ionization and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Li, E-mail: ligan0001@gmail.com; Mousen, Cheng; Xiaokang, Li [College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China)

    2014-03-15

    In the laser intensity range that the laser supported detonation (LSD) wave can be maintained, dissociation, ionization and radiation take a substantial part of the incidence laser energy. There is little treatment on the phenomenon in the existing models, which brings obvious discrepancies between their predictions and the experiment results. Taking into account the impact of dissociation, ionization and radiation in the conservations of mass, momentum and energy, a modified LSD wave model is developed which fits the experimental data more effectively rather than the existing models. Taking into consideration the pressure decay of the normal and the radial rarefaction, the laser induced impulse that is delivered to the target surface is calculated in the air; and the dependencies of impulse performance on laser intensity, pulse width, ambient pressure and spot size are indicated. The results confirm that the dissociation is the pivotal factor of the appearance of the momentum coupling coefficient extremum. This study focuses on a more thorough understanding of LSD and the interaction between laser and matter.

  8. Simultaneous detection and identification of precursors, degradation and co-products of chemical warfare agents in drinking water by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Vijay; Purohit, Ajay; Pardasani, Deepak; Goud, D Raghavender; Jain, Rajeev; Dubey, D K

    2014-11-28

    Environmental markers of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprise millions of chemical structures. The simultaneous detection and identification of these environmental markers poses difficulty due to their diverse chemical properties. In this work, by using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF), a generic analytical method for the detection and identification of wide range of environmental markers of CWAs (including precursors, degradation and co-products of nerve agents and sesqui-mustards) in drinking water, was developed. The chromatographic analysis of 55 environmental markers of CWAs including isomeric and isobaric compounds was accomplished within 20 min, using 1.8 μm particle size column. Subsequent identification of the compounds was achieved by the accurate mass measurement of either protonated molecule [M+H](+) or ammonium adduct [M+NH4](+) and fragment ions. Isomeric and isobaric compounds were distinguished by chromatographic retention time, characteristic fragment ions generated by both in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) and CID in the collision cell by MS/MS experiments. The exact mass measurement errors for all ions were observed less than 3 ppm with internal calibration. The method limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) were determined in drinking water and found to be 1-50 ng mL(-1) and 5-125 ng mL(-1), respectively. Applicability of the proposed method was proved by determining the environmental markers of CWAs in aqueous samples provided by Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons during 34th official proficiency test. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Spin conversion induced by the spin-orbit interaction in positronium collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Haruo; Nakayama, Takashi; Hyodo, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    We show the existence of a new reaction mechanism of positronium - ortho-Ps - para-Ps conversion reaction induced by the spin-orbit interaction. This interaction was previously believed to be negligibly small. Recently, however, Mitroy has suggested that this interaction could be observed in Ps-Xe collision. In the present work, we have succeeded in observing this effect and obtaining the reaction rate by using the Zeeman mixing of positronium.

  10. Ultrastructural observations of chemical peeling for skin rejuvenation (ultrastructural changes of the skin due to chemical peeling).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Tokuya; Sato, Shigeru; Numano, Kayoko; Kawana, Seiji

    2010-02-01

    Chemical peeling of the skin is commonly used as a means to treat photoaging, but the mechanism underlying its efficacy has not yet been fully clarified. We recently conducted chemical peeling of the skin with glycolic acid and lactic acid and observed it at the ultrastructural level. No changes in the horny layer or the upper epidermal layer were observed but there was dissociation and vacuolation between the basal cells and increases in vimentin filaments within fibroblasts and endothelial cells were seen. These findings suggest that chemical peeling of the skin with this type of agent directly induces collagen formation within the dermis and thus directly stimulates remodeling of the dermis.

  11. Spectroscopic constants and the potential energy curve of the iodine weakly bound 0+g state correlating with the I(2P1/2) + I(2P1/2) dissociation limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akopyan, M E; Baturo, V V; Lukashov, S S; Poretsky, S A; Pravilov, A M

    2013-01-01

    The stepwise three-step three-colour aser excitation scheme and rotational as well as rovibrational energy transfer processes in the 0 + g state induced by collisions with He and Ar atoms are used for determination of rovibronic level energies of the weakly bound 0 + g state correlating with the I( 2 P 1/2 ) + I( 2 P 1/2 ) dissociation limit. Dunham coefficients of the state, Y i0 (i = 0–3), Y i1 (i = 0–3) and Y 02 for the v 0 g + = 0–16 and J 0 g + ≈ 14–135 ranges as well as the dissociation energy of the state, D e , and equilibrium I–I distance of the state, R e , are determined. The potential energy curve of the state constructed using these constants is also reported. (paper)

  12. Electron emission following collisions between multi-charged ions and D{sub 2} molecules; Etude de l'emission electronique induite par impact d'ion multicharge sur la molecule D{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, G

    2004-05-15

    Dissociative ionisation mechanisms induced in collisions involving a highly charged ion (S{sup 15+}, 13.6 MeV/u) and a molecular deuterium target, have been studied through momentum vector correlations of both the D{sup +} fragments and the electrons produced. An experimental apparatus has been developed in order to detect in coincidence all the charged particles produced during the collision. The measurement of their momentum vectors, which allows one to determine both their kinetic energy and direction of emission with respect to the projectile one, combines Time of Flight, Position Sensitive Detection, and multi-coincidence techniques. The correlation of the fragment and electron kinetic energies enables not only to determine branching ratios between the dissociative ionisation pathways, but also to separate unambiguously kinetic energy distributions of fragments associated to each process. Finally, the angular distributions of ejected electrons, as a function of the orientation of the molecular axis with respect to the projectile direction, are deduced from the spatial correlation. Measurements are compared to theoretical angular distributions obtained using the CDW-EIS (Continuum Distorted Wave-Eikonal Initial State) method. (author)

  13. The HD+ dissociative recombination rate coefficient at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the rotational temperature of the ions is considered for low-energy dissociative recombination (DR of HD+. Merged beams measurements with HD+ ions of a rotational temperature near 300 K are compared to multichannel quantum defect theory calculations. The thermal DR rate coefficient for a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution is derived from the merged-beams data and compared to theoretical results for a range of rotational temperatures. Good agreement is found for the theory with 300 K rotational temperature. For a low-temperature plasma environment where also the rotational temperature assumes 10 K, theory predicts a considerably higher thermal DR rate coefficient. The origin of this is traced to predicted resonant structures of the collision-energy dependent DR cross section at few-meV collision energies for the particular case of HD+ ions in the rotational ground state.

  14. EM-induced processes in heavy ion collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Electromagnetic processes provide new tools for studying the partonic structure of nuclei, and possibly for directly probing the quark gluon plasma. Ultra-peripheral heavy ion collisions occur when the nuclei have large impact parameter and interact through photon-induced reactions. These include processes in which an energetic photon emitted by one nucleus resolves the partonic structure of the other and stimulates jet production. Much like deep inelastic scattering, such processes provide a clean probe of the nuclear parton distributions. Jet photo-production represents the most direct opportunity to study nuclear parton distributions until a future electron-ion collider is constructed. This talk presents measurements of ultra-peripheral jet photo-production in Pb+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. It also presents another application of EM-induced processes, where dimuons produced by gamma-gamma processes are observed to show a centrality-dependent broadening in their opening angle, which ca...

  15. Surface collisions of formic acid cations HCOOH+ and DCOOD+ with a hydrocarbon-covered stainless steel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepnual, Thawatchai; Feketeová, Linda; Grill, Verena; Scheier, Paul; Herman, Zdenek; Märk, Tilmann D.

    2005-07-01

    Interaction of the formic acid cation HCOOH+ with a stainless steel surface covered with hydrocarbons has been studied as a function of the collision energy from a few eV up to 40 eV. Mass spectra of the product ions showed ions produced by surface-induced dissociation of the projectile and formation of HCO2H2+ in interaction with the surface material. The fragmentation of the projectile led to product ions HCOO+ and CHO+. The product ion HCO2H2+ fragmented to give only CHO+, indicating that its structure was HC(OH)2+ as suggested earlier by others. The results were confirmed by studies using the deuterated formic acid cation DCOOD+.

  16. Electron scattering resonances and dissociative attachment in polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olthoff, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    A relatively new technique, electron transmission spectroscopic, is now being used to investigate the unoccupied valence molecular orbitals of many chemical compounds. Electron-transmission spectroscopy measures the energy of negative ion states that arise from electron capture into unoccupied molecular orbitals. Additional information about the unoccupied orbitals may be obtained if the negative ion decays by way of dissociation. Determination of the identity, kinetic energy, and production rates of stable ion fragments supplies information about the shape and position of the potential energy curves which describe the electronic states of the molecule and the anion. Used together, photoelectron, electron transmission, and dissociation data can produce a complete picture of a molecule's valence electronic structure. For this work, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer was attached to an electron transmission spectrometer to observe negative ion fragments due to dissociative attachment. The mass spectrometer measures the identify and kinetic energy of stable negative ions as a function of incident electron energy. Electron transmission spectra and ion production data were acquired for many compounds in four chemical categories

  17. Fragmentation pathways and structural characterization of organophosphorus compounds related to the Chemical Weapons Convention by electron ionization and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Esmaeil; Saeidian, Hamid; Amozadeh, Ali; Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Babri, Mehran

    2016-12-30

    For unambiguous identification of Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC)-related chemicals in environmental samples, the availability of mass spectra, interpretation skills and rapid microsynthesis of suspected chemicals are essential requirements. For the first time, the electron ionization single quadrupole and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectra of a series of O-alkyl N-[bis(dimethylamino)methylidene]-P-methylphosphonamidates (Scheme 1, cpd 4) were studied for CWC verification purposes. O-Alkyl N-[bis(dimethylamino)methylidene]-P-methylphosphonamidates were prepared through a microsynthetic method and were analyzed using electron ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with gas and liquid chromatography, respectively, as MS-inlet systems. General EI and ESI fragmentation pathways were proposed and discussed, and collision-induced dissociation studies of the protonated derivatives of these compounds were performed to confirm proposed fragment ion structures by analyzing mass spectra of deuterated analogs. Mass spectrometric studies revealed some interesting fragmentation pathways during the ionization process, such as McLafferty rearrangement, hydrogen rearrangement and a previously unknown intramolecular electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction. The EI and ESI fragmentation routes of the synthesized compounds 4 were investigated with the aim of detecting and identifying CWC-related chemicals during on-site inspection and/or off-site analysis and toxic chemical destruction monitoring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Comparison of reactivity on step and terrace sites of Pd (3 3 2) surface for the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen: A quantum chemical molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Farouq; Nagumo, Ryo; Miura, Ryuji; Ai, Suzuki; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Momoji; Miyamoto, Akira

    2011-01-01

    The notion of 'active sites' is fundamental to heterogeneous catalysis. However, the exact nature of the active sites, and hence the mechanism by which they act, are still largely a matter of speculation. In this study, we have presented a systematic quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations for the interaction of hydrogen on different step and terrace sites of the Pd (3 3 2) surface. Finally the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on step and terrace as well as the influence of surface hydrogen vacancy for the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen has been investigated through QCMD. This is a state-of-the-art method for calculating the interaction of atoms and molecules with metal surfaces. It is found that fully hydrogen covered (saturated) step sites can dissociate hydrogen moderately and that a monovacancy surface is suitable for significant dissociative adsorption of hydrogen. However in terrace site of the surface we have found that dissociation of hydrogen takes place only on Pd sites where the metal atom is not bound to any pre-adsorbed hydrogen atoms. Furthermore, from the molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations, we identify a number of consequences for the interpretation and modeling of diffusion experiments demonstrating the coverage and directional dependence of atomic hydrogen diffusion on stepped palladium surface.

  19. Observing electron localization in a dissociating H2+ molecule in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H; Li, Zhichao; He, Feng; Wang, X; Atia-Tul-Noor, A; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T; Litvinyuk, I V

    2017-06-16

    Dissociation of diatomic molecules with odd number of electrons always causes the unpaired electron to localize on one of the two resulting atomic fragments. In the simplest diatomic molecule H 2 + dissociation yields a hydrogen atom and a proton with the sole electron ending up on one of the two nuclei. That is equivalent to breaking of a chemical bond-the most fundamental chemical process. Here we observe such electron localization in real time by performing a pump-probe experiment. We demonstrate that in H 2 + electron localization is complete in just 15 fs when the molecule's internuclear distance reaches 8 atomic units. The measurement is supported by a theoretical simulation based on numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This observation advances our understanding of detailed dynamics of molecular dissociation.

  20. Dissociation pathways of a single dimethyl disulfide on Cu(111): Reaction induced by simultaneous excitation of two vibrational modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motobayashi, Kenta, E-mail: kmotobayashi@cat.hokudai.ac.jp [Catalysis Research Center, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Kim, Yousoo [Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Arafune, Ryuichi [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Ohara, Michiaki; Ueba, Hiromu; Kawai, Maki, E-mail: maki@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan)

    2014-05-21

    We present a novel reaction mechanism for a single adsorbed molecule that proceeds via simultaneous excitation of two different vibrational modes excited by inelastic tunneling electrons from a scanning tunneling microscope. Specifically, we analyze the dissociation of a single dimethyl disulfide (DMDS, (CH{sub 3}S){sub 2}) molecule on Cu(111) by using a versatile theoretical method, which permits us to simulate reaction rates as a function of sample bias voltage. The reaction is induced by the excitation of C-H stretch and S-S stretch modes by a two-electron process at low positive bias voltages. However, at increased voltages, the dissociation becomes a single-electron process that excites a combination mode of these stretches, where excitation of the C-H stretch is the energy source and excitation of the S-S stretch mode enhances the anharmonic coupling rate. A much smaller dissociation yield (few orders of magnitude) at negative bias voltages is understood in terms of the projected density of states of a single DMDS on Cu(111), which reflects resonant excitation through the molecular orbitals.

  1. Reliability analysis of wake-induced collision of flexible risers

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Ping; Leira, Bernt Johan; Myrhaug, Dag

    2017-01-01

    Collision between risers is an important design and operational concern, especially in deep water since the probability of collision tends to increase as the riser length increases. Riser collision is due to the joint effects of many processes, i.e. environmental loads, hydrodynamic interference and surface floater motions and the most of them are stochastic processes. This paper provides an approach for estimating the failure probability of riser collision by considering these joint effects ...

  2. Ionisation and dissociation of water induced by swift multicharged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, S.

    2006-02-01

    Ionization and dissociation of water molecules and water clusters induced by 11.7 MeV/A Ni 25+ ions were carried out by imaging techniques. Branching ratios, ionisation cross sections and Kinetic Energy Released distributions have been measured together with fragmentation dynamics studies. Multiple ionization represents approximately 30% of the ionizing events. Double ionization produces in significant way atomic oxygen, considered as a possible precursor of the large production of HO 2 radical in liquid water radiolysis by ions of high Linear Energy Transfer. We evidence a strong selectivity of bond breakage in the case of ion-induced HOD fragmentation. Once the molecule doubly ionized, the breakage of the O-H bond is found 6.5 times more probable than that of the O-D bond. A semi-classical calculation simulating the fragmentation dynamics on the potential energy surface of the ground-state of di-cation H 2 O 2+ makes possible to as well reproduce the preferential nature of the breakage of the O-H bond as the position and the shift of the kinetic energy distributions. First results concerning interaction with water clusters are also reported. Measurements in coincidence are carried out giving access to correlation, with the distributions in energy and angle of the emitted fragments. Mass spectrum points fast intra-cluster proton transfer, leading to the emission of protonated clusters. (author)

  3. Attosecond control of dissociative ionization of O{sub 2} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siu, W.; Kelkensberg, F.; Gademann, G. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Johnsson, P. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Dowek, D. [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (UMR Universite Paris-Sud et CNRS, 8625), Batiment 351, Universite Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Lucchini, M.; Calegari, F. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Giovannini, U.; Rubio, A. [Nano-bio Spectroscopy Group, ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Avenida Tolosa 72, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, Post Office Box 30012, College Station, Texas 77842-3012 (United States); Kono, H. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Lepine, F. [Universite Lyon 1/CNRS/LASIM, UMR 5579, 43 Boulevard Du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbane (France)

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate that dissociative ionization of O{sub 2} can be controlled by the relative delay between an attosecond pulse train (APT) and a copropagating infrared (IR) field. Our experiments reveal a dependence of both the branching ratios between a range of electronic states and the fragment angular distributions on the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) to IR time delay. The observations go beyond adiabatic propagation of dissociative wave packets on IR-induced quasistatic potential energy curves and are understood in terms of an IR-induced coupling between electronic states in the molecular ion.

  4. Emission spectroscopic studies on dynamics of molecular excitation and dissociation by controlled electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Teiichiro

    1986-01-01

    Emission spectrum by controlled electron impact has been a successful technique for the investigation of molecular dynamics. (1) Molecular excitation. Aromatic molecules give an optical emission similar to fluorescence. However, as is shown by the vibrational structure and the electron energy dependence of benzene emission, its excitation process is not necessarily optical. Some aliphatic molecules also exhibit an emission band at the ultraviolet region. (2) Molecular dissociation. Analysis of the Doppler profile, the threshold energy, the excitation function and the isotope effect of the atomic emission produced in electron-molecule collisions has clarified the dynamics of the molecular dissociation. Especially the Doppler profile has given the translational energy distribution of the fragment atom, which is very useful to disclose the potential energy curve. Its angular dependence has recently found to allow determination of the symmetry of the intermediate excited state and the magnetic sublevel distribution of the fragment atom. These finding has revealed detailed state-to-state dynamics of the molecular dissociation. (author)

  5. Mechanism of pulse discharge production of iodine atoms from CF3I molecules for a chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetov, I V; Napartovich, A P; Vagin, N P; Yuryshev, N N

    2009-01-01

    The pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) development is aimed at many new applications. Pulsed electric discharge is most effective in turning COIL operation into the pulse mode by instant production of iodine atoms. A numerical model is developed for simulations of the pulsed COIL initiated by an electric discharge. The model comprises a system of kinetic equations for neutral and charged species, electric circuit equation, gas thermal balance equation and the photon balance equation. Reaction rate coefficients for processes involving electrons are found by solving the electron Boltzmann equation, which is re-calculated in a course of computations when plasma parameters changed. The processes accounted for in the Boltzmann equation include excitation and ionization of atoms and molecules, dissociation of molecules, electron attachment processes, electron-ion recombination, electron-electron collisions, second-kind collisions and stepwise excitation of molecules. The last processes are particularly important because of a high singlet oxygen concentration in gas flow from the singlet oxygen chemical generator. Results of numerical simulations are compared with experimental laser pulse waveforms. It is concluded that there is satisfactory agreement between theory and the experiment. The prevailing mechanism of iodine atom formation from the CF 3 I donor in a very complex kinetic system of the COIL medium under pulse discharge conditions, based on their detailed numerical modelling and by comparing these results both with experimental results of other authors and their own experiments, is established. The dominant iodine atom production mechanism for conditions under study is the electron-impact dissociation of CF 3 I molecules. It was proved that in the conditions of the experiment the secondary chemical reactions with O atoms play an insignificant role.

  6. Dissociative recombination by frame transformation to Siegert pseudostates: A comparison with a numerically solvable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvizdoš, Dávid; Váňa, Martin; Houfek, Karel; Greene, Chris H.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William; Čurík, Roman

    2018-02-01

    We present a simple two-dimensional model of the indirect dissociative recombination process. The model has one electronic and one nuclear degree of freedom and it can be solved to high precision, without making any physically motivated approximations, by employing the exterior complex scaling method together with the finite-elements method and discrete variable representation. The approach is applied to solve a model for dissociative recombination of H2 + in the singlet ungerade channels, and the results serve as a benchmark to test validity of several physical approximations commonly used in the computational modeling of dissociative recombination for real molecular targets. The second, approximate, set of calculations employs a combination of multichannel quantum defect theory and frame transformation into a basis of Siegert pseudostates. The cross sections computed with the two methods are compared in detail for collision energies from 0 to 2 eV.

  7. Dissociative disorder manifesting for underlying adolescent hemi-parkinsonism: New chronology for old mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shailesh; Garg, Amit; Khanna, Amit

    2015-08-01

    Dissociative symptoms can be induced by a variety of conditions that can either coexist or mimic each other in clinical presentation. In coexisting dissociative disorder with medical illness, the causality remains uncertain, but sometime its role as nidus for dissociative symptoms just cannot be ruled out. The origin of "organic dissociative disorder" is undoubtedly found by various authors who demonstrated that a high percentage of patients with dissociative symptoms present with some form of neurological insult before developing the symptom. Herein we report on a case of adolescent onset hemi-parkinsonism with coexisting dissociative disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A thermal extrapolation method for the effective temperatures and internal energies of activated ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meot-Ner (Mautner), Michael; Somogyi, Árpád

    2007-11-01

    The internal energies of dissociating ions, activated chemically or collisionally, can be estimated using the kinetics of thermal dissociation. The thermal Arrhenius parameters can be combined with the observed dissociation rate of the activated ions using kdiss = Athermalexp(-Ea,thermal/RTeff). This Arrhenius-type relation yields the effective temperature, Teff, at which the ions would dissociate thermally at the same rate, or yield the same product distributions, as the activated ions. In turn, Teff is used to calculate the internal energy of the ions and the energy deposited by the activation process. The method yields an energy deposition efficiency of 10% for a chemical ionization proton transfer reaction and 8-26% for the surface collisions of various peptide ions. Internal energies of ions activated by chemical ionization or by gas phase collisions, and of ions produced by desorption methods such as fast atom bombardment, can be also evaluated. Thermal extrapolation is especially useful for ion-molecule reaction products and for biological ions, where other methods to evaluate internal energies are laborious or unavailable.

  9. Experimental investigation of gas heating and dissociation in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Liu; Kumar, Rajneesh; Ogungbesan, Babajide; Sassi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma torch. • Gas heating and dissociation. • Parametric studies of plasma operating conditions. • Local thermal equilibrium plasma. - Abstract: Experimental investigations are made to understand gas heating and dissociation in a microwave (MW) plasma torch at atmospheric pressure. The MW induced plasma torch operates at 2.45 GHz frequency and up to 2 kW power. Three different gas mixtures are injected in the form of axial flow and swirl flow in a quartz tube plasma torch to experimentally investigate the MW plasma to gas energy transfer. Air–argon, air–air and air–nitrogen plasmas are formed and their operational ranges are determined in terms of gas flow rates and MW power. Visual observations, optical emission spectroscopy and K-type thermocouple measurements are used to characterize the plasma. The study reveals that the plasma structure is highly dependent on the carrier gas type, gas flow rate, and MW power. However, the plasma gas temperature is shown not to vary much with these parameters. Further spectral and analytical analysis show that the plasma is in thermal equilibrium and presents very good energy coupling between the microwave power and gas heating and dissociation. The MW plasma torch outlet temperature is also measured and found to be suitable for many thermal heating and chemical dissociation applications

  10. Thermal dissociation and relaxation in vinyl fluoride, 1,1-difluoroethane and 1,3,5-triazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui

    This study reports measurements of the thermal dissociation of 1,1-difluoroethane in the shock tube. The experiments employ laser schlieren measurements of rate for the dominant HF elimination using 10% 1,1-difluoroethane in Kr over 1500--2000 K and 43 difluoroethane based on a G3B3 calculation of barrier and other properties fits the experiments but requires a very large down of 1600cm-1 . Dissociation of vinyl fluoride has two parallel HF eliminations both three-center and four-center with nearly equal barriers. An RRKM fit to the observed falloff again requires an unusually large down and the experiments actually support a slightly reduced barrier. Both 1,3,5-triazine and pyrazine relax extremely rapidly with energy transfer in a few collisions, any incubation delay can be confidently discounted in dissociation. 1,3,5-triazine dissociation experiments show fall-off with a clear pressure dependence. The three body product dissociation mechanism models this dissociation perfectly. Experimental data agree well with an RRKM calculation using a down of 1200cm-1 and a barrier E0 = 84.66 kcal/mol. Dyakov et al. suggested lower barrier of E0 = 81 kcal/mole. The new RRKM calculation using this barrier seems a better fit to the experiments. The falloff is now fit well with a down of the more usual form 126(T/298) 0-9 cm-1.

  11. Chemical reactions of water molecules on Ru(0001) induced by selective excitation of vibrational modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugarza, Aitor; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-05-07

    Tunneling electrons in a scanning tunneling microscope were used to excite specific vibrational quantum states of adsorbed water and hydroxyl molecules on a Ru(0 0 0 1) surface. The excited molecules relaxed by transfer of energy to lower energy modes, resulting in diffusion, dissociation, desorption, and surface-tip transfer processes. Diffusion of H{sub 2}O molecules could be induced by excitation of the O-H stretch vibration mode at 445 meV. Isolated molecules required excitation of one single quantum while molecules bonded to a C atom required at least two quanta. Dissociation of single H{sub 2}O molecules into H and OH required electron energies of 1 eV or higher while dissociation of OH required at least 2 eV electrons. In contrast, water molecules forming part of a cluster could be dissociated with electron energies of 0.5 eV.

  12. Role of N2 molecules in pulse discharge production of I atoms for a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetov, I V; Napartovich, A P; Vagin, N P; Yuryshev, N N

    2011-01-01

    A pulsed electric discharge is the most effective means to turn chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) operation into the pulse mode by fast production of iodine atoms. Experimental studies and numerical simulations are performed on a pulsed COIL initiated by an electric discharge in a mixture CF 3 I : N 2 : O 2 ( 3 X) : O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) flowing out of a chemical singlet oxygen generator. A transverse pulsed discharge is realized at various iodide pressures. The model comprises a system of kinetic equations for neutral and charged species, the electric circuit equation, the gas thermal balance equation and the photon balance equation. Reaction rate coefficients for processes involving electrons are repeatedly re-calculated by the electron Boltzmann equation solver when the plasma parameters are changed. The processes accounted for in the Boltzmann equation include direct and stepwise excitation and ionization of atoms and molecules, dissociation of molecules, electron attachment processes, electron-ion recombination, electron-electron collisions and second-kind collisions. The last processes are particularly important because of a high singlet oxygen concentration in gas flow from the singlet oxygen chemical generator. A conclusion is drawn about satisfactory agreement between the theory and the experiment.

  13. Measurement of ion species produced due to bombardment of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with hydrocarbons-covered surface of tungsten: Formation of tungsten nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Bhatt, P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kumar, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Singh, B.K.; Singh, B.; Prajapati, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Shanker, R., E-mail: shankerorama@gmail.com [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-08-01

    A laboratory experiment has been performed to study the ions that are produced due to collisions of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with a hydrocarbons-covered surface of polycrystalline tungsten at room temperature. Using a TOF mass spectrometry technique, the product ions formed in these collisions have been detected, identified and analyzed. Different ion–surface reaction processes, namely, neutralization, reflection, surface induced dissociation, surface induced chemical reactions and desorption are observed and discussed. Apart from the presence of desorbed aliphatic hydrocarbon and other ions, the mass spectra obtained from the considered collisions show the formation and sputtering of tungsten nitride (WN). A layer of WN on tungsten surface is known to decrease the sputtering of bulk tungsten in fusion devices more effectively than when the tungsten is bombarded with other seeding gases (He, Ar). It is further noted that there is a negligible diffusion of N in the bulk tungsten at room temperature.

  14. Dissociative Excitation of Acetylene Induced by Electron Impact: Excitation-emission Cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Országh, Juraj; Danko, Marián; Čechvala, Peter; Matejčík, Štefan, E-mail: matejcik@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina F-2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-05-20

    The optical emission spectrum of acetylene excited by monoenergetic electrons was studied in the range of 190–660 nm. The dissociative excitation and dissociative ionization associated with excitation of the ions initiated by electron impact were dominant processes contributing to the spectrum. The spectrum was dominated by the atomic lines (hydrogen Balmer series, carbon) and molecular bands (CH(A–X), CH(B–X), CH{sup +}(B–A), and C{sub 2}). Besides the discrete transitions, we have detected the continuum emission radiation of ethynyl radical C{sub 2}H(A–X). For most important lines and bands of the spectrum we have measured absolute excitation-emission cross sections and determined the energy thresholds of the particular dissociative channels.

  15. Electron collisions with biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKoy, V; Winstead, C

    2008-01-01

    We report on results of recent studies of collisions of low-energy electrons with nucleobases and other DNA constituents. A particular focus of these studies has been the identification and characterization of resonances that play a role in electron attachment leading to strand breaks in DNA. Comparison of the calculated resonance positions with results of electron transmission measurements is quite encouraging. However, the higher-lying π* resonances of the nucleobases appear to be of mixed elastic and core-excited character. Such resonant channel coupling raises the interesting possibility that the higher π*resonances in the nucleobases may promote dissociation of DNA by providing doorway states to triplet excited states.

  16. Dissociation kinetics of iodine in oxygen-containing electrical discharge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, A.I.; Klopovskii, K.S.; Rakhimova, T.V.; Samorodov, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the kinetics of gaseous media containing oxygen and iodine molecules have been stimulated to a substantial degree by the search for ways of improving iodine-oxygen lasers and by the need for information on loss processes for atmospheric ozone. Results are presented from an experimental study and numerical simulations of the kinetics of the dissociation of iodine in self-sustained volume discharges in high-pressure O 2 :Ar:I 2 mixtures. It is shown that the well-studied mechanism for dissociation based on excitation of iodine molecules in successive collisions with singlet oxygen and excited iodine atoms is supplanted by a substantially different mechanism involving the creation and loss of 10 radicals when the densities of atomic oxygen and ozone are high enough. It is also shown that iodine fractions as low as ∼10 -3 in the mixture lead to rapid loss of ozone molecules while less than 18% of the discharge energy is expended in the production of singlet oxygen

  17. Doubly charmed baryon production in heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaojun; Müller, Berndt

    2018-04-01

    We give an estimate of Ξcc ++ production rate and transverse momentum spectra in relativistic heavy ion collisions. We use Boltzmann transport equations to describe the dynamical evolution of charm quarks and diquarks inside quark-gluon plasma. In-medium formation and dissociation rates of charm diquarks are calculated from potential nonrelativistic QCD for the diquark sector. We solve the transport equations by Monte Carlo simulations. For 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions with 0-10% centrality, the number of Ξcc ++ produced in the transverse momentum range 0-5 GeV and rapidity from -1 to 1 is roughly 0.02 per collision. We repeat the calculation with a melting temperature 250 MeV above which no diquarks can be formed. The number of Ξcc ++ produced in the same kinematic region is about 0.0125 per collision. We discuss how to study diquarks at finite temperature on a lattice and construct the antitriplet free energy in a gauge invariant but path dependent way. We also comment on extensions of the calculation to other doubly heavy baryons and doubly heavy tetraquarks and the feasibility of experimental measurements.

  18. Elastic and Proton-Dissociative Photoproduction of J/psi Mesons at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Alexa, C.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kramer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2013-06-15

    Cross sections for elastic and proton-dissociative photoproduction of J/psi mesons are measured with the H1 detector in positron-proton collisions at HERA. The data were collected at $ep$ centre-of-mass energies sqrt{s} approx 318 GeV and sqrt{s} approx 225 GeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of L = 130 pb^{-1} and L = 10.8 pb^{-1}, respectively. The cross sections are measured as a function of the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy in the range 25< Wgp < 110 GeV. Differential cross sections $\\mathrm{d}\\sigma / \\mathrm{d}t$, where $t$ is the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex, are measured in the range $|t| < 1.2 \\, \\gevsq$ for the elastic process and $|t| < 8 \\, \\gevsq$ for proton dissociation. The results are compared to other measurements. The $\\Wgp$ and $t$-dependences are parametrised using phenomenological fits.

  19. Advances in the MQDT approach of electron/molecular cation reactive collisions: High precision extensive calculations for applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motapon O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the stepwise multichannel quantum defect theory approach of electron/molecular cation reactive collisions have been applied to perform computations of cross sections and rate coefficients for dissociative recombination and electron-impact ro-vibrational transitions of H2+, BeH+ and their deuterated isotopomers. At very low energy, rovibronic interactions play a significant role in the dynamics, whereas at high energy, the dissociative excitation strongly competes with all other reactive processes.

  20. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-01-01

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He + 2 . The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He + 2 , which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD + is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  1. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-07-26

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He{sup +}{sub 2}. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He{sup +}{sub 2}, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD{sup +} is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  2. Transient heat transfer in a directly-irradiated solar chemical reactor for the thermal dissociation of ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.; Lipinski, W.; Steinfeld, A.

    2008-01-01

    A numerical and experimental investigation is carried out in a solar thermochemical reactor for the thermal dissociation of ZnO at 2000 K using concentrated solar energy. The reactor consists of a cavity-receiver lined with ZnO particles and directly exposed to high-flux irradiation. A transient heat transfer model is formulated to link the rate of radiation, convection, and conduction heat transfer to the reaction kinetics. The radiosity and Monte Carlo methods are applied to obtain the distribution of net radiative fluxes at the internal surfaces of the reactor cavity and at the surface of the ZnO bed. Validation is accomplished in terms of the calculated and measured transient temperature profiles and chemical reaction rates

  3. Dissociative absorption: An empirically unique, clinically relevant, dissociative factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer-Dudek, Nirit; Lassri, Dana; Soffer-Dudek, Nir; Shahar, Golan

    2015-11-01

    Research of dissociative absorption has raised two questions: (a) Is absorption a unique dissociative factor within a three-factor structure, or a part of one general dissociative factor? Even when three factors are found, the specificity of the absorption factor is questionable. (b) Is absorption implicated in psychopathology? Although commonly viewed as "non-clinical" dissociation, absorption was recently hypothesized to be specifically associated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms. To address these questions, we conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on 679 undergraduates. Analyses supported the three-factor model, and a "purified" absorption scale was extracted from the original inclusive absorption factor. The purified scale predicted several psychopathology scales. As hypothesized, absorption was a stronger predictor of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than of general psychopathology. In addition, absorption was the only dissociative scale that longitudinally predicted obsessive-compulsive symptoms. We conclude that absorption is a unique and clinically relevant dissociative tendency that is particularly meaningful to obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dissociation of the Phenylarsane Molecular Ion: A Theoretical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Young; Choe, Joong Chul [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The potential energy surfaces (PESs) for the primary and secondary dissociations of the phenylarsane molecular ion (1a) were determined from the quantum chemical calculations using the G3(MP2)//B3LYP method. Several pathways for the loss of H· were determined and occurred though rearrangements as well as through direct bond cleavages. The kinetic analysis based on the PES for the primary dissociation showed that the loss of H{sub 2} was more favored than the loss of H·, but the H· loss competed with the H{sub 2} loss at high energies. The bicyclic isomer, 7-arsa-norcaradiene radical cation, was formed through the 1,2 shift of an α-H of 1a and played an important role as an intermediate for the further rearrangements in the loss of H· and the losses of As· and AsH. The reaction pathways for the formation of the major products in the secondary dissociations of [M-H]{sup +} and [M-H{sub 2}]{sup +·} were examined. The theoretical prediction explained the previous experimental results for the dissociation at high energies but not the dissociation at low energies.

  5. Dissociative symptoms and dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Hasan; Ural, Cenk; Vardar, Melek Kanarya; Yesılyurt, Sema; Oncu, Fatıh

    2012-10-01

    The present study attempted to assess the dissociative symptoms and overall dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In addition, we examined the relationship between the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and dissociative symptoms. All patients admitted for the first time to the psychiatric outpatient unit were included in the study. Seventy-eight patients had been diagnosed as having OCD during the 2-year study period. Patients had to meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for OCD. Most (76.9%; n = 60) of the patients were female, and 23.1% (n = 18) of the patients were male. Dissociation Questionnaire was used to measure dissociative symptoms. The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Dissociative Disorders interviews and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Checklist and Severity Scale were used. Eleven (14%) of the patients with OCD had comorbid dissociative disorder. The most prevalent disorder in our study was dissociative depersonalization disorder. Dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder were common as well. The mean Yale-Brown score was 23.37 ± 7.27 points. Dissociation Questionnaire scores were between 0.40 and 3.87 points, and the mean was 2.23 ± 0.76 points. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between Yale-Brown points and Dissociation Questionnaire points. We conclude that dissociative symptoms among patients with OCD should alert clinicians for the presence of a chronic and complex dissociative disorder. Clinicians may overlook an underlying dissociative process in patients who have severe symptoms of OCD. However, a lack of adequate response to cognitive-behavioral and drug therapy may be a consequence of dissociative process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface Collisions of Small Cluster Ions at Incident Energies 10-102 eV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 233, - (2004), s. 361-371 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 561 Grant - others:XE(CZ) EURATOM-IPP.CR Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : surface collisions * cluster ions * unimolecular dissociation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2004

  7. In-medium Modifications of Hadron Masses and Chemical Freeze-out in Ultra-relativistic Heavy-ion Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florkowski, W.; Broniowski, W.

    1999-10-01

    We confront the hypothesis of chemical freeze-out in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions with the hypothesis of large modifications of hadron masses in nuclear medium. We find that the thermal-model predictions for the ratios of particle multiplicities are sensitive to the values of in-medium hadronic masses. In particular, the π + /p ratio decreases by 35% when the masses of all hadrons (except for pseudo-Goldstone bosons) are scaled down by 30%. (author)

  8. Analysis of Nitro-aromatic and Nitramine Explosives by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization / High Performance Liquid Chromatography / Mass Spectrometry / Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, B.J.; Han, W.; Robben, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    This procedure is capable of separating and quantifying twenty-nine high explosives and internal surrogates with a single injection. After the initial preparation step, the sample is introduced to the high performance liquid chromatograph for target separation, ionized by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and the explosives of interest are isolated / quantified by mass spectrometry / mass spectrometry. Concentrations of the target explosives are measured relative to the response of both internal and external standard concentrations. A C-18 reverse phase high performance liquid chromatograph column is used for separation. Ionization is performed using both positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization resulting in a molecular ion with little fragmentation. These ions are isolated at the first quadrupole of the mass spectrometer, dissociated by collision with argon in the collision cell and the resulting daughter ions are isolated at the second quadrupole. These daughter ions then reach the detector where they are quantified. To date this procedure represents the most thorough high performance liquid chromatography / mass spectrometry / mass spectrometry explosives analysis available in the environmental chemistry market. (authors)

  9. Exploring the oxidation and iron binding profile of a cyclodextrin encapsulated quercetin complex unveiled a controlled complex dissociation through a chemical stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantis, Dimitrios A; Ramesova, Sarka; Chatzigiannis, Christos M; Degano, Ilaria; Gerogianni, Paraskevi S; Karadima, Constantina; Perikleous, Sonia; Rekkas, Dimitrios; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P; Galaris, Dimitrios; Mavromoustakos, Thomas; Valsami, Georgia; Sokolova, Romana; Tzakos, Andreas G

    2018-06-07

    Flavonoids possess a rich polypharmacological profile and their biological role is linked to their oxidation state protecting DNA from oxidative stress damage. However, their bioavailability is hampered due to their poor aqueous solubility. This can be surpassed through encapsulation to supramolecular carriers as cyclodextrin (CD). A quercetin- 2HP-β-CD complex has been formerly reported by us. However, once the flavonoid is in its 2HP-β-CD encapsulated state its oxidation potential, its decomplexation mechanism, its potential to protect DNA damage from oxidative stress remained elusive. To unveil this, an array of biophysical techniques was used. The quercetin-2HP-β-CD complex was evaluated through solubility and dissolution experiments, electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical studies (Cyclic Voltammetry) UV-Vis spectroscopy, HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and HPLC-DAD, fluorescence spectroscopy, NMR Spectroscopy, theoretical calculations (density functional theory (DFT)) and biological evaluation of the protection offered against H 2 O 2 -induced DNA damage. Encapsulation of quercetin inside the supramolecule's cavity enhanced its solubility and oxidation profile is retained in its encapsulated state. Although the protective ability of the quercetin-2HP-β-CD complex against H 2 O 2 was diminished, iron serves as a chemical stimulus to dissociate the complex and release quercetin. We found that in a quercetin-2HP-β-CD inclusion complex quercetin retains its oxidation profile similarly to its native state, while iron can operate as a chemical stimulus to release quercetin from its host cavity. The oxidation profile of a natural product once it is encapsulated in a supramolecular cyclodextrin carrier as also it was discovered that decomplexation can be triggered by a chemical stimulus. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Specific cationic emission of cisplatin following ionization by swift protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto-Capelle, P.; Champeaux, J.P.; Deville, C.; Sence, M.; Cafarelli, P.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated collision-induced ionization and fragmentation by 100 keV protons of the radio sensitizing molecule cisplatin, which is used in cancer treatments. A large emission of HCl"+ and NH_2"+ is observed, but surprisingly, no cationic fragments containing platinum are detected, in contrast to ionization-dissociation induced by electronic collision. Theoretical investigations show that the ionization processes take place on platinum and on chlorine atoms. We propose new ionization potentials for cisplatin. Dissociation limits corresponding to the measured fragmentation mass spectrum have been evaluated and the theoretical results show that the non-observed cationic fragments containing platinum are mostly associated with low dissociation energies. We have also investigated the reaction path for the hydrogen transfer from the NH_3 group to the Cl atom, as well as the corresponding dissociation limits from this tautomeric form. Here again the cations containing platinum correspond to lower dissociation limits. Thus, the experimental results suggest that excited states, probably formed via inner-shell ionization of the platinum atom of the molecule, correlated to higher dissociation limits are favored. (authors)

  11. Specific cationic emission of cisplatin following ionization by swift protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto-Capelle, Patrick; Champeaux, Jean-Philippe; Deville, Charlotte; Sence, Martine; Cafarelli, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated collision-induced ionization and fragmentation by 100 keV protons of the radio sensitizing molecule cisplatin, which is used in cancer treatments. A large emission of HCl+ and NH2+ is observed, but surprisingly, no cationic fragments containing platinum are detected, in contrast to ionization-dissociation induced by electronic collision. Theoretical investigations show that the ionization processes take place on platinum and on chlorine atoms. We propose new ionization potentials for cisplatin. Dissociation limits corresponding to the measured fragmentation mass spectrum have been evaluated and the theoretical results show that the non-observed cationic fragments containing platinum are mostly associated with low dissociation energies. We have also investigated the reaction path for the hydrogen transfer from the NH3 group to the Cl atom, as well as the corresponding dissociation limits from this tautomeric form. Here again the cations containing platinum correspond to lower dissociation limits. Thus, the experimental results suggest that excited states, probably formed via inner-shell ionization of the platinum atom of the molecule, correlated to higher dissociation limits are favored.

  12. Elementary Statistical Models for Vector Collision-Sequence Interference Effects with Poisson-Distributed Collision Times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper (Lewis, 2008) a class of models suitable for application to collision-sequence interference was introduced. In these models velocities are assumed to be completely randomized in each collision. The distribution of velocities was assumed to be Gaussian. The integrated induced dipole moment μk, for vector interference, or the scalar modulation μk, for scalar interference, was assumed to be a function of the impulse (integrated force) fk, or its magnitude fk, experienced by the molecule in a collision. For most of (Lewis, 2008) it was assumed that μk fk and μk fk, but it proved to be possible to extend the models, so that the magnitude of the induced dipole moment is equal to an arbitrary power or sum of powers of the intermolecular force. This allows estimates of the in filling of the interference dip by the dis proportionality of the induced dipole moment and force. One particular such model, using data from (Herman and Lewis, 2006), leads to the most realistic estimate for the in filling of the vector interference dip yet obtained. In (Lewis, 2008) the drastic assumption was made that collision times occurred at equal intervals. In the present paper that assumption is removed: the collision times are taken to form a Poisson process. This is much more realistic than the equal-intervals assumption. The interference dip is found to be a Lorentzian in this model

  13. Total Peroxy Nitrates (ΣPNs in the atmosphere: the Thermal Dissociation-Laser Induced Fluorescence (TD-LIF technique and comparisons to speciated PAN measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. LaFranchi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN and its chemical analogues are increasingly being quantified in the ambient atmosphere by thermal dissociation (TD followed by detection of either the peroxyacyl radical or the NO2 product. Here we present details of the technique developed at University of California, Berkeley which detects the sum of all peroxynitrates (ΣPNs via laser-induced fluorescence (LIF of the NO2 product. We review the various deployments and compare the Berkeley ΣPNs measurements with the sums of PAN and its homologue species detected individually by other instruments. The observed TD-LIF ΣPNs usually agree to within 10% with the summed individual species, thus arguing against the presence of significant concentrations of unmeasured PAN-type compounds in the atmosphere, as suggested by some photochemical mechanisms. Examples of poorer agreement are attributed to a sampling inlet design that is shown to be inappropriate for high NOx conditions. Interferences to the TD-LIF measurements are described along with strategies to minimize their effects.

  14. Perception, action, and Roelofs effect: a mere illusion of dissociation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Dassonville

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A prominent and influential hypothesis of vision suggests the existence of two separate visual systems within the brain, one creating our perception of the world and another guiding our actions within it. The induced Roelofs effect has been described as providing strong evidence for this perception/action dissociation: When a small visual target is surrounded by a large frame positioned so that the frame's center is offset from the observer's midline, the perceived location of the target is shifted in the direction opposite the frame's offset. In spite of this perceptual mislocalization, however, the observer can accurately guide movements to the target location. Thus, perception is prone to the illusion while actions seem immune. Here we demonstrate that the Roelofs illusion is caused by a frame-induced transient distortion of the observer's apparent midline. We further demonstrate that actions guided to targets within this same distorted egocentric reference frame are fully expected to be accurate, since the errors of target localization will exactly cancel the errors of motor guidance. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the various perceptual and motor effects of the induced Roelofs illusion without requiring the existence of separate neural systems for perception and action. Given this, the behavioral dissociation that accompanies the Roelofs effect cannot be considered evidence of a dissociation of perception and action. This indicates a general need to re-evaluate the broad class of evidence purported to support this hypothesized dissociation.

  15. Elastic and proton-dissociative photoproduction of J/{psi} mesons at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia)] [and others; Collaboration: H1 Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    Cross sections for elastic and proton-dissociative photoproduction of J/{psi} mesons are measured with the H1 detector in positron-proton collisions at HERA. The data were collected at ep centre-of-mass energies {radical}(s){approx}318 GeV and {radical}(s){approx}225 GeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of L=130 pb{sup -1} and L=10.8 pb{sup -1}, respectively. The cross sections are measured as a function of the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy in the range 25dissociation. The results are compared to other measurements. The W{sub {gamma}p} and t-dependences are parametrised using phenomenological fits.

  16. Elastic and proton-dissociative photoproduction of J/{psi} mesons at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexa, C.; Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Kleinwort, C.; Kraemer, M.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Boudry, V.; Specka, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Pandurovic, M. [University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Brandt, G. [Oxford University, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Orsay (France); Buniatyan, A.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Lubimov, V.; Rostovtsev, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E. [CINVESTAV, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Ceccopieri, F.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Staykova, Z.; Mechelen, P. van [Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Brussels (Belgium); Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerpen (Belgium); Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Cvach, J.; Hladky, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Daum, K.; Meyer, H. [Universitaet Wuppertal, Fachbereich C, Wuppertal (Germany); Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C. [Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM, Marseille (France); Dodonov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Dossanov, A. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L. [CE-Saclay, CEA, DSM/Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferencei, J. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Experimental Physics, Kosice (Slovakia); Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Grab, C. [ETH, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Henderson, R.C.W. [University of Lancaster, Department of Physics, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R. [CINVESTAV IPN, Departamento de Fisica, Mexico City (Mexico); Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Joensson, L. [University of Lund, Physics Department, Lund (Sweden); Jung, H. [Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Brussels (Belgium); Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerpen (Belgium); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kogler, R.; Nowak, K. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D. [Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Martyn, H.U. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [University of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (Montenegro); Soloviev, Y. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stella, B. [Universita di Roma Tre (Italy); INFN Roma 3, Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Sykora, T. [Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Brussels (Belgium); Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerpen (Belgium); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Tsakov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Wegener, D. [TU Dortmund, Institut fuer Physik, Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: The H1 Collaboration

    2013-06-15

    Cross sections for elastic and proton-dissociative photoproduction of J/{psi} mesons are measured with the H1 detector in positron-proton collisions at HERA. The data were collected at ep centre-of-mass energies {radical}(s) {approx} 318 GeV and {radical}(s) {approx} 225 GeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of L = 130 pb{sup -1} and L = 10.8 pb{sup -1}, respectively. The cross sections are measured as a function of the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy in the range 25 < W{sub {gamma}p} < 110 GeV. Differential cross sections d {sigma}/dt, where t is the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex, are measured in the range vertical stroke t vertical stroke < 1.2 GeV{sup 2} for the elastic process and vertical stroke t vertical stroke <8 GeV{sup 2} for proton dissociation. The results are compared to other measurements. The W{sub {gamma}p} and t-dependences are parametrised using phenomenological fits. (orig.)

  17. Strangeness production in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redlich, K.

    2001-05-01

    Strangeness production in heavy ion collisions is discussed in a broad energy range from SIS to RHIC. In the whole energy range particle yields are showing high level of chemical equilibration which can be described by the unified freezeout conditions of fixed energy/particle ≅ 1GeV. The statistical model within the canonical formulation of strangeness conservation provides a framework to describe the observed enhancement of (multi)strange particles from p+A to A+A collisions measured at the SPS energy and predicts that this enhancement should be larger for decreasing collision energy. However, only at the SPS and RHIC chemical freezeout temperature is consistent within error with the critical value required for deconfinement and simultaneously strangeness is uncorrelated and distributed in the whole volume of the fireball. (orig.)

  18. Dissociation in patients with dissociative seizures: relationships with trauma and seizure symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, S; Mellers, J D C; Goldstein, L H

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to extend the current understanding of dissociative symptoms experienced by patients with dissociative (psychogenic, non-epileptic) seizures (DS), including psychological and somatoform types of symptomatology. An additional aim was to assess possible relationships between dissociation, traumatic experiences, post-traumatic symptoms and seizure manifestations in this group. A total of 40 patients with DS were compared with a healthy control group (n = 43), matched on relevant demographic characteristics. Participants completed several self-report questionnaires, including the Multiscale Dissociation Inventory (MDI), Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire-20, Traumatic Experiences Checklist and the Post-Traumatic Diagnostic Scale. Measures of seizure symptoms and current emotional distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were also administered. The clinical group reported significantly more psychological and somatoform dissociative symptoms, trauma, perceived impact of trauma, and post-traumatic symptoms than controls. Some dissociative symptoms (i.e. MDI disengagement, MDI depersonalization, MDI derealization, MDI memory disturbance, and somatoform dissociation scores) were elevated even after controlling for emotional distress; MDI depersonalization scores correlated positively with trauma scores while seizure symptoms correlated with MDI depersonalization, derealization and identity dissociation scores. Exploratory analyses indicated that somatoform dissociation specifically mediated the relationship between reported sexual abuse and DS diagnosis, along with depressive symptoms. A range of psychological and somatoform dissociative symptoms, traumatic experiences and post-traumatic symptoms are elevated in patients with DS relative to healthy controls, and seem related to seizure manifestations. Further studies are needed to explore peri-ictal dissociative experiences in more detail.

  19. Non-collision backgrounds in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, S M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The proton-proton collision events recorded by the ATLAS experiment are on top of a background that is due to both collision debris and non-collision components. The latter comprises of three types: beam-induced backgrounds, cosmic particles and detector noise. We present studies that focus on the first two of these. We give a detailed description of beam-related and cosmic backgrounds based on the full 2011 ATLAS data set, and present their rates throughout the whole data-taking period. Studies of correlations between tertiary proton halo and muon backgrounds, as well as, residual pressure and resulting beam-gas events seen in beam-condition monitors will be presented. Results of simulations based on the LHC geometry and its parameters will be presented. They help to better understand the features of beam-induced backgrounds in each ATLAS sub-detector. The studies of beam-induced backgrounds in ATLAS reveal their characteristics and serve as a basis for designing rejection tools that can be applied in physic...

  20. Feasibility of large-scale phosphoproteomics with higher energy collisional dissociation fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; D'Souza, Rochelle C J; Cox, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics now enables the analysis of thousands of phosphorylation sites in single projects. Among a wide range of analytical approaches, the combination of high resolution MS scans in an Orbitrap analyzer with low resolution MS/MS scans in a linear ion trap has proven......-scale phosphoproteome analysis alongside collisional induced dissociation, (CID) and electron capture/transfer dissociation (ECD/ETD)....

  1. Dissociation energies of six NO2 isotopologues by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy and zero point energy of some triatomic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, G; Jost, R; Sugny, D; Joyeux, M; Thiemens, M

    2004-10-15

    We have measured the rotationless photodissociation threshold of six isotopologues of NO2 containing 14N, 15N, 16O, and 18O isotopes using laser induced fluorescence detection and jet cooled NO2 (to avoid rotational congestion). For each isotopologue, the spectrum is very dense below the dissociation energy while fluorescence disappears abruptly above it. The six dissociation energies ranged from 25 128.56 cm(-1) for 14N16O2 to 25 171.80 cm(-1) for 15N18O2. The zero point energy for the NO2 isotopologues was determined from experimental vibrational energies, application of the Dunham expansion, and from canonical perturbation theory using several potential energy surfaces. Using the experimentally determined dissociation energies and the calculated zero point energies of the parent NO2 isotopologue and of the NO product(s) we determined that there is a common De = 26 051.17+/-0.70 cm(-1) using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The canonical perturbation theory was then used to calculate the zero point energy of all stable isotopologues of SO2, CO2, and O3, which are compared with previous determinations.

  2. Hydrogen dissociation on metal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Wijzenbroek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Dissociative chemisorption is an important reaction step in many catalytic reactions. An example of such a reaction is the Haber-Bosch process, which is used commercially to produce ammonia, an important starting material in the production of fertilisers. In theoretical descriptions of such chemical processes often approximations need to be made in order to keep the computational cost feasible, such as fixing the surface atoms in place, rather than allowing them to vibrate. In this work, seve...

  3. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  4. Orientation dependence in collision induced electronic relaxation studied through van der Waals complexes with isomeric structures. Invited feature article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, P.Y.; Lapierre, L.; Ju, S.S.; DeRose, P.; Dai, H.L.

    1994-01-01

    Weakly bound molecular complexes with more than one well-defined structures provide us with an unique opportunity to investigate dynamic processes induced by intermolecular interactions with specific orientations. The relative orientation of the two interacting molecules or atoms is defined by the complex structure. The effect of the orientation in the spin changing collisions glyoxal (S 1 ) + Ar → glyoxal (T 1 ) + Ar and acetylene (S 1 ) + Ar → acetylene (T) + Ar have been studied by measuring the intersystem crossing (ISC) rates of the glyoxal(S 1 ).Ar and acetylene(S 1 ).Ar complexes with different isomeric structures. Results show that there is a strong orientation dependence in the ISC of glyoxal(S 1 ) induced by interaction with the Ar atom: the Ar atom positioned in the molecular plane is much more effective than in the out-of-plane position in inducing the S 1 → T 1 transition of glyoxal. On the other hand, studies of acetylene(S 1 ).Ar complexes indicate that the Ar-induced ISC rates are nearly identical for the in-plane and out-of-plane positions. Orientation dependence in the collision induced vibrational relaxation process C 2 H 2 (S 1 , v i ) + Ar → C 2 H 2 (S 1 , v f i ) + Ar is also studied by measuring the vibrational predissociation rates of the acetylene(S 1 ).Ar complex isomers. The results indicate that collisions of C 2 H 2 (S 1 , v 3 = 3, 4) with Ar at two orthogonal orientations are equally effective in causing vibrational relaxation of C 2 H 2 . (orig.)

  5. Extension of CE/SE method to non-equilibrium dissociating flows

    KAUST Repository

    Wen, C.Y.; Saldivar Massimi, H.; Shen, Hua

    2017-01-01

    and quadrilateral elements. The dissociating and recombination chemical reactions as well as the vibrational energy relaxation are taken into account. The stiff source terms are solved by an implicit trapezoidal method of integration. Comparison with laboratory

  6. Effect of ketamine dose on self-rated dissociation in patients with treatment refractory anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Cameron; Gray, Andrew; Neehoff, Shona; Glue, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Patients receiving ketamine for refractory depression and anxiety report dissociative symptoms in the first 60 min post-dose. The most commonly used instrument to assess this is the Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale (CADSS), developed based on the assessment of patients with dissociative symptoms. Its psychometric properties for ketamine-induced dissociation have not been reported. We evaluated these from a study using 0.25-1 mg/kg ketamine and midazolam (as an active control) in 18 patients with treatment-resistant anxiety. Dissociation ratings were increased by ketamine in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, midazolam showed no effect on ratings of dissociation. For individual CADSS items, the magnitude of change and the ketamine dose at which changes were observed were not homogenous. The Cronbach alpha for the total scale was high (0.937), with acceptable item-rest correlations for almost all individual items. Purposefully removing items to maximise alpha did not lead to meaningful improvements. Acceptable internal consistency was still observed after removing items which lacked evidence of responsiveness at lower doses. The high Cronbach alpha values identified in this study suggests that the CADSS is an internally consistent instrument for evaluating ketamine-induced dissociation in clinical trials in anxiety, although it does not capture symptoms such as thought disorder.

  7. Radiative capture versus Coulomb dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esbensen, H.; Physics

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of the Coulomb dissociation of 8 B have been used to infer the rate of the inverse radiative proton capture on 7 Be. The analysis is usually based on the assumptions that the two processes are related by detailed balance and described by E1 transitions. However, there are corrections to this relation. The Coulomb form factors for the two processes, for example, are not identical. There are also E2 transitions and higher-order effects in the Coulomb dissociation, and the nuclear induced breakup cannot always be ignored. While adding first-order E2 transitions enhances the decay energy spectrum, the other mechanisms cause a suppression at low relative energies. The net result may accidentally be close to the conventional first-order E1 calculation, but there are differences which cannot be ignored if accuracies of 10% or better are needed

  8. Radiative Capture versus Coulomb Dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esbensen, Henning

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of the Coulomb dissociation of 8B have been used to infer the rate of the inverse radiative proton capture on 7Be. The analysis is usually based on the assumptions that the two processes are related by detailed balance and described by E1 transitions. However, there are corrections to this relation. The Coulomb form factors for the two processes, for example, are not identical. There are also E2 transitions and higher-order effects in the Coulomb dissociation, and the nuclear induced breakup cannot always be ignored. While adding first-order E2 transitions enhances the decay energy spectrum, the other mechanisms cause a suppression at low relative energies. The net result may accidentally be close to the conventional first-order E1 calculation, but there are differences which cannot be ignored if accuracies of 10% or better are needed

  9. Model of the dissociative recombination of molecular ions based on the statistical 'phase-space theory'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltin, M.; Lukac, P.; Morva, I.; Foltin, V.

    2004-01-01

    In the paper the statistical 'phase-space theory' extended for chemical reactions and for dissociative recombination of polyatomic ions is applied to the indirect and direct dissociative recombination of diatomic ions with electrons. Numerical calculations are made for molecular neon ion. The good agreement is obtained with experimental results (Authors)

  10. Experimental study on the fragmentation of Adenine and Porphyrin molecules induced by low energy multicharged ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, B.

    2010-01-01

    Since the dissociation of small molecules might play key roles in the understanding of radiation induced damages of living tissues at the primary steps and at the molecular levels, fragmentation dynamics of small biomolecules have drawn much attention. The knowledge of the internal energy is of fundamental importance for understanding its fragmentation dynamics following external excitation. For a long time however, it was difficult to measure this parameter in coincidence with the fragmentation patterns until the development of CIDEC (Collision Induced Dissociation under Energy Control) method in 2007. In this work, the CIDEC method was extended to study the fragmentation of gas-phase biomolecules adenine (Ade: H 5 C 5 N 5 ) and porphyrin chloride FeTPPCl (C 44 H 28 N 4 FeCl). The population distribution for each dissociation channel as a function of the excitation energy of the parent molecular ions at a well-determined initial charge state has been experimentally determined, which could shed some light on the fragmentation dynamics of these molecules. In collisions between Cl + and Ade at 3 keV, the fragmentation pattern of Ade 2+ is dominated by the loss of H 2 CN + and the successive emission of HCN. The energy distribution of the parent dication confirms the successive emission dynamics. A specific decay channel is observed, i.e. the emission of a charged H 2 CN + followed by the emission of HC 2 N 2 . The measured mean excitation energies of this channel and other competitive channels are compared. In Kr 8+ - FeTPPCl collisions at 80 keV, parent ions FeTPPCL 1+,2+,3+ are observed, along with the corresponding decay patterns. It is found that, in the first step the dominant low-energy-cost decay channel is the emission of Cl 0 independent of the initial charge state of FeTPPCl r+ . For the resulted dication FeTPP 2+ , the dominant fragmentation channel is the neutral evaporation; for the tri-cation however, the dominant fragmentation channel is the

  11. Direct measurements of methoxy removal rate constants for collisions with CH4, Ar, N2, Xe, and CF4 in the temperature range 673--973K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wantuck, P.J.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Baugchum, S.L.; Winn, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    Removal rate constants for CH 3 O by CH 4 , Ar, N 2 , Xe, and CF 4 were measured over a 400K temperature range using a laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence technique. Rapid methoxy removal rates are observed for the non-reactive collision partners (Ar, N 2 , Xe, and CF 4 ) at elevated temperatures showing that the dissociation and isomerization channels for CH 3 O are indeed important. The total removal rate constant (reaction /plus/ dissociation and/or isomerization) for CH 4 exhibits a linear dependence on temperature and has a removal rate constant, k/sub r/ /equals/ (1.2 +- 0.6) /times/ 10/sup /minus/8/exp[(/minus/101070 +- 350)/T]cm 3 molecule/sup /minus/1/s/sup /minus/1/. Assuming that the removal rate constant due to dissociation and/or isomerization are similar for CH 4 and CF 4 , the reaction rate constant for CH 3 O /plus/ CH 4 is equal to (1.7 +- 1.0) /times/ 10/sup /minus/10/exp[(/minus/7480 +- 1100)/T]cm 3 molecule/sup /minus/1/s/sup /minus/1/. 7 refs., 4 figs

  12. Pain sensitivity and neural processing during dissociative states in patients with borderline personality disorder with and without comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludäscher, Petra; Valerius, Gabriele; Stiglmayr, Christian; Mauchnik, Jana; Lanius, Ruth A; Bohus, Martin; Schmahl, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Stress-induced dissociative states involving analgesia are a common feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Our aim was to investigate the psychologic, somatosensory (pain sensitivity) and neural correlates of dissociative states in patients with these disorders. We included 15 women with BPD who were not taking medication; 10 of these women had comorbid PTSD. While undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla, participants were exposed to a script describing a personalized dissociation-inducing situation and a personalized script describing a neutral situation. We assessed dissociative psychopathology and pain sensitivity. Dissociative psychopathology scores were significantly higher and pain sensitivity was lower after the dissociation-inducing script was read compared with the neutral script. The blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal was significantly increased in the left inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area [BA] 9) during the presentation of the dissociation-inducing script. Regression analyses revealed positive correlations between BOLD signal and dissociative psychopathology in the left superior frontal gyrus (BA 6) and negative correlations in the right middle (BA 21) and inferior temporal gyrus (BA 20). In the subgroup of participants with comorbid PTSD, we also found increased activity in the left cingulate gyrus (BA 32) during script-driven imagery-induced dissociation, a positive correlation between dissociation scores and activity in the right and left insula (BA 13) and a negative correlation in the right parahippocampal gyrus (BA 35). The main limitation of this pilot study is the absence of a control group. Therefore, the results may also reflect the neural correlates of non-BPD/PTSD specific dissociative states or the neural correlates of emotionally stressful or "loaded" memories. Another limitation is the uncorrected statistical level of the functional magnetic resonance

  13. Dissociation in mediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Muraru

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches several texts that are part of the so-called discourse of mediation, adopting a pragma-dialectical perspective of the theory of dissociation. It is an attempt to identify the uses of dissociative patterns, with special emphasis on the indicators of dissociation. The paper investigates the various uses of the concept of dissociation as a discursive technique in the argumentation on the different aspects that are involved in international conflict, such as the discussion of the notion of peace. The purpose is to identify the role of dissociation, as a device strategically used by the mediator to help the parties minimize the disagreement space, and come to a conflict resolution.

  14. Dissociation of conditioned taste avoidance from conditioned disgust reactions induced by wheel running in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Virginia L; McDonald, Sarah V; Sheppard, Robyn C; Caldwell, Catherine L; Heeley, Thomas H; Brown, Adam R; Martin, Gerard M

    2012-06-01

    It is well established that wheel running in rats produces conditioned taste avoidance; that is, rats that run in wheels after consuming a novel-tasting solution later consume less of that solution than rats that do not run. In experiment 1, we found that wheel running also produces conditioned disgust reactions, indicated by gapes elicited by both the taste and context that were experienced before running. Experiment 2 showed that the conditioned disgust reactions were likely not due to running itself but to a by-product of running, the rocking of the wheel that occurs when the running stops. When rocking was reduced, the disgust reactions were also reduced, but consumption of the taste solution was not changed, showing dissociation of conditioned taste avoidance and disgust. These findings indicate that the taste avoidance induced by wheel running itself is more like the taste avoidance produced by rewarding drugs than that produced by nausea-inducing drugs. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Communication: Methane dissociation on Ni(111) surface: Importance of azimuth and surface impact site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Xiangjian; Zhang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Dong H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role of reactant ro-vibrational degrees of freedom (DOFs) in reaction dynamics of polyatomic molecular dissociation on metal surfaces is of great importance to explore the complex chemical reaction mechanism. Here, we present an expensive quantum dynamics study of the dissociative chemisorption of CH 4 on a rigid Ni(111) surface by developing an accurate nine-dimensional quantum dynamical model including the DOF of azimuth. Based on a highly accurate fifteen-dimensional potential energy surface built from first principles, our simulations elucidate that the dissociation probability of CH 4 has the strong dependence on azimuth and surface impact site. Some improvements are suggested to obtain the accurate dissociation probability from quantum dynamics simulations.

  16. Electron transfer dissociation of synthetic and natural peptides containing lanthionine/methyllanthionine bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolle, Ashwini B; Jagadeesh, Narasimhappagari; Bhaumik, Suman; Prakash, Sunita; Biswal, Himansu S; Gowd, Konkallu Hanumae

    2018-06-15

    The modes of cleavage of lanthionine/methyllanthionine bridges under electron transfer dissociation (ETD) were investigated using synthetic and natural lantipeptides. Knowledge of the mass spectrometric fragmentation of lanthionine/methyllanthionine bridges may assist in the development of analytical methods for the rapid discovery of new lantibiotics. The present study strengthens the advantage of ETD in the characterization of posttranslational modifications of peptides and proteins. Synthetic and natural lantipeptides were obtained by desulfurization of peptide disulfides and cyanogen bromide digestion of the lantibiotic nisin, respectively. These peptides were subjected to electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS/MS) and ETD-MS/MS using an HCT ultra ETDII ion trap mass spectrometer. MS 3 CID was performed on the desired product ions to prove cleavage of the lanthionine/methyllanthionine bridge during ETD-MS/MS. ETD has advantages over CID in the cleavage of the side chain of lanthionine/methyllanthionine bridges. The cleavage of the N-Cα backbone peptide bond followed by C-terminal side chain of the lanthionine bridge results in formation of c •+ and z + ions. Cleavage at the preceding peptide bond to the C-terminal side chain of lanthionine/methyllanthionine bridges yields specific fragments with the cysteine/methylcysteine thiyl radical and dehydroalanine. ETD successfully cleaves the lanthionine/methyllanthionine bridges of synthetic and natural lantipeptides. Diagnostic fragment ions of ETD cleavage of lanthionine/methyllanthionine bridges are the N-terminal cysteine/methylcysteine thiyl radical and C-terminal dehydroalanine. Detection of the cysteine/methylcysteine thiyl radical and dehydroalanine in combined ETD-CID-MS may be used for the rapid identification of lantipeptide natural products. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Dissociative recombination of the CH+ molecular ion at low energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, K.; Mezei, J. Zs; Motapon, O.; Faure, A.; Dulieu, O.; Hassouni, K.; Schneider, I. F.

    2018-05-01

    The reactive collision of the CH+ molecular ion with an electron is studied in the framework of the multichannel quantum defect theory, taking into account the contribution of the core-excited Rydberg states. In addition to the X 1Σ+ ground state of the ion, we also consider the contribution to the dynamics of the a 3Π and A 1Π excited states of CH+. Our results—in the case of the dissociative recombination in good agreement with the storage ring measurements—rely on decisive improvements—complete account of the ionisation channels and accurate evaluation of the reaction matrix—of a previously used model.

  18. Carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) adsorption and dissociation on the Cu(100) surface: A quantum chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenju, E-mail: wangwenju1982@163.com; Fan, Lili; Wang, Guoping, E-mail: wgp1976@163.com

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • CS{sub 2}, CS, C and S are strongly chemadsorbed on the Cu(100) surface. • C/S/S, S/CS and CS{sub 2} accord to a decreased adsorption strength on the Cu(100). • The asymmetric model CS{sub 2}(II) is easier to dissociate on the Cu(100) surface. - Abstract: Density functional theory (DFT) is used to examine the adsorption and dissociation of CS{sub 2} on the Cu(100) surface. This study evaluates the adsorption energies and geometries of the species (CS{sub 2}, CS, C and S) adsorption on the Cu(100) surface, as well as that coadsorption of CS and a S atom, and that coadsorption of C atom and two S atoms. The results indicate that the species (CS{sub 2}, CS, C and S) are strongly chemadsorbed on the Cu(100) surface through the C−Cu and/or S−Cu bond with an increased adsorption energy (C/S/S > S/CS > CS{sub 2}). Two pathways for CS{sub 2} dissociation on the Cu(100) surface are constructed, and the energy barrier and reaction energy of each step are calculated. It shows that the dissociated energy barrier of the second C−S bond is 0.25 eV higher than that of the first C−S bond in the pathway 1, but in the pathway 2, the dissociated energy barrier of the second C−S bond is 0.11 eV lower than that of the first C−S bond. Comparing the highest dissociated energy barrier of pathway 1 (0.68 eV) and pathway 2 (0.5 eV), the structure of S/C/S(II) is regarded as a preferable product for the dissociation of CS{sub 2} on the Cu(100) surface.

  19. Fragmentation of CO2 into C+ + O+ + O, in collisions with protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto-Capelle, P.

    2000-01-01

    The fragmentation of CO 2 has been investigated in 25 keV H + + CO 2 collisions using an electron-ion-ion triple coincidence technique. In this letter we focus on the three-body fragmentation into the C + + O + + O final state. A comparison between the measured correlation of C + ,O + and O momenta and simple kinematic models allows us to demonstrate that in the present case, a rather unexpected two-step process with formation of a CO 2+ ion as an intermediate state occurs. This result is at variance with the conclusions of other authors achieved in collisions of photons and electrons with the dioxide molecule. Kinetic energy release distributions in the two steps of the dissociation process are also deduced from experiment; the distributions found for the fragmentation of CO 2+ into C + + O + are found to be very similar to those measured by other authors in collisions of various particles (photons, multi-charged ions) with CO molecules at high enough collision energy. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  20. Low-energy electron-induced dissociation in condensed-phase L-cysteine II: a comparative study on anion desorption from chemisorbed and physisorbed films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, E.; Rowntree, P.A.; Massey, S.; Sanche, L.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become apparent that dissociative attachment of low energy electrons (DEA) is important for the description of radiation damage to biologically relevant molecules and living cells. Due to its multifunctional structure, cysteine is becoming an ideal model molecule for investigating the complex interactions of proteins with metallic surfaces such as gold nanoparticles. We report herein the results of low-energy electron induced degradation of L-cysteine films, chemisorbed on a gold substrate via the thiol group or physisorbed into a clean gold surface. The data were recorded under ultra-high vacuum conditions at room temperature. Anion yields desorbed from these films by the impact of 0.5 to 19 eV electrons provide clear evidence of the efficient decomposition of this amino acid via dissociative electron attachment (i.e., from dissociation of intermediate transient anions located between 5 and 14 eV). The peaks in the desorbed-anion yield functions, associated with DEA, are superimposed on a continuously rising signal attributed to dipolar dissociation. Similar to the results previously observed from physisorbed films, light anionic species, with masses lower than 35 amu, have been detected. In addition, we measured for first time fragments at 14 amu (CH_2"-) and 15 amu (CH_3"-) desorbing from physisorbed films, as well as heavier fragments of mass 45 and 46 amu desorbing from chemisorbed films

  1. Structure of [M + H − H2O]+ from Protonated Tetraglycine Revealed by Tandem Mass Spectrometry and IRMPD Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bythell, B. J.; Dain, Ryan P.; Curtice, Stephanie S.; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Groenewold, Gary S.; la Paizs, Bé; van Stipdonk, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation were used to investigate loss of H2O or CH3OH from protonated versions of GGGX (where X = G, A, and V), GGGGG, and the methyl esters of these peptides. In addition, wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation

  2. Charmonium production in pPb and PbPb collisions at 5.02 TeV with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda

    2017-01-01

    Charmonium states, such as $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi\\left(2S\\right)$ mesons, are excellent probes of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The understanding of charmonium production in PbPb collisions requires the inclusion of many phenomena, such as dissociation in the QGP and statistical recombination, on top of cold nuclear matter effects (modifications of nPDFs, initial-state energy loss, nuclear break-up). Measurements of charmonium production in pPb collisions are crucial in order to disentangle the QGP-related effects from cold nuclear matter effects. In this proceeding, final results on the ratio of $\\psi\\left(2S\\right)$ meson to $J/\\psi$ meson yields in PbPb collisions normalized to pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5.02$~TeV, are reported. In addition, final prompt and nonprompt $J/\\psi$ meson results in pPb collisions at 5.02~TeV are also shown, using the 2015 pp data taken at the same energy. At last, final results are reported regarding prompt $\\psi\\left(2S\\right)$ meson production in pPb collisions at 5.02~TeV, ...

  3. Atom capture and loss in ion molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breinig, M.; Lasley, S.E.; Gaither, C.C. III.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported in measuring the energy and angular distribution of protons emerging with velocity close to the beam velocity from the target region when Ar + beams collide with a CH 4 target and ArH + beams collide with a He target at asymptotically high speeds. The protons result from the transfer of a target constituent to the projectile (atom capture) or from the dissociation of the projectile molecule in the collision (atom loss). For atom capture processes the Thomas peak is clearly observed. 10 refs., 3 figs

  4. Thermalization in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, F.; Lynch, W.G.; Bowman, D.R.; De Souza, R.T.; Gelbke, C.K.; Kim, Y.D.; Phair, L.; Tsang, M.B.; Williams, C.; Xu, H.M.; Dinius, J. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States) National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab., Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States))

    1992-05-28

    Impact parameter dependent excited state populations of intermediate mass fragments are investigated for {sup 36}Ar induced reactions on {sup 197}Au at E/A=35 MeV. Population inversions, indicative of non-thermal excitation mechanisms, are observed in peripheral collisions characterized by low associated charged particle multiplicities. These population inversions disappear for collisions with larger associated charged particle multiplicities, consistent with a more complete thermalization for more complex final states. Discrepancies, observed in central collisions, suggest that the limit of local thermal equilibrium has not yet been observed. (orig.).

  5. Differences in high $p_{t}$ meson production between CERN SPS and RHIC heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, G; Barnafoldi, G G; Yi Zhang; Fái, G; Papp, Gabor; Levai, Peter; Barnafoldi, Gergely G.; Zhang, Yi; Fai, George

    2001-01-01

    In this talk we present a perturbative QCD improved parton model calculation for light meson production in high energy heavy ion collisions. In order to describe the experimental data properly, one needs to augment the standard pQCD model by the transverse momentum distribution of partons ("intrinsic k/sub T/"). Proton-nucleus data indicate the presence of nuclear shadowing and multi-scattering effects. Further corrections are needed in nucleus-nucleus collisions to explain the observed reduction of the cross section. We introduce the idea of proton dissociation and compare our calculations with the SPS and RHIC experimental data. (18 refs).

  6. The co-occurrence of PTSD and dissociation: differentiating severe PTSD from dissociative-PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Richardson, J Don

    2014-08-01

    A dissociative-posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subtype has been included in the DSM-5. However, it is not yet clear whether certain socio-demographic characteristics or psychological/clinical constructs such as comorbid psychopathology differentiate between severe PTSD and dissociative-PTSD. The current study investigated the existence of a dissociative-PTSD subtype and explored whether a number of trauma and clinical covariates could differentiate between severe PTSD alone and dissociative-PTSD. The current study utilized a sample of 432 treatment seeking Canadian military veterans. Participants were assessed with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and self-report measures of traumatic life events, depression, and anxiety. CAPS severity scores were created reflecting the sum of the frequency and intensity items from each of the 17 PTSD and 3 dissociation items. The CAPS severity scores were used as indicators in a latent profile analysis (LPA) to investigate the existence of a dissociative-PTSD subtype. Subsequently, several covariates were added to the model to explore differences between severe PTSD alone and dissociative-PTSD. The LPA identified five classes: one of which constituted a severe PTSD group (30.5 %), and one of which constituted a dissociative-PTSD group (13.7 %). None of the included, demographic, trauma, or clinical covariates were significantly predictive of membership in the dissociative-PTSD group compared to the severe PTSD group. In conclusion, a significant proportion of individuals report high levels of dissociation alongside their PTSD, which constitutes a dissociative-PTSD subtype. Further investigation is needed to identify which factors may increase or decrease the likelihood of membership in a dissociative-PTSD subtype group compared to a severe PTSD only group.

  7. Dissociation in Psychiatric Disorders: A Meta-Analysis of Studies Using the Dissociative Experiences Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyssenko, Lisa; Schmahl, Christian; Bockhacker, Laura; Vonderlin, Ruben; Bohus, Martin; Kleindienst, Nikolaus

    2018-01-01

    Dissociation is a complex, ubiquitous construct in psychopathology. Symptoms of dissociation are present in a variety of mental disorders and have been connected to higher burden of illness and poorer treatment response, and not only in disorders with high levels of dissociation. This meta-analysis offers a systematic and evidence-based study of the prevalence and distribution of dissociation, as assessed by the Dissociative Experiences Scale, within different categories of mental disorders, and it updates an earlier meta-analysis. More than 1,900 original publications were screened, and 216 were included in the meta-analysis, comprising 15,219 individuals in 19 diagnostic categories. The largest mean dissociation scores were found in dissociative disorders (mean scores >35), followed by posttraumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, and conversion disorder (mean scores >25). Somatic symptom disorder, substance-related and addictive disorders, feeding and eating disorders, schizophrenia, anxiety disorder, OCD, and most affective disorders also showed mean dissociation scores >15. Bipolar disorders yielded the lowest dissociation scores (mean score, 14.8). The findings underline the importance of careful psychopathological assessment of dissociative symptoms in the entire range of mental disorders.

  8. Chemical-induced allergy and autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulferink, Marty Bernardus Franciscus

    2001-01-01

    This thesis aims towards a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to chemical-induced adverse immune effects. We focussed thereby on the initial induction stage of the immune reaction that consists of three major steps: (i) formation of neoantigen, (ii) processing and presentation of the

  9. Dissociative electron attachment to vibrationally excited H2 molecules involving the 2Σg+ resonant Rydberg electronic state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiberto, R.; Janev, R.K.; Wadehra, J.M.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections as a function of the incident electron energy and for the initial vibration levels v i = 0–5, 10 of the H 2 molecule. Highlights: ► We calculated electron–hydrogen dissociative attachment cross sections and rates coefficients. ► Collision processes occurring through a resonant Rydberg state are considered. ► Cross sections and rates were obtained for vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules. ► The cross sections exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. ► A comparison with the process involving the electron–hydrogen resonant ground state is discussed. - Abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections (DEA) on vibrationally excited H 2 molecule taking place via the 2 Σ g + Rydberg-excited resonant state are studied using the local complex potential (LCP) model for resonant collisions. The cross sections are calculated for all initial vibrational levels (v i = 0–14) of the neutral molecule. In contrast to the previously noted dramatic increase in the DEA cross sections with increasing v i , when the process proceeds via the X 2 Σ u + shape resonance of H 2 , for the 2 Σ g + Rydberg resonance the cross sections increase only gradually up to v i = 3 and then decrease. Moreover, the cross sections for v i ⩾ 6 exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. A discussion of the origin of the observed behavior of calculated cross sections is given. The DEA rate coefficients for all v i levels are also calculated in the 0.5–1000 eV temperature range.

  10. Search for mode-selective chemistry: The unimolecular dissociation of t-butyl hydroperoxide induced by vibrational overtone excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, D.W.; Farneth, W.E.; Zare, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    The use of optoacoustic spectroscopy permits both the monitoring of the overtone excitation of t-butylhydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) and the in situ detection of the resulting reaction product t-butanol (t-BuOH). The sample is contained in a reaction cell, equipped with a microphone, in which all surfaces have been specially passivated. The cell is placed inside the cavity of a dye laser tuned to excite the 5--0 O--H stretch of the t-BuOOH at 619.0 nm. The dissociation process yields directly xOH and t-BuOx, and the latter readily abstracts a hydrogen atom from a parent molecule to form t-butanol (t-BuOH). The appearance rate of t-BuOH is obtained by ratioing the area under the 5--0 O--H stretch of t-BuOH to that of a combination band of t-BuOOH. At low pressures, below 40 Torr, a plot of the reciprocal of the t-BuOH appearance rate versus total pressure shows near linear behavior. This linearlity can be well described by a statistical model (RRKM) when careful averaging of the dissociation rate over the thermal energy distribution of the photoactivated molecules is included. At pressures above 40 Torr, a marked deviation from linearity appears. This deviation is fit to a kinetic model in which the dissociation rate of an energy nonrandomized molecule competes with the rate of intramolecular energy relaxation. This places a lower bound of > or =5.0 x 10 11 s -1 on the rate of energy randomization. A discussion of this model in the context of other possible kinetic schemes as well as other photoactivated and chemically activated systems is presented

  11. Dressing effect in multiphoton unimolecular dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, P.F.; Garcia-Fernandez, P.

    1986-03-01

    On the basis of a quantum-statistical model recently discussed, we deal in this paper with the perturbations induced by the intense field of a CO/sub 2/ laser on the levels of the vibrational pattern of a molecule undergoing multiphoton unimolecular dissociation. This perturbational correction is investigated by using a displacement operator technique and the results are interpreted according to the statistical model.

  12. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Roland, Christopher, E-mail: cmroland@ncsu.edu; Sagui, Celeste, E-mail: sagui@ncsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute for Computational Science and Technology, SBI Building, Quang Trung Software City, Tan Chanh Hiep Ward, District 12, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  13. Transition probability of the 5971-A line in neutral uranium from collision-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, J.M.; Mongeau, B.; Demers, Y.; Pianarosa, P.

    1981-01-01

    From collision-induced fluorescence spectroscopy measurements, we have determined the transition probability Aof the 5971-A transition in neutral uranium. Our value, A 5971 = (5.9 +- 1.8) x 10 5 sec -1 , is, within experimental error, in good agreement with the previous determination of Corliss, A 5971 = (7.3 +- 3.0) x 10 5 sec -1 [J. Res. Nat. Bur. Stand. Sect. A 80,1 (1976)

  14. Cluster-collision frequency. II. Estimation of the collision rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amadon, A.S.; Marlow, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    Gas-phase cluster-collision rates, including effects of cluster morphology and long-range intermolecular forces, are calculated. Identical pairs of icosahedral or dodecahedral carbon tetrachloride clusters of 13, 33, and 55 molecules in two different relative orientations were discussed in the preceding paper [Phys. Rev. A 43, 5483 (1991)]: long-range interaction energies were derived based upon (i) exact calculations of the iterated, or many-body, induced-dipole interaction energies for the clusters in two fixed relative orientations; and (ii) bulk, or continuum descriptions (Lifshitz--van der Waals theory), of spheres of corresponding masses and diameters. In this paper, collision rates are calculated according to an exact description of the rates for small spheres interacting via realistic potentials. Utilizing the interaction energies of the preceding paper, several estimates of the collision rates are given by treating the discrete clusters in fixed relative orientations, by computing rotationally averaged potentials for the discrete clusters, and by approximating the clusters as continuum spheres. For the discrete, highly symmetric clusters treated here, the rates using the rotationally averaged potentials closely approximate the fixed-orientation rates and the values of the intercluster potentials for cluster surface separations under 2 A have negligible effect on the overall collision rates. While the 13-molecule cluster-collision rate differs by 50% from the rate calculated as if the cluster were bulk matter, the two larger cluster-collision rates differ by less than 15% from the macroscopic rates, thereby indicating the transition of microscopic to macroscopic behavior

  15. A theoretical approach to low multiplicity diffractive dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishari, M.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamics of low mass inelastic diffractive production in the framework of the ''1/N dual unitarization'' scheme are investigated. The smallness of inelastic diffractive dissociation is explicitly demonstrated by incorporating a Deck type mechanism with the crucial planar bootstrap equation. Although both inelastic and elastic pomeron couplings are of the same order in 1/N, the origin for their smallness is not identical. The work further confirms the validity of the iterative procedure, where the elastic amplitude is first generated from only non-diffractive intermediate states (except possibly for central collisions). Using a previous study of the ''Cylinder'' strength, a semi-quantitative results for the integrated cross-section for low multiplicity diffractive production is also presented, and is compared with the elastic cross-section at very high energies. (author)

  16. Characterizing Peptide Neutral Losses Induced by Negative Electron-Transfer Dissociation (NETD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumachik, Neil G.; McAlister, Graeme C.; Russell, Jason D.; Bailey, Derek J.; Wenger, Craig D.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    We implemented negative electron-transfer dissociation (NETD) on a hybrid ion trap/Orbitrap mass spectrometer to conduct ion/ion reactions using peptide anions and radical reagent cations. In addition to sequence-informative ladders of a•- and x-type fragment ions, NETD generated intense neutral loss peaks corresponding to the entire or partial side-chain cleavage from amino acids constituting a given peptide. Thus, a critical step towards the characterization of this recently introduced fragmentation technique is a systematic study of synthetic peptides to identify common neutral losses and preferential fragmentation pathways. Examining 46 synthetic peptides with high mass accuracy and high resolution analysis permitted facile determination of the chemical composition of each neutral loss. We identified 19 unique neutral losses from 14 amino acids and three modified amino acids, and assessed the specificity and sensitivity of each neutral loss using a database of 1542 confidently identified peptides generated from NETD shotgun experiments employing high-pH separations and negative electrospray ionization. As residue-specific neutral losses indicate the presence of certain amino acids, we determined that many neutral losses have potential diagnostic utility. We envision this catalogue of neutral losses being incorporated into database search algorithms to improve peptide identification specificity and to further advance characterization of the acidic proteome. PMID:22290482

  17. Dissociative diffusion mechanism in vacancy-rich materials according to mass action kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Biderman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Two sets of diffusion-reaction numerical simulations using a finite difference method (FDM were conducted to investigate fast impurity diffusion via interstitial sites in vacancy-rich materials such as Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS and Cu2ZnSn(S, Se4 (CZTSSe or CZTS via the dissociative diffusion mechanism where the interstitial diffuser ultimately reacts with a vacancy to produce a substitutional. The first set of simulations extends the standard interstitial-limited dissociative diffusion theory to vacancy-rich material conditions where vacancies are annihilated in large amounts, introducing non-equilibrium vacancy concentration profiles. The second simulation set explores the vacancy-limited dissociative diffusion where impurity incorporation increases the equilibrium vacancy concentration. In addition to diffusion profiles of varying concentrations and shapes that were obtained in all simulations, some of the profiles can be fitted with the constant- and limited-source solutions of Fick’s second law despite the non-equilibrium condition induced by the interstitial-vacancy reaction. The first set of simulations reveals that the dissociative diffusion coefficient in vacancy-rich materials is inversely proportional to the initial vacancy concentration. In the second set of numerical simulations, impurity-induced changes in the vacancy concentration lead to distinctive diffusion profile shapes. The simulation results are also compared with published data of impurity diffusion in CIGS. According to the characteristic properties of diffusion profiles from the two set of simulations, experimental detection of the dissociative diffusion mechanism in vacancy-rich materials may be possible.

  18. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    and alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... be readily produced. Products of chemical adsorption and/or chemical reactions induced within adsorbates are aggregated on the surface and observed by light scattering. We will demonstrate how pressure and spectral dependencies of the chemical outcomes, polarization of the light and interference of two laser...... beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis....

  19. LC-MS n Analysis of Isomeric Chondroitin Sulfate Oligosaccharides Using a Chemical Derivatization Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongrong; Pomin, Vitor H.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2011-09-01

    Improved methods for structural analyses of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are required to understand their functional roles in various biological processes. Major challenges in structural characterization of complex GAG oligosaccharides using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) include the accurate determination of the patterns of sulfation due to gas-phase losses of the sulfate groups upon collisional activation and inefficient on-line separation of positional sulfation isomers prior to MS/MS analyses. Here, a sequential chemical derivatization procedure including permethylation, desulfation, and acetylation was demonstrated to enable both on-line LC separation of isomeric mixtures of chondroitin sulfate (CS) oligosaccharides and accurate determination of sites of sulfation by MS n . The derivatized oligosaccharides have sulfate groups replaced with acetyl groups, which are sufficiently stable to survive MS n fragmentation and reflect the original sulfation patterns. A standard reversed-phase LC-MS system with a capillary C18 column was used for separation, and MS n experiments using collision-induced dissociation (CID) were performed. Our results indicate that the combination of this derivatization strategy and MS n methodology enables accurate identification of the sulfation isomers of CS hexasaccharides with either saturated or unsaturated nonreducing ends. Moreover, derivatized CS hexasaccharide isomer mixtures become separable by LC-MS method due to different positions of acetyl modifications.

  20. Absolute total and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine at electron and proton intermediate impact velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Wania, E-mail: wania@if.ufrj.br; Luna, Hugo; Sigaud, Lucas; Montenegro, Eduardo C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PO 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tavares, Andre C. [Departamento de Física, Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, PO 38071, Rua Marquês de São Vicente 225, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-02-14

    Absolute total non-dissociative and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine were measured for electron impact energies ranging from 70 to 400 eV and for proton impact energies from 125 up to 2500 keV. MOs ionization induced by coulomb interaction were studied by measuring both ionization and partial dissociative cross sections through time of flight mass spectrometry and by obtaining the branching ratios for fragment formation via a model calculation based on the Born approximation. The partial yields and the absolute cross sections measured as a function of the energy combined with the model calculation proved to be a useful tool to determine the vacancy population of the valence MOs from which several sets of fragment ions are produced. It was also a key point to distinguish the dissociation regimes induced by both particles. A comparison with previous experimental results is also presented.

  1. Three dimensions of dissociative amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    Principal axis factor analysis with promax rotation extracted 3 factors from the 42 memory and amnesia items of the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID) database (N = 2,569): Discovering Dissociated Actions, Lapses of Recent Memory and Skills, and Gaps in Remote Memory. The 3 factors' shared variance ranged from 36% to 64%. Construed as scales, the 3 factor scales had Cronbach's alpha coefficients of .96, .94, and .93, respectively. The scales correlated strongly with mean Dissociative Experiences Scale scores, mean MID scores, and total scores on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised (SCID-D-R). What is interesting is that the 3 amnesia factors exhibited a range of correlations with SCID-D-R Amnesia scores (.52, .63, and .70, respectively), suggesting that the SCID-D-R Amnesia score emphasizes gaps in remote memory over amnesias related to dissociative identity disorder. The 3 amnesia factor scales exhibited a clinically meaningful pattern of significant differences among dissociative identity disorder, dissociative disorder not otherwise specified-1, dissociative amnesia, depersonalization disorder, and nonclinical participants. The 3 amnesia factors may have greater clinical utility for frontline clinicians than (a) amnesia as discussed in the context of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, nosology of the dissociative disorders or (b) P. Janet's (1893/1977 ) 4-fold classification of dissociative amnesia. The author recommends systematic study of the phenomenological differences within specific dissociative symptoms and their differential relationship to specific dissociative disorders.

  2. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  3. Single-electron capture in He2+-D2 collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Dagnac, R.

    1994-01-01

    Doubly differential cross sections of single-electron capture were measured for He 2+ impinging on a molecular deuterium target. The investigated collision energies are 4, 6 and 8 keV and the scattering angles range from 10' to 2 o 30' (laboratory frame). The exothermic capture leading to He + (1s) + D 2 +* was found to be the most important process at low energies and angles, whereas the endothermic channels leading to dissociative capture become the main processes at high scattering angles, i.e. at small impact parameters. (author)

  4. A method for measurements of neutral fragments kinetic energies released to a specific dissociation threshold: optical translational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roney, A.; Frigon, C.; Larzilliere, M.

    1999-01-01

    The optical translational spectroscopy technique, based on the principles of fast ion beam laser spectroscopy (FIBLAS) and translational spectroscopy, allows the kinetic energies study of neutral fragments released through free dissociation of a neutral molecule. This method presents interesting features such as near-threshold energy measurements and selection of a specific dissociation limit. The fragments resulting from free dissociation (not induced) of neutral molecules, produced by charge exchange processes with a fast ion beam, are probed by laser radiation. Monitoring of the laser-induced fluorescence allows high-resolution spectra due to the kinematic compression of the velocity spread. Measurements of kinetic energies released to the second limit of dissociation H(1s) + H(2l) of H 2 are put forth and compared with those obtained by means of off-axis translational spectroscopy

  5. From dissociation to trauma? Individual differences in dissociation as predictor of 'trauma' perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rassin, Eric; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2006-01-01

    In clinical literature, dissociative complaints are generally considered to be the result of traumatic experiences. However, it has been argued that dissociative complaints, in turn, may indulge over-reporting of traumatic experiences. Hence, correlations between dissociation and self-reported

  6. Giant molecular cloud collisions as triggers of star formation. VI. Collision-induced turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C.; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Christie, Duncan; Li, Qi

    2018-05-01

    We investigate collisions between giant molecular clouds (GMCs) as potential generators of their internal turbulence. Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of self-gravitating, magnetized, turbulent GMCs, we compare kinematic and dynamic properties of dense gas structures formed when such clouds collide compared to those that form in non-colliding clouds as self-gravity overwhelms decaying turbulence. We explore the nature of turbulence in these structures via distribution functions of density, velocity dispersions, virial parameters, and momentum injection. We find that the dense clumps formed from GMC collisions have higher effective Mach number, greater overall velocity dispersions, sustain near-virial equilibrium states for longer times, and are the conduit for the injection of turbulent momentum into high density gas at high rates.

  7. Reaction mechanisms in collisions induced by $^{8}$B beam close to the barrier

    CERN Multimedia

    The aim of the proposed experiment is to investigate the reaction dynamics of proton-halo induced collisions at energies around the Coulomb barrier where coupling to continuum effects are expected to be important. We propose to measure the $^{8}$B + $^{64}$Zn elastic scattering angular distribution together with the measurement, for the first time, of p - $^{7}$Be coincidences coming from transfer and/or break-up of $^{8}$B. The latter will allow a better understanding of the relative contribution of elastic $\\textit{vs}$ non-elastic break-up in reactions induced by extremely weakly-bound nuclei. We believe that with the availability of the post accelerated $^{8}$B beam at REX-ISOLDE we will be able to collect for the first time high quality data for the study of such an important topic.

  8. Deuterium enrichment by selective photo-induced dissociation of an organic carbonyl compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marling, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    A deuterium-enriched material is produced by selective photoinduced dissociation of a gas phase organic carbonyl compound containing at least one hydrogen atom bonded to an atom adjacent to a carbonyl group. Alkyl carbonyl compounds such as acetone, acetaldehyde, trifluoroacetic acid, cyclobutanone, cyclopentanone, methyl acetate, 3,3-dimethyl-2-butanone, 2,4-pentanedione, and 4-methyl-2-pentanone are preferred. The carbonyl compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation from one laser, or two lasers operating at different frequencies, to selectively dissociate the deuterated molecules into stable products. The undissociated compound may be redeuterated by direct aqueous liquid phase H/D exchange, or by indirect liquid phase exchange using an alkanol in an intermediate step

  9. Assessment of complex dissociative disorder patients and simulated dissociation in forensic contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Bethany L; Webermann, Aliya R; Frankel, A Steven

    Few assessors receive training in assessing dissociation and complex dissociative disorders (DDs). Potential differential diagnoses include anxiety, mood, psychotic, substance use, and personality disorders, as well as exaggeration and malingering. Individuals with DDs typically elevate on many clinical and validity scales on psychological tests, yet research indicates that they can be distinguished from DD simulators. Becoming informed about the testing profiles of DD individuals and DD simulators can improve the accuracy of differential diagnoses in forensic settings. In this paper, we first review the testing profiles of individuals with complex DDs and contrast them with DD simulators on assessment measures used in forensic contexts, including the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI), and the Structured Inventory of Reported Symptoms (SIRS), as well as dissociation-specific measures such as the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D-R). We then provide recommendations for assessing complex trauma and dissociation through the aforementioned assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tritium removal from contaminated water via infrared laser multiple-photon dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J.L.; Magnotta, F.; Herman, I.P.; Aldridge, F.T.; Hsiao, P.

    1983-01-01

    Isotope separation by means of infrared-laser multiple-photon dissociation offers an efficient way to recover tritium from contaminated light or heavy water found in fission and fusion reactors. For tritium recovery from heavy water, chemical exchange of tritium into deuterated chloroform is followed by selective laser dissociation of tritiated chloroform and removal of the tritiated photoproduct, TCl. The single-step separation factor is at least 2700 and is probably greater than 5000. Here we present a description of the tritium recovery process, along with recent accomplishments in photochemical studies and engineering analysis of a recovery system

  11. Disparate roles of zinc in chemical hypoxia-induced neuronal death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeong eKim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has provided a causative role of zinc (Zn2+ in neuronal death following ischemic brain injury. Using a hypoxia model of primary cultured cortical neurons with hypoxia-inducing chemicals, cobalt chloride (1 mM CoCl2, deferoxamine (3 mM DFX, and sodium azide (2 mM NaN3, we evaluated whether Zn2+ is involved in hypoxic neuronal death. The hypoxic chemicals rapidly elicited intracellular Zn2+ release/accumulation in viable neurons. The immediate addition of the Zn2+ chelator, CaEDTA or N,N,N’N’-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl ethylenediamine (TPEN, prevented the intracellular Zn2+ load and CoCl2-induced neuronal death, but neither 3-hour-later Zn2+ chelation nor a non-Zn2+ chelator ZnEDTA (1 mM demonstrated any effects. However, neither CaEDTA nor TPEN rescued neurons from cell death following DFX- or NaN3-induced hypoxia, whereas ZnEDTA rendered them resistant to the hypoxic injury. Instead, the immediate supplementation of Zn2+ rescued DFX- and NaN3-induced neuronal death. The iron supplementation also afforded neuroprotection against DFX-induced hypoxic injury. Thus, although intracellular Zn2+ release/accumulation is common during chemical hypoxia, Zn2+ might differently influence the subsequent fate of neurons; it appears to play a neurotoxic or neuroprotective role depending on the hypoxic chemical used. These results also suggest that different hypoxic chemicals may induce neuronal death via distinct mechanisms.

  12. Disparate roles of zinc in chemical hypoxia-induced neuronal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujeong; Seo, Jung-Woo; Oh, Shin Bi; Kim, So Hee; Kim, Inki; Suh, Nayoung; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has provided a causative role of zinc (Zn(2+)) in neuronal death following ischemic brain injury. Using a hypoxia model of primary cultured cortical neurons with hypoxia-inducing chemicals, cobalt chloride (1 mM CoCl2), deferoxamine (3 mM DFX), and sodium azide (2 mM NaN3), we evaluated whether Zn(2+) is involved in hypoxic neuronal death. The hypoxic chemicals rapidly elicited intracellular Zn(2+) release/accumulation in viable neurons. The immediate addition of the Zn(2+) chelator, CaEDTA or N,N,N'N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), prevented the intracellular Zn(2+) load and CoCl2-induced neuronal death, but neither 3 hour later Zn(2+) chelation nor a non-Zn(2+) chelator ZnEDTA (1 mM) demonstrated any effects. However, neither CaEDTA nor TPEN rescued neurons from cell death following DFX- or NaN3-induced hypoxia, whereas ZnEDTA rendered them resistant to the hypoxic injury. Instead, the immediate supplementation of Zn(2+) rescued DFX- and NaN3-induced neuronal death. The iron supplementation also afforded neuroprotection against DFX-induced hypoxic injury. Thus, although intracellular Zn(2+) release/accumulation is common during chemical hypoxia, Zn(2+) might differently influence the subsequent fate of neurons; it appears to play a neurotoxic or neuroprotective role depending on the hypoxic chemical used. These results also suggest that different hypoxic chemicals may induce neuronal death via distinct mechanisms.

  13. Mixed chemical-induced oxidative stress in occupational exposure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mixed chemical-induced oxidative stress in occupational exposure in Nigerians. JI Anetor, SA Yaqub, GO Anetor, AC Nsonwu, FAA Adeniyi, S Fukushima. Abstract. Exposure to single chemicals and associated disorders in occupational environments has received significant attention. Understanding these events holds ...

  14. The relationship between the electric field induced dissociation of charge transfer (CT) excitons and the photocurrent in novel hybrid small molecular/polymeric solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inal, Sahika; Neher, Dieter [Universitaet Potsdam (Germany). Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie; Sellinger, Alan [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Singapore (China)

    2010-07-01

    Complete dissociation of coulombically bound interfacial states is an ultimate step accounting for photovoltaic performance. Recent work has proposed that the emission of CT-exciton, i.e. an exciplex, is a competing process to the generation of free charges. Here, we investigated the photophysical processes in a bulk heterojunction system using a soluble poly(p-phenylenevinylene) donor and a novel small molecular electron acceptor based on Vinazene (2-vinyl-4,5-dicyanoimidazole). Recent work has shown that this blend exhibits a featureless emission, prominent at long wavelengths of the spectrum, which was attributed to a CT-exciton. We monitored the field induced dissociation of these CT-excitons by means of steady state and time resolved PL spectroscopy. Shortened decay times and reduced PL emission in blend film evidence the dissociation of the emissive intermolecular pair by the external electric field. Analyzing the dependence of the photocurrent and external quantum efficiency on the external field, the fate of the separated exciplex pairs is tackled. It is suggested that the formation of free carriers involves channels other than CT-excitons in such blends.

  15. Low-energy electron-induced dissociation in gas-phase nicotine, pyridine, and methyl-pyrrolidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryszka, Michal; Alizadeh, Elahe; Li, Zhou; Ptasińska, Sylwia

    2017-09-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to nicotine, pyridine, and N-methyl-pyrrolidine was studied in the gas phase in order to assess their stability with respect to low-energy electron interactions. Anion yield curves for different products at electron energies ranging from zero to 15 eV were measured, and the molecular fragmentation pathways were proposed. Nicotine does not form a stable parent anion or a dehydrogenated anion, contrary to other biological systems. However, we have observed complex dissociation pathways involving fragmentation at the pyrrolidine side accompanied by isomerization mechanisms. Combining structure optimization and enthalpy calculations, performed with the Gaussian09 package, with the comparison with a deuterium-labeled N-methyl-d3-pyrrolidine allowed for the determination of the fragmentation pathways. In contrast to nicotine and N-methylpyrrolidine, the dominant pathway in dissociative electron attachment to pyridine is the loss of hydrogen, leading to the formation of an [M—H]- anion. The presented results provide important new information about the stability of nicotine and its constituent parts and contribute to a better understanding of the fragmentation mechanisms and their effects on the biological environment.

  16. Dissociation in small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    The study of molecular dissociation processes is one of the most interesting areas of modern spectroscopy owing to the challenges presented bt even the simplest of diatomic molecules. This paper reviews the commonly used descriptions of molecular dissociation processes for diatomic molecules, the selection rules for predissociation, and a few of the principles to be remembered when one is forced to speculate about dissociation mechanisms in a new molecule. Some of these points will be illustrated by the example of dissociative ionization in O 2

  17. Strong dependence of ultracold chemical rates on electric dipole moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quemener, Goulven; Bohn, John L.

    2010-01-01

    We use the quantum threshold laws combined with a classical capture model to provide an analytical estimate of the chemical quenching cross sections and rate coefficients of two colliding particles at ultralow temperatures. We apply this quantum threshold model (QT model) to indistinguishable fermionic polar molecules in an electric field. At ultracold temperatures and in weak electric fields, the cross sections and rate coefficients depend only weakly on the electric dipole moment d induced by the electric field. In stronger electric fields, the quenching processes scale as d 4(L+(1/2)) where L>0 is the orbital angular-momentum quantum number between the two colliding particles. For p-wave collisions (L=1) of indistinguishable fermionic polar molecules at ultracold temperatures, the quenching rate thus scales as d 6 . We also apply this model to pure two-dimensional collisions and find that chemical rates vanish as d -4 for ultracold indistinguishable fermions. This model provides a quick and intuitive way to estimate chemical rate coefficients of reactions occuring with high probability.

  18. Condensed matter applied atomic collision physics, v.4

    CERN Document Server

    Datz, Sheldon

    1983-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 4: Condensed Matter deals with the fundamental knowledge of collision processes in condensed media.The book focuses on the range of applications of atomic collisions in condensed matter, extending from effects on biological systems to the characterization and modification of solids. This volume begins with the description of some aspects of the physics involved in the production of ion beams. The radiation effects in biological and chemical systems, ion scattering and atomic diffraction, x-ray fluorescence analysis, and photoelectron and Auger spectrosc

  19. Measurement of the cross section for electromagnetic dissociation with neutron emission in Pb-Pb collisions at √SNN=2.76 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelev, B.; Garishvili, I.; Soltz, R.; Adam, J.; Bielcik, J.; Cepila, J.; Krelina, M.; Krus, M.; Pachr, M.; Petracek, V.; Petran, M.; Pospisil, V.; Smakal, R.; Tlusty, D.; Wagner, V.; Zach, C.; Vajzer, M.; Adamova, D.; Bielcikova, J.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Sumbera, M.; Adare, A.M.; Aronsson, T.; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caines, H.; Harris, J.W.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P.T.; Ma, R.; Oh, S.; Smirnov, N.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Bhati, A.K.; Chawla, I.; Rathee, D.; Sharma, N.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Augustinus, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Betev, L.; Brun, R.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chochula, P.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Costa, F.; Del Castillo Sanchez, E.; Di Mauro, A.; Divia, R.; Floris, M.; Fuchs, U.; Gheata, A.; Agocs, A.G.; Barnafoldi, G.G.; Bencedi, G.; Berenyi, D.; Boldizsar, L.; Denes, E.; Hamar, G.; Levai, P.; Agostinelli, A.; Arcelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bellini, F.; Cifarelli, L.; Falchieri, D.; Guerzoni, B.; Scioli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Almaraz Avina, E.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Gonzalez-Trueba, L.H.; Grabski, V.; Martinez Davalos, A.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Basu, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Choudhury, S.; De, S.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Ghosh, P.; Khan, S.A.; Mohanty, B.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Nayak, T.K.; Baldisseri, A.; Borel, H.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Charvet, J.L.; Geuna, C.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Yang, H.

    2012-01-01

    The first measurement of neutron emission in electromagnetic dissociation of 208 Pb nuclei at the LHC is presented. The measurement is performed using the neutron zero degree calorimeters of the ALICE experiment, which detect neutral particles close to beam rapidity. The measured cross sections of single and mutual electromagnetic dissociation of Pb nuclei at √S NN = 2.76 TeV with neutron emission are σ singleEMD =187.4 ± 0.2(stat) +13.2 -11.2 (syst) b and σ mutualEMD = 5.7±0.1(stat) ± 0.4(syst) b, respectively. The experimental results are compared to the predictions from a relativistic electromagnetic dissociation model. (authors)

  20. Childhood Traumatic Experiences, Dissociative Symptoms, and Dissociative Disorder Comorbidity Among Patients With Panic Disorder: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Cenk; Belli, Hasan; Akbudak, Mahir; Tabo, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed childhood trauma history, dissociative symptoms, and dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with panic disorder (PD). A total of 92 psychotropic drug-naive patients with PD, recruited from outpatient clinics in the psychiatry department of a Turkish hospital, were involved in the study. Participants were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D), Dissociation Questionnaire, Panic and Agoraphobia Scale, Panic Disorder Severity Scale, and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Of the patients with PD, 18 (19%) had a comorbid dissociative disorder diagnosis on screening with the SCID-D. The most prevalent disorders were dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, dissociative amnesia, and depersonalization disorders. Patients with a high degree of dissociation symptoms and dissociative disorder comorbidity had more severe PD than those without (p dissociation and PD. Among all of the subscales, the strongest relationship was with childhood emotional abuse. Logistic regression analysis showed that emotional abuse and severity of PD were independently associated with dissociative disorder. In our study, a significant proportion of the patients with PD had concurrent diagnoses of dissociative disorder. We conclude that the predominance of PD symptoms at admission should not lead the clinician to overlook the underlying dissociative process and associated traumatic experiences among these patients.

  1. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  2. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-11-16

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  3. Modeling dissociation behaviour of methane hydrate in porous soil media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayasinghe, A.G.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrates, exist in the form of crystalline solid structures of hydrogen bonded water molecules where the lattice cages are occupied by guest gas molecules. Methane gas hydrates are the most common. As such, hydrate bearing sediments are considered to be a potential future energy resource. Gas hydrates also function as a source or sink for atmospheric methane, which may influence global warming. The authors emphasized that an understanding of the behaviour of soils containing gas hydrates is necessary in order to develop ways of recovering the vast gas resources that exist in the form of hydrates, particularly since hydrates are also suspected to be a potential factor in the initiation and propagation of submarine slope failures. Gas hydrate dissociation occurs when water and gas are released, resulting in an increase in pore fluid pressure, thereby causing significant reductions in effective stress leading to sediment failure. Dissociation may occur as a result of pressure reductions or increases in temperature. This study focused on the strength and deformation behaviour of hydrate bearing soils associated with temperature induced dissociation. Modeling the dissociation behavior of hydrates in porous soil media involves an understanding of the geomechanics of hydrate dissociation. This paper addressed the issue of coupling the hydrate dissociation problem with the soil deformation problem. A mathematical framework was constructed in which the thermally stimulated hydrate dissociation process in porous soil media under undrained conditions was considered with conduction heat transfer. It was concluded that a knowledge of geomechanical response of hydrate bearing sediments will enable better estimates of benefits and risks associated with the recovery process, thereby ensuring safe and economical exploration. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 appendix.

  4. Characterization of Neutral Radicals from a Dissociative Electron Attachment Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2017-08-01

    Despite decades of gas-phase studies on dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to various molecules, as yet there has been no direct detection and characterization of the neutral radical species produced by this process. In this study, we performed stepwise electron spectroscopy to directly measure and characterize the neutrals produced upon zero-electron-energy DEA to the model molecule, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 ). We observed the direct yield of the trichloromethyl radical (CCl3. ) formed by DEA to CCl4 and measured the appearance energies of all the other neutral species. By combining these experimental findings with high-level quantum chemical calculations, we performed a complete analysis of both the DEA to CCl4 and the subsequent electron-impact ionization of CCl3. . This work paves the way toward a complete experimental characterization of DEA processes, which will lead to a better understanding of the low-energy electron-induced formation of radical species.

  5. Dissociative symptoms and dissociative disorders comorbidity in obsessive compulsive disorder: Symptom screening, diagnostic tools and reflections on treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Belli, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder, conversion disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder frequently have dissociative symptoms. The literature has demonstrated that the level of dissociation might be correlated with the severity of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and that those not responding to treatment had high dissociative symptoms. The structured clinical interview for DSM-IV dissociative disorders, dissociation questionnaire, somatoform dissociation questionnaire and dissociative expe...

  6. [Dissociative disorders and affective disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montant, J; Adida, M; Belzeaux, R; Cermolacce, M; Pringuey, D; Da Fonseca, D; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenology of dissociative disorders may be complex and sometimes confusing. We describe here two cases who were initially misdiagnosed. The first case concerned a 61 year-old woman, who was initially diagnosed as an isolated dissociative fugue and was actually suffering from severe major depressive episode. The second case concerned a 55 year-old man, who was suffering from type I bipolar disorder and polyvascular disease, and was initially diagnosed as dissociative fugue in a mooddestabilization context, while it was finally a stroke. Yet dissociative disorders as affective disorder comorbidity are relatively unknown. We made a review on this topic. Dissociative disorders are often studied through psycho-trauma issues. Litterature is rare on affective illness comorbid with dissociative disorders, but highlight the link between bipolar and dissociative disorders. The later comorbidity often refers to an early onset subtype with also comorbid panic and depersonalization-derealization disorder. Besides, unipolar patients suffering from dissociative symptoms have more often cyclothymic affective temperament. Despite the limits of such studies dissociative symptoms-BD association seems to correspond to a clinical reality and further works on this topic may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence for the formation of acyclic ions from the radical cations and cyclic ions from the protonated molecules of ¿,¿-diamines upon loss of ammonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Ana M.; Correia, A.J. Ferrer; Fokkens, R.H.; Nibbering, N.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    The structural characterization of the ions generated by the electron ionization-induced loss of ammonia from the molecular ions of α,ω-diamines, using ion/molecule reactions in combination with collision-induced dissociation (CID) studies, is described. The results of the experiments of

  8. From bismuth oxide/hydroxide precursor clusters towards stable oxides: Proton transfer reactions and structural reorganization govern the stability of [Bi18O13(OH)10]-nitrate clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, M.; Zahn, D.

    2018-01-01

    Structural relaxation and stability of a Bi18-cluster as obtained from association of [Bi6O4(OH)4](NO3)6 precursor clusters in DMSO solution is investigated from a combination of quantum chemical calculations and μs-scale molecular dynamics simulations using empirical interaction potentials. The Bi18-cluster undergoes a OH⋯OH proton transfer reaction, followed by considerable structural relaxation. While the aggregation of the Bi18-cluster is induced by the dissociation of a single nitrate ion leading to [Bi6O4(OH)4](NO3)5+ as an activated precursor species that can bind two more Bi6-clusters, we find the [Bi18O13(OH)10](NO3)18-x+x species (explored for x = 1-6) rather inert against either nitrate dissociation, collision with Bi6-precursors or combinations thereof.

  9. Toward prethreshold gate-based quantum simulation of chemical dynamics: using potential energy surfaces to simulate few-channel molecular collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornborger, Andrew T.; Stancil, Phillip; Geller, Michael R.

    2018-05-01

    One of the most promising applications of an error-corrected universal quantum computer is the efficient simulation of complex quantum systems such as large molecular systems. In this application, one is interested in both the electronic structure such as the ground state energy and dynamical properties such as the scattering cross section and chemical reaction rates. However, most theoretical work and experimental demonstrations have focused on the quantum computation of energies and energy surfaces. In this work, we attempt to make the prethreshold (not error-corrected) quantum simulation of dynamical properties practical as well. We show that the use of precomputed potential energy surfaces and couplings enables the gate-based simulation of few-channel but otherwise realistic molecular collisions. Our approach is based on the widely used Born-Oppenheimer approximation for the structure problem coupled with a semiclassical method for the dynamics. In the latter the electrons are treated quantum mechanically but the nuclei are classical, which restricts the collisions to high energy or temperature (typically above ≈ 10 eV). By using operator splitting techniques optimized for the resulting time-dependent Hamiltonian simulation problem, we give several physically realistic collision examples, with 3-8 channels and circuit depths < 1000.

  10. An analytical platform for mass spectrometry-based identification and chemical analysis of RNA in ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Masato; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Nobe, Yuko; Masaki, Shunpei; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hideaki; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2009-11-01

    We describe here a mass spectrometry (MS)-based analytical platform of RNA, which combines direct nano-flow reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) on a spray tip column and a high-resolution LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Operating RPLC under a very low flow rate with volatile solvents and MS in the negative mode, we could estimate highly accurate mass values sufficient to predict the nucleotide composition of a approximately 21-nucleotide small interfering RNA, detect post-transcriptional modifications in yeast tRNA, and perform collision-induced dissociation/tandem MS-based structural analysis of nucleolytic fragments of RNA at a sub-femtomole level. Importantly, the method allowed the identification and chemical analysis of small RNAs in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, such as the pre-spliceosomal RNP complex, which was pulled down from cultured cells with a tagged protein cofactor as bait. We have recently developed a unique genome-oriented database search engine, Ariadne, which allows tandem MS-based identification of RNAs in biological samples. Thus, the method presented here has broad potential for automated analysis of RNA; it complements conventional molecular biology-based techniques and is particularly suited for simultaneous analysis of the composition, structure, interaction, and dynamics of RNA and protein components in various cellular RNP complexes.

  11. Peripheral collisions in Ar induced reactions between 27 and 44 A.MeV: study of energy dissipation by measuring the correlated neutron multiplicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.; Doubre, H.; Galin, J.; Pouthas, J.; Jahnke, U.; Jiang, D.X.; Lott, B.; Jacquet, D.

    1988-01-01

    A 4 π detector measuring the neutron multiplicities has been used to investigate the energy dissipation during peripheral collisions in Ar induced reactions around the Fermi Energy. Besides the persistance of direct transfer reactions for the most peripheral collisions, there are strong evidences for the occurrence of quite large energy dissipation, a clear signature for the one body friction to still play a major role at these intermediate energies

  12. Energy redistribution in the dissociation of low Rydberg states of HeH and 02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zande, W.J.A. van der.

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the dissocation process is studied of the diatomic molecules, heliumhydride and molecular oxygen. In ch.'s 2-4 results on the spectroscopy and dissociative decay of the excited states of heliumhydride (HeH) are explained. The positions and dissociation pathways of the A 2 Σ + and B 2 Π states are determined and a theoretical description of the decay of these states are given. An isotope dependent dissociation behaviour of the C 2 /σ + Rydberg state is reported which explained with this theory. In ch.'s 5-7 observations are presented regarding the first Rydberg states of molecular oxygen. The spectroscopy of the (3sσ)d 1 Π g and C 3 Π g states is treated, and the stability and decay of these Rydberg states is discussed qualitatively. An experimental study is described of the (3sσ)d 1 Π g , v=4-8 states. By isotope studies and resolving rotational lines and the measurements of natural linewidths quantitative estimates have been acquired on coupling strengths, positions of repulsive valence states and perturbations reported in literature from REMPI experiments. The electronic coupling strengths between the C 3 Π g state and the 3 Π g valence state has been established. Observed spin-orbit interactions have been quantified and the dissociation of the multiplet states (C 3 Π g , ω=0-2 has been correlated with the multiplet states of the fragment O 3 P J=0-2 . The spectroscopy of the (3sσ3) Rydberg states which con- verge to and are formed in collisions with the O + 2 , a 4 Π μ ion state, is treated. The (3sσ) 5 /π μ state competition between auto-ionizations and (pre-)dissociation has been observed. 207 refs.; 36 figs.; 18 tabs

  13. Molecular growth in clusters of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induced by collisions with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaunay, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    This thesis concerns the experimental study of the interaction between low energy ions (keV range) and neutral isolated molecules or clusters of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the gas phase. The use of ionising radiations on these complex molecular systems of astrophysical interest allowed to highlight processes of statistical fragmentation, corresponding to the redistribution of the energy through the degrees of freedom of the target, and non-statistical fragmentation, linked to binary collisions of the ions on the nuclei of the target. A mechanism of intermolecular growth in clusters of PAH is observed. It is associated to the ultrafast (≤ ps) formation of fragments inside the clusters following binary collisions. The presence of a molecular environment around the fragments formed during the interaction may initiate a process of reactivity between the fragments and the molecules of the clusters. More precisely, the study focusses on the importance of the electronic stopping power SE and the nuclear stopping power SN of the projectile ion. It shows that the molecular growth is enhanced when SN is higher than SE. This can be explained by the fact that the deposit of energy is mainly due to the interaction with the nuclei of the target. The process of growth has been observed for all the molecules of PAH studied during this thesis and also for nitrogenated analogues of the molecule of anthracene. This demonstrates that molecular growth may be efficiently induced by collisions of low energy ions with clusters of PAH. (author) [fr

  14. Gas lasers applied atomic collision physics, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 3: Gas Lasers describes the applications of atomic collision physics in the development of many types of gas lasers. Topics covered range from negative ion formation in gas lasers to high-pressure ion kinetics and relaxation of molecules exchanging vibrational energy. Ion-ion recombination in high-pressure plasmas is also discussed, along with electron-ion recombination in gas lasers and collision processes in chemical lasers.Comprised of 14 chapters, this volume begins with a historical summary of gas laser developments and an overview of the basic ope

  15. A Unified Kinetics and Equilibrium Experiment: Rate Law, Activation Energy, and Equilibrium Constant for the Dissociation of Ferroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) is the basis of a suite of four experiments spanning 5 weeks. Students determine the rate law, activation energy, and equilibrium constant for the dissociation of the complex ion in acid solution and base dissociation constant for phenanthroline. The focus on one chemical system simplifies a daunting set of…

  16. The co-occurrence of PTSD and dissociation: differentiating severe PTSD from dissociative-PTSD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armour, C.; Karstoft, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    A dissociative-posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subtype has been included in the DSM-5. However, it is not yet clear whether certain socio-demographic characteristics or psychological/clinical constructs such as comorbid psychopathology differentiate between severe PTSD and dissociative-PTSD....... The current study investigated the existence of a dissociative-PTSD subtype and explored whether a number of trauma and clinical covariates could differentiate between severe PTSD alone and dissociative-PTSD. The current study utilized a sample of 432 treatment seeking Canadian military veterans. Participants...... were assessed with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and self-report measures of traumatic life events, depression, and anxiety. CAPS severity scores were created reflecting the sum of the frequency and intensity items from each of the 17 PTSD and 3 dissociation items. The CAPS severity...

  17. Mechanisms of Coupled Vibrational Relaxation and Dissociation in Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenise, Iole; Kustova, Elena

    2018-05-21

    A complete vibrational state-specific kinetic scheme describing dissociating carbon dioxide mixtures is proposed. CO 2 symmetric, bending and asymmetric vibrations and dissociation-recombination are strongly coupled through inter-mode vibrational energy transfers. Comparative study of state-resolved rate coefficients is carried out; the effect of different transitions may vary considerably with temperature. A non-equilibrium 1-D boundary layer flow typical to hypersonic planetary entry is studied in the state-to-state approach. To assess the sensitivity of fluid-dynamic variables and heat transfer to various vibrational transitions and chemical reactions, corresponding processes are successively included to the kinetic scheme. It is shown that vibrational-translational (VT) transitions in the symmetric and asymmetric modes do not alter the flow and can be neglected whereas the VT 2 exchange in the bending mode is the main channel of vibrational relaxation. Inter-mode vibrational exchanges affect the flow implicitly, through energy redistribution enhancing VT relaxation; the dominating role belongs to near-resonant transitions between symmetric and bending modes as well as between CO molecules and CO 2 asymmetric mode. Strong coupling between VT 2 relaxation and chemical reactions is emphasized. While vibrational distributions and average vibrational energy show strong dependence on the kinetic scheme, the heat flux is more sensitive to chemical reactions.

  18. Dissociation and Memory Fragmentation in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Evaluation of the Dissociative Encoding Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard-Gilligan, Michele; Zoellner, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Several prominent theories of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) posit that peritraumatic dissociation results in insufficient encoding of the trauma memory and that persistent dissociation prevents memory elaboration, resulting in memory fragmentation and PTSD. In this review, we summarize the empirical literature on peritraumatic and trait dissociation and trauma narrative fragmentation as measured by meta-memory and rater/objective coding. Across 16 studies to date, the association between dissociation and fragmentation was most prominent when examining peritraumatic dissociation and patient's own ratings of memory fragmentation. This relationship did not hold when examining trait dissociation or rater-coded or computer-generated measures of fragmentation. Thus, initial evidence points more toward a strong self-reported association between constructs that is not supported on more objective fragmentation coding. Measurement overlap, construct ambiguity, and exclusion of potential confounds may underlie lack of a strong association between dissociation and objective-rated fragmentation. PMID:22348400

  19. [Screening for major dissociative disorders with the FDS, the German version of the Dissociative Experience Scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodewald, Frauke; Gast, Ursula; Emrich, Hinderk M

    2006-06-01

    The prevalence of major dissociative disorders (dissociative identity disorder, DID and similar forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, DDNOS) in clinical samples is about 5 %. Despite their frequency, major dissociative disorders are often overseen for a long time. Screening-scales have proved to be effective to support clinical diagnosis. The aim of this study was to test, whether the Fragebogen für dissoziative Symptome (FDS), the German version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), differentiates between patients with dissociative disorders, non-dissociative disorders and non-clinical controls. Additionally, an optimal FDS-cutoff for a more detailed differential-diagnostic evaluation of the dissociative symptomatology should be identified. 150 participants with DID (group DID: n = 44), DDNOS (DDNOS: n = 22), posttraumatic disorders (TRAUMA: n = 20), other non-dissociative disorders (non-TRAUMA: n = 34) and non-clinical controls (KG: n = 30) completed the FDS. In the five diagnostic groups, mean values were calculated and compared for the FDS, DES and FDS-20. Via receiver-operating-curves the cutoff-scores, which differentiated best between participants with and without major dissociative disorders, were identified. FDS, DES and FDS-20 differentiate significantly between patients with and without major dissociative disorders. For all scales, there were significant differences between the diagnostic groups, with mean-scores decreasing continuously from the groups DID to DDNOS and TRAUMA. Between the groups non-TRAUMA and KG tendencies were found in the predicted direction. The optimal cutoff-scores to differentiate between participants with and without major dissociative disorders were 13 (FDS/FDS-20) and 15 (DES). Using these cutoff-scores, at least 90 % of the patients with major dissociative disorders could be identified correctly (sensitivity). The specifity of the scales was 0.89 to 0.90. Screening for major dissociative disorders

  20. Does phasic trauma treatment make patients with dissociative identity disorder treatment more dissociative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Bethany; Loewenstein, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Proponents of the iatrogenic model of the etiology of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have expressed concern that treatment focused on direct engagement and interaction with dissociated self-states harms DID patients. However, empirical data have shown that this type of DID treatment is beneficial. Analyzing data from the prospective Treatment of Patients With Dissociative Disorders (TOP DD) Study, we test empirically whether DID treatment is associated with clinically adverse manifestations of dissociated self-states: acting so differently that one feels like different people, hearing voices, and dissociative amnesia. We show that, over the course of the study, there were significant decreases in feeling like different people and hearing voices. These results indicate that this form of DID treatment does not lead to symptomatic worsening in these dimensions, as predicted by the iatrogenic model. Indeed, treatment provided by TOP DD therapists reduced, rather than increased, the extent to which patients experienced manifestations of pathological dissociation. Because severe symptomatology and impairment are associated with DID, iatrogenic harm may come from depriving DID patients of treatment that targets DID symptomatology.

  1. Fragmentation of CO{sub 2} into C{sup +} + O{sup +} + O, in collisions with protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto-Capelle, P. [Laboratoire CAR-IRSAMC, UMR 5589 CNRS-Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 rue de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France). E-mail: pmc at yosemite.ups-tlse.fr; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A. [Laboratoire CAR-IRSAMC, UMR 5589 CNRS-Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 rue de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2000-08-14

    The fragmentation of CO{sub 2} has been investigated in 25 keV H{sup +} + CO{sub 2} collisions using an electron-ion-ion triple coincidence technique. In this letter we focus on the three-body fragmentation into the C{sup +} + O{sup +} + O final state. A comparison between the measured correlation of C{sup +},O{sup +} and O momenta and simple kinematic models allows us to demonstrate that in the present case, a rather unexpected two-step process with formation of a CO{sup 2+} ion as an intermediate state occurs. This result is at variance with the conclusions of other authors achieved in collisions of photons and electrons with the dioxide molecule. Kinetic energy release distributions in the two steps of the dissociation process are also deduced from experiment; the distributions found for the fragmentation of CO{sup 2+} into C{sup +} + O{sup +} are found to be very similar to those measured by other authors in collisions of various particles (photons, multi-charged ions) with CO molecules at high enough collision energy. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  2. Chemical and dynamics properties of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies by the measurement of the production of the doubly strange baryons in the STAR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estienne, M.

    2005-04-01

    Lattice QCD calculations predict, at μ B ∼ 0, a crossover from ordinary hadronic matter to a Quark Gluon Plasma. Heavy ion collisions have been proposed to recreate it in the laboratory and to study its properties. The Au+Au, d+Au collisions at √(S NN ) = 200 GeV and the Au+Au ones at 62.4 GeV delivered at RHIC have been probed by the measurement of the Ξ particles in the STAR experiment. Their yield evolution with collision energy and system size gives size to the chemical properties of the reaction in the framework of hadronic and statistical models. The Ξ R CP shows: (1) a meson/baryon dependence for 2 pT CP suppression at pT > 3 GeV/c, (3) strong interactions between constituents suggesting the existence of strong collectivity in the medium. The Ξ transverse flow seems to be interesting to probe the early stage the collision with presumably partonic degrees of freedom. (author)

  3. Far-wing absorption in Na-Ar collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulander, K.C.

    1985-01-01

    Collision-induced absorption and emission at wavelengths well removed from line center play important roles in many atomic and molecular processes. The authors have developed the theory and computer codes to calculate exact quantum mechanical cross sections for these optical and radiative collisions between atoms. The authors also have produced a quasi-classical model that can efficiently generate accurate absorption cross sections. This model cannot, however, give branching ratios for the final-state populations. Their codes and model can be used to study the propagation of nearly resonant light through gaseous media and to calculate accurate gain and absorption cross sections for the far wings of atomic transitions. The authors have used their theory to study the collision-induced absorption by sodium in argon for wavelengths in the vicinity of the resonance lines D 1 and D 2

  4. Is the dissociative adult suggestible? A test of the trauma and fantasy models of dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluemper, Nicole S; Dalenberg, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Psychologists have long assumed a connection between traumatic experience and psychological dissociation. This hypothesis is referred to as the trauma model of dissociation. In the past decade, a series of papers have been published that question this traditional causal link, proposing an alternative fantasy model of dissociation. In the present research, the relationship among dissociation, suggestibility, and fantasy proneness was examined. Suggestibility was measured through the Gudjonsson Scale of Interrogative Suggestibility (GSS) as well as an autobiographically based version of this measure based on the events of September 11, 2001. Consistent with prior research and with the trauma model, dissociation correlated positively with trauma severity (r = .32, p suggestibility measure. Although some participants did become quite emotional during the procedure, the risk/benefit ratio was perceived by almost all participants to be positive, with more reactive individuals evaluating the procedure more positively. The results consistently support the trauma model of dissociation and fail to support the fantasy model of dissociation.

  5. Strong-field dissociation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMauro, L.F.; Yang, Baorui.

    1993-01-01

    The strong-field dissociation behavior of diatomic molecules is examined under two distinctive physical scenarios. In the first scenario, the dissociation of the isolated hydrogen and deuterium molecular ions is discussed. The dynamics of above-threshold dissociation (ATD) are investigated over a wide range of green and infrared intensities and compared to a dressed-state model. The second situation arises when strong-field neutral dissociation is followed by ionization of the atomic fragments. The study results in a direct measure of the atomic fragment's ac-Stark shift by observing the intensity-dependent shifts in the electron or nuclear fragment kinetic energy. 8 figs., 14 refs

  6. Atom-diatom processes in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haftel, M.I.; Lim, T.K.

    1981-09-01

    Elastic and dissociative scattering of He on He 2 are studied for an incident laboratory energy of 1 0 K. We apply Faddeev-AGS multiple-scattering theory in momentum space to the analysis. We show that this leads to a simple justification for the importance of the 'complex-formation mechanism' in termolecular recombination, the time reverse of collision-induced dissociation. Our work, in which separable expansions of two phenomenological He-He potentials are used, predicts significant magnitude differences in the cross sections derived from the interactions and also verifies the validity of the 'peaking approximation' for hyperthermal-energy elastic collisions. (orig.)

  7. Dissociation - a preliminary contextual model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Krüger

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM system has certain limitations when applied to two South African examples of dissociation, because it is descriptive (non-explanatory and focuses on intrapsychic (non-communal processes. Even the existing Western explanatory models of dissociation fail to accommodate fully the communal aspects of dissociation in our South African context. Objectives and methods. The aim was to explore an expanded perspective on dissociation that does not limit it to an intrapsychic phenomenon, but that accounts for the interrelatedness of individuals within their social context. Auto-ethnography was used. In this article a collective, socially orientated, contextual hermeneutic was applied to two local examples of dissociation. Three existing Western models were expanded along multicontextual, collective lines, for them to be more useful in the pluralistic South African context. Results. This preliminary contextual model of dissociation includes a person’s interpersonal, socio-cultural, and spiritual contexts, in addition to the intrapsychic context. Dissociation is considered to be a normal information-processing tool that maintains balanced, coherent selves-in-society, i.e. individuals connected to each other. In the South African context dissociation appears mostly as a normal phenomenon and seldom as a sign of mental illness. Dissociation is pivotal for the normal construction of individual and communal identities in the face of conflicting sets of information from various contexts. Dissociation may help individuals or communities to survive in a world of conflicting messages, where conflict is often interpersonal/cultural/societal in nature, rather than primarily intrapsychic. Conclusions. This model should be developed and evaluated further. Such evaluation would require suitable new local terminology.

  8. Further Study of Λ-Related Quantum Interference of Π-State Diatomic on Collision-Induced Rotational Energy Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongqing; Song Peng; Chen Yuehui; Wang Weili; Ma Fengcai

    2005-01-01

    In our previous theoretical studies [Meng-Tao Sun, Yong-Qing Lee, and Feng-Cai Ma, Chem. Phys. Lett. 371 (2003) 342], we have reported the quantum interference on collision-induced rotational energy transfer on CO (A 1 Π, v = 3) with inert gases, which originates from the difference between the two Λ-related collision potential energy surfaces. The interference angle, which measures the degree of coherence, is presented in this paper. Based on the time-dependent first order Born approximation, taking into account the anisotropic Lennard-Jones interaction potentials, the relation of the interference angle with the factors, including experimental temperature, partner, and rotational quantum number, are obtained. The changing tendencies with them are discussed. This theoretical model is important to understanding and performing this kind of experiment.

  9. Global functioning and disability in dissociative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph; Rufibach, Kaspar; Perron, Noelle; Wyss, Daniela; Kuenzler, Cornelia; Prezewowsky, Cornelia; Pitman, Roger K; Rufer, Michael

    2012-12-30

    Dissociative disorders are frequent comorbid conditions of other mental disorders. Yet, there is controversy about their clinical relevance, and little systematic research has been done on how they influence global functioning. Outpatients and day care patients (N=160) of several psychiatric units in Switzerland were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV Axis I Disorders, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders, Global Assessment of Functioning Scale, and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule-II. The association between subjects with a dissociative disorder (N=30) and functional impairment after accounting for non-dissociative axis I disorders was evaluated by linear regression models. We found a proportion of 18.8% dissociative disorders (dissociative amnesia=0%, dissociative fugue=0.6%, depersonalization disorder=4.4%, dissociative identity disorder=7.5%, dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified=6.3%) across treatment settings. Adjusted for other axis I disorders, subjects with a comorbid dissociative identity disorder or dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified had a median global assessment of functioning score that was 0.86 and 0.88 times, respectively, the score of subjects without a comorbid dissociative disorder. These findings support the hypothesis that complex dissociative disorders, i.e., dissociative identity disorder and dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified, contribute to functional impairment above and beyond the impact of co-existing non-dissociative axis I disorders, and that they qualify as "serious mental illness". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dissociation of acetaldehyde in intense laser field: Coulomb explosion or field-assisted dissociation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshakre, Mohamed E.; Gao, Lirong; Tang, Xiaoping; Wang, Sufan; Shu, Yafei; Kong, Fanao

    2003-09-01

    Dissociation of acetaldehyde in moderate strong laser field of 1013-1014W/cm2 was investigated. Singly charged parent ion CH3CHO+ and fragmental ions CH3+, CHO+, C2H4+, O+, CH2CHO+, and H+ were produced by 800 nm laser of 100 fs pulse duration and recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CH3+ fragment further dissociated to CH2+, CH+, and C+ ions at higher intensity. Ab initio calculated results show that the singly-, doubly-, and triply charged parent ions are stable. So, the dissociation mechanism was not due to Coulomb explosion of multicharged ion. A field-assisted dissociation (FAD) theory, which assumes that only one bond undergoes dissociation while the rest of the molecular geometry stays unchanged, was employed to treat the dissociation dynamics. Accordingly, the dressed potential energy surfaces of the ground state for the parent and the fragment ions were calculated. Corresponding quasiclassical trajectory calculations show that the bond ruptures take place in the order of C-C, C-O, and C-H, agreeing with the observation. The observed angular dependence and charge distribution of the product ions can also be interpreted by the FAD theory.

  11. Dissociative symptoms and dissociative disorders comorbidity in obsessive compulsive disorder: Symptom screening, diagnostic tools and reflections on treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Hasan

    2014-08-16

    Borderline personality disorder, conversion disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder frequently have dissociative symptoms. The literature has demonstrated that the level of dissociation might be correlated with the severity of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and that those not responding to treatment had high dissociative symptoms. The structured clinical interview for DSM-IV dissociative disorders, dissociation questionnaire, somatoform dissociation questionnaire and dissociative experiences scale can be used for screening dissociative symptoms and detecting dissociative disorders in patients with OCD. However, a history of neglect and abuse during childhood is linked to a risk factor in the pathogenesis of dissociative psychopathology in adults. The childhood trauma questionnaire-53 and childhood trauma questionnaire-40 can be used for this purpose. Clinicians should not fail to notice the hidden dissociative symptoms and childhood traumatic experiences in OCD cases with severe symptoms that are resistant to treatment. Symptom screening and diagnostic tools used for this purpose should be known. Knowing how to treat these pathologies in patients who are diagnosed with OCD can be crucial.

  12. Specific estrogen-induced cell proliferation of cultured Syrian hamster renal proximal tubular cells in serum-free chemically defined media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberley, T.D.; Lauchner, L.J.; Pugh, T.D.; Gonzalez, A.; Goldfarb, S.; Li, S.A.; Li, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the renal proximal tubular epithelium of the hamster is a bona fide estrogen target tissue. The effect of estrogens on the growth of proximal tubule cell explants and dissociated single cells derived from these explant outgrowths has been studied in culture. Renal tubular cells were grown on a PF-HR-9 basement membrane under serum-free chemically defined culture conditions. At 7-14 days in culture, cell number was enhanced 3-fold in the presence of either 17β-estradiol or diethylstilbestrol. A similar 3-fold increase in cell number was also seen at 1 nM 17β-estradiol in subcultured dissociated single tubular cells derived from hamster renal tubular explant outgrowths at 21 days in culture. Concomitant exposure of tamoxifen at 3-fold molar excess in culture completely abolished the increase in cell number seen with 17β-estradiol. The proliferation effect of estrogens on proximal tubular cell growth appears to be species specific since 17β-estradiol did not alter the growth of either rat or guinea pig proximal tubules in culture. In addition, at 7-10 days in culture in the presence of 17β-estradiol, [ 3 H]thymidine labeling of hamster tubular cells was enhanced 3-fold. These results clearly indicate that estrogens can directly induce primary epithelial cell proliferation at physiologic concentrations and provide strong additional evidence for an important hormonal role in the neoplastic transformation of the hamster kidney

  13. Combined compared to dissociated oral and intestinal sucrose stimuli induce different brain hedonic processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eClouard

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of brain networks contributing to the processing of oral and/or intestinal sugar signals in a relevant animal model might help to understand the neural mechanisms related to the control of food intake in humans and suggest potential causes for impaired eating behaviors. This study aimed at comparing the brain responses triggered by oral and/or intestinal sucrose sensing in pigs. Seven animals underwent brain single photon emission computed tomography (99mTc-HMPAO further to oral stimulation with neutral or sucrose artificial saliva paired with saline or sucrose infusion in the duodenum, the proximal part of the intestine. Oral and/or duodenal sucrose sensing induced differential cerebral blood flow (CBF changes in brain regions known to be involved in memory, reward processes and hedonic (i.e. pleasure evaluation of sensory stimuli, including the dorsal striatum, prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, insular cortex, hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex. Sucrose duodenal infusion only and combined sucrose stimulation induced similar activity patterns in the putamen, ventral anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus. Some brain deactivations in the prefrontal and insular cortices were only detected in the presence of oral sucrose stimulation. Finally, activation of the right insular cortex was only induced by combined oral and duodenal sucrose stimulation, while specific activity patterns were detected in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex with oral sucrose dissociated from caloric load. This study sheds new light on the brain hedonic responses to sugar and has potential implications to unravel the neuropsychological mechanisms underlying food pleasure and motivation.

  14. Combined compared to dissociated oral and intestinal sucrose stimuli induce different brain hedonic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouard, Caroline; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Meurice, Paul; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Val-Laillet, David

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of brain networks contributing to the processing of oral and/or intestinal sugar signals in a relevant animal model might help to understand the neural mechanisms related to the control of food intake in humans and suggest potential causes for impaired eating behaviors. This study aimed at comparing the brain responses triggered by oral and/or intestinal sucrose sensing in pigs. Seven animals underwent brain single photon emission computed tomography (99mTc-HMPAO) further to oral stimulation with neutral or sucrose artificial saliva paired with saline or sucrose infusion in the duodenum, the proximal part of the intestine. Oral and/or duodenal sucrose sensing induced differential cerebral blood flow changes in brain regions known to be involved in memory, reward processes and hedonic (i.e., pleasure) evaluation of sensory stimuli, including the dorsal striatum, prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, insular cortex, hippocampus, and parahippocampal cortex. Sucrose duodenal infusion only and combined sucrose stimulation induced similar activity patterns in the putamen, ventral anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus. Some brain deactivations in the prefrontal and insular cortices were only detected in the presence of oral sucrose stimulation. Finally, activation of the right insular cortex was only induced by combined oral and duodenal sucrose stimulation, while specific activity patterns were detected in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex with oral sucrose dissociated from caloric load. This study sheds new light on the brain hedonic responses to sugar and has potential implications to unravel the neuropsychological mechanisms underlying food pleasure and motivation. PMID:25147536

  15. Measurement of the Cross Section for Electromagnetic Dissociation with Neutron Emission in Pb-Pb Collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Nicolas; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Bottger, Stefan; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Bugaiev, Kyrylo; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caballero Orduna, Diego; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chiavassa, Emilio; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Del Castillo Sanchez, Eduardo; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fearick, Roger Worsley; Fedunov, Anatoly; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Fragkiadakis, Michail; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerra Gutierrez, Cesar; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Gutbrod, Hans; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Hasegan, Dumitru; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hille, Per Thomas; Hippolyte, Boris; Horaguchi, Takuma; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter; Jancurova, Lucia; Jangal, Swensy Gwladys; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Janik, Rudolf; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jha, Deeptanshu Manu; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jirden, Lennart; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jusko, Anton; Kakoyan, Vanik; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalisky, Matus; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kliemant, Michael; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Koch, Kathrin; Kohler, Markus; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Korneev, Andrey; Kour, Ravjeet; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kraus, Ingrid Christine; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasily; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Bornec, Yves; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lefevre, Frederic; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Leistam, Lars; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Liu, Lijiao; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohn, Stefan Bernhard; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luquin, Lionel; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Marin Tobon, Cesar Augusto; Markert, Christina; Martashvili, Irakli; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Mastromarco, Mario; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matthews, Zoe Louise; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayani, Daniel; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Musa, Luciano; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Naumov, Nikolay; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nazarov, Gleb; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Ortona, Giacomo; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, S; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Piccotti, Anna; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piuz, Francois; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pocheptsov, Timur; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puchagin, Sergey; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujol Teixido, Jordi; Pulvirenti, Alberto; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Radomski, Sylwester; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, Bartolomeu; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sano, Satoshi; Santo, Rainer; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schreiner, Steffen; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Scott, Rebecca; Segato, Gianfranco; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senyukov, Serhiy; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Sgura, Irene; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shimomura, Maya; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Siciliano, Melinda; Sicking, Eva; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, catherine; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Sinha, Bikash; Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Sputowska, Iwona; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stefanini, Giorgio; Steinbeck, Timm Morten; Steinpreis, Matthew; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strabykin, Kirill; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sukhorukov, Mikhail; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szostak, Artur Krzysztof; Tagridis, Christos; Takahashi, Jun; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Tlusty, David; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Tosello, Flavio; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urban, Jozef; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; van der Kolk, Naomi; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vikhlyantsev, Oleg; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vranic, Danilo; Øvrebekk, Gaute; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Dong; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Yaping; Watanabe, Kengo; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Alexander; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Shiming; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo

    2012-01-01

    The first measurement of neutron emission in electromagnetic dissociation of 208Pb nuclei at the LHC is presented. The measurement is performed using the neutron Zero Degree Calorimeters of the ALICE experiment, which detect neutral particles close to beam rapidity. The measured cross sections of single and mutual electromagnetic dissociation of Pb nuclei at √sNN = 2.76 TeV with neutron emission are σ_single EMD = 187.2±0.2 (stat.) +13.8−12.0 (syst.) b and σ_mutual EMD = 6.2 ± 0.1 (stat.) ±0.4 (syst.) b respectively. The experimental results are compared to the predictions from a relativistic electromagnetic dissociation model.

  16. Quasiclassical R-matrix theory of inelastic processes in collisions of electrons with HCl molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, I.I.

    1991-01-01

    The R-matrix theory for the vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment in e-HCl collisions is developed. Only one pole in the R-matrix expansion is included. This allows for making a connection between the R-matrix and the nonlocal-complex-potential theories, and for obtaining the expression for the dissociative-attachment cross section without using the R-matrix radius in the internuclear coordinate. All matrix elements in the equation for the vibrational-excitation and dissociative-attachment amplitudes are calculated using the quasiclassical approach. We study how the results depend on the number of vibrational levels of the neutral molecule included in the theory and show how to exclude the vibrational continuum by a modification of the nonlocal-complex potential. The results for the vibrational-excitation cross sections are extremely sensitive to the behavior of the R-matrix potential curve near the point of crossing this curve with the potential curve of the neutral molecule. Particularly in some cases the cross section at the threshold peak exhibits the boomerang oscillations earlier found for HCl by Domcke [in Aspects of Electron-Molecule Scattering and Photoionization, edited by A. Herzenberg (AIP, New Haven, 1989), p. 169]. The dissociative-attachment cross sections are in reasonable agreement with experiment and with other theories

  17. Hyperglycemia associated dissociative fugue (organic dissociative disorder) in an elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Dushad; Ashoka, H G; Gowdappa, Basavnna

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes is known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, and cognitive impairment. However, dissociative syndrome has not been reported so far. Here we are reporting a case of repeated dissociative fugue associated with hyperglycemia, in an elderly with type II diabetes. Possible neurobiological mechanism has been discussed.

  18. Hyperglycemia associated dissociative fugue (organic dissociative disorder) in an elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Ram, Dushad; Ashoka, H. G; Gowdappa, Basavnna

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes is known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, and cognitive impairment. However, dissociative syndrome has not been reported so far. Here we are reporting a case of repeated dissociative fugue associated with hyperglycemia, in an elderly with type II diabetes. Possible neurobiological mechanism has been discussed.

  19. Fine-structure relaxation of O(3P) induced by collisions with He, H and H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lique, F.; Kłos, J.; Alexander, M. H.; Le Picard, S. D.; Dagdigian, P. J.

    2018-02-01

    The excitation of fine-structure levels of O(3P) by collisions is an important cooling process in the interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate here spin-orbit (de-)excitation of O(3Pj, j = 0, 1, 2) induced by collisions with He, H and H2 based on quantum scattering calculations of the relevant rate coefficients in the 10-1000 K temperature range. The underlying potential energy surfaces are derived from highly correlated abinitio calculations. Significant differences were found with the rate coefficients currently used in astrophysical applications. In particular, our new rate coefficients for collisions with H are up to a factor of 5 lower. Radiative transfer computations allow the assessment of the astrophysical impact of these new rate coefficients. In the case of molecular clouds, the new data are found to increase slightly the flux of the 3P1 → 3P2, while decreasing the flux of the 3P0 → 3P1 line. In the case of atomic clouds, the flux of both lines is predicted to decrease. The new rate coefficients are expected to impact significantly the modelling of cooling in astrophysical environments while also allowing new insights into oxygen chemistry in the ISM.

  20. Dissociation and memory fragmentation in post-traumatic stress disorder: an evaluation of the dissociative encoding hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard-Gilligan, Michele; Zoellner, Lori A

    2012-01-01

    Several prominent theories of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) posit that peritraumatic dissociation results in insufficient encoding of the trauma memory and that persistent dissociation prevents memory elaboration, resulting in memory fragmentation and PTSD. In this review we summarise the empirical literature on peritraumatic and trait dissociation and trauma narrative fragmentation as measured by meta-memory and rater/objective coding. Across 16 studies to date, the association between dissociation and fragmentation was most prominent when examining peritraumatic dissociation and patient's own ratings of memory fragmentation. This relationship did not hold when examining trait dissociation or rater-coded or computer-generated measures of fragmentation. Thus initial evidence points more towards a strong self-reported association between constructs that is not supported on more objective fragmentation coding. Measurement overlap, construct ambiguity, and exclusion of potential confounds may underlie lack of a strong association between dissociation and objective-rated fragmentation.

  1. [Reactive collisions of high-temperature systems]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    We are developing an experiment to study the reactive collisions of systems with large activation barriers or endothermicities. The basis design involves the collision of fast radicals with a stable reactant gas (hydrogen) in a collision cell. Initially, products will be detected by ionization and mass analysis. Later, laser-induced fluorescence will be used to probe internal states of products. Studies will include an investigation of rotational effects by comparing results for rotational levels J = O and 1 of molecular hydrogen. 2 figs

  2. A survey of chemicals inducing lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, H

    1987-01-01

    A great number of drugs and chemicals are reviewed which have been shown to stimulate lipid peroxidation in any biological system. The underlying mechanisms, as far as known, are also dealt with. Lipid peroxidation induced by iron ions, organic hydroperoxides, halogenated hydrocarbons, redox cycling drugs, glutathione depleting chemicals, ethanol, heavy metals, ozone, nitrogen dioxide and a number of miscellaneous compounds, e.g. hydrazines, pesticides, antibiotics, are mentioned. It is shown that lipid peroxidation is stimulated by many of these compounds. However, quantitative estimates cannot be given yet and it is still impossible to judge the biological relevance of chemical-induced lipid peroxidation.

  3. Low-energy electron-induced dissociation in condensed-phase L-cysteine II: a comparative study on anion desorption from chemisorbed and physisorbed films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Massey, Sylvain; Sanche, Léon; Rowntree, Paul A.

    2016-04-01

    Due to its multifunctional structure, cysteine is becoming an ideal model molecule for investigating the complex interactions of proteins with metallic surfaces such as gold nanoparticles. We report herein the results of low-energy electron induced degradation of L-cysteine films, chemisorbed on a gold substrate via the thiol group or physisorbed into a clean gold surface. The data were recorded under ultra-high vacuum conditions at room temperature. Anion yields desorbed from these films by the impact of 0.5 to 19 eV electrons provide clear evidence of the efficient decomposition of this amino acid via dissociative electron attachment (i.e., from dissociation of intermediate transient anions located between 5 and 14 eV). The peaks in the desorbed-anion yield functions, associated with DEA, are superimposed on a continuously rising signal attributed to dipolar dissociation. Similar to the results previously observed from physisorbed films, light anionic species, with masses lower than 35 amu, have been detected. In addition, we measured for first time fragments at 14 amu (CH2-) and 15 amu (CH3-) desorbing from physisorbed films, as well as heavier fragments of mass 45 and 46 amu desorbing from chemisorbed films. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic, B. Sivaraman.

  4. Electrochemistry-assisted top-down characterization of disulfide-containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Cui, Weidong; Zhang, Hao; Dewald, Howard D; Chen, Hao

    2012-04-17

    Covalent disulfide bond linkage in a protein represents an important challenge for mass spectrometry (MS)-based top-down protein structure analysis as it reduces the backbone cleavage efficiency for MS/MS dissociation. This study presents a strategy for solving this critical issue via integrating electrochemistry (EC) online with a top-down MS approach. In this approach, proteins undergo electrolytic reduction in an electrochemical cell to break disulfide bonds and then undergo online ionization into gaseous ions for analysis by electron-capture dissociation (ECD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). The electrochemical reduction of proteins allows one to remove disulfide bond constraints and also leads to increased charge numbers of the resulting protein ions. As a result, sequence coverage was significantly enhanced, as exemplified by β-lactoglobulin A (24 vs 75 backbone cleavages before and after electrolytic reduction, respectively) and lysozyme (5 vs 66 backbone cleavages before and after electrolytic reduction, respectively). This methodology is fast and does not need chemical reductants, which would have an important impact in high-throughput proteomics research.

  5. Hyperglycemia associated dissociative fugue (organic dissociative disorder in an elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushad Ram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes is known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, and cognitive impairment. However, dissociative syndrome has not been reported so far. Here we are reporting a case of repeated dissociative fugue associated with hyperglycemia, in an elderly with type II diabetes. Possible neurobiological mechanism has been discussed.

  6. Dissociative disorders in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, David; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Lanius, Ruth; Vermetten, Eric; Simeon, Daphne; Friedman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The rationale, research literature, and proposed changes to the dissociative disorders and conversion disorder in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) are presented. Dissociative identity disorder will include reference to possession as well as identity fragmentation, to make the disorder more applicable to culturally diverse situations. Dissociative amnesia will include dissociative fugue as a subtype, since fugue is a rare disorder that always involves amnesia but does not always include confused wandering or loss of personality identity. Depersonalization disorder will include derealization as well, since the two often co-occur. A dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), defined by the presence of depersonalization or derealization in addition to other PTSD symptoms, is being recommended, based upon new epidemiological and neuroimaging evidence linking it to an early life history of adversity and a combination of frontal activation and limbic inhibition. Conversion disorder (functional neurological symptom disorder) will likely remain with the somatic symptom disorders, despite considerable dissociative comorbidity.

  7. Direct Reprogramming of Fibroblasts via a Chemically Induced XEN-like State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Defang; Ma, Yantao; Du, Xiaomin; Jing, Junzhan; Wang, Lipeng; Xie, Bingqing; Sun, Da; Sun, Shaoqiang; Jin, Xueqin; Zhang, Xu; Zhao, Ting; Guan, Jingyang; Yi, Zexuan; Lai, Weifeng; Zheng, Ping; Huang, Zhuo; Chang, Yanzhong; Chai, Zhen; Xu, Jun; Deng, Hongkui

    2017-08-03

    Direct lineage reprogramming, including with small molecules, has emerged as a promising approach for generating desired cell types. We recently found that during chemical induction of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse fibroblasts, cells pass through an extra-embryonic endoderm (XEN)-like state. Here, we show that these chemically induced XEN-like cells can also be induced to directly reprogram into functional neurons, bypassing the pluripotent state. The induced neurons possess neuron-specific expression profiles, form functional synapses in culture, and further mature after transplantation into the adult mouse brain. Using similar principles, we were also able to induce hepatocyte-like cells from the XEN-like cells. Cells in the induced XEN-like state were readily expandable over at least 20 passages and retained genome stability and lineage specification potential. Our study therefore establishes a multifunctional route for chemical lineage reprogramming and may provide a platform for generating a diverse range of cell types via application of this expandable XEN-like state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermodynamics of ion binding to phosphatidic acid bilayers. Titration calorimetry of the heat of dissociation of DMPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, A; Tuchtenhagen, J

    1992-05-19

    The heat of dissociation of the second proton of 1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) was studied as a function of temperature using titration calorimetry. The dissociation of the second proton of DMPA was induced by addition of NaOH. From the calorimetric titration experiment, the intrinsic pK0 for the dissociation reaction could be determined by applying the Gouy-Chapman theory. pK0 decreases with temperature from ca. 6.2 at 11 degrees C to 5.4 at 54 degrees C. From the total heat of reaction, the dissociation enthalpy, delta Hdiss, was determined by subtracting the heat of neutralization of water and the heat of dilution of NaOH. In the temperature range between 2 and 23 degrees C, delta Hdiss is endothermic with an average value of ca. 2.5 kcal.mol-1 and shows no clear-cut temperature dependence. In the temperature range between 23 and 52 degrees C, delta Hdiss calculated after subtraction of the heat of neutralization and dilution is not the true dissociation enthalpy but includes contributions from the phase transition enthalpy, delta Htrans, as the pH jump induces a transition from the gel to the liquid-crystalline phase. The delta Cp for the reaction enthalpy observed in this temperature range is positive. Above 53 degrees C, the pH jump induces again only the dissociation of the second proton, and the bilayers stay in the liquid-crystalline phase. In this temperature range, delta Hdiss seems to decrease with temperature. The thermodynamic data from titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry as a function of pH can be combined to construct a complete enthalpy-temperature diagram of DMPA in its two ionization states.

  9. J/$\\psi$ azimuthal anisotropy relative to the reaction plane in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Prino, F; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Atayan, M; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borges, G; Castanier, C; Castor, J; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalo, C; Comets, M P; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Grigoryan, A A; Grigoryan, S; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanyan, H; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavicheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Mac Cormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Riccati, L; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, E; Villatte, L; Willis, N; Wu, T

    2009-01-01

    The J/$\\psi$ azimuthal distribution relative to the reaction plane has been measured by the NA50 experiment in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 GeV/nucleon. Various physical mechanisms related to charmonium dissociation in the medium created in the heavy ion collision are expected to introduce an anisotropy in the azimuthal distribution of the observed J/$\\psi$ mesons at SPS energies. Hence, the measurement of J/$\\psi$ elliptic anisotropy, quantified by the Fourier coefficient v$_2$ of the J/$\\psi$ azimuthal distribution relative to the reaction plane, is an important tool to constrain theoretical models aimed at explaining the anomalous J/$\\psi$ suppression observed in Pb-Pb collisions. We present the measured J/$\\psi$ yields in different bins of azimuthal angle relative to the reaction plane, as well as the resulting values of the Fourier coefficient v$_{2}$ as a function of the collision centrality and of the J/$\\psi$ transverse momentum. The reaction plane has been estimated from the azimuthal distribution of the ...

  10. Results on J/psi and Psi(2S) in p-Pb Collisions at 5.02 TeV with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    White, Ryan Mackenzie; The ATLAS collaboration; Arratia, Miguel; Hu, Qipeng

    2015-01-01

    The production rates of heavy quarkonia states in A-A collisions provide sensitive probes to the hot and dense QGP. However, a reference for understanding the dissociation in the hot medium is necessary; p-A collisions open the possibility to study heavy quarkonia states in a smaller system. This is an important step in forming a baseline for understanding A-A collisions, as well as an investigation into the nature of modifications of the parton distributions in the nucleus. Using data collected at the LHC in 2013, the ATLAS experiment will show results on the prompt J/psi and psi(2S) nuclear modification factors and the double ratio, psi(2S) divided by J/Psi in p-Pb divided by the same in p-p, in p-Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. The charmonia states were reconstructed via the dimuon decay channel and the yield will be differentially presented in bins of transverse momentum, rapidity, and event activity.

  11. Analyzing angular distributions for two-step dissociation mechanisms in velocity map imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, Daniel B; Butler, Lynne M; Alligood, Bridget W; Butler, Laurie J

    2013-08-15

    Increasingly, velocity map imaging is becoming the method of choice to study photoinduced molecular dissociation processes. This paper introduces an algorithm to analyze the measured net speed, P(vnet), and angular, β(vnet), distributions of the products from a two-step dissociation mechanism, where the first step but not the second is induced by absorption of linearly polarized laser light. Typically, this might be the photodissociation of a C-X bond (X = halogen or other atom) to produce an atom and a momentum-matched radical that has enough internal energy to subsequently dissociate (without the absorption of an additional photon). It is this second step, the dissociation of the unstable radicals, that one wishes to study, but the measured net velocity of the final products is the vector sum of the velocity imparted to the radical in the primary photodissociation (which is determined by taking data on the momentum-matched atomic cophotofragment) and the additional velocity vector imparted in the subsequent dissociation of the unstable radical. The algorithm allows one to determine, from the forward-convolution fitting of the net velocity distribution, the distribution of velocity vectors imparted in the second step of the mechanism. One can thus deduce the secondary velocity distribution, characterized by a speed distribution P(v1,2°) and an angular distribution I(θ2°), where θ2° is the angle between the dissociating radical's velocity vector and the additional velocity vector imparted to the product detected from the subsequent dissociation of the radical.

  12. Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Molecular Hydrogen Pairs at Thousands of Kelvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Collision-induced absorption by hydrogen and helium in the stellar atmospheres of cool white dwarfs causes the emission spectra to differ significantly from the expected blackbody spectra of the cores. For detailed modeling of radiative processes at temperatures up to 7000 K, the existing H2–H2 induced dipole and potential energy surfaces of high quality must be supplemented by calculations with the H2 bonds stretched or compressed far from the equilibrium length. In this work, we describe new dipole and energy surfaces, based on more than 20 000 ab initio calculations for H2–H2. Our results agree well with previous ab initio work (where those data exist; the calculated rototranslational absorption spectrum at 297.5 K matches experiment similarly well. We further report the calculated absorption spectra of H2–H2 for frequencies from the far infrared to 20 000 cm−1, at temperatures of 600 K, 1000 K, and 2000 K, for which there are no experimental data.

  13. Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Leimin; Fan, Lisha; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yao; Shen, Xiaokang; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-10-30

    Identification of chemical intermediates and study of chemical reaction pathways and mechanisms in laser-induced plasmas are important for laser-ablated applications. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), as a promising spectroscopic technique, is efficient for elemental analyses but can only provide limited information about chemical products in laser-induced plasmas. In this work, time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was studied as a promising tool for the study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas. Resonance fluorescence excitation of diatomic aluminum monoxide (AlO) and triatomic dialuminum monoxide (Al 2 O) was used to identify these chemical intermediates. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of AlO and Al 2 O were used to observe the temporal evolution in laser-induced Al plasmas and to study their formation in the Al-O 2 chemistry in air.

  14. Collision energy-resolved study of the emission cross-section and the Penning ionization cross-section in the reaction of BrCN with He*(2 3S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Kazuhiro; Yamakita, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Koichi

    2001-12-01

    The dissociative excitation of BrCN producing CN(B 2Σ +) fragment by the collision of He *(2 3S) was investigated by the collision energy-resolved electron and emission spectroscopy using time-of-flight method with a high-intensity He * beam. The Penning electrons ejected from BrCN and the subsequent CN ( B2Σ +- X2Σ +) emission were measured as a function of collision energy in the range of 90-180 meV. The formation of CN ( B2Σ +) is concluded to proceed dominantly via the promotion of an electron from Π-character orbital, by comparison between the collision energy dependence of the partial Penning ionization cross-sections and the CN ( B2Σ +- X2Σ +) emission cross-section.

  15. Approach to chemical equilibrium in thermal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boal, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The experimentally measured (μ - , charged particle)/(μ - ,n) and (p,n/p,p') ratios for the emission of energetic nucleons are used to estimate the time evolution of a system of secondary nucleons produced in a direct interaction of a projectile or captured muon. The values of these ratios indicate that chemical equilibrium is not achieved among the secondary nucleons in noncomposite induced reactions, and this restricts the time scale for the emission of energetic nucleons to be about 0.7 x 10 -23 sec. It is shown that the reason why thermal equilibrium can be reached so rapidly for a particular nucleon species is that the sum of the particle spectra produced in multiple direct reactions looks surprisingly thermal. The rate equations used to estimate the reaction times for muon and nucleon induced reactions are then applied to heavy ion collisions, and it is shown that chemical equilibrium can be reached more rapidly, as one would expect

  16. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcinikov, Y.; Fainberg, V.; Garbar, A.; Gutman, M.; Hetsroni, G.; Shindler, Y.; Tatrtakovsky, L.; Zvirin, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  17. Pion multiplicity as a probe of the deconfinement transition in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenstejn, M.I.; Shin Nan Yang; Che Ming Ko.

    1991-01-01

    The hydrochemical model is used to calculate the pion multiplicity in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Chemical reactions are explicitly taken into account in the expansion stage of the hadronic phase. It leads to the absence of chemical equilibrium among hadronic particles and a nonzero value of the pion chemical potential at thermal freeze out. We find a specific structure in the incident energy dependence of the pion multiplicity as a result of the formation of the quark-hadron mixed phase in the initial stage of the collision. 13 refs.; 3 figs

  18. The Dual Role of Disorder on the Dissociation of Interfacial Charge Transfer Excitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Lee, Chee-Kong; Willard, Adam

    In organic-based photovoltaics (OPV), dissociation of neutral photo-excitations (i.e., Frenkel excitons) into free charge carriers requires the excitons to overcome binding energy that can significantly exceed thermal energies. The inability of bound charges to overcome this large binding energy has been implicated as a primary source of efficiency loss in OPVs. Despite the potential impact on the performance of organic solar cells much remains to be understood about the microscopic mechanism of exciton dissociation in OPV materials. Here we explore the role of static molecular disorder in mediating this charge dissociation process. Using a simple lattice model of exciton dynamics we demonstrate that random spatial variations in the energetic landscape can mitigate the effects of the exciton binding energy by lowering the free energy barrier. By considering the competition between this thermodynamic effect and the disorder-induced slowing of dissociation kinetics we demonstrate that exciton dissociation yields are expected to depend non-monotonically on the degree of static disorder. We conclude that a certain amount of molecular-scale disorder is desirable in order to optimize the performance of organic photovoltaic materials.

  19. Probing the active sites for CO dissociation on ruthenium nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strebel, Christian Ejersbo; Murphy, Shane; Nielsen, Rasmus Munksgård

    2012-01-01

    affect the CO dissociation activity. The Ru nanoparticles were synthesized in a UHV chamber by gas-aggregation magnetron sputtering in the size range from 3 to 15 nm and the morphology was investigated in situ by scanning tunneling microscopy and ex situ by high resolution transmission electron...... microscopy. Surprisingly, it was found that larger particles were more active per surface area for CO dissociation. It is suggested that this is due to larger particles exposing a more rough surface than the smaller particles, giving rise to a higher relative amount of under-coordinated adsorption sites...... on the larger particles. The induced surface roughness is proposed to be a consequence of the growth processes in the gas-aggregation chamber....

  20. Dissociative symptoms and neuroendocrine dysregulation in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob, Petr; Fedor-Freybergh, Peter; Jasova, Denisa; Bizik, Gustav; Susta, Marek; Pavlat, Josef; Zima, Tomas; Benakova, Hana; Raboch, Jiri

    2008-10-01

    Dissociative symptoms are traditionally attributed to psychological stressors that produce dissociated memories related to stressful life events. Dissociative disorders and dissociative symptoms including psychogenic amnesia, fugue, dissociative identity-disorder, depersonalization, derealization and other symptoms or syndromes have been reported as an epidemic psychiatric condition that may be coexistent with various psychiatric diagnoses such as depression, schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder or anxiety disorders. According to recent findings also the somatic components of dissociation may occur and influence brain, autonomic and neuroendocrine functions. At this time there are only few studies examining neuroendocrine response related to dissociative symptoms that suggest significant dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The aim of the present study is to perform examination of HPA axis functioning indexed by basal cortisol and prolactin and test their relationship to psychic and somatoform dissociative symptoms. Basal cortisol and prolactin and psychic and somatoform dissociative symptoms were assessed in 40 consecutive inpatients with diagnosis of unipolar depression mean age 43.37 (SD=12.21). The results show that prolactin and cortisol as indices of HPA axis functioning manifest significant relationship to dissociative symptoms. Main results represent highly significant correlations obtained by simple regression between psychic dissociative symptoms (DES) and serum prolactin (R=0.55, p=0.00027), and between somatoform dissociation (SDQ-20) and serum cortisol (R=-0.38, p=0.015). These results indicate relationship between HPA-axis reactivity and dissociative symptoms in unipolar depressive patients that could reflect passive coping behavior and disengagement.

  1. Isotope effects in photo dissociation of ozone with visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früchtl, Marion; Janssen, Christof; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ozone (O3) plays a key role for many chemical oxidation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. In these chemical reactions, ozone can transfer oxygen to other trace gases. This is particularly interesting, since O3 has a very peculiar isotope composition. Following the mass dependent fractionation equation δ17O = 0.52 * δ18O, most fractionation processes depend directly on mass. However, O3 shows an offset to the mass dependent fractionation line. Processes, which show such anomalies, are termed mass independent fractionations (MIF). A very well studied example for a chemical reaction that leads to mass independent fractionation is the O3 formation reaction. To what degree O3 destruction reactions need to be considered in order to understand the isotope composition of atmospheric O3 is still not fully understood and an open question within scientific community. We set up new experiments to investigate the isotope effect resulting from photo dissociation of O3 in the Chappuis band (R1). Initial O3 is produced by an electric discharge. After photolysis O3 is collected in a cold trap at the triple point temperature of nitrogen (63K). O3 is then converted to O2 in order to measure the oxygen isotopes of O3 using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. To isolate O3 photo dissociation (R1) from O3 decomposition (R2) and secondary O3 formation (R3), we use varying amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) as O atom quencher (R4). In this way we suppress the O + O3 reaction (R3) and determine the isotope fractionation in R1 and R2 separately. We present first results on the isotope effects in O3 photo dissociation with visible light in the presence of different bath gases. Results are interpreted based on chemical kinetics modeling. (R1) O3 + hυ → O (3P) + O2 (R2) O3 + O (3P) → 2 O2 (R3) O + O2 + M → O3 + M (R4) O (3P) + CO + M → CO2 + M

  2. Dissociative symptomatology in cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civilotti, Cristina; Castelli, Lorys; Binaschi, Luca; Cussino, Martina; Tesio, Valentina; Di Fini, Giulia; Veglia, Fabio; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The utilization of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic spectrum is currently being debated to categorize psychological adjustment in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the presence of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology in a sample of cancer patients; (2) examine the correlation of cancer-related dissociation and sociodemographic and medical variables, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology; (3) investigate the predictors of cancer-related dissociation. Methods: Ninety-two mixed cancer patients (mean age: 58.94, ds = 10.13) recruited from two hospitals in northern Italy were administered a questionnaire on sociodemographic and medical characteristics, the Karnofsky Scale to measure the level of patient activity and medical care requirements, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression, the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R) to assess the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and hypervigilance, and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) to quantify the traumatic dissociative symptomatology. Results: 31.5% of participants report a PDEQ score above the cutoff. The results indicated that dissociative symptomatology was positively correlated with HADS scores (HADS-Anxiety: r = 0.476, p dissociative symptomatology. The results converged on a three predictor model revealing that IES-R-Intrusion, IES-R-Avoidance, and IES-R-Hyperarousal accounted for 53.9% of the explained variance. Conclusion: These findings allow us to hypothesize a specific psychological reaction which may be ascribed to the traumatic spectrum within the context of cancer, emphasizing the close relationship between the origin of dissociative constituents which, according to the scientific literature, compose the traumatic experience. Our results have implications for understanding dissociative symptomatology in a cancer

  3. Steering dissociation of Br2 molecules with two femtosecond pulses via wave packet interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong-Chang; Yuan, Kai-Jun; Hu, Wen-Hui; Yan, Tian-Min; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2008-04-07

    The dissociation dynamics of Br2 molecules induced by two femtosecond pump pulses are studied based on the calculation of time-dependent quantum wave packet. Perpendicular transition from X 1Sigma g+ to A 3Pi 1u+ and 1Pi 1u+ and parallel transition from X 1Sigma g+ to B 3Pi 0u+, involving two product channels Br (2P3/2)+Br (2P3/2) and Br (2P3/2)+Br* (2P1/2), respectively, are taken into account. Two pump pulses create dissociating wave packets interfering with each other. By varying laser parameters, the interference of dissociating wave packets can be controlled, and the dissociation probabilities of Br2 molecules on the three excited states can be changed to different degrees. The branching ratio of Br*/(Br+Br*) is calculated as a function of pulse delay time and phase difference.

  4. Hypoxia, Radiosensitizers and high-LET radiation - Nimorazole fragmentation using mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feketeova, Linda; Bassler, Niels

    (s): Fragmentation experiments have been performed using a Finnigan- LTQ-FT mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionisation source. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-induced dissociation (EID) have been carried out by mass selecting the desired ions and subjecting them to activation energy...... using mass spectrometry. Understanding the fragmentation of radiosensitizers is crucial in evaluating the radiosensitization potential and developing new and more effective drugs, which may improve TCP in hypoxic tumours when using ion beams such as carbon-12 along with LET-painting techniques. Method...

  5. Collision-induced light scattering in a thin xenon layer between graphite slabs - MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawid, A; Górny, K; Wojcieszyk, D; Dendzik, Z; Gburski, Z

    2014-08-14

    The collision-induced light scattering many-body correlation functions and their spectra in thin xenon layer located between two parallel graphite slabs have been investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. The results have been obtained at three different distances (densities) between graphite slabs. Our simulations show the increased intensity of the interaction-induced light scattering spectra at low frequencies for xenon atoms in confined space, in comparison to the bulk xenon sample. Moreover, we show substantial dependence of the interaction-induced light scattering correlation functions of xenon on the distances between graphite slabs. The dynamics of xenon atoms in a confined space was also investigated by calculating the mean square displacement functions and related diffusion coefficients. The structural property of confined xenon layer was studied by calculating the density profile, perpendicular to the graphite slabs. Building of a fluid phase of xenon in the innermost part of the slot was observed. The nonlinear dependence of xenon diffusion coefficient on the separation distance between graphite slabs has been found. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Speech-Language Dissociations, Distractibility, and Childhood Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conture, Edward G.; Walden, Tedra A.; Lambert, Warren E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relation among speech-language dissociations, attentional distractibility, and childhood stuttering. Method Participants were 82 preschool-age children who stutter (CWS) and 120 who do not stutter (CWNS). Correlation-based statistics (Bates, Appelbaum, Salcedo, Saygin, & Pizzamiglio, 2003) identified dissociations across 5 norm-based speech-language subtests. The Behavioral Style Questionnaire Distractibility subscale measured attentional distractibility. Analyses addressed (a) between-groups differences in the number of children exhibiting speech-language dissociations; (b) between-groups distractibility differences; (c) the relation between distractibility and speech-language dissociations; and (d) whether interactions between distractibility and dissociations predicted the frequency of total, stuttered, and nonstuttered disfluencies. Results More preschool-age CWS exhibited speech-language dissociations compared with CWNS, and more boys exhibited dissociations compared with girls. In addition, male CWS were less distractible than female CWS and female CWNS. For CWS, but not CWNS, less distractibility (i.e., greater attention) was associated with more speech-language dissociations. Last, interactions between distractibility and dissociations did not predict speech disfluencies in CWS or CWNS. Conclusions The present findings suggest that for preschool-age CWS, attentional processes are associated with speech-language dissociations. Future investigations are warranted to better understand the directionality of effect of this association (e.g., inefficient attentional processes → speech-language dissociations vs. inefficient attentional processes ← speech-language dissociations). PMID:26126203

  7. Objective documentation of child abuse and dissociation in 12 murderers with dissociative identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, D O; Yeager, C A; Swica, Y; Pincus, J H; Lewis, M

    1997-12-01

    The skepticism regarding the existence of dissociative identity disorder as well as the abuse that engenders it persists for lack of objective documentation. This is doubly so for the disorder in murderers because of issues of suspected malingering. This article presents objective verification of both dissociative symptoms and severe abuse during childhood in a series of adult murderers with dissociative identity disorder. This study consisted of a review of the clinical records of 11 men and one woman with DSM-IV-defined dissociative identity disorder who had committed murder. Data were gathered from medical, psychiatric, social service, school, military, and prison records and from records of interviews with subjects' family members and others. Handwriting samples were also examined. Data were analyzed qualitatively. Signs and symptoms of dissociative identity disorder in childhood and adulthood were corroborated independently and from several sources in all 12 cases; objective evidence of severe abuse was obtained in 11 cases. The subjects had amnesia for most of the abuse and underreported it. Marked changes in writing style and/or signatures were documented in 10 cases. This study establishes, once and for all, the linkage between early severe abuse and dissociative identity disorder. Further, the data demonstrate that the disorder can be distinguished from malingering and from other disorders. The study shows that it is possible, with great effort, to obtain objective evidence of both the symptoms of dissociative identity disorder and the abuse that engenders it.

  8. Dissociative Part-Dependent Resting-State Activity in Dissociative Identity Disorder : A Controlled fMRI Perfusion Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlumpf, Yolanda R.; Reinders, Antje A. T. S.; Nijenhuis, Ellert R. S.; Luechinger, Roger; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Jaencke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Background: In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP), studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the "Emotional Part'' (EP) and the "Apparently Normal Part'' (ANP), have

  9. Collision-induced stimulated photon echo generated at transition 0-1 on broad spectral line conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsova, N. N.; Gol'dort, V. G.; Ishchenko, V. N.; Khvorostov, E. B.; Kochubei, S. A.; Borisov, G. M.; Ledovskikh, D. V.; Reshetov, V. A.

    2018-04-01

    For the first time, the collision induced stimulated photon echo generated at transition 1S0 → 3 P1 of 174Yb (type 0-1) in the mixture of gases Yb  +  Xe was investigated in the presence of weak longitudinal magnetic field, with experimental parameters corresponding to broad spectral line conditions. Comparison of the experimental echo amplitude versus magnetic field strength dependence with the theoretical curve shows a very good agreement, giving rise to an improved estimate for the difference between alignment and orientation decay rates.

  10. Probing QCD critical fluctuations from light nuclei production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jia Sun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the coalescence model for light nuclei production, we show that the yield ratio Op-d-t=NH3Np/Nd2 of p, d, and 3H in heavy-ion collisions is sensitive to the neutron relative density fluctuation Δn=〈(δn2〉/〈n〉2 at kinetic freeze-out. From recent experimental data in central Pb+Pb collisions at sNN=6.3 GeV, 7.6 GeV, 8.8 GeV, 12.3 GeV and 17.3 GeV measured by the NA49 Collaboration at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS, we find a possible non-monotonic behavior of Δn as a function of the collision energy with a peak at sNN=8.8 GeV, indicating that the density fluctuations become the largest in collisions at this energy. With the known chemical freeze-out conditions determined from the statistical model fit to experimental data, we obtain a chemical freeze-out temperature of ∼144 MeV and baryon chemical potential of ∼385 MeV at this collision energy, which are close to the critical endpoint in the QCD phase diagram predicted by various theoretical studies. Our results thus suggest the potential usefulness of the yield ratio of light nuclei in relativistic heavy-ion collisions as a direct probe of the large density fluctuations associated with the QCD critical phenomena.

  11. Role of Surface Chemistry in Grain Adhesion and Dissipation during Collisions of Silica Nanograins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quadery, Abrar H.; Tucker, William C.; Dove, Adrienne R.; Schelling, Patrick K. [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Doan, Baochi D., E-mail: patrick.schelling@ucf.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The accretion of dust grains to form larger objects, including planetesimals, is a central problem in planetary science. It is generally thought that weak van der Waals interactions play a role in accretion at small scales where gravitational attraction is negligible. However, it is likely that in many instances, chemical reactions also play an important role, and the particular chemical environment on the surface could determine the outcomes of dust grain collisions. Using atomic-scale simulations of collisional aggregation of nanometer-sized silica (SiO{sub 2}) grains, we demonstrate that surface hydroxylation can act to weaken adhesive forces and reduce the ability of mineral grains to dissipate kinetic energy during collisions. The results suggest that surface passivation of dangling bonds, which generally is quite complete in an Earth environment, should tend to render mineral grains less likely to adhere during collisions. It is shown that during collisions, interactions scale with interparticle distance in a manner consistent with the formation of strong chemical bonds. Finally, it is demonstrated that in the case of collisions of nanometer-scale grains with no angular momentum, adhesion can occur even for relative velocities of several kilometers per second. These results have significant implications for early planet formation processes, potentially expanding the range of collision velocities over which larger dust grains can form.

  12. Energy Dependence of Particle Multiplicities in Central Au+Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Corbo, J.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hicks, D.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Rafelski, M.; Rbeiz, M.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the pseudorapidity density of primary charged particles in Au+Au collisions at (sNN) = 200 GeV. For the 6% most central collisions, we obtain dNch/dη\\|\\|η\\|<1 = 650+/-35(syst). Compared to collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV, the highest energy studied previously, an increase by a factor of 1.14+/-0.05 at 90% confidence level, is found. The energy dependence of the pseudorapidity density is discussed in comparison with data from proton-induced collisions and theoretical predictions.

  13. Applied atomic and collision physics special topics

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, H S W; Bederson, Benjamin

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 5: Special Topics deals with topics on applications of atomic collisions that were not covered in the first four volumes of the treatise. The book opens with a chapter on ultrasensitive chemical detectors. This is followed by separate chapters on lighting, magnetohydrodynamic electrical power generation, gas breakdown and high voltage insulating gases, thermionic energy converters, and charged particle detectors. Subsequent chapters deal with the operation of multiwire drift and proportional chambers and streamer chambers and their use in high energy p

  14. Dissociative, depressive, and PTSD symptom severity as correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidality in dissociative disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webermann, Aliya R; Myrick, Amie C; Taylor, Christina L; Chasson, Gregory S; Brand, Bethany L

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates whether symptom severity can distinguish patients diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified with a recent history of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts from those patients without recent self-harm. A total of 241 clinicians reported on recent history of patient NSSI and suicide attempts. Of these clinicians' patients, 221 completed dissociative, depressive, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptomatology measures. Baseline cross-sectional data from a naturalistic and prospective study of dissociative disorder patients receiving community treatment were utilized. Analyses evaluated dissociative, depressive, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptom severity as methods of classifying patients into NSSI and suicide attempt groupings. Results indicated that dissociation severity accurately classified patients into NSSI and suicidality groups, whereas depression severity accurately classified patients into NSSI groups. These findings point to dissociation and depression severity as important correlates of NSSI and suicidality in patients with dissociative disorders and have implications for self-harm prevention and treatment.

  15. Mechanisms of the hepatoprotective effects of tamoxifen against drug-induced and chemical-induced acute liver injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Yukitaka; Miyashita, Taishi; Higuchi, Satonori [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Tsuneyama, Koichi [Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Science for Research, University of Toyama, Sugitani, Toyama 930‐0194 (Japan); Endo, Shinya [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Tsukui, Tohru [Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Yamane, Hidaka 350‐1241 (Japan); Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Yokoi, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tyokoi@p.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    Although estrogen receptor (ER)α agonists, such as estradiol and ethinylestradiol (EE2), cause cholestasis in mice, they also reduce the degree of liver injury caused by hepatotoxicants as well as ischemia–reperfusion. The functional mechanisms of ERα have yet to be elucidated in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. The present study investigated the effects of an ERα agonist, selective ER modulators (SERMs) and an ER antagonist on drug-induced and chemical-induced liver injuries caused by acetaminophen, bromobenzene, diclofenac, and thioacetamide (TA). We observed hepatoprotective effects of EE2, tamoxifen (TAM) and raloxifene pretreatment in female mice that were exposed to a variety of hepatotoxic compounds. In contrast, the ER antagonist did not show any hepatoprotective effects. DNA microarray analyses suggested that monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated 2 (Mmd2) protein, which has an unknown function, is commonly increased by TAM and RAL pretreatment, but not by pretreatment with the ER antagonist. In ERα-knockout mice, the hepatoprotective effects of TAM and the increased expression of Mmd2 mRNA were not observed in TA-induced liver injury. To investigate the function of Mmd2, the expression level of Mmd2 mRNA was significantly knocked down to approximately 30% in mice by injection of siRNA for Mmd2 (siMmd2). Mmd2 knockdown resulted in a reduction of the protective effects of TAM on TA-induced liver injury in mice. This is the first report of the involvement of ERα in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. Upregulation of Mmd2 protein in the liver was suggested as the mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of EE2 and SERMs. -- Highlights: ► Liver injury induced by drugs or chemicals was investigated in mice. ► Liver injury was suppressed by pretreatment with tamoxifen in female mice. ► Mmd2, whose function was unknown, could be a candidate gene for liver protection. ► Tamoxifen up-regulated Mmd2 mRNA expression

  16. Mechanisms of the hepatoprotective effects of tamoxifen against drug-induced and chemical-induced acute liver injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Yukitaka; Miyashita, Taishi; Higuchi, Satonori; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Endo, Shinya; Tsukui, Tohru; Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Although estrogen receptor (ER)α agonists, such as estradiol and ethinylestradiol (EE2), cause cholestasis in mice, they also reduce the degree of liver injury caused by hepatotoxicants as well as ischemia–reperfusion. The functional mechanisms of ERα have yet to be elucidated in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. The present study investigated the effects of an ERα agonist, selective ER modulators (SERMs) and an ER antagonist on drug-induced and chemical-induced liver injuries caused by acetaminophen, bromobenzene, diclofenac, and thioacetamide (TA). We observed hepatoprotective effects of EE2, tamoxifen (TAM) and raloxifene pretreatment in female mice that were exposed to a variety of hepatotoxic compounds. In contrast, the ER antagonist did not show any hepatoprotective effects. DNA microarray analyses suggested that monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated 2 (Mmd2) protein, which has an unknown function, is commonly increased by TAM and RAL pretreatment, but not by pretreatment with the ER antagonist. In ERα-knockout mice, the hepatoprotective effects of TAM and the increased expression of Mmd2 mRNA were not observed in TA-induced liver injury. To investigate the function of Mmd2, the expression level of Mmd2 mRNA was significantly knocked down to approximately 30% in mice by injection of siRNA for Mmd2 (siMmd2). Mmd2 knockdown resulted in a reduction of the protective effects of TAM on TA-induced liver injury in mice. This is the first report of the involvement of ERα in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. Upregulation of Mmd2 protein in the liver was suggested as the mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of EE2 and SERMs. -- Highlights: ► Liver injury induced by drugs or chemicals was investigated in mice. ► Liver injury was suppressed by pretreatment with tamoxifen in female mice. ► Mmd2, whose function was unknown, could be a candidate gene for liver protection. ► Tamoxifen up-regulated Mmd2 mRNA expression

  17. Dissociation dynamics of methylal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaud, P; Frey, H -M; Gerber, T; Mischler, B; Radi, P P; Tzannis, A -P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The dissociation of methylal is investigated using mass spectrometry, combined with a pyrolytic radical source and femtosecond pump probe experiments. Based on preliminary results two reaction paths of methylal dissociation are proposed and discussed. (author) 4 fig., 3 refs.

  18. MODELING DISPERSION FROM CHEMICALS RELEASED AFTER A TRAIN COLLISION IN GRANITEVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Addis, R; Matt Parker, M

    2006-08-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies following the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for nine fatalities, and caused injuries to more than five hundred others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing two days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Department of Energy Headquarters, and hazmat teams dispatched from the SRS. Although model-generated forecast winds used in consequence assessments conducted during the incident were provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response, a high-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) simulation was later performed to examine potential influences of local topography on plume migration. The detailed RAMS simulation was used to determine meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 meters. Results from the two simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time; consequently, local topography did not significantly affect wind in the area. Use of a dense gas dispersion model to simulate localized plume behavior using the higher resolution

  19. Investigation of L X-ray intensity ratios in Pt induced by proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Manpuneet; Kaur, Mandeep; Mohan, Harsh; Jain, Arvind Kumar; Singh, Parjit S.; Vohra, Neelam; Sharma, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    A survey of literature on L X-ray parameters inspires us for taking up the present investigation. These parameters are useful to study atomic properties. In view of this, we report L X-ray intensity ratios for Pt, namely, L ℓ / L α , L β / L α and L γ / L α with proton collisions over the energy range 260 - 400 keV with an interval of 20 keV. The intention of research presented in this paper is to explore their energy dependence and comparison with theoretical calculations. These analyses will yield a data in the low energy region which assist in better clarity of proton induced X-ray emission phenomenon

  20. Visible luminescence studies in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpa, K. K.; Kumar, Awadesh; Naik, P. D.; Annaji Rao, K.; Parthasarathy, V.; Sarkar, S. K.; Mittal, J. P.

    1997-11-01

    A strong visible luminescence was observed in the CO 2 laser induced infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane. The emission observed between 350-750 nm is attributed to electronically excited carbene CF 2ClCH. The temporal profile of this luminescence was studied as a function of laser pulse duration, pulse energy, excitation frequency and substrate pressure. A suitable dissociation mechanism is presented considering various channels of IRMPD of this molecule.

  1. Strong-field dissociation of CS2+ via a pump/dump-like mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severt, T.; Zohrabi, M.; Betsch, K. J.; Ablikim, U.; Jochim, Bethany; Carnes, K. D.; Zeng, S.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Uhlíková, T.

    2014-05-01

    Laser-induced dissociation of the quasi-bound electronic ground state of CS2+ is investigated in intense laser pulses (pump/dump-like mechanism to explain this observed feature. Contrary to the conventional pump/dump control scheme, this process occurs within a single laser pulse, where the time delay is caused by the molecular structure. The process begins when the vibrational wavepacket in the electronic ground state of CS2+ is pumped into the electronic first excited state's continuum by a single photon. After a period of stretching at an energy above the potential barrier, the emission of a second photon is stimulated by the same laser pulse, most likely at the Condon point. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy, Grants DE-FG02-86ER13491 and DE-FG02-09ER16115. TU supported by GACR and MetaCentrum.

  2. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of stellar collisions. II. White dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, W.; Thielemann, F.K.; Hills, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations are presented for collisions between white dwarfs, using a smooth-particle hydrodynamics code with 5000 particles. The code allows for radiation and degenerate pressure and uses a reduced nuclear network which models the large release of nuclear energy. Two different collision models are considered over a range of impact parameters: between two 0.06 solar-mass C-O white dwarfs and between 0.9 solar-mass and 0.7 solar-mass C-O white dwarfs. In nearly head-on collisions, a very substantial fraction of the mass is lost as a result of a large release of nuclear energy. In grazing collisions, the fraction of mass lost is close to that produced in collisions between main-sequence stars. The quantity of processed elements ejected into the ISM by these collisions does not significantly affect the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. 24 refs

  3. Collision Risk and Damage after Collision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Hansen, Peter Friis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a new and complete procedure for calculation of ship-ship collision rates on specific routes and the hull damage caused by such collisions.The procedure is applied to analysis of collision risks for Ro-Ro pasenger vessels. Given a collision the spatial probability distribution ...

  4. Theoretical study of the mechanism of formation of a chemical bond between two ions: A+ and B+. Application to CO++. Interpretation of N2O++ photo-dissociation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levasseur, Nathalie

    1989-01-01

    This research thesis reports the theoretical study of the mechanism of formation of a chemical bond between two positively charged species, within the frame of the valence-bond theory and in the CO model case. The analysis in terms of orthogonal and non orthogonal orbitals leads to two very different interpretations, and allows potential curves of doubly charged diatomic ions to be simply explained, the generally evoked model to be put into question again, and a predictive model to be developed. The theoretical determination of N 2 O potential energy surfaces and of the first states of N 2 O ++ ( 3 Σ - , 1 Δ, 1 Σ + et 3 Π) allowed experimental results of N 2 O ++ photo-dissociation to be at least qualitatively understood and interpreted. Moreover, the study of electronic configurations involved in dissociation, showed that the model elaborated for a diatomic molecule is also valid for a triatomic system [fr

  5. Matrix metalloproteinases regulate the formation of dendritic spine head protrusions during chemically induced long-term potentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Szepesi

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are are small membranous protrusions that extend from neuronal dendrites and harbor the majority of excitatory synapses. Increasing evidence has shown that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a family of extracellularly acting and Zn(2+-dependent endopeptidases, are able to rapidly modulate dendritic spine morphology. Spine head protrusions (SHPs are filopodia-like processes that extend from the dendritic spine head, representing a form of postsynaptic structural remodeling in response to altered neuronal activity. Herein, we show that chemically induced long-term potentiation (cLTP in dissociated hippocampal cultures upregulates MMP-9 activity that controls the formation of SHPs. Blocking of MMPs activity or microtubule dynamics abolishes the emergence of SHPs. In addition, autoactive recombinant MMP-9, promotes the formation of SHPs in organotypic hippocampal slices. Furthermore, spines with SHPs gained postsynaptic α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptors upon cLTP and the synaptic delivery of AMPA receptors was controlled by MMPs. The present results strongly imply that MMP-9 is functionally involved in the formation of SHPs and the control of postsynaptic receptor distribution upon cLTP.

  6. Statistical model predictions for p+p and Pb+Pb collisions at LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraus, I.; Cleymans, J.; Oeschler, H.; Redlich, K.; Wheaton, S.

    2009-01-01

    Particle production in p+p and central collisions at LHC is discussed in the context of the statistical thermal model. For heavy-ion collisions, predictions of various particle ratios are presented. The sensitivity of several ratios on the temperature and the baryon chemical potential is studied in

  7. The Shutdown Dissociation Scale (Shut-D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalinski, Inga; Schauer, Maggie; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary model of the defense cascade by Schauer and Elbert (2010) provides a theoretical frame for a short interview to assess problems underlying and leading to the dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder. Based on known characteristics of the defense stages “fright,” “flag,” and “faint,” we designed a structured interview to assess the vulnerability for the respective types of dissociation. Most of the scales that assess dissociative phenomena are designed as self-report questionnaires. Their items are usually selected based on more heuristic considerations rather than a theoretical model and thus include anything from minor dissociative experiences to major pathological dissociation. The shutdown dissociation scale (Shut-D) was applied in several studies in patients with a history of multiple traumatic events and different disorders that have been shown previously to be prone to symptoms of dissociation. The goal of the present investigation was to obtain psychometric characteristics of the Shut-D (including factor structure, internal consistency, retest reliability, predictive, convergent and criterion-related concurrent validity). A total population of 225 patients and 68 healthy controls were accessed. Shut-D appears to have sufficient internal reliability, excellent retest reliability, high convergent validity, and satisfactory predictive validity, while the summed score of the scale reliably separates patients with exposure to trauma (in different diagnostic groups) from healthy controls. The Shut-D is a brief structured interview for assessing the vulnerability to dissociate as a consequence of exposure to traumatic stressors. The scale demonstrates high-quality psychometric properties and may be useful for researchers and clinicians in assessing shutdown dissociation as well as in predicting the risk of dissociative responding. PMID:25976478

  8. The Shutdown Dissociation Scale (Shut-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Schalinski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary model of the defense cascade by Schauer and Elbert (2010 provides a theoretical frame for a short interview to assess problems underlying and leading to the dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder. Based on known characteristics of the defense stages “fright,” “flag,” and “faint,” we designed a structured interview to assess the vulnerability for the respective types of dissociation. Most of the scales that assess dissociative phenomena are designed as self-report questionnaires. Their items are usually selected based on more heuristic considerations rather than a theoretical model and thus include anything from minor dissociative experiences to major pathological dissociation. The shutdown dissociation scale (Shut-D was applied in several studies in patients with a history of multiple traumatic events and different disorders that have been shown previously to be prone to symptoms of dissociation. The goal of the present investigation was to obtain psychometric characteristics of the Shut-D (including factor structure, internal consistency, retest reliability, predictive, convergent and criterion-related concurrent validity.A total population of 225 patients and 68 healthy controls were accessed. Shut-D appears to have sufficient internal reliability, excellent retest reliability, high convergent validity, and satisfactory predictive validity, while the summed score of the scale reliably separates patients with exposure to trauma (in different diagnostic groups from healthy controls.The Shut-D is a brief structured interview for assessing the vulnerability to dissociate as a consequence of exposure to traumatic stressors. The scale demonstrates high-quality psychometric properties and may be useful for researchers and clinicians in assessing shutdown dissociation as well as in predicting the risk of dissociative responding.

  9. The Dissociative Subtype of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Among Adolescents: Co-Occurring PTSD, Depersonalization/Derealization, and Other Dissociation Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kristen R; Seng, Julia S; Briggs, Ernestine C; Munro-Kramer, Michelle L; Graham-Bermann, Sandra A; Lee, Robert C; Ford, Julian D

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the co-occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dissociation in a clinical sample of trauma-exposed adolescents by evaluating evidence for the depersonalization/derealization dissociative subtype of PTSD as defined by the DSM-5 and then examining a broader set of dissociation symptoms. A sample of treatment-seeking, trauma-exposed adolescents 12 to 16 years old (N = 3,081) from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network Core Data Set was used to meet the study objectives. Two models of PTSD/dissociation co-occurrence were estimated using latent class analysis, one with 2 dissociation symptoms and the other with 10 dissociation symptoms. After model selection, groups within each model were compared on demographics, trauma characteristics, and psychopathology. Model A, the depersonalization/derealization model, had 5 classes: dissociative subtype/high PTSD; high PTSD; anxious arousal; dysphoric arousal; and a low symptom/reference class. Model B, the expanded dissociation model, identified an additional class characterized by dissociative amnesia and detached arousal. These 2 models provide new information about the specific ways PTSD and dissociation co-occur and illuminate some differences between adult and adolescent trauma symptom expression. A dissociative subtype of PTSD can be distinguished from PTSD alone in adolescents, but assessing a wider range of dissociative symptoms is needed to fully characterize adolescent traumatic stress responses. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dissociation Energies of Diatomic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qun-Chao, Fan; Wei-Guo, Sun

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dissociation energies of 10 electronic states of alkali molecules of KH, 7 LiD, 7 LiH, 6 LiH, NaK, NaLi and NaRb are studied using the highest three accurate vibrational energies of each electronic state, and an improved parameter-free analytical formula which is obtained starting from the LeRoy–Bernstein vibrational energy expression near the dissociation limit. The results show that as long as the highest three vibrational energies are accurate, the current analytical formula will give accurate theoretical dissociation energies D e theory , which are in excellent agreement with the experimental dissociation energies D e expt . (atomic and molecular physics)

  11. Laser induced energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcone, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Two related methods of rapidly transferring stored energy from one excited chemical species to another are described. The first of these, called a laser induced collision, involves a reaction in which the energy balance is met by photons from an intense laser beam. A collision cross section of ca 10 - 17 cm 2 was induced in an experiment which demonstrated the predicted dependence of the cross section on wavelength and power density of the applied laser. A second type of laser induced energy transfer involves the inelastic scattering of laser radiation from energetically excited atoms, and subsequent absorption of the scattered light by a second species. The technique of producing the light, ''anti-Stokes Raman'' scattering of visible and infrared wavelength laser photons, is shown to be an efficient source of narrow bandwidth, high brightness, tunable radiation at vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths by using it to excite a rare gas transition at 583.7 A. In addition, this light source was used to make the first measurement of the isotopic shift of the helium metastable level at 601 A. Applications in laser controlled chemistry and spectroscopy, and proposals for new types of lasers using these two energy transfer methods are discussed

  12. Rabi oscillations in the dissociative continuum: Rotation and alignment effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granucci, Giovanni; Magnier, Sylvie; Persico, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    We have simulated a set of experiments in which Rabi oscillations are induced in bound-free and free-free transitions of a diatomic molecule. Dissociative vibrational states belonging to different electronic terms are involved. We show analytically and confirm computationally that a simple relationship exists between the one-dimensional dynamics of a molecule with fixed orientation with respect to the polarization of the radiation field and the three-dimensional dynamics of a rotating system. It is demonstrated that sufficiently short laser pulses can induce oscillations in the probabilities of two coupled electronic states, and in the yields of the respective dissociation products, as functions of the radiation intensity. As a result of molecular rotation the oscillations are damped but not washed out. The initial thermal distribution on several rotational levels has a negligible effect on the photodissociation yields and other experimentally relevant quantities. Since the molecule undergoes a strong alignment along the polarization axis of the laser field, the ejection of atoms and ions is anisotropic. We have chosen the well known diatomic ion Na2+ as a convenient example.

  13. Reduced amygdala reactivity and impaired working memory during dissociation in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause-Utz, Annegret; Winter, Dorina; Schriner, Friederike; Chiu, Chui-De; Lis, Stefanie; Spinhoven, Philip; Bohus, Martin; Schmahl, Christian; Elzinga, Bernet M

    2017-05-19

    Affective hyper-reactivity and impaired cognitive control of emotional material are core features of borderline personality disorder (BPD). A high percentage of individuals with BPD experience stress-related dissociation, including emotional numbing and memory disruptions. So far little is known about how dissociation influences the neural processing of emotional material in the context of a working memory task in BPD. We aimed to investigate whole-brain activity and amygdala functional connectivity (FC) during an Emotional Working Memory Task (EWMT) after dissociation induction in un-medicated BPD patients compared to healthy controls (HC). Using script-driven imagery, dissociation was induced in 17 patients ('BPD_D'), while 12 patients ('BPD_N') and 18 HC were exposed to neutral scripts during fMRI. Afterwards, participants performed the EWMT with neutral vs. negative IAPS pictures vs. no distractors. Main outcome measures were behavioral performance (reaction times, errors) and whole-brain activity during the EWMT. Psychophysiological interaction analysis was used to examine amygdala connectivity during emotional distraction. BPD patients after dissociation induction showed overall WM impairments, a deactivation in bilateral amygdala, and lower activity in left cuneus, lingual gyrus, and posterior cingulate than BPD_N, along with stronger left inferior frontal gyrus activity than HC. Furthermore, reduced amygdala FC with fusiform gyrus and stronger amygdala FC with right middle/superior temporal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule was observed in BPD_D. Findings suggest that dissociation affects reactivity to emotionally salient material and WM. Altered activity in areas associated with emotion processing, memory, and self-referential processes may contribute to dissociative states in BPD.

  14. Single-electron capture in He[sup 2+]-D[sub 2] collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Dagnac, R. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France))

    1994-02-14

    Doubly differential cross sections of single-electron capture were measured for He[sup 2+] impinging on a molecular deuterium target. The investigated collision energies are 4, 6 and 8 keV and the scattering angles range from 10' to 2[sup o]30' (laboratory frame). The exothermic capture leading to He[sup +] (1s) + D[sub 2][sup +*] was found to be the most important process at low energies and angles, whereas the endothermic channels leading